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Back to School Letter from the Thompson School District Superintendent direction for the next 10 years. As we are driven by a vision and mission that demands excellence from our students, teachers, support staff and leadership, we are keenly aware of the challenges our nation and world face that affect the 21st century. Therefore, our strategic plan anticipates the need for all of us to be ongoing learners, critical thinkers and innovators. Our students will contribute to our community and nation because the skills and knowledge they gain will be transferable to new situations and environments. We intend to challenge and stretch our students to do their best to meet standards of excellence, taking risks and pursuing ventures that will lead to new learning. With respect to the strategic plan, it is our vision to continue FORWARD LOOKING, FORWARD our work in THINKING reshaping and This fall, the final steps in our new redesigning our instructional approaches and curriculum so we can Thompson School District Strategic bring personalized learning to every Plan, Vision 2020, will be presented student. Our staff will be aptly formally to our school community prepared and confident to serve our and broader public. Our plan is not top secret. Already over 4,000 partici- students and community. We anticipate and expect our strategic plan pants have provided insight and will move the Thompson School Disobservations about the district’s Dear Friends, The Thompson School District welcomes you to the 2010-2011 school year. We just finished a very successful 2009-2010 and hope to carry that momentum into the coming year. We are diligently working on our new strategic plan — finalizing its preparation, approval and launch — while implementing Ron Cabrera innovative educational approaches and continuing a firm commitment to fulfilling the district’s mission: Empower to learn, Challenge to achieve, Inspire to excel.

trict toward being recognized as the best in the state of Colorado.

INNOVATIVE EDUCATIONAL APPROACHES The Thompson School District is known for outstanding education. It is one of the few large school districts in Colorado that has demonstrated three consecutive years of growth based on the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP). We have raised the graduation rate, lowered the dropout rate, increased attendance and increased student performance in virtually every area measured by the state. In the spirit of continuous improvement, we know we have a lot of work to do. One of our primary goals is to close the achievement gap between our most and least successful students. This requires hard work and a variety of approaches. Part of the innovation is a unique intervention approach labeled Learning Together that connects students as mentors and protégés to build reading and math skills. This research-based approach has already demonstrated success in catching

Empower to learn Challenge to achieve Inspire to excel

Reporter-Herald Staff Editor & Page Design: Jade Cody Page Design & Reporter: Jennifer Lehman Page Design & Contributing Writer: Dennis Book Thompson School District is an equal opportunity educational institution and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national

July 21, 2010

We are a district on the move. Our mission drives our purpose in an unrelenting manner. We have an urgency to improve because the beneficiaries of this improvement are our children. I encourage you to visit our website, www.thompsonschools.org, to read more about our vision and mission and recent good news in the district. Lastly, I thank you for your support. I hope you will come and visit the Thompson Schools and see and hear the wonderful learning that is going on. Strong schools support a strong community. Sincerely,

Ron Cabrera, Ph.D. Superintendent of Schools

origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, marital status or veteran status in its activities, programs or employment practices. The prohibition against sexual harassment includes a prohibition against harassment based on race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, marital status or veteran status. For information regarding civil rights or grievance procedures, contact the Department of Human Resources, 800 S. Taft Ave., Loveland, CO 80537, 970-613-5000, or the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Region VIII, Federal Office Building, 1244 N. Speer Blvd., Suite 310, Denver, Colorado 80204, 303-844-5695. The 2010 Thompson School District & Reporter-Herald Back to School section is published by the Loveland Reporter-Herald on behalf of the Thompson School District. Content is copyrighted by the Reporter-Herald and the Thompson School District. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content, in part or in whole, without express written permission is prohibited. Neither the ReporterHerald nor the Thompson School District assumes any liability for errors or omissions.

School district calendar ................................... pg. 3 Registration for TSD schools............................ pg. 4 School time schedules ..................................... pg. 6 Kindergarten program schedule...................... pg. 7 School transportation ...................................... pg. 8 Late start schedule........................................... pg. 8 TSD information directory .............................. pg. 9 TSD fees ......................................................... pg. 10 Athletic seasons at TSD.................................. pg. 12 Volunteer for TSD .......................................... pg. 13 Educational options....................................... pg. 14 Early childhood programs ............................. pg. 15 Student assessments...................................... pg. 16 Student support services ............................... pg. 17 Special education........................................... pg. 17 Response to Intervention............................... pg. 18 Diversity awareness calendar ........................ pg. 18 School meals/nutrition.................................. pg. 19 Immunizations............................................... pg. 19 TSD Board of Education ................................ pg. 20 Ponderosa Elementary School....................... pg. 21 Loveland High School pool............................ pg. 23 Private schools in Loveland ........................... pg. 24 Higher education ........................................... pg. 26 TSD school happenings................................. pg. 27 TVHS trout project......................................... pg. 28 New Vision Charter School............................ pg. 29 Lunch box fever ............................................. pg. 30 Inspiring changes at TSD............................... pg. 31

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BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

TSD Staff Editor: Melissa Adams, Communication & Community Resources Assistant Editor/Proofreader: Debbie Wright Photography: Melissa Adams, Brian Lindecker & other contributors

A DISTRICT WITH A MISSION

Contents

Back to School This publication is a project of the Thompson School District, 800 S. Taft Ave., Loveland, CO 80537, and the Loveland Reporter-Herald, 201 E. 5th St., Loveland, CO 80537. All Thompson School District editorial content is provided by the Thompson School District. All remaining content is provided by the ReporterHerald. Advertising sales and revenue are generated and gathered by the Reporter-Herald. Thompson School District can be contacted at 970-613-5000 or by visiting www.thompsonschools.org.

students up in overall reading and math skills, developing leadership and building self-confidence. We also anticipate Learning Together will improve our graduation rate. Another innovative educational approach is Thompson Online, our new online education school. Providing online curriculum kindergarten through grade 12 will allow students with unique learning needs and demands to gain a rigorous education via the Internet. But this approach is far more than one-dimensional. Our hope is that we will continue to be creative and find more ways to meet students’ needs at their level, thus ensuring continued educational successes.

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Thompson School District 2010-2011 Calendar

Date

August 24, 2010

August 25, 2010 October 7, 2010 October 13, 2010 January 14, 2011 May 4, 2011 May 5, 2011

Variance First day with children who attend Monday-Thursday or Tuesday/Thursday classes First day with children who attend Monday/Wednesday classes No school — teacher work day No school — parent/teacher conferences 1st semester ends No school — home visit/transition meeting day No school — home visit/transition meeting day

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Transition day for students Graduation, first quarter Transition day for students Graduation, second quarter Transition day for students Teacher work/plan/meeting day Graduation, third quarter Teacher work day Transition day for students Graduation, fourth quarter

Date

July 21, 2010

August 16, 2010 October 12, 2010 October 14, 2010 December 17, 2010 January 4, 2011 February 17, 2011 March 11, 2011 March 14, 2011 March 15, 2011 May 20, 2011

Variance

Thompson Integrated Early Childhood Program 2010-2011 calendar variances

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

Ferguson High School 2010-2011 calendar variances

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What to bring:

Registration — 2010-2011 school year

• Birth certificate if the child is enrolling in kindergarten or new to the district • Completed health and immunization forms • Phone number of the child's doctor and local phone numbers of relatives or friends who can be contacted in case of an emergency • Proof of residency (e.g., utility bill) • Information that may be helpful to the school (e.g., special health or family concerns)

Elementary Schools

All grades: August 4, 2010, 8-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-4 p.m.; August 5, 2010, 1-6 p.m. Check with your school to see if students must register in August if preregistration took place in the spring.

Bill Reed & Conrad Ball Middle Schools

New students to the district: August 2, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:30 p.m. Returning students: 8th Grade — August 3, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:30 p.m. 7th Grade — August 4, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:30 p.m. 6th Grade — August 5, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Turner Middle School

New students to the district: August 2, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:30 p.m. Returning students (grades 7-8): August 3, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-5 p.m. Schedules and student fee invoices will be available through Infinite Campus Portal. Fee payment and athletic sign-up available on this day. Registration took place in the spring for all grades.

Lucile Erwin Middle School

New students to the district: August 2, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:30 p.m. Please bring proof of residence, immunization records, birth certificate and previous school records. Returning students (grades 6-8): Registration for classes (5th, 6th and 7th grades) was completed in May 2010. 6th grade will report to the gym for their first day of school on August 16, 2010 7th and 8th grade will report to the gym for their first day of school on August 17, 2010 All students will receive their class schedules on the first day of school. Information such as bell schedule, calendar, lunch information and athletic information/packets for fall sports (plan now for sports physicals) may be found on Lucile Erwin’s website at http://fc.thompson.k12.co.us/~ems/. Completed athletic packets for fall sports may be dropped off in the front office beginning August 2.

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July 21, 2010

Walt Clark Middle School

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Berthoud High School

Loveland High School

New students to the district: August 2, 2010, 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:30 p.m. Returning students (grades 6-8): August 3, 2010, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m. in the school cafeteria. Student registration materials will be mailed to parents/guardians the last week of July. Partial schedules and student fee invoices will be available on registration day. New students to the district and transfer students from other district high schools: Please call 613-7711 beginning July 28, 2010, to schedule an appointment for registration and information. Available dates for these appointments are August 5-6, 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Please remember to bring previous school records to your appointment. Returning students (grades 10-12): Registration for classes was completed in February 2010. Report for the first day of school on August 17, 2010. Parents will receive student schedules and invoices in the mail during the first half of August. Grade 9: Registration was completed at middle schools in February 2010. The first day of school for freshmen and new students is August 16, 2010. Add/drop day: August 16, 2010, 12:30-3 p.m. for grades 10-12 and 2:30-3 p.m. for grade 9. Back to school night: August 12, 2010, 5-7:30 p.m. New students to the district and transfer students from other district high schools: Please call 613-5212 beginning July 28, 2010, to schedule an appointment for registration and information. Please remember to bring previous school records to your appointment. Fall check-in (grades 9-10): August 5, 2010. REQUIRED FOR FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES. ID and yearbook photos will be taken, fees paid (separate checks are required), and parking permits issued. Specific times for check-in are as follows: Sophomore students — 8 a.m.-noon Freshman students — 1-3 p.m. Fall check-in (grades 11-12): August 4, 2010. REQUIRED FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS. ID and yearbook photos will be taken, fees paid (separate checks are required), and parking permits issued. Specific times for check-in are as follows: Senior students — 8 a.m.-noon Junior students — 1 p.m.-3 p.m. 9th grade orientation: August 16, 2010. Only 9th graders attend this day. Ninth graders report to the auditorium for orientation. Buses will run regular schedule. Lunch will be available for purchase (approximately $2.50). Add/drop day: August 16, 2010, noon-3 p.m. for all students. First day of school: August 17, 2010, for all secondary students. Back to school night: August 30, 2010, 6 p.m. in the auditorium. Athletic registration: Students may start clearing for fall sports on August 10, 2010, 7:15 a.m.-2:45 p.m. Please clear early … plan now for physicals. Call 613-5219 if you have questions. Required school documents and instructions to help direct this process are available on the LHS website at lhs.thompson.k12.co.us OR LovelandHS.org. Student invoices will be mailed the last week of July.

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REGISTRATION continued from page 4

Mountain View High School

New students to the district and transfer students from other district high schools: Please call 613-7800 beginning July 28, 2010, to schedule an appointment for registration and information. Please remember to bring previous school records to your appointment. Fall check-in: August 3, 2010. REQUIRED FOR ALL STUDENTS. ID and yearbook photos will be taken, fees paid (separate checks are required), and parking permits issued. Specific times for check-in are as follows: Students with last names A–D 7:30-9:30 a.m. Students with last names M–R 1:30-3:30 p.m. Students with last names E–L 9:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Students with last names S–Z 3:30-5:30 p.m. 9th grade and new student orientation: August 16, 2010. Only 9th graders and new students attend this day for orientation. Free lunch. Buses run regular schedule. First day of school: August 17, 2010, for all secondary students. Back to school night: August 19, 2010, 6 pm for LISA/ESS/GT students and 6:30 p.m. for all grades. Athletic registration: Students may start clearing for fall sports on August 16, 2010, 7:15 a.m.-2:45 p.m. Fall sports begin on August 16, 2010, with the exception of golf, which starts on August 9, 2010.

Thompson Valley High School

New students to the district and transfer students from other district high schools: Please call 613-7916 beginning July 28, 2010, for information and to schedule an appointment with a counselor for August 3 or August 4 between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Please remember to bring your previous school records, birth certificate, immunization records and proof of residence to your appointment. Returning students’ fall registration: Student registration reminders will be mailed to parents/guardians during the last week of July with directions on how to download required registration materials from the TVHS website at www.tvhseagles.org. Students and their parents need to come to the TVHS cafeteria on August 4, 2010. THIS IS REQUIRED FOR ALL STUDENTS. Students will get their picture IDs taken, receive schedules, and parents will be able to pay fees/fines at this time. Students will need a separate check made payable to Lifetouch Photography to pay for photo packets. Student and parent suggested alphabetical schedule: Students with last names A-D 7:30-9:45 a.m. Students with last names M-P 1-3:15 p.m. Students with last names E-L 9:45 a.m.-noon Students with last names Q-Z 3:15-5:30 p.m. Building closed for lunch noon-1 p.m. 9th grade orientation: August 16, 2010. Only 9th graders attend this day. Lunch provided. Buses will run regular schedule. New student orientation: August 16, 2010, at 10 a.m. 10th, 11th and 12th grade students new to Thompson Valley report to the TVAC Room. First day of school: August 17, 2010, for all secondary students (Periods 1-4). Back to school night: August 12, 2010, 6-8:30 p.m. Athletic registration: Open registration begins August 4, 2010, 8-11:45 a.m. and 1-2:30 p.m. Fall sports begin August 16, 2010.

Harold Ferguson High School

New student orientation: July 28, 2010, 3 p.m. Returning/rebounder students: Students register August 5 and August 6, 2010, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Students will need to call FHS at 613-5300 and schedule an appointment during the week of August 2, 2010.

