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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 3

Inside

HELAiLT H ne

On the cover: The senior salsa dancing class at the Chilson Chilson Recreation Center in Loveland (RH photo by Rhema Muncy).

November, 2009

Health Line of Northern Colorado is a monthly publication produced by the Loveland Daily Reporter-Herald. The information provided in this publication is intended for personal, non-commercial, informational and entertainment purposes only and does not constitute a recommendation or endorsement with respect to any company, product, procedure or activity. You should seek the advice of a professional regarding your particular situation.

For advertising information, contact: Linda Story — 635-3614

Senior Salsa

For editorial information, contact: Jade Cody: 635-3656 jcody@reporter-herald.com

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Robotic surgery in Northern Colorado Page 14

also inside Researchers work on a nicotine vaccine................................................ pg. 4 The Healthy Plate .................................................................................... pg. 6 How Lovelanders are aging well ............................................................. pg. 8 Seniors realize the importance of socialization ................................... pg. 11 Hospitals react to swine flu threat ....................................................... pg. 13 Uncommon Sense with Loveland’s Dr. Beth Firestein ........................ pg. 17 Gluten awareness increases................................................................ pg. 18 COPD deaths to increase ..................................................................... pg. 20 Crandoodles by Steve Crandall ............................................................ pg. 21 Destination: Healthy with Amanda Wicker ........................................... pg. 22 Loveland health calendar ..................................................................... pg. 23 Loveland health briefs .......................................................................... pg. 24 The Healthy Plate .................................................................................. pg. 26

Health in a Handbasket Jade goes rock climbing

Page 25


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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

HL

Health in the News

A Vaccine for Nicotine? the lungs, then the bloodFederal stimulus through stream and into the brain. However, when nicotine is trapped by an antigrant supports body, it’s too large to get into the brain, crucial study of subverting the rewarding effects of the anti-nicotine vaccine drug. “We know that once inside the brain, The Associated Press

E

fforts to develop a vaccine capable of preventing tobacco addiction got a $10-million shot in the arm in the form of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant. The award to Nabi Biopharmaceuticals of Rockville, Md., was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The Recovery Act funds will help pay for the first pivotal phase III trial of NicVAX, an injectable vaccine intended to help people quit smoking and prevent them from relapsing. Successful completion of the study will bring the vaccine closer to final approval. Already given fast track designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, NicVAX passed initial regulatory hurdles showing the basic idea is sound. Patients in the trial get six monthly shots in the arm. Earlier results show that smokers using the vaccine had higher rates of quitting and longer term cigarette abstinence than those given a placebo. “Nicotine addiction causes nearly a half million deaths annually in the United States alone. Finding effective treatments that can help people stay off cigarettes has been a real challenge,” said NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins. “This Phase III trial of a nicotine vaccine offers tremendous hope towards solving this immense public health problem.” Annually in the U.S., cigarette smoking costs more than $193 billion ($97 billion in lost productivity and $96 billion in health care expenditures). Like other vaccines, NicVAX works by boosting the immune system. In this case, the goal is to generate antibodies that bind to nicotine. Normally, nicotine is a small molecule that travels quickly

nicotine triggers the release of dopamine, a chemical linked to pleasure and to addiction. Once a person becomes addicted, it is extremely difficult to achieve and sustain abstinence. Withdrawal symptoms, environmental cues and stress can all trigger relapse,” said NIDA Director Dr. Nora Volkow. “A vaccine that limits the ability of nicotine to enter the brain, and that is effective for six to 12 months following vaccination will give smokers a fighting chance to end the addiction/relapse cycle that plagues the great majority of smokers trying to quit.” “In the future, the anti-nicotine vaccine could also prove to be a powerful tool in smoking prevention,” Volkow said. The award continues a public-private partnership between NIDA and NABI that started in 2001 with a grant to support the basic science that led to NicVAX. The effort continued in 2005 with a grant to help support early clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of the vaccine. “The Recovery Act grant enables NABI to take the next step in the development of NicVAX. We’re delighted that NIDA has chosen to support the NicVAX program, since we think it could ultimately benefit millions of smokers worldwide,” said Dr. Raafat Fahim, president and chief executive officer of Nabi Biopharmaceuticals. The National Institute on Drug Abuse is a component of the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIDA supports most of the world’s research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction. The Institute carries out a

“In the future, the antinicotine vaccine could also prove to be a powerful tool in smoking prevention.” — Dr. Nora Volkow large variety of programs to inform policy and improve practice. Fact sheets on the health effects of drugs of abuse and information on NIDA research and other activities can be found on the NIDA home page at www.drugabuse.gov. To order publications in English or Spanish, call NIDA’s new DrugPubs research dissemination center at 1-877-NIDANIH or 240-645-0228 (TDD) or fax or requests to 240-645-0227 or e-mail drugpubs@nida.nih.gov. Order online at www.drugpubs.drugabuse.gov. NIDA’s National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is a multi-site research project of behavioral, pharmacological and integrated treatment interventions to determine effectiveness across a broad range of community-based treatment settings and diversified patient populations. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.


Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 5

Step, shimmy, repeat out a local certification for Zumba Gold, the Zumba course geared for seniors. When she couldn’t find one around she designed her own senior friendly dance aerobics class. Jennifer Lehman “The participants seem to Staff Writer enjoy the challenge of getting the steps and enjoy doroom full of senior ing the steps versus just getwomen move from ting on a cardio machine, “ shimmying shoulder said Fancannon. action to a low, hard, wiggle Nancy Jones, 64, teaches of the behind. “Shimmy!” classes in the Silver Sneakers shouts Instructor Lisa Fanprogram Monday and cannon to the participants in Wednesday at the Chilson her Senior Salsa class, guidSenior Center but comes ing them to the next move, down on Tuesdays just to “Shake it all!” take the Senior Salsa class. Shimmies, shakes, mam“She keeps us moving,” bo, salsa, merengue, square said Jones. “It’s not boring step, air guitar and the chayet it’s familiar enough that cha intermingle with aerobics during the Senior Salsa we don’t get confused.” Jones said that traditional class at the Chilson Senior dance aerobics classes or Center in Loveland. salsa classes don’t take into “It’s upbeat, it’s fun, we get to be silly,” said Instruc- account the joint issues with seniors when it comes to tor Lisa Fancannon. turns and hip work. The class started in “The class is geared toSeptember 2008 and has ward this age group, toward been going strong ever the health issues of seniors,” since. Certified in Zumba Jones said. and a range of senior pro“I have been coming to grams, Fancannon sought

Senior salsa keeps those hips moving

A

RH Photos/ Rhema Muncy Chilson Center for 16 years doing strength training which includes a little bit of aerobics,” said Barbara Lewallen, age 70. “I needed more aerobic type work and this sounded like fun. You’re exercising and you don’t realize it ... until you start perspiring.” Joann Grazier, 66, has

been participating in the class it started. “It gets my heart rate up. I like the music, I like to dance,” said Grazier. “It’s fun to be with other people.” “Who’s you’re hero?” shouts Fancannon to the class, “We are!” they respond, flexing their biceps.


Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

HL

The Healthy Plate

Parmesan-Crusted Chicken Fingers the mustard and egg whites until frothy and opaque. Dip each chicken tender in the egg white mixture, then Ingredients: Olive or vegetable oil cooking in the bread crumb mixture spray to coat all sides. Place on the 2 /3 cup panko (Japanese-style) prepared rack. breadcrumbs Spritz the top of each ten1 /4 cup grated Parmesan cheese der lightly and evenly with 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cooking spray, then turn and parsley (optional) 1 /4 teaspoon ground black pepper repeat on the other side. Bake 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard until the crumb coating is 2 egg whites golden brown and crisp and 1 pound chicken tenders the chicken is no longer pink Directions: Place a rack in at the center, about 15 to 20 minutes. Serve immediately. the top third of the oven. Heat the oven to 425 degrees. Nutrition information per Set a wire rack on a baking serving (values are rounded sheet and coat the rack light- to the nearest whole numly with cooking spray. ber): 204 calories; 24 calories from fat; 3 g fat (1 g saturatIn a shallow bowl, stir toed; 0 g trans fats); 72 mg gether the breadcrumbs, cholesterol; 13 g carbohyParmesan cheese, parsley (if using) and pepper. In another drate; 32 g protein; 0 g fiber; shallow bowl, whisk together 339 mg sodium. Start to finish: 35 minutes (15 minutes active) Servings: 4

AP photo

Parmesan-Crusted Chicken Fingers

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

Age without limits

Jupiter Images

Rhema Muncy Special Sections

A

well worn path traces the feet of Frances Whitney as she takes her regular walk. Next month she celebrates her 100th birthday and she has hardly slowed down to count the decades. For Whitney, physical activity has been a life-long journey. Walking was her family’s only means of transportation during the depression but in later years she never stopped to take her athletic shoes off. “It is important to stay active for your health more than anything,” she said. “I went in for a check-up and [the doctor] said walking is the best. It wasn’t anything new to me.” On nice weather days, Whitney walks with her helper around the church parking lot near her house or when running errands they will park as far from the building as possible. To keep her mind sharp, Whitney devours reading materials. She receives books through the Loveland Library Homebound delivery program.

