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Camden Fairview defensive coordinator resigns, Page 7

Local dog is winner on national stage Page 1

Thursday February 16, 2012

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Vol. 92 • No. 154 • 1 Section • 10 pages

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Center serving working uninsured By TAMMY FRAZIER Staff Writer New health care laws may go into effect in 2014 and may address the health concerns of some, according to media sources. But in the meantime, where can the local, working uninsured go to get help for medical concerns? The Christian Health Center in Camden was started in 1997 to provide “through the power of community” health care to those who work, but are still financially un-

able to afford quality health care, according to a CHC handout. Judy Boyd, executive director of the center, and Toni Greenlee, the center’s coordinator, were the guests at the Camden Lion’s Club meeting on Wednesday. Boyd asked: “Should someone die because they don’t have health insurance? Do the wealthy deserve better medical care than the uninsured poor?” She then went on to explain the mission of the center and told of

how the services at CHC are provided by medical professionals and others in the community who provide their services voluntarily. The center was originally located in a single-wide mobile home that was donated by Camden resident Mildred Mathis. The center is now located at 1115 Fairview Road in a building that was donated in 2005 by Farmer’s Bank & Trust for CHC’s use. CHC directors were able to raise $160,000 to remodel the building

and by 2006, the building was in use by the medical staff. CHC provides medical services, dental exams, extractions and xrays, and prescription assistance to the working uninsured in the community. Boyd said CHC was able to help provide more than $4 million in prescription medicines to those who would have otherwise been unable to afford them. CHC provides chronic disease management for diabetes, high blood pressure and asthma; acute

care for infections or injury. The center now has an on-site lab for EKGs, pulmonary function testing, cholesterol and liver function testing, blood sugar testing, urinalysis and others. The center does not handle drug dependency issues as that is provided at the Ouachita County Medical Center, and does not deal with pregnancy services - as that is provided by the Ouachita County Health Department, said Boyd. See HEALTH, Page 6

State budget is still up in the air

LITTLE ROCK (AP) — The future of Democratic Gov. Mike Beebe’s proposed $4.7 billion budget for the coming year is up in the air as Republicans are calling for $21 million in spending cuts. Democratic Rep. Kathy Webb, who co-chairs the Joint Budget Committee, said today the House would again delay a vote on a resolution to move forward with the budget bill. Republicans have detailed $21 million in cuts to 11 agencies that they’d like to see in Beebe’s budget and have said the vote on the resolution should wait until he has had a chance to review those proposals. Republicans are a minority in the state Legislature,

but have enough seats to block the budget bill from being introduced. The resolution requires 67 votes in the House. Webb accused Republicans in the Legislature of politicizing the budget process by proposing an alternate plan that would cut $21 million in agency spending. Webb told reporters today that she was disappointed with Republicans for pushing forward the alternate proposal to the budget backed by Beebe. Webb says she is still looking at the proposal but believes some of the cuts would have a “devastating” impact on some agencies. Republicans have targeted 11 agencies with a 3 percent budget cut.

Photo by Mary Brown

Car flips Camden Fire Department firefighters look for leaking fluids and fire hazards on the underside of a vehicle that flipped on Fairview Road on Wednesday. According to the driver of the vehicle, another vehicle pulled out onto the road in front of him, which prompted the driver to swerve in an attempt to avoid collision. Upon swerving, the pavement, wet from recent rain, hindered his ability to maintain control of the vehicle and when it impacted the sidewalk and grass, it flipped.

Local dog shines in the Big Apple

By TAMMY FRAZIER Staff Writer Camden now has a celebrity in its midst. Is it a football player this time? No. A musician? No. A writer? Nope. The local celebrity is a Brittany Spaniel named “Cam,” which won “Best of Breed” at the 2012 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City on Feb. 13-14. The event is considered by many to be the ‘Super Bowl’ of dog shows, according to the Internet. The dog’s owners are Chris and Leslie Robinson of Camden. Leslie’s parents are Dr. and Mrs. Dan and Linda Martin of Camden. And after the couple’s firsthand experience at Westminster, Leslie Robinson was still able to brag about the excellence of the facility used for the South Arkansas Kennel Club Dog Show and Obedience Trials right here in Camden. The Camden News contacted Leslie Robinson and she told of how hectic the trip to New York was, a little about behind-the-scenes activity at the show, and how rewarding the Westminster experience turned out to be.

‘Cam’ greets his owners Christopher, center, and Leslie Robinson, in the staging area after winning his breed category at the 2012 Westminster Dog Show in New York. “Cam” won “Best of Breed” in the sporting category of the dog show on Tuesday. Robinson said the dog won in its category even though it was his first time at the prestigious show. “It was our first dog as a married couple, our first Brittany, our first everything,” she said. When the Camden News spoke to Leslie Robinson, it was Wednesday afternoon she and her husband had just returned from New

York. The couple had traveled to New York on Monday, they attended the dog show and Cam was shown by its handler at Westminster on Tuesday, the Robinsons boarded a plane to return to Arkansas at around 5:40 a.m. on Wednesday and made it back to the state Wednesday afternoon. Despite the whirlwind trip, Robinson said she and her husband are proud of their dog and that Cam’s win is still a bit surreal.

“We are so tired right now we still half-way believe it,” she said. Robinson said she and her husband originally bought the Brittany Spaniel as a pet in 2008, and as a dog for hunting quail. But the couple was advised by breeders they met to look into entering Cam in different shows. Cam was entered in his first show in 2009. Most dog lovers only get the chance to see the show on television this year, but Robinson gave the newspaper a first-hand, backstage, behind-the-scenes glimpse of how things really are at the Westminster show. And with her new experience, she was able to compare the New York show to the one held in Camden. “It’s (Westminster) a lot more crowded than your typical show,” Robinson said. “The Camden show has this wonderful, huge area for grooming with everyone pretty much spaced out. But at Westminster, there are pretty tight quarters. Everything is stacked as high as you can possibly get it, all the dog crates are stacked on

Weather Tonight - Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s. Northeast winds 5 mph. Friday - Partly sunny. Highs in the lower 60s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph. Friday night mostly cloudy, 50percent chance of rain. Lows in the mid 40s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph. Saturday -

Cloudy, cooler. A 50-percent chance of rain. Highs in the lower 50s. Northeast winds 10 to 15 mph. Saturday night mostly cloudy. Colder. A 20-percent chance of rain in the evening. Lows in the mid 30s.

River Stages

(Numbers represent, from left, that station’s flood stage, current stage and 24-hour change.) Ouachita River Arkadelphia 17 11.59 3.55 Camden 26 15.02 2.11 Thatcher 79 77.00 0.00 Moro Bay -- 71.70 0.80 Felsenthal 70 65.30 -0.20 Little Missouri River Boughton 20 10.02 4.18 Sunset: 5:57 p.m. Sunrise: 6:53 a.m.

top of each other three rows. “The space that Camden has is wonderful. The only complaints I’ve ever heard about the Camden show from other people is that it’s not close to anything as far as restaurants and hotels and you have to drive quite a way to get that. But that’s the only complaint, because we (Camden) have so much space, so much parking, it’s ground level and no stairs to cause problems when you have to carry huge crates and such.” Darleen Wheelington, the president of the SAKC, was one of Cam’s first trainers, and she told the Camden News she is also very proud of the dog for his win at Westminster. Unfortunately, Cam is still with his handler in Houston, Texas, and will not be shown at the SAKC dog show on Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 18-19, in East Camden. But other Brittany Spaniels and several other breeds of dog will be seen at this week’s dog show. For a complete schedule, visit www.arkansasdogs. com and click on “SAKC.”

Brown announces bid for JP re-election

Harry Brown, District 4 justice of the peace, has announced that he is seeking reelection during the upcoming Democratic Primary Election. Brown has served as justice of the peace since 2001. He and his wife, Erma, live in Stephens, and he currently serves as the mayor of Stephens. He is a graduate of Stephens High School and a member of Brown St. Stephens B a p t i s t Church. A news release states that Brown is noted for many accomplishments during his tenure on the Ouachita County Quorum Court, and says he hopes the citizens of District 4 will re-elect him as justice of the peace so that “together, we can continue to move Ouachita County forward.”

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Abby . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . 9 Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Crossword. . . . . . . . . . 6 Horoscopes. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Lifestyles . . . . . . . . . . 5 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . 2 Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 What’s Happening. . . . 2 TV listings. . . . . . . . . . .8

Clerk’s office to close on Friday afternoon The Ouachita County Clerk’s Office will be closed Friday afternoon, beginning at 1 p.m. The office will close to allow workers to attend the funeral of a family member of a clerk’s office employee. The office will reopen for normal hours on Tuesday, Feb. 21.


2 - Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012

STOCKS

Arkansas News Digest

Mid-Morning Quotes Company Name DOW JONES INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE ACXIOM AT&T AUTOZONE BANCPSOUTH INC CENTERPOINT CHEVRON CORP NEW COCA COLA DELTIC TIMBER DILLARDS INC DOLLAR GEN CORP NEW ENTERGY CORP NEW FEDEX CORP FORD MOTORS CO. GENERAL DYNAMICS GENERAL MTRS CO INTL.PAPER CO. JB HUNT TRANS. LOCKHEED MARTIN MCDONALDS CORP MURPHY OIL CORP O REILLY AUTOMOTIVE RAYTHEON CO SONIC CORP STAGE STORES TYSON FOODS UNITED PARCEL B USA TRUCK VALERO ENERGY VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS INC WAL-MART STORES WINDSTREAM CORP Provided by:

Mid-morning 12,880.92 14.09 30.15 354.60 12.07 18.90 105.81 68.84 70.02 48.84 42.00 68.52 95.15 12.71 70.13 26.64 33.52 51.97 86.64 99.03 62.60 84.87 48.62 7.88 14.95 19.01 76.57 8.50 25.22 38.09 62.06 12.49

Change 99.97 0.42 0.28 -1.52 0.32 0.06 0.81 0.44 2.35 -0.02 -0.27 1.15 1.00 0.33 0.08 1.71 0.67 0.76 -0.29 0.42 -0.04 1.42 -0.72 0.00 0.16 0.17 0.41 0.00 0.35 0.26 0.30 0.07

Volume 54743741 95141 10280843 161457 229846 7856827 2071805 2481905 4892 133994 520487 614617 576675 23056350 459553 18005263 2316970 210373 809770 1802373 449931 807625 1586254 183030 38483 1134097 1515735 600 3309843 3727687 2286544 1445763

Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. 1325 Hwy. 278 Bypass Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2288 Member FINRA/SIPC

The above list is not a recommendation to buy or sell any of these securities mentioned. Past performance may not be indicative of future results. Investments mentioned may not be suitable to all investors. Raymond James Financial Services may make a market in the shares of any investments mentioned and may deal as a principal. Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., its affiliates, officers, directors, or branch offices may in the normal course of business have a position in any securities mentioned. More detailed information on these investments in available upon request. Commissions are an additional cost of doing business and have not been factored into these prices. Securites offerered through Raymond James Financial Services Inc., are - Not a deposit - Not insured by FDIC or any government agency - NOT GUARANTEED by First Bank - Subject to risk and may lose value. First Bank is independent of Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Price per share is as of 02/16/2012.

What’s Happening

(Items for What’s Happening may be submitted to the Camden News, P.O. Box 798, Camden, AR 71701, or by email at camdennews@camdenarknews.com.)

seat is to be installed must both be present at the event. For more information, call Claudia Williams at 8365755.

SAU Tech to have Camden Bible has Praxis I workshop fundraiser dinner SAU Tech will hold a work-

Camden Bible Baptist Church will hold its 3rd Annual Taco Salad Dinner fundraiser from 4-6:30 p.m. today. The meal is $10, and proceeds will go to fund school programs. For more information, call 836-3716.

Cullendale church to offer free meal

shop for Praxis I from 8:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 18, and Saturday, Feb. 25. The cost of the course is $60, and both dates are included in the price. Participants will receive personalized instruction in writing and math, and will have three, timed Praxis I exams with feedback. To register, contact Lisa Oden at 574-4548, or at loden@ sautech.edu.

Cullendale Assembly of God, 3250 Cash Road near the Cardinal Café in Fairview, and The Salvation Army will provide a meal to families in need from 4:30-6 Dutch Oven event p.m. on today. The event is called "F.E.A.S.T." For more to be held Feb. 25 information, call 231-5406, A Dutch Oven Workshop or e-mail info@cullendale- and Cookoff will be held on ag.org. Saturday, Feb. 25. Chidester council Pre-registration for the event must be done by Satto meet Thursday urday, Feb. 18. The Chidester City Coun- Those who participate in cil will hold a special meet- the workshop, held from 1-3 ing at 6:30 p.m. today at city hall, 118 Willow St. The p.m. on Feb. 25, will receive a council will discuss a sunset new dutch oven upon comtax, water rates and a resolu- pletion. The cost is $30. The free cookoff will be from 3-4 tion to apply for a grant. with all food cooked on White Oak group p.m. site. For more information, will meet Feb. 16 call 870-685-2748. The White Oak Lake Neighborhood Watch group RFL team hosts will meet at 7 p.m. today ‘Harlem’ ball team at White Oak Lake Baptist The Charlie's Angels ReChurch. For more information, call lay for Life Team and the Cecil Hooks at 870-685-2335, Camden Fairview School or 807-833-0826. District will host the "HarSAUT plans event lem Ambassadors Basketball Game & Show" beginning at for black history 5:45 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. SAU Tech will hold its 18, at the Camden Fairview Black History Community High School. Tickets are Celebration at 6 p.m. today $10 for adults and $5 for stuat the Charles O. Ross Cendents. Children four years ter. Dr. E. Faye Williams, chair of the National Con- of age and under will get in gress of Black Women, will free. be the guest speaker for the County offices event.

will close Monday Church to host The Ouachita County ‘Bingo for Charity’ Extension Office and the

St. Louis Catholic Church, 202 N. Adams, will hold a "Bingo for Charity" night at 6:30 p.m. Friday in the parish hall of the church. Concessions will open at 6 p.m., and cash prizes of over $1,800 will be given away.

RSVP dance to be held Friday

The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program will hold a dance from 7-10 p.m. Friday at the Champagnolle Landing Senior Center, 910 East 4th St., El Dorado. Admission is $6 per person. Music will be performed by "Cousin Earl."

Safety seat event held on Saturday

The Camden Police Department, Troop F of the Arkansas State Police and Dimensions, Inc. will present a free child passenger seat safety program from 9 a.m. until noon Saturday at the old Smitty's store parking lot across the street from the police station, next to Car-Mart. The child and the vehicle in which the safety

Ouachita County Courthouse will be closed on Monday, Feb. 20, for the President's Day holiday. Garbage pick up will run on its regular schedule.

Watch group to meet on Feb. 20

Supreme Court hears nursing home case LITTLE ROCK (AP) — Attorneys for an Arkansas nursing home say they deserve a new trial in an alleged neglect case in part because a lower court blocked them from introducing evidence. The lawyers laid out their arguments in front of the Arkansas Supreme Court in the neglect lawsuit filed after the 2005 death of Minnie Valentine. Valentine had a stroke in 2004 and wound up at the nursing home where attorneys say she didn’t receive proper care. Attorneys for Valentine’s estate sued. A jury found in their favor and ordered the nursing home to pay out more than $5 million. During that trial, however, attorneys for the nursing home say they weren’t allowed to introduce evidence about Valentine’s medical condition and care after her stay at the nursing home.

Ex-Tyson Foods worker sentenced for threat TEXARKANA (AP) — A former Tyson Foods worker accused of making a bomb threat last year so he could spend more time with a female friend has been sentenced to time served. Harvey Harper will be supervised by probation officials for a year after being sentenced Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Harry Barnes, according to the Texarkana Gazette. Harper worked at Tyson’s Nashville chicken plant, but the poultry producer fired the 30-year-old after the January 2011 threat. The FBI said it identified Harper by calling the number from which the threat was made and

closed in November 2009 — but the tax continued to be collected to repay the hospital’s debts. County Judge Donald Baker told the Texarkana Gazette that the debts — except for salaries owed two doctors — have been repaid. Baker said the doctors’ salaries will be repaid by Court: Use-of-force the time the tax ends in July. The measure to end the tax passed reports public records on a 474-20 vote on Tuesday. LITTLE ROCK (AP) — The Arkansas Supreme Court has ruled that reNew scanner unveiled ports from police officers that explain why they use force against someone at northwest Ark. airport are not exempt from the state’s public HIGHFILL, Ark. (AP) — The Northrecord law. The state’s highest court issued its west Arkansas Regional Airport now opinion today in a case stemming from has a new full-body scanner that offian incident in which a Little Rock po- cials say should speed up the screenlice officer used force against Chris Er- ing process and reduce the number of win outside a restaurant last year. pat-downs. Erwin’s attorney requested the use- A spokeswoman for the Transportaof-force reports under the Freedom of tion Security Administration says the Information Act. When he didn’t get new machine can scan 150 to 200 pasthe records, he filed a petition against sengers per hour. Sari Koshetz tells the police chief. A lower court said the reports weren’t the Northwest Arkansas Times that exempt from the public records law. passengers who refuse to go through The Supreme Court upheld that deci- the scanner will receive alternative sion and pointed out that it interprets screening, including a thorough physiexemptions to the public records law cal pat-down. narrowly and in favor of disclosure. TSA began using the new scanner Wednesday at the airport in Highfill. Voters in Pike County The Little Rock National Airport has abolish tax for hospital been using two of the scanners since MURFREESBORO (AP) — Voters in December. Pike County have agreed to abolish a The millimeter-wave machines di3/8 cent sales tax that was created to rect radio waves that penetrate the support a now-closed hospital. The tax was enacted in 2007 to sup- clothing of a passenger to reveal conport Pike County Memorial Hospital traband. Officials say the body outline in Murfreesboro and generates an esti- is the same for everyone — which promated $300,000 per year. The hospital vides privacy for passengers. investigators said Harper told them he wanted to stay home with a woman. Harper was released on bond in November. Proceedings were delayed amid questions about Harper’s mental health. The Bureau of Prisons concluded he was competent.

Huckabee stumps for congressional candidate HOT SPRINGS (AP) — Republican congressional candidate Beth Anne Rankin drew a hearty endorsement Wednesday from former Gov. Mike Huckabee, who touted her experience in his administration and running a business as qualification for representing southern Arkansas. Rankin was an adviser to Huckabee and handled contact between the governor’s office and the state’s House

and Senate offices in Washington. The ex-governor said she gained experience dealing with a number of federal issues that affect Arkansas. “Her background and understanding of those issues give her a unique ability to serve the 4th District,” Huckabee said. Rankin worked for Huckabee in seven of his 10 years in office. Huckabee and Rankin ad-

dressed about 150 people who paid $125 for lunch. About 50 attendees paid double that amount to meet with Huckabee at a private reception beforehand. A campaign spokesman said he didn’t know how much money came in. Huckabee, mixing his customary one-liners with serious points, told the crowd that Rankin needs as much money as possible, as Democrats hope to keep the seat

in their hands. Incumbent Rep. Mike Ross isn’t seeking re-election. State Sen. Gene Jeffress of Louann and D.C. Morrison are running as Democrats. “Enormous amounts of funds are coming to get Beth Anne defeated,” Huckabee said. “She needs your prayers, but if that’s all you do make it because it’s all you can do.”

Police Log • A Camden Police Department officer was asked to arrest a suspect for public intoxication and obstructing government operation while out on an unrelated call around 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 14. The officer found James Lee Davis, 58, of Camden in the middle of the

intersection of Willow and Sycamore streets. According to the report Davis had an extremely strong odor of unknown intoxicant emitting from his breath, and was yelling and screaming. The officer was unable to make sense of what Davis was saying. The officer arrested Davis because

of his incoherent state and interrupting the investigation that was previously being conducted. He was issued a citation for public intoxication and obstructing governmental operations, and taken to the Ouachita County Jail to sober up.

Obituaries Earnestine Carroll Earnestine Carroll, 78, of Camden, died on Feb. 11, 2012, at the Ouachita County Medical Center. She was preceded in death by her parents, Frank and Roxie Scott. She is survived by her sons, Henry Jones, Tollie Carroll Jr., Jerome Carroll and Timothy Carroll, all of Camden; daughter, Nora Celestine of Pine Bluff; brothers Alex Scott of Kansas City, Mo., Frank Scott of Grange, Nev., Arthur Scott of Hampton, Va., the Rev. J.C. Scott and Elsie Scott, both of Camden; sisters, Christine Scott and Lillie Scott, both of Cleveland, Ohio; 18 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren. Reddick Funeral Home of Camden is in charge of arrangements. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Pilgrim Rest Missionary Baptist Church, with the Rev. J.C. Scott officiating. Burial will be at Mt. Willie Cemetery. Visitation will be from noon until 5 p.m. Friday, and a wake from 5-6 p.m. Friday, with both being held at the funeral home. To sign the online guest register, visit www.reddickfuneralhome.net.

The South Central Neighborhood Watch group will meet at 6:30 p.m on Monday, Feb. 20, in the lower unit Robert Carter at Greater St. Paul Baptist Church on Adams and Hol- Robert Carter Sr., 74, of Troy, died on Tuesday, Feb. loway Streets. 14, 2012, at the Ouachita Medical Center in Lincoln members County Camden. He was born on search for items April 27, 1937, in Ida, La., to the late John Henry and OlThe Lincoln Alumni As- lie Mae (Davis) Carter. sociation has established Robert was a production a museum in a building at supervisor and retired afthe corner of Lincoln Drive, ter 27 years from Mobil Oil Company. He was a member across from Car-Mart. Alumni are now seeking of Westside United Methodany memorabilia from the ist Church in Camden, was school, which closed in 1970. a 32nd degree mason and an avid outdoorsman who Items can be donated or loved to hunt. He loved his loaned to the museum. wife, his children, and grandFor more information, call children dearly and enjoyed 836-7010 or 836-5618. spending time with them.

He was preceded in death by his parents; and brothers, John Henry Carter Jr. and Cecil M. Carter. He is survived by his wife, Bobbie (Lamkin) Carter of Troy; daughter, Sherri Hunter and husband, Paul, of Camden; son, Robert M. Carter Jr. and wife, Sherrie, of Troy; grandchildren, Brad Carter of Troy, Wesley Carter and wife, Amber, of Buena Vista, and Jacob Hunter and Haley Hunter, both of Camden; great-granddaughter, Lauren Carter of Buena Vista; brother, Thomas Carter and wife, Wendy, of Troy; and numerous nephews, nieces, cousins, and friends. Lewis Funeral Home, Inc. of Magnolia is in charge of arrangements. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Friday at the funeral home chapel with the Rev. Don Nicholson, the Rev. Larry Goza, and the Rev. Phil Worley officiating. Burial will follow at Riddick Cemetery. Pallbearers will be Troy Carter, Merle Weaver, Brad Carter, Wesley Carter, Roger Ottinger, Jeff Lamkin, Edward Earl Davis and Trent Carter. Honorary pallbearers will be Paul Hunter, Jacob Hunter, Dr. Cal Sanders, Monty Hodnett, Lonnie Williams, Robert Arrington and members of the Lamkin Deer Camp. Visitation will be from 68 p.m. today at the funeral home. To sign the online guest register, visit www.lewisfuneralhome.biz.

Glenn Jordan Glenn Edward Jordan, 80, of Camden, passed away on Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012. He was born on Feb. 28, 1931, in Tulip, to Glenn C. and Agnes Ross Jordan. He was an Army and Air Force veteran of the Korean War. He was a member of Cullendale Assembly of God. He was preceded in death

by his daughter, Deborah Lynn Jordan; brother, Billy Joe Jordan; and sister, Cora Mae Smith. He is survived by his wife, Virginia Cross Jordan; son, Michael Jordan J o r d a n ; daughters, Darlene Jones and husband, Tim, and Linda Huggs and husband, Otis; grandchildren, Tyler Jones, David Jones and wife, Brittney, Scott Huggs, Cynthia Huggs, Tiffany Jordan and Marshall Jordan and wife, Katie; three great-grandchildren; brother, James Jordan; and sister, Betty Sue Cross Proctor Funeral Home of

Camden is in charge of arrangements. Funeral services will be 10 a.m. Saturday at the funeral home with the Rev. Chris Cleveland officiating. Burial will be in Bethesda Cemetery. Visitation will be from 68 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to Pine Hills Nursing/Alzheimers Unit or Cullendale Assembly of God. To sign the online guest register, visit www.proctorfuneralhome.com.

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Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 3

Today Ouachita County Adult Education Center sponsored by SAU Tech is open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 237 Jackson. M c C o l l u m Chidester House will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $2 for students under age 18. For groups of 10 or more call 836-9243 for reservations. Public Library of Camden and Ouachita County will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Chidester Public Library will be open from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. SAU Tech Adult Education Center will offer Workplace Readiness Training for free from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 237 Jackson. English as a second language class from 5 until 8 p.m., at the Ross Center, 746 California Ave. These adult education classes are provided free of charge by SAU Tech. For more information call 837-4001. Living Clean Narcotics Anonymous will have an open meeting at 8 p.m. at 805 Monroe. Turning Point Group, Alcoholics Anonymous, will hold an open meeting at 8 p.m. at St. Louis Catholic Church, 202 Adams NW.

Friday, Feb. 17 Written drivers tests will be held from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m., oral tests will be from 10:30-11 a.m. by appointment only, and driving tests will be at 1 p.m. at the Ouachita Valley Business and Technology Center on Adams Avenue in Camden. Ouachita County Adult Education Center sponsored by SAU Tech is open from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at 237 Jackson. M c C o l l u m Chidester House will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $2 for students under age 18. For groups of 10 or more call 836-9243 for reservations. Public Library of Camden and Ouachita County will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Women’s Crisis Center of South Arkansas will have a support group meeting at 10 a.m. Child care will be provided, and volunteers will work with the children on crafts and other activities. Anyone wishing to attend should call 836-0375 or 836-0325. Chidester Public Library will be open from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Celebrate Recovery will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Victory Church, 1283 U.S. 278 in Camden. Camden Group Alcoholics Anonymous will hold an open meeting at 8 p.m. at 805 Monroe.

Sat., Feb. 18 Public Library of Camden and Ouachita County will be open from 9 a.m. to noon. M c C o l l u m Chidester House will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $2 for students under age 18. For groups of 10 or more call 836-9243 for reservations. Camden Group Alcoholics Anonymous will hold an open meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 805 Monroe. Living Clean Narcotics Anonymous Group will hold an open nonsmoking meeting at 8 p.m. at 805 Monroe.

