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CF 8th graders and girls volleyball team pick up wins, Page 7

For the latest on church activities, see Page 2

Friday October 4, 2013 No one does LOCAL news better! www.camdenarknews.com www.facebook.com/CamdenNews

Vol. 94 • No. 47 • 2 Sections • 12 pages

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County’s health clinic announces flu clinic dates

By PATRIC FLANNIGAN Staff Writer The Ouachita County Health Unit will have its annual Mass Flu Clinic from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 22, and the health clinic is urging residents to get vaccinated to protect themselves during the upcoming flu season. The flu clinic will be held from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. at gymnasium at First Assembly of God, located at the corner of Cash and Maul Road. Forms are already available at all the banks in town, at city hall, the Camden News, the Ouachita County Courthouse and at the health unit at 740 California Ave. Ouachita County Health Unit Administrator Rebecca Wright says that residents can go by the health unit every day from 3-4 p.m. for the vaccina-

tion, but they may have a longer wait. The Mass Clinic, however, promises to be much more convenient, she said. “We will have nursing students from SAU Tech and SAU,” Wright stated. “We will also have other qualified volunteers from around the community that will be there to help, so it would not take long for people to get there shots and continue with the rest of their day.” Wright also said that filling out the forms ahead of time would also contribute to speedy and accurate service and that the In-Person Assistants, or IPA’s, who are delegated to guide people in the community in the new insurance enrollment process, will be in attendance. The flu shot is not the only method that will be offered. There is a flu mist that will be available for anyone be-

tween the ages of two and 49 years old who do not have any health complications. OCHU also released its schedule for the county schools flu vaccinations. A list of dates and locations are provided below: • 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8: Camden Christian Academy, Chidester Community Academy and Victory Christian School • 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15: Stephens Schools • 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16: Fairview Elementary School • 7:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 17: Camden Fairview High School • 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29: Camden Fairview Middle School • 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30: Ivory Primary School

CFHS principal says she wants to continue students’ academic success By KELLY BLAIR Editorial Manager Peggy Burton’ says her vision is for Camden Fairview to be just as successful in the field of academics as they have been on the athletic field. Burton, Camden Fairview’s high school principal, spoke at the local Kiwanis Club’s weekly meeting at the Camden Country Club on Thursday, and pointed out that it’s not too often that a high school can dote on three state sports champions from the same school year. However, that is exactly what Camden Fairview did in the 2012-13 school year, winning titles in football, girls

track and gymnastics. Now, Burton said, it’s time to get academics up to the same standard. While Camden Fairview has done well getting a majority of its students to achieve basic or proficient levels in academics, Burton said she is looking for a level of “distinction.” And once they do get there, she wants them to stay there, she added. Too often when people do achieve a level of distinction, the educator of 33 years said, they quickly slip backward again and do not maintain the level. She recalled during a recent meeting how the football coaches joked with her that since they finished last season

14-0 and won the title, they felt they were in the distinguished category. “That was last year. Now we have to do it again,” she joked back with them. “And since we are currently 4-0 going into the White Hall game, I guess we are well on our way.” To present a power-point program, “Making a Difference at Camden Fairview,” Burton brought a team with her, including the high school’s literacy coach, Joyce Flowers, and its math and science coordinator, Pam Vaughan. Burton referred to Flowers and Vaughan as her “right and left hand” and said the trio are constantly disSee CFHS, Page 6

Photo by Stephanie Dunn

Bearden band prep Bearden High School Marching Band students Xavier McElroy, right drummer; Coby Miller, left drummer; and Jesse Walker, background with horn, play during the half-time show at a recent game. The Bears’ kick off time is at 7:30 p.m. on Friday nights. With a current record this season of 3-1, the Bears face Parker’s Chapel this week for their homecoming game.

Photo by Stephanie Dunn

Steel reinforcements

RIO Steel & Tower, LTD. workers, from top, Joel Mosher (at very top), Ky Nguyen and Jermain Hernandez climb the Sprint Tower located behind the Camden News building to reinforce the legs and diagonals with halfpipe.

Management at Fox Creek making repairs By JENNIFER SHERIDAN Staff Writer Management at Fox Creek apartments is in the process of making needed repairs to the complex, Camden City Code Enforcement Officer Tom Vaughan. During a phone interview this week, Vaughan reported talking with the manager of Fox Creek about the repairs being started. Vaughan previously reported that balconies at the apartment complex are beginning to crumple and fall, which is causing a safety hazard. Also, roofing issues are causing interior problems because of water seeping into the electrical areas, according to Vaughan. Vaughan said there is a roll-off container and lumber stacked to begin the cleaning and repair project at the complex. He said the items are located by the tennis courts. He said the main problem at the complex were the balconies. The roofs will be fixed and gutters replaced to help with the water seeping into interiors. He said there are also minor electrical and plumbing issues throughout the complex in different units. The managers told Vaughan after the balconies are repaired they will move on to the minor issues.

Kiwanis Club, Key Club plans to transform OCMC courtyard By TAMMY FRAZIER News Editor A local group has come up with a way for area residents to utilize space at the Ouachita County Medical Center to honor loved ones who have passed away and give comfort to hospital patients and their families.

Camden resident and Kiwanis Club member Becky Davis is spearheading a project to convert courtyard space at OCMC, and she is asking for suggestions on how to create the memorial area. Davis said she has already enlisted the help of Key Club students from Camden Fairview and Harmony Grove. The Key

Club is sponsored by members of the Kiwanis Club, and to meet the requirements as members, Davis said that students must volunteer to participate in community activities. She and Kiwanis members Jim Coleman and Krissy Bassetti met with some Key Club members recently at OCMC to look

Weather Tonight -

ter midnight. Lows in the mid 50s.

Mostly cloudy. Lows around 70. South winds 5 River Stages to 10 mph in the evening ... Decreasing to 5 mph (Numbers represent, from left, that station’s after midnight. flood stage, current stage and 24-hour change.) Ouachita River Saturday Arkadelphia 17 3.77 0.01 Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers Camden 26 5.38 -0.13 and thunderstorms. Highs in the mid Thatcher l/D hw 79 77.00 0.00 80s. South winds 5 mph in the mornMoro Bay st pk -- 64.50 0.00 ing. Becoming southwest in the afterFelsenthal hw 70 65.10 0.00 noon. The chance of precipitation 50 Little Missouri River percent. Average rainfall 1/10 to 1/4 inch. Saturday Boughton 20 1.49 0.03 night cooler. Showers likely in the evening. A slight Sunset: 6:51 p.m. chance of thunderstorms. A chance of showers afSunrise: 7:08 a.m.

over the courtyard and begin brainstorming about the project. “I thought this (the courtyard project) would be a good way to get the students involved,” stated Davis. “Our Key Club members from Camden Fairview and Harmony Grove can help us beautify that See COURTYARD, Page 6

Inside Abby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . .11-12 Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Crossword. . . . . . . . . . 11 Horoscopes. . . . . . . . . . . 11 Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8 What's Happening. . . . 4 TV listings. . . . . . . . . . .9

Local OCCCA will host concert on Oct. 17 The Ouachita County Community Concert Association will host a concert by John Berry at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 17, at the Camden Fairview Middle School auditorium at 746 Dooley Womack Drive. The cost is a $50 OCCCA membership. For more information, call 231-6244 or 8372062.


2 - Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013

Religion 4 - Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013

Is religious freedom still important? The Supreme Court of the United States of America has created bewildering confusion about where the line should be drawn between church and state. Sometimes public displays of the Ten Commandments are acceptable and other times they are not. Sometimes public prayer is okay and other times it is unconstitutional. Sometimes a public cross is legal and other times it must be removed. Nativity scenes are allowed here, but not there.  Why is religious freedom so difficult? Are decades of conflicting legal rulings evidence that religious freedom does not work? Are we in danger of losing a precious liberty for which so many have suffered and died?  After centuries of cruel oppression and harsh violence in the Old World, people came to the New World hoping to build a better life, one with liberty and justice for all. Even so, some people brought Old World ideas with them to America and oppressed their fellow citizens because of religious differences. And even though we now have an amendment to the Constitution that guarantees our religious freedom, after more than two hundred years we still struggle.  Despite these persistent difficulties, religious freedom in America is truly

ground-breaking and not something that we should abandon. Religious freedom is fundamental. Our cherished political liberties rest firmly on the foundation of our religious freedom. Without religious freedom there is no political freedom. It is true, Enlightenment philosophers made important contributions to the great American experiment in liberty, but religious freedom was and is the vital underpinning for political liberty. And religious liberty was championed by Christians who built the house of freedom on the firm foundation of God’s word. Specifically, the teachings of Jesus provide the basis for providing religious freedom to everyone. Jesus revealed two cornerstone principles that undergird a uniquely Christian concept of religious tolerance and freedom. First, Jesus practiced religious freedom by allowing individuals to accept or reject his message without coercion from him, from religious institutions or from the state.  On one occasion a rich young ruler asked Jesus what he must do in order to inherit eternal life. Jesus instructed him to do more than follow commandments: to sell his possessions, give the money to the poor, and become his follower. The rich man could not bring himself

to leave his wealth. So Jesus, although he loved the man, allowed him to walk away. Jesus respected the man’s God-given freedom to make up his own mind. Proponents of true religious freedom who came to America insisted on laws that kept religious and state institutions from punishing people for their religious beliefs and practices, or lack thereof. They wanted laws

him about paying taxes, Jesus noted whose inscription was on a Roman coin, then said, “Give the things of Caesar to Caesar and the things of God to God” (Matthew 22:21). Jesus’ enemies accused him of being a dangerous threat to the local Roman government. He was arrested and faced Pilate, the local Roman governor. In his interrogation Pilate asked

Religious Reflections that protected people from being forced to support any particular religious organization. Everyone had to have freedom to practice religion, or not, based on their own personal beliefs, not someone else’s. Jesus’ second cornerstone principle is that two kingdoms co-exist in this age, both endorsed by God: Church and State. Jesus clashed with the kingdoms of this world.  He had powerful enemies who constantly tried to trick him into saying something that would allow them to bring legal charges against him. Once, when they had questioned

Jesus if he was a king. Jesus said yes, but of a kingdom that is not of this world, a kingdom that does not fight like this world’s kingdoms, a kingdom that instead relies on proclaiming God’s truth. Jesus refused to use the power of the state, or any coercion whatsoever, to force people into submitting to his message against their will. After all, forced conversion is not true conversion. But Jesus also recognized the authority of the state to impose and enforce law and order, even to the point of his own execution (unfairly, I might add). He saw a clear distinction between Caesar

and God, the state and the church. Christians in America fought for religious freedom that is based on Jesus’ understanding of two kingdoms. The state has no Godgiven right to govern the religious beliefs and practices of its citizens. The church has no God-given mandate to enforce law and order. Or, from a positive perspective, the state should concern itself with law and order and the church should focus on religious beliefs and practices. The state is allowed the sword of physical coercion in its task of enforcing law and order. The church has a sword, too, but not one of physical violence or even political coercion. The sword of the church is the word of God. The power of God’s people is in proclaiming God’s truth. So, is religious freedom still important? Perhaps for those of us who have never really endured violent religious oppression it is impossible to measure the true value of religious liberty. Perhaps Americans have grown somewhat complacent about the great worth of our freedoms because we have no memory of the stockades, the jail cells, the fines, or the bloodshed.  Or, maybe Americans take religious freedom for granted, refusing to believe that it

really could be lost. But there are no guarantees that religious freedom gained will be religious freedom retained. The confusing court cases in the U.S. over the past few decades are evidence that our religious freedom is still a work in process, still open to conflicting interpretations by various groups who represent divergent points of view. Ironically, despite their passionate belief in freedom, followers of Jesus have often referred to themselves as slaves. But the master is not the state, a political leader, or even a religious leader or institution. The Master is Jesus. It may seem counterintuitive, but true and eternal freedom comes through serving the Lord.  Religious freedom is precious, but in reality it has come and gone throughout history and its future is precarious. Nevertheless, a true and lasting personal freedom is available to anyone, whatever the direction of political or legal trends may be. Let’s not give up on protecting our religious freedom, but let’s not forget that the greatest liberty of all comes by God’s grace through our faith in the Crucified One; and no human lawmaker can take that away.  (Richard Foster is pastor at Grace Baptist Church in Camden.)

Church News (Information for church briefs should be submitted to the Camden News office no later than noon on the Wednesday preceding the event. Information may be dropped off on FULL, 8x11” sheets of paper at the Camden News office at 113 Madison; e-mailed to camdennews @camdenarknews.com; mailed to Camden News, P.O. Box 798, Camden, AR 71701; or faxed to 870-837-1414. When emailing articles, information should be put in the body of the e-mail and photos attached in a jpg format. Information should include a name and the daytime phone number of a contact person.)

tries. The guest speaker will be church anniversary at 2:30 p.m. Bishop Chester L. Thompson of Sunday. The guests for the event will be the Rev. James E. Johnson Zion Hill Baptist Church. and New Starlight Baptist Church.

Grtr. St. Paul Church sets special events

A “Pre-Family-Night Musical” will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday at Greater St. Paul Baptist Church, 896 S. Adams Ave. Choirs participating in the event will be “A Fellowship Choir” from Arkadelphia, the Mt. Gillard Male Chorus, the Chidester Community Choir, the Greater St. Paul Magnificent Male Chorus, and the Bethlehem Baptist Choir of Magnolia. On Sunday, the church will hold its Family and Friends Night at 6 p.m. The Rev. James C. Scott and Shady Grove Baptist Church will be the guests.

Immanuel Baptist has new study program Red Hill UMC hosting Immanuel Baptist Church will host a ladies’ Bible study program ‘Old-Fashioned’ Day

Red Hill United Methodist Church in Chidester will hold its annual “Old-Fashioned Sunday” beginning at 11 a.m. Sunday. The public is invited to attend and dress in “period-correct attire, i.e. New Hope plans bonnets, long frock coats, etc.” will be a potluck meal in the upcoming programs There church’s fellowship hall following New Hope Church of God in the service. The church is located Christ, 2236 South Adams Ave., on Ouachita 22. For more informawill have an appreciation service tion, call 870-685-9202. to honor Supt. Roy L. Wesley Sr. and his wife, Debra Wesley, at 7 Mt. Gillard Church p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Also, services for New Hope on has 161st anniversary Sunday will be held at 3 p.m. at Mt. Gillard Missionary Baptist Connection International Minis- Church will celebrate its 161st “James - Mercy Truimphs” by Beth Moore, at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesdays for eight weeks. The program began on Oct. 2. For more information, call 818-8449.

Macedonia MBC will host appreciation day

Mt. Sinai Ministries to honor its pastor/wife

Women’s Day event at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 13. The guests will be the Rev. Roy Elliott and Pleasant Mt. Sinai Christian Outreach Grove Baptist Church. Ministries, 333 South St., will cel-

Two Bayou Church to hold revival services

The “Third Pastoral Appreciation Service” honoring “Bro Roy” Williams and his wife, D. Williams, will be held at 2:30 p.m. at Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church, 1030 Gibson Road. The special guest for the day will be members of St. John Missionary Baptist Church of El Dorado.

Jehovah Jireh set for appreciation service

Jehovah Jireh Ministries will hold an appreciation service for Deseree Jenkins - the wife of the church's pastor, Emmanuel Jenkins - at 2:30 p.m. Sunday. The guest speaker will be evangelist Renea Moore of Jenkins New Mt. Hebron Missionary Baptist Church.

Pleasant Grove has 142nd anniversary

Historic United Methodist Church, located on Ouachita 125 off of Arkansas 278, will hold its annual revival at 6:30 p.m. on Oct. 13-15. Special music will be provided by different local church groups each evening. The church is listed on the register of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Board and its early congregation dates back to pre-1864.

Supt. and Mrs. Jimmie Talley

ebrate the 24th anniversary of its Faith Temple hosting pastor and his wife, Supt. and Mrs. Jimmy Talley, at 3 p.m. Sunday. fellowship conference The special guests will be the Rev. Faith Temple Apostolic Church, James Sanders and members of 1034 Dunning Ave., will hold a felWest End Church of God in Christ lowship conference at 1 p.m. on of Malvern. Oct. 19. The theme will be “Let All Speak the Same Thing.” Westside UMC plans Us The speaker for the event will be for revival on Oct. 6-8 Leroy McFarland from Meadville, Westside United Methodist Miss. A free dinner will be served Church, 2211 Maul Road, will hold immediately after the service. For revival services at 6 p.m. Sunday, more information or to request and at 7 p.m. on Monday and Tues- transportation, call 836-7542 or day. The guest will be Cedric Wal- 870-465-2292. ters, pastor of Stephens and Buena Vista United Methodist Churches New Starlight to have in Stephens. women’s conference

Pleasant Grove Missionary Baptist Church will hold its 142nd Hickory Ridge holds church anniversary at 3 p.m. Sun- its Men/Women’s Day day. The guests will be members of Greater New Hope Missionary Hickory Ridge Missionary Baptist Church, 3100 Arkansas 24 Baptist Church in Little Rock. West, will hold its Annual Men and

New Starlight Baptist Church, 2780 Cash Road, will hold a women’s conference from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Oct. 19. The theme will be “You Are a Mentor, Whether You Want to Be or Not.”