“I read all kinds of novels and histories, and I travel while sitting in my chair,” she said. Frances Whitney’s family has been celebrating her big birthday all year. She is thankful for her upstanding health and she hasn’t followed any gimmicks to achieve so many happy years. “I haven’t done anything special,” Whitney said. “Just watch your diet and use common sense. That is the only thing I do.” Loveland resident Carroll, a retired classical guitarist, takes weekly walks with the Body, Mind and Spirit walking group at the Seasons Club. With three other ladies, she takes a few laps around McKee Medical Center’s wellness track. Other days of the week she participates in a heart wellness program and a Tai Chi class. “Activities make me feel good,” Carroll said. “You use it or you lose it. Exercise makes me feel better physically, mentally and emotionally.” On one weekly walk, Carroll chatted with her close-

knit walking group girls and expressed a grateful heart for life. “It is such a blessing. The beauty around us is overwhelming,” she said. The Seasons Club exists to promote such support groups, social connections McKee senior services manager Phoebe Hawley works to cultivate in the senior population. “I would love to reach thousands of people, but I am happy if I just make an impact with one,” Hawley said. The Seasons Club offers a range of programs, from balance education to driving ability checkups. Seniors can also participate in the heart watchers program and receive blood pressure checks. They also do monthly brown bag medication checks to make sure senior’s medications are balanced. The club also sponsors leisure activities, such as regular card games and outings to front range activities, such as a recent trip to see the musical Wicked in Denver. Hawley works hard to promote graceful and com-

petent aging. “The most important thing is that we are going to age no matter what but the quality of the aging is what’s in question,” she said. “ A club like this is designed to enhance this quality.” Because falls are a major problem among seniors, proactive medication interaction checks, limitation training and hearing screenings all help keep seniors independent. “You only have to worry about moving on to an advanced level of care if you can’t take care of yourself,” Hawley said. “By enhancing life and doing the best we can with the health we have, then folks aren’t visiting facilities as often and they are not changing their location. Moving is very stressful and having health problems is stressful. Even if you help someone in a tiny little way, you are enhancing their quality of life.” AGING AND FITNESS Enhancing fitness and social interaction is at the heart of the senior program at Lifestyle Center Health Club in Fort Collins, a Columbine


Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 9 cane or walker and so they have a hump over from leaning forward,” she said. “Exercise strengthens some of those muscles. Functional fitness helps in continuing day-to-day activities, helping them to be more independent in their living.” This independence is important because seniors want to continue taking care of themselves and living as they please. “Sometimes we take that Jupiter Images for granted and don’t realize those things could change if Health System facility. Man- tive outlook both mentally and emotionally. Rogers en- we don’t take care of ourager Dana Rogers’ expericourages group fitness class- selves,” Rogers said. “To be ence with the senior proable to continue activities es, social moving programs gram extends for several without nursing care is why years. Many of her members that help also help seniors it is important to be fit, to achieve fitness goals. are over 90 years old and have built an active commu“The ability to get up from continue enjoying quality of life.” nity. a chair with out assistance She notices that enjoyment and walk without a cane or a AGING AND NUTRITION walker is a thrill,” she said. of life effects the quality of Chilson Recreation Center life day-to-day for many seDuring exercise programs, dietician Denise Moore niors, and that enjoyment is Rogers sees a gradual teaches nutrition classes for enhanced by interacting with change in posture too. seniors, coaching them in others, creating a more posiways to eat better and save “So many seniors need a

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

Jerry’s cancer team gave him his life back. And that’s music to everyone’s ears. Even after he was diagnosed with nonHodgkin’s lymphoma, Jerry found comfort in playing the piano. And thanks to McKee Medical Center’s carefully coordinated cancer team, he soon found the strength to go on to a healthy life. The pathology and imaging departments quickly gave Jerry’s doctors his test results, which helped get his treatment started right away. Yet, Jerry said his considerate doctors and nurses took the time to explain his condition and give him the best care possible. Because of this highly specialized, personal approach, Jerry’s life is in tune. Now he not only plays for comfort, he gives back by using his piano to lift the spirits of those in cancer support groups. McKee Medical Center. Remarkable health care inspired by you.

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 11

Old Friends

Marcia Wiener was Joyce Grauberger’s maid of honor. When Bob and Gin Link celebrated their 25th anniversary, Bruce renewed their vows. An important factor in the strength of their friendship, Bob said, is that this group isn’t all that they have. Loveland retirees stick together “We all have other friends. We get together once a week after decades of friendship and have a real good time, but we’re not clinging to us extra incentive to win,” Jennifer Lehman each other, we all have our Staff Writer Gin said. own friends and families.” The group has shared “We all have our own ob and Gin Link, good times and bad times space,” Bruce said. Bruce and Joyce together. Between them some of Grauberger and Paul “There were situations that their activities include a barand Marcia Wiener have kind of cemented our relabershop group in Loveland, been great friends for the tionships,” Bruce said. the founding of and participast 50 years or so. When the Link’s were on The group is now in their one of many annual visits to pation in the Loveland Police mid to late 70s and have met the Grauberger’s home years Chaplains, Rotary, Golden K. Kiwanis club of Loveland, for dinner just about every ago, the Grauberger’s son, week for nearly fifteen years. who was three-and-a-half at theological study groups, men’s ministry groups, PEO, Bob, Bruce, Paul, Marcia the time, came in to use the book club, women’s mission and Joyce all attended the restroom while Bob was organizations and calling on same tiny college of 300 shaving. Bob saw rust colthe sick members of their rehundred students in Lemars, ored urine in the toilet and spective churches. Iowa and Bob met Gin alerted the Graubergers. “And being retired pastors when they were fifteen. Eric was admitted to the we still do funerals and wedThe men all went on to hospital for ten days for dings,” Bob said. seminary together where nephritis, a disease that can “Lots of our friends said two became Methodist pas- cause the kidneys to stop we wish you had the suptors and one a Presbyterian functioning if not caught in port that you all have had,” pastor. time. Gin said. “We all have our The group has been jok“So in some respects we ingly (but truthfully) referred feel that Eric is alive because kids and they are all fairly close around but we don’t to as the Six E’s or the Six of Bob. So you know, its totally rely on them. We’ve Evangelicals. these kind of relationships all had each other.” “They were ministers we that kind of help seal your “I saw a sign not too long were teachers, all of us are friendships,” Bruce said. ago (that said), ‘It takes a interested in education,” Gin The Links found solace in long time to grow an old said. their friends after they lost a friend,’ ... “I thought, that With the names Grauberg- son. sums it up pretty well,” er, Wiener and Link the “When Dan died, our Bruce said. friends have joked about youngest son, why you were “We don’t all think alike. starting a sausage and ham- all so supportive, we we don’t all agree,” Gin said, burger joint. couldn’t have made it with... “but we do enjoy each The group rotates houses out them, their help and other’s friendship and we’re and dinner starts promptly at support. There’s just nothing very supportive to each oth5 p.m. when an evening of that will take the place of er. Whenever we’re needed, sharing news, memories and friends when life is tough, “ we’ll be there,” she said. jokes ensues. Gin said. STAYING SOCIAL Then it’s game time. The Grauberger’s named Feelings of isolation and their youngest son Brian “One of our favorites is loneliness in the elderly is a Wayne after Bob Wayne marbles which is another serious problem contributing name for divorce. Quite fre- Link. to disproportionately high Paul Wiener was Bruce quently the fellows play suicide rates, alcoholism, deagainst the gals which gives Grauberger’s best man and