Sunday, Feb. 19 Camden Group Alcoholics Anonymous will hold an open meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 805 Monroe. Alcoholics Anonymous Unity Group will hold an open non-smoking book study meeting at 7 p.m. at 301 Jefferson Ave. Basic Group Narcotics Anonymous will hold an open discussion meeting at 7 p.m. at 972 W. Washington.

U.S. & World News Digest Bernanke says banks have strengthened WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke says the health of the nation’s community banks has strengthened, despite what he calls a frustratingly slow economic recovery. In remarks to a conference on community banking, Bernanke says profits at smaller banks have been rising for the past several quarters. He said the quality of the loans on their books has stopped deteriorating, although the proportion of bad loans remains high. Bernanke says the hundreds of community banks, those with assets below $10 billion, have also seen their capital reserves against future loses increase, in part because they can more easily raise capital.

Romney struggling to attract working class WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Mitt Romney is faltering with white working-class voters crucial to his party’s drive to capture the White House. That’s a problem for him because he’s trying to fend off a rising GOP challenger, Rick Santorum, who appeals strongly to that

group. Combined polls of voters in the first five states that held presidential nominating contests show Romney has led his rivals by comfortable margins among white college graduates. But the exit and entry surveys show only a modest Romney advantage among whites who lack college degrees. The imbalance was most pronounced among less-educated white men, with whom his lead disappeared completely. More recently, a national poll of Republicans by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center shows Romney leading Santorum narrowly among whites with degrees but trailing him among working-class whites.

No common link for Norovirus patients WASHINGTON (AP) — Officials at George Washington University in Washington are alerting the campus that about 85 students have been sickened by the norovirus this week. University officials said in a statement that norovirus was the cause of dozens of cases of gastrointestinal illness. Officials said students who live at the Foggy Bottom campus, the Mount Vernon campus and

off campus were affected but that they could not find a common link. Students were advised to wash their hands frequently and disinfect surfaces. The school also said it would beef up cleaning of commonly used areas. Symptoms of norovirus include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. The virus is usually not considered serious and most people recover in one or two days.

Probe finds Iraqi V.P. behind death squads BAGHDAD (AP) — An Iraqi investigation panel says the country’s Sunni vice president and his employees were behind years of deadly attacks on security officials and Shiite pilgrims. Iraqi Supreme Judicial Council spokesman Abdul-Sattar Bayrkdar did not offer any evidence Thursday to back up the panel’s findings. Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi has denied the charges and accuses Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki of coordinating a smear campaign to consolidate power. The independent judicial council appointed the nine-judge investigating committee after the government issued an arrest warrant against alHashemi in December, throwing

Iraq’s politics into chaos. Al-Hashemi is in Iraq’s northern Kurdish region, where he has sought refuge from the central government in Baghdad.

Cops recruit robbers to stem burglaries

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — What to do when burglaries get out of hand? In Denmark, police think they might have the answer: Turn to the experts themselves, the housebreakers. Northern Zealand police spokesman Finn Bernth Andersen says burglars caught red-handed in the district will be asked to participate in an anonymous questionnaire about their profession. The region, which has seen a 60 percent annual surge in break-ins in some areas, will ask robbers questions about their typical targets, motives and disposal methods for stolen goods. Bernth Andersen conceded that police are not sure of the project’s success but said “we’ll do anything we can to lower the number (of burglaries).” The project is planned to last a few months.

U.K.’s Cameron tells Scotland: Let’s stay together LONDON (AP) — England and Scotland work “so much better together” than apart, British Prime Minister David Cameron said, as he appealed to Scots not to break up the United Kingdom by voting for independence. In a speech in Edinburgh ahead of talks on the ground rules for a referendum, Cameron said Britain was “a warm and stable home that billions elsewhere envy.” “I believe in the United Kingdom,” he said. “I’m a unionist — head, heart and soul. “Of course Scotland could govern itself. So could England. But we do it so much better together.” Cameron was scheduled to hold his first meeting on the issue with Scottish leader Alex Salmond, whose separatist party has long campaigned for Scotland to leave its neighbors behind for the first time in more than 300 years. Salmond is seeking to hold an independence referendum in September 2014, hop-

ing that a separation from London would be completed with a May 2016 election for the Scottish Parliament. However, with opinion polls showing that only about a third of Scots favor splitting the nation, Cameron and other opponents are pressing for the vote to be held earlier. Salmond said negotiations on the details were making progress. “We are moving toward areas of agreement,” he told the BBC. “We’re now agreed there shall be a referendum on Scottish independence, and what we’re now doing is seeking to get agreement on what some of the ground rules for that referendum are.” Scotland and England united in 1707 to form Great Britain, but Scotland gained significant autonomy after voting in 1997 to set up the Edinburgh-based Scottish Parliament, which has power over education, health and justice and can make minor alterations to income tax.

London retains primacy on all matters relating to Britain as a whole — including defense, energy and foreign relations. Cameron’s government and Salmond are already at odds over the date of the referendum, what will be on the ballot paper and whether 16- and 17-year-olds should be entitled to vote. In his Edinburgh speech, Cameron hinted that independence could damage Britain’s status in Europe, within NATO and put at risk the U.K.’s permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council. He said Scotland would be safer and richer if it remained a part of the U.K., along with England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Both Wales and Northern Ireland also have devolved administrations with limited powers. But his overall tone was emollient. Cameron stressed that Scotland had the right to choose its own destiny, but said he hoped it would remain within Britain.

U.S. housing starts rise modestly to start new year WASHINGTON (AP) — Construction of single-family homes cooled off slightly in January after surging in the final month last year. But a rebound in volatile apartment construction kept builders busy and pushed housing starts to their highest level in more than three years. The Commerce Department said that builders broke ground on a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 699,000 homes in January. That’s up 1.5 percent from December and the highest level since October 2008. Construction began on 508,000 single-family homes last month. That’s a 1 percent drop from December and the first decline in four months. Still, December singlefamily homes were revised up strongly to show builders started 513,000 homes — a 12 percent gain from November. Apartment building, a more volatile category, jumped 14.4 percent. Building permits, a gauge of future construction, rose 0.7 percent. Single-family home construction rose in each of the final three months of last year, bringing the pace of those starts to the highest level since April 2010. The modest but steady gains helped boost confidence among builders after the worst year for single-family home construction on record. Still, the critical gauge of the housing market’s health has a long way to go before most declare a full recovery is under way. The current pace is less than half the rate in which those homes went up during the 1990s. And it’s only one-quarter of the 1.82 million single-family homes that builders started in January 2006, at the peak of the housing boom. Most analysts say it could

be years before the industry is fully recovered from the damage caused by the housing bust. Builders are starting to see some signs of progress. A measure of builder sentiment has risen for five straight months and is now at its highest level in nearly five years. Many builders are seeing more people express interest in buying a home, leading them to believe 2012 could be a turn-around year for the market. Mortgage rates have never been cheaper. And home sales started to rise at the end of last year. Yet for all their optimism, builders began only 428,600 single-family homes last year. It was the fewest on records dating back a halfcentury. And home prices

are still falling. Though new homes represent just 20 percent of the overall home market, they have an outsize impact on the economy. Each home built creates an average of three jobs for a year and generates about $90,000 in taxes, according to the National Association of Home Builders. Builders are struggling to compete with deeply discounted foreclosures and short sales — when lenders allow homes to be sold for less than what’s owed on the mortgage. After previous recessions, housing accounted for at least 15 percent of U.S. economic growth. Since the recession officially ended in June 2009, it has contributed just 4 percent.

“Think of the key challenges of our times,” Cameron said. “There’s the risks and opportunities of globalization — with populations moving, cultures clashing and new routes to prosperity. “And there’s the impact of increasing economic competition from the new, economic powerhouses of the world. “I believe the United Kingdom has the answers to both those challenges. “Nothing encapsulates the principle of pooling risk, sharing resources and standing together with your neighbor better than the United Kingdom,” he said. He also suggested Scotland could be granted more powers within the U.K. if it rejected independence. “We have to settle that question before going on and asking, quite legitimately, is there more we can do to improve the devolved settlement?” he said. “Are there other powers that can be devolved? How can we make

the United Kingdom work better?” Salmond insists that independence would bring greater prosperity, allowing Scotland to better exploit its oil, gas and other energy resources. And he was skeptical of Cameron’s suggestion that rejecting independence would bring more powers for Scotland. “If the prime minister has an offer to make to the people of Scotland then he should make it now,” Salmond said. “He should spell it out now so we can have a clear debate and a clear decision on the alternative futures for Scotland. “This idea of saying ’well, vote No and we’ll give you something later’ I don’t think is going to convince anyone in Scotland and I think the prime minister, as a new tactic just adopted this morning, is on very shaky ground if he believes people in Scotland will be fooled again.”

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Editorial Page 4 - Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012

Good decision on jail project Has anyone ever heard of a county jail having too much room or state prisons needing fewer beds? On the contrary. It seems county jails fill to capacity as soon as they’re built, and the state prison system usually stays at capacity-plus status. However, a couple of circumstances have resulted in a kind of negative blip in the number of people being incarcerated. With the number of criminals being sent to prison for committing felonies, state legislators in the last session decided to address the issue by, not reducing crime, but instead raising the dollar amount threshold on felonies such as theft. So when a burglar steals your stuff in an amount that used to be a felony that would send him to state prison, it now could be a misdemeanor, meaning probation or a short stint in the county jail. Is that an answer to the crime problem? Nope. But it has temporarily put a dent in the number of criminals being put behind bars. So it would be seem to be a temporary Band-Aid for a long-term problem. Programs such as Smarter Sentencing and drug courts seem to be more long-term solutions to getting people on paths to avoid prison. But unless innovative programs have significantly-proven results over a long period, and if simply categorizing what used to be felonies as misdemeanors actually reduces the state prison population over the long term, we can expect the need for jail and prison space not to permanently go down. Which is all a long way of saying we don’t think the county can go wrong in using an advantageous financing situation to convert available space at the new Ouachita County Detention Complex to an additional cell pod. The added bed space will be leased to those areas with insufficient room to house inmates, including federal prisoners - which would bringing in added revenue. In 2011, county officials reported that there were between $1.7 and 1.8 million in funds left over from the construction of the county’s new jail. If those funds were not used for jail construction, the county would have to return them to the shareholders who purchased the bonds that financed the jail project. The county judge and quorum court felt it advantageous to take the funds and add a 50-bed pod, especially since housing outside inmates would boost the county’s cash flow. With an additional 50 beds in the county jail and housing outside inmates at $28 per day per inmate for 365 days, the county could make a profit of around $302,339. With the recent news about reported a drop in inmates being incarcerated in state prisons and county jails, it was prudent for the sheriff, county judge and justices of the peace to mull over the decision that had been made to add to the jail capacity. But the county’s decision to go ahead with plans to increase cell space makes sense because it is a good bet that over time, and probably not that long of a time, counties and the state will once again be clamoring for space to house inmates. By taking advantage of the opportunity to afford it now, the county is taking care of its future jail needs and, at the same time, generating revenue.

Editorial

Xi wraps up his scripted visit WASHINGTON (AP) — For Americans looking at the U.S. visit of China’s likely future leader for a clue about where relations between the two nations might be headed, the signal has been clear: No change in substance, but perhaps a change in style. Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping toed the line set by the man he is set to succeed as Communist Party chief in the fall, Hu Jintao, who made a grand U.S. state visit a year ago. Xi, who is expected to become president in 2013, made clear that China wants a deeper relationship with the United States and even welcomes its engagement in the Asia-Pacific, as long as it respects China’s interests and concerns in its own neighborhood. “It was a scripted trip without surprises,” said Jeff Bader, East Asia policy director during the first two years of the Obama administration. “He obviously wasn’t here to make policy, or make decisions or alter positions on issues. He is not the No. 1 yet and he doesn’t want to prejudice his chances of being No. 1.” But while Xi, 58, has said little new — and did little to narrow the gaping differences that exist between the U.S. and China on issues such as human rights — he made a conscious effort to appear less remote than the stiff and aloof Hu. “He’s more interactive than past Chinese leaders. He looks you in the eye, and you feel he’s conversing with you,” said Bader, who spoke briefly with Xi on Wednesday. Mindful that Xi likely will lead China for the next decade, Washington pulled out the stops to make him feel welcome. He held a long meeting with Obama and received a 19-gun salute at the Pentagon — unprecedented for a visiting vice president.

