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CONTENT

P O R T S TA F F

executive director

deputy director

c h i e f

Roy Quezaire

o p e r at i n g o f f i c e r

airport director

Vincent Caire

director of business development

executive counsel

director of finance

director of o p e r at i o n s

director of human resources

s p e c i a l

Dale Hymel, Jr.

Cindy Martin

director of a d m i n i s t r at i o n

Paul Aucoin

projects officer

Linda Prudhomme Melissa Folse Grant Faucheux Brian Cox Tamara Kennedy Joel T. Chaisson

port of south louisiana 171 Belle Terre Blvd., P.O. Box 909 LaPlace, LA 70069-0909 www.portsl.com Phone: (985) 652-9278 | Fax: (504) 568-6270 globalplex intermodal terminal Phone: (985) 652-9278 port of south louisiana executive regional airport Phone: (985) 652-9278 ext 8512 a s s o c i at e d t e r m i n a l s Phone: (985) 233-8545 The Port of South Louisiana is a member of the Ports Association of Louisiana. To become an associate member of PAL and to help further the maritime industry in Louisiana, please visit PAL’s website at www.portsoflouisiana.org or call the PAL office at (225) 334-9040.

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director ’ s log overview around the port Guys Achieving Goals Aviation Awareness Day

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published by renaissance publishing llc

what ’ s new Linde Hydrogen Plant in St. James Parish what ’ s new Protecting the Port

editor

port side

art director

Topher Balfer

Ali Sullivan

production designers Emily Andras, Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney

traffic coordinator

Lane Brocato

v i c e

president of sales

Colleen Monaghan

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port raits

Brennan Manale, Caitlin Sistrunk, Jessica Jaycox, Sydney Steib

company profile The Committee of 100 for Economic Development, Inc.

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port owned facilities

contributing writers

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port map

company profile IFFCBANO

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final frame

airport news Southern Aviators

company profile C- River Logistics

SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

account executives

Andrea Blumenstein Jordan LaHaye William Kalec Misty Milioto

To advertise call Shelby Harper at (504) 830-7246 or email Shelby@myneworleans.com. 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 • www.myneworleans.com Copyright 2019 The Port Log, Port of South Louisiana, and Renaissance Publishing LLC. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Port of South Louisiana, Post Office Box 909, LaPlace, LA 700690909. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the owner or Publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine’s managers, owners or publisher. The Port Log is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self addressed stamped envelope.


DIRECTOR’S LOG

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ast April, the Port of South Louisiana celebrated the 25th anniversary of operations for our transshipment center, Globalplex Intermodal Terminal. Founded in 1992, the creation of Globalplex was the first step for the Port to take in becoming a landlord/ tenant port. Throughout its history, Globalplex Intermodal Terminal has seen many companies and clientele utilize its facilities; currently, Globalplex houses eight tenants. While these companies vary in products and services, they are all equally beneficial to the success of the Port of South Louisiana as the largest tonnage port in the Western Hemisphere. Globalplex’s current tenants are: • Evonik Industries: Rooted in Germany and creating a presence in America in 1882, the company established a warehouse with Globalplex in 2009. As one of 30 production sites in the United States, the Globalplex location stores a variety of products including absorbent polymers for baby diapers and spill kits. • NATCO: NATCO’s operation began in New Orleans as a grocery store before evolving into a commercial food service distributor in 1978. Due to Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, the company moved to an available facility at Globalplex and was able to ship out their first post-Katrina order in October 2005. NATCO specializes in various meat cuts as well as offering dairy and paper products. • Archer Daniels Midland: ADM became a Globalplex Intermodal Terminal tenant in 1994 to operate a grain elevator that is used to store 3.7 million bushels of grain received from the Midwest. Employing 136 people, ADM is one of the largest exporters in the River Region. • LafargeHolcim: Operating in 80 countries, the Globalplex location for the company was launched in 1996.

d. paul robichaux president

pat sellars vice president

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LafargeHolcim’s chief procedures in Reserve are to manufacture cement and prepare ready-mix concrete. • Crystal Baumer Foods, Inc.: Dating back to 1923 in New Orleans, this business, known for its world-famous hot sauce, in addition to other condiments, relocated in early 2006 after Hurricane Katrina damaged its New Orleans facility. Today, the company ships its goods across the U.S. and to 31 countries worldwide. • Cross Roads Centers Global Solutions: A tenant since 2014, the company manages four entities: CRC Logistics Solutions, CRC Building Solutions, CRC Realty Solutions and CRC Brand Solutions. In addition to the Globalplex location, the company has 53 sites worldwide across five continents. • Pinnacle Polymers: Operating two production lines, Pinnacle Polymers became a Globalplex tenant in 2006. The company’s employees help produce over one billion pounds of polypropylene, the second-most widely produced commodity plastic, per year. Pinnacle Polymers specializes in injection molding polypropylene. • Associated Terminals: Associated Terminals, founded in 1990, began their River Region operations in 2005 and has bases in five cities in Louisiana in addition to the Reserve location. The company’s Globalplex location offers many services including midstream operations, agricultural commodity exports, logistical solutions, terminal port operations and in-plant services. The success of these companies at Globalplex Intermodal Terminal, in addition to previous tenants over the past 25 years, have helped make our facility into a world-class transshipment center. We appreciate these businesses, their histories and the jobs they create for our region. •

joseph scontrino executive vice president

p. joey murray

stanley bazile

treasurer

s e c r e ta r y

robert "poncho" roussel

kelly buckwalter

whitney hickerson

judy songy

vice president

vice president

vice president

vice president

SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


OVERVIEW

T R A N S P O R TAT I O N CENTER OF THE AMERICAS The state legislature established the Port of South Louisiana in 1960

20.61

25.0

ORES / PHOSPHATE ROCK 2.4 (4%)

20.37

22.04

OTHER 0.1 (<1%) STEEL PRODUCTS 1.0 (1%)

21.27

EDIBLE OILS 0.3 (<1%)

65.74

84.14

St. John and St. James tri-parish regions.

69.6

74.27

stretch of the Mississippi River that runs through the St. Charles,

72.03

to promote commerce and industrial development along the 54-mile

15.64

17.17

13.16 2019

16.81 16.78

18.62 2017 20.45

2018

17.94

NUMBER OF BARGE MOVEMENTS: 14,737

2015

NUMBER OF VESSEL CALLS: 991

15.04

TOTAL TONNAGE: 65,736,935

2016

17.57

MAIZE 9.3 (14%)

18.57

FIRST QUARTER 2019

16.32

CHEMICALS / FERTILIZERS 5.7 (9%)

20.08

16.09

16.25

SOYBEAN 11.3 (17%)

COAL / LIGNITE / COKE 4.2 (6%)

PO R T OF SOU TH LOU ISIA NA 2 0 1 9 ANIMAL FEED 2.8 (4%)

T OTA L TO NNA GE FIR ST Q U A R TE R (IN M I L L IONS O F S H OR T TO NS )

WHEAT 0.9 (1%)

PETROCHEMICALS 12.0 (18%)

EXPORTS

DOMESTIC SHIPPED

IMPORTS

DOMESTIC RECEIVED

SORGHUM (MILO) + RICE 0.3 (<1%)

CRUDE OIL 15.4 (23%)

MISSION

PHILOSOPHY

FACILITIES

The Port is charged with a mission to promote maritime commerce, trade and development, and to establish public and private partnerships for the creation of intermodal terminals and industrial facilities.

The Port’s philosophy of development is to entice companies to set up regional operations within its boundaries. The Port serves primarily as a “landlord” port to more than 30 grain, petroleum and chemical companies. The exception to this is the port-owned world-class intermodal Globalplex facility SoLaPort, and the St. James Westbank property.

Within the Port’s jurisdiction, there are seven grain elevators, multiple midstreaming operations, more than 40 liquid and dry-bulk terminals, the Globalplex Intermodal Terminal and the Port’s Executive Regional Airport.

GOVERNANCE

The Port is under the jurisdiction of the state of Louisiana and authorized by the state constitution. A nine-member board of commissioners directs the Port; all of them are unsalaried.

WORLD’S LARGEST PORT DISTRICT

The ports of South Louisiana, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, St. Bernard and Plaquemines make up the world’s largest continuous port district. They are responsible for moving one-fifth of all U.S. foreign waterborne commerce.

PORT AREA

The Port covers a 54-mile stretch of the lower Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The Port begins at river mile 114.9AHP near the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport and winds through St. Charles, St. John the Baptist and St. James parishes. It continues north to river mile 168.5AHP just north of the Sunshine Bridge. •

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AROUND THE PORT

S O AR ING HIGHER AND HIG HER BY WILLIAM KALEC

F o r t h e t h i rd s t r a i g h t y e a r, t h e P o r t o f S o u t h L o u i s i a n a a n d t h e n o n - p ro f i t ‘ G u y s A c h i e v i n g G o a l s ’ s u c c e s s f u l l y p u t o n Av i a t i o n Aw a re n e s s D a y, g i v i n g k i d s h a n d s - o n e x p e r i e n c e re g a rd i n g w h e re f l y i n g m i g h t t a k e t h e m – b o t h t o d a y a n d i n t h e f u t u re .

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n what is fast becoming a mark-your-calendar event for those in the River Parishes, hundreds of area youths and their families took part in the third annual Aviation Awareness Day at the Port of South Louisiana Executive Airport on April 20, 2019. Pilots of various disciplines — some former military aviators, some current commercial aviators of both planes and helicopters — mentored those in attendance, shedding light on the various career avenues available in aviation (beyond just being a pilot) and hammered home the importance of excelling in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education once they reach high school. But, of course, the highlight of Aviation Awareness Day has been, and remains, the eye-opening, smileinducing, horizon-expanding, free-of-charge rides the kids can enjoy in a variety of aircraft. “Our goal each and every year — the origin of all this — is to showcase aviation to those who have never seen it showcased before and lay it out as a possible career path,” said Paul Green of Guys Achieving Goals, the non-profit organizer of Aviation Awareness Day. “To see the growth in the number of planes that come, the number of sponsors that want to be a part of this and the turnouts we get, it just shows to us that we’re steadily accomplishing what we set out to accomplish with Aviation Awareness.”

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This year, the 200 kids in attendance rode an array of general aviation aircraft, including a single-engine Cessna 172 — a plane many aviation experts dub the most successful plane in aircraft history because of the units sold and the longevity of production — the twin-engine monoplane Cessna 310, and several models of Piper planes. Before and after takeoff, the volunteer pilots gladly answered questions from the kids they shuttled up in the sky. “Not only have many of these kids never flown in a plane before, most don’t know and have never met a pilot in real life before,” Green said. “You know that takes me back to my experience, because for me as a young man growing up in St. John Parish, I never

SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

met a pilot until I joined the Navy and got into helicopters. But kids shouldn’t have to wait that long, so that’s our mission — for kids to at least have the opportunity to look into aviation and see if it’s something for them.” Roy Quezaire, Port Deputy Director, said the event has become instrumental in showing kids that there are resources available that can help them achieve their dreams, should they decide that a career in aviation is right for them. “The annual Aviation Awareness Day is increasingly becoming a serious connector between aspirations and possibilities, as it engages the youthful minds of our children into the various dynamics of the aviation industry from an I-can-do-also perspective,” he said.


AROUND THE PORT

PHOTOS: Children from the River Parishes enjoy their first ride in an airplane BOTTOM RIGHT: Deputy Director Roy Quezaire interviews the children ranging in age 6-18 after each flight

“The Port and the airport there have helped tremendously,” Green said. “I remember the first time we talked about doing this with (Port of South Louisiana) Paul Aucoin and Roy Quezaire; they were more excited about it than some of the kids that go up in the airplanes. They said, ‘Let’s make this happen,’ and they have. As a sponsor, they’ve provided the fuel for these rides to off-set the costs for these pilots that bring their planes, so that alone has been a tremendous help.” While not the Port’s main intention when it unveiled its multiphased, multi-million-dollar Airport improvement campaign roughly a decade ago, having a more modern, up-to-date aviation complex — capable of hosting community outreach events like Aviation Awareness Day and last year’s historic Ford Tri-Motor Tour — has been a pleasant consequence of that investment. “There’s no doubt this is an exciting event for the community and that’s what I like about it — it’s a big community event,” Aucoin said. “We just think it’s a wonderful thing to introduce people to avi-

ation, and it gives us a great opportunity to let the community know we’re here and we’re a part of the community and we serve the community — with the airport and with everything the Port does. It shows the airport can not only serve the needs of those who do business here but can be used to serve the community — in this case, educating kids and their parents and introducing them to aviation.” At the end of the day, Quezaire said the most rewarding aspect of the event — in addition to

demonstrating the possibilities and opportunities available at the Port — is seeing the reaction from the young attendees. “It’s such an honor, privilege and joy to conduct the post-flight exit interviews with the children and hear their individual comments of joy, happiness and excitement as they’ve experienced the runway take-off, the gravitational impact, the wonderful and beautiful scenery from the elevation, and the reconnective landing of their plane,” he said. •

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AIRPORT NEWS

A F U T U R E TA K I N G F L I G H T BY DREW HAWKINS

Pi l ots -i n-tr a in i n g f i n d t h e ir win g s wit h S o u t h e r n Aviat o r s an d the Exec uti v e R e g i o n a l A i r p o r t

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hings are taking off at the Port of South Louisiana – including new pilots trained on site at the Executive Regional Airport. In February of 2019, Southern Aviators Flight Training, LLC opened for business, filling a much-needed void in the area and providing a new service to the airport and the surrounding River Parishes region. The school is currently providing high-quality flight training services to anyone who wants to learn how to fly, whether they’re looking to pursue a career in piloting, to pick up flying as a hobby, or just to boost aviation ratings. An accredited member of the Flight School Association of North America, