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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010 3 I Do is produced by the Loveland Reporter-Herald. For advertising information, call 970-669-5050. For editorial information, e-mail editor Jade Cody at jcody@reporter-herald.com or call 970-635-3656. Contact reporter Rhema Muncy at rmuncy@reporter-herald.com or 970-635-3684.

inside this issue Spring, 2010

7 Down the Aisle Rhema Muncy dishes on planning that monumental first kiss at her wedding

8 Wedding Cake Alternatives What to serve if you don’t want cake

10 Dance the Night Away Couples sparkle during first dance

14 Blast from the Past Loveland couple’s 1959 wedding

also inside: A little wedding inspiration...............................pg. 4 Recent weddings in Northern Colorado...........pg. 5 Ask a wedding planner.......................................pg. 6 Local wedding jewelry.......................................pg. 16 Escort cards make a statement........................pg. 19 Find wedding gowns to fit your budget...........pg. 20 Countdown checklist to your wedding...........pg. 22

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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

A little inspiration Hanging Garden Make these tissue paper peonies to hang from the ceiling for the reception. Find directions at www.marthastewartweddings.com/ article/tissue-paper and click on the pom-poms and luminarias link. Order whole sale tissue paper from www.papermart.com for as low as one penny per sheet.

Groom’s Cake Throwback

Go ahead and let him play video games at the wedding or indulge in your own classic game passions with this Pac Man-inspired groom’s cake found at www.technobob.com.

Fine Wine For a one-of-a-kind wedding drink, head to Vintages in Old Town Fort Collins to hand select your own wine and create your own label. Pay whole sale prices when your purchase by the case. Log onto www.vintageswine.com

One-day wedding Now here is a myth buster: weddings don’t take forever to plan. The “Improv Everywhere” troupe staged a wedding for a random real bride and groom they found exiting the Manhattan courthouse steps. Improv Everywhere put the event together in one day with a borrowed tent, stand-in bridal party, a cake and gifts. There was dancing, toasts and the bride was able to dance with her real father, although a stand-by father was at the scene if needed. See more details at www.improveverywhere.com/2009/06/02/ surprise-wedding-reception/.

DIY Invitation Design Loveland-based graphic designer Margaret Southworth offers graphics for brides to use when creating their own wedding invitations. This swanky chandelier is part of a series with several colors and styles. Purchase her file downloads at www. etsy.com/shop/masouth.


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Just Married Recent newlyweds in the area

Photos courtesy Chris Gentile Photography

Clockwise from above: Natalie & Matt Clair, married on Oct. 4, 2009; Leigh & Joe Munchak married on Sept. 2, 2009; Danielle & Ryan Haney married on Oct. 15, 2009; Liz & Joe Dudek, married on Jan. 18, 2009; Colyn & Aaron Wolfe, married on Aug. 21, 2009.


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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

Ask a wedding planner Tips for preparing your own food for the reception

that if you and your family and invited, what to serve, what friends are working on your family members should be inwedding day, you might not volved, etc. How do we gracehave the time to relax and en- fully stick up for ourselves? joy yourself. If the thought of Answer: Weddings can be HEATHER DWIGHT tion are you going for (i.e., ap- this stresses you out then tricky events that bring up a FOR THE REPORTER-HERALD petizers, buffet or plated) and maybe hiring in some profeslot of emotions and unsolicited do you have the experience to sionals to help would be a good advice from all. It’s best for you uestion: We are con- pull this off for the number of idea. You could even just hire and your fiancé to have a sidering cooking our guests you are expecting? Can servers to help with serving, reconversation and be on the own food for our you ensure that the food will plenishing and clean up. same page about your goals for wedding. What are be of good quality and will Question: A lot of people your wedding and try to stick some ideas to save money and safety standards be considered? are volunteering for our wedto this throughout the planmake the process easier? Who will be responsible for re- ding. Should they be given any ning process. plenishing the food, utensils, Answer: In theory this type of compensation for their If people make unwanted sounds like a great idea but in plates and beverages as it services? If so, what is accept- suggestions, politely thank the end it could be much more needs restocking? able? them for their ideas and let of a hassle than you and your Some options that could Answer: How wonderful them know you’ll consider it. If fiancé want to deal with on make it more feasible and enthat you have such great help. their idea is completely out of your wedding day. There are a joyable for you and your guests If the people volunteering are the question, politely thank lot of factors to look into when would be if you have a friend friends or family, a small gift as them but let them know that considering cooking your own who is familiar with catering or a token of your appreciation you are planning on going in a food for your wedding. if friends and family would like would be a lovely gesture. A different direction. How many guests will you be to do a less formal, potluck bottle of wine, dinner at their If you have family members serving? What style of recepstyle reception. Keep in mind favorite restaurant and a gift that are contributing to your certificate for a pedicure are all budget, you can expect a bit of things that would be appropri- input and involvement from ate. Accompany all gifts with a them. Their financial contribuhand-written thank you note. tion doesn’t give them the fiIf the volunteers are not nal say – however, by accepting friends or family members but their contribution, you might are friends of friends or people at least have to entertain and just helping out for the day, potentially compromise on a then monetary compensation few of the items. Again, comwould be appropriate and mon courtesies and manners would be appreciated by them. go a long way when dealing Again, a hand-written note with family members and their should accompany the tip. unsolicited advice. By thanking them and trying to get them Question: My fiancé and I involved in the parts of the tend to be people pleasers. wedding you know they are on We’ve already experienced people strongly stating opinions board with, you may have an easier time navigating the parts about the details of our wedCustom wedding cakes • Grooms’ cakes ding — such as who should be that create the tension. • Shower cakes • Cupcake Wedding Cakes • Specialty flavors Heather Dwight is Call for your free consultation today! the owner of Calluna Events, LLC, an event planning business located in Boulder. She can be reached at 808 14th St. SW • Loveland 667-9811 303-443-4617 or at 5750 West 10th St. • Greeley www.CallunaEvents.com. 970-475-0550 www.schmidtsbakery.com

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Down the Aisle RHEMA MUNCY SPECIAL SECTIONS REPORTER

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his moment filled my dreams from the first time I watched the movie “Cinderella” when I was three. Right before the stroke of midnight, Charming plants a sweet one on the beautifully gowned peasant girl. In a few months, my Cinderella moment will be here, but I’m nervous about this romantic wedding tradition. First of all, hands, elbows and arms refuse to behave when a kiss is in full swing. Then try adding ultra formal attire, lipstick, stilettos, the sun shining overhead and grandma sitting in the front row. Cinderella sure had it easy when she kissed her prince charming in the privacy of his ball room. I just hope my upper lip brow doesn’t sweat and make Matt’s lips slip before we seal the deal. There are many factors to consider when thinking about the first kiss as a married couple. Remember, this lip-lock action will forever fill the memory of your future children through modern technology’s millions of digital photos, happily provided by all of the wedding guests uploading their horribly shaky and grainy snap shots onto Facebook the same night of the wedding. The best course of action, then, is to not let the kiss set an ambush of

Where Dreams...

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How to avoid a kiss catastrophe

this moment. It is great for the wedding gifts back home with planned kiss dip. them. • The French Kiss — A I am also concerned about a stand-by for all romantics, this few other things. What in the kiss can be tactfully done with world am I supposed to do a hint of passion while putting with my veil when Matt wants it all out there. Grandma to kiss me as his new bride? should buckle up for a wild What if our kiss becomes a ride with this one. tango that topples us off the • The Passionate Get-astage? I think we will settle in embarrassment. A thorough way — Firm lips pressed toon the loose lips sandwich tacknowledge bank of the types of gether with the grooms arms tic, draw up a game plan on kisses out there should allevi- gently cradling the bride’s the white board and get to ate this threat. This list should head complete this perfect mopracticing. I hope we can recover all of the kisses wedding ment. The bride and groom member all of the methods we history: get so lost in their love for learned in kissing school, but • The Tactful Kiss — This each other that the audience come drool or perfect moment, family-friendly lip-lock ingets uncomfortable. I know the only thing that will volves four feet of room be• The Enthusiastic Maul matter is that we made it tween the bride and groom, — Falling slightly short of a down the aisle. hands tucked behind the back passionate Tarzan call, and a lean at a perfect angle to this kiss breaks all public allow slightly parted lips to Rhema Muncy display of affection rules brush. can be reached and confers a great • The Peck, Hug and at 970-635-3684 Grin — This kiss is a great ice emotional release from or by e-mail at all of the stress of wedbreaker for those who are rmuncy@ ding planning. Keep this slightly petrified of public disreportertype of kiss to a miniplays of affection. Simply peck herald.com with lips splayed like a fan, hug mum in order to keep guests from taking their (but no manly back slaps please) and grin. • The Looney Toons smooch — Sound effects are all the rage these days, and this kiss is full of them. Have a competition to see how big of a popping noise you can make. • The Giggler — After the minister declares you man and become reality wife, if giggling ensues, this kiss is guaranteed to have a few The Ranch provides the perfect location for your nose bubbles. wedding ceremony & reception with both indoor • The She’s in Control and outdoor space as well as the breath-taking kiss — This kiss lets the entire view of the Front Range from our popular audience know who wears the 5280 Arena Circle rehearsal dinner site. pants in the relationship and Loveland, Colorado seems to be timed by her interWedding packages include: I-25 & Crossroads Blvd. Exit nal clock. The groom better Room Rental & Set Up Fee watch out for his new tigress. 970.619.4058 Pipe and Drape Treatments • The Great Hammie — If Champagne or Sparkling Cider Toast rprawdzik@larimer.org the groom grew up as the class Coffee Service Silver, Glass and China Service clown, he might shock his Tables & Chairs bride by cradling her, dipping Table Linens her and adding a face-sucking Cake & Guest Book Tables with Linens motion to the moment. This Staging for Band/DJ and Head Table usually garners oohs and ahhs Cake Cutting Service from the crowd but could inOn-Site Event Coordinator volve a slap from the bride. • The Loose Lips Sandwich — Loose and slightly lu- Packages start at $35 per person. bricated lips relax and meet for


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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

Decadent endings tradition to what people want to do anymore,” said Dorthy Skroch of Dorothy’s Catering. “There are so many blendings of different types of ethnic backgrounds and family types and regional types. What kids RHEMA MUNCY SPECIAL SECTIONS REPORTER remember from when they were growing up and what they like is what people are reamy icing, moist flavors and mini cake bringing into their marriages. They want it to be more perfights accompany this darling of every wedding. sonal.” People tend to choose a From rolling fondant extravawedding cake alternative to gance to simple tiered decamake their wedding different dence, Northern Colorado from other weddings in the weddings shine the spotlight area. Several brides opt to do on the sweet ending. Ala small cake for photographs though most local brides and and then either serve sheet grooms prefer simple cakes, cake to the guests or go with area caterers are seeing a a different desert entirely, number of brides branch into such as a chocolate fountain other desert options to both or ice cream sundae bar. wow their guests and offer a When planning an alternaglimpse of their own sweet tive dessert, factor in how to tooth preferences. serve a large number of peo“There isn’t a whole lot of ple smoothly.

Wedding desserts not limited to cake

C

“A dessert bar might be good for 8-10 people, but when it becomes 200 or more people, that’s a different story,” Skroch said. “An ice cream bar is not easy to pull off with 200 people, but if it is done in stations and the right way, it will work. The ice cream sundae and the chocolate fountain are the messiest ones.” Cupcakes are one of the top dessert alternatives Skroch is asked to design because no one has to cut a cake. “They can change the flavors and colors and do butterflies and ribbons and you can put them on tiered cake stands,” she said. “With cupcakes, I don’t think people realize 250 portions is a lot of boxes of cupcakes. Know where to store them and have people to put them out.” Anything can be miniatur-

Sarah Lee Welch photography

A tiered cupcake dessert at an August 2009 wedding at the McCreery House in Loveland.

ized when planning a dessert bar. When brides decide to opt for a different type of dessert, Skroch never hears negative comments from guests. “People think it is fun,” she said. “Their only confusion is about when to eat the desserts so that people don’t take it before time.” Loveland wedding planner Lyndsay Stark of Stark Wedding Consulting has seen a lot of non-traditional wedding cake ideas popping up in Northern Colorado weddings. “The past 10 years have been all traditional cakes,” Stark said. “Now it is becoming more people wanting to be remembered for their Sarah Lee Welch photography wedding.” This ice cream sundae bar complemented a traditional cake and a grooms cake at a One of her brides decided to place a different flavor of wedding in February of 2009 at Wild Basin Lodge in Allens Park.


Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010 9 the sweet end of the celebration. “Dessert bars would be awesome,” Carter said. “Candies, truffles and pie bars, or do individual tortes like black forest, caramel cakes, lavas and stuff like that. Just go in there, stack it up and wow your guests.” She would love to cater an abundant fall wedding with cascading autumn desserts and a lavishly decorated table. The last few years, the cake or dessert have not been the focus of receptions due to budget constraints, but she sees clients opening up to new options again. “If you are going for the more upscale high-end tortes, chocolates and other high end desserts, the price will be up there,” Carter said. Lower-priced dessert alternatives could be cookies, cobblers, bread puddings and individual creme brules. If the cake route is still desired, clients don’t need to have the cake slices match the amount of people. “If you are going to have food and alcohol, you really don’t need that much cake,” Carter said. “If it is cut right, you will have enough cake for everyone. If you are doing 150 people, you really need cake for 80. A lot of people are going to [grocery] stores. They are getting the cheaper part, but they aren’t getting the quality.”

Cake Alternatives The world of wedding desserts offers far more than the traditional white three tier wedding cake. Below are some ideas from Lyndsay Stark of Stark Wedding Consulting: • Assorted candies • Assorted individual cakes for each guest • Ice Cream bar • White chocolate fountain colored to match the theme • Fruit arrangements as center pieces • Cheesecake • Tiered puddings and mousses • Tiered pastries • Chocolate covered strawberries designed to look like tuxes and gowns • Sugar sculptures • Stacked cheeses to resemble a tiered cake for a wine and cheese weddings • Ice sculptures • Frosted cookies • Theme cakes • Pie bars

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cake at each table to get guests mingling, talking and sampling. Another bride decided to forego sweets altogether by placing an ice sculpture with fruit and shrimp on the cake table. A wedding Stark helped plan in December of 2009 opted for a $50 three-tier cardboard cake with fondant decoration. Guests were served from a sheet cake kept in the kitchen. “It looked like a real cake, and they saved a lot of money, and no one knew but me, the bride and the groom,” Stark said. “Anywhere brides can save money is the way to go now.” Another popular dessert choice is the pie bar. Stark recommended a buffet-style pie table with a dessert guard to make sure guests take only the right amount. “I like it when pies are placed on pillars at different heights,” Stark said. “You can have different columns to make them pretty for photos. The caterer might have them, or you can rent them.” Holly Carter of Carter’s Creative Catering is a pastry chef from Hollywood who is working to expand Loveland’s wedding dessert expectations. Most of her clients feel they have to keep their desserts traditional, and she is waiting for a bride to let her have free reign over


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Dance

Make the first dance one to remember JENNIFER LEHMAN SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF WRITER

Me L

with

earning to waltz in the kitchen with dad or siblings or even at charm or cotillion classes is a rarity these days, leading many couples to take dance lessons to put together a routine for their first dance as newlyweds. “[Newlywed couples] really just want to share this

Photo by Christina Gressianu

Stephanie and Skip Way perform the first dance at their wedding.

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experience with others,” said Debra Endres, dance instructor and owner of Okay Dance in Loveland. “They want to share their joy of being married, they want it to be memorable and they don’t want to look foolish on the floor. They don’t want to look awkward,” she said. “We didn’t want to do the Frankenstein dance as our first dance,” Joanna Fetherholf said of the choreographed tango routine she and her husband Justin did at their September wedding with the help of Endres. “We wanted it to be something people watched and were entertained by.” The first dance is about the newlyweds, but is inherently a public performance with couples choosing how much drama, humor and surprise they want to incorporate. Stephanie and Skip Way of Fort Collins made a point of catching their audience off guard at their wedding reception in September by dancing to a slow song to start off with and then doctoring the CD with the sound of a scratched record before transitioning into a fun, upbeat dance to the popular song “I know you want me” by Pitbull. “Nobody would expect him to do anything like that,” Stephanie said of her husband, Skip, who she described as reserved. The dance then faded back to the original slow song. The Ways choreographed first dance was kept a secret from their guests as was the Fetherholfs’ choreographed tango at their wedding reception. “We kept it a pretty good secret,” Fetherholf said. “We told people we were taking dance lessons but we didn’t tell them we were doing a choreographed tango. It was kind of more fun — if you mess up no one knew about it anyway.” The time frame needed to put together a choreographed first dance depends on the needs and schedules of the couples, but Endres recommends setting up lessons three months in advance. The fancier or more sophisticated the

Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010 11

Photos by Christina Gressianu

Stephanie and Skip Way of Fort Collins surprised their audience by starting off their first dance slow, then finishing in a choreographed dance to “I know you want me” by Pitbull. dance, the more time is required. Some of her students who have chosen to do things like full-fledged tango routines have seen her up to a year before the big day. “If you go to the high end with a stylish, sophisticated dance, that takes a lot of effort,” Endres said. The Fetherholfs were both so busy that they started taking lessons five months in advance, with one lesson per month. One couple that came to Endres only had time for one lesson but because of their ability, were still able to get a little bit of an entrance and solidify how they moved together on the floor. “It can be a little bit more than the high school sway to something as elaborate as a tango routine and anything in between,” Endres said. Most couples are looking to create something memorable with their first dance, and it gives the couple something they can have complete control over together on the big day, Endres said. There really is no limit to what couples can do. The flashiness of the dance de-

pends on what the couple wants, what they can afford, what their abilities are and how much time they to schedule lessons and learn the dance. Endres said nerves often dictate what the couple is comfortable with pulling off. “They need to be able to feel that they can accomplish what we’re setting out to do on the dance floor so they that don’t feel overwhelmed,” Endres said. Choosing to take dance lessons as a couple and preparing for the first wedding dance can have a lasting impact for some. The first dance is an important part of the wedding reception for newlyweds but it can also be the start of something much bigger for the relationship. “As couples grow, it is the best form of communicating, it’s the only activity where you’re really in each other’s arms,” Endres said. “I think dancing is one of those life long activities that help keep couples together. You have to learn how to communicate and share your feelings and dancing helps you bring that out in a positive way.”


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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

Blast from the Past Lovelanders celebrate 50th anniversary, look back on wedding JADE CODY SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR

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magine a wedding without a dance, a disc jockey, a catered reception, cutesy table centerpieces and whitedraped seating for 350 in an elegant banquet hall. And think of trading vows without a slide show, a dance party or a white limousine waiting outside.

Welcome to 1959. That was the year Beth and Jim Crowder tied the knot at the First Methodist Church in Loveland. “It was much more simple back then,” Beth said. “You just had to make sure the church was available.” The Crowders’ serendipitous love story was nothing less than

Clockwise from top: Beth and Jim Crowder standing with parents Mr. and Mrs. O.N. Eberhart of Johnstown and Mr. and Mrs. A. Crowder of Louisville, Ky.; Beth and Jim in 2009; Beth feeds cake to Jim at their 1959 wedding reception. Photos courtesy Beth and Jim Crowder


Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010 15 extraordinary, however. They met while Beth served as a flight attendant for Trans World Airlines. She was serving on a flight to Las Vegas — a plane that Jim happened to be on after winning a trip as a result of working for as a dealer for General Electric. There were 81 men on the plane, and one caught Beth’s eye during her preflight seatbelt check, though she hadn’t mentioned it to anyone, including Jim. It happened that Jim and one of his buddies talked the other hostess on the flight into going out that night, and the other hostess asked Beth if she would like to come along. The two men decided which girls they wanted to go out with and Jim chose Beth. “We spent the whole night out,” Beth said. “We went to a couple shows and dinner. I knew I liked him really well and that we had a lot in common.” Jim and Beth hit it off so well that they eventually began to write letters to each other every day, and they met for a few visits in Louisville, where Jim lived at the time. After about a year, Jim asked Beth to marry him. The Lovelanders celebrated their 50th anniversary on September 6. At the wedding, the Crowders, their four attendants and a crowd of approximately 75 people were in attendance. Following the double ring ceremony, the Crowders’ greeted guests with background music performed by a pianist. “We had a typical church fellowship reception with punch and cake,” she said. Little bowls of nuts and mints were available as well. After spending their first night as husband and wife at the Brown Palace in Denver, The Crowders’ enjoyed a 12 day honeymoon at Grand Bahama Island. Looking back, Beth said the key to a long lasting marriage is to give and take, and deciding what is most important for the relationship. She said being supportive is essential. If 50 happy years are any indication, it seems the Crowders’ have a little Vegas luck and a lot of love to celebrate.

Then and Now: The average cost of a wedding It’s no secret that weddings have gotten increasingly expensive in the past 60 years. According to The Wedding Report, the cost has risen substantially since 1945, $22,120 with the average cost reaching nearly $29,000 in 2007 and coming back down to $15,200 $22,000 in the third quarter of 2009. $2,240 1945

1990

2009

Photos courtesy Beth and Jim Crowder

Beth Crowder, above, gets help from an attendant before her wedding. Below, the crowd lines up to meet the newly married couple.


Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

Subtle Elegance Loveland Shade Tree Artist Marion Simmons of Loveland mixes vintage pieces, crystals and other interesting beads to make jewelry that will fit into any bride’s ensemble. “I like to think my jewelry says, ‘I am a beautiful, confident woman,’” Simmons said. The price range of wedding jewelry is from $16 to $60. She is open to custom orders, although many of the pieces she makes are one-of-a-kind creations. For more information, log onto www.lovelandshadetree.etsy.com.

RHEMA MUNCY SPECIAL SECTIONS

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Brillig and Babble Altered art creator Stephen Zapatka of Longmont uses just about any household flat surface to craft his keepsakes. Using photos from a bride’s wedding, Zapatka will make each piece with any color theme and preference, including specific semi-precious stones of provided charms. He also creates these bracelets for honeymoon photos, anniversaries, children, grandchildren and pets. The pieces can be fashioned around any type of wedding theme and could be used as a family tree piece worn for the wedding day. Each keepsake bracelet goes for $100 and up, depending on the materials used, all of which are determined by the customer. For more information and to view samples of Zapatka’s work, check out his site at www.etsy.com/shop/BrilligAndBabble. Top right and directly right, the collage memory charm bracelets crafted with photos from the big day. Bracelets can be stored in a frame for a keepsake. Photos courtesy Stephen Zapatka

Dreams of Jewels Loveland Artist Aleia Kurtz officially started creating her floral-inspired pieces two years ago after family and friends encouraged her to expand her passion. “My jewelry can range from simply stated and elegant to bold and exciting,” Kurtz said. “It feels good to help on such a special day.” Her jewelry can be made into matching sets for the entire bridal party and she accepts custom orders. Her jewelry can be made to fit any where from an elegant and classy wedding to a wild and sassy party. Photos courtesy Aleia Kurtz Kurtz specializes in floral designed The romantic floral jewelry crafted by earrings. The prices range from $12 Aleia Kurtz are available in many $25 for each piece. Log onto www.etsy.com/shop/aleia24 for more colors. I See Jewelry/Page 18 information.


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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

Two in a Tree Longmont artists Kit Colorado and Sharri Shaw specialize in up-cycled jewelry to compliment eco-conscious brides and customers. Other pieces range from edgy to traditional. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and utilizes various textures and materials. They will work with a bride to create exactly what she envisions for her wedding day jewelry. “We love creating pieces that are a reflection of the customer and designer’s vision through the use of vintage, second-hand, new and custom-made materials,” Colorado said. Prices on earrings range from $8 to $12. Necklaces range from $18 to $30. For more information, log onto www.etsy.com/shop/kitcolorado. A few up-cycled pieces created by Two in a Tree. Each piece of jewelry is unique, and the artists also offer traditional material work. Photos courtesy Kit Colorado

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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010 19

good boy! designs Loveland Artist Sarah Hunt started her jewelry business in 2009 out of a love for making jewelry and with a little inspiration from a dog named Jack. “All of my jewelry is made with any combination of sterling silver, glass beads, semi-precious gemstones, mixed metals and lead free stained glass,” Hunt said. Hunt can create custom orders for any type of wedding. Her jewelry ranges in price from $10 - $60. To see the jewelry, log onto www.etsy.com/shop/SarahEmilyHunt.

Top, a bracelet by Sarah Hunt. Below, a fused glass necklace and earring set. RH photos/Paul Litman

Escort cards make a statement Add dramatic flare for the first glance of the guests JOHN LABBE CTW FEATURES

P

reston Bailey travels the world planning and executing lavish events, the most recent of which being the October 2009 wedding of Ivanka Trump. Fresh off creating a wedding and with the release of a new book, “Preston Bailey Celebrations” (Rizzoli, 2009), the party maestro gives brides a few style pointers for their big day. Question: You’re big on dramatic statements. What’s a simple, easy way to create a dramatic statement for a wedding? Answer: The escort card table is a great place to create a dramatic statement — it’s the first thing the guest sees, and it is the moment they are most likely remember. A simple way is to assign a flower for each guest at the card table, just as I did

