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2016 ANNUAL REPORT “Ko te kai hoki i Waiaua” To be the food bowl that feeds the world” 122 St John St, Ōpōtiki www.whakatohea.co.nz Ph | +64 7 315 6150

Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board


CONTENTS Chairperson And CEO Report ....................................................................................................................... 4 Six Integrated Strategies ........................................................................................................................ 4 What We Said We Would Do ....................................................................................................................... 6 Review Of The Trust Board Businesses ........................................................................................................... 6 Treaty Settlement ......................................................................................................................................... 7 Cultural Development .................................................................................................................................. 7 Mapping Project .......................................................................................................................................... 7 Cultural Development Strategy .................................................................................................................... 7 Joint Venture Partnerships .......................................................................................................................... 7 Growing Our Aquaculture Aspirations .......................................................................................................... 7 Eastern Sea Farms Ltd .................................................................................................................................. 7 Whakatōhea Mussels Ōpōtiki Ltd – (The Company) ...................................................................................... 8 Dairy ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 Waikeke Farm .............................................................................................................................................. 8 Forestry ........................................................................................................................................................ 8 Looking Ahead ............................................................................................................................................. 8 Trust Board Performance .............................................................................................................................. 8 Chairperson’s Report – Te Pou Oranga O Whakatōhea ................................................................................ 11 Integrating Whakatōhea Education ............................................................................................................. 11 Health And Social Services .......................................................................................................................... 11 Re-Branding ............................................................................................................................................... 11 Ara Whanui Data System ............................................................................................................................. 12 Operation Manager Role.............................................................................................................................. 12 Working With Other Stakeholders ................................................................................................................ 12 Whakatōhea Health Clinic ........................................................................................................................... 12 Education ................................................................................................................................................... 13 Workforce Development Centre .................................................................................................................. 13 Looking Ahead ........................................................................................................................................... Matauranga – Education ............................................................................................................................. Health & Social Services ............................................................................................................................. Social Services ............................................................................................................................................

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Directory ................................................................................................................................................... Trustees .................................................................................................................................................... Bank ......................................................................................................................................................... Legal Firm ................................................................................................................................................. Accounting Firm ........................................................................................................................................ Auditor ..................................................................................................................................................... Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board Meeting Attendance ............................................................................... Audited Accounts .....................................................................................................................................

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Kō Tirotirowhitu te maunga Kō Kakaho te awa Kō Kutarere te marae Kō Te-Poho-o-Tamaterangi te whare tipuna Kō Ani-i-waho te wharekai Kō Upokorehe te hapū

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E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karangaranga maha o te ao Tēnā koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki tēnēi purongo a tau 2016.

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CHAIRPERSON & CEO REPORT Tēnā koutou katoa Ngā mihi mahana i roto i ngā āhuatanga katoa o te wā, e ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā rangatira o te Whakatōhea nau mai haere mai. Otirā, ngā mate huhua o te wiki, o te mārama o te tau, whakangaro atu, okioki mai rā ki ngā ringaringa o tō tātou Kaihanga. Tau mai kia tātou ngā uri o te Whakatōhea, tēnā koutou katoa.

We welcome in another very busy and challenging year, and we thank our Board members, staff and stakeholders for supporting us through the activities we have been involved with both jointly and individually. As a Trust Board, we are acutely aware that our business is about administering the assets that we hold on behalf of Whakatōhea beneficiaries, and ensuring that we are supporting activities in health, education, environment, social, cultural and economic advancement. We have done this through the asset holding companies this Board has established, and the directors of whom we have appointed both internally and externally which will assure many, that we have the right people in place supporting a strong vision for the future.

SIX INTEGRATED STRATEGIES We have been consistent with providing outcomes against our six key integrated strategies, and this report reflects how we have progressed over previous and current years.

Robert Edwards Chairperson Page | 4

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TREATY SETTLEMENT

Whakatōhea hapū have been on this journey for over three decades, and it has been tough. Relationships strained, and government policy pits one against the other. This journey will be difficult but necessary if we are to see a better future for our mokopuna and tamariki. In 2010, four hapū approached the Trust Board to seek assistance to support them reach mandate, these being Ngāti Ira, Ngāti Ngāhere, Ngāti Rua and Ngāti Patumoana. These hapū formally became known as the Tu Ake Whakatōhea Collective (the Collective). The Trust Board considered this request over a period of four months, with a final resolution being agreed to and supported by the Board members of Ngai Tamahaua, and Te Upokorehe. In doing so, the Trust Board requested that the following principles apply, that the Collective be transparent, pono ki te kaupapa, and inclusive. This year an emphasis was placed on supporting Tu Ake Whakatōhea making contact with the rest of the iwi. Which meant that the role of the Trust Board was very clear; initiate robust communications with whānau and hapū of Whakatōhea both here at home and around the country. The Collective with the support of the Trust Board, undertook a roadshow meeting with whānau to listen to what they saw as important, allowing them to participate in discussions, receive information and education on what is happening with regards to the treaty settlement process, in particular, the pathway to mandate.

Dickie Farrar Chief Executive WHAT WE SAID WE WOULD DO This year the Trust board set its sights on a number of key priorities, the first undertaking a review of the Trust Board’s businesses, supporting hapū move through treaty settlement mandate stage, continuing to grow our aquaculture and commercial aspirations, and meeting the challenges of a volatile dairy milk price.

REVIEW OF THE TRUST BOARD BUSINESSES

Last year, the trustees, through our CEO approved a review of the Trust Board’s businesses which included our subsidiaries and joint venture partnerships. The review looked at “consolidating activities and maximising the use of resources” across the Trust Board’s group activities; that being Te Wheke Atawhai Ltd company of which the Trust Board owns 100%, the shared management activities offered to the group, commercial and joint venture partnerships along with policies provided to the Whakatōhea Fisheries Trust and the Whakatōhea Fisheries Asset Holding Company. The priority was to identify the performance of our shared management services to the group and where any gaps were for current and future services. We reviewed policies and identified some duplications in staff roles, and services and worked towards streamlining some of these functions through improvement of policy, service function and staff repositioning.

We congratulate the hapū for taking a proactive step towards engaging with the wider members and for initiating a path where a resolution on treaty settlements may occur.

CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

This year our iwi development manager spent time developing and strengthening relationships with the Ministry of Education with the purpose of developing a Whakatōhea Curriculum. In discussions with the Ministry, we took a long-term view of the importance of having a localised kaupapa māori curriculum, based on raising the achievement of Rangatahi’s awareness of their culture, identity and history which provides the grounding for strengthening our Whakatōheatanga and Te Reo. A proposal has been developed and sent to the Ministry for consideration.

CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

The Trust Board approved the cultural development strategy where Te Reo Māori, whakapapa and tikanga will become the focus. This will be a long-term plan that will be led by Whakatōhea hapū and kaumatua with the support of the Trust Board. We moved quickly to implement this strategy and have begun working across the organisation with our staff, along with stakeholders external to the Trust Board. Pre-schools have not had any understanding of Whakatōhea culturally, and the relationship between both parties is beginning to strengthen in the community.

JOINT VENTURE PARTNERSHIPS GROWING OUR AQUACULTURE ASPIRATIONS EASTERN SEA FARMS LTD

Eastern Sea Farms Ltd is the company that the Trust Board has of 54% shareholding. Its primary role is that of a landlord as it holds the resource consent for the entire water space. Before 2014, the Trust Board went looking for investors from other iwi with little success, until the community put their hands in their pockets and came on board. In 2014, the operating arm of Eastern Sea Farms was initiated through a separate company called Whakatōhea Mussels Ōpōtiki Ltd (WMOL) which was approved by kaumatua and by the Trust Board. With agreement from Eastern Sea Farms, 80% of the water space was leased to WMOL to continue with commercial developments. Eastern Sea Farm retained 20% with the view of seeking other parties who had an interest in putting lines in the water. This site has seen a regular occurrence of SPAT which is a dense cluster of mussel larvae that floats in the ocean currents. However, there were concerns from the industry that SPAT occurrence had taken a drastic dive with a shortfall in natural spat supply. Eastern Sea Farms has capitalised on this opportunity and moved to lease the water space to external parties. Twenty SPAT lines have been put in place for Sanford, with another twenty to Gulf Mussels and twenty for Hauraki giving a total of 60 SPAT lines between the three external companies. WMOL have also put their 76 SPAT lines in place giving a total number of lines at 136. This has been a major achievement for both companies and places them well ahead of their production timeframes and business plans for this year.