B

pression and a decline in mind and body health. In 2004, people 65 and older made up 12 percent of the United States population but accounted for 16 percent of suicide deaths, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. “Our experience has been that isolation is very detrimental to the overall well being of elderly people. It makes them vulnerable for self-neglect, abuse, financial exploitation,” said Gary Thurman, manager of the Adult Protection Program for Larimer County. As we get older, the desire for meaningful friendships does not change but forming new friendships and maintaining the old can get more difficult with the loss of a spouse or the onset of health problems that leaves someone homebound. “The older you get the harder it is to make friends and it seems like less or fewer opportunities to make friends,” said Dianne Stobnicke, Director of Volunteers of America in Larimer County that runs multiple programs for seniors including daily congregate meals and a frozen meals on wheels program. Stobnicke said that based on a survey of the congregate meal attendants, socialization is the No. 1 reason that they come. For some “the biggest socialization they have during the week is that club meeting, it really is a life saver,” Paul Wiener said about the Golden K. Kiwanis club he’s involved in. Meeting new people requires a willingness to work at it and sometimes it’s just a matter of luck said psychologist Dr. Beth Firestein of Loveland. “I have clients who go and play cards at the senior center and they’ve made some


12

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

great friends playing cards, participating in classes, playing bingo ‌ through activities basically,â€? Firestein said. “Some people are just plain outgoing.â€? “I think one of the things that’s helpful to people is to do volunteer work,â€? said Paul. “It will help you get beyond yourself and really feel that your life is needed by somebody else or some other institution, whatever it is.â€? Even if someone has a group of friends it can be isolating if those relationships are superficial. According to a 2005 study on elderly relationships from the University of Michigan, it is not the number of people in the social network of an elderly person it is the quality of those relationships. To deepen existing relationships, Firestein recommends taking the risk of

self-disclosure with another person that seems like they would be a good fit for a deeper friendship. “A lot of times your friends may also be seeking a deeper connection,â€? Firestein said. “That invites them to share more and they know it’s safe to go to a more personal level.â€? “You can usually tell if someone welcomes that personal disclosure. It’s better to do it gradually and see how the other person reacts,â€? she said. Sharing common intellectual and spiritual interests or goals can enhance friendships. “When people share participation in civil rights, helping the poor ‌ they develop deeper relationships with others that are involved,â€? Firestein said. “It is a very fertile ground for deepening a relationship.â€? “Some people grow close

through bible study or attending same inspirational talk because in depth subjects leads to more meaningful conversations,� Firestein said. Illness or an inability to continue driving can limit opportunities to get out and socialize or volunteer. Firestein recommends the possibility of telecommunication. “Not every older person is comfortable with technology but it is a way to stay connected with families and find people with similar interests,� she said. “I’ve known people that were chronically ill that found an online community that they could speak very openly and honestly with,� Firestein said. For those in their later years, Firestein offers this: “There’s no right way to be an older person. There’s no one idea of psychologi-

Stay for a week, a month,

or for as long as you like columbine cares for seniors

cal health. My hope is that they would find the freedom to do whatever they want to do.� RESOURCES Larimer County Office on Aging • www.co.larimer.co.us/ seniors/lcoa.htm 970-498-7750 The Suicide Resource Center of Larimer County • www.suicideresource center.org Toll-free hotline 1-800-273TALK(8255) Colorado Volunteers of America www.voacolorado.org 970-472-9630 Loveland Meals on Wheels 970-667-0311 Chilson Senior Center 970)-962-2783

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12

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

great friends playing cards, participating in classes, playing bingo ‌ through activities basically,â€? Firestein said. “Some people are just plain outgoing.â€? “I think one of the things that’s helpful to people is to do volunteer work,â€? said Paul. “It will help you get beyond yourself and really feel that your life is needed by somebody else or some other institution, whatever it is.â€? Even if someone has a group of friends it can be isolating if those relationships are superficial. According to a 2005 study on elderly relationships from the University of Michigan, it is not the number of people in the social network of an elderly person it is the quality of those relationships. To deepen existing relationships, Firestein recommends taking the risk of

self-disclosure with another person that seems like they would be a good fit for a deeper friendship. “A lot of times your friends may also be seeking a deeper connection,â€? Firestein said. “That invites them to share more and they know it’s safe to go to a more personal level.â€? “You can usually tell if someone welcomes that personal disclosure. It’s better to do it gradually and see how the other person reacts,â€? she said. Sharing common intellectual and spiritual interests or goals can enhance friendships. “When people share participation in civil rights, helping the poor ‌ they develop deeper relationships with others that are involved,â€? Firestein said. “It is a very fertile ground for deepening a relationship.â€? “Some people grow close

through bible study or attending same inspirational talk because in depth subjects leads to more meaningful conversations,� Firestein said. Illness or an inability to continue driving can limit opportunities to get out and socialize or volunteer. Firestein recommends the possibility of telecommunication. “Not every older person is comfortable with technology but it is a way to stay connected with families and find people with similar interests,� she said. “I’ve known people that were chronically ill that found an online community that they could speak very openly and honestly with,� Firestein said. For those in their later years, Firestein offers this: “There’s no right way to be an older person. There’s no one idea of psychologi-

Stay for a week, a month,

or for as long as you like columbine cares for seniors

cal health. My hope is that they would find the freedom to do whatever they want to do.� RESOURCES Larimer County Office on Aging • www.co.larimer.co.us/ seniors/lcoa.htm 970-498-7750 The Suicide Resource Center of Larimer County • www.suicideresource center.org Toll-free hotline 1-800-273TALK(8255) Colorado Volunteers of America www.voacolorado.org 970-472-9630 Loveland Meals on Wheels 970-667-0311 Chilson Senior Center 970)-962-2783

:HRIIHUDYDULHW\ RIDSDUWPHQWVL]HV DQGVW\OHVWRPHHW \RXULQGHSHQGHQWRU DVVLVWHGOLYLQJQHHGV

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 13

Current hospital safety measures

T

McKee has also removed all shared reading materials from reception areas, as these materials can host a store-house of germs from all people who have contact with them. The restrooms are also cleaned more frequently. To prevent the spread of disease in the work world, Poduska advises that all people to stay home, even if they are die-hard workers, and that they understand when symptoms are serious enough to go to the hospital. “Most flus come and go and you can do just fine with something to treat the fever and fluids. It is a virus and it will last basically a week.” GERMS AT HOME For keeping the family healthy, clean frequently used surfaces. Poduska said

that most products on the market will kill flu and H1N1. For am inexpensive alternative, Conner recommended a 10 percent bleach disinfectant. For hand washing, lather hands for 20 seconds. Then use the paper towel to turn off the faucet and open the door, Conner said. Wash after preparing food, cleaning kids rooms, changing diapers and using the bathroom. Conner also advocates using a tissue only once because their single use prevents the spread of infection. Poduska also recommended making sure the dishwasher booster is working effectively. “When you go to dry the dishes, don’t dry them on their own,” he said. “Dry them in the washer. That helps disinfect the dishes.”

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cember to be hard hitting flu months. According to Conner, younger adults and pregnant women see a lot more complications with H1N1. People who are older are at a lower Rhema Muncy risk because they have been Special Sections Reporter exposed over the decades to a similar virus. For others he additional health whose immune systems have concerns of the seanever seen a virus, the comson prompted both plications are harsher. McKee Medical Center and Every week, the staff at Poudre Valley Hospital to en- PVHS reviews the epidemic hance visitor rules and insti- status of the area to assess tute several health precauhow to proceed with patient tions through out both hosand staff hygiene regulations. pital buildings. Paul PodusThe staff at PVHS also is now ka, who works in the PVHS using a different type of infection control unit, admask for the nose and vised the hospital to adopt mouth. etiquette guidelines from the “They are a much higher Center of Disease Control for density mask that filter out a the current flu and H1N1 much smaller particle, such season when they set the as a virus, that could be gentemporary rule of not allow- erated from a procedure ing children as visitors. such as suctioning, or if a pa“We try and work with tient coughs with large people to make an arrange- amounts of drops and virusment so someone watches es,” Poduska said. the kids while a parent is in To amp up protection, the hospital,” he said. “We both hospitals now have hydon’t want them to be exgiene stations with holders posed to the flu or our pawith hand sanitizers, tissues tients.” and masks. There are also inAlthough the CDC does structions posted throughout not recommend a specific the buildings on cough etiage cut off, both McKee and quette from the CDC. Poudre Valley determined 12 “Basic respiratory and years as the youngest age hand hygiene is the most efpermitted to visit. fective way of stopping the McKee’s infection preven- spread of infection any time tionist Janet Conner sees of the year,” Conner said. H1N1 mainly in children be- “Your eyes nose and mouth cause they don’t hold the are huge gateways for virussame hygiene standards as es. People shouldn’t touch adults. the mucus areas. If you have “You need to assess your been in a public place, don’t patient population and what touch the eyes nose or is best for your facility,” she mouth until you have said. washed your hands.” “Cough etiquette is using a Both hospitals anticipate enforcing these and other flu tissue or coughing into your prevention rules until the flu sleeve and washing your season ends, about March or hands. I can’t say enough about just washing your April, Conner said. She also hands,” Poduska said. expects November and De-