Pope Francis outlines his plans for Camden News less ‘Vatican-centric’ Catholic Church

Vatican City (AFP) - Pope Francis outlined plans for reform of the Church to make it less “Vatican-centric” on Tuesday as he met with top cardinals tasked with helping him overhaul the 2,000-year-old institution. In his strongest censure of the intrigue-filled Vatican world yet, the Argentine pontiff condemned “leprosy” in the Vatican and called for a less hierarchical Church structured “horizontally”. “Leaders of the Church have often been Narcissuses, gratified and sickeningly excited by their courtiers. The court is the leprosy of the papacy,” Francis said in an interview with Italian left-wing daily La Repubblica. The comments came as the pope, who has become known for his humble style, met with a group of eight cardinals he has called to advise him on reforming the Vatican administration and bettering communication with local churches. Francis has already taken several significant steps to tackle one of the Vatican’s most high-profile problems: the scandal-plagued bank. In June he set up a pontifical commission to analyse the bank and propose ways to reform it, and on Tuesday it published its accounts for the first

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time in a new drive for transparency. A report in the Corriere della Sera daily said the bank was shutting 900 accounts as part of an internal audit, including ones deemed suspicious belonging to diplomats from the embassies to the Holy See of Indonesia, Iran, Iraq and Syria. The unique advisory board of cardinals meeting on Tuesday -- an innovation in Church government -- is holding closed door talks for three days and is expected to address a range of problems. These could include further financial reform, the role of women in the Church and whether to soften institutional lines on issues such as the position of divorced Catholics and homosexuality. It will also look at how to strengthen ties between the Vatican and local parishes, and place more focus on priests and their communities. The Holy See “is too Vatican-centric”, the pontiff said in the interview. “It looks after the interests of the Vatican, which are for the most part, earthly interests. This Vatican-centric vision neglects the world that surrounds it,” he said. “I do not share this vision and will do everything to change it.

“The Church is -- or must become once more -- a community of the people of God, and the presbyter priests, vicars and bishops who cure souls are at the service of God’s people,” he added. The eight cardinals in the group come from Australia, Chile, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Germany, Honduras, India, Italy and the United States. “This is the start of a Church structured just not vertically but horizontally as well,” Francis said. The cardinals “are not courtiers but wise men who share my same feelings,” he added. The 76-year-old said his focus lay on helping the Church engage better with the modern world -- while also returning to its humble roots. “We have to open up to the future,” he said, recalling how the 1962-1965 Second Vatican Council, which carried out large-scale reforms to update the Church. Those who drew up the reforms “knew that opening up to modern culture meant Christian unity and dialogue with non-believers.” “Little was done to follow up on it. I have the humility and ambition to want to do it,” he added.

Clyde E. Palmer (1876-1957)

Walter E. Hussman (1906-1988)

Walter E. Hussman Jr. Publisher

Buddy King President

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Editorial Manager/ Sports Editor

Sue Silliman General Manager

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Published Monday through Friday except Jan. 1, July 4, and Dec. 25 at 113 Madison NE by Camden News Publishing Co., Camden AR 71701. Phone 836-8192. Periodical postage paid at Camden, Ark. The Camden News is not responsible for any copy omission, typographical error or unintentional error that occurs other than to make a correction upon being presented with proper, correct information. The publisher reserves the right to revise or edit all advertising offered for publication and to reject any objectionable advertising. POSTMASTER: PLEASE SEND CHANGE OF ADDRESS TO CAMDEN NEWS, P.O. BOX 798, CAMDEN, AR 71711.

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Attend the church of your choice this week.


Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013 - 3

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A Day Of Atonement Yom Kippur is a solemn Jewish holy day described in the Bible, in Leviticus 16. It is a day of atonement set aside for man to be in agreement with God, and a day of prayer, fasting, and repentance of sin. It is wonderful to have this special religious holiday to remind not only the Jewish faith, but everyone, that reconciliation between God and man is necessary for our happiness and salvation. However, we should keep in mind that living our lives in harmony with God is not just a once-a-year occasion; we should be mindful of God’s mercy and love for us every day of our lives. God’s bountiful blessings are endless and He asks so little from each of us in return. We should always keep in mind what the Bible tells us: “Know that the Lord is God! It is He that made us, and we are His; we are His people, and the sheep of his pasture” (Psalm 100:3).

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116 Jefferson Street • Camden, Arkansas

This Devotional & Church Directory is made possible by these businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. APOSTOLIC Apostolic Church 200 First Street Bearden, AR 71720 Phone: 870-352-5404 City of Refuge Apostolic 257 Center St. Evang. Benfadine Cribbs Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 12 noon Evening Worship - 7:30 p.m. Faith Temple Apostolic 1034 Dunning St. District Elder Andrew Kimbell Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:45 a.m. Evening Worship - 7 p.m. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Bethel Temple Assembly Thompson Loop, Har. G. Rev. Joyce Smith Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening - 7 p.m. Cullendale Assembly 3250 Cash Road Pastor Chris Cleveland Assoc. Pastor Ryan Workman Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. KidFs Church Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Wednesday Service - 7 p.m. (Adults, Youth, & Children)

First Assembly of God 1275 Maul Rd. Rev. Greg L. Sanders Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. First Assembly of God P.O. Box 479, Bearden Rev. Wayne McGuire Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:50 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Louann Assembly of God Rev. Kurt Birkeland Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Pleasant Ridge AOG 2880 Fairview Road Rev. Mary Jo Taylor Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. Rolling Hills AOG Stephens Rev. Dennis Smith Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Victory Assembly of God 1283 Hwy. 278 Rev. Jerry Ables Early Service - 9:00 a.m. Main Service - 10:30 a.m. Evening Service - 5:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening - 7:00 p.m. Warner Spur Assembly of God 131 Ouachita County Rd. 43 Rev. Damon Launius Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 5 p.m. White Oak Assembly of God 662 Oua. 92., Bearden Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m. BAPTIST Adams Chapel MBC Rev. Jared Conatser 909 Oua 17 Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Afternoon Worship - 1 p.m. Antioch Baptist Church Charles R. Easter-Pastor 10 Columbia Rd. 204, Magnolia www.preacherallday.com 870-696-3875 Antioch MBC Hwy. 57 - Stephens Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Bearden Missionary Baptist Olive & 2nd St - Beardem Rev. Harold Sims Sunday School - 9:45 am Morning Service - 11:00 am Evening Service - 4:00 pm Calvary Baptist Church 319 Hwy. 278 East Rev. Don Phillips Early Morning worship - 8:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Wor. -11:00 a.m. Evening Worship - 6p.m. Calvary MBC Ark. 376 South Louann, AR Pastor - Cecil R. Gibson Sunday School - 9:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Bible study - 6 p.m. Camden Bible Baptist 1245 California Al Green - Pastor Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Cedar Grove Baptist Church 1658 Oua. 2, Stephens Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. 2nd & 4th Sundays Chidester Baptist Church 145 Tates Bluff Rev. Ken Key, Pastor Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Wednesday - 6 p.m. Concord Missionary Baptist 430 Adams • Rev. B.C. Jones Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Cullendale First Baptist 1850 Cash Road Dr. Wade Totty, Pastor Sunday School - 9:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:15 a.m. Evening Worship - 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Night Svc. - 6:30 p.m. Damascus MBC 213 Sallie Rev. K.W. Anderson Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Eagle Mills First Bap. Church Rev. Chris Morgan Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. Elliot Baptist Church 4189 Hwy. 376 S. (870) 231-6411 Morning Worship - 10:50 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Fairview Road Baptist 2999 Fairview Rd. Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:50 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Faith Baptist Church 134 Oua. 34 Rev. Bill Smith Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Fellowship Baptist Church P.O. Box 478, Bearden Rev. Rev. Kevin Stevicks Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Wed. Evening - 7 p.m. First Baptist 348 Washington Rev. Richard D. Piles - Sr. Pastor Sun. Bible Study for all ages - 9:30 Sun. Morning Worship - 10:45 Sun. Evening Worship - 6:00 Wed. Fellowship Supper - 5:00 Wed.Worship & Student Life - 6:00 First Baptist, East Camden Pastor Charles Simpson Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. First Baptist, Reader Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. First Landmark Missionary Baptist Church 1674 Maul Road Pastor Danny Sikes Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Evening Bible Study - 5:30 p.m. Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening - 6:30 p.m. First Missionary Baptist Church 701 North Oak St., Bearden Rev. Elijah McDaniel, Pastor Church Prayer-9:15 a.m. Sunday School-9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Service - 6:30 p.m. First Southern Baptist Church P.O. Box 449, Bearden Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 7 p.m. First Union Baptist Ark. 24 Rev. Frank C. Dawn Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m.

Good Home Baptist Church 112 Oua. 499, Camden Rev. Billy R. Hunter Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Service 6:45 p.m. Good Hope Baptist 289 Oua. 7 Rev. Bruce Porchia Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Grace Baptist 1505 California Ave. Bro. Richard Foster Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Greater Mt. Olive Baptist Bearden, AR Rev. David Thrower-Pastor Sunday School 10:00 AM Worship 11:00 AM Wednesday 6:00PM Greater St. Paul Baptist 116 Holloway Dr. George E. Smith Early Morning Worship - 8:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Regular Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Harmony MBC Stephens Bro. LeRon Braswell-Pastor Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:50 a.m. Evening Worship - 5 p.m. Harmony Grove MBC Ouachita 403 Pastor Harvey Ambrose Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m Hickory Ridge MBC Rev. S. Porchia Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Hillside Baptist 322 Columbia Ave. Rev. Neil Wigley Pastor Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Prayer Line: 870-836-6162 Immanuel Baptist Anthony Tropp- Pastor 2409 Mt. Holly Rd. Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Locust Bayou Missonary Baptist Hwy 278 Rev. Leroy Jones, Pastor Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. BTS - 5:00 p.m. Sunday Evening Worship - 6:00 P.M. Wednesday Evening - 6:30 P.M. Macedonia MBC 1030 Gibson Street Rev. Roy Williams, Pastor Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Mt. Gillard Baptist 112 Ouachita395, - Hwy 376 S Rev. Davis Dixon, Pastor Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Mid-Week Service - Wed. 5:30 p.m. Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist 136 Arkansas 376 Rev. Jamal Brown Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Mt. Willie Baptist Rev. David Thrower Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Mt. Zinna Baptist, Stephens Rev. A. Roy Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 5 p.m. New Haven Baptist 336 Stewart St. Rev. Jeffery Fields Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship 3rd Sun.- 5:00 p.m. New Jerusalem Baptist Rev. Raymond Jordan - Pastor Old Lisbon Road Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. New Mt. Hebron Baptist 2417 Old Smackover Rd. Rev. Lonnell Moore Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:50 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. New St. Mary Baptist, 1776 Hwy. 7 N Rev. Odell Carr-Pastor Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. New Starlight Baptist Church 2780 Cash Rd. (Cardinal Shopping Ct.) Rev. James E. Johnson -Pastor Sunday School - 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study - 6:00 p.m. New Zion Hill Baptist 592 Oua. 1, Stephens Rev. Alonzo Roy Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (1st & 3rd Sunday) Pilgrim Rest Baptist 675 Viser Ave. Rev. Jacob H. Hayes, Jr. Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:40 a.m. Pleasant Grove Baptist Rev. Roy Elliott 175 Oua. 408, Camden Worship Service every Sunday Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist Rev. Rodney Phillips, Pastor Chidester, AR Wed. Night Prayer Serv. - 6-7:30 Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Sunday Services - 11:00 a.m. Rising Star Baptist Church 2457 Hwy. 7 N Rev. Frank C. Dawn Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Second Baptist Church 530 Cash Rd. NW Rev. Fred Martin Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 5 p.m. Shady Grove Baptist Church Ark. 79 North Rev. James C. Scott Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Shiloh Missionary Baptist 247 Buchanan St. Rev. H. Earl Anderson Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Smead Community Baptist Highway 7 South, Sparkman Sunday School: 10:00 AM Morning Worship: 11:00 AM South Street Baptist Rev. Johnney Bailey Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. St. James Baptist 171 Bensberg Road Rev. T.Kelly, Pastor Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. St. John Baptist Rev. Leon Parham, Sr. - Pastor Eagle Mills, AR Worship Service - 1st & 3rd Sunday Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Service - 11:00 a.m. St. Stephens Baptist, Stephens Rev. Daryl Hope Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Bible Study - Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Sweet Home Baptist 3261 U.S. 79 South Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Sylvan Hills Baptist Rev. Carl Hart 3584 Hwy. 376 Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Temple Baptist 2511 Adams Ave. Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Trinity Missionary Baptist 2180 Old Wire Rd. Rev. Richard Merritt Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Unity Missionary Baptist 537 Cash Road Rev. Brandon Melton-Pastor Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:50 a.m. Evening Worship - 7 p.m. White Oak Lake Baptist Church 427 Hwy 387, Chidester (Upper White Oak Lake) Bro. Doug Higginbotham Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship -11:00 a.m. Wed. Evening Prayer & Bible Study -7:00 p.m. Whitest Chapel Baptist Church 1032 Cook Ave. Rev. M. Wilson Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:50 a.m. Zion Hill Missionary Baptist 117 Maul Rd. Rev. C.L. Thompson, Jr. Morning Worship - 8:45 a.m. Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m.

CATHOLIC St. Louis Catholic Church 114 Van Buren Father Tony Robbins Confessions: Half Hour before Mass Sun. Morning Mass - 11:30 a.m. Also by appointment: Please Call For daily Mass schedule call 870-836-2426 CHRISTIAN First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Rev. Mark Williams 202 Van Buren Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Full Council Christian Fellowship of Camden 2780 Cash Rd. Rev. Ranfolph Hegwood, Pastor Sun. Christian Growth - 9 a.m. Sun. Morning Worship - 10 a.m. 1st Sun. Communion - 6 p.m. Wed. All Saints Prayer - 6:30 p.m. Wed. Mid-Week Service - 7 p.m. Wed. Youth Worship - 7 p.m. St. Paul Christian Church Road 88 Harmony Grove Rev. Will Lovett Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST Church of Christ Locust Bayou, Hwy 278 Cedric Mitchell - Minister Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Sunday -5:00 p.m. Wednesday -6:00 p.m. Cullendale Church of Christ Richard Kirkland 2707 Mt. Holly Rd. Sunday School - 9 a.m. Morning Worship - 10 a.m. Evening Worship - 5 p.m. Wednesday Service - 7 p.m. only1way2heaven@live.com Madison St. Church of Christ 347 Madison St. Lonnell Herron, Sr., Minister Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Maul Road Church of Christ 1425 Maul Road www.maulroad.com Johnny Hobbie, Preacher Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:40 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Wednesday - 7 p.m. Two Bayou Church Of Christ Russ Comeaux, Minister Sunday Bible Study - 9:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:00 a.m. Evening Worship - 5:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study - 7:00 p.m. Hwy 7 Church of Christ 2850 Hwy 7 South 231-4871 Sammy Grant - Minister Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Wed. Bible Class - 6:30 p.m. Westside Church of Christ 1695 W. Washington St. Dwayne Scribner, Minister Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST Brown Temple COGIC 789 Scales and Progress Supt. Clenso Thrower Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 7 p.m. Crossroads COGIC Hwy. 4 & 57 Supt. John D. Monk Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Greater Grace COGIC 725 Iowa Street Elder Ryan Utsey Sr - Pastor Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. Bible Study Wed. - 6:00 p.m. For more information call 870-807-1596 Greater Love COGIC 447 Elm & Sycamore St. Bishop J.E. Williams Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:15 a.m. Evening Worship - 6:30 p.m. Great New Calvary COGIC 3150 HWY. 7 S. Supt. Cedric Mitchell Sunday School - 9:30 Morning Worship - 11:00 Healing & Deliverance Worship Center Pastor Keith Marks Washington Street (Downtown Camden) Sunday Worship - 11 a.m. Wed. Night DiscipleFs Bible Study - 7 p.m. Locust Bayou COGIC Elder James Sanders Rt. 1 Box 81 Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:15 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Band - 7:00 p.m. Louann COGIC Elder Charles Ellis Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Mt. Sinai COGIC 333 South St. Elder Jimmy Talley Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:15 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. (1st & 3rd Sun.) Rocky Hill COGIC Co. Rd. 25, Chidester, AR Elder Maurice Williams Sunday School - 10:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6:30 p.m. New Beginnings Deliverance Church Elder Kevin Tate, Pastor 1725 Mt. Holly Road 870-568-NBDC Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Thursday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. New Hope COGIC 2236 S. Adams Ave Pastor Roy L. Wesley Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:30 a.m. New ScottC s Temple COGIC Chidester Hwy. Pastor - Elder Roy Allen Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship - 5:00 p.m. Bible Study - Fri. 6:30 PM Temple COGIC 310 Pearl St. Elder Jerry W. Gaston, Sr. Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:20 a.m. Wed. Midweek Service - 6 p.m. Velie COGIC 1415 Hwy 7 N. -Amy Elder Arian Pinkston, Pastor Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship - 5:30 p.m. EPISCOPAL St. JohnC s Episcopal Harrison, Van Buren Holy Eucharist - 9 a.m. METHODIST Beech Hill AME Church Rev. Roy D. Smith Columbia 75, Stephens Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Bible Study - every Wed. at 7:00 p.m. (1st and 3rd Sunday) Bell Chapel United Methodist 267 Hwy 76, Chidester Rev. Larry E. Goza, Pastor Sunday School - 8:30 a.m. Worship- 9:30 a.m. Bethel AME 575 N. Madison Rev. Gwain Hammock Church School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Bethel AME Church 321 Bradley, Chidester Rev. Sarah Green - Pastor Church School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (2nd & 4th Sundays) Buena Vista UMC 215 Ouachita County Rd. 5 Rev. Cedric Walters Morning Worship - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School - 10:45 a.m. CME Temple 414 N. Adams Ave. Rev. Aurther Britgs Jr. Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Fairview United Methodist 2603 Mt. Holly Rd. Rev. Allen Crum Contemporary Worship - 8:30 am Sunday School - 9:00 a.m. Traditional Service - 10:00 a.m. Sunday Youth Service - 4:00 pm Sunday Evening Worship/Bible Study - 6 p.m. First United Methodist P.O. Box 161, Bearden Rev. Andy Hughes Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. First United Methodist 121 Harrison Street, Camden Rev.Buddy Ratliff Praise Service - 8:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Good Hope AME Hwy. 57, Chidester Pastor G.C. Nettles Church School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Harmony Grove UMC Rev. James Harris Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Holly Springs UMC Rev. James Harris Hwy. 9 Morning Worship - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School - 10:30 a.m. Lakeside UMC Rev. James Harris Morning Worship - 8 a.m. Love & Joy Hispanic UMC 115 Ouachita 286, Camden Sandra Cotton, Pastor Sunday Service 1:30p.m.-3:30p.m. Macedonia A.M.E. Church 2906 Adams Ave. SW Church School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 7 p.m. Mt. Moriah UMC Hwy. 57, Chidester Rev. James Fort Morning Devotion - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Mt. Zion AME Church 194 Ouachita 173 Church School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (Every Sunday) Wed. Bible Study - 6p.m. Bethel Temple Wed. Night Service - 7:00 p.m. Radio: 8:30 a.m. Sunday New Bethel AME 134 Ouachita 130 Buena Vista, Arkansas Bro. Michael Harris Church School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (1st & 3rd Sunday)

New Union AME Rev. Lessly Banks 290 Ouachita 101, Stephens Church School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (2nd & 4th Sundays) Pine Grove AME Rosston Rd. John Lewis Bates, Pastor Church School - 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Red Hill United Methodist Ouachita County Medical Center 781 Oua. 22, Chidester Rev. Larry E. Goza, Pastor 638 California • Camden • 836-1000 Worship- 11:00 a.m. 1st & 3rd Sundays Rushing Memorial United Methodist Church Bro. Benny Morgan Hwy 24 & Benton St. - Chidester Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. “Wednesday Night Supper” - 6 pm each Wed. Shiloh AME 173 Oua. 56, Chidester Rev. Sarah Green - Pastor Church School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (1st & 3rd Sundays) Silver Springs Methodist Church Hwy 57, Stephens Lay Minister T.J. Huffman Sunday Morning Worship - 11:00 a.m. Spring Hill AME Pavilion 2 Locations Stephens Church School - 9:45 a.m. Next To McDonald’s • 836-8132 Morning Worship - 11 a.m. New Seminary AME Church Ouachita Clinic • 836-2727 Rev. Roy D. Smith Old Curry Field Rd, Stephens Sunday School - 9:30 Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Bill Morrison P.D. • Angela Jeffus P.D. (2nd & 4th Sundays) New St. James AME Church Maribeth Wright P.D. • Katy Bostic Pharm D. Rev. Napoleon Davis, Jr. - Pastor 241 Center St. Camden, Arkansas Morning Glory Service - 8:30 a.m. Church School - 9:30 a.m. Worship Service- 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study - 6:00 p.m. St. James AME, Eagle Mills Church School - 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (2nd & 4th Sunday) St. James AME, Stephens Rev. Andrew Banks - Pastor Arch Street, Stephens Church School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study - 6 p.m. (2nd & 4th Sunday) St. James AME, Waldo Bro. Michael Harris Church School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. (2nd & 4th Sunday) St. Mark UMC 1315 Washington Ave. Rev. Deanna McCormack Morning Worship - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School - 10:45 a.m. Light the Night Sunday 5 p.m. Timothy UMC 1800 California Rev. Deanna McCormack Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Romans 10:9-10 Union AME Church, Chidester Rev. Sherman Dumbar STORE FRONTS • WINDOWS • STORM WINDOWS & DOORS Church School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. • SHOWERS & TUB • ENCLOSURES Westside UMC 2211 Maul Rd. Rev. Don Nicholson Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Zion Hill AME 278 West Church School 10a.m. 870-836-4321 Fax: 870-836-8752 Morning Worship 11 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 6 p.m. 1150 West Washington Camden, AR 71701 (1st & 3rd Sunday)

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MORMON Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 859 Lakewood Road Larry Robert Olson, Branch Pres. Sacrament Meeting - 9 a.m. Sunday School - 10:15 a.m. NAZARENE First Church of Nazarene 1204 Country Club Rd. Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. PENTECOSTAL Bethel Pentecostal Church 364 N. Madison Rev. Jack Billingsley Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Word Aflame United Pentecostal 1621 Cash Rd. Rev. Michale Shelton Sunday School - 10 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. PRESBYTERIAN Bethesda Cumberland Presbyterian Church Bro. Anthony Needham www.bethesdacpchurch.org 395 Ouachita 47 (Mt. Holly Road) Sunday Morning Prayer - 8:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. Thurs. Bible Study - 7:00 p.m. Fellowship Cumberland Presbyterian Church Sis. Roberta Johnson Old Wire Road Oua. 3 Sun. School - 10:00 a.m. Mornig Worship - 9:00 a.m. Evening Worship - 5:00 p.m. Wed. Prayer Meeting - 7:00 p.m. Wed. Worship - 7:00 p.m. Camden Cumberland Presbyterian Church 1545 California Ave Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m Sunday Evening - 6 p.m. Wed. Evening Children WWF - 6 p.m. Wed. Evening Adult Bible Study - 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Rev. Erin P. Kaye 313 Greening St. Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. www.firstprescamden.org Sulphur Springs Cumberland Presbyterian County Rd. 2 Pulpit Supply - Jamie Venable Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Tates Bluff Presbyterian Rev. Charlotte Cobb - Pastor Chidester, Ouachita 23 Worship Service - 9:00 AM Sunday School - 10:00 AM OTHER Abiding Life Temple 514 Hwy. 274, East Camden Rev. Warren & Jean Schion Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. BelieverCs World Outreach Church 1600 Cash Rd. Pastors: Jake & Heidi Kinnamon Adult Sunday School - 9 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship - 10:15 a.m. Sunday ChildrenFs Ministry - 10:15 a.m. Wed. Night Service - 7:00 p.m. Wed. Children & Youth Ministries - 7:00 p.m. Camden Seventh Day Adventist 121 North Agee 9:15 a.m. - Sabbath School 11:00 a.m. Divine Worship

Bible Study & Prayer Meeting every Thurs. 6:00 p.m.

Chidester Community Church Pastor: Bill Ponder Sunday School - 10 a.m. Sunday Service - 11 a.m. (870)685-2729 Faith Community Church 2780 Cash Road Pastor: Randolph Hegwood (870) 231-5483 Frenchport Community 1926 Oua. 67 Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6:00 p.m. GodCs Place International Elder R. “Reese” Broadnax - Pastor 115 East Washington • (870) 837-2350 Meet & Greet - Sundays 9:45 - 10:00 am School of the Bible - Sundays 10:00 am Morning Worship - Sundays 11:00 am Intercessory Prayer - Mondays 7:00 pm Radical Praise Service - 2nd Sun. 6:30 pm Evangelistic & Fellowship Ser. - 4th Sun. 6:30 pm Johnson Memorial Ministries 419 Washington, Downtown Camden Sunday Worship - 11:00 am Wednesday Night Bible Study - 7:00 pm Kingdom Ministries International Bishop M. Randy Morris, Pastor Cardinal Shopping Center – Suite 223 1105 Fairview Road – Camden, AR Sunday Worship Service - 11:00 am Wednesday Night Bible Study - 6:30 pm Koinonia of Grace Church Bishop Julian & Elder Nancy Lott,Pastor/Teacher 329 N. Adams, Camden - (870) 837-2755 www.julianlottministries.ning.com Sunday Morning Worship 8:30 AM Tuesday Mid Week Worship 6:00 PM Tabernacle of Faith International William S. McCoy - Pastor 636 Cleveland Ave. Sunday Bible: 10a.m. Morning Worship: 11a.m. Wednesday Youth & Adult Bible Study: 6:30p.m. New Beginnings Family Church Rev. Eddie R. Moore, Jr., Pastor-Teacher Junction City Rd. - ElDorado New Mt. Vernon 1184 Myrtle St. Rev. Paul Kelly Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m. Revelations Ministries, Inc. 1945 California Ave. Pastor: Charles Gordon Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship - 11:15 a.m. Wed. Night Service - 7:00 p.m. Spirit Led Christian Ministries 277 North Street, Camden Rev. Jacovis & Co-Pastor Iretha Davis Intercession 8:30 - 9:10 a.m. Sunday School 9:15 - 10:30 a.m. Prayer Service 10:30 - 11:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. M.A.P. Thursday Evening 5:00 p.m. Tuesday Women & Men for Christ 6:00 p.m. Wed. Intercession/Bible Study 6:30p.m. Children Ministry Zion Temple of Deliverance 346 Monroe Rev. Marvin Toney Sunday School - 10 a.m. Morning Worship - 11 a.m.

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Williams Funeral Home Williams Burial Association 870-836-5096

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502 Adams Ave. NW Camden, AR 71701

Only God Is Perfect Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? R.S.V. Luke 6:41

Attend the Church of Your Choice This Sunday! Life’s Problems: ONE SOLUTION

It’s just that easy.


4 - Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013

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What’s Happening (Items for What’s Happening may be submitted to the Camden News, P.O. Box 798, Camden, AR 71701, or by e-mail at c a m d e n n ews @ c a m d e narknews.com.)

RSVP group will hold dance Friday

The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program will hold a dance for those 55 and older from 7-10 p.m. Friday at the Champagnolle Landing Senior Center in El Dorado. Admission is $6 per person. Music will be provided by Night Hawk.

FHS Class of ‘63 to have reunion

The Fairview High School Class of 1963 will hold a reunion Friday and Saturday. On Friday, the class will gather in the high school commons area before attending the CFHS football game against Whitehall. On Saturday, there will be a tailgate party for the Razorbacks vs. Florida football game, followed by a catfish dinner at the Burton's house. For more information, contact Ray Jones in Bentonville or Tom Burton in Camden at 870-692-2967.

Dog dock-jump to be held on Friday

A “Walk-on-the-Water Dogs” Dock-Jumping Competition will be held beginning at 4 p.m. today and at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Waggin’ Tails Dog Park, 1825 Fairview Road. A cash prize of $100 will be given to the overall best jumper. The cost to enter a dog is $10, with proceeds going to the OASIS Spay/Neuter fund. For more information, call 836-7297.

Fundraiser held for local museum

An auction and brunch to support the Chidester School Museum will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Charles O. Ross Center. For more information, call 870833-2303.

Ouachita County NRA dinner is set The 2013 Ouachita County Friends of NRA Dinner will be held at 5:30 p.m. Saturday at the Jim Golden Ford-Lincoln dealership at 790 California Ave. Tickets are $25 per person and will be available at the door. Advance "Big Shooter" tickets are $100, advanced "Super Shooter" tickets are $250, and advanced "Corporate Table Package" tickets are "$750. Tickets can be purchased at Walthall's Sporting Center, 1250 California Ave.

Wooten at CFHS at 837-1300 during school hours. The theme for this year's parade is "It's a Jungle Out There."

Stream Team hosts a ‘River Clean-Up’

The Arkansas Stream Team, a program of the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission, is sponsoring the Ouachita River Clean-Up at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 12, at Sandy Beach. A free lunch will be provided. Those wanting to participate in the event can contact Ben Thesing at 870-675-8412.

CASA is holding fundraiser Oct. 12

Members of the 13th Judicial Court Appointed Special Advocates organization will hold a "Poker Run for Children" beginning at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 12, at Red's Restaurant in Fordyce. At 6 p.m., CASA will host a dance at the National Guard Armory in Fordyce.

Lions Club event tickets are on sale

Tickets are now on sale for the Camden Noon Lions Club's Distinguished Service Awards Banquet, which will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 15, at the Charles O. Ross Center. The cost of tickets is $20 and can be purchased at the Camden Area Chamber of Commerce office, Catherine's Bistro, Farmers Bank locations, the Shopper's Guide and the Cam-Tel office. The guest speaker will be Arkansas Baptist College Chancellor Dr. Fitz Hill.

OWOD has tickets to annual banquet Tickets are now on sale for Outstanding Women of Distinction in Southern AR, Inc.'s 8th Annual Banquet and Gala, set for 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Charles O. Ross Center. Katherina Yancy, Channel 7 News reporter, will be the guest EMCEE. Tickets are $25 and may be purchased from any member or by calling 231-5383 or 818-5004.

Watch group will meet on Oct. 14

The West Camden Heights Neighborhood Watch group will meet at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 14, at 537 Cash Road.

OCCCA will host concert on Oct. 17

The Ouachita County Community Concert Association will host a concert by John Berry at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 17, at the Camden Fairview Middle School H.G. Boosters will auditorium at 746 Dooley Womack Drive. The cost is meet on Monday a $50 OCCCA membership. The Harmony Grove Band For more information, call Boosters will meet at 6:15 231-6244 or 837-2062. p.m. Monday in the band AARP is holding building on the school's campus. driver safety class An AARP Driver Safety CF homecoming Class will be held from 8:30 needs entrants a.m. until 12:30 p.m. on SatIf you, your club, or your urday, Oct. 19, in the felloworganization would like to ship hall at Cullendale First participate in the Camden Baptist Church at 1850 Cash Fairview Homecoming Pa- Road. rade at 3 p.m. on Oct. 11, you The cost is $12 for AARP must pre-register by Oct. 10 members and $14 for nonby contacting Pam Strick- members. Pre-register for land, Darla Stivers or Tavitha the class by calling 231-5441..

L.R. Air Force Base is continuing operations

program. Architectural planning for the estimated 20,000 square-foot nursing faLITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE cility will start in 2014 with construc(AP) — The commander of the 19th tion starting in 2015. Airlift Wing at Little Rock Air Force Delay sought in trial for Base says operations at the base are continuing despite the loss of about UCA ex-administrator 350 civilian workers due to the federal CONWAY (AP) — Prosecutors are government shutdown. asking a judge to delay the upcoming The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette re- trial for a former University of Cenports that Col. Patrick Rhatigan said tral Arkansas administrator accused of Thursday the flights are taking place commercial burglary. normally and airmen are taking on ex- Jack Gillean faces an Oct. 28 trial tra duties to make sure flights remain in Van Buren County on the charges. on schedule and other duties are per- But the Log Cabin Democrat reports formed as usual. that prosecutors are seeking a delay The base employs about 600 civil- because they haven’t yet received subians and about 350 have been on leave poenaed phone records in the case. without pay since the government Gillean was chief of staff at UCA shutdown on Tuesday. until his arrest last year. Prosecutors WWII veterans still plan accuse him of giving a master key to a student who allegedly broke into proto travel to Washington fessors’ offices to steal test answers. LITTLE ROCK (AP) — Nearly 80 Gillean faces five counts of commerWorld War II veterans will travel from cial burglary, one count of fraudulent Arkansas to the nation’s capital to see insurance acts and one misdemeanor charge of issuing a false financial the memorial built in their honor. A commercial jet has been chartered statement. to fly the veterans free of charge from Death penalty is off table Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport in Little Rock to Washington, in the Fort Smith case D.C., and back. The group will include FORT SMITH (AP) — Prosecutors veterans as old as 98 who will see the say they won’t seek the death penalty World War II Memorial as well as oth- for a Fort Smith man charged in the er military memorials. shooting death of his former father-inEarlier this week, 125 veterans from law. Iowa and Mississippi were initially de- Sebastian County Prosecutor Dan nied access to the World War II Memo- Shue filed the notice Thursday sayrial on the National Mall because of the ing he will not seek death for Michael government shutdown, but they even- Ray Underwood. Prosecutors charged tually made their way past barriers. Underwood with capital murder in the 13 shooting death of 63-year-old JBU nursing program to June Michael Shook. receive $6M endowment Authorities say Underwood also shot himself in the encounter. According to SILOAM SPRINGS (AP) — John the Southwest Times Record, a police Brown University says it’s received a $6 million gift for its new nursing edu- report says Underwood will likely never walk again or regain function in cation facility and an endowment for the university’s new nursing program. the left side of his body because of his JBU President Chip Pollard an- injuries. nounced the gift Thursday and said the The report says Underwood’s exdonor wants to remain anonymous. The wife told police that Underwood had university is working to raise about $10 been harassing her and showing up at her home unannounced. million total for the program. JBU was approved last month by the Wording change is OKd Arkansas State Board of Nursing to begin recruiting students to start in fall for a marijuana proposal 2014 in the pre-nursing phase of the LITTLE ROCK (AP) — Arkansas At-

torney General Dustin McDaniel has approved the wording of a proposal for next year’s ballot legalizing medical marijuana. McDaniel on Thursday certified the proposal submitted by Arkansans for Compassionate Care, clearing the way for the group to begin gathering the 62,507 signatures needed to place the proposed initiated act on next year’s ballot. The proposal would allow patients with qualifying conditions to purchase marijuana from nonprofit dispensaries or to grow their own marijuana if they don’t live close to a dispensary. A competing marijuana legalization measure certified by McDaniel is nearly identical, but does not allow for patients to grow their own. Arkansans for Compassionate Care was behind a medical marijuana proposal that voters narrowly rejected in November. Several other marijuana legalization proposals have been submitted to McDaniel’s office.

Necropsy finds TB in a Little Rock Zoo elephant

LITTLE ROCK (AP) — A 62-yearold elephant that was euthanized last month at the Little Rock Zoo after it was unable to stand tested positive for tuberculosis, according to preliminary necropsy results. The elephant, named Jewell, was euthanized after staff members discovered her lying on her side, unable to get up. Necropsy results showed that tissue from the elephant tested positive for tuberculosis, though the official cause of death will be listed as euthanasia due to arthritis and severe musculoskeletal problems, the zoo said. Susan Weinstein, the state public health veterinarian, said zoo employees who had contact with the elephants will be tested for tuberculosis. Weinstein told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette that zoo visitors aren’t at risk because they did not have close contact with the elephants. “We have a list of everyone who has been in close contact with the elephants or with the necropsy area,” Weinstein said. “We are going to set up blood tests at our local health unit for those employees, but tuberculosis can take anywhere from eight to 12 weeks to even show up. There’s not any point in testing earlier.”

Rep. Griffin posts/deletes tweet LITTLE ROCK (AP) — A Republican congressman from Arkansas on Thursday posted — and later deleted — a tweet criticizing President Barack Obama and Democratic lawmakers for “violent rhetoric” during a U.S. Capitol lockdown following a shooting. U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin tweeted from his personal account “Stop the violent rhetoric President Obama, Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi” after a shooting was reported outside the Capitol. Griffin’s tweet included the hashtag “disgusting.” Griffin sent that tweet after sending another about the gunshots outside the Capitol. He later deleted the

tweet, which had received a flurry of angry responses on Twitter, and issued a statement indicating he regretted sending it out. “We are still processing information about this shooting, but as I have been saying for days, we all need to choose our words wisely because violent rhetoric only coarsens our culture, creates an atmosphere of incivility and is not helpful,” Griffin said in a prepared statement released by his office. “I tweeted out of emotion but agree that the timing was not helpful.” Griffin told The Associated Press that he regretted the timing of the tweet, but not the substance of his crit-

icism. He said he wasn’t trying to blame Democrats for the shooting and lockdown. “I did not blame them for any of the activity,” Griffin said. “What I have said is what I have been saying, and that’s the language they’re using in this debate to paint Republicans in an evil light is completely inappropriate.” Griffin said he was referring to comments Democrats have made about the federal government shutdown, including remarks by Schumer referring to being forced to conference with the House “with a gun to everybody’s head” and Pelosi calling some Republican lawmakers “legislative arsonists.”

Griffin is a two-term congressman who represents the 2nd district in central Arkansas. He does not have an announced Democratic opponent for his re-election bid next year. Before Thursday’s lockdown, he had tweeted from his account: “Is violent Democrat language resulting in real violence? Dems said ‘yes’ previously. Just saying. .” The lockdown occurred after a woman driving a black Infiniti with a young child in the car tried to ram through a White House barricade Thursday, then led police on a chase that ended in gunfire outside the Capitol. Police shot and killed the woman.

Neighbor’s feud ends in stabbing By JENNIFER SHERIDAN Staff Writer A feud between neighbors led to an alleged stabbing and a female being arrested, according to a release from the Camden Police Department. The release states that the incident occurred recently at the Fort Lookout Public Housing Complex. Officers found Melissa Rose Howard, 29, of Camden, to be the suspect in the al-

leged stabbing. Howard was arrested and evidence was gathered by CPD officers. The victim was Mayorga Johnson, who received a wound to the arm, according to the release. Johnson was taken to the Ouachita County Medical Center by ambulance. She received multiple staples for the stab wound and will require follow-up treatment, the release stated. Howard has been charged with sec-

ond-degree battery and public intoxication. She had a first judicial appearance on Monday in the court of Division 1 Judge Hamilton Singleton, according to the release. The case was transferred to circuit court after finding probable cause. Howard was released on a $5,000 signature bond.

Vet cherishes second chance at life MOUNT PLEASANT (AP) — For most folks, having a hobby or two is something mainly for enjoyment during free time. For some, a hobby might even lead to some extra income. But for Alan “Skip” Gasperich, his longtime love for music and a newfound passion for custom woodworking have brought him from near death to a new lease on a happy and joyful life. Always seeming to have a smile on his face, Gasperich can usually be found working on one of his dozens of cedar projects in his front yard in Mount Pleasant or playing and singing old country and gospel songs with his girlfriend Faye Condrey at the local nursing home and senior citizens center.

But just two short years ago, Gasperich was lying in a nursing home bed with little chance of ever getting out or even living much longer. “I was an alcoholic and nearly drank myself to death,” Gasperich told the Batesville Daily Guard “I was yellow as yellow can get.” In almost complete liver failure due to his years of heavy drinking, Gasperich’s longtime friend Howard Lamb told Faye to get ready to say her goodbyes to Skip because he didn’t have much longer. “It was a dark time there for a while,” Gasperich recalled. “But with a lot of prayer, the caring staff at Pioneer Nursing Home, and Dr. Adam Gray — I started

Corrections In a focus item on Thursday, an incorrect date was listed for the "River Cleanup"by the Stream Team. The event will be held on Saturday, Oct. 12. Also, the name of the me-

dia company that has interest in the Camden News and Cam-Tel was incorrectly listed in a story on Thursday. The company is the Walter E. Hussman Company, aka WEHCO.

steadily getting better.” Within just four months, Gasperich went from being bedridden, to walking using a walker, and then one day a nurse caught him in the hallway dancing without his walker. Soon, he was as healthy as he’d ever been and was ready to resume his normal life — except he won’t touch alcohol to this day. This wasn’t the first time the high-spirited Army veteran seemed to find a blessing amid all his struggles — he waited 39 years for his Purple Heart. While serving in Vietnam from 1967-68, Gasperich was injured in an explosion and was unable to apply for VA benefits for nearly four decades because the Army had lost any records of his Purple Heart (his papers were apparently burned in a fire in Missouri). In February 1968, Gasperich had stopped his truck at a bridge and got out, waiting on the truck ahead of him to cross. However, the bridge had been booby-trapped, and the exploding shrapnel hit his right arm and leg.

He said the medics couldn’t find the metal in his body, so it stayed put. Instead, they wrapped his wounds and gave him a cane, then he was discharged about a month later. In addition to the Purple Heart, he also received the Good Conduct Medal and Commendation Medal. Although Gasperich went on living in pain for nearly 40 years before the Army finally recognized his combat injuries, he says he doesn’t hold any resentment and is very proud to have served his country. Gasperich said God really worked on his heart during the time he was very sick; while in the nursing home, he started attending church services and eventually leading the music worship each Sunday. Before being released to go home, the pastor told Gasperich he would like for him to come back every Sunday to lead in opening prayer and to lead music worship. “Now I know about 50 old gospel songs and haven’t missed a Sunday in two years,” Gasperich said.


Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013 - 5

Calendar TODAY McCollum-Chidester House will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $2 for students under age 18. For groups of 10 or more call 836-9243 for reservations. Public Library of Camden and Ouachita County will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Chidester Public Library will be open from noon to 8 p.m. Living Clean Narcotics will have an open noon meeting at 805 Monroe. Celebrate Recovery will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Victory Church, 1283 U.S. 278 in Camden. Camden Group Alcoholics Anonymous will hold an open meeting at 8 p.m. at 805 Monroe.

Sat., Oct. 5 Public Library of Camden and Ouachita County will be open from 9 a.m. to noon. M c C o l l u m Chidester House will be open from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $2 for students under age 18. For groups of 10 or more call 836-9243 for reservations. Mariah Craighen/ Shady Valley Chapter 172 Order of Eastern Star will meet at 10 a.m. at the Masonic Temple at 346 South Monroe Street. Camden Group Alcoholics Anonymous will hold an open meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 805 Monroe. Living Clean Narcotics Anonymous Group will hold an open book study at 8 p.m. at 805 Monroe.

Sunday, Oct. 6 Camden Group Alcoholics Anonymous will hold an open meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 805 Monroe. Alcoholics Anonymous Unity Group will hold an open non-smoking book study meeting at 7 p.m. at 301 Jefferson Ave. Basic Group Narcotics Anonymous will hold an open discussion meeting at 7 p.m. at 972 W. Washington.

Monday, Oct. 7 Ouachita County Adult Education Center sponsored by SAU Tech is open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 237 Jackson. Public Library of Camden and Ouachita County will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Chidester Public Library will be open from noon to 8 p.m. Living Clean Narcotics will have an open noon meeting at 805 Monroe. SAU Tech Adult Education Center will offer Workplace Readiness Training for free from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 237 Jackson. Ouachita County Department of Human Services will hold a recruitment meeting for new foster/adoptive parents from 5 until 6 p.m. at the DHS ofďŹ ce. Fore more information, call 870-862-6631, ext. 157. English as a second language class from 5 until 8 p.m., at the Ross Center, 746 California Ave. These adult education classes are provided for free by SAU Tech. For more information, call 837-4001. Weight Watchers will meet at Ouachita County Medical Center Conference Room C. Weigh-in begins at 5:30 p.m. with the group meeting at 6 p.m.

U.S. & World News Digest Home returned to slain lottery winner‘s estate BARTOW, Fla. (AP) — The million-dollar Florida home of a murdered lottery winner has been stripped from his convicted killer and returned to his estate. The Ledger of Lakeland reports Friday that Circuit Judge J. Dale Durrance ruled that Dorice Moore never paid Abraham Shakespeare. A lawyer representing Shakespeare’s estate said it will be sold to beneďŹ t his two sons. Shakespeare won a $17 million lump-sum in 2006 but he lost most of his money. During Moore’s trial last year, prosecutors showed she befriended Shakespeare to take control of his remaining wealth, including his home. He disappeared in April 2009 and his body was found nine months later under a slab behind a home owned by Moore. He had been shot twice. Moore was convicted of ďŹ rst-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.

looking for a 70-foot-long mobile home that was stolen from a diner’s parking lot. The Washington County sheriff’s ofďŹ ce tells The Post-Star of Glens Falls that the mobile home had been placed on a trailer that was parked at a diner in the town of Hampton awaiting delivery to neighboring Vermont. Investigators say the owner had to have emergency surgery and when he came back to Hampton a few weeks later, the trailer with the $50,000, partially furnished mobile home was gone. Police say someone apparently hitched a truck to the trailer and towed it away late on the afternoon of Sept. 23, when a witness reported seeing it headed toward Vermont.

Ohio to offer alternative lethal injection option

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio prison ofďŹ cials are keeping their primary lethal injection drug in place despite the state’s supply expiring, but they’ve added a second drug option for executioners to adMobile home is stolen dress the shortage. The Department of Rehabilitation from diner parking lot and Correction said Friday that penHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Police in tobarbital will remain Ohio’s pria rural upstate New York town are mary method of administering the

death penalty. Spokeswoman JoEllen Smith says a second, alternative intravenous drug has been added as an option because of difďŹ culties in obtaining pentobarbital. The agency’s announcement Friday came just a few days after its last supplies of pentobarbital expired. The drug’s original manufacturer, Denmark-based Lundbeck Inc., said in 2011 that it was putting the drug off-limits for executions. It required that prohibition remain when it sold the product to Lake Forest, Ill.based Akorn Inc.

Ariz. race, sex abortion ban lawsuit dismissed PHOENIX (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed two civil rights groups’ lawsuit challenging an Arizona law banning abortions based on the race or sex of the child. U.S. District Judge David G. Campbell’s ruling Thursday says the NAACP’s Maricopa County branch and the National Asian PaciďŹ c American Women’s Forum don’t have legal standing to sue. The law makes it a felony to knowingly provide a sex- or race-based abortion. The groups contended that the law unconstitutionally singles out Asian and black women based on stereo-

types and the sponsors’ beliefs that Asian and black women may choose an abortion because of race or the baby’s sex. Supporters of the 2011 legislation that became the law said it was intended to prevent discrimination.

Futures rebound after a downturn this week

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock futures are rebounding from a signiďŹ cant sell-off over the past two days, but major averages that have been rattled by the partial government shutdown appear to be headed for a weekly loss. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index has ended in positive territory only twice over the past 11 days as disgust over the budget impasse grows. Though futures are ticking higher Friday, the Dow Jones Industrial average slumped below the 15,000 mark by Wednesday and is unlikely to recover this week. Dow Jones futures are up 30 points to 14,936. S&P futures have tacked on 4.6 points to 1,674.30. Nasdaq futures are up 10.50 points to 3,212.75. Because of the shutdown, there are no economic indicators Friday, including the crucial September jobs report from the Labor Department.

Shutdown jeopardizes nutrition program ALLENTOWN, Pa. (AP) — Jacob Quick is a fat and happy 4-month-old with a big and expensive appetite. Like millions of other poor women, Jacob’s mother relies on the federal Women, Infants and Children program to pay for infant formula — aid that is now jeopardized by the government shutdown. Pennsylvania and other states say they can operate WIC at least through the end of October, easing fears among ofďŹ cials that it would run out of money within days. But advocates and others worry what will happen if the shutdown drags on beyond that. “What’s going to happen to my baby?â€? asked Jacob’s mother, Cierra Schoeneberger, as she fed him a bottle of formula bought with her WIC voucher. “Am I going to have to feed him regular milk, or am I going to have to scrounge up the little bit of change I do have for formula or even baby food?â€? WIC serves nearly 9 million mothers and young children, providing what advocates say is vital nutrition that poor families might otherwise be unable to afford. Schoenberger, for example, said her son goes through about $40 worth of formula a week. “It’s like a car payment,â€? said the unemployed mother of three. The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children — better known as WIC — supplies low-income women with checks or debit cards that can be used for

infant formula and cereal, fruits and vegetables, dairy items and other healthy food. WIC also provides breast-feeding support and nutrition classes. Poor women with children under 5 are eligible. Just before the shutdown, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had warned that states would run out of WIC cash after a “week or so.â€? Now the agency says WIC should be able to provide beneďŹ ts through late October, with states using $100 million in federal contingency money released Wednesday and $280 million in unspent funds from the last budget year. If the aid dries up, desperate moms will probably dilute their babies’ formula with water to make it last longer, or simply give them water or milk, said the Rev. Douglas A. Greenaway, head of the National WIC Association, an advocacy group. Pediatricians say children under 1 shouldn’t drink cow’s milk because they can develop iron deďŹ ciency anemia. “These mothers have trust and conďŹ dence in this program, and that trust and conďŹ dence has been shaken by Congress,â€? Greenaway said. “This is just unconscionable.â€? Danyelle Brents, 22, a single mother of three, receives about $200 a month in vouchers for food and formula for her two children and baby. She is being hit doubly hard by the shutdown: She is a contract worker for the Federal Aviation Administration who catalogs records for aircraft certiďŹ cation, and is furloughed. Now,

D.C. suspect was depressed NEW YORK (AP) — The mother of a Connecticut woman who was shot to death by police after trying to breach a barrier at the White House said her daughter was suffering from post-partum depression. Authorities said the woman set off a high-speed car chase that put the Capitol on lockdown Thursday and caused a fresh panic in a city where a gunman killed 12 people two weeks ago. Two law enforcement ofďŹ cials identiďŹ ed the driver as 34year-old Miriam Carey, of Stamford, Conn. She was traveling with a 1-year-old girl who avoided serious injury and was taken into protective custody. The ofďŹ cials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss an ongoing investigation. Carey’s mother, Idella Carey, told ABC News Thursday night that her daughter began suffering from post-partum depression after giving birth to her daughter, Erica, last August. “A few months later, she got sick,â€? she said. “She was depressed. ... She was hospitalized.â€? Idella Carey said her daughter had “no history of violenceâ€? and she didn’t know why she was in Washington on Thursday. She said she thought Carey was taking Erica to a doctor’s appointment in Connecticut. ABC News reported that Miriam Carey was a dental hygienist. Her boss, Dr. Steven Oken, described Carey as a person who was “always happy.

Please bring your Birthdays or Anniversaries in by Wednesday for publication the following week.

with her baby going through 10 cans of formula a month, she might lose key help with her grocery bill. “That’s a lot of money, $15 a can,â€? she said. “Now that I’m out of work, WIC is how I support my family. ... I’m scared at this point to go buy anything extra.â€? Groups that ďŹ ght hunger say they are also concerned about the confusion that needy mothers may be feeling. Though most WIC ofďŹ ces are open, many mothers mistakenly assumed that beneďŹ ts were cut off. Advocates are also worried that there will be a cumulative effect as other, smaller government feeding programs run out of money. Adding to the uncertainty: While USDA has said that food stamps are guaranteed to continue through October, it is unclear what will happen after that. In Pennsylvania, whose $208 million WIC program supports 250,000 women and children, all local WIC ofďŹ ces remain open and beneďŹ ts are being dispensed as usual. The state Health Department said it has $25.5 million on hand to continue operating the program through October. Ohio said it has enough money to last through the second week of November. “Ohio WIC is open for business!â€? proclaimed the headline on a state website.

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Entertainment 6 - Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013

Spielberg honors Clooney for humanitarian work NEW YORK (AP) — Steven Spielberg and George Clooney go way back in show business. In fact, it was Spielberg who gave Clooney his big break on the TV show “ER,” the actor recalls. But the two Hollywood heavyweights came together Thursday evening for a different reason: Spielberg was honoring Clooney for his humanitarian work around the globe, especially in the Darfur region of Sudan. At a glittery fundraising gala in the vast “Whale Room” at New York’s Museum of Natural History, the director and his USC Shoah Foundation presented Clooney with its Ambassador for Humanity Award. Also on hand to praise Clooney were his co-star in the new movie “Gravity,” Sandra Bullock, and Jon Stewart of “The Daily

Show.” “George is the best kind of humanitarian,” Spielberg said. “The humble humanitarian.” The director called Clooney “an unparalleled example of action over apathy.” Clooney told the crowd of donors that “Our job is to make it hard for the bad guys to do what they’re doing, and for the good guys to ignore it.” The actor also praised Spielberg for his foundation’s work in creating and preserving video testimonies of Holocaust victims for future generations to learn from. “We have to be able to keep a record of what the powerful can do to the powerless,” Clooney said. The gala marked the 20th anniversary of Spielberg’s Holocaust movie “Schindler’s List,” a film that won the director an Oscar and, Spiel-

berg says, gave him the idea to start a foundation that would record interviews with Holocaust survivors. To date, the foundation, founded in 1994 and based since 2006 at the University of Southern California, has collected nearly 52,000 eyewitness testimonies on video, in what it calls the largest digital collection of its kind in the world. In an interview before the gala, Spielberg explained that a new, broader phase of the foundation’s work, begun recently, involves collecting video testimonies from survivors of genocide in places like Rwanda, Cambodia, and Armenia. “The origins of hatred haven’t gone away,” the director said. The foundation has already begun its work with testimony from Rwanda. The other countries will follow. Spielberg said the only obstacle

to further broadening the foundation’s work is funding, and the group announced during the evening that the gala had raised close to $3.7 million. A further goal, Spielberg said in the interview, was to get the country’s public school systems to teach tolerance education. The director said his foundation is working on getting materials to schools to be used in social science classes. He noted that Holocaust survivors are fast dying out, an even more important reason to preserve their life stories on video — video that can be catalogued and indexed for easy access, which now makes up for much of the foundation’s work. “The survivor community is vanishing,” he said. “Soon, it will only exist in cyberspace. But it’s a powerful community. We hope

Poker movie quickly politicized

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The thriller “Runner Runner” starring Justin Timberlake and Ben Affleck hasn’t even opened yet, but it’s already in the center of the fight over online gambling regulation. The American Gambling Association has bought ads on major websites including Twitter, Facebook and the IMDb movie database framing the film as a “cautionary tale” that points to the need for Congress to legalize online poker. The ads also pop up when people Google the movie’s title. The screenwriters have said their story of a young gambler pulled into the criminal dealings of an offshore poker site was never intended as a political parable. The movie is scheduled to open later Thursday. The Stop Predatory Gambling Foundation, a national nonprofit, sent a letter to the casino lobby Thursday pointing to the writers’ comments, and calling the ads dishonest. The group is demanding

that the ads — one of which warns, “sometimes movie villains are real” — be taken down. National director Les Bernal wrote that there was no reason to think shady offshore operations would disappear if online gambling was legalized in The U.S. and accused the casino lobby of wanting a cut of the illegal operators’ business. “Casino operators now hope to expand another key demographic to their base: young people, especially those of college age, which is why the AGA greedily seized upon ‘Runner, Runner,”’ Bernal wrote. Internet poker, never fully legal, has been strictly outlawed since 2011, when the Department of Justice seized the domain names of the largest offshore sites catering to U.S. customers and blacked them out. This crackdown, dubbed “black Friday,” left poker fanatics with two options: Get dressed and visit a card

room, or break the law and log into an offshore site. Offshore gambling sites took in roughly $2.6 billion from U.S. players last year, according to Geoff Freeman, president of the association. More recently, the federal government softened its stance on Internet betting, and three states — New Jersey, Delaware and Nevada — legalized some form of online wagering within their borders. The gambling lobby, which counts MGM Resorts International and Caesars Entertainment among its members, supports a federal approach. It warns that a patchwork of state laws will be unworkable for corporations and could leave gamblers exposed to dishonest dealings. The lobby is seizing any opportunity to try to jumpstart stalled federal legislation. “Washington is changing, and how you share your message in Washington is changing,” Freeman said. “You’ve got to break through the clut-

Continued from Page 1 -cussing about how to improve the academics at the school. Flowers pointed out how the school’s scores on Advanced Placement exams had improved 100 percent under the AIMS program. She also discussed some of the great work of the school’s EAST lab students, and pointed out that several distinguished guests have visited the school, including the governor’s wife, Ginger Beebe. Vaughan discussed how the school district participates in the Teach For America program, which brings new teachers to the district from all over the nation, and how many of the programs the school does wouldn’t be possible without the support from sponsors such as Farmers Bank and Trust, Aerojet and Lockheed Martin.

She mentioned how Farmers Bank and Trust recently donated a huge billboard sign to the school, and how Aerojet recently held a “Flash for your Success” campaign at the school where they handed out flash drives loaded with college information to seniors. Lockheed Martin sponsors Engineering in the Classroom, a family night at the school, Project Lead the Way classes, and the METS program, she added. Burton, who is serving as the high school principal for just the 2013-14 academic year, then closed the program, by reiterating that she believes the school can achieve the same success in academics as they have in athletics, and that in her mind, academics should always come first. Burton served as the Camden Fairview principal for nine years before retiring two years ago. When the dis-

trict found itself late in the hiring season needing a principal for the upcoming year, superintendent Robert Davis contacted Burton to see if she would be interested in coming back for one year. The one year gives the district time to conduct a thorough search for a permanent replacement. “When Mr. Davis called ... I had to give it a lot of thought, prayer and consideration, because I wasn’t bored,” Burton said. “But I’m a hometown girl ... and the City of Camden means a lot to me. I feel privileged to be afforded the opportunity to give back to a community that has given so much to me. “I’m a lot more tired at the end of the day ... but the students and faculty have responded so positively to my return, it’s just been wonderful.”

Continued from Page 6 area at the hospital. It’s such a worthwhile cause, I think.” Davis said she feels those at the hospital for hospice care and their families, along with other patients and the OCMC staff, would find peace and comfort from an area that has been beautified and is located on the hospital grounds. She reported that the area she is interested in at the hospital is a space located behind the hospice rooms and is completely enclosed. What Davis would like to see is that space transformed into a ‘healing garden’ type of area. The space, after completion, could include benches, a flower garden, hummingbird feeders, small flowering trees, a water fountain and a “walking trail area” for patients who need rehabilitation after orthopedic and other surgeries, stated Davis. She said she would love to have a vegetable garden in the courtyard as well so that the items can be sold to the public with proceeds going back into the upkeep of the area. Also, Davis has envisioned that the public would be able to purchase memory pavers, plaques and other items from the hospital’s gift shop to be placed in the courtyard in memory of a loved one. She reported that she was told the area was once main-

tained by a Camden man, and that it was often visited by several rabbits that also enjoyed the courtyard. The man has since passed away, but Davis said it would be fun and fitting if there was a rabbit-shaped fountain located in the center of the courtyard in tribute to the man who gave of his time and efforts to maintain that space. The project may take up to three years to complete, Davis said, and she is looking

for suggestions from residents about what the courtyard would include. She reported that she has spoken with OCMC President and CEO Peggy Abbott and has been given the green light to proceed with the project. Anyone with ideas about what could be placed in the courtyard and sketches regarding the area’s overall look can send those suggestions to Davis via email at keyclubproject@yahoo.com.

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ter.” Freeman dismissed the predatory gambling group’s complaint. He said online gambling empires like the one depicted in the movie often fail to verify gamblers’ ages and locations, and they offer no guarantee they’re playing fair. “Runner Runner,” released by Twentieth Century Fox, tells the story of a Princeton University graduate student, played by Timberlake, who believes he’s been cheated after gambling away his tuition money. He travels to Costa Rica to stick it to an online poker tycoon, played by Affleck, who then offers him a job. Writers David Levien and Brian Koppelman, who also created the 1998 gambling classic “Rounders,” told Reuters that they were surprised by the casino lobby’s campaign and found it amusing. Early reviews have been mostly negative.

that through these testimonies, the survivors can live forever.” Spielberg himself did not have relatives who died in the Holocaust. But his grandmother helped Hungarian Jews who had fled the Holocaust learn English in the United States. As a three-year old, he says, he learned his numbers from the “Auschwitz tattoo” of one of the survivors who gathered regularly in his home. While making “Schindler’s List,” he said, he met survivors who would come to him and want to tell him their stories, starting from when they were children. “They just wanted me to listen,” he said. “They didn’t want to talk to their children about it. The fact that they wanted to tell a complete stranger what they couldn’t tell a daughter or son really moved me.”

Verdict should end Jackson court saga LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jury’s rejection of a longrunning lawsuit by Michael Jackson’s mother against the promoter of his ill-fated comeback concerts could finally allow Jackson to disappear from a forum he has dominated for years — the courtroom. For five months, jurors were given an intimate look at Jackson’s life, his drive to be the top entertainer of all time, and his devotion to his mother and three children. Barring the intervention of an appeals court, Katherine Jackson’s case against concert promoter AEG Live LLC figures to be the last time a jury is asked to consider the life and death of the King of Pop in such detail. Several court cases involving Jackson remain, including disputes related to his estate, which erased nearly $500 million in debt

after his death and keeps churning out new products. It opened a Las Vegas Cirque-du-Soleil show this year and is likely considering additional releases of Jackson-related material to ensure his mother and children keep living comfortably and fans have new material to see and hear. The financial well-being of his children wasn’t an issue at the trial, but the effects of the family’s fight against AEG Live will likely linger for some time. Despite AEG’s victory, legal experts expect that entertainment companies will change how they deal with celebrities’ requests for specialized staff such as doctors. “I just think it’s a multiple lesson book on ways for companies to mitigate risk,” said Marcellus McRae, a former federal prosecutor who now handles white collar defense cases.


Sports Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013, 2011 - 7

Sports Focus Reds fire Baker after playoff loss CINCINNATI (AP) — The Reds fired Dusty Baker on Friday, parting ways with the manager who led them to their best stretch of success since the Big Red Machine but couldn’t get them past the first round of the postseason. The move came after the Reds lost the wild-card playoff in Pittsburgh 6-2 on Tuesday night, ending the season with their sixth straight loss. He had a year left on his two-year deal. The final-week fade was a major factor in the decision, general manager Walt Jocketty said in a phone interview. “Just the way we played lately was a factor,” Jocketty said. “But I think the way the season ended was kind of the final decision. “The last six games certainly played a big part in this.” The Reds are the fourth team with an opening at manager. Davey Johnson retired after the Nationals’ season, Eric Wedge left the Mariners and the Cubs fired Dale Sveum after finishing last in the NL Central. Baker took over a rebuilding team in 2008 and led it to three 90-win seasons and three playoff appearances in the last four years, their best run since Sparky Anderson managed the Big Red Machine to two World Series titles in the 1970s. Cincinnati couldn’t get past the opening round of the playoffs, however, building pressure for change.

Rodriguez sues MLB and Selig

NEW YORK (AP) — Alex Rodriguez took a swing for the fences in a bid to restore his reputation and lucrative career with the New York Yankees, accusing Major League Baseball and Commissioner Bud Selig in a lawsuit made public Friday of pursuing him in a “witch hunt” designed to smear Rodriguez’ character and cost him tens of millions of dollars. The lawsuit was filed Thursday in New York State Supreme Court by lawyers for the Yankees third baseman. It seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages for what it alleges was a relentless campaign by the league and Selig to “destroy the reputation and career of Alex Rodriguez.” The suit claims Selig and MLB tried to smear Rodriguez’s reputation to “gloss over” Selig’s past inaction and tacit approval of the use of performanceenhancing substances.

Calendar TODAY

FOOTBALL Camden Fairview will host White Hall in a 5A South conference game at Cardinal Stadium, starting at 7 p.m. Harmony Grove will travel to Genoa Central for a 6-3A conference game, starting at 7:30 p.m. Bearden will host Parkers Chapel for homecoming and a 8-2A conference game, starting at 7:30 p.m.

CF 8th-graders take 34-0 victory By KELLY BLAIR Sports Editor Camden Fairview split a pair of junior high contests at Cardinal Stadium on Thursday, dominating the 8th-grade game over Magnolia 34-0 while losing a close and competitive 9th-grade game, 19-14. In the 8th-grade game, Delvante Lewis scored early on a long touchdown run, before CJ Mitchell added another score later in the first half. The Junior Cardinals were able to convert one of their 2-point conversions before KJ Malone completed a touchdown pass on what Junior Cardinal head coach Chris Coker called a “Johnny Football” play. “Malone starts to scramble, fumbles the ball, picks it up and starts to scramble again, and then just throws it up for Delvante to come down with it and run it into the end zone,” Coker laughed, saying it reminded him of a Heisman trophy winner Johnny Manziel-type play. “I couldn’t believe we didn’t have any lineman down field. I told (assistant coach Benjamin) Hargrove, ‘That’s great line coaching.’ And he said, ‘Coach I think they all missed their blocks the first time, and were going back when he threw the ball.’” Tarron Thompson recovered a Magnolia fumble in the end zone

for another score in the second half, before Tyree Parham broke loose for a long touchdown late to complete the scoring. “Defense pitched a shutout, and you better win when the defense shuts them out,” Coker said, complementing defensive coordinator Bo Smith and the defensive staff. “We really played well. I think this is the first game where we pretty much had everything going at the same time. They (Magnolia) had a pretty big quarterback that was a load to handle, but we did good.” In the 9th-grade game, Magnolia got its first score off an interception returned for a touchdown with 46 seconds left in the first quarter. The Junior Panthers, who blew out this same group of players last year in the 8th-grade, then added a 32-yard touchdown run to push its lead to 14-0 in the first half. Camden Fairview continued to fight and made a game out of it, however, with Cody Chellette recovering a Magnolia fumble. The Junior Cards then missed a gold opportunity to cut into the lead right before half when they did not score from the Magnolia 2-yard line, losing a yard on first down and being called for a personal foul which backed them up another 15 yards. On third down, Magnolia picked

off a pass with 3.2 seconds left in the half. In the second half, Keiondre Jefferson prevented another Magnolia score by intercepting a pass in the end zone. The Junior Panthers quickly got another score, however, but returning a punt 60 yards for a touchdown to take a 19-0 lead. Camden Fairview continued to battle back, and got on the board when Cameron Shaffer hit Javon Pace with a 15-yard touchdown pass with 3:38 to play in the fourth quarter. Shaffer then hit Kyron Hillard with a 2-point conversion pass, and the Junior Cardinals just missed a great on-side kick attempt to get the ball back at midfield. Jefferson intercepted an option pitch at the 37 yard line, however, and returned it all the way back to the Magnolia 1-yard line before being chased down. Lee Ellis Helms then scored on third down by reversing field, breaking at least four tackles and falling into the end zone to get the home team within 19-14 with 1:21 to play. The Junior Cardinals then missed two more opportunities to recover an onside kick, missing a second opportunity when Magnolia was called offsides on the first one. Coker said he believes Camden

Fairview would have been called for offsides on the second one even if they had recovered it. Despite the loss, Coker said he wasn’t entirely discouraged with what he saw, especially considering how bad Magnolia beat this group of players last year, and the fact that they are now playing without their best player, Jonathan Turner, who had season ending shoulder surgery this week. “I think this was a good game for the kids. They had their head down at the start because JT (Turner) is out. They didn’t have the best attitude to start a football game after losing one of our main offensive weapons,” Coker said. “I think instead of trying to figure out how to win they were trying to figure out how to survive. We spent the whole first half trying to figure out what to do offensively. “But then we came out in the second half, made some plays and got a spark, and started playing hard. That was a great run by Helms, we just took too much time to score. And we’re not going to see two better running backs than we saw tonight. Our kids just need to realize that we have four winnable games left on our schedule, and we can still finish with a winning record.”

CF volleyball gets big win on senior night By KELLY BLAIR Sports Editor Camden Fairview’s volleyball team continued to roll on Thursday, downing White Hall in three straight games on the Lady Cardinals’ senior night. Camden Fairview downed the Lady Bulldogs 27-25, 25-17, 25-16 to end the match early. The win improves the Lady Cardinals to 9-5 overall and 5-1 in 5A South conference play. CF head coach Melissa Thames said the home team was actually trailing White Hall 20-10 at one point in the opening match, but the Lady Cardinals were able to rally, tie the game up at 25-25, and then “eke it out” in the words of the coach by winning the next two points. The Lady Cardinals then took care of business in the next two games, not necessarily in dominating fashion but not in a way that the Lady Bulldogs threatened much. “It was a great effort,” Thames said. “We didn’t fill the bleachers but we had a very good crowd. We had a lot of football and basketball guys there who really got into it and made it fun. I had a lot of people ask me why we were having Senior Night so early, and its because we needed to swap the Magnolia game for next week because its homecoming, and the El Dorado game falls on a Monday and we weren’t sure if we would have the gym. So we swapped those games early on.” Camden Fairview will play its final four games of the regular season on the road, starting at Magnolia on Tuesday. Against White Hall, Jade Sanders led the Lady Cardinals with 24 points, 12 digs and five kills, while Natalie McLelland added 16 points, six digs, seven kills and eight assists. Jada McKinney had 11 points, nine digs, four blocks and five kills, while Jalissa Avery had 10 points, seven digs and seven kills. Cori Moore chipped in nine points and five kills, while Tiauna Wilkins finished with seven points, five digs, four blocks, seven kills and five assists. The CF junior varsity team was defeated by White Hall 25-8, 25-23. Thames said after they “looked a mess” in the first game, she “jumped on them pretty good” and they responded with a very competitive game in the second game. Jenna Sandry and Maiyah Hunter both had seven points each in the JV contest. All of the Camden Fairview seniors were honored before the game, including Moore, Sanders, McLelland, Kendall Jones and Wilkins. Thames said she prepared a quote about just how much this year’s squad, led by her seniors, has meant to her. “In 38 years of coaching, I have coached some great athletes. I have had some great teams. We have won many games and conference titles. But I have never had a team with as much ‘heart’ as this year’s team,” Thames said. “They will not give up on themselves or each other. At the beginning of the year it took us a while to find our identity, but I believe we have found it. “Don’t get me wrong - we have some athletes, but it’s the desire to win and the determination to win that sets the team apart. They are a team TEAM, and they like each other. “I love this team!”

Photo by Stephanie Dunn

2013 Camden Fairview golf team

The Camden Fairview golf team recently wrapped up its season. Team members include front from left; Jameson Milner, Hunter Scharbor, Mason Green, Alexis Morgan, back row, Wade Bryan, Dalton Pate, Jonathan Lester, Jackson Mosley and coach Sarah Roscoe. Morgan qualified to play in the 5A girls state tournament as an individual.

Hogs head to ‘The Swamp’ By NATE ALLEN For the Camden News FAYETTEVILLE - Bret Bielema said he came to Arkansas intent to do something the Razorbacks have never done before. Bielema could achieve that Saturday though Saturday night’s mission against the Florida Gators is not the task Bielema described last December upon leaving his 7year post coaching Wisconsin to coach the Razorbacks. Kickoff between the Razorbacks, 3-2, 0-1 in the SEC West, and Coach Will Muschamp’s 18th-ranked Gators, 3-1, 2-0 in the SEC East, is 6 p.m. on ESPN2 from the Gators’ Ben Griffin Stadium better known as The Swamp. Bielema last December was discussing winning an outright SEC football championship that Arkansas has not achieved even with three times winning and one time sharing the SEC West championship since joining the league in 1992. That can’t be accomplished

Saturday, but it would be an Arkansas SEC first if the Razorbacks beat Florida, the only team to win every SEC battle with the Razorbacks. Arkansas is 1-8 against Florida, the lone victory achieved by Lou Holtz’s 1982 Hogs when they represented the Southwest Conference in the Bluebonnet Bowl. In the SEC, including two SEC Championship games in Atlanta, Arkansas is 0-8 against the Gators. “We could be the first team in Arkansas history to beat Florida in the SEC,” Bielema said Wednesday. “And that’s a big, big deal.”  A real big deal if achieved in The Swamp. The Hogs are 11 to 12 points underdogs and were routed two of their three trips there. Their last visit was close, 2320 decided by a Florida field goal with nine seconds left and so fraught with enough controversy that the officiating crew was suspended from their following week’s assignment. However other than 2009

redshirting freshmen like current Arkansas fifth-year senior center Travis Swanson who suited up but didn’t play, the players from that 2009 Arkansas vs. Florida clash have moved on. So have the coaches. Urban Meyer left Florida following the 2010 season and has coached Ohio State since 2012. Muschamp, formerly the defensive coordinator for Nick Saban at LSU, and the Miami Dolphins in the NFL, then back to college coordinating Auburn and Texas defenses, left Austin to replace Meyer in 2011 and brought a defensive emphasis to Gainesville. In NCAA stats, the Gators rank No. 2 in total defense and No. 1 in rushing defense. Conversely, the Gators, known for “Fun and Gun” passing offenses under Steve Spurrier and the Spread offenses of Meyer quarterbacked by Tim Tebow, rely more on conventional running backs.

PIGSKIN PICKS Arkansas @ Florida

McNeese State #4 Ohio State @ NFL: New England @ UCA #16 Northwestern @ Cincinatti

NFL: Denver @ Dallas

Last Week / Season:

CINCINATTI

DENVER

8-2 / 28-12

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

8-2 / 30-10

MCNEESE STATE

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

7-3 / 28-12

MCNEESE STATE

#4 OHIO STATE

CINCINATTI

DENVER

9-1 / 30-10

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

7-3 / 27-13

MCNEESE STATE

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

9-1 / 26-14

UCA

#4 OHIO STATE

CINCINATTI

DENVER

8-2 / 26-14

White Hall @ Camden Fairview

Lakeside @ Magnolia

El Dorado @ Sheridan

Kelly Blair

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

UCA

#4 OHIO STATE

Jackie Bevill

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

MCNEESE STATE

Jim Edwards

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Sue Silliman

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Chris Gilliam

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

MAGNOLIA

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Tony Burns

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

ARKANSAS

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Guest Picker Gin Foster

Parkers Chapel Genoa Central @ Bearden @ Harmony Grove

UCA


8 - Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013

Kershaw Cardinals rout Pirates in Game 1 leads LA past Braves 6-1

ATLANTA (AP) — Give Clayton Kershaw a 5-0 lead by the fourth inning, and there’s not much chance he’ll mess things up. The Los Angeles Dodgers are off to quite a start in the NL division series. Kershaw struck out 12 during seven dominant innings, Adrian Gonzalez hit a tworun homer and the Dodgers beat the Atlanta Braves 6-1 in Game 1 on Thursday night. The big-money Dodgers haven’t won a World Series championship since 1988 — by far their longest dry spell since the franchise moved from Brooklyn to Southern California in 1958. In an interesting twist, Kershaw was born the same year as that most recent title. If the ace left-hander keeps pitching the way he did in his first postseason win, the Dodgers might have a chance to go all the way again. “This one definitely has special meaning to me,” Kershaw said. For the bumbling Braves, it was another dose of October misery. “When you have an opposing pitcher on the mound who is as good as Kershaw, there’s not a lot of room for error,” said Atlanta starter Kris Medlen, knocked out in the fifth. “I had a lot of error tonight.” Game 2 in the best-of-five series is Friday night in Atlanta, with Zack Greinke (154) starting for the Dodgers against Mike Minor (13-9). Kershaw, who had a 1.83 ERA during the regular season, limited the Braves to Chris Johnson’s run-scoring single with two outs in the fourth. That just seemed to make the pitcher mad — he struck out Andrelton Simmons to end Atlanta’s only serious threat, and the next five Braves hitters for good measure. Appropriately, Kershaw finished up by striking out the side in the seventh, matching his season high for Ks. He allowed just three hits. “He’s the best pitcher in baseball,” Gonzalez said, “and he showed it tonight.” Atlanta struck out 15 times in all. Even though slugger Matt Kemp is out for the playoffs and Andre Ethier is hobbling with an injured ankle, the Dodgers had no trouble piling up runs against Medlen, who came into the playoffs riding a five-game winning streak. He gave up nine hits and five runs in four-plus innings, finally getting the hook when he plunked Yasiel Puig with a pitch right between the shoulder blades. Of course, Medlen would’ve fared better if he’d gotten any help from the guys behind him. The Braves played some truly atrocious defense, though they were not charged with an error. In the second, rookie left fielder Evan Gattis flopped to the ground in an attempt to catch a sinking liner, only to look very much like the converted catcher he is. The ball hit by A.J. Ellis rolled all the way to the wall for an RBI double, putting the Dodgers ahead 2-0 on a play that an outfielder with even a modest amount of experience probably would’ve grabbed fairly easily. “I thought there was a couple plays that we could have made,” Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez said. “I think that the guys were just a little amped up.” Adrian Gonzalez began to put it out of reach in the third, driving a pitch over the center-field wall for his first postseason homer, a tworun shot that made it 4-0 as a sense of doom fell over a Turner Field crowd that had been so raucous in the first when Medlen struck out the side. Not that Atlanta fans haven’t seen this all before. The Braves are perhaps best known for winning only one World Series ring during a historic run of 14 straight division titles. Now, they’re already in the hole as they try to snap a streak of losing seven straight postseason series since 2001. At least they’re not done yet. After losing to St. Louis in a one-and-done wild-card

game last season, which was marred by a disputed infieldfly call, the Braves have a chance to bounce back this time. In addition to Gattis’ stumbling attempt at a catch, second baseman Elliot Johnson bobbled Carl Crawford’s grounder leading off the third, a play that was generously ruled a hit by the official scorer. Medlen retired the next two hitters, but Gonzalez drove the next pitch over the wall, with Jason Heyward making a futile leap that left him hanging from the top. Heyward, who was moved from right field to center as part of an outfield reshuffling, had his own problems. Twice, he overthrew the cutoff man .

We

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Clint Hurdle waited patiently for the double-play ball that never materialized. When the Pittsburgh Pirates’ manager finally made his slow walk to the mound to take the ball from A.J. Burnett, it was way too late to salvage Game 1 of the NL division series against St. Louis. “Please, put it all on me,” Hurdle said after the Cardinals rode a sevenrun third inning and another stingy start from Adam Wainwright to a 9-1 rout Thursday. “We had a rough game. Game 164 was rough.” Especially for Burnett, who’s had nothing but trouble lately in St. Louis. The key hit was a three-run homer by Carlos Beltran that put the Cardinals ahead. “It was a grind all the way,” said Burnett, among a half-dozen Pirates with postseason experience. “A few pitches here and there, but I wasn’t able to string many together. “It was here and there and then off again, way off again.” The first eight Cardinals batters reached safely in the third, saddling the right-hander with the secondshortest outing of his career. A sellout

crowd roared early and then settled in for an easy victory. St. Louis’ big rally began with a fullcount walk to Wainwright. “Walking anybody never works out,” Burnett said. Lance Lynn (15-10) faces Pirates rookie Gerrit Cole (10-7) in Game 2 on Friday. After a record 20 straight losing seasons, the Pirates are back in the playoffs for the first time since 1992. They entered their first best-of-five division series with plenty of momentum after beating Cincinnati in the wild-card game Tuesday, but Pittsburgh never threatened to rally against Wainwright and finished with only four hits. Pittsburgh also was sloppy in the field, committing three errors. St. Louis was sharp on defense, with reliever Carlos Martinez turning in the top play by slinging an off-balance throw to first to nip Russell Martin. “What a play!” Cardinals manager Mike Matheny mouthed in the dugout. Wainwright remained unbeaten in the postseason, going to 3-0 with a 2.27 ERA in 14 games, five of them

starts. He allowed a run on three hits in seven innings, striking out nine without a walk. The only damage came on a homer by Pedro Alvarez to start the fifth. The right-hander tied for the NL lead with 19 wins this year and was 4-0 in his last five starts. Beltran, who has never reached the World Series, reprised his role as one of the game’s greatest playoff sluggers. His 443-foot drive put St. Louis ahead and was the second-longest shot by a left-handed batter at 8-yearold Busch Stadium. Beltran has 15 home runs, 10 doubles and 28 RBIs in 35 postseason games. He also has scored 40 runs and stolen 11 bases. Leadoff man Matt Carpenter called Beltran “Mr. October.” “He’s like our secret weapon when it comes to the postseason. He steps up every time,” Carpenter said. “Some guys just have a knack for a big game and he’s one of them.” Beltran’s 13 career RBIs against Burnett are the most of any player. Beltran’s homer got the Cardinals going.

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Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013 - 9

Sudoku

Oct. 7 - Oct. 11

Thursday's answer

Bearden School District

Sudoku is a number puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The goal is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains each number only once. The difficulty level increases from Monday to Friday.

PJG

A J E S J M ZT B

ONDBBJZU MA

MZ

BT Z O :

TSSMXZDR

TZ

MCDZ

C XT J X J D

NPM

QT O D

U XT G G R

Monday - Nachos with ground beef, lettuce/tomato/salsa, refried beans, orange wedges, fresh fruit (H.S.), milk Tuesday - Chicken Spaghetti, tossed salad with ranch dressing, seasoned green beans, pineapple chunks, roll, fresh fruit (H.S.), milk Wednesday - Fish strips, oven fries, carrot and celery sticks, fruit cocktail, ketchup/tartar sauce/ranch dressing, fruit juice (H.S.), milk Thursday - Sloppy Joe, baked beans, veggie strips, pears, fruit juice (H.S.), milk Friday - Sausage pizza, seasoned broccoli, tossed salad, apple wedges, orange wedges (H.S.), sugar cookie, fruit (H.S.), milk

Harmony Grove School District

gravy, tomato soup with crackers, wheat roll, sliced peaches, milk Tuesday - Pizza, barbecue on bun, lettuce/tomato/dressing, baked beans, pears, milk Wednesday - Baked ham, corn dog, turnip greens, sweet potato casserole, cornbread, fruit variety, milk Thursday - Chili cheese corn chips, chicken sandwich, lettuce/tomato/dressing, whole kernel corn, salsa, pineapple tidbits, muffin, milk Friday - Chicken stir fry, cheeseburger on bun, vegetable egg roll, fries, apple-

Stephens School District

Monday - Italian dunkers, cheese bread sticks, green salad, seasoned corn, fruit salad, fresh fruit, milk Tuesday - Chili on corn chips, green salad, carrot sticks, mixed fruit, cinnamon roll, fresh fruit, milk Wednesday - Turkey and cheese wrap, lettuce/tomato, seasoned pinto beans, sliced peaches, fresh fruit, sugar cookie, milk Thursday - Beef steak patty, mashed potatoes with gravy, seasoned green beans, Camden Fairview wheat roll, peach cups, fresh fruit, milk Friday - Cheeseburger on bun, sandwich School District salad cup, French fries, sliced pears, fresh FES, Ivory, Whiteside, CFIS fruit, milk Monday - Chicken and noodles, peas and carrots, broccoli with dip, applesauce, Hampton School District roll, milk Tuesday - Hot ham and cheese on bun, Monday - Whole grain pizza, tossed tomato soup, sandwich salad cup, gelatin salad with dressing, California veggie blend, apple wedges, fresh fruit (H.S.), with fruit, milk Wednesday - Chicken nuggets, creamed whole grain cookie, milk potatoes with gravy, green beans, pears, Tuesday - Taco salad with salsa, pinto roll, jelly, milk beans, strawberries and bananas, milk Thursday - Taco with cheese, lettuce/ Wednesday - Toasted ham and cheese, tomato/salsa, pinto beans, pineapple tidoven fries, pickle spears, peaches, fruit bits, cornbread, milk Friday - Hamburger on bun, sandwich juice (H.S.), milk salad cup, French fries, catsup, orange Thursday - Vegetable beef soup with crackers, half grilled cheese, raw veggie smiles, milk strips, pears, fresh fruit (H.S.), milk CFMS, CFHS Friday - Sloppy Joe, baked beans, coleMonday - Chicken strips, hot ham and slaw, chilled pineapple, banana, milk cheese on bun, creamed potatoes with

Cryptoquip AT Q D O

sauce, rice, milk

S XT E S

QT G M Z .

Yesterday's Cryptoquip: I would think that almost any illustrious British guy who’s been knighted has a Sir-name. Today’s Cryptoquip Clue: M equals O The cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error.

107 Washington St. S.E. Camden, AR • 836-5566

Monday - Hamburger patty with gravy, rice with butter, green beans, peaches, milk Tuesday - Collard greens, baked chicken, yams, cornbread, fruit, milk Wednesday - Barbecue beef on buns, coleslaw, French fries, cookies, milk Thursday - Shepherd pie, baby lima beans, cornbread, apple slices, milk Friday - Taco rolls, lettuce/tomato/salad, creamed corn, orange slices, milk

OCTOBER 4

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Sports Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013, 2011 - 7

Sports Focus Reds fire Baker after playoff loss CINCINNATI (AP) — The Reds fired Dusty Baker on Friday, parting ways with the manager who led them to their best stretch of success since the Big Red Machine but couldn’t get them past the first round of the postseason. The move came after the Reds lost the wild-card playoff in Pittsburgh 6-2 on Tuesday night, ending the season with their sixth straight loss. He had a year left on his two-year deal. The final-week fade was a major factor in the decision, general manager Walt Jocketty said in a phone interview. “Just the way we played lately was a factor,” Jocketty said. “But I think the way the season ended was kind of the final decision. “The last six games certainly played a big part in this.” The Reds are the fourth team with an opening at manager. Davey Johnson retired after the Nationals’ season, Eric Wedge left the Mariners and the Cubs fired Dale Sveum after finishing last in the NL Central. Baker took over a rebuilding team in 2008 and led it to three 90-win seasons and three playoff appearances in the last four years, their best run since Sparky Anderson managed the Big Red Machine to two World Series titles in the 1970s. Cincinnati couldn’t get past the opening round of the playoffs, however, building pressure for change.

Rodriguez sues MLB and Selig

NEW YORK (AP) — Alex Rodriguez took a swing for the fences in a bid to restore his reputation and lucrative career with the New York Yankees, accusing Major League Baseball and Commissioner Bud Selig in a lawsuit made public Friday of pursuing him in a “witch hunt” designed to smear Rodriguez’ character and cost him tens of millions of dollars. The lawsuit was filed Thursday in New York State Supreme Court by lawyers for the Yankees third baseman. It seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages for what it alleges was a relentless campaign by the league and Selig to “destroy the reputation and career of Alex Rodriguez.” The suit claims Selig and MLB tried to smear Rodriguez’s reputation to “gloss over” Selig’s past inaction and tacit approval of the use of performanceenhancing substances.

Calendar TODAY

FOOTBALL Camden Fairview will host White Hall in a 5A South conference game at Cardinal Stadium, starting at 7 p.m. Harmony Grove will travel to Genoa Central for a 6-3A conference game, starting at 7:30 p.m. Bearden will host Parkers Chapel for homecoming and a 8-2A conference game, starting at 7:30 p.m.

CF 8th-graders take 34-0 victory By KELLY BLAIR Sports Editor Camden Fairview split a pair of junior high contests at Cardinal Stadium on Thursday, dominating the 8th-grade game over Magnolia 34-0 while losing a close and competitive 9th-grade game, 19-14. In the 8th-grade game, Delvante Lewis scored early on a long touchdown run, before CJ Mitchell added another score later in the first half. The Junior Cardinals were able to convert one of their 2-point conversions before KJ Malone completed a touchdown pass on what Junior Cardinal head coach Chris Coker called a “Johnny Football” play. “Malone starts to scramble, fumbles the ball, picks it up and starts to scramble again, and then just throws it up for Delvante to come down with it and run it into the end zone,” Coker laughed, saying it reminded him of a Heisman trophy winner Johnny Manziel-type play. “I couldn’t believe we didn’t have any lineman down field. I told (assistant coach Benjamin) Hargrove, ‘That’s great line coaching.’ And he said, ‘Coach I think they all missed their blocks the first time, and were going back when he threw the ball.’” Tarron Thompson recovered a Magnolia fumble in the end zone

for another score in the second half, before Tyree Parham broke loose for a long touchdown late to complete the scoring. “Defense pitched a shutout, and you better win when the defense shuts them out,” Coker said, complementing defensive coordinator Bo Smith and the defensive staff. “We really played well. I think this is the first game where we pretty much had everything going at the same time. They (Magnolia) had a pretty big quarterback that was a load to handle, but we did good.” In the 9th-grade game, Magnolia got its first score off an interception returned for a touchdown with 46 seconds left in the first quarter. The Junior Panthers, who blew out this same group of players last year in the 8th-grade, then added a 32-yard touchdown run to push its lead to 14-0 in the first half. Camden Fairview continued to fight and made a game out of it, however, with Cody Chellette recovering a Magnolia fumble. The Junior Cards then missed a gold opportunity to cut into the lead right before half when they did not score from the Magnolia 2-yard line, losing a yard on first down and being called for a personal foul which backed them up another 15 yards. On third down, Magnolia picked

off a pass with 3.2 seconds left in the half. In the second half, Keiondre Jefferson prevented another Magnolia score by intercepting a pass in the end zone. The Junior Panthers quickly got another score, however, but returning a punt 60 yards for a touchdown to take a 19-0 lead. Camden Fairview continued to battle back, and got on the board when Cameron Shaffer hit Javon Pace with a 15-yard touchdown pass with 3:38 to play in the fourth quarter. Shaffer then hit Kyron Hillard with a 2-point conversion pass, and the Junior Cardinals just missed a great on-side kick attempt to get the ball back at midfield. Jefferson intercepted an option pitch at the 37 yard line, however, and returned it all the way back to the Magnolia 1-yard line before being chased down. Lee Ellis Helms then scored on third down by reversing field, breaking at least four tackles and falling into the end zone to get the home team within 19-14 with 1:21 to play. The Junior Cardinals then missed two more opportunities to recover an onside kick, missing a second opportunity when Magnolia was called offsides on the first one. Coker said he believes Camden

Fairview would have been called for offsides on the second one even if they had recovered it. Despite the loss, Coker said he wasn’t entirely discouraged with what he saw, especially considering how bad Magnolia beat this group of players last year, and the fact that they are now playing without their best player, Jonathan Turner, who had season ending shoulder surgery this week. “I think this was a good game for the kids. They had their head down at the start because JT (Turner) is out. They didn’t have the best attitude to start a football game after losing one of our main offensive weapons,” Coker said. “I think instead of trying to figure out how to win they were trying to figure out how to survive. We spent the whole first half trying to figure out what to do offensively. “But then we came out in the second half, made some plays and got a spark, and started playing hard. That was a great run by Helms, we just took too much time to score. And we’re not going to see two better running backs than we saw tonight. Our kids just need to realize that we have four winnable games left on our schedule, and we can still finish with a winning record.”

CF volleyball gets big win on senior night By KELLY BLAIR Sports Editor Camden Fairview’s volleyball team continued to roll on Thursday, downing White Hall in three straight games on the Lady Cardinals’ senior night. Camden Fairview downed the Lady Bulldogs 27-25, 25-17, 25-16 to end the match early. The win improves the Lady Cardinals to 9-5 overall and 5-1 in 5A South conference play. CF head coach Melissa Thames said the home team was actually trailing White Hall 20-10 at one point in the opening match, but the Lady Cardinals were able to rally, tie the game up at 25-25, and then “eke it out” in the words of the coach by winning the next two points. The Lady Cardinals then took care of business in the next two games, not necessarily in dominating fashion but not in a way that the Lady Bulldogs threatened much. “It was a great effort,” Thames said. “We didn’t fill the bleachers but we had a very good crowd. We had a lot of football and basketball guys there who really got into it and made it fun. I had a lot of people ask me why we were having Senior Night so early, and its because we needed to swap the Magnolia game for next week because its homecoming, and the El Dorado game falls on a Monday and we weren’t sure if we would have the gym. So we swapped those games early on.” Camden Fairview will play its final four games of the regular season on the road, starting at Magnolia on Tuesday. Against White Hall, Jade Sanders led the Lady Cardinals with 24 points, 12 digs and five kills, while Natalie McLelland added 16 points, six digs, seven kills and eight assists. Jada McKinney had 11 points, nine digs, four blocks and five kills, while Jalissa Avery had 10 points, seven digs and seven kills. Cori Moore chipped in nine points and five kills, while Tiauna Wilkins finished with seven points, five digs, four blocks, seven kills and five assists. The CF junior varsity team was defeated by White Hall 25-8, 25-23. Thames said after they “looked a mess” in the first game, she “jumped on them pretty good” and they responded with a very competitive game in the second game. Jenna Sandry and Maiyah Hunter both had seven points each in the JV contest. All of the Camden Fairview seniors were honored before the game, including Moore, Sanders, McLelland, Kendall Jones and Wilkins. Thames said she prepared a quote about just how much this year’s squad, led by her seniors, has meant to her. “In 38 years of coaching, I have coached some great athletes. I have had some great teams. We have won many games and conference titles. But I have never had a team with as much ‘heart’ as this year’s team,” Thames said. “They will not give up on themselves or each other. At the beginning of the year it took us a while to find our identity, but I believe we have found it. “Don’t get me wrong - we have some athletes, but it’s the desire to win and the determination to win that sets the team apart. They are a team TEAM, and they like each other. “I love this team!”

Photo by Stephanie Dunn

2013 Camden Fairview golf team

The Camden Fairview golf team recently wrapped up its season. Team members include front from left; Jameson Milner, Hunter Scharbor, Mason Green, Alexis Morgan, back row, Wade Bryan, Dalton Pate, Jonathan Lester, Jackson Mosley and coach Sarah Roscoe. Morgan qualified to play in the 5A girls state tournament as an individual.

Hogs head to ‘The Swamp’ By NATE ALLEN For the Camden News FAYETTEVILLE - Bret Bielema said he came to Arkansas intent to do something the Razorbacks have never done before. Bielema could achieve that Saturday though Saturday night’s mission against the Florida Gators is not the task Bielema described last December upon leaving his 7year post coaching Wisconsin to coach the Razorbacks. Kickoff between the Razorbacks, 3-2, 0-1 in the SEC West, and Coach Will Muschamp’s 18th-ranked Gators, 3-1, 2-0 in the SEC East, is 6 p.m. on ESPN2 from the Gators’ Ben Griffin Stadium better known as The Swamp. Bielema last December was discussing winning an outright SEC football championship that Arkansas has not achieved even with three times winning and one time sharing the SEC West championship since joining the league in 1992. That can’t be accomplished

Saturday, but it would be an Arkansas SEC first if the Razorbacks beat Florida, the only team to win every SEC battle with the Razorbacks. Arkansas is 1-8 against Florida, the lone victory achieved by Lou Holtz’s 1982 Hogs when they represented the Southwest Conference in the Bluebonnet Bowl. In the SEC, including two SEC Championship games in Atlanta, Arkansas is 0-8 against the Gators. “We could be the first team in Arkansas history to beat Florida in the SEC,” Bielema said Wednesday. “And that’s a big, big deal.”  A real big deal if achieved in The Swamp. The Hogs are 11 to 12 points underdogs and were routed two of their three trips there. Their last visit was close, 2320 decided by a Florida field goal with nine seconds left and so fraught with enough controversy that the officiating crew was suspended from their following week’s assignment. However other than 2009

redshirting freshmen like current Arkansas fifth-year senior center Travis Swanson who suited up but didn’t play, the players from that 2009 Arkansas vs. Florida clash have moved on. So have the coaches. Urban Meyer left Florida following the 2010 season and has coached Ohio State since 2012. Muschamp, formerly the defensive coordinator for Nick Saban at LSU, and the Miami Dolphins in the NFL, then back to college coordinating Auburn and Texas defenses, left Austin to replace Meyer in 2011 and brought a defensive emphasis to Gainesville. In NCAA stats, the Gators rank No. 2 in total defense and No. 1 in rushing defense. Conversely, the Gators, known for “Fun and Gun” passing offenses under Steve Spurrier and the Spread offenses of Meyer quarterbacked by Tim Tebow, rely more on conventional running backs.

PIGSKIN PICKS Arkansas @ Florida

McNeese State #4 Ohio State @ NFL: New England @ UCA #16 Northwestern @ Cincinatti

NFL: Denver @ Dallas

Last Week / Season:

CINCINATTI

DENVER

8-2 / 28-12

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

8-2 / 30-10

MCNEESE STATE

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

7-3 / 28-12

MCNEESE STATE

#4 OHIO STATE

CINCINATTI

DENVER

9-1 / 30-10

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

7-3 / 27-13

MCNEESE STATE

#4 OHIO STATE

NEW ENGLAND

DENVER

9-1 / 26-14

UCA

#4 OHIO STATE

CINCINATTI

DENVER

8-2 / 26-14

White Hall @ Camden Fairview

Lakeside @ Magnolia

El Dorado @ Sheridan

Kelly Blair

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

UCA

#4 OHIO STATE

Jackie Bevill

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

MCNEESE STATE

Jim Edwards

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Sue Silliman

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Chris Gilliam

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

MAGNOLIA

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Tony Burns

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

ARKANSAS

CAMDEN FAIRVIEW

LAKESIDE

EL DORADO

BEARDEN

HARMONY GROVE

FLORIDA

Guest Picker Gin Foster

Parkers Chapel Genoa Central @ Bearden @ Harmony Grove

UCA


Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013 - 11

Horoscopes For Saturday: ARIES (March 21-April 19): Express what you have to say with wisdom and knowledge. Someone may try to goad you into a force play. Consider your relationships with your peers and how you can make them better. Strive for efficiency in all that you do. *** TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You may feel like going on an adventure or debating with someone you don’t agree with, but in both cases you will have to be cautious and do your best to avoid injury or insult. Put greater emphasis on love, romance and getting along. *** GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Explore a new direction or join a group that can offer you something insightful or enlightening. Look for the obvious instead of searching for something that will cost you emotionally, financially

or physically. Make home improvements. ***** CANCER (June 21-July 22): Focus on what you can accomplish. Believe in your capabilities. Turn something you enjoy doing into a moneymaking machine. Embrace a dream or pursue an activity or hobby that entices you. Explore new possibilities and you will meet interesting and inspiring people. ** LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Try new things and make it a priority to spend time with people who share common interests. Problems and responsibilities at home will add to your stress. Finding an outlet will help you deal with any trials and tribulations you face. **** VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Communication should take top priority. Whether you are dealing with personal or professional matters,

having a good handle on how and what you want to express to others will make a difference. Participate in community events. Love is on the rise. *** LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Make a positive change that will help you budget wisely and protect your interests. Professional changes will be beneficial. Reconnect with people you have worked with in the past and ask for favors if it will help you get ahead. *** SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t waste time on a no-win situation. Focus on what you can do and explore possibilities that allow you to use your skills diversely. Romance is featured, and making alterations that fit your lifestyle should be put in play. *** SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Join in the fun. Get involved in events and

activities that allow you to show off. Initiate changes that will make your living arrangements more conducive to your personal or professional success. Secret affairs may be tempting. **** CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Network, socialize and plan to have fun. Acceptance may be necessary when it comes to what others want to do. Go about your business and do what works best for you. Reconnecting with someone from your past will be eye opening. ** AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Consider what’s being asked of you before you commit to something that may not work with your schedule. Change is upon you, and you want to be able to take advantage of an offer that can lead to your success. ***** PISCES (Feb. 19-March

20): Make a move. Take ad- role in your life. Go after the vantage of any opportunity goals you have been waiting that will raise your financial profile. Someone from your so long to pursue. *** past is likely to play a crucial By Eugenia Last

Crossword

By Eugene Sheffer

Parents feel weighed down by kids’ homework burden DEAR ABBY: My kids attend a private school that has made it a goal to be a “blue ribbon” school. To that end, teachers pile on so much homework that many of our parents send our kids to bed after three hours and finish it ourselves. Our kids are completely overwhelmed with senseless piles of busywork. This summer, our children had to read four substantial books and complete hefty vocabulary packets and math packets that required most of us parents to hire tutors. Our children are stressed, anxious and depressed. We have never indulged them with a lot of video game or TV time. I have considered pulling my kids out of this school, but the public schools around here are awful. Parents are miserable. Kids are miserable. We want them to have a decent education, but we also want them to be happy people -- and right now, no one is happy. - PRESSURED MOM OF PRESSURED KIDS

children were given may have been designed to keep their skills sharp so they would be prepared for the fall term. Because you and other parents feel your children are being overburdened with busywork, it’s time to address this as a group with the principal so you can voice your concerns and get an explanation. DEAR ABBY: My 12-yearold grandson lies often. His parents are trying to give him consequences for his lying as a “team effort.” I don’t want to be the stern grandma and have him have bad memories of me. When he lies to me, should I look the other way and ignore it or follow through with my own consequences? - GRANDMA IN ST. PETE, FLA.

DEAR PRESSURED: Are you aware that some educators feel that students should have no summer vacation at all, and should be in class year-round? The assignments your

DEAR GRANDMA: Would you prefer your grandson remember you as the grandmother whose eye he could spit in, tell her it’s raining and she would accept it? It would

grandchildren! I’m scared and I cry every day. How do I accept him being him? - CHEATED IN CONNECTICUT

Dear Abby be better to ask him why he feels it is necessary to lie to someone who loves him, tell him that you expect honesty from him and if you don’t receive it there will be MORE consequences. Remember, you are also a part of the team, and this is an important life lesson he needs to learn. DEAR ABBY: My only son is 18. He didn’t attend his prom. He quit school and goes to night school instead. I’ll never see him in a cap and gown, holding his diploma. On top of that, he told me six months ago that he’s bisexual and that he has a boyfriend in the U.K. I’m having a hard time with all of this. I taught my son to love and respect everyone, regardless of race, religion or sexual orientation. Now I’m afraid I won’t have any grandchildren. Even more upsetting, he wants to move to the U.K. to be with his 26-year-old boyfriend. I feel so cheated -- no prom, no graduation, no

DEAR CHEATED: OK, so reality isn’t in sync with your fantasy about how your son would turn out. But why are you dwelling on the negative? Your son is completing his high school education, and with his GED could very well go on to college or a technical school. While he didn’t attend his prom, he has found a meaningful relationship. He may eventually give you the grandchildren you long for -- other same-sex couples have done it. So look on the bright side. If you count your blessings, encourage him and accept the man he loves, you could have a life of adventure and international travel, a warm relationship with both of them and gain a son. ••• Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, aka Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write her at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

CLASSIFIEDS

Employment Opportunities

ATTENTION LPNs

Ouachita County Medical Center’s Hospice has an immediate opening for a full-time LPN. Hospice experience is preferred but not required. OCMC offers an excellent benefits package. Interested individuals can complete an application in person at 685 California, Camden or online at www.ouachitamedcenter.com. For more information please contact Cindy at OCMC Hospice 836-6055. 26444C

Employment Opportunities

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BEARDEN PUBLIC SCHOOL Position Openings The Bearden School District is taking applications for qualified substitute bus drivers. Contact the Superintendent's Office at 870-687-2236 for further information and an application or send resume' to Bearden Public Schools, 100 Oak Ave., Bearden, AR. 71720.

HELP WANTED!! - Make up to $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! Genuine Opportunity! NO Experience Required. Start Immediately! www.MailingCountry.com

Transport Service Co., a highway subsidiary of the Kenan Advantage Group, is now seeking company drivers & owner-operators out of El Dorado, AR for our OTR positions!   There are many advantages of joining our driving team.  

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NEED 10 TEAMS ASAP!! $1500 signing bonus , Opportunity for 420plus Mi. per/wk,. Fantastic pay/ benefits, Quarterly Bonus/stop pay Touch Free Freight,! Pet Friendly. Apply online at longistics.com, or by Phone at 1-800-2890082 Must have: CDL-A, 2 yrs OTR experience, clean criminal background, good MVR and CSA scores. DRIVERS -O/O!s - Trucking Company in Southwest Arkansas hiring Owner Operators to pull company flatbeds, 53! dry vans and refrigerated units. Primary lanes within the midwest, north and east coast. Company pays reefer fuel and permits. Weekly pay settlements on loaded and empty miles. Call 870-887-0800. NEW TRUCKS ARRIVING! Exp Pays – up to 50 cpm. Full Benefits + Quality Hometime. CDL-A Req. 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com

MOTOR ROUTE CARRIER

The Camden News is now accepting applications for a mature adult for on time delivery and monthly collections of Camden News. Applicants should be able to fulfill the following:

Requirements for new pay scale:

·         Class A CDL ·        Minimum 5 years recent, verifiable tank experience ·         1 year recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience ·         Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) ·         No more than 1 moving violation in the past 3 years ·         No preventable accidents in the past 5 years   Schedule an appointment today to

1. Want a part time profit for 6 days a week delivery. 2. Have dependable, economical transportation & insurance. 3. Want to work a couple hours a day. 4. Must be available to start work at 2:00 p.m.