CTW photo

for Ivanka Trump’s wedding, in which each guest had a gardenia in floating water next to their names. Question: What types of colors and flowers do you like for 2010? Answer: I tend to pay a lot of attention to the fashion shows in Paris and New York; they usually work six months ahead of time, so it’s great inspiration. For 2010, I noticed a lot of deep purple. Question: Do you have any do’s and don’ts for centerpieces? Answer: I treat my centerpieces as dramatic statements full of layers and surprises. I love to create a piece that not only has great flowers but shows tons of intricate details. I tend to

keep away from anything that looks too forced. Besides that, the sky is the limit. Question: You say beauty is in the details. Any suggestions for keeping details top of mind when brides have so many things to plan and keep track of? Answer: I think that the bride should keep in mind that the beauty of all details are what her team will execute for her. She simply needs to share her vision and lets us worry about all those wonderful details. Of course, if she is working alone, a trusted friend or freelance wedding organizer for the day could be a great tool.


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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

The best

dress for your

Budget NOLA SARKISIAN-MILLER CTW FEATURES

J

ust five years ago, if a bride wanted to spend $1,000 or less for a wedding gown, most often she was relegated to designer sample sales or mass-market bridal discounters. Enter the tanking economy, the ensuing recession and the subsequent wedding budget crunch, and

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designers and manufacturers are quickly hitching their companies to a new trend: creating up-market gowns for under a grand. Bridal lines such as Watters are prominently highlighting the category on their Web sites and in their magazine ads. Others have unveiled new secondary lines, such as Alfred Angelo’s Niki Bridal. And new, modern designers are stepping out, including Ceec Design and Alix & Kelly, infusing their collections with influences from contemporary fashions, and finding reception with equally minded boutiques.

CTW Features

Spaghetti strap tea-length silk taffeta dress with gathered tulle trim from Alix & Kelly ($650).

$1,000 gown and splurge on $700 shoes that she can wear again and again. “As a result, the stigma of penny-pinching when it comes to wedding planning is in freefall, say wedSplurge and Steal The category certainly got a ding experts. “There may have been a boost when destination wedstigma in the past where brides dings became the rage in the maybe felt the more you spent last decade. Brides sought more sand-friendly gowns that on a wedding gown, the better could billow before the ocean. it was, but the change in econCompanies like Nicole Miller omy has opened everyone’s eyes to the quality and style and J. Crew have benefited that can be found at lower from that trend. From there, price points,” said Melissa some brides became more atAkey Drayer, owner and detuned to ready-to-wear looks and have embraced the high- signer of Thread. If a bride low mentality of pairing expen- feels like she’s giving up somesive, designer duds with mass- thing at this less stratospheric market accessories or vice ver- cost, most designers insist that they’re able to deliver on sa, says Maria Prince, vice president of Dallas-based Wat- craftsmanship without sacrificing on styling. Even those ters Brides. brides interested in their fairy “This is a generation of tale moment can find less exsplurge and steal buying,” pensive ball gowns, which typiPrince said. “She’ll buy a

cally cost more due to extra fabric. Wtoo Brides offers an A-line look with waist beading at $990. For their spring offerings, designers don’t seem to be cutting corners. There’s a return to romance for designers, says Michael Shettel, head designer of Alfred Angelo. Brides will find gowns with floatier fabrics, like crinkle chiffon, satin organzas and airy taffetas. Body hugging styles with dropped waists and trumpet skirts are in, as are one-shoulder looks, a trend brought to the forefront with Michelle Obama’s inaugural gown. Dimensional flowers are getting played up along with beaded sashes and new textured ornamentation, like newly shaped stones at Wtoo. Anxious brides can take heart in a new feature offered on dresses. “We’re adding sideslit pockets to some gowns for


Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010 21 nervous hands,” Shettel said. “It’s like their good luck charm.”

The Wedding Dress Experience Should a bride stick to a $1,000 wedding dress budget, most designers say she’ll still get the red-carpet treatment when buying her gown, from making an appointment to working with a wedding consultant through the entire dress-buying process. Unless she visits a bigger bridal chain store where she can buy off the rack, she’ll most likely have to order her dress, which can take up to three months. Some purchases can be trickier, like buying J. Crew gowns, which are sold only online. Under each dress description is a note to contact J. Crew’s wedding specialist for help with the gown purchase. A few stores, such as Tom’s Bridal in Anaheim, Calif., may charge for gown fittings but will deduct it from the purchase price of a gown

should a customer buy it. “We don’t look at how much she spends,” said Aubree Cummings, a sales rep for Celebrations Bridal, a Las Vegas-based bridal gown store in business for 22 years. “Whatever she spends, we treat the customer the same. A bride walks in the door, and whoever greets her stays with her through the entire process.” Vendors say the growing category is opening new doors of distribution. “Retailers all over the country that used to sell gowns for thousands of dollars are looking for vendors to give them the same quality that won’t break their budget,” said Omid Moradi, CEO of Faviana, which designs special occasion gowns, including a White Collection of wedding gowns. “We’ve recently met with a couple of national stores who are interested in our line.”