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

Robots

& Surgeons Local hospitals embrace the latest in robotic technology

Jennifer Lehman Staff Writer

T

hree small, metal bird beaks shaped like scissors and clamps are working inside your belly or in your heart, removing cancerous masses, performing bypasses. Imagine these bird beaks have the ability to rotate 360 degrees, and match your surgeon’s wrists move for move from across the room, making delicate snippets and slices. This is robotic surgery. “I can do anything I want, just as if I was operating with my normal hands,” said Dr. John Crane, gynocologist with Banner Health Systems at McKee Medical Center. Crane sits at a console, his forehead set in a viewer, his forearms resting at 90 degree angles with the thumb and forefinger of each hand in small slings that open and close. From the console is where the surgeon’s hands are virtually downsized into

tiny instruments that are attached to a robot that looks like a cross between an oversized R2D2 and a metal spider. During surgery the surgeon sits at the console in the corner and this robot is docked next to the patient. Surgeons at McKee Medical Center, Poudre Valley Hospital and Medical Center of the Rockies, and at a growing number of hospitals across the country, are using this latest technology. The robot called daVinci and designed by Intuitive Surgical, performs robotic laparoscopic surgeries and thoracoscopic surgeries, minimally invasive surgery of the abdomen and chest area including lungs and heart by gynecologists, urologists and cardiac surgeons. The wristed capability of the robotic instruments mimics all forms of motion of your own wrist and thumbs and forefinger said Dr. Michael Stanton, cardiac surgeon for Poudre Valley Health Systems.

“I can do anything I want, just as if I was operating with my normal hands,” — Dr. John Crane, gynocologist with Banner Health Systems at Mckee Medical Center.

Traditional minimally invasive surgery used fixed instruments that were anywhere from 30-50 cm long, said Crane. “The scissors on the end or graspers on the end were just there, they didn’t have the ability to move and articulate. This has what are called wristed instruments,” Crane said. Demonstrating with the robot, Crane grasps a safety pin with one clamping tool and uses a curved clamp to open the saftey pin and close it again while seated at the console several feet away. “There is absolutely no way you could do that with traditional laparoscopy,” Crane said. From the consol the surgeon controls the instruments and views them and the innards from a high definition, three dimensional screen that magnifies the RH Photos/Paul Litman scope’s focus ten Crane sits at the surgical console manipulating the robotic instruments times. “It’s like when you see this sheet right here,” the act of manipulating both street with one eye covered said Crane, pointing to the instruments in the patient as opposed to both eyes unblue sheet wrapping the surmakes the procedure covered; three dimensions gical table. “When I’m in the messier and less precise, offers greater depth percepconsole I can see every fiber Crane said. tion, he said. of that blue sheet. That’s the “Once you get used to it “(Traditional laparoscopy) difference.” it’s like driving a stick shift,” is ranking on that patient, “I can get a lot closer and Crane said, “you go around where as this, the way it's see itty bitty arterials that I the corner without even built, it pivots. It allows me couldn’t see with traditional thinking about it.” to get over, around and unlaparoscopy or even with derneath,” said Crane. In traditional laparoscopic open surgery,” Crane said. and thoracoscopic surgeries The instruments used with The difference between the surgeon has to manipurobotic surgery are never two dimensional and three late the scope in one hand moving more than they have dimensional capabilities is and an instrument in the to and tearing the muscle, huge, said Stanton. Having other hand inside the patient something that is more likely only a two dimensional view while viewing his or her acwith traditional laparois like driving down the tions on a video screen. Just scopies, Crane said.

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 15 The typical recovery time for a traditional laparoscopic surgery for say, a hystorectome, is six weeks, with robotic surgery, it’s two weeks. Previous hospital stays would have been two to three days and with robotic surgery the same procedure allows most patients to go home after one. The decrease in recovery time is owed to the greater visibility and articulation that the console and wristed instruments offer with robotic surgery. “There is less cutting (in robotic surgery) but even compared to traditional laparoscopy where the incisions are about the same size and there is the same amount, three, four or five,” said Crane, “there is still less blood loss and that’s because you have such a closer, more magnified, distinct view of your anatomy. “In traditional laparoscopy you may not see the little blood vessels that are two millimeters in diameter that can bleed 10-15 ccs here, 1015 ccs over here. But (with robotic surgery), you can see them all and avoid that,” he said. The amount of bleeding during surgery directly impacts the pain factor because blood is an irritant, Crane explained. “You get blood in the belly or the pelvis and it creates inflammation in all of the tissues and without that you don’t hurt as much. The more blood you lose the more your heart has to adapt to that blood loss, the bone morrow cranks up and starts producing more red blood cells. It’s a systemic event when you lose enough blood,” said Crane. Robotic surgery makes it so that cardiothoracic surgeons don’t have to spread the ribs to access the chest cavity which is very painful,

said Stanton, contributing to faster recovery times for heart and lung patients. “It can hurt anywhere from four weeks to several months when you spread the chest,” Stanton said. The robot has centralized major surgical procedures. The surgeon depends only on the touch of a button to switch between the three instruments and scope whereas open surgery and traditional minimally invasive methods requires communication between assistants and the surgeon to change out each instrument Crane said. “There is a lot of time wasted in traditional laparoscopy”. The surgeon is accompanied by an assistant, typically another surgeon, who stays next to the patient. A team of surgical technicians is also in the room. The surgeon makes the initial incisions and closes the surgical area by hand once the procedure is completed. Similar to traditional mini-

mally invasive surgery, the incisions for robotic surgery are few and small at eight to ten millimeters each. The scope and instruments are guided into the patient by little tubes called trocars. The trocar with the scope, or camera, is the first thing to go in so that the surgeon can determine where to place the other trocars. In some cases, robotic surgery is not the best option. “There’s things where it’s absolutely ideal and things where it just isn’t,” Stanton said. Combination heart procedures like a valve replacement and a coronary bypass can take so long that it’s detrimental to the patient, Stanton said. In general, robotic surgery takes 30-40 percent longer. There’s a longer surgery but a shorter hospital stay, Stanton said. If the patient has had a I See ROBOTIC/Page 16

Left: Dr. Crane demonstrates the pivoting ability of the robotic instruments. Below: The robotic tools are able to open and close a safety pin.


14

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

Robots

& Surgeons Local hospitals embrace the latest in robotic technology

Jennifer Lehman Staff Writer

T

hree small, metal bird beaks shaped like scissors and clamps are working inside your belly or in your heart, removing cancerous masses, performing bypasses. Imagine these bird beaks have the ability to rotate 360 degrees, and match your surgeon’s wrists move for move from across the room, making delicate snippets and slices. This is robotic surgery. “I can do anything I want, just as if I was operating with my normal hands,” said Dr. John Crane, gynocologist with Banner Health Systems at McKee Medical Center. Crane sits at a console, his forehead set in a viewer, his forearms resting at 90 degree angles with the thumb and forefinger of each hand in small slings that open and close. From the console is where the surgeon’s hands are virtually downsized into

tiny instruments that are attached to a robot that looks like a cross between an oversized R2D2 and a metal spider. During surgery the surgeon sits at the console in the corner and this robot is docked next to the patient. Surgeons at McKee Medical Center, Poudre Valley Hospital and Medical Center of the Rockies, and at a growing number of hospitals across the country, are using this latest technology. The robot called daVinci and designed by Intuitive Surgical, performs robotic laparoscopic surgeries and thoracoscopic surgeries, minimally invasive surgery of the abdomen and chest area including lungs and heart by gynecologists, urologists and cardiac surgeons. The wristed capability of the robotic instruments mimics all forms of motion of your own wrist and thumbs and forefinger said Dr. Michael Stanton, cardiac surgeon for Poudre Valley Health Systems.

