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FEB. 6 — FEB. 19, 2015 • VOL. 9 — NO. 3

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City officials consider ways to direct ‘fast and furious’ growth BY ANN MARIE QUILL

annmariequill@reporternewspapers.net

As the Great Recession ends, growth is “coming at us fast and furious,” Sandy Springs’ community development director says. “We’re seeing lots of growth, and, really, what’s key is, how do we meet this in a way that’s consistent with what the council wants to see?” Community Development Director Angela Parker told members of Sandy Springs City Council during the group’s annual retreat on Jan. 27. “The bricks and mortar follow the dollars, and that’s not the way to grow a community.” Parker and City Manager John McDonough told the council that staff was looking to make changes to the city’s Comprehensive Plan, adopted in 2007, to deal with a “post-recession inundation of growth.” The plan is required to be updated in 2017. McDonough said more than 1,600 building permits were issued in 2014, with 1,600

PHOTOS BY PHIL MOSIER

Left, Jordan Renfro, a member of the Riverwood International Charter School boys’ varsity basketball team, makes a lay up against the North Springs Charter High School “Spartans” on Feb. 3.

Above, enjoying the action together off the court, North Springs student Julia Rosenthal, second from left, joins Riverwood students, from left, Megan Nohstadt, Carly Clayman and Mary Kate Swanson in celebrating Senior Night during the game held in the Riverwood gym. The “Raiders” beat the “Spartans” 72 to 51.

SEE CITY TASKED, PAGE 4

White gloves no longer part of police gear BY ELLEN ELDRIDGE

elleneldridge@reporternewspapers.net

SPECIAL

Steve Rose, now a police captain, directs traffic in 1982.

Dunwoody police officers want you to feel it when they pull you over. New city patrol cars are outfitted with a “rumbler,” a device that emits a low bass sound. So, in addition to hearing a siren, a misbehaving driver will feel the approach of authority, Dunwoody Police Officer Tim Fecht said. “So, even if someone has their windows up and the music loud, they’re going to feel the rumble,” he said. “People who

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weren’t paying attention visually will feel it now.” Technology has changed all industries and made almost everyone’s life easier—at least in terms of access to information. It’s changed police work, too. Less than a decade ago, police officers used “blue out” to correct mistakes on handwritten reports and tickets. Now, the cop on the street has access to computers and writes reports digitally. SEE WHITE GLOVES, PAGE 5

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02-06-2015 Sandy Springs Reporter