His two-day swing through the power centers of Washington is being followed by a trip to Iowa, where Xi visited in 1985 as a county-level official to learn about crop and livestock practices. He will round off his U.S. visit in California. The Iowa trip in particular will be another opportunity for Xi to show a more personal side and appear less wooden than Hu. He will meet hosts from that trip in the small farming community of Muscatine, where Xi is remembered as handsome and polite 31-year old who was intensely focused on learning as much as he could. “I’m flabbergasted that he would take time out of his busy schedule and come back to Muscatine,” said Eleanor Dvorchak, whose family hosted Xi for two nights during the visit 27 years ago. Before leaving for Iowa on Wednesday, Xi, who has a daughter at Harvard University, used the main policy speech of his U.S. visit to call for more people-to-people ties between the world’s two largest economies. Steering away for a while from the diplomatic-speak characteristic of a Chinese leader, Xi recounted at length a personal story about how, as an official serving in the Chinese province of Fujian in 1992, he had helped an American widow reunite with the elderly friends of her husband who had lived as a child in the province. That said, Xi also has been sure to restate standard Chinese positions, urging the U.S. to oppose any moves toward Taiwanese independence and not meddle on the issue of Tibet, where sentiment against anti-Chinese rule has flared with a spate of self-immolations by Buddhist clergy who support their exiled leader, the Dalai Lama. “He goes back home having burnished his leadership creden-

tials, showing he’s ready to take command and manage relations with the U.S. and state Chinese positions forthrightly,” said Evans Revere, a former senior State Department official on East Asia. Xi also heard plenty of critical voices — a reflection of the gamut of issues on which Washington and Beijing don’t see eye-to-eye, and which also are likely to intrude on the U.S. presidential campaign this year. Xi would have seen the boisterous Tibetan protesters yelling antiChina slogans outside the White House on Tuesday. He listened to business executives and officials’ concerns about unfair trading practices and hurdles to American investment. He also got an earful from a Congress that is never shy about airing its criticism of Beijing. Xi met with House leaders, and Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, delivered a letter regarding the plight of Gao Zhisheng, a dissident and human rights lawyer imprisoned in China. The Chinese vice president also faced tough criticism from senators on human rights and allegations that China manipulates its currency to help its exporters. They also raised China’s veto of a recent U.N. Security Council resolution to condemn the bloody crackdown by Syria’s government on its opponents. John Park, an expert on East Asia and research fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center, said Xi will face many internal challenges when he takes the helm in China and a change in leadership style won’t necessarily mean a new chapter in U.S.-China relations. “There’s been a lot of reading into the fact he spent some time in Iowa. Maybe that was something of a formative experience,” Park said. But he added that it does not mean Xi will be a reformer.

Today in History The Associated Press Today is Thursday, Feb. 16, the 47th day of 2012. There are 319 days left in the year. On this date: In 1945, American troops landed on the island of Corregidor in the Philippines during World War II. Ten years ago: Authorities in Noble, Ga., arrested Ray Brent Marsh, who’d been operating a crematory where hundreds of decomposing corpses were found stacked in storage sheds and scattered in the woods behind it. (Marsh later pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 12 years in prison.) Five years ago: The Democratic-controlled House issued a symbolic rejection of President George W. Bush’s decision to deploy more troops to Iraq, approving the nonbinding resolution by a vote of 246-182. One year ago: Bookstore chain Borders filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and said it would close nearly a third of its stores. (Borders closed all of its remaining stores in Sept. 2011.) Today’s Birthdays: Actor LeVar Burton is 55. Actor-rapper Ice-T is 54. Actress Sarah Clarke is 41. Actress Elizabeth Olsen is 23. Actor Mike Weinberg is 19. Thought for Today: “I am content to define history as the past events of which we have knowledge and refrain from worrying about those of which we have none — until, that is, some archaeologist digs them up.” — Barbara W. Tuchman, American historian (1912-1989).

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Shadrack, please say it’s satire Poor Steve Holland. He must have mistaken this for a country where people read books and have walking-around sense. Satire used to be a legitimate tool in the crusader’s box, but most citizens -- senses dulled by too much television, minds atrophied by sitting on their library cards -- are as humorless as stumps. Satire is dead. Just ask Randy Newman. Mississippi’s Holland is a populist Democrat legislator, an endangered species if ever there was one. He lately proposed that the Gulf of Mexico be renamed the Gulf of America. His intention was to highlight with pointed humor the absurdity of the anti-immigration hysteria abroad in the land. His modest proposal went virile, launching the usual volley of “Mississippi is racist” commentary from outside the state and Republican venom from within. In other words, nobody got his point or his humor. I was hoping that an Alabama Republican senator was using the same thankless satirical technique when I read about Shadrack McGill’s comments the other day. I hoped he, like Holland, would be forced to explain that his tongue was firmly planted in his rosy cheeks. But ol’ Shadrack was serious. He said schoolteachers should not get a pay raise, because the

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Rheta Grimsley Johnson Bible tells us so. “It’s a biblical principle,” he said at -- where else? -- a prayer breakfast. “If you double a teacher’s pay, you’ll attract people who aren’t called to teach ... It better be a calling in your life. I know I wouldn’t want to do it, OK?” Not OK. Teachers and police and fire fighters almost always are underpaid and almost always deserve raises, and nobody had mentioned doubling Alabama teachers’ paychecks anyhow. What had been mentioned was a 2.5 percent raise for one-third of the state’s teachers with the least seniority, according to one newspaper account. Shadrack said the 62-percent pay raise legislators gave themselves was acceptable because the $1,650 a day they now earn made politicians less susceptible to bribes. That’s probably in Shadrack’s Bible, too, but I can’t quote you scripture and verse, having read a different Bible. not be published. Letters must be addressed to the editor; open letters to other individuals or groups are not used. Poetry and form letters are not accepted. All letters become the property of the Camden News. Thank you items will not be published as letters to the editor. Writers are limited to one letter to the editor per month. Letters must be signed by the

You can see why I hoped Shadrack was the Steve Holland of Alabama, but now I’m being silly. Shadrack literally meant what he said. If you pay teachers well, you’ll attract the kind of riffraff who want to feed their families. Pay state legislators absurdly well and maybe, just maybe, they will refuse all bribes. You decide. I like Steve Holland because he once came to my book-signing in the Tupelo library. I like him because he knows what a book and a library are. But he’s hissing in the wind. Whenever I’m tempted as a columnist to use satire to make a point, I remember my own failures. I once wrote a column about W using only three-word sentences because a survey had shown voters admired George Bush because he spoke in short sentences. “I like Bush. He makes sense.” Readers thought I’d had a big change of heart. Randy Newman’s brilliant satirical song about short people actually addressed the cruelty of all discrimination. He got flak from short people. (Rheta Grimsley Johnson is a King Features Syndicate columnist. To find out more about her and her books, visit www.rhetagrimsleyjohnsonbooks.com) writers to be considered for publication. An address and phone number must be included for verification purposes. Names, under most circumstances, will not be withheld. Address letters to: The Editor Camden News P.O. Box 798 Camden, AR 71711


Lifestyles Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 5

Bariatric surgery and mall teeth whitening

By MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., and MEHMET OZ, M.D. Q: I'm 100 pounds overweight, and I've never had any luck losing weight. Now I've got diabetes. Do you think bariatric surgery is a smart way to go? -- Gary F. A: If you lose 100 pounds, you'll gain 100 percent in selfconfidence and health. You'll dramatically reduce your risk for heart attack and stroke, normalize your blood sugar, slash cancer risks, ease or prevent osteoarthritis and protect your brain from dementia. But not everyone can do it on his or her own, even with programs and support from friends and family. So we YOU Docs get it that weight-loss surgery is a solution for some. And if RIGHT NOW you are at risk of lifethreatening health problems because of your weight, it may be smart to opt for bariatric surgery. The stomach-shrinking procedure is for men 100 or more pounds overweight, women 80 plus, or people who are less overweight but who also have diabetes, heart disease or sleep apnea. But this is not a "get

Q: At the mall, there's a teethwhitening kiosk that offers a $99 bleaching session. Are these setups safe to go to? -- Lynda G.

healthy in an instant" scheme. Afterward, to really get healthy for the long term, you have to change your eating patterns and get up and get moving. And there are other positives and negatives, too: Some studies indicate that more than 60 percent of folks see their glucose level normalize after surgery, and it often cures sleep apnea, gastric reflux disease and other ailments. But more recent research indicates that only 41 percent of patients who had gastric bypass surgery (also known as Rouxen-Y), and 26 percent who had gastric sleeve resection (surgical removal of part of the stomach), and 7 percent who had ad-

justable gastric banding, were "cured" of diabetes long term. And any surgery has risks, from anesthesia, infection or unforeseen complications. If you do opt for surgery - after going through a screening and making sure the doc you choose is a real pro at the procedure -- you'll also need to renovate your life the oldfashioned way, with "YOU On a Diet" food changes and exercise. You can do this, Gary! Start today by getting a pedometer and a buddy, and committing to walking 10,000 steps a day, no matter what else you decide to do.

A: A bright smile is pleasing, but you don't want to end up with a blinding shine like Ross in the "Friends" dental-disaster episode. Or throw your money away on no results at all. Many quick glows are manned by anyone but a dentist. In fact, they're so iffy that South Carolina, North Carolina, Oklahoma and other states are trying to regulate the practice. (Arkansas already has banned it.) So here's what to look out for: What are they using for bleach, and how strong is it? A 10 percent carbamide peroxide solution is American Dental Association-approved for use in at-home teeth-whitening products; so it's pretty safe for it to be given to you by a secretary with a second job. (In most, if not all, of these places, the workers don't actually apply the bleach to your teeth - you do.) But it doesn't pack a lot of whitening power. Trained pros should be the

only ones to deliver 15 percent to 35 percent hydrogen peroxide. (It's usually combined with the bleaching powers of a light or laser.) When they use that strength at the mall, without medical oversight, the risks for gum irritation, sensitivity and overbleaching go up. Also, there's no one to make sure your tooth discoloration doesn't require dental therapy. Or to handle color differences between your natural teeth and any veneers or caps. The ideal combo? YOU Docs suggest in-office whitening, then use brush-ons and toothpastes. Repetitive whitening at low concentrations of active ingredients gives longer-lasting results. But don't do it more than once every two weeks, or you'll thin tooth enamel. A simple five-minute fluoride treatment before bleaching will allow the teeth to recover fully in two weeks. Smile! (The YOU Docs is distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc., and sponsored in the Camden News by A Healthy Ouachita County.)

Trimming super-size with half-orders, plate colors

Births Lewis Danielle Rhodes and Virgel Lewis announce the birth of a daughter, IsaBella M’Caiyah Lewis at 5:38 p.m. on Feb. 10, 2012, at Ouachita County Medical Center. She weighed 6 pounds, 8.8 ounces and was 19 inches long. Grandparents are Stephanie Anderson, Bruce Rhodes, Marchella Lewis Lockhart, and Johnny Lockhart.

Randall Kirsten Schmidt announces the birth of a daughter, Somaya Olivia Randall, at 2:35 a.m. on Feb. 11, 2012, at Ouachita County Medical Center. She weighed 7 pounds, 10.6 ounces and was 20 inches long. Siblings are Cornelius, Illeana, and Christopher Randall. Her grandmother is Kathy McKenzie.

Strickland Christopher Strickland and Jemiris Perez announce the birth of a daughter, Mia Lachele Strickland at 8:43 a.m. on Feb. 8, 2012, at Ouachita County Medical Center. She weighed 5 pounds, 3.6 ounces and was 18 inches long. Her sibling is Ja’niyah C. Stickland. Her grandmother is Teresa Jones.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it the alter-ego of super-sizing. Researchers infiltrated a fast-food Chinese restaurant and found up to a third of diners jumped at the offer of a half-size of the usual heaping pile of rice or noodles — even when the smaller amount cost the same. Giant portion sizes are one of the culprits behind the epidemic of bulging waistlines, and nowhere is the portion-creep more evident than in restaurants with French fry-heavy meal deals or plates overflowing with pasta. Now scientists are tapping into the psychology of eating to find ways to trim portions without people feeling cheated — focusing on everything from the starchy sides to the color of the plates. “The small Coke now is what used to be a large 15 years ago,” laments psychologist Janet Schwartz, a marketing professor at Tulane University who led the Chinese food study. “We should ask people what portion size they want,” instead of large being the default. Restaurants are paying close attention, says prominent food-science researcher Brian Wansink of Cornell University. His own tests

found children were satisfied with about half the fries in their Happy Meal long before McDonald’s cut back the size, and the calories, last year. “We’ll be seeing some very creative ways of down-sizing in the next couple of years,” predicts Wansink, author of Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think. But let’s call it “right-sizing,” says Duke University behavioral economist Dan Ariely. Right-size suggests it’s a good portion, not a cut, he says. Couldn’t you just get a doggie bag? Sure, if you’ve got the willpower to stop before your plate is mostly clean. Lots of research shows Americans don’t. We tend to rely on visual cues about how much food is left, shoveling it in before the stomach-to-brain signal of “hey wait, I’m getting full” can arrive. So Schwartz and Ariely tested a different approach: Could we limit our own temptation if we focus not on the tastiest reason we visited a restaurant — the entree — but on the side dishes? After all, restaurants can pile on calorie-dense starches like rice or pasta or fries because they’re very

inexpensive, filling the plate so it looks like a good deal, Schwartz says. A popular Chinese franchise at Duke University, with a mix of students, staff and visitors to the campus hospital, allowed the researchers in at lunchtime. In the serving line, customers pick the rice or noodles first. The standard serving is a whopping 10 ounces, about 400 calories even before ordering the entree, says Schwartz. There was no half-size option on the menu board. In a series of experiments, servers asked 970 customers after their initial rice or noodle order: “Would you like a half-order to save 200 calories?” Those who said yes didn’t order a highercalorie entree to compensate. Weighing leftovers showed they threw away the same amount of food as customers who refused or weren’t offered the option. A 25-cent discount didn’t spur more takers. Nor did adding calorie labels so people could calculate for themselves, the researchers report in this month’s journal Health Affairs — concluding the up-front offer made the difference. Anywhere from 14 percent to 33

percent chose the reduced portions, depending on the day and the mix of customers. Even 200 fewer calories can add up over time. And other tricks can trim portions without people noticing, whether dining out or at home. Cornell’s Wansink found people served 18 percent more pasta with marinara sauce onto a red plate than a white one — and 18 percent more pasta alfredo onto a white plate. A stark contrast “makes you think twice before you throw on another scoop,” explains Wansink. His own family bought some dark dinner plates to supplement their white ones, because people tend to overeat white starches more than veggies. Wansink’s other research has found: • Switching from 11-inch plates to 10-inch plates makes people take less food, and waste less food. The slightly smaller plate makes a normal serving look more satisfying. • People think they’re drinking more from a tall skinny glass than a short wide one even if both hold the same volume, a finding Wansink says was widely adopted by bars.

Club News Camden Amateur Radio Club

is being designed to take in all communications needed in a disaster situation. Kennedy reminded club members about the Thursday night Radio net held on the Camden Repeater at 8 p.m. He also mentioned that during severe weather an informal net is held to make sure that communications are established if needed. The meeting was adjourned at 9 p.m. with the next meeting being scheduled for 7:00 p.m. March 6 at OCMC's Green Room.

The Camden Amateur Radio Club held its monthly meeting on Feb. 7 in the Green Room at OCMC. After the meeting was called to order the nominating committee made its recommendation for club officers for the 2012 year. The names put forth were for president Richard Kennedy-KD5PTG, vice-president Donna Jeffus – KD5ZJW and treasurer Richard Murry – KF5DCX. It was decided to postpone the election until the March ••• meeting to give more members an opportunity to par- New Century Club ticipate in the process. Club Members of the New Cendues were due in January tury Club met Feb. 14 in the and can be paid to club trea- home of Mrs. John Hendrick with Ms. Gloria Bounds surer Richard Murry. as co-hostess. President Kennedy gave a presenta- Mrs. Dan Martin called the tion on a possible site for meeting to order. Secretary, the upcoming Field Day Mrs. Richard Taylor, read Event being held June 23-24. the minutes of the January, The site suggested was at meeting. Treasurer Mrs. White Oak Lake State Park George Smith gave her rebehind the visitor center. "It port. Mrs. Martin reminded has all that we need to operthe recording secretary, the ate, it has public access and corresponding secretary does not have power lines Mrs. W. H. Mulligan, and the to interfere with radio optreasurer that their annual erations.," Kennedy stated in reports are due in March. his presentation. Other sites will be looked at if proposed Mrs. Martin announced the members of the nomiby a club member. The Fox hunt for May 5 is nating committee: Mrs. still on at this time, but some Donald Baustian, chair, with things need to be worked out members Mrs. Robert Fisher as location and ground rules and Mrs. Vernon Garrison. for the event. Jeffus spoke She directed Mrs. Mulligan of a full scale exercise be- to send a card to Mrs. John ing held April 20 which may Stinson on the occasion of need to involved amateur ra- her 100th birthday. She also asked that a card be sent to dio operators. Joe Giddens-N5IOZ, gave Mrs. George Davidson. an overview of a new sys- Mrs. Hendrick introduced tem being developed for her guest, daughter, Mrs. emergency communications Dwayne Daniels. called Auxiliary Communi- In the absence of Mrs. Dacation System. This system vidson, Mrs. Hugh Wayne

Jeffus was the leader for the day’s program, Visual Arts. The quote for the day was “Every genuine work of art has as much reason for being as the earth and the sun.”…Emerson. Roll Call was answered with “A movie I’d like to see made is…. Mrs. Hendrick introduced Margy Niel of El Dorado. Niel, president of the South Arkansas Arts Center, related her personal experiences with filmmaking. She has teamed up with a Little Rick group on the condition that she work with them and they cooperate with her in bringing film making to South Arkansas. She described her film “Seven Souls”, made in El Dorado, a 20-minute production filmed in five days. She emphasized the importance of entering the many film festivals in an effort to get your product before the public. She cited the many advantages of working in South Arkansas and praised the efforts of the SAU film classes. She concluded her presentation by showing her latest film, “ Bloodstone Diaries.” Mrs. William Mulligan, entertainment chair, announced that he next meeting will be March 13 in the home of Mrs. Baustian with Mrs. Hendrick as co-hostess. Guests were invited to the tea table which carried out the Valentine’s Day theme. The hostesses were assisted in serving by Mrs. Judson Hout and Mrs. George Smith.

Photo by Mary Brown

Valentine royalty Byron Usher, standing, and Michelle Turner, seated, take a moment to have their photograph taken as Ouachita Industries' 2012 Valentine King and Queen at the recent Valentine’s party at the Ross Center. Usher and Turner were crowned prior to the event after their names were drawn to be honored as royalty.


6 - Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012

Compromise reached to extend tax cuts

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are mostly satisfied with a compromise bill extending payroll tax cuts and benefits for the longterm unemployed through 2012, and it should be pushed through Congress quickly, the party’s House leader said today. The remarks by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi came hours after a post-midnight announcement by the two lead negotiators, Rep. David Camp, R-Mich., and Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., that only technical issues and the drafting of legislative language remained. The bill would assure a continued tax cut for 160 million workers and jobless benefits for several million others, delivering top

election-year priorities to President Barack Obama and edging a white-hot political battle a big step closer to being resolved. Congressional leaders have said they hope for congressional approval by Friday, a goal Pelosi, DCalif., said she supports. “I don’t think the American people can wait another day,” she told reporters. Pelosi also said that while Democrats were hoping parts of the roughly $150 billion measure could be paid for with savings from winding down wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, “I don’t see a scenario where our members would vote against it.” Though there were hints that last-minute problems might still

crop up, negotiators were bullish that work on the legislation was virtually complete, saying that only technical work remained. The temporary payroll tax cut and extra unemployment coverage initially ran into GOP resistance, some of which lingers. But Republicans have largely concluded that it would be politically damaging to oppose the package, particularly in this presidential and congressional election year. That contrasted with their attitude in December, when House Republicans refused to back a bipartisan Senate bill providing a two-month extension of the tax cuts and jobless benefits while bargainers completed a yearlong deal — only to retreat under bar-

rages of criticism from Republicans and conservatives around the country. Underscoring that they had learned the consequences of seeming to block a middle-class tax cut, House Republicans removed the major hurdle to the legislation earlier this week when they agreed that the payroll tax cut — comprising about two-thirds of the measure’s cost — would not have to be paid for with spending cuts. Chief among the late disputes was a proposal to save around $15 billion — about half the $30 billion cost of the bill’s extended jobless benefits — by requiring federal workers to contribute an additional 1.5 percent of their pay to their

pensions. Democrats, including Sen. Ben Cardin and others from Maryland, home to many government employees, resisted that plan, holding up a final handshake among congressional bargainers. The provision was ultimately changed to target the boost only at newly hired federal workers, requiring them to contribute 2.3 percent of their salaries toward defined benefit pensions. There was little controversy over the main thrust of the bill. A 2-percentage-point cut in the 6.2 percent Social Security payroll tax, which is deducted from paychecks, would run through 2012. For a family earning $50,000 a year, the cut saves $1,000 annually.

Horoscopes

For Friday: ARIES (March 21-April 19): Refrain from being overly generous with your time, information or skills. Whatever you do should benefit you personally or professionally. You'll be competitive and efficient when it comes to achieving your goals. Don't let a romantic problem slow you down. ** TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Strive for perfection. If you are accurate, quick and agile in whatever you do, you will come out on top. Your ability to digest information will enhance the outcome of whatever you pursue. *****

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Stick to whatever will benefit you most. Home improvements, financial dealings or finishing a project that is in demand will bring you rewards. Interesting connections you make while marketing your talents will inspire you to expand your plans. *** CANCER (June 21-July 22): You'll be undecided regarding personal versus professional responsibilities. Organization coupled with unorthodox methods will help you take care of matters of concern. Let your intuitive intelligence be your guide and you will satisfy everyone's needs.

*** LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do the things you love doing most. Don't let someone use emotional blackmail to stand in your way or make you question what you truly want. Live life your way and you will not regret your decision. Compatibility and common interests go hand-in-hand. *** VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Concentrate on honing your skills and being the best you can be. Don't let someone else's unpredictability ruin your plans. Join a group that shares your concerns or caters to something you enjoy doing. You need a creative outlet.

***** LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Too much uncertainty is present in a relationship with someone sending mixed signals. You'll get to the bottom of a personal problem you are dealing with if you do a little investigating. Renovating or changing your surroundings will lift your spirits. ** SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Use intelligence and intuition to come up with workable solutions to problems at home. Uncertainty regarding your future may be where your concerns originate. A change of location or networking functions you attend will help

you out. **** SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Avoid anyone who is trying to use you in any way. You can expect someone to misrepresent you or to start a rumor that will tarnish your reputation. Let the dust settle before you engage in retaliation. Success is your best weapon. *** CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Emotions will well up if you let others bother you. Concentrate on your home and how you can make your surroundings more conducive to the lifestyle you want to live. Don't let someone else's decision disrupt your life.

*** AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Someone from your past will help you out. Get involved in a group that allows you the freedom to speak about your concerns and you will reach higher goals. A personal change you make will improve your life. *** PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Whom you know will make a difference regarding a project you want to pursue. You'll be surprised how good it feels to put the past behind you and to pick up where you left off with someone important to your present and future. **** By Eugenia Last

Crossword

Ways to right our driving wrongs By Eugene Sheffer DEAR ABBY: "Mild-Mannered Motorist in Virginia" (Dec. 26) asked you for a hand signal to indicate "I'm sorry" to fellow drivers when he makes mistakes behind the wheel. Not long ago, I made a not-so-serious mistake that angered another driver. When I flashed a peace sign, then moved my mouth in an "I'm sorry," the person's frown changed to a smile. We then drove on with pleasant attitudes, and I tried to watch my driving more closely. The peace sign, of course, is hand closed, forefinger and middle finger up as in a "V." I think the whole world recognizes a peace sign. It worked for me. FAITHFUL READER IN ARKANSAS DEAR FAITHFUL READER: I assured "Mild-Mannered" that my helpful readers would step forward to offer suggestions for an "I'm sorry" signal. And many, like you, mentioned giving the peace sign. Offering more options, my newspaper readers comment: DEAR ABBY: We New Yorkers have honed silent signals to a fine art. When I'm at fault in traffic or other situations where I can't apologize verbally, I make eye contact, put my hand to my chest to accuse myself, and put my hands in a prayerful gesture to ask forgiveness. This almost always defuses the situation on the spot. Add a smile and you've made a friend as well. LORNA, IN THE CITY DEAR ABBY: I, too, have made boo-boos while driving and wish I could have said "I'm sorry," but the person is usually too busy shaking a fist and screaming what are obviously obscenities to notice. I like the idea of a standard "sorry" gesture. How about holding one

Dear Abby hand up with your palm toward your face for just a second? (As in "I'm ashamed of what I just did.") It's simple and lets you keep your other hand on the wheel. CAROL IN HOUSTON

ticed the "offending" car was directly behind me. It continued following me and I started becoming concerned that I had a stalker. Turning into my neighborhood, I quickly drove up my driveway and into my garage. When I got out of the car, the young woman was walking up the driveway. She then began profusely apologizing for having caused a problem for me. She had driven miles out of her way to offer her apology, which I gratefully accepted. Then we both thanked God for protecting us. I have never seen her again, but I hope she knows I respect her tremendously. PLEASANTLY SURPRISED IN NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR ABBY: If I think the other driver will be able to see me, the gesture I make after a mistake is an exaggerated, slow smack to my forehead -- basically, my own Homer Simpson "Doh!" IN THE WRONG IN MAINE DEAR ABBY: Why not use the American Sign Language symbol for "sorry"? Make DEAR ABBY: "Mild-Mana fist with your right hand, nered Motorist's" letter repalm toward the body and minded me of an incident a place it over the area of your few years ago. Driving home heart and move it in small from work, I was forced circles. Of course, the ex- to swerve into an oncompression on your face pulls ing lane by a car driven by it all together. Sign language a young woman who was is used by many people, and pulling onto the road from the chance that the person a parking lot. She didn't see you offended may already me because of traffic in the ••• be familiar with this sign lane to my right. Fortunatemakes it a great way to con- ly, there were no oncoming vey the sentiment. vehicles, and I was able to Write Dear Abby at www. SIGN USER IN OLD return to my lane and pro- DearAbby.com or P.O. Box LYME, CONN. ceed. 69440, Los Angeles, CA At the traffic signal, I no- 90069.

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HEALTH Continued from Page 1 The center is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, with clinics held on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday afternoon with two evening clinics per week. To qualify for services at the Christian Health Clinic, a person must be employed, not have any other outside source of health coverage such as Medicaid, Medicare or private insurance; must be a resident of Ouachita County and meet financial guidelines. The center does receive

grants to operate certain programs and the prescription assistance program, but runs mostly on donations for overhead expenses. With tougher financial times, the center has recently seen a drop in donations, and Boyd reminded residents that they could help support CHC through making monetary donations, supporting fundraisers and even making a donation in memory of a loved one. Upcoming fundraisers are a “Sunday Dinner” from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 4, at What’s Cookin’; a “White Elephant” sale at

St. John’s Episcopal Church on March 9-10, the weekend of the Daffodil Festival; and a “Dinner and Bingo Night” at 6 p.m. on April 28 at St. Louis Catholic Church; and through the purchase of RADA cutlery through the center’s Web site. Boyd said there have been three cases in the last four months of the center treating people who had lifethreatening illness and did not have health insurance to help treat the illness. To find out more about the Christian Health Center, visit www.camdenchc.org.

6:30 am til 5:30 pm Mon.-Fri. Sat 9-1

February 16th Carrie Steed Boyce McClain Denise Merritt


Sports Camden News - Thursday, February 16. 2012 - 7

Sports Focus Games no longer free online for all NEW YORK (AP) — Some fans will no longer be able to watch every NCAA men’s basketball tournament game online for free. Turner, CBS and the NCAA announced Thursday a new model for streaming March Madness. Games aired on CBS will still be free through the network’s website. Most, but not all, viewers who get TBS, TNT and truTV on their cable or satellite systems will also be able to watch games aired on those channels for free online. Fans will also have the option of paying $3.99 to see all games on multiple platforms — online, mobile and tablet. The app will be available on Android phones for the first time. About 77 million households will be able to watch the Turner channels for free online.

Arkansas women eyeing berth FAYETTEVILLE (AP) — Tom Collen wanted to do everything possible to forget about those first four Southeastern Conference games. The Razorbacks’ coach went so far as to put up a new group of standings in the team’s locker room, one that featured only nine SEC teams rather than the league’s full complement of 12. Collen’s philosophy: Arkansas had already lost to the top three teams in the league — Georgia, Kentucky and Tennessee — so why not just focus on finishing at the top of what was left? Whatever the reasoning or psychology, Collen’s plan worked. Following a defeat at Mississippi on Jan. 12 — a loss that sent the Razorbacks to 0-4 in the SEC — Arkansas has won a program-best eight SEC games in a row. The streak has lifted the Razorbacks (19-5, 8-4 SEC) from the bottom of the league to the top of Collen’s limited standings. Heading into Thursday night’s game with LSU (178, 7-5), Arkansas is fourth in the SEC — with hopes of returning to the NCAA tournament for the first time since the 2002-03 season. “They took some hard knocks again this year, but they’ve been able to rebound from it,” Collen said. “I don’t know if they could have rebounded from 0-4 last year, but this year they did.” The Razorbacks are rolling behind a group of five seniors who formed Collen’s first recruiting class. C’eira Ricketts, Lyndsay Harris and Ashley Daniels were forced to play large roles as freshmen — resulting in growing pains at times.

Hogs no match for Vols on road By BOB HOLT Arkansas Democrat-Gazette KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Arkansas is running out of a chances to get at least one for the road this season. Tennessee made sure it didn’t become the first home team to lose to the Razorbacks, as the Volunteers rolled to a 77-58 victory on Wednesday night at ThompsonBoling Arena before an announced

crowd of 16,048. Arkansas (17-9, 5-6 SEC) remained the only SEC team without at least one road victory as the Razorbacks fell to 0-9 away from Walton Arena, including a loss to Houston at Verizon Arena in North Little Rock. The Razorbacks have just two road games left, at Auburn on Feb. 25 and at Mississippi State on March 3. “You’ve got to have some leader-

ship, some veteran play on the road,” Arkansas Coach Mike Anderson said. “You’ve got to have guys make plays for you, and you’ve got to have that level of toughness. “This is the growing pain of going through it with a young team. We’ve just got to keep getting experience. “I’m encouraging our guys to keep fighting and keep scratching, and eventually they’re going to get it.”

Freshmen guard BJ Young and freshman forward Hunter Mickelson combined for 30 points to lead the Razorbacks. Young, making his third start of the season, had a game high 18 points and hit 7 of 10 shots and 3 of 4 free throws. Mickelson had a seasonhigh 12 points on 6-of-9 shooting and added 5 rebounds and 2 blocked shots.

CF's Jones retires By KELLY BLAIR Sports Editor After 26 years of coaching, Mark Jones has decided to take a break. Jones, who has served as the defensive coordinator for Camden Fairview’s varsity football team for the last three seasons, officially retired on Tuesday, when the CF school board accepted his resignation. Jones said while he has been extremely happy during his time at Camden Fairview, he has opted to “step away (from coaching) and see how much I miss it” while deciding what career choices he wants to make in the future. “What it comes down to is right now I can make just about as much retired, as I can working, because they base everything on your biggest three years (of income),” Jones said. “I can say this though, in 26 years of coaching, I’ve been at the bottom of the barrel, at the top of the barrel, and in the middle of the barrel a bunch, but the best six years I have ever had were my first three (at UCA) and my last three here at Camden Fairview.” After finishing up his playing career at the University of Arkansas-Monticello, where he roomed for a time with current CF head football coach Buck James, Jones spent three years as a graduate assistant at the University of Central Arkansas under Harold Horton before coming to Camden to be Bob Gatling’s defensive coordinator at Camden High School in 1989. Jones mentioned that UCA only lost one game in his three years at the school, and joked that “it ruined me for the rest of my coaching career.” He left Camden after one year to go to Benton where he served as an assistant for five years, then served as the defensive coordinator for Henderson State for four years, and had just taken a job to be the defensive coordinator at UCA when the head coaching job at Benton opened up. Wanting to be a head coach, Jones said he applied for that job and was hired, taking over for the recently retired Dwight Fite. Jones ended up being the head coach at Benton for 10 years, compiling an overall record of 47-57-2. The Panthers won conference championships in 2003, 2004 and 2005, and qualified for the playoffs seven times in the 10 years Jones was coach there. The Panthers advanced to the quarterfinals in ‘04 and ‘05, before Jones resigned following backto-back 2-8 seasons. In three years as the Cardinals’ defensive coordinator, Jones helped lead the school to backto-back appearances in the state championship game in 2009 and 2010, before the Cardinals lost in the semifinals this season. The Cardinals also won three straight conference championships during Jones’ time with the program. Jones, who will remain on staff

until June 30, said he is announcing his retirement now so James and the CF administration will have plenty of time to find a replacement for next season. “I didn’t want them to have to go out and try to find someone at the end of the summer ... I’m just trying to do what is best for the program,” Jones said. He added that he has thought about going to work with his brother, who is starting a new business, but said he is not entirely sure what he might do at this point. He definitely left the door open to returning to coaching. “I would like to be a head coach again someday - I won’t lie about that, and a place like Camden Fairview is the kind of place that I would like to be a head coach at,” Jones said. “If the right opportunity came along, I would certainly jump at it.” Whatever he does in the future, it will likely take place up around Northwest Arkansas, where Jones said he plans to move his family - wife Hope and son Steven - back to. Jones was born and raised in Fayetteville before moving away in 1981. “All my brothers, sisters, nieces and nephews, they are all still in Fayetteville,” Jones said. “My mom and dad are extremely excited about it. Of course, they are more excited about me bringing their grandson to them than anything.” Jones reiterated several times that he was extremely happy with his time spent in Camden, mentioning that it was really nice to work with long-time friends Sherman Brooks and James. “I can’t say enough good things about the good things that I have been a part of here in Camden,” Jones said. “From the community to the administration, to the coaching staff and the kids - everyone welcomed me here with open arms. The only way it could have ended on a higher note is if we had been able to bring the whole thing (state title) home.” CF athletic director Fred Lilly said a search for a new defensive coordinator would begin immediately, adding that there wouldn’t be a definite time line for a new hire. He also said the district would look for a replacement both within the school district and outside of it, adding that James would play a very big role in the hiring of the new coach. Lilly said its easier to bring someone in immediately in cases where a head coach is hired, but that with assistant coaches, the school they are leaving often needs them to finish out the school year first. “We were really pleased with what Coach Jones was able to do for us. He came in with a lot of energy and fire,” Lilly said. “But we understand his desire to get back a little closer to home, and we’re excited for him.”

Photo by Mary Brown

Setting the screen Camden Fairview's Maya Ford (12) dribbles around a helpful screen set by teammate Aysia Jackson during a recent home game at the Birdhouse. The Cardinals and Lady Cardinals travel to Magnolia on Friday.

Diamond Hogs ready to start season

By NATE ALLEN For the Camden News FAYETTEVILLE - The snow that customarily falls before the Arkansas Razorbacks' season-opening baseball week has already come and gone. The Baum Stadium forecast is sunny, and with February baseball bearable temperatures for the Razorbacks' season-opening series against the Villanova Wildcats Friday through Sunday at 3 p.m., 1 p.m., 1 p.m. Judging by the overflow crowd at the Swatter's Club baseball booster's meeting earlier this month at the Fayetteville Clarion, Arkansas fans already have caught baseball fever anticipating the deepest pitching staff of the Dave Van Horn era headed by Preseason junior All-American DJ Baxendale. The infield, headed by another potential All-American, switch-hitting first baseman Dominic Ficociello, returns intact. The outfield, with Sam Bates, Jacob Morris and Matt Vinson stepping up from part-time roles last year into fullfledged ones, seems to be taking shape. Now if the catching can just catch on, the Hogs will have something. James McCann, one of Arkansas' greatest defensive catchers in a school with a tradition of great defensive catchers, has

moved on to the pros after three years of being not just the backstop but the foundation. It has left sophomore Jacob Wise and freshman John Clay Reeves, battling to be McCann's heir apparent, not just will with shoes to fill but caverns. "It's not even fair to whoever comes in behind McCann to compare," Arkansas assistant coach Todd Butler said. "But these two guys are going to be plenty good enough." Van Horn said he's been impressed how Wise, lettering as McCann's backup last year, and Reeves, have responded to the challenge not just individually but collectively at the position that most naturally requires a team player directing traffic and working with the pitchers. Both, Van Horn said, have responded well to the teachings of Brian Walker, one of the many former Hogs defensive catching greats now coaching after retiring from professional ball. "It's going to be work in progress and they are going to battle each other all year," Van Horn said earlier this month. "The good thing about that battle is they have become friends and they help each other. They stay late and work together. And Coach Walker has done a tremendous job with them."

Local teams eliminated from district tourneys By KELLY BLAIR Sports Editor A pair of local teams were recently eliminated from their respective district tournaments, bringing their seasons to an end short of qualifying for a regional tournament. On Tuesday, the Harmony Grove Hornets were defeated by the Rison Wildcats 56-46 in the first round of the 8-3A district tournament, which is being held at Fordyce. On Wednesday, the Bearden Bears were defeated by the Junction City Dragons 5148 in the second round of the 7-2A East district tournament, which is being held at Dermott. In the Hornets game, Harmony Grove had just edged Rison by two points on Friday in the final regular season game of the season, but HG coach Jeremy Horton said a bad night shooting severely hammered his team’s chances. “Field goal shooting, 3-point shooting, and free throw shooting were all way down in this game,” Horton said, adding the Hornets were 18 percent shooting from 3point range, and 44 percent from the free throw line. “Our defense in the first half was OK, but our rebounding was horrible.

We only had 10 rebounds at halftime, and we had a goal of 15-18 by that time.” The Hornets trailed 15-12 after one quarter of play, and 25-19 by halftime, but rallied to tie the game at 34-all in the first minute of the fourth quarter. Rison then pulled away, eventually outscoring Harmony Grove 2214 in the final period. “They (Rison) did nothing differently than they had done in the previous two games we won,” Horton said. “They ran the same offense and defense, they just played well. They did play extremely hard on defense ... they were determined to turn us over with their full court press.” Matthew Dismuke led the Hornets (7-16) with 13 points on the night, while Jon Pigott finished with 10, and freshman Austin Hill scored eight points to go along with seven rebounds and six blocked shots. Logan Peterson finished with seven points for the Hornets. “I’m still proud of our kids,” Horton said. “They never quit, and continued to fight hard for four quarters. I’m still proud of all their hard work this season. Wins and losses don’t always tell the whole story ... how someone continues to persevere determines their character.” Before the senior high boys game, the

Junior Hornets were eliminated from their district tournament by Rison as well, falling in the final moments 33-30. Horton said Rison scored a final basket with just under a minute left to take its three-point lead, before Hill came down and launched a 3-pointer which could have tied the game. Horton said Hill’s shot hit the rim and went straight up, and fell back through the basket for what appeared to be a game tying shot, but officials ruled that the ball had touched a cable above the basket and waved the shot off. “There was only about three seconds left when that happened. We didn’t even have time to have them inbound the ball and foul after that,” Horton said. Devin Venzant led the Junior Hornets (58) with 11 points, while Hill finished with eight. At Dermott, the Bears had already defeated Hermitage on Tuesday to advance to Wednesday’s second-round affair, but a strong second half by Junction City brought Bearden’s season to a close. Junction took a 10-7 lead in the first quarter before Bearden rallied to lead 25-23 at halftime. Junction then outscored the Bears 15-11 in the third and 13-12 in the fourth to

pull out the win in a game that was close throughout. “It was a tough game defensively,” Bearden coach Bobby Hartgen said. “Both teams knew what was on the line. They worked hard to take away our 3-pointers, and the bad thing about 3’s is that you can live or die by them. Our kids knew that a regional berth was on the line and I think that made our shooting tight at the beginning.” Quentin Wilson led the Bears with 17 points, while B.J. Ross and Clint Parham added eight points each. The Bears also played much of the game without senior Ray Rideout, who was still trying to recover from flu-like symptoms, and played “less than half of what he usually does,” Hartgen said. “I don’t want to make any excuses. He tried to go but he couldn’t be in there at the end,” Hartgen said. “We still had a heck of a season. We finish up 9-12 after a 1-6 start, so I’m proud of the guys for fighting back. Plus, after back-to-back junior district championships and winning the tournament this year, the future is looking bright. I looked out there at one time and we had four freshmen and one sophomore on the floor, so we’ll be OK.”