MAPPING PROJECT

We also have been busy working with kaumatua on mapping special sites that are significant to Whakatōhea. This was done through an interactive software program that allows us to link photos, videos, and other historical records. In addition to this, we can overlay tradition Māori names for our rivers, streams, rocks and fishing areas which we hope to utilise in an education program for our people.

The next significant change occurred with Te Wheke Atawhai company, rebranding and changing the name of the company to “Te Pou Oranga o Whakatōhea Ltd” a name that is Whakatōhea inspired and aligned to the vision set by its directors. As a Trust Board, we were pleased with these changes as it signalled confirmation of what we valued as a board and what we are “asking for and expecting excellence.” The process for undertaking this restructure has taken more than a year to initiate as it involved many-moving parts such as consultation with staff and management. The implementation of the review will continue into the year 2017 as we move to review the commercial and joint venture activities.

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LOOKING AHEAD

WHAKATŌHEA MUSSELS ŌPŌTIKI LTD (THE COMPANY)

The Trust Board is a current investor in this company with a 5.54% shareholding and has been given an opportunity to be at the table with all the companies due to initiating the aquaculture program. We must commend our community for supporting the Iwi move through and develop this aquaculture strategy as the call for establishing the company and receipt of financial support occurred within a week. We went back to the community for a second round of financial support to purchase a boat large enough to assist with harvesting and setting SPAT lines and once again our community came together. The company saw the need for a vessel given we had to wait at the beck and call of other parties, so this was a strategic move for the company. The company went unconditional on the sale and purchase agreement for the Northern Quest in March of this year, the largest mussel boat in NZ to assist with harvesting our mussels when they mature. A contract was in place to export these mussels, however, due to the mussels being too large they will be sold on the local market.

DAIRY

The dairy farm has been challenged again this year with a low milk payout which is the primary reason as to why we have an operating loss this year. Budgets across the organisation were slashed to the bare minimum with changes also occurring with the review. It has been a tough year on the farm, and our farm manager and the farm committee have looked to find savings and make changes where ever they could. The next course of action that the farm committee will need to consider is a change in the farming system. As the dairy farm is 100% owned by the Trust Board, any dividend to our beneficiaries will not occur this year.

TRUST BOARD PERFORMANCE

2017 will be the year where we as a Board will review our performance and look at key components of governance. High on the list will be the review of our Board charter, along with the completion of the Trust Board’s governance statement. As we head into another election year for the Trust Board, it is important to identify trustees who will be committed to the vision we have set as a board, and continue to challenge and debate issues that are of significance to us as a tribe. Looking ahead, the Trust Board will continue to review its commercial activities as we move to consolidate and look at the portfolio mix we have and the performance of the joint venture arrangements we have invested in. The Trust Board will also be looking at its performance as a board and the performance of the Trust overall. With the aquaculture strategy, the Trust Board will continue to be active in promoting economic advancement alongside the community as employment is one of the key drivers. Next year, the opportunity to put local product in the local market will occur, and we will wait and see the results of this

Robert Edwards Chairman

WAIKEKE FARM

The Trust Board along with Otanemutu Lands Trust and Nukutere Lands Trust joined forces and purchased a 40.47ha dairy farm along the Waioeka straight on the 23 March 2016 and has been named Waikeke Farms Ltd. The attraction for buying this dairy farm was the land that was next door had been purchased by the Trust Board as a strategic acquisition, and there was potential in developing this block further. It is envisaged that the 40ha currently owned by the Trust Board will go across as a lease to support the growth of this dairy farm. Management plans are being put in place with the expectation that cow numbers will increase over time in line with the lease of land from the Trust Board.

Dickie Farrar Chief Executive

FORESTRY

The Trust Board has been a partner along with 24 other partners in this forestry block on Tauwhareparae Rd Gisborne since 1993. The Board reviewed the rationale as to why we should remain as a partner in this investment and has moved to sell its forest shareholding, however; we will consider other opportunities with the land.

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To achieve integrated provision of services, the Board has invested in a re-branding strategy, a high performing data system, and an

RE-BRANDING

expression of styles and colours. This will make them easily recognised within the community as part of a

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ARA WHANUI DATA SYSTEM

• •

To capture all client information, the Board has invested in the Ara Whanui Solution to track the wellbeing journey of clients accurately measure health, social and education outcomes as they progress through the services.

Ara Whanui was designed using the Microsoft Dynamic platform and is based on a client and whānau centric model. This tool has been implemented by Te Pou Oranga o Whakatōhea social and health unit of the Trust Board since August 2014. We are currently extending the system to include our early childhood education, Pouawhitia alternative education programme and workforce development training.

A joint venture with Te Runanga o te Whānau a Apanui to provide alcohol and drug clinical services to rangatahi is working well and between both of our services rangatahi have access to a range of specialist services that also include Bay of Plenty DHB Voyagers, special education and mental health services.

A closer working relationship with Bay of Plenty Community Mental Health services has resulted in whānau avoiding hospitalisation and revolving service door experiences. This relationship has provided Whakatōhea with access to a leading psychiatrist Dr David Chaplow who has taken up rooms in WISH to offer second opinions and treatment reviews. This service has been of significant value to our whānau with long and enduring mental health conditions.

This system will assist whānau to access a range of services regardless of what door they use to enter Whakatōhea services, referral pathways and information sharing will strengthen the organisations ability to support whānau aspirations for wellbeing. The information from Ara Whanui is regularly analysed and is used to inform day to day operations, contract negotiation and strategic planning significantly strengthens Whakatōhea’s ability to provide integrated services.

OPERATION MANAGER ROLE

An operations management role was recruited in January 2016. This position is responsible for working with the Managing Director (MD/CEO Trust Board) to execute strategies that improve operations productivity, performance and efficiency. Developing and maintaining effective relationships with key stakeholders, and supporting Whakatōhea Group Managers to provide services that are integrated and whānau centred.

WORKING WITH OTHER STAKEHOLDERS

Additionally, to working an integrated approach to service provision within Whakatōhea, we have developed a number of key working relationships with other organisations, agencies and providers, to improve access to services that can support whānau outcomes. These are a few examples of high value stakeholder relationships Whakatōhea has fostered in the past year: • With a strong oversight on services that can support our pepi and tamariki we have been proactively involved in the Eastern Bay Children’s team. This team provides access to a range of specialist services with Whakatōhea providing lead professional support to whānau in Ōpōtiki. •

Te Pou Oranga o Whakatōhea is in the process of forming a trust with Toi Ora Health Services, Ōpōtiki and Kerry Nott Pharmacies and Ōpōtiki Physical Therapy clinic. The Trust will be called Pae Ora Community Trust and has a vision for building a legacy of health and wellbeing for future generations.

This Trust will see Whakatōhea GP Clinic and Toi Ora Health clinic co-locate to provide primary health services. This Trust will work closely with Bay of Plenty DHB, St Johns Ambulance Services and a wide range of other health and social services in an integrated care model, to better improve health outcomes of whānau living in Ōpōtiki.

Ōpōtiki College and TPOW have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to formalise a working relationship that integrates services to contribute to a shared vision for the education achievement and wellbeing of rangatahi living within their rohe.

WHAKATŌHEA HEALTH CLINIC

Our General Practice Clinic Manager has worked consistently to recruit a full complement of general practitioners to ensure we are adequately covered. Our clinic population has steadily grown and currently sits at 2,500. Patients can now expect to build a relationship with a more permanent GP rather than engaging with a locum. Cornerstone accreditation was achieved in May and recommendations from the Price Waterhouse Coopers review conducted in 2015 have all been actioned. Our nursing staff have worked hard this year to achieve health targets and their efforts are evident in the achievement of important health targets like smoking cessation, breast screening, diabetes and immunisation.

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EDUCATION

Our education unit has two exceptionally well run early childhood education pre-schools with full rolls and waiting lists. We have qualified teachers as a result of the Pre-School manager’s commitment to professional development. Whakatōhea has secured the Pouawhitia alternative education programme to support our rangatahi who struggle with mainstream education. The Pouawhitia programme provides alternative education in a different setting and style. Staff are committed to ensuring that every student can enjoy education success and are entitled to educational achievement and they work hard to strengthen students’ perception of themselves as successful learners.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT CENTRE

In May planning and development of a workforce development centre commenced. A proposal for funding from Te Puni Kōkiri was successful and enabled us to recruit a workforce development coordinator to write a strategy with Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board. The strategy focused on education and training of a local labour force to ensure people would be prepared for the employment opportunities that are coming in 2018 with the harbour build. In June, we commenced upgrading and refurbishing the training building to create comfortable and inspiring learning spaces for people registered on the unemployment benefit.

HEALTH AND SOCIAL

A number of highly functional teams make up the health and social services known as WISH. These staff are hardworking and dedicated to the wellbeing of whānau living in Ōpōtiki, Torere, and Te Kaha. Staff are well qualified and registered and manage demanding workloads with commitment. We appreciate the additional effort staff have made to learn a new data system and to support our endeavours to gather important data that will better inform our service design and delivery and to provide us with outcome evidence. This evidence is important in demonstrating the value of our services to our communities and to support our continued funding by government. Te Pou Oranga o Whakatōhea group has had a productive year of service delivery and I congratulate management teams and staff for another successful year.

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We support our whānau to ensure: Our pēpi are born healthy, thrive and are well prepared for school Our tamariki live in safe and nurturing homes Our rangatahi are ambitious, contributing, highly performing members of our community


A great leader not only leads by example in political and cultural matters but also practical matters like providing for and sustaining their people. It takes courage, perseverance, persistence, scholarship and knowledge to attain such a prominent position of respect amongst one’s peers, people and the tribe. The Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board’s vision is to be a provider for its people and to invest in the wellbeing of its people. The story of Tapuikakahu is a great example of how one can provide for one’s people.


LOOKING AHEAD

HEALTH & SOCIAL SERVICES

Te Pou Oranga o Whakatōhea provides Education, Health and Social Services to people who live in Ōpōtiki. Each unit contributes to a shared vision for wellbeing and their services are provided in an integrated model guided by a high level strategic plan for the next 5 years.

Whānau ora, Hapū ora, ka ora ai te iwi When the Whānau and Hapū are well the iwi will thrive. High Level Strategies

MATAURANGA – EDUCATION Ko te matauranga te waka e kawea nei ngā wawata Education is the vehicle to realising our potential dreams and aspirations High level Strategies 1. Lifting participation and achievement benchmarks of NCEA 2. Identifying academic and training pathways for future employment 3. Improving enrolment in early childhood education

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What we have done this year 1.

What we have done this year 1.

2.

• Family start services are consistently being provided to support high and complex needs of 60 whānau – this service is focused on pepi from birth to 3 years old. This hard-working team has achieved significant outcomes in the whānau they have worked with. 2.

Identifying academic and training pathways for future employment

3.

• Whakatōhea provides 1.4FTE Lead Professional services to the Eastern Bay of Plenty Children’s Team. We are fortunate to have social workers with the experience and qualifications to work at a high need level of service provision. This work is often complex requiring engagement with a range of services, agencies and organisations. 3.

Improving enrolment in early childhood education

Rangatahi are ambitious, contributing, high performing members of our community. • In the past year, we have developed a high performing team of rangatahi workers and renovated a building specifically for rangatahi to access services.

• With MOE funding, we have been able to invest in mobile early childhood education groups for whānau who would not normally access ECE. Whānau are rural and as a rule are hard to engage.

• The Rangatahi team are actively involved in the Ōpōtiki College and have a network of highly functional services they can access. They have great relationships with Bay of Plenty DHB Voyagers, Te Runanga o te Whānau AOD services, Etu Whānau Mahuri Totara Youth Programme as well as other organisations.

• Our ECE pre-schools Te Aria Toka and Pa Harakeke have full enrolments and waiting lists. Investment in professional development for teachers has resulted in a well-qualified workforce and tamariki that are well prepared for school. 4.

Communities of Learning

Our Tamariki are active learners, they are respectful, secure and confident. • Whakatōhea has engaged a social worker in every Primary School in Ōpōtiki, Waiotahi, Kutarere, Torere and Te Kaha. This hard-working team work with tamariki and their whānau providing support, advocacy, health and social services. Often assisting whānau to access assessments and specialist services they wouldn’t ordinary have access to.