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Garcia-Sander at Winona Elementary School. He previously was principal at Erie Elementary School and also taught at Cottonwood Plains Elementary School. • Carmen Williams was named assistant principal at Lucile Erwin Middle School. She held this position temporarily during 2009-2010. • Dr. Judy Skupa was named deputy superintendent. She was previously assistant superintendent of Learning Services. • Vicki Mivshek was named director of Human Resources. She previously was an assistant director. • Theresa Clements was named administrator over Early Childhood programs. She previously was principal of EC. However, the individual centers will now be under the umbrella of the schools where they are located, except for Madison, which will remain under Clements. • Arnold Jahnke was named assistant principal of Bill Reed Middle School. He most recently worked in Greeley. • Sheila Pottorff, previously principal at Conrad Ball Middle School, was named interim director of Secondary Education. • Scott Elias, previously assistant principal at Loveland High School, was named interim principal at Conrad Ball Middle School.

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achievement and behavioral competence of all learners. Having PBS district wide provides consistency from school to school while allowing each school to create a structure that best suits its needs. For the past year, the district’s Special Education Department has worked with its staff and parent community to “reimagine” the department to better define and provide services. The district will firm up its Vision 2020 strategic plan this year, a process that started last school year and included input from more than 4,000 stakeholders. By spring, Loveland High School will have a new pool thanks to the 2005 bond, the City of Loveland and a major community fundraising campaign. In addition to Caro and Bashor, several schools will have new leadership and some changes also took place in district administration: • Todd Ball replaces Fred Dreier as principal of Loveland High School. Ball is currently principal at Bill Reed Middle School. Greg Peterson will replace Ball for the 2010-2011 school year, then retire. • Kendrick White replaces Caro as principal of Van Buren Elementary School. • Larry Shores replaces Lori

July 21, 2010

wo new schools will open this fall at Thompson School District — one you can see and one you can’t. The visible school is Ponderosa Elementary, funded through the 2005 bond, which will open to more than 320 students in northwest Loveland at 4550 Florence Drive. The 70,000square-foot school has a capacity of 550 students with four rounds for grades K-5. Ponderosa will be a school of global learning, which will focus on the new standards-based curricula with a multicultural lens. The virtual school is Thompson Online for grades K-12. There will be no cost for students registered and courses will follow the same accreditation requirements, including CSAPs and Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) expectations. The principal for Ponderosa is Lamb Caro, who previously headed Van Buren Elementary School. The principal for Thompson Online is Kellie Bashor, who will also be principal at Big Thompson Elementary School. Big Thompson has a focus on nature and science. Thompson School District is now one of a few districts, if not the only district, in Colorado where all of its schools use the Positive Behavior Support (PBS) approach. PBS is designed to establish and maintain effective school environments that maximize academic

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

What’s new at Thompson School District

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BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

July 21, 2010

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Before- and After-School Care and Kindergarten Programs Offered for 2010-2011 Elementary School Name

Before- and After-School Care

Morning Kindergarten Class

Afternoon Kindergarten Class

Extended-Day All-Day Kindergarten Class Kindergarten Class

Schools of choice

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pected of being under the No blades of any size will be influence of illegal drugs or allowed in school by students. alcohol will be turned over to police for investigation prior Students caught possessing blades of any kind could face to suspension and/or expulsion. an immediate out-of-school suspension or possible mandatory expulsion. Repeat BULLYING The district believes all violations regarding students are entitled to a safe knives/blades will result in school environment and bemore severe disciplinary lieves all types of bullying, action. including cyberbullying, are DRUGS/ALCOHOL unacceptable. Students Students coming to school violating this policy will face disciplinary consequences. under the influence of drugs Parents receive the general or alcohol will face an immediate 10-day out-of-school sus- guidelines for disciplinary pension for their first offense. action as set forth by the state The second offense will result and Board of Education policy in the Thompson School Disin a recommendation for a trict Discipline Code. The Dis45-day expulsion. Proof of completing a treatment pro- cipline Code can be accessed in its entirety on the district’s gram may allow the student website at www.thompson to return before the 45 days have expired. Any student sus- schools.org. KNIVES/BLADES

July 21, 2010

All students in the Thompson School District are assigned to attend a specific school based upon the geographical attendance area of their residence. However, students have the option of attending a school outside of their assigned school area. Families who wish to enroll their student in a school other than their neighborhood school must complete a School of Choice/Open Enrollment application and submit it to their school of choice. Applications for School of Choice/Open Enrollment are accepted from December 1-January 10 for middle and high schools and January 5-February 25 for elementary schools for the following school year. Applications are available at any school or on the district’s website at www.thompsonschools.org during the application window. A separate application must be completed and submitted for each child. Requests are approved based on space and program availability. Transportation arrangements are the responsibility of the family choosing this option. Once a student is accepted, he/she is enrolled at the school of choice for the duration of the grades served by that school. Specific questions about enrolling in a school can generally be answered by calling that school's administrative office. Board policies JFBA/JFBB and JFBA/JFBB-R, School of Choice/Open Enrollment, provide detailed explanations of the school of choice procedures. You are also invited to visit a Thompson school to get a personal look at the quality educational programs. Contact any school to arrange for a visit.

Discipline enforcement

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

Before- and after-school care providers:

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Transportation at TSD District provides bus transportation to students past walking distance

RJ Sangosti for the RH

transportation. However, if space is available on existing scheduled buses, the parent may apply for "space available" busing. Request forms for “space available” busing may be obtained at individual school offices or at the Transportation Center, 2500 E. 13th Street, Loveland. To maximize efficiencies and stretch transportation dollars as far as possible, routes are arterialized. Buses do not go into every subdivision or down every street. Bus stops are usually located on main roads to reduce the number of miles on each route and the time it takes to run the route. Preliminary bus routes/schedules are available at your child’s school during August registration; please ask to view the bus schedules when

registering your child. Additionally, elementary and secondary route packets will be available approximately one week before school at the following locations: • Thompson School District Transportation Center, 2500 E. 13th Street • Thompson School District Administration Building, 800 S. Taft Avenue • Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams • Berthoud Public Library, 236 Welch Avenue • City of Loveland Utility Billing Office, 500 E. 3rd Street Routing information made available in August will list bus stop locations and times for the start-up of school. After September 15,

STUDENT TRANSPORTATION QUESTIONS MAY BE DIRECTED TO: Cyndi Hawk — General Information: 613-5186 Linda Worthington — Regular Education Routing: 613-5188 Sherry Allerheiligen — Special Education Routing: 613-5189 Kay McMullen — Dispatch/Field Trip Scheduling: 613-5191 Nansi Crom — Director: 613-5187 The website address for Thompson School District Transportation is http://thompson.k12.co.us/departments/os/transportation.html

route and stop times may be adjusted. If stop locations are moved or schedules are altered more than five minutes, a written notice will be distributed to parents. You may also contact Transportation’s dispatch office at 613-5185 with questions regarding changes. Students should be at their assigned bus stop no more than five minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. Transportation registration forms will be sent home with each child during their first week on the bus. The completed registration form must be returned to your child's driver. Failure to return the form may result in your child being denied transportation privileges. Students are strongly discouraged from bringing skateboards, scooters, rollerblades or other bulky, hard-to-store items with them to the bus. Not all buses are equipped with underbody storage compartments and suitable storage areas for large items are not readily available aboard buses. For the safety and security of students and staff, audio/video cameras may be used on school vehicles transporting students to and from school or extracurricular activities.

School closings/late start schedule for TSD

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he superintendent may announce a late start schedule for the opening of schools if weather or other emergency conditions are severe but not serious enough to close schools. If a decision is made to start schools late, it will be announced no later than 5:30 a.m. A late start means that all bus routes and school starting times will be delayed by 90 minutes. • All bus routes will run as usual only 90 minutes later. • All school start times will be delayed 90 minutes.

• All a.m. kindergarten and preschool programs will begin 90 minutes later than usual. • P.M. kindergarten will have no delay in their normal start time. When the district is on a late start schedule, all schools will be dismissed at normal times and all after-school bus routes will run in the normal order and at the normal times. If the district cancels school because of inclement weather or dangerous conditions, these stations will carry the announcement: radio stations KCOL (600 AM) and KTRR TRI-102.5 (102.5 FM), Denver television stations and the district’s television channel, Comcast Cable

Channel 14. For route advisories, dial 613-5192. Please note: All channels will be contacted for both school closings and late starts. Information will also be available on the district’s school closure line at 613-6788 and the district’s website at www.thompsonschools.org. If the district has to cancel school after students have already arrived for the day, no child will be sent home on the bus or released to walk home unless a responsible adult has been contacted and the child has a place to go. When schools are closed, all athletic events and practices are canceled.

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July 21, 2010

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lthough the Thompson School District is not mandated to transport regular education students, the Board of Education elects to provide this service to eligible riders who reside outside of the following distances: • Elementary students who live over one and one-half (1.5) miles from school • Middle school students who live over two and one-half (2.5) miles from school • High school freshmen and sophomores who live over three (3) miles from school Students who live within the distances indicated above are considered "walkers" and are not scheduled for transportation services. The Thompson School District works cooperatively with the City of Loveland to provide crossing guards at several crossing sites on elementary student walk routes. These crossing guard sites are determined by the city. Please contact Transportation to receive information on the suggested walk route for your child. Our special needs routes have specialized schedules based on the programs and students they serve. If your child rides one of the Special Education routes, please keep Transportation aware of any changes in contact information, pick-up/drop-off information or other information you feel may be pertinent for the transportation of your child. If your child will not require transportation for the day, we ask that you contact Transportation at 613-5185 prior to the absence so that the driver can be informed. Kindergartners enrolled in halfday programs and who reside outside of the walk area may be provided one-way busing; mid-day busing is not provided. High school juniors and seniors are not scheduled for

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Staying Connected Information directory

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henever parents have questions, the best place to start is in the student's school. The Thompson School District has adopted the philosophy of allowing as many decisions as possible to be made at the level closest to the students, staff and parents. However, most programs also have a designated coordinator for the entire district. This directory is designed to help parents find the appropriate contact person as quickly and easily as possible. The main phone number is 613-5000. Information is also available through the district's website at www.thompsonschools.org. The prefix for the following numbers is 613. Accountability/Accreditation — Lisa Leith.................................................................. 5070 At-Risk — Dennis Rastatter ........................................................................................ 5019 Athletics/Activities — Deb Huffsmith.......................................................................... 5030 Attendance Boundaries — Skip Armatoski .................................................................. 5017 Bond Administration — Jay Earl................................................................................. 5767 Budget/School Finance — Steve Towne ...................................................................... 5777 Business Services — Steve Towne................................................................................ 5777 Career Education — Kathy Gaasvig............................................................................. 5027 Channel 14 Programming — Brian Lindecker.............................................................. 5779 Child Abuse Prevention — Julie Ward.......................................................................... 6072 Communication & Community Resources — Wes Fothergill......................................... 6077 Curriculum & Instruction — Diane Lauer ................................................................... 6785 Distribution of Materials in Schools — Melissa Adams/Debbie Wright ................. 5011/5071 District Website — Greg Blair..................................................................................... 6089 Early Childhood Programs — Theresa Clements/Diana Klundt ........................... 5031/5052 Elementary Education — Paul Bankes......................................................................... 5025

Visit www.thompsonschools.org or watch Thompson Schools Television, which can be viewed on Comcast Cable Channel 14 or by clicking on the Channel 14 Live Stream button on the website. For information on school closures, call the school closure line at 613-6788.

Emergency response If you hear of a community emergency affecting Thompson School District, turn your radio dial to KTRR TRI-102.5 (102.5 FM) or the City of Loveland station (1610 AM) for information and updates. The latest information will also be posted on the TSD website at www.thompsonschools.org. For information on school closures, call 613-6788.

serves as the Activation Key upon entry to the portal. This information can be acquired directly from your student’s school. Once you have this information, visit the following website to set up an account: https://campus.thompson.k12 nfinite Campus Portal empowers all .co.us/campus/portal/thompson.jsp. parents, middle school students and After you have entered your Activation high school students alike by giving Key, you will need to establish an real-time access to accurate and current account by creating a user name and information on students’ school attenpassword. Once the account has been dance, schedules, grades, class assignestablished, click on the link to log in or ments, reports and more. You can return to the original site to log in. access Infinite Campus Portal from any For assistance with your Infinite Internet capable computer that has a Campus Portal account, contact the newer browser installed (Internet Thompson School District Infinite CamExplorer 6.0 and above or Firefox 2.0 pus Help Desk via phone at 613-5102 or and above). via e-mail at parentportal@thompson To create your portal account, you’ll .k12.co.us. need your unique, personal GUID, which

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Thompson Schools Television Thompson Schools Television can be viewed in Loveland and Berthoud on Comcast Cable Channel 14 or by clicking on the Channel 14 Live Stream button on our website, www.thompsonschools.org.

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Since the passage of the 2005 bond issue, Thompson Schools Television has produced Bond Update programs directed at various aspects of the bond projects, including schedule updates and interviews with architects, principals and Bond Administrator Jay Earl. The programs will return periodically in the fall. Check the schedule on the website.

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KID TV Kid TV is a student-hosted, weekly program for elementary schools to provide news and information about what is being

2005 BOND UPDATE

Ages 0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 20

July 21, 2010

BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETINGS Board of Education meetings are broadcast live on the day of the meeting and then rebroadcast on Thursday at 3 p.m. and Friday at 7 p.m. following each board meeting.

learned or events occurring in the life of the school. The programs will begin airing in October. Look for the schedule on the website next fall. The program airs weekdays at 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. and weekends at 8:30 a.m., 3 p.m. and 6 p.m.