8 - Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012

Blondie

Sudoku

For Better or For Worse

Wednesday's answer

Sudoku is a number puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The goal is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains each number only once. The difficulty level increases from Monday to Friday.

Garfield

Cryptoquip KRRZUXF

IHXFGB

JIR

DK

L U GT

KDG

WQNJ

WGRB

Q

UJN

NRJ

P UT X U F I J

L RT J U P R ,

DHJ

ZDDCUXF

Mallard Fillmore

NXQCR.

Yesterday’s Cryptoquip: Every time a prominent cartoon bear shoots one over par, I believe they call it a Yogi bogey. Today’s Cryptoquip Clue: K equals F The cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error.

Andy Capp

Snuffy Smith

Baby Blues

Tank McNamara

Zits

TONIGHT’S THE NIGHT!

Miguel’s AUTHENTIC “All-You-Can-Eat” MEXICAN BUFFET!

107 Washington St. S.E. Camden, AR • 836-5566

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News 4 Ark. Ent 30 Rock Parks The Office Up All Night Grimm ” News 4 Ark. Jay Leno ” Late Night / Jimmy Fallon Carson Daly Paid Prog. Paid Prog. (:05) Today Late Night / Jimmy Fallon Ent Early Today KARK 4 Today ” ” Today ” ” ” ” ” ” ” Rachael Ray ” KARK 4 News Days of our Lives The Doctors ” Judge Brown Judge Brown Judge Judy Judge Judy News 4 Ark. Nightly News

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Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 9

Camden News 1 0 0-199

Employment Opportunities

0120

CDL Driver - Local Route 7:30am-5pm Mon-Fri Apply in person at EHG Steel Deals 1615 Mt. Holly Rd.

200-299

300-399

Employment Opportunities

0120

400-499

Employment Opportunities

0120

Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment School. 3 wk training program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local job placement asst. Start digging dirt Now. 866-362-6497.

DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position:

Class A CDL Truck Drivers Needed - Joe Tex Xpress in Mt. Vernon, TX. Good Wages and Benefits. Call: 903.537. 7030 ext.236 or Apply online: www.joetexusa.com

If you are not able to access our Web site, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. Include the reference number for the position in which you are interested. EOE

HUNTING FOR A NEW CAREER? We can help put you on the right track!

Let us clue you in!

Classifieds

Satellite Installation Technician (Little Rock, AR) - 1200155

Drivers - Excellent Pay! Regional/Long-Haul. TWIC/ Passport a plus! Tanker Operation. Hazmat/Tanker End. www.drive4sbi.com Paul: 800-826-3413 GUARANTEED PAY...Really! and Sign-On Bonus! Lease Purchase/$0 Down/$1 Buyout Company Drivers/ Benefits Contact us at 800-509-2021 or www.oandstrucking.com Guys & Gals Travel USA!! Single individuals needed to present black fashion, sporting, & popular publications; capable earnings over $400 weekly in commissions plus bonuses; return transportation guaranteed. Call Mrs. Arnold at (877) 710-0017.

500-599 Employment Opportunities

0120

NOW HIRING - Companies Desperately Need Employees to Assemble Products at Home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. AR2270 Payroll Clerk – Stant Mfg, Inc, White Hall, Need to have 1-3 years ADP exp. Send resumes as an MS Word attachment to: Stantrecruitingpb@stantinc.co m or fax to 870-267-1278 AA/EEO Employer SIGN-ON BONUS! GOOD PAY, GREAT HOME TIME! Professional Class A Drivers OTR tractor trailer, good pay, Great home time, health ins., 401K,pd. vacation, top equipment. Call Blake @888-9675737 www.driveforpamtransport.com , eeoc Inexperienced or refreshers, call Lavonna @ 877-440-7890 /888-283-0038, or  www.driveforpamtransport. com

Ads are EASY to Find Call

836-8192 700-799

600 Roofing

0194

TALLEY ROOFING Shingle Roofs Only. 39 Years of Experience. Call 870-696-3363

0320

Johnson outboard motor, 6hp, old, runs good, $200. Call 318-986-4681

Hunting

0340

Pellet Rifles (2), Benjamin pump rifles. $195 for both. Call 870-863-3925 in El Dorado.

Sporting Goods & Fitness Auto Accessories

0205

Tires. Goodyear Wrangler (4). Size P275/60R20. $40 for all. Call 870-863-3925 El Dorado Two winches. One Warren winch, 15k pound. One 10k pound. $150 each. Call 870574-1826

Trucks

0355

Tony Littles Gazelle. Shows calories burned, speed, distance and time, $50. Call 870862-3866 in El Dorado. Total Gym 3000. $600. Call 870-725-6676 Treadmill. Health Rider, $100. Call 870-314-4339

900-999

Appliances

0404

30 gallon hot water heater, gas, like new, $250 OBO. Call 870-807-3295

Electric stove, excellent condition, $275 OBO. Call 870-8073295

GE Washer and Dryer, good condition, $300 for the set. Call 870-807-3295 Small White Refrigerator, can sit on floor or table, $50. Call 870-864-7130

Articles for Sale

0408

3 Church Pews, good condition, $75 each or $200 for all three. Call 870-864-7130

0250

1990 Dodge pickup for sale. $1,100. Call 870-863-0980 or 870-310-8465 in El Dorado.

Pool table, $100. Call 870863-0980 or 870-310-8465 in El Dorado.

Top Pay for RN's, LPN's/ LVN's, CNA's, Med Aides. $2,000 Bonus – Free Gas. AACO Nursing Agency Call 1-800-656-4414 WANTED - LIFE AGENTS Earn $500 a Day , Great Agent Benefits , Commisions Paid Daily, Complete Training, Leads, Leads, Leads NO LICENSE REQUIRED. Call 1-888-713-6020.

Boats and Accessories

800-899

Antiques and Collectibles

Boats and Accessories

0320

1989 1436 Alumacraft boat with Minn Kota trolling motor, seats, two gas tanks and trailer. $800. Call 870-8818856 or 870-310-0000

0402

Antique Singer Sewing Machine. Needs cord, $100 OBO. Call 870-639-1407 or 870-6391110 Large Antique Hutch, $150. Call 501-672-4102 Small Antique Hutch, $40. Call 501-672-4102

Rug, black and red zebra pattern. 7.65 x 12.5. Excellent condition. Paid $299, asking $80. Call 870-665-1029

1000 Auctions

Building Materials

0418

Aluminum Window, 36” x 74”, $50. Call 870-918-0759 New Aluminum stranded entry service cable triplex 4/0-4/02/0 plus #2 ground wire. Direct burial, 280 ft on spool, made by Southwire, $560. Call 870918-2256 Steel Building Sale Inventory Discount Sale 30x40, 42x80, 100x100 Erection Avail, 40 yr paint Must Sell, Will Deal www.utilityking.com Source#1OG 866-609-4321 Veneer door, 36 x 80, $50. Call 870-918-0759. El Dorado

Clothing Wall chalkboard, 54 1/2” wide, 37” high. Great for a home schooling family. $40. Call 870-918-0759 in El Dorado.

0412

SPRING EQUIPMENT AUCTION: Saturday Feb. 18, 2011 9:00 AM 102 Hwy 82B, Garland City, Arkansas, Tractors, Construction & Farm Equipment, Dump Trucks, Motorgrader, Autos, Trailers & MUCH more! John Nutt, 903824-0581, R.W. “Bud” Nutt, 903-748-4400 TX#11712, AR#1030, more info, terms: www.nuttauctions.com

0420

Vintage 3/4 length sleeve Mink Coat. Medium, excellent condition, 2 side pockets, $395. Call 870-836-2283.

PERFORMANCE THE ULTIMATE OWNERSHIP EXPERIENCE

CARS

2010 CHRVROLET SILVERADO EXTENDED CAB 4WD LTZ - 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ,LEATHER BUCKET SEATS, HEATED SEATS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, BED LINER, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, ONSTAR, TRAILERING PKG., 35,000 MILES - WHITE

2011 CADILLAC DTS LUXURY SEDAN4.6 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED AND COOLED SEATS WITH MEMORY, POWER SUNROOF, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, CHROME WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, FRONT AND REAR BACKUP ASSIST, ONSTAR, 8,000 MILES - SILVER METALLIC 2011 CADILLAC STS LUXURY SEDAN3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED AND COOLED SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, REAR BACKUP ASSIST, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, REAR DECK SPOILER, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 14,000 MILES - SILVER

2011 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT - 3.5 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, HEATED SEATS, POWER SUNROOF, POWER LEATHER SEATS, ALUMINUM WHEELS, REAR DECK SPOILER, 11,000 MILES WHITE 2011 BUICK LUCERNE CX SEDAN - 3.9 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER CLOTH SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY, 27,000 MILES SILVER 2011 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT SEDAN - 2.4 LITER 4 CYLINDER, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 12,000 MILES WHITE 2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE LTZ - 1.4 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, 10 AIR BAGS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 11,000 MILES - SAPPHIRE BLUE 2011 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN - 1.8 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, 11,000 MILES BURGANDY 2011 CHEVROLET AVEO LT SEDAN - 1.6 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, AM FM CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, REAR SPOILER, 27,000 MILES - SUMMIT WHITE 2011 CHEVROLET CAMARO LT - 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, POWER SUNROOF, R. S. PKG., ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, 13,000 MILES - SILVER 2010 CHEVROLET COBALT LT- 2.2 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, REAR DECK SPOILER, KEYLESS ENTRY, 26,000 MILES - SILVER 2010 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ - 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 27,000 MILES - SUMMIT WHITE 2010 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1LT - 2.4 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, POWER DRIVERS SEAT, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 19,000 MILES - GOLD MIST 2009 PONTIAC G6 SEDAN2.4 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER DRIVERS SEAT, POWER SUNROOF, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 26,000 MILES - RED 2009 TOYOTA VENZA - 4 CYLINDER VVT, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, AM FM CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALUMINUM WHEELS, CLOTH BUCKET SEATS, 18,000 MILES - SILVER

2006 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE - 4.0 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, AM FM CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, REAR DECK SPOILER, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 80,000 MILES - RED 2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT - 2.4 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, POWER DRIVERS SEAT, REAR DECK SPOILER, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 81,000 MILES - WHITE

2010 GMC ACADIA SLT 2 - 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS, POWER SUNROOF, REAR DVD, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, POWER LIFTGATE, 20” CHROME WHEELS, CENTER BUCKETS, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO BLACK

2002 CADILLAC DEVILLE - 4.6 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS WITH MEMORY, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, CABRIOLET TOP, GOLD PKG., ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY, 88,0000 MILES - BRONZE MIST

2008 GMC ACADIA SLT - 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, KEYLESS ENTRY, POWER LIFTGATE, ALUMINUM WHEELS, HEATED SEATS, REAR DVD, REAR BACKUP ASSIST, 60,000 MILES - LIGHT SAPPHIRE

TRUCKS 2011 CHEVROLET REGULAR CAB 2WD LT - 4.8 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALUMINUM WHEELS, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, ONSTAR, 3,000 MILES - MIDNIGHT BLUE

2008 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER 2WD - 4.0 LITER 6 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALUMINUM WHEELS, TRAILERING PKG., 58,000 MILES - BURGANDY

2011 GMC SAVANA G3500 15 PASSENGER VAN - 6.0 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, ONSTAR, TRAILERING PKG., 26,000 MILES - SUMMIT WHITE 2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO CREW CAB 2WD LT - 4.8 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, CHROME WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, 29,000 MILES - SILVER 2011 GMC SIERRA EXTENDED CAB 4WD SLE - 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, KEYLESS ENTRY, BED LINER, ALUMINUM WHEELS, TRAILERING PKG., 37,000 MILES - WHITE 2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXTENDED CAB 4WD LT - 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, CHROME WHEELS, 20,000 MILES - VICTORY RED 2011 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 2WD LT - 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, CENTER SPLIT BENCH, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, POWER SUNROOF, REAR DVD, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 13,000 MILES - BLACK 2011 CHEVROLET TAHOE 4WD LT - 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, TRAILERING PKG., 12,000 MILES - MOCHA 2011 CHEVROLET TAHOE 4WD LT 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, POWER SUNROOF, REAR DVD, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, TRAILERING PKG., 13,000 MILES - BLACK

2008 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL- 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, KEYLESS ENTRY, CENTER BUCKETS, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, POWER LIFTGATE, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 41,000 MILES - SILVER 2008 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL- 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, ALUMINUM WHEELS, POWER LIFTGATE, 33,000 MILES - CRYSTAL RED TINTCOAT 2008 GMC ACADIA SLT3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, CENTER BUCKETS, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS, POWER LIFTGATE, NEW TIRES, 18” ALUMINUM WHEELS, 56,000 MILES - BLACK 2007 GMC YUKON XL 2WD SLT- 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS WITH MEMORY, POWER SUNROOF, REAR DVD, CENTER BUCKETS, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, TRAILERING PKG., 85,000 MILES - WHITE 2007 CHEVROLET SILVERADO CREW CAB 2WD LT- 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD, SPRAY IN LINER, NERF BARS, TRAILERING PKG., ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY, 32,000 MILES - BLUE GRANITE 2007 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXTENDED CAB 2WD “CLASSIC” - 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, TRAILERING PKG., ALUMINUM WHEELS, 75,000 1 OWNER MILES - GOLD 2007 CHEVROLET TAHOE 2WD LT5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER SUNROOF, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, CENTER BUCKETS, ALUMINUM WHEELS, TRAILERING PKG., AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, KEYLESS ENTRY, 98,000 MILES - GOLD MIST