• Planning and development of a workforce development centre commenced. A proposal for funding from Te Puni Kōkiri was successful and enabled us to recruit a workforce development coordinator to write a strategy with Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board. The Strategy focuses on providing training that will prepare long term unemployed for ongoing training, education and employment. • Commenced upgrading and refurbishing of the training building to create comfortable and inspiring learning spaces for people registered on the unemployment benefit.

By 2020 Our Pēpi are born healthy, thrive and are well prepared for school.

• There has been a strong focus throughout our health and social services on immunisation and enrolment of our pepi in a primary health service. To this end our Immunisation rates to 8 months - 90% and at 24 months 92.31%.

Lifting participation and achievement benchmarks of NCEA

• NCEA Achievement - This year we have delivered on a WEAP contract which is Whānau Engagement Action Plan. This contract has funded us to engage Secondary school students who are at risk of not achieving credits for NCEA Level 1 & 2 and supporting them to achieve in an after-school homework club. This contract also includes engaging whānau and ex-students who left school without achieving and supporting them into further training and education to complete their NCEA levels.

By 2020 Our Pēpi are born healthy, thrive and are well prepared for school. Our Tamariki are active learners, they are respectful, secure and confident. Rangatahi are ambitious, contributing, high performing members of our community Our Pakeke role model and embody whānau ora Our Kaumātua are inter-active and enjoy a high quality of life

We have strengthened our partnership with local schools through being a member of our local community of learning. Communities of Learning are groups of kura/schools that come together, along with their communities, to raise achievement for all tamariki and young people by sharing expertise in teaching and learning (ako), and supporting each other. They focus on the compulsory educational pathway, but can also engage with early childhood and post-secondary education to fully include the learning journey children and young people will take. A Community of Learning will work with the students, parents, families, whānau, iwi and other communities within its catchment.

Our Pakeke role model and embody whānau ora. • Mental health and addiction services would be our biggest and most used service. This is the biggest team in the organisation and has a highly-qualified workforce. This service has worked hard this year to keep whānau out of hospital and engaged the services of a highly-qualified psychiatrist to provide a second opinion and review of cases, resulting in better and improved services. • A strong focus on men’s health has been a priority of health promotion this year which saw the creation of the Urutawa Warriors a group of men committed to losing weight and getting fitter.

Through participation in the COL Whakatōhea has the opportunity to contribute to solutions that will affect the learning success of our pepi, tamariki and rangatahi. Low literacy and numeracy achievement and the inclusion of Whakatōheatanga in local curriculum are two of our priorities in this space.

• Health and social services have supported the training for work trainees to deal with a number of barriers to attending training which has the potential to creating barriers to employment. 5.

Our Kaumātua are inter-active and enjoy a high quality of life • Our SAGES (Seniors at all ages) group has grown and provides programmes and activities for our elderly

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SOCIAL SERVICES •

One of the biggest challenges this year has been finding accommodation for whanau. Our social service workers have worked hard to find homes when whānau have been faced with homelessness caused by a shortage of rental properties.

Budget services have been provided by a voluntary church group to assist whanau to get on top of debt and to maintain housing and power supply. They have done an amazing job unpaid and full of challenges. We are not currently funded to provide budgeting services but the demand has been very high and we are most grateful to this group of women for the time and energy they have contributed to our whānau – A big acknowledgement of Gateway Church.

One of the most aspirational services that has had the greatest impact has been path planning – a number of staff have been trained to use the path planning tool and to support whānau to dream, set goals and aspire to whānau transformation. Path planners and social workers then support whānau to achieve their planned goals.

Josephine Karanga Chairperson, Te Pou Oranga O Whakatōhea

TE POU ORANGA O WHAKATŌHEA 5 Year Plan Long Term Outcomes Our Pēpi are born healthy, Our Tamariki are active learners, Our Rangatahi are ambitious, contributing, highly performing members of our community, Our Pakeke role model and embody Whānau Ora and our Kaumātua are active and enjoy a high quality of life. High Level Strategies Whakatōheatanga (Cultural Development) Whānau at the Centre Economic development (employment) Health & Social Wellbeing. Education Healthy Environments BY 2020… Pēpi (Conception – 5 years) 1. 100% uptake of all immunisations by age 2

Tamariki (5-13years) 1. Tamariki have a strong sense of identity and resilience

Rangatahi Pakeke (14-25 years) (26-70 years) 1. Collectives of 1. Pakeke have a Rangatahi high level of categorically reject health literacy tobacco, alcohol skills and and drug abuse knowledge to manage the health of their whānau

Kaumātua (70+) 1. Are the carriers of values and culture and provide good models for lifestyle

2. In homes with whānau that are healthy, safe and nurturing.

2.