GENERAL DENTISTRY & VISION CARE FOR INFANTS, CHILDREN AND TEENS

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

Infinite Campus: A portal for parents, students

3485C West 10th Street Centennial Commons Shopping Center

30-310459

District news & information

English Language Acquisition â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jorge Garcia............................................................. 6083 Facilities Services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brian Erickson............................................................................ 5350 Facility Rental â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mae Svendsen.................................................................................. 5393 Financial Services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Towne............................................................................... 5777 Foreign Exchange Students â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Monica Brundeen......................................................... 5032 Gifted & Talented â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carol Swalley.............................................................................. 5058 Head Start â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Diana Klundt........................................................................................ 5052 Homebound Instruction â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dennis Rastatter ............................................................... 5019 Homeschooling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lisa Leith...................................................................................... 5070 Human Resources â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Luis Martinez............................................................................. 5007 Learning Services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Judy Skupa ................................................................................ 5092 Media Center (School Libraries) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reyne Woolf.......................................................... 5131 Nutrition Services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tammie Rempe.......................................................................... 5147 Planning â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kate Browne............................................................................................ 5048 Publications/News Media â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Melissa Adams................................................................. 5011 Purchasing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Traci Burtnett ...................................................................................... 5151 Resource Enrichment Center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carol Swalley/Danel Lins .................................. 5058/5057 School Support â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michael Jones................................................................................ 5050 School to Life Coordinator â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kathy Gaasvig ............................................................... 5027 Secondary Education â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sheila Pottorff ....................................................................... 5075 SOARS Night School â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nancy Frink ........................................................................... 7575 Special Education â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dennis Rastatter/Sammi Spear.......................................... 5019/5020 Student Health Services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Barb Hartman................................................................... 5065 Student Records â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ginger Shearer ............................................................................ 5049 Superintendent â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ron Cabrera.................................................................................. 5013 Technology Services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Erv Klein ................................................................................ 5138 Thompson Education Foundation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wes Fothergill ..................................................... 6086 Title I Programs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Roger Quintanilla/Theresa Morgan ....................................... 5093/5022 Translation Services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Theresa Morgan ...................................................................... 5022 Transportation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nansi Crom .................................................................................... 5187 Volunteers/VITAL Office â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chris Ingold ..................................................................... 5072

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School fees 2010-2011

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tudents at all grade levels are expected to have their own basic school supplies. A list of those supplies is available at each school. The following fees have been approved by the Thompson School District Board of Education for the 2010-2011 school year. These fees cover a portion of the expendable supplies used by each student participating in these specific classes and activities. Fees will be waived for students qualifying for free or reduced price meals under the Federal Free or Reduced Price Meal Policy. Fees will be prorated for students coming on or going off the meal assistance program during the school year. Students may also be charged for optional materials that they select for class projects in addition to the board-adopted fees. In some high schools, fees are assessed by credits and half credits rather than by year or semester. Please check with the high school at registration. Fees for retaking non-elective classes required for graduation are being assessed as per board policy JQA/JQA-R. This retake fee will be in addition to any other school fee required for that class. The fee structure as adopted by the Board of Education is subject to annual change.

Middle School Course/Fee Description

Cost

Applied Arts Family & Consumer Science................................ $5/semester Industrial Education......................................... $11/semester Art Art, Grades 6, 7, 8 ............................................ $10/semester

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BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

July 21, 2010

Music Band, Choir, Orchestra ................................ $5/trip travel fee Instrument Rental ................................................... $40/year

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Facts about student fees

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he Thompson School District supplies students with textbooks and instructional materials that are necessary for the successful completion of the district’s curriculum. The student fee schedule falls within Colorado Statute which allows the district to assess fees for extended school programs, summer school tuition, and miscellaneous fees as a condition of participation or attendance at extracurricular activities or programs that are not within the academic portion of the educational program. • All fees are authorized by the Board of Education for the 2010-2011 school year. • Students who qualify for meal assistance are exempt from paying fees. • No student will be denied the use of textbooks or enrollment in a class based on his or her parent’s inability or refusal to pay. • All fees will be used for the purpose set forth in the fee schedule and will not be used for any other purpose. • No fee will generate revenue in excess of the purpose for which the fee is being collected. • Students who do not participate in the activity or consume supplies or incur costs associated with a particular course or activity will not be charged a fee. • Students may be required to bring specific, necessary supplies for their own use in the classroom. • Students may be required to pay all or part of field trip costs relating to admission fees, meals and lodging. Field trip fees are waived for students qualifying for meal assistance. • Students may be required to pay the cost of materials for projects in specified classes when the items produced will be retained by the student. • Athletic fees will be assessed to assist the district in maintaining quality programs. These fees should be collected prior to the student’s participation in any sport. Students with financial need may request a waiver of the fee through the building principal.

High School These courses may fulfill core requirements for graduation. The fees that are charged are associated with expendable supplies and are assessed when students register for the course. Fees associated with graduation, International Baccalaureate (IB) exams and Advanced Placement (AP) exams are assessed during the school year and are included in this list as an approved fee. Course/Fee Description

Cost

General AP Studio Art ................................................... $35/semester AP Courses......................................Student pays for textbook Leadership Class ................................................ $5/semester Transcripts ...................... One copy free — $2/copy thereafter Retaking required classes for graduation that were failed due to attendance issues ............................ $100/semester/class Graduation Cap & Gown.................................................. $25 Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate Exams AP Exams – Exam fee is set by AP and changes yearly; school may not add administrative fees on top of fee charged by AP (approximately $90/exam) IB Exams – Exam fee set by IB and mailing costs; school may not add administrative fees on top of fee charged by IB (students take six exams – approximately $110/exam – as well as an extended essay for the IB diploma) Art Drawing I & II, Painting I & II, Commercial Art, Sculpture/ Ceramics I & II............................................... $20/semester Metalsmithing/Jewelry I & II ............................ $30/semester Photography I, II & III....................................... $40/semester TV Broadcasting I & II ...................................... $20/semester Video Production I & II ..................................... $30/semester Applied Arts All Business/Marketing Classes (Accounting, Advanced Computer Applications, Business Law, Career Development, Computer Applications, E-Commerce and Web Design, Introduction to Business, Keyboarding, Marketing Research, Multi-Media Presentations, Finance, Principles of Marketing, Sales and Advertising).......................................$5/semester Work Experience (Business, Marketing, Family & Consumer)...................................................... $5/semester Web Application Administration I & II ............... $25/semester CISCO ............................................................. $25/semester All Family & Consumer Science Classes (Teen Challenges, Life Management, Relationships, Housing & Interior Design I & II, Textile Studies, Early Childhood Education I & II, Teacher Cadet I & II).....................................................$5/semester Catering .......................................................... $10/semester Foods I & II ...................................................... $10/semester All Industrial Tech Classes (Invention and Design, Technical Drawing, Architectural Drawing, Project Design Team, Construction I, Transportation I & II, Manufacturing I & II, Principles of Technology I & II)..........................$5/semester Project Lead the Way (PLTW, Intro. to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, Digital Electronics, Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Aerospace Engineering) .................................................. $20/semester Computer Graphics Business I & II ................... $15/semester Math Principles of Technology I & II............................. $5/semester Music All Performing Musical Groups .......................................... $15/semester + $5/trip travel fee Marching Band................................................. $11/semester Band Uniform Cleaning ........................................... $10/year Instrument Rental ................................................... $40/year P.E. Athletic Training ..................................... Approx. $25/course First Aid (fee required) ............ Set by Red Cross (approx. $35) Life Guarding (fee required) .... Set by Red Cross (approx. $65) Lifetime Sports .................. $15/semester + $5/trip travel fee Science Microcomputer Projects.................................... $18/semester

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School Fees 2010-2011 Board authorized fees Our aim is to provide the best programs and services possible. We believe that the imposition of student fees is necessary to maintain and enhance the educational experiences of students in the Thompson School District. Thank you for your continued support of your student(s) and the district. If you have further questions regarding the fees or the voluntary or mandatory nature of such fees, please contact your school for clarification. If fee payment at the time of registration presents a hardship for you, the school will be happy to work with you on a payment plan. Please remember that the staff is working diligently to implement this policy and appreciates your cooperation.

Students who participate in secondary level athletics and some selected activities are required to pay a fee, which is collected at the school. Students with financial need may request a waiver of the fee through their principal. Fees are to be paid or waivers obtained prior to a student's participation in a sport or activity. Participants who are cut or who quit an activity within 10 practice or school days will be reimbursed the full amount of the fee if reimbursement is requested no later than 15 calendar days after the first practice. Students who participate in an activity at least 10 days will not be reimbursed if they choose to drop out of a program.

PLEASE NOTE • Fees will be waived for students qualifying for free or reduced price school meals under the Federal Free or Reduced Price Meal Policy. Students coming on or going off the free or reduced price school meal program during the school term will have fees prorated. • Extracurricular activities (other than athletics) and student organizations may collect fees to cover the cost of specific activities or events.

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Loveland Turkey Trot

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Win a $250 grant!

Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25, 2010 5K 8:30 a.m. McKee Medical Center The middle school with the most participants wins $250! Call (970) 203-2519 or visit McKeeFoundation.com Race benefits Stepping Stones Adult Day Program at McKee

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ate use of the forums, which are outlined in the registration process. All posts are moderated and will need to be accepted by the moderator before appearing on the forums. “The forums provide an element of twoway communication between the district and community members,” said Wes Fothergill, director of Communication & Community Resources. “We hope the public will take advantage of this opportunity to open dialogues regarding important issues around education in our district and our state.” To register, go to: http://forums .thompsonschools.org. If you have questions, click on the FAQ link at the top of the forum page. If you can't find the answer there, e-mail the moderator by clicking on the link at the bottom of the forum page or by e-mailing forums@forums. thompsonschools.org.

(970) 667-3190

July 21, 2010

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www.The ReadingClinicInc.com

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

District forums available

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• Certified Professionals

HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC/ACTIVITY FEES $125 per sport participation fee $30 per activity (Knowledge Bowl, Forensics) $5 per activity trip travel fee $325 family maximum for high school (excluding the $5 travel fee)

ATHLETIC/ACTIVITY FEE MAXIMUM There is a $450 maximum athletic/ MIDDLE SCHOOL ATHLETIC/ activity participation fee per family per ACTIVITY FEES school year which includes the fees col$20 per sport participation fee for intra- lected for Knowledge Bowl, Band, Choir, Orchestra and Forensics. This includes mural sports participants in both middle and high $50 per sport participation fee for inter- school programs. Parents should keep scholastic sports track of the athletic/activity fees (exclud$5 per activity trip travel fee ing the $5 travel fee) they pay and notify $125 family maximum for middle the school(s) when the maximum has been reached. school (excluding the $5 travel fee)

he Thompson School District has community Internet forums to enable community members to post thoughts and questions about state education issues, the district, or schoolrelated topics ranging from concerns to celebrations in a non-judgmental atmosphere. The forums also include a photo gallery where district or school-related photos can be posted for other forum members to view. A forum is an Internet message board where individuals may post and exchange information online. There are three main forum areas, which include several topic areas, for participants to contribute to. As topics grow, they may become forums of their own. Forum participants must register, but by creating a “display name,” their identity will be anonymous to other users. The district has set up guidelines for appropri-

• Now Tutoring Investigations M Math

BS-315544

Athletic/ activity fees

• Individualized Instruction in Reading, Writing and Study R Skills for students of all ages

BS-315685

— Board of Education The fee structure as adopted by the Board of Education is subject to annual change.

Reading Clinic INC.

THE

BS-315256

Dear Parents/Guardians and Students, The Thompson School District Board of Education voted to set fees for the 20102011 school year. We have done this reluctantly. Although some have questioned the board's authority to establish student fees, Colorado law specifically provides that the board may require students to pay "reasonably necessary" fees. Under the law, we have decided that it is necessary to impose and collect student fees in order to maintain the quality of our educational programs. No student will be denied access to transcripts, graduation ceremonies or necessary classes (except high school classes requiring "retake fees”) for failure to pay required fees. As provided by state law, students who qualify for free or reduced price school meals are exempt from paying fees.

This edition of Back to School is online at www.reporter-herald.com

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Athletic Seasons at TSD Middle School Season

Sport

Girls Volleyball ........................................... September-October Boys & Girls Swimming .............................. September-October Fall Intramurals (combines a variety of outdoor sports and cross country)............ September-October Boys Basketball .........................................November-December Girls Basketball ......................................... January-Early March Boys Wrestling........................................... January-Early March Boys & Girls Track................................... Late March-Early May The middle school athletic program seeks to balance traditional interscholastic competition with an expanded emphasis on intramurals so more students can participate. No return busing is provided from in-district middle school athletic events.

High School Season

Sport

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald 12 .

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o admission is charged for middle school athletic events except for end-of-the-season tournaments. Admission to these events is $3 for adults and $1 for students without a school ID. There is no charge for middle school and high school students with a school ID. General admission tickets for high school athletic events are $5 for adults and $4 for students. Children six and under are free. Family and all-sports plan tickets are available at Thompson Valley High School, Loveland High School, Berthoud High School and Mountain View High School for all home athletic events. Parents can obtain these tickets at the high school. For more information about prices, contact the school. A combo family ticket (includes attendance at the four high schools) can be purchased at the Administration Building, 800 S. Taft Avenue, Loveland. Senior citizens (65+ years) can obtain a Golden 65 Card which allows them to attend any regular season, at-home athletic event free. Call Deb Huffsmith at 613-5030 for more information.

Physical examinations

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he district strongly encourages parents to obtain physical examinations for all kindergartners and other students who are new to the district as well as for continuing students entering grades 4, 7 and 10. Students participating in middle or high school athletics are required to have a physical before they can take part in any supervised conditioning exercises or practice sessions. The district's physical and immunization form is available in the central office or in the schools. Most local physicians also have forms in their offices.

Please note: All high school students are eligible to participate in athletic programs that are not offered at their home high school. Homeschooled students may participate in athletic programs at the middle school and high school level as long as they meet the same eligibility requirements as Thompson School District students.

A

. “BIKE

July 21, 2010

Girls Softball* .................................................. August-October Boys Football* ............................................... August-November Boys Tennis ...................................................... August-October Boys Golf ..................................................... August-September Cross Country .................................................. August-October Girls Gymnastics* ............................................ August-October Girls Volleyball*............................................. August-November Boys Soccer*.................................................... August-October Boys Basketball*.............................................. November-March Girls Basketball* ............................................. November-March Boys Wrestling*............................................... November-March Girls Swimming*............................................. November-March Boys Swimming* .................................................. Februar y-May Track ................................................................... Februar y-May Baseball* ............................................................. Februar y-May Girls Tennis.......................................................... Februar y-May Girls Soccer*........................................................ Februar y-May Girls Golf ............................................................. Februar y-May Boys Lacrosse* ..................................................... Februar y-May Girls Lacrosse*..................................................... Februar y-May *Admission is charged for these events.

Athletic event ticket prices

TO

SCHOOL

TM TM

New & Recycled Bicycles Accessories Parts Full Service

www.recycled-cycles.com 4031 S. Mason, Ft. Collins 223-1969 • 9-8 Mon-Sat • 10-6 Sun BS-315686 .


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Volunteering at TSD

Career Day fun A

t the end of the school year, Carrie Martin Elementary School students participated in Career Day where they signed up to attend sessions in specific interest areas. Volunteers from several professions visited with students and brought hands-on materials and displays to give students ideas about what they might like to do “when they grow up.”

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Mary Blair Elementary Wanda O’Donnell 461-1940 Monroe Elementary Jennifer Kingston 613-6500 Namaqua Elementary Ann Houckes 744-3192 Ponderosa Elementary Terri Johnson 663-6197 Sarah Milner Elementary Amanda Nanez 213-0204 Diane Rud 215-1046 Stansberry Elementary Amy Berglund 308-9020 Kathy Peden 663-7673 Truscott Elementary Suzanne Cinert 622-0292 Rene Frudden 353-0085 Van Buren Elementary Liz Reinard 613-1053 VOLUNTEER COORDINATORS Winona Elementary Elaine Pollard 663-2108 Early Childhood Merri Hocker 622-8054 Jane Everett 613-5053 Berthoud Elementary Bill Reed Middle School Agnes Juhasz 231-2020 Vanessa Klinker 203-9793 B. F. Kitchen Elementary Conrad Ball Middle School Penny Sanford 613-5507 Heather Godell 622-0830 Big Thompson Elementary Julie Slayback 278-9012 Elizabeth Townsend Lucile Erwin Middle School 461-3426 Susan Ruff 204-0641 Carrie Martin Elementary Karey Thomas 744-2243 Nicole Acton 744-9654 Turner Middle School Fran Parsons 461-8691 Gina Archuleta 532-5532 Centennial Elementary Alisa Breitstein 231-4870 Julia Cherry 593-0781 Walt Clark Middle School Stacee Kersley 430-6235 Karen Dufour 635-0445 Cottonwood Plains Berthoud High School Elementary Irma Bautista 218-1943 Beth Conrey 532-0329 Linda Spence 635-1876 Jennifer Carter 532-4743 Coyote Ridge Elementary Ferguson High School Amanda Mudron 377-2793 Audrey Mehls 613-5300 Rochele Witman 232-9362 Loveland High School Garfield Elementary Janine Waldrep 214-4046 Nikki Basart 203-1849 Mountain View High School Ivy Stockwell Elementary Pat Gembarowski 667-7097 Jennifer Tow 532-5364 Thompson Valley High Laurene Edmondson School Elementary Dixie Anderson 663-7131 Lori Richard 278-0463 Denise Walton 622-8816 Lincoln Elementary Senior Volunteers (SOS) Misty Plummer Jean Kenny 266-9054 316-847-3695 he education of Thompson School District students is a vital partnership between the community, schools, parents and children. Whether you are volunteering with individual students or the classroom teacher, making a one-time presentation on a career or culture, or serving on a decisionmaking committee, you are an active partner affecting the lives of children. If you can help, please contact the volunteer program specialist at the central office (613-5072) or call the volunteer coordinator or principal at the school.

learning A A lifetime lifetime ofof learning starts with with Knowledge starts Discovery.. At Bright Horizons, we provide educational experiences for ages infants to 12 years that build a foundation for success in school and in life. We strive to grow young readers, scientists, artists and explorers who are encouraged to reach their full potential.

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Ages vary per location. See our Web site for more! Loveland

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East: 970-484-4700 West: 970-229-0300 Infants: 970-206-9200

East: 303-772-1008 West: 303-682-0102

www.brighthorizons.com/BackToSchool

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30-315820

hompson School District’s community usage policy welcomes members from the community to rent space for their events in district buildings. Fields for outdoor events are also available. To make a building reservation and receive a permit, please contact the facility use coordinator at 613-5393.

July 21, 2010

• Music, computers, foreign language, physical education, math, science, handwriting, & art • Full gymnasium and dance/music studio • Full, part-time & before/after school programs

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Community welcome to reserve space in schools

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

Above, Cal Kasch and Ben Burleson play with animal puppets during the session presented by the Larimer County Parks and Natural Resources Department. Right, Kate Gentrup pets a collie brought in by a veterinarian who presented to the students.

Get involved at TSD

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Educational options at TSD ADVANCED PLACEMENT 21 COURSES OFFERED Advanced Placement (AP) is a voluntary program that offers specific college-level classes at the high schools. By participating in the courses and exams, students are better prepared for the rigor of college, earn college credit while in high school and save tuition money as a result. All AP courses have a cost for the textbook. Students also pay for the end-of-course exam that leads to college credit. Districtwide, there are 21 AP classes offered. Not every course is offered at every high school every year. Check the High School Course Guide for a list of courses.

A set of content-specific strategies is used at the middle schools to prepare students for a more rigorous curriculum and to promote access to AP classes for all students. The district has provided professional development through the College Board to middle school teachers to assist them in introducing the skills, concepts and assessment methods to prepare students for success in AP courses when they reach high school. Preparing middle school students for AP courses establishes solid academic work habits early, provides more challenging opportunities to more students and provides more depth in the subject areas. CHARTER SCHOOL New Vision Charter School is a tuition-free public school of choice for grades K-8 located at 2366 E. 1st Street in Loveland. For information, call 5936827 or go to the website at www.newvisioncharter school.org. CORE KNOWLEDGE Thompson School District offers a Core Knowledge curriculum that is open to all district elementary students at Truscott Elementary and to all district middle school students at Bill Reed Middle School. Core Knowledge offers an integrated curriculum rich in history, arts and science with a grade-by-grade sequence of learning. Bill

approach to learning at B. F. Kitchen Elementary focuses on increasing the academic achievement of each and every child through physical activity and wellness education. Research shows that students who are physically active and eat properly have better success at school. The school has embraced the idea that healthy bodies and healthy habits build healthy minds! The school enjoys several partnerships with various local community health and wellness agencies. B. F. Kitchen provides a structure that includes learning literacy and math with movement, individual health profiles and goals, fresh fruit and vegetable snacks paired with minilessons on health and nutrition, swimming lessons for every 4th grader and recess before lunch. Back to School night will be held August 13, 2010, 4:30-6 p.m. Please contact the school at 613-5500 for more information.

FERGUSON HIGH SCHOOL Ferguson High School (FHS) is a small, relationship-oriented school that offers a program designed to address the needs of the student for whom the regular high school situation has not been successful. FHS provides a positive, safe, personalized and drug-free environment where high expectations are valued. Trust, proactive involvement and effective communication enable students to develop a sense of fulfillment, belonging, self-esteem and teamwork that help them to gain employability and life skills. These skills enable them to achieve and exceed their postsecondary goals. For HIGH SCHOOL OPTIONS information, call FHS at Thompson School Dis613-5300. trict offers several options GLOBAL STUDIES FOCUS for high school students who have dropped out or Ponderosa Elementary School’s global studies ap- need to take credit recovproach prepares students ery classes and for homeschooled students needing for a global society a specific classroom-setthrough a rigorous, ting course. The opportuinquiry-based philosophy nities are listed below. that utilizes the ThompSOARS: Registration for son School District’s stanthe SOARS (Secondary dards-based curriculum with an emphasis on mul- Options for Achievement ticultural awareness, tech- Resulting in Success) pronological proficiency, glob- gram will begin August 2, 2010. SOARS high school al citizenship, leadership skills and human connect- is for students who have edness. Twenty-first centu- previously dropped out of a Thompson School ry skills such as critical District high school. The thinking, creativity, lifelong learning, innovation, student and a parent/ collaboration and commu- guardian will need to nication skills are integral schedule an interview with the counseling secretary components of the stuby calling 613-7576 begindents’ success. These skills are nurtured and de- ning August 2, 2010. veloped through real-world Classes will be held four and virtual experiences in days per week for two the classroom and beyond. hours per day at the The integration of real and following times: 8-10 a.m., virtual experiences will en- 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:30-3:30 p.m. hance learning for all Credit recovery: Stuwhile broadening commudents who want to enroll nity partnerships and dein credit recovery will veloping global partnerneed to contact the counships with other learning selor at their home high communities around the world. For more informa- school to obtain an application. Check the tion, please contact Ponschool website for times, derosa Elementary at locations and dates. 679-9500. Homeschool courses: HEALTH AND WELLNESS Homeschooled students FOCUS will have the opportunity The health and wellness to select courses from a

who possess mathematical ability. Through the math focus program, students will have an opportunity to accelerate their mathematical journey by leaving Turner Middle School having completed algebra and geometry. All students in the math focus program will have the chance to expand their learning through a math project INTERNATIONAL lab which is incorporated BACCALAUREATE within their regular classInternational Baccalau- room time. This experireate (IB) is in progress in ence gives the student a Thompson School District. mathematical edge when Coyote Ridge Elementary entering high school. For information, call Bill begins the application process in May 2011 to be- Siebers, 613-7403, or Suzanne Cox, 613-7454. come a candidate school for the Primary Years Programme. Lucile Erwin NATURE AND SCIENCE FOCUS Middle School and LoveBig Thompson Elemenland High School are candidate schools for the Mid- tary School of Nature and dle Years Programme. Stu- Science students will dents who wish to contin- receive a well-rounded, in-depth, relevant educaue after the Middle Years Programme may apply for tion integrating basic skills through a broad the Diploma Programme at Loveland High School. curriculum with a nature The IB program is a multi- and science focus. The students will explore and cultural, international understand connections in approach to learning the their world and leave with “big picture” through inquiry and critical think- a deeper understanding of the natural environment ing. With IB, all subjects that surrounds them. For are equal in importance information, call Big including mathematics, Thompson Elementary at science and technology, 613-5600. social studies, arts, personal, social and physical PROJECT LEAD THE WAY health and language. All levels of IB programs must Project Lead the Way is be authorized by the IB a pre-engineering program Programme. The Diploma that provides hands-on, Programme has been project-based learning authorized and grade 6-10 that adds rigor to tradiprograms are in process. tional technical programs For information, call and relevance to tradition613-5200 for high school, al academics by using 3-D 613-7600 for middle years, computer modeling softand 679-9400 for elemen- ware and 3-D printers, tary school programs. prototyping and applying scientific and mathematiLOVELAND AREA cal concepts and princiINTEGRATED SCHOOL OF ples to student-constructTHE ARTS (LISA) ed projects. Students learn LISA is designed to de- problem-solving methodolvelop talent and encourogy and actually test their age the pursuit of excelstudent-generated prodlence in the fields of visual ucts/models. While learnand performing arts. This ing via application and program gives LISA stuguidance from instructors, dents opportunities to students also learn to perform, appreciate and analyze, synthesize and understand the arts in a evaluate concepts through variety of cultures. The a myriad of informational LISA program is offered at elements provided by Garfield Elementary means of the Project Lead School, 613-6000, Bill the Way curriculum. Reed Middle School, 613- Project Lead the Way 7200, and Mountain View courses are for ANY stuHigh School, 613-7800. dent who is interested in engineering, engineering MATH FOCUS technology and/or would The Math Focus at like a rich hands-on, fun Turner Middle School will strive to academically I See Ed. options/Page 15 challenge those students full, comprehensive high school curriculum. Anyone interested in taking two classes during the 2010-2011 school year should call 613-7576 or 613-7592 beginning August 2, 2010. Classes will begin on August 17, 2010. Students will attend four days per week for two hours per day.

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BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

July 21, 2010

Middle Schools Offer Pre-AP Strategies

Reed also offers the regular district curriculum at all grade levels. Both Truscott and Bill Reed offer Spanish as a foreign language. For information, call Truscott Elementary at 613-6900 or Bill Reed Middle School at 613-7200.

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Early Childhood programs

Ed. options

HEAD START PROGRAM

From Page 14

experience. Project Lead the Way is offered at Berthoud and Mountain View high schools. For information, call the district’s career and technical education coordinator at 613-5027. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS (STEM) STEM is being offered at Berthoud High School as a focused educational program. STEM will strive to produce scientifically and mathematically literate graduates who can step into leadership positions at the most competitive postsecondary programs in the country. The curriculum, educational enrichment and interactive approach will develop scientists capable of planning, conducting and communicating their own investigations. Students will design their own research project and work with an adult mentor during their junior and senior years. Included in the program are Pogil Chemistry, Project Lead the Way engineering classes and Advanced Placement options. Students interested in entering this rigorous program should contact Jane Ballard at Berthoud High School at 613-7730.

The Head Start Program provides services to children who are 3 and 4 years old as of October 1 of the current year. Children are enrolled in classrooms with developmentally appropriate curriculum and provided with nutrition, health and family support services. To be eligible, children must meet federal income and program guidelines. COLORADO PRESCHOOL PROGRAM The Colorado Preschool Program provides services to children who are 4 years old as of October 1 of the current year. Children are either enrolled in integrated preschool centers or in community preschools that participate in the program. This program is funded by the State of Colorado to prepare children for success in school. To be eligible, children must have risk factors such as chronic health problems, lack of group experiences, premature birth, etc. SPECIAL NEEDS Special Needs service options are available to children who meet federal and state guidelines for special help in developmental areas. Children who meet these guidelines are eligible for services as of their third birthday. Services may be provided in a classroom, in a small group or in a community setting. FALL REGISTRATION Fall registration for all newly accepted Early Childhood children will be July 28, 2010, 1-6 p.m. and July 30, 2010, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Thompson School District Administration Building, 800 S. Taft Avenue, Loveland. Registration will be held in the Board Room. Children whose last names begin with A-L are encouraged to register on July 28 and children whose last names begin with M-Z on July 30. Parents who are interested in applying for the preschool program should contact Early Childhood at 613-5052 or 613-5761.

THOMPSON ONLINE

TUITION PAYING PROGRAM

Thompson Online offers a robust online education for students K-12 through the Thompson School District. Students attend classes through an online platform, accessing the curriculum and assignments 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection. Online teachers interact with students through multiple venues, creating a virtual learning environment. The school follows the same high accreditation requirements, including CSAP assessments and Annual Yearly Progress expectations, as any other Thompson school. Thompson Online students can grow, learn and earn credits toward graduation as a Thompson School District student. For further information, contact Kellie Bashor, principal, at 613-5132 or ThompsonOnline@thompson.k12.co.us.

This year, Thompson School District is piloting a half-day, four-day-per-week tuition paying program at Coyote Ridge, Cottonwood Plains and Ponderosa elementary schools. Tuition will be $300 per month. This program is open to children who will be 3 or 4 years of age by October 1. Enrollment is open to any resident in the Thompson School District. EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER LOCATIONS Early Childhood services are provided at the following locations: Coyote Ridge Center 7115 Avondale Road Ft. Collins, CO 80525 Edmondson Center 307 W. 49th St. Loveland, CO 80538 Madison Center 1307 E. 5th St. Loveland, CO 80537

Monroe Center 1500 N. Monroe Ave. Loveland, CO 80538 Ponderosa Center 4550 Florence St. Loveland, CO 80538 Sarah Milner Center 743 Jocelyn Dr. Loveland, CO 80537

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

Berthoud Center 950 Massachusetts Ave. Berthoud, CO 80513 Carrie Martin Center 4129 Joni Lane Loveland, CO 80537 Cottonwood Plains Center 525 Turman Dr. Ft. Collins, CO 80525

FREE REGISTRATION August 11 from 11am-8pm August 12 from 11am-6pm

4650 Sunview Dr. Loveland, CO

667-7606

BS-315412 BS-315258

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July 21, 2010

• Preschool – 8th grade • National test scores in the top 3% • K– 8th grade Spanish instruction • 5th – 8th grade Sports programs • National and Regional Accreditation

30-315768

Partnering with Families to Raise the Next Generation of Christian Leaders

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TSD student assessment

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ACUITY for reading and math, the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) for reading, writing, math and science, and DIBELS for assessing literacy at the elementary level. In addition to these assessments, teachers utilize daily assessments such as running records and observations to assist in meeting the specific needs of your child. It is important that you receive and understand the assessment data collected on your student. This information provides insight regarding your student’s abilities and allows for meaningful conversations with your child’s teacher about specific academic strengths and weaknesses.

August 16 and 17, 2010, are mandatory assessment days for all elementary schools. During these two days, the staff at elementary schools will be working to accurately assess the reading level of students. This data is critical for effective instruction of our students. Schools will be scheduling testing for all K-3 students and some 4th and 5th grade students. If your student has been scheduled for a testing period, please make every effort to have him/her at school for that period. These are official school days and your student is required to be present at school for his/her scheduled testing period. If you have not yet scheduled a testing period for either August 16 or 17, please contact your elementary school.

TSD’s Strategic Plan UNDERLYING PRINCIPLES Overall Action Plans reflect: • Whole child (subgroup data and strategies) • Opportunities for success (subgroup data and strategies) • Accountability (assessment, measurable goals, people responsible) • Sharing responsibility (people responsible) • Communication (communication of progress) • Respect (behaviors that show respect for self and others) • Stakeholders meaningfully involved (people responsible and communication of progress) • High and consistent expectations (annual targets) • Continuous progress orientation (continuation tasks, data use) • Integration of technology (a tool and method of meeting diverse learner academic needs) PRE K-12 – BASIC SKILLS Reading 5-Year Goal: In the

Thompson School District we expect all students to be proficient or advanced in reading by 2011, and we expect yearly progress toward closing the achievement gap in all subgroups. Essential Components: Standard 1-Reading Comprehension, Standard 4-Critical Thinking, Standard 5-Using Information Sources, and Standard 6-Literature.

yearly progress toward closing the achievement gap in all subgroups. Essential Components: Standard 1-Number Sense, Standard 2-Algebra, Standard 3-Statistics and Probability, Standard 4-Geometry, Standard 5-Measurement, and Standard 6-Computation.

playground, and as part of cocurricular activities. Essential Components: (1) Physical Safety, (2) Acceptance and Tolerance, (3) Opportunity for Academic Success, (4) SelfDiscipline and Personal Responsibility, and (5) Resiliency and Empowerment.

SCHOOL TO LIFE 5-Year Goal: All students in CRITICAL THINKING AND the Thompson School District CREATIVITY will relate their school life in Goals: (1) Complex Thinking, Writing practical ways to life beyond the (2) Effective Communication, school walls. Students will re5-Year Goal: In the (3) Information Processing, ceive academic and career Thompson School District we (4) Collaboration/Cooperation, counseling, meaningful career expect all students to be and (5) Creative Problem preparation experiences and opproficient or advanced in Solving. portunities to contribute in writing by 2011, and we expect Standards/Foundations: age-appropriate ways to their yearly progress toward closing (1) Clarity, (2) Accuracy, (3) community. the achievement gap in all Precision, (4) Relevance, (5) Essential Components: subgroups. Depth, (6) Breadth, (7) Logic, (1) Communication/PresentaEssential Components: Stan(8) Significance, and (9) Fairtion Skills, (2) Organizational dard 2-Writing, and Standard ness. Skills, (3) Creative Thinking 3-Mechanics/Conventions. and Problem Solving, (4) SAFETY AND BELONGING Math Career Exploration and 5-Year Goal: All students feel Workplace Readiness, (5) Social 5-Year Goal: In the safe at school – physically, Thompson School District we and Life Skills, (6) Accessing, academically and emotionally. expect all students to be profiAnalyzing and Evaluating Inforcient or advanced in mathemat- They also feel a sense of belong- mation, and (7) Technology ing in their classrooms, on the Skills. ics by 2011, and we expect

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BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

July 21, 2010

ollecting information about student performance relative to the skills and knowledge required at each grade level is vital. This information allows teachers to tailor instruction to the specific needs of the class and individual students. We collect a body of evidence about student performance by administering assessments at various times during the year. Our assessments are progressive in difficulty. This means that as your child’s abilities improve, some assessments will no longer be used, but other assessments will be utilized to produce useful data. This allows us to track longitudinal growth of students as well as growth during the year. Our comprehensive assessment system includes

Official assessment days for elementary schools

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Student support services at TSD T

he Thompson School District provides several programs that focus on various learning approaches used to reach students with diverse needs. Under this umbrella are programs that provide options to gifted students, students who are linguistically diverse, at-risk students and more.

ents. Contact: Jorge Garcia, ELA administrator, 613-6083.

mine if the child has a disability and is eligible for special education services. If a disability is identified, an Individual Education Plan (IEP) will be developed. he term "special education" For more information, please means specially designed contact your child's teacher, instruction to meet the counselor or school psychologist, unique needs of a child with a disability. Special education services the Special Education Department are available for students with iden- at 613-5020 or Beth Johnson, tified disabilities in accordance with parent liaison, at 613-5014. the Individuals with Disabilities EduMEDICAID cation Act (IDEA) and Section 504 In 1988 the U.S. Congress passed of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. When a student is not making ex- legislation enabling school districts pected learning or social/behavioral to access Medicaid funds for healthgains, a Request for Assistance from related services provided to children. Such services include but are not the school’s problem-solving team can be requested. The goal is to find limited to: health assessments and evaluations, nursing services, learning solutions for individual speech, occupational and physical students through a team approach therapy, and psychological or social using a structured problem-solving work services as part of an individual process that focuses on student assets. After completing the process, student's educational or health plan. Your child will continue to receive the team may determine that the services at no cost to you under this student needs to be referred to system. This initiative simply helps special education. A special education evaluation in- the district maximize federal funds in support of local education. cludes a variety of individualized assessments administered to a child Allowing the school district to only after parents have given written receive Medicaid funds in no way limits other Medicaid benefits for informed consent. This evaluation which your child is eligible and has includes a variety of assessment tools and strategies, including data no impact whatsoever on your own from interventions, that will lead to family coverage. The district appreciates your the most complete understanding of assistance with this important prothe child's unique educational gram. For more information about needs. A meeting will be held with the parents, teachers and those who Medicaid, please contact the Special Education Department at 613-5020. conducted assessments to deter-

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He lp Kid s

Su cce ed

School Supply Drive for the Thompson School District

We’re right here...making a difference for local students. For more than eight years, the Help Kids Succeed School Supply Drive has targeted underprivileged students throughout the Thompson School District, providing each student with a backpack filled with school supplies for the entire school year. More than 1,100 students in the Thompson School District will receive backpacks full of new school supplies before school starts in the fall, thanks to a communitywide effort.

In order to truly be successful, we need your help. Thanks to leverage from our sponsor partners, we are able to purchase more supplies with donation dollars. We can provide $40 worth of supplies (or more!) for just $15 per student!

A donation of

$15 will fill a backpack with new school supplies for a local student. This includes the backpack too!

 Yes! I’d like to donate to help fill backpacks! Name ________________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________ City ______________________________ST______ ZIP _______ To make a donation, please send a check to: Help Kids Succeed School Supply Drive c/o Thompson Education Foundation 800 S. Taft Ave.• Loveland, CO 80537 (Donations are tax-deductible. Any amount is greatly appreciated.)

Help Kids Succeed Team: Loveland-Berthoud Salvation Army, Country Financial, Loveland Sertoma, Loveland Chamber of Commerce, Loveland Reporter-Herald, Rocky Mountain Cheer and Dance Co., Thompson Education Foundation, Thompson School District, United Way of Larimer County

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Thank You!

July 21, 2010

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Services offered at TSD

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

EQUITY AND DIVERSITY The goal of the Equity and Diversity office is to assist members of school communities in understanding and supporting the unique needs of students from diverse backgrounds. At Thompson School District we respect differences GIFTED AND TALENTED including (but not limitEDUCATION ed to) race, ethnicity, Programming options age, family structure, and support services sexual orientation, designed to help meet national origin, gender the academic and social/ identity, home language, emotional needs of our and socioeconomic gifted/talented/creative status. students are available at We work with multiple each school. Additional other departments to district-sponsored opporprovide these services tunities include the through the Community Resource Enrichment Diversity Council, culturCenter (a lending library al events and programof resources for parents/ ming, the Loveland students/teachers), Hispanic Latino LeaderOdyssey of the Mind, ship Institute (HLLI), Shadows in the Arts, community action plans, Robotics, District professional developSpelling Bee, District ment opportunities for Chess Tournament, and staff, financial support Middle School Math for middle and high Counts. Contact: Carol school students in Swalley, gifted and diversity clubs, and talented education resources and networks coordinator, 613-5058. with state and national equity professionals. ENGLISH LANGUAGE Contact: Maria Gabriel, ACQUISITION (ELA) The English Language equity and diversity Acquisition Department coordinator, 613-5775. provides identification, TITLE I assessment, programFederal Title programs ming and instructional services to students who provide funding to are linguistically diverse, specific at-risk populaare acquiring English as tions for services in areas such as literacy, math an additional language, and who are not yet fully and family involvement. Students are served at proficient in English. Instructional services are Monroe, Van Buren, provided by fully licensed Winona, Truscott, B. F. Kitchen, Garfield and teachers who are endorsed in the teaching of Sarah Milner elementary schools. Contact: Roger linguistically diverse Quintanilla, Title students. Services are provided throughout the programs coordinator, 613-5093. school day as well as through after-school and INDIVIDUAL BUILDING summer programs. PROGRAMS Parental engagement Contact your building activities include participation of parents in principal to learn about program governance as individual programs that well as parent education optimize learning for classes selected by pardiverse students.

Special Education

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Response to Intervention

need is necessary for student success (Pre K12). • A comprehensive system of tiered interventions is essential for addressing the full range of student needs. • Student results improve when ongoing academic and behavioral performance data esponse to Intervention (RtI) is an inform instructional decisions. instructional framework that promotes a • Collaboration among educators, families well-integrated system connecting and community members is the foundation for general, compensatory, gifted and special effective problem solving and instructional education in providing high quality, standardsdecision making. based instruction and intervention that is • Ongoing and meaningful involvement of matched to students' academic, social-emotionfamilies increases student success. al, and behavioral needs. • All members of the school community must CORE PRINCIPLES OF RTI (ADOPTED FROM THE continue to gain knowledge and develop COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION) expertise in order to build capacity and sustainability of RtI. • All children can learn and achieve high • Effective leadership at all levels is crucial standards as a result of effective teaching. • All students must have access to a rigorous, for the implementation of RtI. standards-based curriculum and research-based School Commitments instruction. • Identify and work with struggling learners in all settings. • Intervening at the earliest indication of

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Attention all high school juniors

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BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

July 21, 2010

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he Thompson School District, in accordance with state and federal law, authorizes the release of names and addresses of students to Armed Forces recruiting officers. The recruiting services have requested this information in order to inform students about scholarship programs, tuition assistance and other educational and vocational training opportunities available from the military. Service in any branch of the Armed Forces is an employment and educational alternative that high school graduates have today. Federal, state and district regulations specify that the name and address of your son or daughter will be released to the recruiting services unless you notify us in writing to the contrary. The district will periodically inform high school students and their parents of the right to request that the district not release to military recruiters their information or that of their son or daughter. After a student or parent makes a request not to release, the district will not release that student’s information to military recruiters unless and until it receives subsequent parent consent to release such information.

• Use data to drive decisions about student needs. • Employ research-based strategies to address student learning gaps. • Continually monitor student progress towards learning goals. • Create a positive, supportive school environment for all students. • Provide resources and staff training to support the RtI framework. Family Expectations • Contact your child's teacher, principal or counselor if you have a concern about his/her academic or behavioral performance. • Collaborate with teachers. • Share information about student and family as appropriate. • Support student learning at home. • Attend Problem-Solving Team meetings. An electronic Response to Intervention Guidebook is available on the district website at www.thompsonschools.org.

Diversity awareness calendar AUGUST 2010 – DIVERSITY AWARENESS MONTH August 8 — International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples August 12 — International Youth Day August 12-September 9 — Ramadan, Islamic August 26 — Women’s Equality Day, USA* SEPTEMBER 2010 – NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH (SEPT. 15-OCT. 15) September 9-10 — Rosh Hashanah, Jewish September 16 — Mexican Independence Day, Mexico* September 18 — Yom Kippur, Jewish September 23 — Autumnal Equinox September 23-29 — Sukkot, Jewish September 28 — Native American Day OCTOBER 2010 – NATIONAL DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS & LGBT HISTORY MONTH October 1 — Simchat Torah, Jewish October 8 — Navaratri, Hindu October 11 — National Coming Out Day, USA October 20 — Birth of the Bab, Bahá’i* NOVEMBER 2010 – NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN HERITAGE MONTH November 1 — Día de los Muertos/All Saints Day, Mexico/USA November 5 — Diwali, Hindu November 12 — Birth of Baha’u’llah, Bahá’i* November 16 — International Day for Tolerance November 20 — Transgender Day of Remembrance November 25 — Thanksgiving Day, USA* DECEMBER 2010 – HUMAN RIGHTS MONTH December 1 — World AIDS Day December 2-9 — Chanukah begins sundown, Jewish December 3 — International Day of Disabled Persons December 7 — Muharram/Islamic New Year, Islamic December 8 — Bodhi Day, Buddhist December 10 — Human Rights Day, USA* December 21 — Winter Solstice December 25 — Christmas, Christian* December 26-January 1 — Kwanzaa, USA*

JANUARY 2011 – NATIONAL POVERTY IN AMERICA MONTH January 1 — USA New Years, USA* January 17 — Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, USA FEBRUARY 2011 – BLACK HISTORY MONTH February 3 — Hsin nien/Chinese New Year, China February 3 — Tet-Vietnamese New Year, Vietnam February 8 — Nirvana Day, Buddhist February 16 — Milad Al-Nabi, Islamic MARCH 2011 – NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH March 8 — International Women’s Day March 9 — Ash Wednesday (Western), Christian March 21 — New Year’s Day/Naw-Rúz, Bahá’i* March 21 — International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination March 30-April 6 — Passover begins sundown, Jewish March 31 — Cesar Chavez Day, USA* APRIL 2011 April 14 — Day of Silence April 18-26 — Festival of Ridván, Bahá’i* April 22 — Good Friday, Christian April 24 — Easter Sunday, Christian MAY 2011 – ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN HERITAGE & OLDER AMERICANS MONTH May 1 — Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day), Jewish May 5 — Cinco de Mayo, USA/Mexico* May 8 — Mother’s Day, USA May 17 — Buddha Day, Buddhist May 23 — Declaration of the Bab, Bahá’i* May 29 — Ascension of Baha’u’lláh, Bahá’i* JUNE 2011 – LGBT PRIDE MONTH June 7 — Shavuot, Jewish June 19 — Juneteenth, USA June 19 — Father’s Day, USA June 21 — Summer Solstice *Holidays with constant dates. Provided by the Thompson School District and Community Diversity Council as an informational piece to assist schools in providing inclusive environments for all students and their families. .


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Nutrition Services at TSD

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he Thompson School District offers both breakfast and lunch at all school locations through the help of the National School Lunch and National School Breakfast programs. TSD serves meals that meet students’ nutritional requirements (1/3 at lunch and 1/4 at breakfast) without taking money away from instruction and other school needs. Three registered dietitians create TSD breakfast and lunch menus according to high quality standards including: fresh fruit and vegetables at every meal; locally grown produce whenever possible; milk that is rbSTand hormone-free; menu choices that include whole grains, natural meats, beans or fish; no fried foods or foods containing trans fat; and reusable, biodegradable and recyclable serving materials wherever possible. The Nutrition Services Department welcomes

comments and input regarding menus. The department can be reached by calling 613-5148 or 613-5147. The district also encourages parents and visitors to join students and staff members for lunch any day. Please contact the school in advance to reserve a meal. ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR MEAL BENEFITS Students from households that meet federal income guidelines are eligible for free or reduced price meals. Applications will be distributed to all homes either by mail, at registration or during the first week of school. Applications are available during the school year at all school sites as well as on the district website. The information provided on the application is confidential and will be used only for the purpose of determining if a student is eligible for free or reduced price meals.

2010-2011 SCHOOL BREAKFAST PRICES Students

Adults

Elementary $1.25 Secondary $1.50 Reduced Price Free

Breakfast without Milk $1.95 Breakfast with Milk $2.45

Students

Adults

Elementary $2.25 Secondary $2.50 Reduced Price $.40 À la Carte Items Varied

Lunch without Milk Lunch with Milk

$3.10 $3.60

GRADES 6-10 DPT ........................................ 5 * Tdap ....................................... 1 Polio ....................................... 4 * MMR ....................................... 2 Hepatitis B.............................. 3 Varicella ............................ 1 (2)**

KINDERGARTEN-GRADE 3 DPT ........................................ 5 Polio ....................................... 4* MMR ....................................... 2 Hepatitis B.............................. 3 Varicella .................................. 2 GRADES 4-5 DPT ........................................ 5 Polio ....................................... 4* MMR ....................................... 2 Hepatitis B............................. 3 Varicella .................................. 1

GRADES 11-12 DPT ....................................... 4 Tdap ....................................... 1 Polio ....................................... 3 MMR ....................................... 2 Hepatitis B.............................. 3

*Only 4 DPT and 3 Polio required if last one given after age 4 years. **Two doses are required if series started at 13 years of age or older.

Special health needs If your child has special health care needs, requires medication or medical treatments during the school day, requires changes to the regular school program or scheduled monitoring, or has a chronic health condition, please contact the school nurse so that we can prepare for the student’s entry into school. Some situations require the development of a health care plan and the training of staff to assist your child prior to the first day of attendance. For example, board policy JLCDA pertains specifically to students with life-threatening allergies and encourages parents, in accordance with Colorado Senate Bill

09-226, to provide the school with the student’s emergency medication unless the student has a plan for self-administering needed emergency medications. It is extremely important that parents notify the school nurse of their child’s health problems or of any procedure that they wish the nurse to employ when dealing with this or any other concern in the school environment. Health questionnaires are provided to parents/guardians on a yearly basis and requested even if your child does not have a health concern as this assists us in keeping our records up to date.

Student accident insurance Thompson School District offers parents the opportunity to obtain student accident insurance through a private company. The plans are available to all students in grades K-12. Parents can elect to purchase a low, middle or high option that provides either school-time or 24-hour coverage. These policies cover only accidental injuries. They do not pay for illnesses. Injuries suffered during football practices or games will only be covered if the separate football plan is purchased.

United Healthcare also provides a student health insurance plan option. Visit www.k12studentinsurance.com for details. Insurance application brochures are available in the high schools when football practice begins in August and can be obtained in all schools during registration and throughout the school year. They can be found online at the website above. Call the district insurance office at 613-5774 or athletics office at 613-5030 for more information.

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July 21, 2010

35th ANNIVERSARY DISCOUNT: PAY ONLY $35 TUITION PER WEEK FOR 2 WEEKS!

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A Tradition of Excellence in Early Education

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

2010-2011 SCHOOL LUNCH PRICES

Colorado School immunization requirements

BS-314657

Healthy Learning

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Board of Education Assigned Schools

DIRECTOR DISTRICT A Lola Johnson 2473 Chama Ct. Loveland, CO 80538 970-669-8838

DIRECTOR DISTRICT B Dennis Breitbarth 4109 Stoneham Cir. Loveland, CO 80538 970-667-6126

DIRECTOR DISTRICT C Lucille Steiner 7401 Streamside Dr. Ft. Collins, CO 80525 970-204-9008

Elementary Schools

Middle Schools

High Schools

Big Thompson Namaqua Van Buren

Lucile Erwin Turner

Ferguson

Centennial Laurene Edmondson Lincoln Ponderosa

Lucile Erwin

Loveland

Cottonwood Plains Coyote Ridge Stansberr y

Conrad Ball

Ferguson Loveland

Carrie Martin Sarah Milner

Bill Reed Walt Clark

Berthoud Thompson Valley

B. F. Kitchen Garfield Truscott

Bill Reed Walt Clark

Thompson Valley

Mary Blair Monroe Winona

Conrad Ball

Mountain View

Berthoud Ivy Stockwell

Turner

Berthoud Mountain View

DIRECTOR DISTRICT D Leslie Young 2890 N. Monroe Loveland, CO 80538 970-203-4084

DIRECTOR DISTRICT E Sharon Olson 904 W. 5th St. Loveland, CO 80537 970-669-3297

DIRECTOR DISTRICT F Leonard Sherman 600 Crescent Dr. Loveland, CO 80538 970-667-3807

DIRECTOR DISTRICT G

All meetings begin with a 5:30 p.m. work session followed by the regular meeting at 7 p.m. and are held in the Board Room at the Administration Building, 800 S. Taft Avenue, Loveland, with the exception of the October 20, 2010, and April 20, 2011, meetings, which are held in the library at Berthoud High School. Board of Education meetings held at the Administration Building are televised live on Thompson Schools Television, which can be viewed on Comcast Cable Channel 14 or by clicking on the Channel 14 Live Stream button on our website, www.thompsonschools.org. These meetings are rebroadcast the Thursday (3 p.m.) and Friday (7 p.m.) following each board meeting. 2010 August 4 August 18 September 1 September 15 October 6 October 20* November 3 November 17 December 8

2011 January 5 January 19 February 2 February 16 March 2 March 16 April 6 April 20* May 4 May 18 June 1 June 15

*Meetings to be held at Berthoud High School library.

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PLAY! LAUGH! RELAX!

BS-315684

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

July 21, 2010

Karen Stockley 316 Bothun Rd. Berthoud, CO 80513 970-532-7031

2010-2011 BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING SCHEDULE

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Ponderosa architects incorporate geology and inquiry into design

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Example of a plaque that will be placed inside Ponderosa Elementary to explain the geologic concept of the building

Design Team Bennett Wagner & Grody Architects PC

July 21, 2010

I See PONDEROSA/Page 22

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he foothills have a new neighbor on the west side of Loveland. And soon it will be buzzing with more than 320 students as the first school year begins at Ponderosa Elementary School. Earth tones, varying elevations, multicolor bricks and corrugated panels provide a multidimensional vision that blends in and stands out at the same time with the rise of the foothills to the west. While it stands out from Wilson Avenue, it also settles into its surrounding neighborhood. In fact, the area’s geology as well as the global learning concept of the school prompted architects to incorporate plate tectonics into the design, said Jennifer Song Koeppe of Bennett Wagner & Grody Architects PC. This theme is evident in the swirling brick design at the entrance of the building, which represents an anticline, which is an arch of stratified rock in which A view from the east toward the school and the foothills. the layers bend downward in opposite directions from the crest. Once inside the building, the ceilings have a tilt to them, as though they were floating, to mimic the motion of the earth being pushed upward. Classroom area entryways also have pitched ceilings to replicate plates pushing up. And the carpet tiles and vinyl flooring are patterned to represent the earth’s layers flipping, Koeppe said. The carpet pattern in the media center also reflects plate tectonics with a shifting pattern. Principal Lamb Caro has worked closely with the architects to ensure the school fits its place in west Loveland. Multiple beige/brown/ gray bricks contrasting with deep red and gray textured corrugated panels and plenty of windows in the multilevel building provide its depth and dimension. The design is The brick pattern at the entrance to Ponderosa Elementary. similar to Coyote Ridge Elementary, which opened two years ago on the north end of the district. However, Ponderosa, with 70,000 square feet, is a larger building, designed for four rounds of classes grades K-5. “Other modifications were made based on feedback from Coyote Ridge as well,” Caro said. Jay Earl, the district’s bond administrator, said Coyote Ridge staff provided input about what worked well and what could use tweakWith the Rocky Mountains to draw on as inspiration, ing in a design. “It really helped us to come up with the best plan,” he said. the design concept is based on geology. The idea of One change from the Coyote Ridge design is geological plates sliding and pushing towards each the addition of an extra door at the foyer of the other to create new forms is the basis of the architectural building – one that leads directly into the office, rather than into the main hallway. “With concept throughout the building. the building being larger, this provides an extra layer of security,” Caro said. The school also includes some green features such as sunThe exterior brick pattern of the west facade wraps the shades, specialty windows that reflect light into entry and extends into the main lobby. The brick pattern the room, efficiency lighting and more. One reflects the idea of anticline, which is an arch of stratified extra space is a book storage room, which Caro said will be a huge benefit. rock in which the layers bend downward in opposite diColor splashes of reds and bright greens acrections from the crest. The main lobby flooring pattern is cent the interior of the school and the flooring based on the tectonics of the late 20th century. The single continues the multiple-texture theme with a combination of carpet tiles and tan vinyl tilsquare is the approximate location of Colorado and the ing. Koeppe said that the colors may seem a wall of the administration suite is the line of the equator. bit sophisticated for children, but the school needs to stand the test of time. “There will still be whimsical aspects,” she said. When designThe main lobby ceiling as well as the ceiling for each ing a building, she said the goal is to have a classroom entry depicts the uplift and compression of human scale – in this case, the humans are children. “We try to keep to that scale so the earth in the formation of mountains. kids don’t feel so overwhelmed,” she said. All

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PONDEROSA From Page 21

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Private School Listing to the Colorado High School Activities Association (CHSAA), and play varCampion sity and junior varsity sports Academy with other private schools in the area, while glorifying The mission statement of Campion Academy is “Expe- God through athletic performance. The teams ofriencing Christ in a Learning Environment.” The stu- fered are soccer, volleyball, baseball and basketball. dents attend a Bible/Religious Education class each Extra-curricular activities: year they are enrolled. Christian programming and Grades: 9-12 activities, community serWebsite: www.campion.net vice activies, men’s and ladies’ clubs, outdoor club, Phone number: sports clubs and bicycling. 970-667-5592 Specialty classes include Tuition: $9,005/year for gymnastics (acrosports), incommunity students, dustrial arts (auto mechan$14,150 for boarding students (includes room rental ics, CAD drafting, welding, and cafeteria fees). A Com- woodworking), Koinonia monweal Foundation Pathtraveling choir, Mountain ways Scholarship is available Echoes Concert Chorale, for students in a certain in- The Campanas hand bell come bracket. choir, music theory, string Athletics: Campion belongs ensemble, private lessons,

Loveland

FISHING

art, Mountain Echoes Yearbook and student literature ministr y. Lunch: Full time cafeteria with three meals a day (included in Board). Nonboarding day students may purchase meal tickets.

Immanuel Lutheran School Immanuel Lutheran School offers students and families a quality Christian education experience. The bible is studied alongside literature, history, music and math. Grades: Preschool-8 Website: www.school .immanuelloveland.org Phone number: 970-667-7606 Tuition: Varies by grade level, scholarships available. Athletics: Immanuel of-

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TEACHERS - Earn Your Graduate Degree in Education from UNC on Your Schedule Online • Loveland • Greeley Ô Art Education MA—Online + Summer sessions in Greeley Ô Natural Sciences: K–12 Teaching Emphasis MA—Online + short Summer sessions in Northern Colorado Ô Reading MA—Loveland Ô Curriculum Studies MAT—Loveland Ô Theatre Education MA: Theatre Education Intensive—Online + Summer sessions in Greeley Ô Special Education MA Programs: Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Gifted and Talented, and Visual Impairment—Online Ô Doctor of Education in Educational Studies— Online + Summer sessions in Loveland

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July 21, 2010

663-0800 or www. coloradoyo.org

Visit www.unco.edu/extendedstudies @ Choose Extended Degree Programs

fers a complete athletic program beginning in 5th grade which includes soccer, volleyball, basketball and track. Extra-curricular activities: Spanish is taught in Kindergarten through 8th grade and middle school students choose elective classes for each semester such as yearbook / journalism, mock trial, concert band, leadership, technology, net sports, Lego robotics, speech, bridge building, and cooking. Lunch: A daily hot lunch program is offered.

Resurrection Christian School The school offers several educational options different from public education: Curriculum/TestingRather than doing CSAPS and have the pressure of teaching to a test, Resurrection Christian School's curriculum and testing go hand-in-hand. Class size-Kindergarten classes are limited to 18 students in each class. First grade is limited to 25 per class and all other grades are limited to 26 in each class. Leadership and Character Building- The school provides leadership training that allows students to identify a need and then participate in creatively helping to meet that need. RCS students actively participate in community and world outreach, in turn preparing each of them to be a positive part of their future community and workplace. Grades: PreK-12 Website: www.recschool.org Tuition: Registration Fee of $400 per student (max. of $1000 per family), $25 admissions testing fee (for new students only). Kindergarten: Half day M-F (AM or PM), $2,499; Full Day Kindergarten, $4,986; 3-Full Day/two-half day Kindergarten, $3,843 Elementary (Grades 1-5), $4101; Middle School (Grades 6-8), $4,560; High School (Grades 9-12), $4,965. Athletics: RCS is a member of CHSAA, giving teams the opportunity to advance to districts, regionals and state tournaments. Middle School Athletics Program: Boys and Girls basketball and cross country. Boys football and baseball. Girls volleyball and soccer. High School Athletics Program: Girls and Boys basketball and cross country. Boys football and golf. Girls volleyball and soccer. Extra-curricular

activities: Elementar y: Leadership and character building programs, Mission and service Projects, First LEGO league, Odyssey of the Mind, Math Olympics, Spelling Bee, speech Meet, Cougar Chorus (choir and drama), Weekly Chapel, Spanish (beginning in the 3rd grade) High School and Middle School: Drama, choir, band, student council, weekly chapel, foreign language, Business and internships, AP courses, Honor Society, Mission and service projects, Senior Mission trip to Belize, art, spelling, and math district competitions, science fair, world fair Lunch: The hot lunch program serves breakfast, lunch and after school snacks to K-12th graders Monday-Thursday.

Saint John the Evangelist Catholic School In communion with family, St. John the Evangelist Catholic school provides a respectful Catholic environment dedicated to developing the whole child through academic achievement, personal responsibility and the formation of faith-filled citizens in a place where Christ is ever present. Grades: PreK-8 Website: www.school.saintjohns.net Phone number: 970-635-5830 Tuition: Varies and scholarships are available. Athletics: Basketball, track, volleyball and other sports through city leagues. Extra-curricular activities: Chess, speech, drama, Mathcounts, River Watch, National Honor Society, spelling bee and choir. Lunch: Homemade meals are offered every day.

Fort Collins Cornerstone Christian School Cornerstone Christian School offers a personal, flexible, and self-paced program, which is possible because enrollment is limited to around 20 students. Students at all grade levels can learn at their own speed in each subject. They also have classes that instruct students according to ability, not according to their established grade level. As a Christian school, they also emphasize certain religious perspectives and standards that would not be enforced in a public school setting. Grades: 2-12 Website: www.corner stone-fortcollins.org Phone number: 970-691-5210 .


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Front Range Baptist Academy

HMS Richards Adventist School

Awesome Pedodontics Of Loveland

Oakwood School Oakwood School specializes in individual instruction in all academic areas. They use a proven curriculum to formulate challenging educational plans that ensure successful learning for each child. Grades: PreK-5 Website: www.oakwoodabc.com Phone number: 970-221-0566 Tuition: $6750, Fees — $200 Registration Fee per Child, $50 Supply Fee for PK/Kindergarten Class. Inquire about half-day programs and scholarship opportunities. Athletics: Oakwood offers physical education classes for all students as well as bowling, basketball, and swimming programs for the older students. In addition, all students participate in a recreational running club daily. Extra-curricular activities: Spanish, vocal music, Suzuki violin lessons, orchestra, art, world art, physical education, Jr. Great

970-669-1122

This is your brain. This is your brain with arts education.

Any questions? Art makes life more colorful!

Support arts programs in Thompson Schools by making a donation to Arts & Technology online at

www.thetef.org

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Helping Parents Raise Healthy Smilers

July 21, 2010

HMS Richards Adventist School has been founded to provide an environment for Christian Education. The program is designed to provide an education that is thoroughly Christian; challenging each student to grow in Christ-likeness, as evidenced by spiritual, academic, physical and personal maturity. Grades: Pre K-8 Website: www.hmsrichards.net

There are also 3 and 4 day Website: options for preschool. There www.stjosephchurchfc.org is a multiple child discount. /School.html Athletics: Students use Phone number: city programs or other es970-484-1171 tablished public sport clubs. Tuition: Annual tuition is Rivendell School Extra-curricular activi- $3990 ($332.50 per Rivendell school offers in- ties: Along with before and month) dividualized academics with after school care, they offer Athletics: Fall — Girls progression based on child's a rotation of special classes volleyball, 5th-8th; Boys socability and comprehension f which cover art, math, com- cer, 6th-8th the academic discipline. All puter or yoga. Winter — Girls basketLunch: Hot lunches may PK-5th graders have instrucbe purchased, catered by lo- ball, 6th-8th; boys baskettion in Spanish, German, ball 6th-8th physical education, art, mu- cal eateries. Spring — Girls and boys sic and computers weekly. Saint Joseph District Track, 4th-6th There is low teacher to stuGirls and boys track, 7thdent ratio and multi-aged Catholic School 8th classrooms. Saint Joseph Catholic Grades: PreK-5 Extra-curricular activiSchool offers a faith-based ties: Specialty classes inWebsite: education. The mission of clude music, band, art, www.rivendell-school.org Saint Joseph Catholic Heritage ChrisPhone: 970-493-9052 School is to build a spiritual Spanish, library and health. tian Academy foundation upon which our Extra-curricular activities Tuition: The tuition for include sports, student Heritage Christian Acade- one elementary aged child students develop Catholic council, and Odyssey of the my offers a Christ centered is $6, 500, plus registration morals and values while Mind. education at the highest they achieve academic exand supply fees. Preschool, academic level, which incellence. Lunch: Daily meals are ofbased on a 5-day enrollcludes AP classes. The bible ment, $ 7,500 , plus fees. Grades: PreK-8 fered for $2.25 is a part of the curriculum. Smaller class sizes ensure more one-on-one time with the teachers. Grades: PreK-12 Website: www.heritagechristian.info Complete Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics Phone number: Infants Thru Teens 970-494-1022 Latest In Techno - Dentistry Tuition: PreK for the year is $1,400. Half day KinderWhile Still Using Good Old Toby Derloshon, garten is $2,500, full day is “Nana” Technology D.D.S. & Associates $4,400. Elementary, 1-6th Call About FREE Back 2 School Screenings grade, is $4,600. Junior High, 7-8th grade, is $5,200 and High School, 9-12th is $5,850. 2700 Madison Square Drive Athletics: Volleyball, boys Most Insurance and girls basketball and socWelcome cer, spring baseball at the junior high and high school level. Lunch: Balanced lunches offered for $3.00.

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The primary purpose of Front Range Baptist Academy is to give students an excellent education and to train them in the knowledge of God and a Christian way of life. They employ traditional teaching methods using quality Christian curriculum taught by well-qualified, caring teachers. Grades: PreK-12 Website: www.frbacademy.org Phone number: 970-223-2173 Tuition: K-4 and K-5 half day --$205 monthly; K-4 and K-5 full day, $255 monthly; Elementary--$365 monthly; Secondary-- $385 monthly. Families with multiple children enrolled get discounted rates. Athletics: Front Range Baptist Academy maintains an active inter-scholastic sports program competing in girls' and boys' soccer, volleyball, basketball and girls' cheerleading and maintains membership in the Front Range Christian Athletic Association. Extra-curricular activities: We offer band and choir to elementary and secondary students. Drama and art are offered to secondary students. FRBA competes in the Colorado Association of Christian Schools fine arts and academic competition. Lunch: No lunch programs offered.

Phone number: 970-667-2427 Tuition: $309 for a member of the constituency church, Campion SDA Church and $400 for a nonmember of the constituency church. Scholarships are available through the ACE Scholarship program. Athletics: Through the Northern Colorado Independent League, kids in grades 5-8 can play soccer, basketball, track, and volleyball after school. Extra-curricular: Field trips during the year and music classes. Lunch: Hot lunch for $2.50 served 3 days a week.

BS-315755

Tuition: Attendance of 20 hours a weeks is considered full time and rates are adjusted for part-time work. Grades 7-12 — First child in family: $230.00, second child in family: $220, third child in family: $210 Grades 4-6 — First child in family: $220, second child in family: $210, third child in family: $200 Grades 2-3 — First child in family $210, second child in family: $200, third child in family: $190 Athletics: Programs through other schools such as soccer, volleyball, basketball and baseball. Lunch: Students bring lunch

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Books, friendship circles and drama. Lunch: Students have the option of ordering lunches catered by local restaurants.

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Higher Education

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oveland enjoys easy access University of Northern Colorado to the state’s three largest www.unco.edu universities: Colorado State 970-351-1890 University in Fort Collins (12 miles north), University of North- University of Colorado www.colorado.edu ern Colorado in Greeley (23 miles 303-492-5007 east), and University of Colorado at Boulder (35 miles southwest). Regis University Offered locally are two community www.regis.edu colleges, two smaller universities 800-944-7667 and business schools. Colorado Christian University Colorado State University www.ccu.edu www.colostate.edu 970-669-8700 970-491-6444

COMMUNITY COLLEGES Aims Community College www.aims.edu 970-667-4611

Institute of Business & Medical Careers www.IBMC.edu 970-223-2669

Front Range Community College Career Coders www.frontrange.edu www.careercoders.com 970-226-2500 970-663-0020 BUSINESS SCHOOLS University of Phoenix CollegeAmerica 4601 South Mason Street www.phoenix.edu Fort Collins, CO 80525 1-800-622-2894 www.collegeamerica.edu

College life: 5 ways to spend and save money enough to worry about: Studying for tests, paying for tuition, making it to class on time and, of mong the many won- course, having fun. How and derful things you may where you spend your monlearn in college, ey is probably the last thing there’s one thing you may on your mind. College is an learn the hard way: money expensive investment. management. As a recent There isn’t much you can college graduate, there are do to control those expensmany money saving tips I es, but there are ways to wish I’d known before head- control your personal ing to college. spending. College students have Check out these five tips TAMERA MUNIZ MCCLATCHEY TRIBUNE

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1. TRACK YOUR SPENDING The best thing you can do is track exactly where your money goes. Make a list of all mandatory expenses, such as rent, utilities, school supplies and groceries. Once you know where your money is going, it’s easier to establish a

Why Saint John the Evangelist School? • St. John The Evangelist strives for it’s graduates to be faith filled individuals, lifelong learners, effective communicators, active community members and problem solvers by providing an exceptional and challenging academic environment. • The 2009 Iowa Standards Test shows that St. John students are performing 1-4 grade levels above their grade level in reading, math, science and social studies. • Now accepting applications for 3- and 4-year-old preschool. • Every class gives back to our community by participating in a service project. • St. John the Evangelist Catholic School is accredited by the North Central Association. All teachers are state certified. • St. John the Evangelist has completed the preschool expansion and new gymnasium, and newly renovated cafeteria, technology center & library.