2011 CHEVROLET HHR 2LT - 2.4 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS, POWER SUNROOF, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, ALUMINUM WHEELS, 14,000 MILES - MAROON

2006 CADILLAC SRX3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, 3RD ROW SEAT, HEATED SEATS, POWER SUNROOF, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, ALUMINUM WHEELS, NEW TIRES, 59,000 MILES - MOCHA

2011 CHEVROLET HHR LS - 2.2 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, POWER DRIVERS SEAT, RUNNING BOARDS, KEYLESS ENTRY, 15,000 MILES - SILVER METALLIC

2006 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB 4WD SLE- 5.3 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD, BED LINER, ALUMINUM WHEELS, KEYLESS ENTRY, TRAILERING PKG., 80,000 MILES - SILVER

2008 TOYOTA COROLLA CE SEDAN - 1.8 LITER 4 CYLINDER, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, AM FM CD, 52,000 MILES - MEDIUM RED

2004 DODGE DURANGO 2WD SLT 4.7 LITER V-8, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, CLOTH BUCKET SEATS, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, ALUMINUM WHEELS, TRAILERING PKG. 83,000 MILES - SILVER

2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA LS - 3.5 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, CLOTH INTERIOR, 54,000 MILES - GRAY 2008 BUICK LACROSSE CXL - 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALUMINUM WHEELS, AM FM CD, 71,000 MILES - MAROON

2010 CHEVROLET SILVERADO REGULAR CAB 2WD W/T 4.3 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, TILT AND CRUSE, AM FM CD, L.S.PKG., CHROME WHEELS, 17,000 MILES - BLACK

2003 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXTENDED CAB 2WD - 4.3 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, TRAILERING PKG., BED MAT, 95,000 MILES - PEWTER 1985 California Ave. (Hwy 79 South) Camden, Arkansas 71701 Sales - (870) 836-5066 Parts Dept. - (870) 836-0343 Service - (870) 836-8403 Body Shop - (870) 836-2540 Watts - 1-800-737-1077 Facsimile - (870) 836-8643 www.gm-performance.com

www.gm-p p erfor mance.com

www.performanceofcamden.com

2011 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT - 3.5 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, KEYLESS ENTRY WITH REMOTE START, HEATED SEATS, POWER SUNROOF, POWER LEATHER SEATS, ALUMINUM WHEELS, REAR DECK SPOILER, 10,000 MILES SILVER

2007 VOLKSWAGON BEETLE- 2.0 LITER 4 CYLINDER, 5 SPEED MANUAL SHIFT TRANSMISSION, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, LEATHER INTERIOR, KEYLESS ENTRY, AM FM CD, ALUMINUM WHEELS. 60,000 MILES GREEN

2010 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL - 3.6 LITER V-6, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, POWER LEATHER SEATS, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, TILT AND CRUISE, ONSTAR, AM FM CD WITH XM RADIO, REAR SEAT DVD, REAR CAMERA ASSIST, POWER LIFTGATE, HEATED SEATS, 38,000 MILES - MOCHA


10 - Camden News - Thursday, February 16, 2012 Farm Equipment

0430

Lift boom pole for tractor 3 point system. Medium duty. $200. Call 870-862-8663 in El Dorado.

Firewood

0432

Red Oak Fire Wood, $165/ cord. Call 870-807-3295

Furniture

0442

Furniture

0442

Lawn and Garden

Lawnmower. Stanley, self propelled, electric start. Needs cleaning and new battery. $200. Call 870-837-2399

Bed. King size, includes frame, mattress, box springs and headboard, $500. Call 870-875-1156 in El Dorado.

Medical Supplies

Black sofa set, 2 piece, excellent condition, $135. Call 870665-1029 in El Dorado. Dining Set. 5 piece, solid wood, black, $225 OBO. Call 870-665-1029 in El Dorado. Dining Table. Round, no chairs, $25. Call 870-875-2995

TV, Stereo, Video, Radio

0486

DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-877-575-8281

Full size mahogany bed. Complete, no mattress, $80. Call 870-665-1029 in El Dorado.

Queen headboard, dark wood, $40. Call 870-314-1443 in El Dorado. Queen size mattress and box springs, cood condition, $100. Call 870-574-1694. Queen size mattress and box springs, almost new, excellent condition, $175. Call 870-8073295 Sofa. Tan colored with sleeper. Excellent condition, about 6 months old. $150. Call 870-665-1029 in El Dorado.

0755

For Rent: 3BR 2BA Mobile home in the country. $400/ month. Call 870-231-7303 or 870-231-5653

0462

Dresser. Solid wood, excellent condition, $65 OBO. Call 870665-1029 in El Dorado.

Love Seat, $75. Call 870-8752995

Manufactured Homes Rent

Geriatric chair with tray, blue leather, like new. Paid $900, asking $200. Call 870-8369836 or 870-836-6626 Wheel Chair, $50. Call 870875-2995 in El Dorado.

Free Pets

0540

FREE: Shepherd/Mountain Cur. Female, 1 year old, spayed, gentle, playful, likes to run free. Call 870-862-0069

0945

PROCLAIMER

0456

Hedge trimmer, $40. Call 870833-2727 in Camden.

Antique Mahogany Dining table, six chairs, large buffet, and china cabinet. $2,000. Call 479-754-0721. El Dorado

Bedroom set. 6 pieces, including full size mattress. $575 for all. Call 870-665-1029 in El Dorado.

Notices, Business

Table set. 3 piece, high end, wrought iron with wood table tops. Paid $2,000, asking $185. Call 870-665-1029 in El Dorado.

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or intention to make any such preferences, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Notices, Personal Lots and Acreage

0835

HUNTING LAND FOR SALE Godfrey Landing Tract 353 acres in Bradley County, AR. 1+ mile shared boundary with Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge! Bids Due Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 10:00 AM. CALL 1-888-6958733 FOR PROSPECTUS AND BID FORM. www.forestryrealestate.com Davis DuBose Forestry & Real Estate Consultants PLLC

0950

DIVORCE with or without children $125. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7890198, 24/7. IF YOU HAD HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY between 2005 and present and suffered problems, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

Legals

1000

7305 Request for Proposals The Southwest Arkansas Workforce Investment Board (SWAWIB) is seeking proposals for the following: Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth Programs Provider and One-Stop Operator.

At What’s In The Camden News.

Interested Parties are invited to secure a Request for Proposals (RFP) package from: Southwest Arkansas Workforce Investment Board Attn: Gina Frederick P.O. Box 767 101 Business Park Drive Magnolia, AR 71754-0767 870-235-7510 gina.frederick@arkansas.gov All interested parties must submit their response to the RFP to the above entity by Friday, March 30, 2012, 5:00 P.M.

Call Today For Home Delivery

TIMBERLAND FOR SALE 60 Acres, 4 miles east of El Dorado off Nick Springs Road. Great timberland investment and recreational opportunities. Call Neeley Forestry Service at (870) 836-5981 or check www.neeleyforestryservice.co m

Per Month $8.25 3 Months $24.75 6 Months $49.50

FREE: Small puppy. Mom is Manchester Feist & Jack Russell, dad is Jack Russell & Rat Terrier. As cute and playful as can be! Call 870-748-2566

Livestock and Supplies

Clean Out Your Garage and Turn the Items You’ve Forgotten Into Cash.

0550

Large round horse pen, $700. Call 318-558-0368

Adoption

0905

ADOPT – Devoted loving couple would be honored to raise your newborn with warmth, security, educational opportunities, endless love. Expenses paid. Please call Mary Anne & Jack, 877-297-4304.

Swivel desk chair, $30. Call 870-875-2995 in El Dorado. Twin bed with 2 drawers (no mattress), $100. Call 870-8332727 in Camden.

That old collection of clutter might not mean much to you anymore, but chances are someone out there would love it. By using the Classifieds, you’ll make it easier for them to find, and easier for you to sell. So try it today!To place an ad, simply call

Camden News

836-8192

11 3 Madison • (870) 836-8192 www.camdenarknews.com

AUTO

HEATING & COOLING

Camden News 790 California SW Camden, Arkansas

(870) 836-2100

Professional Service Directory

Camden 1300 California Ave. SW

w w w. c a m d e n a r k n e w s . c o m

El Dorado 1520 Mt. Holly Road

Toll Free 1-800-447-2736 WWW.JIMGOLDENFORD.NET

(870) 836-7785 (870) 875-COOL www.deansac.com

OFFICE PRODUCTS

JEWELRY

WE PAY

LOW PRICES & GREAT CUSTOMER SERVICE

MORE CASH

Make Us Your #1 Source For All Your Printing Needs!

for your unwanted, worn and broken gold than anyone in this area. We Also Buy Silver, Platinum And Coins!

Garden Oaks Shopping Ctr. Camden, Arkansas

Sell Risk Free

(870) 836-5018 www.dancooks.com

TO YOUR HOMETOWN JEWELER

TREE SERVICE

Jeff Barnhart

(870) 833-1983 or (870) 836-5990 Lot Clearing - Demolition Tree Trimming Topping Removal & All Debris Removed 75 Foot Bucket Truck - Insured Free Estimates Fair, Honest & Dependable Experienced Now Offering Stump Grinding

CONCRETE

DENTAL

REDI-MIXED CONCRETE COMPANY

Promote Your Business or Service Here!!

IN EL DORADO: IN CAMDEN:

(870) 574-9971 FAX: (870) 574-9973

(870) 875-2000 IN FORDYCE:

(870) 352-3601

Serving Union, Ouachita, Calhoun, & Dallas Counties A Member Of AR Redi-Mix Asso. Plant is State Certified

Arkansas Medicaid & ARKids Provider

836.8944 540 Jefferson St. Camden Allyn Ladd, D.D.S.

DOZER WORK & PRECISION LEVELING

R.D. (Rick) Daniel & Grandson (Charle) Dozer Works

REMODELING

LAWN SERVICE

Camden News No one does LOCAL news better! 870.836.8192 LAWN SERVICE WHY WORRY WITH YOUR

Buddy Willingham

(870) 836-2883 Cell: (870) 807-4424

Toll Free 1-877-290-4323 • MOWING • LEAF & PINE STRAW CLEANUP FOR WINTER & SPRING • CLEAN ROOFS & GUTTERS • FERTILIZING

WRECKER SERVICE

Buddy’s Wrecker Service

(870) 836-2300 or (870) 818-2121

(870) 836-3056

(870) 836-7335

Monday - Friday 8:00 - 4:00

Camden, Arkansas

Ask for Sam

Tires Buy Online and SAVE

Our online store is always open

www.twcinc.net

Compare Prices with the

BIG DOGS SAVE

Then Buy from Us &

CALL 870-818-2742 727 California St. SW Suite D Camden, AR 71701

Showroom at

USED BOOKS

Vinyl Replacement Windows Vinyl Siding • Seamless Gutters Leaf-Free Gutter Tops And All Your Remodeling Needs

Buy • Sell • Trade 2552 Hwy. 79 S. 837-1134

1271 California in Camden

Owner Kim Davis

Office: 870-837-2675 Cell: 870-562-1202

CONSTRUCTION

R&R CONSTRUCTION PHIL ROCCONI

(870) 818-4395

Call today to schedule an appointment!

USED BOOKS

K&J

(870) 918-8025

OUACHITA INDUSTRIES

Let us take the worry off of your hands!

The House Doctor FREE ESTIMATES Over 40 Yrs. Experience in Camden We Do It All: • Painting Interior & Exterior • Remodeling • House Leveling • Foundation

TOWN & COUNTRY LAWNS

All Types of Dozer Work, Clearing, Precision leveling, grading, ponds, chicken house pads, etc.

LAWN WORK?

HOME RENOVATIONS

No job too big or too small *Land Clearing *Pond Construction * Demolition/ Removal *Road & Driveway Construction * Hauling: Gravel, Top Soil, & Fill Dirt * Building Pads: House & Commercial *Lot Clearing: Residential & Commercial * Septic Tank & Field Line Instillation

CHIMNEY SWEEP

LAUNDROMAT L AU N D R O M AT

645 CALIFORNIA • (870) 833-3060 Located Across From The Hospital

WASH, FOLD & DRY $1 PER LB./15 LB. MIN. MONDAY-FRIDAY 7AM-5PM OPEN 24-7 WITH SECURITY CAMERAS 60LB. Washers 80LB. Dryers TO HANDLE YOUR LARGE COMFORTERS ETC.

Get Your Change & Soap Here With Easy To Use Machines! Handicap Accessible

CONSTRUCTION

Lucky Sweep MARTIN Chimney Cleaning BUILDERS David Faulk - Owner

•REPAIRING •INSTALLATION

870-310-5295

- Fast Quality Service - Relining With Stainless Steel Pipes Ask About Insurance Discounts 1561 Columbia 29 • Magnolia, AR 71753

METAL ROOFS METAL BUILDINGS CONCRETE SLABS CARPORTS ADDITIONS & REMODELING

870.234.7492

SHANE MARTIN - OWNER

1.877.896.3094 Toll Free


February 16, 2012 issue