All tamariki have access to dental care, social supports and responsive primary health provision

2.

3. 95% of all pepi born in Ōpōtiki are enrolled in early childhood education

3.

All tamariki are a healthy weight and have access to regular physical activity

3.

4. 95% of all pepi are enrolled with a primary health provider

4.

All tamariki have access to a local iwi curriculum that is rich in local Māori knowledge and te reo Māori

4.

5. 85% of pepi live in homes that are smoke free

5.

All tamariki live with whanau with a high level of health literacy skills and knowledge

5.

Rangatahi are performing above average at school with a 40% increase in the achievement of NCEA Level 1 & 2 for Māori attending Ōpōtiki College Rangatahi are cognisant of their cultural identity, kawa, tikanga, te reo Māori

2.

Education and training pathways have seen a significant reduction in Pakeke registration for unemployment benefits

2.

Are the guardians of our environment and share their knowledge to enable higher participation in te Ao Māori

3.

Pakeke take responsibility for disease prevention through 80% uptake of annual health reviews

3.

Contribute to the health leadership of our whānau because they have high levels of health literacy skill and knowledge, traditional and contemporary

Rangatahi have a 4. high level of health literacy with skills and knowledge to maintain responsibility for their own health

Whanau provide 4. homes that are healthy, safe and nurturing by being guardians and viable economic units

Participate in early childhood and primary education to strengthen the delivery of a local curriculum

Rangatahi are engaged in planning for tertiary education studies and trade training pathways and preparing to compete in global job markets

Pakeke maintain responsibility for the health and safety of their whanau through access to personalised on line health information and programmes

Our people exceed a life expectancy of 80 years for men and 85+ for women, through healthy lifestyles that are compatible with tikanga

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5.

5.


ANNUAL BUDGET SUMMARY 2016-2017

DIRECTORY TRUSTEES Robert Edwards Ngāti Rua Chairperson Josephine Karanga Ngāti Rua Deputy chairperson Graeme Riesterer Ngāti Patumoana Trustee John Hata Ngāti Patumoana Trustee Te Kahautu Maxwell Ngāti Ngahere Trustee Arihia Tuoro Ngāti Ngahere Trustee Maui Hudson Ngāi Tamahaua Trustee Tracy Hillier Ngāi Tamahaua Trustee Robyn Hata-Gage Ngāti Irapuaia Trustee Amber Rakuraku-Rosieur Ngāti Irapuaia Trustee Gaylene Tuari Kohunui Upokorehe Trustee Maude Edwards Upokorehe Trustee BANK Westpac Trust LEGAL FIRM Potts and Hodgson Kahui Legal ACCOUNTING FIRM Zeal Accounting AUDITOR Cookson Forbes and Associates

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HAPŪ Ngāti Ruatākena Ngāti Ruatākena Ngāti Patumoana Ngāti Patumoana Ngāti Ngāhere Ngāti Ngāhere Ngāi Tamahaua Ngāi Tamahaua Ngāti Irapuaia Ngāti Irapuaia Upokorehe Upokorehe

TRUSTEE Robert Edwards Josephine Karanga Graeme Riesterer John Hata Te Kahautu Maxwell Arihia Tuoro Maui Hudson Tracy Hillier Robyn Hata-Gage Amber RakurakuRosieur Gaylene Tuari-Kohunui Maude Edwards

(1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016)

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5/6

2/6

6/6

6/6

5/6

5/6

TOTAL

WHAKATŌHEA MAORI TRUST BOARD MEETING ATTENDANCE

WHAKATOHEA MAORI TRUST BOARD FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016 INDEX

PAGE

24 DIRECTORY

25 STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE REVENUE AND EXPENSES

26 STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN NET ASSETS

27 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

28 CASH FLOW STATEMENT

29-34 STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES

35-44 NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

45-46 AUDIT REPORT

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Notes:

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Notes:

Notes:

Page | 48

Page | 49


Whakatohea Maori Trust Board Annual Reports 2016  
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