“I can do anything I want, just as if I was operating with my normal hands,” — Dr. John Crane, gynocologist with Banner Health Systems at Mckee Medical Center.

Traditional minimally invasive surgery used fixed instruments that were anywhere from 30-50 cm long, said Crane. “The scissors on the end or graspers on the end were just there, they didn’t have the ability to move and articulate. This has what are called wristed instruments,” Crane said. Demonstrating with the robot, Crane grasps a safety pin with one clamping tool and uses a curved clamp to open the saftey pin and close it again while seated at the console several feet away. “There is absolutely no way you could do that with traditional laparoscopy,” Crane said. From the consol the surgeon controls the instruments and views them and the innards from a high definition, three dimensional screen that magnifies the RH Photos/Paul Litman scope’s focus ten Crane sits at the surgical console manipulating the robotic instruments times. “It’s like when you see this sheet right here,” the act of manipulating both street with one eye covered said Crane, pointing to the instruments in the patient as opposed to both eyes unblue sheet wrapping the surmakes the procedure covered; three dimensions gical table. “When I’m in the messier and less precise, offers greater depth percepconsole I can see every fiber Crane said. tion, he said. of that blue sheet. That’s the “Once you get used to it “(Traditional laparoscopy) difference.” it’s like driving a stick shift,” is ranking on that patient, “I can get a lot closer and Crane said, “you go around where as this, the way it's see itty bitty arterials that I the corner without even built, it pivots. It allows me couldn’t see with traditional thinking about it.” to get over, around and unlaparoscopy or even with derneath,” said Crane. In traditional laparoscopic open surgery,” Crane said. and thoracoscopic surgeries The instruments used with The difference between the surgeon has to manipurobotic surgery are never two dimensional and three late the scope in one hand moving more than they have dimensional capabilities is and an instrument in the to and tearing the muscle, huge, said Stanton. Having other hand inside the patient something that is more likely only a two dimensional view while viewing his or her acwith traditional laparois like driving down the tions on a video screen. Just scopies, Crane said.

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 15 The typical recovery time for a traditional laparoscopic surgery for say, a hystorectome, is six weeks, with robotic surgery, it’s two weeks. Previous hospital stays would have been two to three days and with robotic surgery the same procedure allows most patients to go home after one. The decrease in recovery time is owed to the greater visibility and articulation that the console and wristed instruments offer with robotic surgery. “There is less cutting (in robotic surgery) but even compared to traditional laparoscopy where the incisions are about the same size and there is the same amount, three, four or five,” said Crane, “there is still less blood loss and that’s because you have such a closer, more magnified, distinct view of your anatomy. “In traditional laparoscopy you may not see the little blood vessels that are two millimeters in diameter that can bleed 10-15 ccs here, 1015 ccs over here. But (with robotic surgery), you can see them all and avoid that,” he said. The amount of bleeding during surgery directly impacts the pain factor because blood is an irritant, Crane explained. “You get blood in the belly or the pelvis and it creates inflammation in all of the tissues and without that you don’t hurt as much. The more blood you lose the more your heart has to adapt to that blood loss, the bone morrow cranks up and starts producing more red blood cells. It’s a systemic event when you lose enough blood,” said Crane. Robotic surgery makes it so that cardiothoracic surgeons don’t have to spread the ribs to access the chest cavity which is very painful,

said Stanton, contributing to faster recovery times for heart and lung patients. “It can hurt anywhere from four weeks to several months when you spread the chest,” Stanton said. The robot has centralized major surgical procedures. The surgeon depends only on the touch of a button to switch between the three instruments and scope whereas open surgery and traditional minimally invasive methods requires communication between assistants and the surgeon to change out each instrument Crane said. “There is a lot of time wasted in traditional laparoscopy”. The surgeon is accompanied by an assistant, typically another surgeon, who stays next to the patient. A team of surgical technicians is also in the room. The surgeon makes the initial incisions and closes the surgical area by hand once the procedure is completed. Similar to traditional mini-

mally invasive surgery, the incisions for robotic surgery are few and small at eight to ten millimeters each. The scope and instruments are guided into the patient by little tubes called trocars. The trocar with the scope, or camera, is the first thing to go in so that the surgeon can determine where to place the other trocars. In some cases, robotic surgery is not the best option. “There’s things where it’s absolutely ideal and things where it just isn’t,” Stanton said. Combination heart procedures like a valve replacement and a coronary bypass can take so long that it’s detrimental to the patient, Stanton said. In general, robotic surgery takes 30-40 percent longer. There’s a longer surgery but a shorter hospital stay, Stanton said. If the patient has had a I See ROBOTIC/Page 16

Left: Dr. Crane demonstrates the pivoting ability of the robotic instruments. Below: The robotic tools are able to open and close a safety pin.


Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 Banner Health’s Dr. Crane with the robotic surger y equipment.

ROBOTIC From Page 15

RH photo/ Paul Litman

actually worldwide, is getting huge,” Crane said. “They’re still having major surgery. They just don’t realize it. They are looking and seeing four or five little incisions, and from what they’ve heard on Opera and Redbook and Grey’s Anatomy, they think they are going to be able to jump out of bed and go to

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 17

HL Uncommon Sense Reclaim personal life when kids grow What you are feeling is probably a mother doesn’t happen overnight. The blend of things that can occur anytime space and free time you are regaining there is a marked change from the situ- are, in fact, empty at first. How could it ation we have been in for several years. be otherwise? Refilling that inner and Feeling of loss and feelings of happiouter emptiness — which I prefer to Beth Firestein ness and relief are both natural emocall free space and free time — usually Uncommon Sense tional reactions to these changes, but doesn’t happen all at once. Rediscoveryou may feel them at different times in ing yourself, old interests and renewing uestion: My youngest son the transition. friendships is a process you can trust started full time in school for will definitely happen if you allow In addition, the challenges are differthe first year. I thought I would yourself permission to be in that spabe thankful for some free time ent for full-time mothers who care for ciousness. Slowly replant the free space their children at home and full-time after staying home with my three kids with people and activities that are fun mothers who work outside the home. for the last seven years, but instead I and meaningful to you. (There is no such thing as a part-time feel deep emptiness. How can I claim mother, is there?) For a my own life back again? Dr. Beth Firestein is a licensed woman (or man) who Answer: I am probably stating the psychologist. She has 23 has taken on the all-conobvious when I say how powerful the years of therapy experience suming responsibility of first 5 or 6 years of parental attention and has practiced in Loveland daily child-rearing, it is and bonding are to a child’s healthy for over 12 years. She may be emotional, psychological and physical almost impossible not to reached by calling her office at development. We often focus on the in- lose sight of whom you 970-635-9116 or via e-mail at are as an individual. tensity of the bonding of the child to firewom@webaccess.net. Reconnecting with his or her mother, but we sometimes forget how powerful the bonding is for your sense of self apart Uncommon Sense the at-home parent as well. from your identity as

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

Leaving gluten behind troenterologist in Loveland, said in an e-mail. Particularly in the last two to three years there’s been a huge mushrooming of available foods and resources, said Judy Bushnell, secretary of the Northern Colorado Chapter of the Celiac Sprue Jennifer Lehman Staff Writer Association, a national support group for people with wareness surrounding celiac disease. celiac disease, a ge“Restaurants are getting netic, autoimmune much more knowledgeable. disease that damages the Any time I go into a restausmall intestinal lining, has in- rant I ask if they have a creased in the past few years gluten-free menu and most bringing attention to the of the them do and if they mandatory gluten-free diet don’t, the chefs are at least that accompanies it. somewhat knowledgeable about gluten so you can get Prolamins and glutenins, the proteins in wheat, barley steered in the right direction.” and rye are what cause the Bushnell was diagnosed immune system to go bonkers in patients with celi- with celiac disease twenty years ago when there was litac, Dr. Crystal North, a gas-