Presc h 8th G ool rade! !

1730 West 12th Street • Loveland 635-5830 • www.school.saintjohns.net Notice of Student Nondiscrimination Policy: The Catholic Schools of the Archdioceses of Denver, under the jurisdiction of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. cap. and at the direction of the Secretary for Catholic Schools, state that all their Catholic schools admit students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made with Archdiocesan Policy

We invite you to come and take a look at what this investment will mean to your family.

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July 21, 2010

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to help reduce those costs and help you avoid eating Ramen noodles every day of the week.

budget. Make sure you budget a bit for fun or you’ll fall off your budget as easily as you’d fall off a diet. Just stick to your plan and form good spending habits early. 2. AVOID CREDIT CARDS Although having a credit card may sound like a good idea, don’t be fooled. Credit cards are one of the biggest problem areas for college students. They may seem like free and easy money to a poor college kid, but the money you borrow must be paid back with a steep interest rate and hidden fees. Fortunately, recent federal legislation makes it far more difficult for students to obtain credit cards without an adult co-signer, but it’s still possible to get into trouble. If you must get a card, make sure to sign up for one with a low interest rate that won’t balloon after the introductory period. And make sure you pay the balance off every month. 3. SAVE, SAVE, SAVE! THEN SPLURGE If you’re really itching to buy that brand new iPod but just don’t have the funds, be smart and save up your pennies. Charging such extras to a credit card provides instant gratification, but then you’ll pay extra in interest every month. Why not save that extra money, wait, and get the iPod a month or two from now? 4. EAT CHEAP AND SMART Eating out may seem like less work than cooking at home, but you’ll have to work much harder to pay restaurant prices than for

groceries. If you plan meals before you go to the store, you won’t buy things you don’t need. Doesn’t a $4 plate of spaghetti sound much tastier than a $10 plate from a restaurant, not to mention the price of a drink and tip. 5. BORROW OR BUY USED TEXTBOOKS This is one tip almost every college student has probably heard. We’ve all heard horror stories about the dreadful cost of books. If you can’t borrow text books, buy used from websites like Amazon.com, Half.com or CampusBooks .com. You also might consider buying the international edition. One of the best-kept secrets is that the international edition of a textbook will usually be significantly cheaper than the U.S. edition. When you’re done, sell them back online to other college bargain shoppers and get back much more than you would from the bookstore. This way, everyone wins. .


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Elementary school collects pet food for shelter B. F. Kitchen Elementary, a health and wellness school, recently completed a successful pet food/supply drive, a project the school has participated in for 15 years! This year, the drive benefitted the Denkai Animal Sanctuary, a no-kill shelter in northern Colorado that was formerly known as Canine Bed & Biscuit. “We stress this to the students about being kind to animals and they are the ambassadors of friendship to all – including our furry friends,” said Darleen Statucki, media specialist, who coordinated the project with the First Friends group at the school composed of students selected at the beginning of

the school year to connect with other students and provide momentum for projects and activities. More than 1,027 pounds of dried and canned food was collected during the two-week drive as well as a penny jar with enough to purchase a special bed for $56, said Statucki. The class that donated the most “points” participated in the Pet Olympics at BFK in which the kids compete in an obstacle course as a dog or cat. The winning class also received a “Big Bone” award to hang in their classroom. “We stress to the students that the real winners are the pets,” Statucki said, “but the kids and parents just love this project.”

B. F. Kitchen students in Shauna Mayberry’s 2nd grade class pose with their collected animal supplies.

Summer Academy of Music

Photos courtesy of Thompson School District

Below, Susan Harding directs the Summer Academy of Music (SAM) choir during the academy’s performance at the close of the sessions for incoming and current middle school music students around the district. SAM was originally started to give incoming 6th grade students the opportunity to learn how to play a musical instrument – either in orchestra or in band. Since its inception, SAM has grown to include both incoming 6th graders and incoming 7th and 8th grade students. The choir program was then added and this year a high school orchestra component was included. Right, two students practice after their performance at SAM. Bottom right, orchestra students applaud after the choir performance.

Pictured: Mary Vandertop and Teresa Harstad paint the trim, Amy Noble paints a door, and Vern Vandertop paints trim at the center.

July 21, 2010

Members of the Vineyard Church in Loveland painted the exterior of the Madison Early Childhood Center this summer as part of a community project in the church’s neighborhood.

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Church paints Early Childhood Center

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“This is a public school that “It’s a parent-run doesn’t function if parents aren’t school. It’s amazing involved,” she said. The school encourages and exthe number of pects parents to be active particihours the parents pants in their child’s education and welcome their input and input into the school.” volvement. The demand for charter school- — Kimberly Tyson, New Vision parent and lead PR volunteer ing opportunities prompted a pair of mothers in Loveland, Trisha Coberly and Tamara ter school would follow a classical Cramer, to begin exploring starting a second charter school. Both Core Knowledge curriculum, mothers have children on the New which would be grounded on taking students back-to-the-basics. Vision waiting list. “Instead of reading about the conCoberly said the proposed stitution, students would actually school, to be named Loveland read the constitution,” Coberly Classical Schools, has received Spanish, physical education, art, JADE CODY said. Students would have the openormous community support, SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR music and technology, until 7th portunity to read literature in its with over 100 families already grade, when they are able to original text and come to their committed and an anticipated choose electives (Spanish remains opening in fall 2011 with 360 stu- own conclusions. “They will learn n 2005, New Vision Charter mandatory through 8th grade). Ex- dents. If approved, the school will how to think rather than what to School became a part of tracurricular clubs and activities think,” she said. offer K-12 instruction. Thompson School District, ofare also available, and sports are Coberly said they will be submitProportionally, Thompson School fering Loveland parents and stuoffered for grades 7-8. ting an application for approval District has a lower percentage of dents an alternative educational The school is unique in that it is charter school students than many from TSD in August. Loveland choice. Largely run by parents, the dependent on parent involvement. surrounding areas. According to Classical Schools will work on a K-8 charter school’s popularity Out of the nine school board direc2009 data from the Charter School lottery based enrollment system soared, and today there are more tors, seven are also parents of New Institute, TSD has 2.87 percent of similar to New Vision. than 300 students enrolled with For more information regarding students who attend charter hundreds on the waiting list. Class- Vision students. “It’s a parent-run school, Tyson schools. In comparison, the Poudre New Vision Charter School, located es are kept small, at approximately at 2366 East 1st. St. in Loveland, said. “It’s amazing the number of School District has 5.26 percent, 16 students in each kindergarten call 970-593-6827 or visit Greeley has 14.06 percent, Windhours the parents put into the class and 24 in 1st-8th grade classhttp://newvisioncharterschool.org. school.” Parents volunteer in near- sor has 10.15 percent and the es. For more information regarding ly every aspect of the school, from Johnstown school district has The school recently hired a new Loveland Classical Schools, visit principal, Carmella Schroeder, who grant writing and public relations 11.64 percent. www.lovelandclassical.org. Coberly said the proposed charto classroom volunteering. has more than 30 years’ experience with charter schools. Schroeder replaces past-principal Chris Cockrill. New Vision board president Matt Hall said Schroeder is highly regarded and has extensive educational knowledge. “She will be the person to take us to the next level,” he said. New Vision follows the Core Knowledge curriculum, which is based on building critical thinking skills in a cross-disciplinary model, said volunteer public relations lead representative Kimberly Tyson, who is also a parent at the school. For instance, with Core Knowledge, when students learn about Rome in history class, they might make mosaics in art class and learn roman numerals in another class, she said. “The curriculum is coordinated,” she said, and the learning is going to cross different subject matters. Hall said the curriculum is forward-thinking and promotes hands-on learning. New Vision students are enrolled New Vision Charter School/RH photo by Jade Cody in mandatory electives, such as

Chartered Learning

Charter schools provide curricular alternatives

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TRIMESTER BEGIN DATES 1st Trimester................................................. August 16 (58 days) 2nd Trimester............................................. November 9 (58 days) 3rd Trimester ............................................. February 22 (56 days) Total Student Days ......................................................... 172 days

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March 3 ................................ Parent/teacher conferences 4-8 p.m. March 4 ....................................................................... No School March 25 ..................... Teacher workday — no school for students March 28-April 1................................... Spring break — no school May 13......................... Teacher workday — no school for students May 20......................................................... Last day for students May 23 & 24...................................................... Teacher workdays

July 21, 2010

August 16 ................................................ First day for all students September 6 ............................................. Labor Day — no school November 1................... Teacher workday — no school for students November 5.................................................... End of 1st trimester November 8................... Teacher workday — no school for students November 16......................... Parent/teacher conferences 4-8 p.m. November 18......................... Parent/teacher conferences 4-8 p.m. November 19................................................................. No school November 24-26.......................... Thanksgiving break — no school December 20-December 31.................... Winter break — no school January 17...................................... MLK Jr. birthday — no school February 18................... Teacher workday — no school for students February 21....................................... Presidents’ Day — no school March 1 ................................ Parent/teacher conferences 4-8 p.m.

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New Vision Charter School 2010-11 Calendar

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Inspiring Changes Thompson Education Foundation supports district with funding

founded by a group of concerned community members over twenty years ago and has continued to be a community-run foundation. The board of directors is made up primarily of community members that understand the value of K-12 education and the need for further funding and support of new educational developments. MECHELLE MARTZ-MAYFIELD The funds that Thompson Education FoundaTHOMPSON EDUCATION FOUNDATION tion provides for projects and programs comes from community businesses, individuals and groups who feel that educational support is not resident Obama gave over $900,000 to only a way to give back, but a way to improve educational charities from his Nobel Prize upon the education that is being provided to winnings. His commitment to education the youth in Thompson School District. and the development of youth is inspiring. BeWith the intent of supporting greater inspirayond any politics, education should be an imtion for our children to learn, the Thompson portant priority for all our children. The youth Education Foundation will begin to raise funds of our nation need support and inspiration to for an Arts & Technology initiative that it adoptsucceed in the 21st century. We all can be an ined late last year. After examining the needs in spiration to the students of our schools. As a the Thompson School District, it was discovered community, we can support the educational efthat often the arts were not receiving the fundforts of the Thompson School District in many ing needed to provide new technologies for stuways. dents. At the K-12 grade levels, school foundations Students with at least two years or more of are primarily established to help support traditional or performing arts classes have schools and districts in areas that they might scored over 45 points higher than average on not be able to fully fund, or fund at all, and to their SAT exams and traditionally perform betprovide educational opportunities that go above ter in reading and math classes. The arts have and beyond typical day-to-day classroom learnproven to help student achievement and proing. The Thompson Education Foundation was mote a positive student environment. Consider-

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ing 21st century learning practices, the Thompson Education Foundation Board of Directors decided that providing funding for technology for the arts throughout the district is important for our students’ achievement. After many focus groups and community discussions on what this particular initiative will look like, the foundation is now ready to move forward in finding partnerships, community funding and grants that will help to fund technology for art and music programs throughout the district. With this new initiative, Thompson Education Foundation is challenged to raise funds and operate on a minimal budget without a single fulltime staff member. Because of this, Thompson Education Foundation is working to develop its volunteer base to help keep it running and to develop new offerings and programs. The foundation is in need of community volunteers to help it thrive and become an effective partner in education. Volunteers can help with office operations, a variety of communication areas, events and fundraising. Though having volunteers will be new to the foundation, it is hoped that we can grow a group of volunteers that will want to grow with us! Mechelle Martz-Mayfield can be reached at 613-5067.

Schoolwork and stress: 5 ways to help a child HEIDI STEVENS MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE

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1. TALK TO THE TEACHERS “Establish a dialogue on homework policies from the beginning, including how involved you’re expected to be,” suggests Susan Kane, editor-in-chief of Parenting: School Years magazine.

some children it can be helpful to have some active playtime after school. A lot depends on your child’s temperament.”

toring comes in many forms these days: expensive learning centers, private tutors, homework helpers,” Kane said. “Which one, if any, to pick depends on your child’s temperament, learning style and needs, not to mention what you can afford.”

3. MAKE A SCHEDULE Once you’ve established peak performance time, put it in writing. “On Sunday night, make a schedule for the week,” Kane said. “Put big 5. STAY POSITIVE. things like homework assignments and after“You don’t want to add to the stress,” Stott school activities on a calendar, so when a task is said. “You want to add to the coping.” completed your child can cross it off.” “If you’re overly critical of your child’s work, 4. SEEK OUTSIDE HELP she’ll get discouraged,” Kane said. “Remember that she’s just a kid and is learning to handle an Calling on a third party can be a huge help. increasingly large workload with each grade levMost public libraries offer on-site homework el. Focus on the effort or creativity she puts in, help. Many Web sites offer online tutoring rather than on errors or how much time she (homeworkhelp.com is a good place to start). Then there are good old-fashioned tutors. “Tu- spends on a project.”

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2. MAKE SURE YOU UNDERSTAND HIS OR HER DEFINITION OF HOMEWORK “Typically the purpose is to practice what is already known, with the theory that time on task helps them learn,” said Frances Stott, professor of child development at the Erikson Institute. “Find out if the material is being taught in class. And if it’s something the child is having trouble with, ask if the teacher can provide extra support during class.” If you sense your child is overloaded, request another meeting. “Ask how long she expects her assignments to take,” Kane said. “Compare that to the 10-minutes-per-grade-level guideline (how long homework should take) and how long it actually takes your child. “Avoid being accusatory, but rather enlist the teacher as an ally. Together, develop a solution.” Find the optimal homework time. After school works great for some kids, not so great for others. “Some children are really alert and can do homework in the morning,” Stott said. “For some children you’re asking for trouble dragging them out of bed to do homework. For

BACK TO SCHOOL/Reporter-Herald

f you’re still plagued by show-up-for-the-final-and-realize-you’ve-never-been-to-class nightmares, you know schoolwork anxiety is no small matter. So how do you help your kids cope before stress tanks their confidence and their grades? Here are five steps to help strike the right balance and keep schoolwork from overwhelming your child.

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