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The Project Statement Background I am the client of this article. I am writing this article because I have done a series of reports, presentations and statistical analysis of prison systems over the years and plan to continue my research and analysis on the United States Prison System with the purpose of expanding my knowledge of the prison system. Target Audiences The Target audience of the project is the general public and stakeholders such as the government and insurance companies. To inform the public of issues regarding inmate health and the healthcare system in California as it may affect them or someone they know. Also, to arouse concern by government employees, agencies or insurance companies that may be potential stakeholders in healthcare reform. Objectives The objective is to arouse concern by the general population of the community, government, insurance and law firm to invoke action to make changes with the current health care situation in California. Obstacles Obstacles to obtaining the goal include but are not limited to government budget control, government shut down or shortage, individual believes involving crime and punishment and resource limits. If changes are made their have to be adjustments made elsewhere to accommodate the changes in social class that will be created by the adjustment in economics for medical care for incarcerated peoples and upon their release. Key Benefit The audience will have an understanding that there is medical in Jail but not on the outside and the audience will have the key understanding of this concept to explore more deeply on the issue. Support Statements/ Reasons Why These are the reasons why the key benefit outweighs the obstacles and the reasons that what you are promoting is beneficial. These reasons often become messages. Tone The article has an emotional tone due to the fact that incarceration is an emotional issue that impacts families directly in an emotional way. Also, most incarcerated peoples need the medical upon release for the purpose or rehabilitation and have emotional issues. It is emotional in that convicts typically have emotional issues that need medical treatment and without medical care they cannot get rehabilitation easily, which made lead them in a cycle or habitual offence. Media This article is intended for print advertising such as newspaper editorials or for use on the internet. Also, there is alternate images made about the same article that could be used in print, the web or also as poster, signage or flyers for a more direct advance if working for a political action was in demand. Creative Considerations This article does not target any specific ethnic or cultural group alone, but pertains solely to those incarcerated and facing incarceration that may be at risk of losing their health care benefits.


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Medi-Cal for ex-inmates - latimes.com

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AB 720 would allow people who are enrolled in Medi-Cal when they are sent to jail to have their benefits suspended, rather than terminated. That makes sense. Email

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Ellen DeGeneres gives $10,000 to waitress who paid soldiers' tab 9,251 people recommend this.

By The Times editorial board October 8, 2013

More than 100,000 people are booked into Los Angeles County's jails each year. When they arrive, many of them are receiving healthcare benefits through Medi-Cal, the state's healthcare program for the poor. But by the time they leave, those inmates often have no healthcare coverage.

a d ve r t i se m e n t

That's bad, and not just for the inmates but for society as a whole. When people leave jail without medical coverage, their ailments often go untreated and they wind up in the emergency room with more expensive, acute problems. The ultimate cost usually ends up being covered by taxpayers in any case because hospitals can sign them up for Medi-Cal retroactively. What's more, former jail inmates who suffer from mental health issues and substance-abuse problems but who don't receive treatment are more likely to end up back in jail, according to studies of jail populations in Florida and Washington. State lawmakers have moved to address the problem by passing AB 720. The bill would allow people who are enrolled in Medi-Cal when they are sent to jail to have their benefits suspended, rather than terminated, which is what happens under current law. The legislation would also permit counties to enroll those inmates who are not covered by Medi-Cal — but who are eligible for it — while they are in jail, to take effect when they are released. The changes are sensible and will increase the continuity of care while reducing recidivism. Currently, many people fail to re-enroll in Medi-Cal when they are released from jail, often because they are too ill, mentally or physically, to navigate the process. California's prison break

To stop prisons' revolving door

Foot-dragging on criminal justice reform

The bill could also help counties save money by providing local law enforcement agencies greater flexibility in managing their jail populations, especially those inmates who are mentally ill but not considered dangerous. In L.A. County, an estimated 15% of inmates suffer from some form of mental illness, and taxpayers spend about $160 a day to house them — nearly twice the cost of housing other inmates. If more of those inmates were covered, the county might be able to release them and divert them to more effective and less costly programs. What's more, enrolling inmates in Medi-Cal while they are detained would allow counties to shift some costs to the federal government. Starting in 2014, the federal government will pay for 100% of the medical costs of people who are newly eligible for Medi-Cal, including for pretrial inmates who are released on home detention and required to get treatment. That's a sensible approach that will help

http://www.latimes.com/local/la-ed-medi-cal-prisoners-ab-720-20131008,0,2659222.story#axzz2iWvpOiMA[10/23/2013 1:04:54 AM]

A balloon ride into nearspace for $75,000?


Letters: Sick and in jail - latimes.com

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Handcuffs dangle from a handrail in one of the open dorm areas of the Twin Towers Correctional Facility dedicated to mentally ill inmates. (Los Angeles Times)

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October 8, 2013

Re "Try compassion, not prison," Column, Oct. 6

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As Steve Lopez explained, 3,200 mentally ill inmates fill L.A. County jails. Many of them are charged with nonviolent offenses. Many of them are suffering needlessly. The system is inhumane. Jail makes those who are sick even sicker, worsening their symptoms and leaving them more difficult to treat. If that weren't enough, inmates with mental illness in Los Angeles have suffered a pattern of physical abuse from deputies.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/letters/la-le-1008-tuesday-mentally-ill-jail-20131008,0,6299392.story#axzz2iWvpOiMA[10/23/2013 1:09:51 AM]

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