Celiacs reflect on new awareness of illness

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tle knowledge and support surrounding the disease and few gluten-free options in the stores, Bushnell said. “It’s very exciting now, Bushnell said, “When new bakeries or gluten free products would start up I would buy them to encourage them but there is too many now. I can’t buy all of them and that’s a wonderful choice to have to make,” she said. “It’s almost become a fad diet. People say, oh I’m not feeling well I want to go gluten-free or wheat-free. I think that’s all feeding on the (gluten-free) market,” Bushnell said. Bushnell had what were considered classic symptoms of celiac disease at the time, diarrhea and malabsorption. “I was essentially starving to death, even though I was

eating like an absolute pig,” said Bushnell. “The only reason I think that the doctor was able to diagnose it is because I started to keep a food diary of everything I put in my mouth,” said Bushnell, who made the connection that she felt better on one of the days that she hadn’t eaten any wheat. The wide variety of symptoms, or lack thereof, can make the disease difficult to diagnose. Gina Mohr-Callahan, incoming chairperson of the Northern Colorado Celiac Sprue Association, suffered from fiber mayalgia and chronic headaches before she was diagnosed. “I had really unrelated • See Gluten/Page 19

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Gluten From Page 18

symptoms and I was probably sick my whole adult life with celiac related symptoms and no one put them all together,” Mohr-Callahan said. “I was losing my hair, I had enormous, thick, Diana Ross hair, and it just evaporated,” she said. Mohr-Callahan, who was diagnosed about eleven years ago, experienced severe weight loss, losing 40 pounds in a year, leaving her at 89 pounds. “No one could figure it out, it wasn’t like I was dieting in any way, I was eating a normal diet,” Mohr-Callahan said. Through research she learned that 50 percent of people with the disease don’t have the classic symptoms. “I begged my doctor to test me,” said Mohr-Callahan who was diagnosed as having a wheat allergy and tipped off to celiac disease by a reader of her food column. “She said, Oh you don’t have that, its really rare,” said Mohr-Callahan. It is now known that celiac disease is a common genetic disorder affecting 1 in 133 people, according to the National Institute of Health. “Patients can have no symptoms at all, have mild blood test abnormalities or can have gastrointestinal problems,” said North. Malabsorption leads to vitamin deficiencies effecting everything from the brain to the bones. There are lists of related symptoms and illnesses. Celiacs are diagnosed through a blood test that screens for high levels of antibodies. If that number is high, celiac disease is likely and a biopsy of the small bowel is done to confirm the diagnoses and assess the

damage, said North. Since gluten-free diets can begin to repair the system immediately, people who believe they have celiacs should get tested before starting the diet. “It’s very difficult to test a patient once they have started a gluten-free diet, said North, “They feel good and don’t want to “re-challenge” themselves with gluten just for a blood test. So that leaves us with performing an endoscopy or getting the genetic testing done, which isn’t 100 percent accurate,” said North. Mohr-Callahan’s diagnoses inspired her consulting business, A Fork in the Road, that counsels celiacs on diet and lifestyle. “We’re getting smarter and patients are becoming more well educated and becoming their own health care advocates, said Mohr-Callahan, “ and health care practitioners are becoming more aware.” Gluten-free options can be found everywhere from health food stores to the drive-in menu at Carl’s Jr. “It can be a fad diet for some people and then some people just fall somewhere in between,” said Donna Huckaby, owner of Granny’s Gluten-Free Zone in Loveland and a diagnosed celiac. “A lot of people have taken the test but it just doesn’t show up, but they do feel better when they stop eating gluten,” she said. “I would say that it is unwise to choose the glutenfree path if it is not certain if you have celiac disease or a gluten intolerance,” said Mohr-Callahan, “It’s a very difficult path. However, some people just feel better gluten free. We need to make good proactive choices about our health. Its important to heed your body’s signs,” said Mohr-Callahan. “It’s in medicine, it’s in food, it’s in cosmetics, it’s in

personal care items. You need to be educated about where it is if you are going to be gluten free. And that’s not so simple when you think about it. It’s a challenge to eat out in a restaurant. It’s a challenge to cook for yourself and make sure you’re not accidentally contaminating your food with gluten. “I don’t know if I see it as a trend or not,” said North, “A lot of people read about the symptoms of celiac and place themselves on a gluten-free diet. They feel better. Whether this is representative of a gluten sensitivity or allergy, I am not sure,” she said, “But one can’t argue if the patient feels better. RESOURCES • Celiac Sprue Assocation: (877) CSA-4-CSA www.csaceliacs.org • Northern Colorado Chapter of Celiac Sprue Association: www.northerncolorado celiacs.org

RH photo/Jade Cody

Potato Starch Muffins From the Celiac Sprue Association web site Ingredients: 4 eggs, separated 1 tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons cold water 3 /4 cup potato starch 1 /2 teaspoon salt grated rind of 1/2 lemon

Directions: Beat the yolks until light. Gradually add the sugar. Beat until light and creamy. Add the water and grated rind. Slowly sift in the potato starch. Blend well. In another bowl, beat the egg whites with the salt at low speed until frothy; increase the speed to high and beat until peaks form. Carefully fold the stiffly beaten egg whites into the yolk batter. Fill greased muffin cups half full. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes. Yields 12 muffins.


20

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

COPD is fourth leading cause of death in U.S.

Theresa Lindahl, McKee Medical Center a risk factor in the development of COPD. RH paid advertorial In rare cases, a genetic condition called Alpha -1 antitrypsin deficiency can cause COPD. People who have this condition OPD stands for Chronic Obstruchave low levels of this protein. Having tive Pulmonary Disease. Chronic low levels of this protein can lead to means it won’t go away, ObstrucCOPD if you smoke, are exposed to tive means partly blocked, Pulmonary smoke or to other lung irritants. means in the lungs and Disease means sickness. This is a common lung disease You may have COPD if you have been that blocks the airways, making breathing exposed to any of these risk factors and difficult. COPD is a group of lung diseases have symptoms such as shortness of which include emphysema and chronic breath, a chronic cough and you bring up bronchitis. phlegm or mucus when you cough. If COPD is a major cause of disability and you are over the age of 40 and have any is the fourth leading cause of death in the of these key indicators a COPD diagnosis United States. While the death rate for oth- should be considered. Because it is a diser major diseases such as Coronary Heart ease that develops slowly, many people may have it but don’t know it. More than Disease and Stroke are declining, the deaths related to COPD are increasing. It is 12 million people are currently diagnosed predicted that COPD will become the third with COPD, an additional 12 million people have it but have not been diagnosed. leading cause of death in the year 2020. One of the reasons for the increased morA medical evaluation and tests are tality is due to the expanding epidemic of needed to diagnose COPD. The most smoking and the population living longer. common test is a breathing test called spirometry. This measures the amount of While smoking is the No. 1 cause for air a person can breathe out, and the developing COPD, it can also be caused by occupational dust and chemicals, envi- amount of time taken to do so. This test is ronmental tobacco smoke and indoor and quick and painless and can often be peroutdoor air pollution. Genetics can also be formed in your doctor’s office.

C

Although there is no cure, COPD can be treated. The earlier a diagnosis is made the more effective the treatment can be. Smoking cessation is the single most effective and cost effective intervention to reduce the risk of developing COPD and stop its progression. Ask your doctor what can be done to help you quit smoking. Counseling, support groups or certain medications may help you quit. Part of a treatment plan may also include medications for COPD that are used to decrease symptoms and/or complications. Oxygen therapy may be prescribed if tests show that your blood contains too little oxygen. If your doctor prescribes oxygen, use it. The long term administration of oxygen has been shown to increase survival. Another part of your treatment plan may include pulmonary rehabilitation. This program includes exercise and education, and will help to reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and increase physical and emotional participation in everyday activities. Remember that the No. 1 cause for COPD is smoking and help us celebrate the Great American Smokeout on Nov. 19. It’s never too late to quit.

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 21

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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

HL

Destination: Healthy

Holiday Temptations Navigate a healthful holiday season

Amanda Wicker is a Loveland native and the founder of Destination: Healthy, a free weight loss support group held at Message of Life Ministries on the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Amanda has lost a total of 130 pounds using diet and exercise. She can be reached at destinationhealthy@gmail.com.

Amanda Wicker Destination: Healthy

I

t’s the most wonderful time of the year. Yes, the holidays are here again and it does not seem to take long for the festivities to begin. This time of the year is full of shopping, parties, family, friends and in the midst of it all food. The food of the season invokes comfort and good memories. Because this time of year is so special it also seems to make a great excuse to break healthy habits with hopes of starting fresh at the New Year. Going into the holiday season with the goal of keeping the healthy habits you have started may seem like a daunting task, however it is not impossible. Over the last year I have shared many tips and tricks that can

Destination: Healthy help you navigate the season with your health in mind. It would seem a waste to start over just because of the new year approaching. My challenge to you is to take the focus off the special food of the moment and look around at the many blessings and loved ones that surround you. Celebrate with love, and I think you will find something incredible that even your favorite holiday treat could never satisfy.

Beverly Donnelley, MD

Warren James, MD

Caring For All Women - Always Susan Kozak, MD

Premier women’s health care since 1970 offering full range of general and specialized obstetrical and gynecological care, including state-of-the-art digital mammography, ultrasonography, midwifery program, high-risk obstetrics, robotic-assisted surgery.

Elizabeth Serniak, MD

1107 S. Lemay Ave, Suite 300 Ft. Collins, CO 80524

2695 Rocky Mountain Ave, Suite 200 Loveland, CO 80538

(970) 493-7442 • (888) 441-6983

Kara Micetich, MD

Kevin Tool, MD

Angela King, MD

Philip Priebe, MD

Kaea Beresford, MD

Maude Vance, MD

All Physicians are Board Certified, OB-GYN www.FCWC.com

Audrey Tool, MD

Eric Yeh, MD

Bradley Stern, MD

47-304659


22

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

HL

Destination: Healthy

Holiday Temptations Navigate a healthful holiday season

Amanda Wicker is a Loveland native and the founder of Destination: Healthy, a free weight loss support group held at Message of Life Ministries on the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Amanda has lost a total of 130 pounds using diet and exercise. She can be reached at destinationhealthy@gmail.com.

Amanda Wicker Destination: Healthy

I

t’s the most wonderful time of the year. Yes, the holidays are here again and it does not seem to take long for the festivities to begin. This time of the year is full of shopping, parties, family, friends and in the midst of it all food. The food of the season invokes comfort and good memories. Because this time of year is so special it also seems to make a great excuse to break healthy habits with hopes of starting fresh at the New Year. Going into the holiday season with the goal of keeping the healthy habits you have started may seem like a daunting task, however it is not impossible. Over the last year I have shared many tips and tricks that can

Destination: Healthy help you navigate the season with your health in mind. It would seem a waste to start over just because of the new year approaching. My challenge to you is to take the focus off the special food of the moment and look around at the many blessings and loved ones that surround you. Celebrate with love, and I think you will find something incredible that even your favorite holiday treat could never satisfy.

Beverly Donnelley, MD

Warren James, MD

Caring For All Women - Always Susan Kozak, MD

Premier women’s health care since 1970 offering full range of general and specialized obstetrical and gynecological care, including state-of-the-art digital mammography, ultrasonography, midwifery program, high-risk obstetrics, robotic-assisted surgery.

Elizabeth Serniak, MD

1107 S. Lemay Ave, Suite 300 Ft. Collins, CO 80524

2695 Rocky Mountain Ave, Suite 200 Loveland, CO 80538

(970) 493-7442 • (888) 441-6983

Kara Micetich, MD

Kevin Tool, MD

Angela King, MD

Philip Priebe, MD

Kaea Beresford, MD

Maude Vance, MD

All Physicians are Board Certified, OB-GYN www.FCWC.com

Audrey Tool, MD

Eric Yeh, MD

Bradley Stern, MD

47-304659


Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 23

HL

Health Line Calendar

ON OUR OWN Pathways Hospice is presenting a discussion group for people adjusting to life after the death of a spouse. When: Second Wed. of every month at 6:30 p.m. Where: 305 Carpenter Road , Fort Collins Cost: No fee/registration Contact: 970-292-1080

BREAST FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP When: 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays Cost: Free Call: 970-669-WELL (9355)

BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING Have your blood pressure checked by a Wellness Specialist SURVIVING HOLIDAYS AFTER When: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Friday 8 DEATH OF A LOVED ONE Pathways Hospice is host- a.m.-noon. Cost: No charge ing a presentation for bereaved persons help navigat- Call: 970-635-4056 Where: McKee Wellness Sering the holiday season. When: November 23 from 1- vices, 1805 E. 18th St. Suite 6, Loveland 2:30 p.m. and 7-8:30 p.m. Where: 305 Carpenter Road, DIABETES INFORMATION GROUP Fort Collins An informational/educaCost: No fee/registration tional meeting for anyone Contact: 970-292-1080 touched by diabetes who BRIGHT BEGINNINGS wants to learn and share. Poudre Valley Health Sys- Cost: No fee/registration tem offers free Bright Begin- Call: 970-203-6550 for more nings materials for families in information and topics. Larimer County with children Location: McKee Confer0-3 years of age. Materials ence and Wellness Center cover growth, development, JOINT PAIN SEMINAR health, safety and info on For any type of joint pain. community resources. Materials can be obtained through When: 5:30 p.m., Nov. 19 a home visit or by attending Where: Coors Room, McKee a class. Registration required. Conference/Wellness Center Contact: 970-635-4031 December classes: • Program A for infants: TOTAL JOINT EDUCATION When: Dec. 14 at MMC, Physical and occupational Dec. 15 at MCR therapists prepare patients • Program B for toddlers: for surgery. Program is coorWhen: Dec. 7 at the Lovedinated through your physiland Library cian's office. • Program C for 2-3 year When: Thursdays at 3 p.m. olds: Call: 970-635-4172 When: Dec. 15 at MCR Location: McKee ConferContact: 970-495-7528 ence & Wellness Center

CANCER CAREGIVER’S SUPPORT GROUP For caregivers of cancer patients. Call for times/locations. Contact: 970-635-4129.

Church, 2000 N. Lincoln Ave. Contact: 970-669-7069 LOVELAND TURKEY TROT 5K RUN/WALK When: Nov. 26, 8:30 a.m., Gobbler Trek starts at 8 a.m. Where: McKee Med. Center Contact: Active.com or www.mckeefoundation.com

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP When: Second Thursday of each month from 5:30-7 p.m. WORLDWIDE CANDLE Where: McKee Cancer Cen- LIGHTING VIGIL ter lobby. This ceremony takes place Contact: 970-622-1961 around the world to recognize and honor children who SOULPLAY ART THERAPY have died. People whose lives are When: 6:30 p.m. Dec. 13 touched by cancer express Where: McKee Med. Center themselves through art. No art experience needed. THE SEASONS CLUB When: Wednesdays, 9:45Gain insight to Medicare 11:45 a.m. basics with a counselor from Where: McKee Cancer Cen- the State Health Insurance ter Conference Room Program. Contact: 970-635-4129 When: 11 a.m., Nov. 23 MAN TO MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP When: 5:30-7 p.m. the fourth Thursday of the month Where: McKee Conference and Wellness Center Contact: 970-622-1961

Where: McKee Conference and Wellness Center Contact: 970-635-4097 Cost: No cost.

KNEE PAIN, JOINT REPLACEMENT PRESENTATION Find answers to questions you have about knee pain CAREGIVERS SUPPORT and treatment options at an For caregivers of elderly adults. Group provides sup- upcoming presentation at McKee Medical Center. port/education, particularly Orthopedic surgeon Mark for memory impairment. Cost: No charge. Care of el- McFerran, M.D., will serves derly family or friends avail- as a guest speaker able through Stepping Stones When: 5:30 p.m., Nov. 19 Adult Day Care program dur- Where: McKee Conference ing class times at no charge. and Wellness Center, 2000 When: Nov. 19, Dec. 17, 10 Boise Ave., Loveland. Cost: Free a.m.-noon Contact: 970-635-4031. Where: First Christian


24

Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

HL

We’re here for your family.

Foxtrail Family Medicine offers comprehensive family care—for infants, children, moms-to-be, adults and seniors. Dr. Bradley Schnee and Dr. Anne Siple look forward to caring for you and your family. Call today for an appointment: (970) 619-6900 Foxtrail Family Medicine 1625 Foxtrail Drive (Just south of Medical Center of the Rockies in Centerra) pvhs.org

Dr. Anne Siple and Dr. Bradley Schnee

47-304437

F O X T R A I L FA M I LY M E D I C I N E POUDRE VALLEY HEALTH SYSTEM

Health Briefs

challenged six middle schools to compete and see which school can send the most runners to this year’s race. The schools are Bill Reed, Conrad Ball, Lucille Erwin, New Vision Charter, Turner and Walt Clark middle schools. The 5K race begins at 8:30 a.m. on Nov. 26 with the Free Kids Gobbler Trek starting at 8 a.m. The Gobbler Trek is a short fun run around the wellness walk of the hospital. Register online at www.Active.com or print a MCKEE FACILITIES DIRECTOR registration form at RECOGNIZED BY NATIONAL www.McKeeFoundation ASSOCIATION .com. Jim Revis, McKee Medical Center’s director of facilities PVHS TO RECEIVE NATION’S services, has earned the des- TOP QUALITY AWARD ignation of Certified HealthPVHS will receive the 2008 care Facility Malcolm Baldrige NationManager by al Quality award from the AmeriPresident Obama at a can HospiDec. 2 ceremony in tal AssociaWashington, D.C. tion. The The award is given by certification the U.S. Department of is a national Commerce to recognize credential sustainable performance that distinexcellence. PVHS is the guishes Reonly healthcare organizaJim Revis vis as being tion to receive the 2008 among the elite in the critical Baldrige award. field of health care facility PVHS WINS MAGNET management. Revis joined PRIZETM AWARD McKee Medical Center in The American Nurses CreDecember 2008. dentialing Center (ANCC) and Cerner Corporation, a MCKEE MEDICAL CENTER TURKEY TROT MIDDLE global supplier of healthcare SCHOOL CHALLENGE solutions, announced The Loveland or Berthoud Poudre Valley Hospital of middle school that has the Fort Collins as the winner of most participants in the 2009 the 2009 Magnet Prize at the Turkey Trot at McKee Medi- Oct. 1-3 National Magnet Conference in Louisville, KY. cal Center is in for an early This award recognizes innoChristmas present: a $250 grant courtesy of the McKee vative nursing programs and practices in ANCC MagnetMedical Center Foundation recognized organizations. to be used for a health or wellness-related purpose The Magnet Recognition The foundation, which or- Program was developed to ganizes the annual 5K I See BRIEFS/Page 26 Thanksgiving Day race, has LOVELAND AUTHOR TO BE FEATURED IN PARENTS MAGAZINE After publishing “The Other Side of Pregnancy” in the spring of 2008, Loveland chiropractor and author Dr. Trenton Scott will be featured in an article by Maureen Heaney with Parents Magazine. Heaney’s article focuses on back pain and pregnancy and will publish in the Dec. issue of Parents magazine. The article will be in the “As They Grow” section of the magazine.


Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009 25

HL

Health in a Handbasket

Hang

Man

Jade takes rock climbing lessons Jade Cody Special Sections Editor

A

s I clung to the top of a ledge giving way to a 30 foot drop off, my lip curled. You see, that’s what happens with quality action heroes — their lips curl, teeth grit and a growling sound can be heard deep within their chest. What is that sound, you ask? It’s courage, reader. Courage of a mountain cat. I didn’t have an elbow spider web tattoo before mounting this feat of danger, but as I shifted over the ledge to repel down, one just appeared there, much like permanent mental scars appear on women who date magicians. A moment later I looked down. Then my arms did an

embarrassing shaking motion — like a five-year-old nervously gripping handlebars on his first unassisted ride. My elbow tattoo faded as quickly as it appeared, and my lip descended sadly back to a normal position. Will I make it down? Will the ropes violently slip through my hands slamming me into the ledge ear first? You’ll have to read on to find out, reader. You didn’t think I’d write a column about climbing walls without attempting an intense literary cliffhanger, did you? The reason I’m jaunting up and down walls is because this month for Health in a Handbasket, I took rock climbing lessons from Tracy Sowder of Airborne Gymnastics in Longmont. Sowder is a seasoned climber who teaches in a fun, hands- and feet-on manner. From the moment I got into class we were climbing, tieing ropes and saying words like “harness” and “wedgie” — real boy-type

Health in a Handbasket is a monthly feature in which I try a health-related adventure and write about it. If you have an idea for a new adventure, write to me at jcody@reporter-herald.com.

Health in a Handbasket

RH photos/Paul Litman

Here I am doing my best impression of a spider. Tracy Sowder of Airborne Gymnastics, is providing me with a belay, which helps me not die when I fall. Below: a figure eight follow through knot. activities I tell you. I learned right away that rock climbing is less about monkeying yourself up a wall and more about using your legs, strategic footholds and shifting your weight to reach the top. It’s more controlled than you might imagine, and safety is paramount. The first thing Sowder taught me was a proper knot, which is essential if you’re interested in such things as not dying. The knot I learned is called a figure eight follow through. To put it lightly, I struggled. When Sowder showed me

how to tie the knot for the 53rd time, I did start to catch on (in a slow, not really catching on but still nodding like I understood kind of way). When climbing a mountain, or in my case, a wall with handy little notches, you need to have a belay. A belay is not, in fact, an affectionate term for a person’s belly. This disappointed me, as I’m sure it did you. So don’t go offering belay rubs to rock climbers, cause that would be awkward. Belay is actually a term that climbers use to identify the anchor to the ground below. A belay is usually accomplished by anchoring to a person (or in some cases an object), I See CODY: CLIMB/Page 26


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Thursday LOVELAND REPORTER-HERALD/Health Line of Northern Colorado November 19, 2009

Retirement In Full Bloom

Visit Us Today! Live at MacKenzie Place and you’ll be free. Free to see your grandkids more. Free to travel. Free to live it up to your heart’s content. Call now for more information and to request a brochure.

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CODY: CLIMB From Page 25

the belayer, who creates friction on the ground (see photo at right). Belaying keeps climbers from falling very far. Sowder started by letting me meander my way up the wall, picking and choosing which notches I wanted to use to ratchet upward. Then he began challenging me to use specific notches, such as the ones with blue tape below them, and I had to climb without raising my hands above my head, which made me use just my legs. Sowder taught me how to shift my weight to create leverage and balance, which proved effective on the more difficult climbs. And at the end of the class, he taught me how to repel off of a ledge — with or without a lip curl. THE HEALTHFULLY DEPARTED High on the ledge, with my lip decidedly downward, I shifted one leg over the wall and paused. Sure, I might fall, I thought, but Sowder had me anchored in just in case I did slip. And with all climbing safety knowledge he had taught me, I swung the other leg over and repelled all the way down, safe and sound. And although I had to disobey my mom (she gave me specific instructions to NOT climb any rocks or walls), I feel like I was never in any real danger and I’m glad I took the class. If you would like more information about rock climbing with Sowder, visit www.airbornegym.com or call 303-651-1456.

HL

Health Briefs cont’d

recognize healthcare organizations that provide the best in nursing care and uphold the tradition of professional nursing practice. The Magnet Prize is awarded only to Magnet-recognized organizations. Winning organizations must meet specific criteria such as extraordinary nursing activities that have been sustained over an extended period of time, innovations that are beyond the characteristics of Magnet organizations, and positive outcomes that have been demonstrated and empirically linked to the innovation. The winning entry from Poudre Valley Hospital highlighted their Community Case Management Program which was selected as a pioneer in the area of community outreach for its track

record of reducing costs and improving outcomes in managing complex patients with chronic conditions. This unique program provides a continuum of care, focuses on preventative care, and improves the ability of patients, families, and providers to work together to manage chronic disease. Nurses and social workers at this facility have worked together for 14 years to develop and sustain the Community Case Management Program. The program targets patients with inadequate support systems and financial resources, and provides them with a safety net to deal with complex issues that may otherwise result in avoidable visits to the Emergency Room or healthcare provider.


We offered Sarah, Wayne and their new baby all the pampering they needed. Even a limo ride home. When it came time for Sarah to have her baby, McKee Medical Center went the extra mile. Her physician, Dr. Budd, paid special attention to make her comfortable and McKee Medical Center gave her the most relaxing birthing experience possible in a private labor, delivery, recovery and postpartum room. Sarah and her husband took advantage of our affordable, upgraded package that includes such amenities as a flat-screen TV, gourmet meals and a limo ride home from the hospital. It’s a great way to start your new life with your baby in style. McKee Medical Center. Remarkable health care inspired by you.

www.BannerHealth.com, keyword: McKee VIP • 2000 N. Boise Ave. • Loveland (970) 669-4640 • Job opportunities: 866-377-5627 (EOE/AA) or www.BannerHealth.com Banner Health is the leading nonprofit health care provider in northern Colorado. 47-293319

Healthline November 2009  

Health and fitness in Northern Colorado