CTW Features photos

Above: Chiffon gown with beaded empire waist from Faviana ($300). Left: Lace and chiffon gown with crystal beading and sweep train from Niki Bridal ($429). Far left: Alfred Angelo’s charmeuse over satin dress with rhinestones, sequins and chapel train, left ($799).

Find chic, affordable bridal fashions If You Budget is $1,000 ... Here are a few highlights of the season grouped by price point. Some of the best gowns available at the $1,000 and under price point (not including tax and alterations) include: Saja Inc.’s empire waist gown made of crinkle chiffon and lightly dotted with handbeaded glass and crystals at the bust line. $925. Ceec Design’s strapless gown in silk georgette with cascading tiers and a silk charmeuse bow on the back. $950. Wtoo Brides’ pleated tulle, trumpet gown. $940. JCrew.com’s limited edition confetti dress, made in Irish linen with a

tulle overlay sprinkled with tiers of delicately embroidered disks. $995. Nicole Miller’s stretch metal and silk gown. $880.

dress in silk taffeta with gathered tulle trim. $650.

Not a Penny Over $500 ...

So, how low can you go when shopping for a dress with bespoke allure? Drop down a few Benjamins and Some designers and companies are brides can look great in these gowns rolling out options that are under $500, priced at $799 or less: Wtoo Brides’ including: Thread’s one-shouldered floor-length baby-doll style with pleated floor length gown with a high-waisted flowers and pockets. $725. Alfred Ange- skirt in matte silk. $480. Niki Bridal’s lo’s charmeuse over satin dress adorned lace and chiffon gown with crystal beadwith rhinestones, pearls and sequins ing and sweep train. $429. Faviana’s with a chapel train. $799. Saja’s sheer chiffon gown with beaded empire waist. panel v-neck dress with a v-back. $790. $300. JCrew.com’s silk tricotine v-neck Alix & Kelly’s spaghetti strap tea-length gown with cap sleeves. $395.

If Your Budget is $800 ...


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Sunday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/I DO January 31, 2010

Countdown to the blissful life

T

• Meet with your caterer to diso get things started, discuss finances with everyone contribut- cuss menu and drinks. ing to the event and set a budget. • Order the cake. Then set the date and the ceremony and • Pick out favors. reception locations, establish a guest list • Plan and shop for welcome and start gown shopping. Start thinking bags. about the style and theme of your wed• Arrange party rentals, if necesding.. sary. • Book your wedding-night room. 6-9 Months Before • Mail out Save-the-Dates • Interview and book your vendors; don't forget to get a signed contract. • Choose your attendants; shop for their dresses. • Order your stationery. • Start looking into honeymoon locales. • Register for gifts.

4-8 weeks before

4-6 months before

2-4 weeks before

• Book your hair/makeup help. • Plan the rehearsal and rehearsal dinner. • Shop for wedding bands. • Reserve a block of hotel rooms for your guests. • Finalize your honeymoon plans.

• Submit a shot list to your photographer and setlist to your DJ. • Finalize the seating chart and prepare escort/place cards. • Confirm details with your vendors. • Get your final dress fitting.

• Mail out your invites. • Do a hair/makeup run-through. • Discuss insurance/bank account changes you'll need to make. • Send ceremony programs, reception menu and place cards to be printed.

Metro Creative Services photos

who will distribute them. 1 week before • Buy attendants' gifts. • Give your caterer the final headcount. 1 day before • Get the men's fashions in order. • Pick up your dress; break in your • Get a mani-pedi. shoes. • Choose readings/music for the cere• Enjoy the rehearsal and dinner. • Pack for your honeymoon. mony. • Organize your payments and decide • Get plenty of sleep. • Check marriage-license requirements.

2-4 months before


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