$30.00 & up

Mon. - Fri. & Sun. morning before 7:00 a.m.

in the El Dorado area

This is an excellent position for a housewife, retired person or a person wishing to supplement their income. Apply in person to:

LaDonna Foster The Camden News Circulation Department 113 Madison NE Camden, AR 71701

26447C

26176C

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

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Employment Opportunities

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Administrative Specialist I, Teacher Education (Part-time) Southern Arkansas University Duties: perform clerical duties of a secretary/receptionist (pick and distribute mail, answer the phone, run copies, make folders, test, file, fax, etc.); greet students and provide specific information and assistance; scan and index files; process purchase orders and ordering all office supplies; prepare reports, tables and computer-generated documents as required; enter and maintain data in database; create and maintain office files; become and remain informed on the rules and regulations of the education program; assist in recruitment and retention of students; travel with director when needed to off-campus sites; attend and assist with coordinating off campus meetings and events; reviewing and processing student forms (applications, financial aid, etc.); coordinating with various departments on campus; and perform other duties as assigned. This position will average 20 hours per week. Qualifications: bachelor!s degree preferred; high school diploma required. At least one year of office experience and procedures, such as typing and computer skills, and strong communication skills. All SAU employees are expected to demonstrate excellence in interpersonal behaviors and be committed to effective collaboration with colleagues. An application form may be picked up in the Office of Human Resources, Overstreet Hall, room 115, or online at www.saumag.edu then send to: Office of Human Resources P.O. Box 9288, Magnolia, AR 71754-9288 or e-mail HR@saumag.edu. AA/EOE COMPANY! DRIVERS & OWNER! OPERATORS WANTED! No touch freight, 90% drop & hook, dedicated opportunities available. Call 888-710-8707 Also seeking Recent Grads. Call Lavonna 877-440-7890. Apply online: www.driveforpamtransport.co m

Employment Opportunities

0120

Field Instructor for Title IV-E Southern Arkansas University Duties: provide services to DCFS in Columbia, Hempstead, Lafayette, Little River, Miller, Nevada, Ouachita, Sevier, and Union counties; some out of state and overnight travel will occur; training and consulting with DCFS on a vast array of child welfare topics; participation in routinely scheduled statewide partnership meetings with agencies and universitites also involved in the Arkansas Child Welfare Partnership; foster parent education and retention; complete monthly activity reports; and perform other duties as assigned. Qualifications: Bachelor!s or Master!s in Social Work or related field is preferred; a minimum of one-year experience with the Division of Children and Family Services is required as is knowledge of current child maltreatment/juvenile law and DCFS policy. SAU hires professional staff who are employable by DCFS and who have prior child welfare experience. New hires must be approved by both the SAU Title IV-E search committee and the current DCFS Area Director. All SAU employees are expected to demonstrate excellence in interpersonal behaviors and be committed to effective collaboration with colleagues. Applicants should submit a formal letter of interest, current vitae, unofficial graduate transcripts, and the names and telephone numbers of three (3) references to Human Resources, Southern Arkansas University, P.O. Box 9288, Magnolia, AR 71754-9288 or HR@saumag.edu. Resume will be reviewed as received and accepted until the position is filled. AA/EOE. Non-listed references may be contacted.

CAN YOU DIG IT? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Week Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits! Eligible! 1-866-362-6497.


Bicycles

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Auto Accessories

0315

Schwinn Bicycles (2), Mesa Runner, need work, $20 each. Call 870-863-8785.

Boats and Accessories

0320

Wellcraft 1436 Aluminum Crappie Boat, no rivets, stick steering, 20HP Mercury motor, FCTM, trailer with spare and jack, $1,950. Call 870-5685676.

Baby changing table, med. color wood, excellent condition, $30. Call 870-814-1329. Rocking Horse, large, heavy duty wood, $25. Call 870-8141329. Small Children!s Bikes (2), 1 girls, 1 boys, excellent condition, $25 each. Call 870-8141329. Toy car, Dodge Viper, battery operated, both doors open, $100. Call 870-500-8303 and ask for Rita.

0205

Building Materials

14ft. Trailer, double axle, bumper pull, $450 OBO. Call 870-299-9011 in Magnolia.

Antiques and Collectibles

0402

15” Tires (3), 205 75R15, brand new, $65 each. Call 870-299-9011.

Antique tea pot, $20. Call 870862-9652.

2 Buckshots, 31/10/50/15!s, $40 each. Call 870-310-0305.

Rock and roll coffee cups (8), $20 each. Call 870-862-9652.

Appliances

Fiberglass bed cover, red, fits 2006 GM pickup with 5 1/2 ft. bed, made by Leer, $600. Call 870-862-2459 or 918-4083. Parts for Ford F-150. Alternator, $45. Regulator, $10. Carburetor, $175. Cylinder switch, $15. Call 870-299-9011. Tires (4), 245/70R17 RWL, $175. Call 870-310-0305.

0404

2000 Ford Ranger XLT, for parts, $2,000 FIRM. Text for pictures 870-807-3988.

Farm Equipment

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Craftsman tractor, DGT 6000, 27HP Kohler V-twin, with belly mower, 38 hours of use, like new, $2,000 FIRM. Call 870310-8570.

Furniture

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Frigidaire Refrigerator, side by side, white, with ice and water in the door, $375. Call 870299-9011 in Magnolia.

Antique Dinette Set. Solid Oak China Cabinet with buffet and table with 2 leaves and 6 chairs, $950 OBO. Call 870818-3243 or 870-574-1741.

Kenmore washer and dryer, white, $350 for the set. Call 870-299-9011.

0250

Large carpet roll, neutral color, $50. Call 469-865-3644.

Antique bedroom suite, with head board, foot board, dresser and chest of drawers, $200. Call 870-798-4556.

Gas Stove, $160. Call 870299-9011 in Magnolia.

Used tires, 14” and 15”, very good condition, $30 each. Call 870-299-9011 in Magnolia.

0418

Coffee Maker, Black and Decker, 12 cup, brand new, never been used, $15. Call 870-814-1329.

Frigidaire Stackable washer and dryer, $375 OBO. Call 870-299-9011 in Magnolia.

Tires (9), 3 on rims, 4 fit Ram 1500, all tires fit 16” or 17” rims, $150/all OBO. Call 870814-0618 for more details.

Trucks

Baby and Children 0416 Items

Refrigerator, side by side, white, ice and water in door, $375 OBO. Call 870-299-9011

Articles for Sale

0408

Assorted Christmas tree ornaments and other decorations, $1-5 each. Call 870-814-1329.

Furniture

0442

Queen Sofa, shades of blue, good condition, $100. Call 870-833-1385. Sofa and a Chair & 1/2, both recline, excellent shape, $600. Call 870-863-3231. Sofa, floral print, $100. Call 870-863-3231. Wine Bar, wood and wrought iron, very nice, like new, $200. Call 870-863-3231.

Heating and Air Lawn and Garden

Machinery and Tools

Chair and ottoman, tan, good condition, $25. Call 870-9184506. Coffee tables (2), $10 each. Call 501-554-4926. Computer desk chair, black, good shape, $35. Call 501765-8638. Computer desk with chair, glass and chrome, with pull out tray, very nice, asking $25. Call 870-862-1549.

TV, Stereo, Video, Radio

GE Digital DVD player, $15. Call 501-765-8638.

Glider with ottoman, $25. Call 870-863-3231.

TV, 52”, flat screen, speaker on bottom, with rollers, $600. Call 870-863-3231. TV, 60” big screen, good condition, $1,200. Call 870-6398005.

Kitchen Table, ceramic tile, with 4 chairs, $50. Call 501554-4926.

VHS Tapes (50), large variety, $10 each. Call 870-862-9652.

Large executive computer desk with hutch, light oak finish, black laminate desk top, $50. Call 870-748-2104.

Wii game console, rarely used, with nunchucks, 2 controllers, 2 games, all in original packaging, $125. 870-310-8354.

Houses for Rent, Furnished

0740

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Beautiful Brick House for Rent. Quiet neighborhood, excellent neighbors. Fully furnished with top brand furniture (Bassett & Thomasville). Washer, dryer, refrigerator, stove included. Lawn maint. by owner. Month to month lease or longer. No pets. $800/mo., $800/dep. For appt. call 870-836-5628.

Houses for Rent, Unfurnished

0742

FOR RENT: 3BR/1BA House, CH/A, $490/month rent, $490 deposit. Call 870-260-9125.

No. PR-2013-129 NOTICE OF FILING OF AFFIDAVIT FOR COLLECTION OF SMALL ESTATE BY DISTRIBUTEES Last known address: 2615 Bryant Street, Camden, Ouachita County, Arkansas

0950

DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7.

0910

Expression of Thanks The family of Brady Thrower would like to express their sincere thanks and appreciation for the many acts of love and kindness shown to us during our time of bereavement. A special thanks to New St. Mary Baptist Church - Camden, AR; Life Touch Hospice El Dorado, AR; Cornerstone Medical Center - Jacksonville, AR; and Reddick Funeral Home - Camden, AR. Please continue to keep us in your prayers. ~The Thrower Family~

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LOST DOG: Small 20-25 lb. female, half Yorkie, brownishblonde color, answers to Taffy. Has collar and tags. Missing since September 17th from Fairview Road near Jay!s Country Store. If found, please call 870-836-4518. We miss her very much!!

Legals

1000

7805 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF OUACHITA COUNTY, ARKANSAS DOMESTIC RELATIONS DIVISION THELMA A. WILLIAMS PLAINTIFF VS. DR. 2013-313-2 WILLIE W. WILLIAMS, SR. DEFENDANT WARNING ORDER Willie W. Williams, Sr., defendant in the above captioned cause, is hereby warned to appear within 30 days from the first date of publication of this warning order to answer plaintiff!s Complaint for Divorce or be forever barred from answering. DATED this 2nd day of October, 2013. BETTY WILSON, CLERK

Please Don’t Drink And Drive

1000

In the Matter of the Estate of BRENDA KAYE WILSON, DECEASED

Meet Singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-877-939-9299.

Card of Thanks The Family of James Hesterly would like to thank their many friends and family for their prayers, food, flowers and many other acts of kindness during the illness and death of their loved one. Also a special thanks goes to Dr. Daniel, Doctors Home Health, Dr. Braden and the OCMC Hospice Program. May God bless each of you. Mamie Hesterly Mike Hesterly & Children

Lost and Found Pets

Notices, Personal

Legals

7801 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF OUACHITA COUNTY, ARKANSAS PROBATE DIVISION

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or intention to make any such preferences, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Camden News

Date of death: June 3, 2013 An Affidavit for Collection of Small Estate by Distributees was filed on August 28, 2013, seeking distribution of the estate of Brenda Kaye Wilson, including the following real property: Lot 10 and the South Half of Lot 8 in the Shady Oaks Addition to Fairview, Ouachita County, Arkansas, according to plat of said addition of record in the Office of the Recorder of Ouachita County, Arkansas, in Plat Book 1 at page 86. Subject to any easements of record or held by prescription; to any outstanding oil, gas, and mineral interests; and to any protective covenants of record. AND A parcel of land located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4 SE 1/4) of Section 3, Township 14 South of Range 17 West (lying immediately West of Lots 1, 2 and 12 of the Wrentz Addition to the City of Camden, Arkansas, formerly Cullendale, Arkansas) and described as follows: Beginning at a point 139 feet West of Southeast corner of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4; thence North 139 feet; thence West 85 feet; thence South 139 Feet; thence East 85 feet to the point of beginning. All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit them, duly verified, to the undersigned within three (3) months from the date of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit in the estate. This notice first published on September 27th, 2013. Robyn E. Horn Attorney for Distributees P.O. Box 576 Camden, AR 71711

Sell those unwanted items...

Call Camden News 870.836.8192

Professional Service Directory

790 California SW Camden, Arkansas

HEATING & COOLING

Card of Thanks

Color TV, 32”, $50. Call 501765-8638.

End Tables (2), non-matching, $20 each. Call 870-863-3231.

King size bedroom suite with mattress, box springs and dresser with mirror, $350. Call 870-798-4556.

Toll Free 1-800-447-2736 WWW.JIMGOLDENFORD.NET

0600

HOME APPLICATION HOTLINE! If you are paying more than $400 in rent, we can make you a homeowner! CALL 870-862-4305 For pre-approval. Trade your Home, Top Dollar Paid!! Call 501.653.3204

0486

Dresser with mirror and night stand, solid wood, $75. Call 501-554-4926.

(870) 836-2100

Garage Sales

*REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! * Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade. CALL NOW!1-800-474-0423.

Night Lights (4), $10 each. Call 870-862-9652.

ESCAPE

0 Down with your Land or Family Land!! Call 501.653.3201

Stihl Chainsaw, 14” blade, works great, $150. Call 870299-9011.

2011 Baja Wilderness Trail 4-wheeler with trailer, $1,850 FIRM. Call 870-944-0656.

2013FORD

0840

26441C

Door Mirrors (2), beveled, 14x54, new, $15 for both. Call 501-765-8638.

AUTO

Manufactured Homes

Ryobi Compound Miter Saw, with extra blade, used once, $95. Call 870-862-1549.

0305

836-7443 Dixie Newton 837-2665 231-6176 Faith Herring Covington 818-7621

0835

Timberland Bid Sale 10-24-2013 “Parkers Chapel 290 acres” Union County, Arkansas, 73 acres 11-year pine plantation, 182 acres hardwoods. Reynolds Forestry Consulting & Real Estate Call Colleen at 870-299-0978 www.reynoldsforestry.com

FREE to a good home: Mother and daughter donkeys.!Mom is solid white and baby born in July is traditional donkey color with cross on her back, very cute. Call 870-685-2605 in Chidester for more info.

Ladder, 20!, $125. Call 870299-9011.

Dish TV Retailer -SAVE! Starting $19.99/month (for 12 months.) FREE Premium Movie Channels. FREE Equipment, Installation & Activation. CALL, COMPARE LOCAL DEALS! 1-800-278-8081.

Bill Jordan Jerry Parker

Lots and Acreage

0460

Deluxe Food Lover!s Kit, with books and dvds, never used, paid almost $200, asking $75. Call 870- 554-2239.

This country setting could be what you are looking for. Home is on a great setting with Approx 1.5 acres of land, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and a 2 car carport. Take a look at this one that is nestled in a wooded area on a deadend street. Call any agent at Jordan Agency to see at 870-836-5775.

0550

0456

Console TV, 25”, $40. Call 870-862-0423.

130 Ouachita 542

Livestock and Supplies

0446

Riding Mower, 18 1/2 HP, 42” cut hydro stat., shift trans., has new deck bearings, belt runs great, needs new blades, $250 OBO. Call 870-310-0305.

0945

PROCLAIMER

Window air conditioning unit, $50. Call 870-862-3548.

Dining room chairs (2), solid wood, $20 each. Call 870-8620423.

ATVs

Notices, Business

Love Seat, tan, good condition, $75. Call 501-765-8638.

26435C

12 - Camden News - Friday, October 4, 2013

w w w. c a m d e n a r k n e w s . c o m

JEWELRY

Camden 1300 California Ave. SW

(870) 836-7785

El Dorado 1520 Mt. Holly Road

(870) 875-COOL www.deansac.com TREE SERVICE

Jeff Barnhart

(870) 833-1983 or (870) 836-5990

Lot Clearing - Demolition Tree Trimming Topping Removal & All Debris Removed 75 Foot Bucket Truck - Insured Free Estimates Fair, Honest & Dependable Experienced Now Offering Stump Grinding

PLUMBING

NEW CONSTRUCTION GAS PIPING & INSPECTION WATER PIPING • ALL DRAIN CLEANING SEWER LINE REPAIRS WATER HEATERS

JASON SANDERS PLUMBING For All Your Plumbing Repairs

Jason D. Sanders Cell: 870-489-3522 Lic.#MP5931 Office: 870-574-0799 Serving The Camden Area

CONCRETE REDI-MIXED CONCRETE COMPANY IN EL DORADO:

IN CAMDEN:

(870) 875-2000

FAX: (870) 574-9973

(870) 352-3601

(870) 574-9971

IN FORDYCE:

Serving Union, Ouachita, Calhoun, & Dallas Counties A Member Of AR Redi-Mix Asso. Plant is State Certified

Camden 1300 California Ave. SW (870) 836-7785 •

DENTAL

836.8944

Arkansas Medicaid & ARKids Provider 540 Jefferson St. Camden Allyn Ladd, D.D.S.

El Dorado 1520 Mt. Holly Road (870) 875-COOL www.deansac.com

IF YOU WANT TO YOU CAN DO IT IN THE CLASSIFIEDS CONSTRUCTION

R&R CONSTRUCTION PHIL ROCCONI

(870) 818-4395

No job too big or too small *Land Clearing *Pond Construction * Demolition/ Removal *Road & Driveway Construction * Hauling: Gravel, Top Soil, & Fill Dirt * Building Pads: House & Commercial *Lot Clearing: Residential & Commercial * Septic Tank & Field Line Instillation

BIRTHDAYS & EVENTS

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

PAINTERS

PLAYLANDS

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(870) 277-1961

LAWN SERVICE

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Let us take the worry off of your hands!

OUACHITA INDUSTRIES Call today to schedule an appointment!

(870) 836-3056 Monday - Friday 8:00 - 4:00

Buddy’s Wrecker Service

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Servicing Camden, Magnolia & Arkadelphia Area spacewalkSWA@herecomesfun.com or check us out on facebook!

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WRECKER SERVICE

Camden, Arkansas

USED BOOKS

K&J

USED BOOKS Buy • Sell • Trade 2552 Hwy. 79 S. 837-1134

CUSTOM FLOORING

TRI-COUNTY

CUSTOM FLOORING Ceramic Tile • Laminate Flooring

Pre-Finished Hardwood • Natural Granite Marble • Carpet • Vinyl & Solid Surface Counter Tops Refinish Hardwood Floors

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JIM CRUTCHFIELD

(870) 833-1650 (870) 231-7100

October 4, 2013  

General excellence entry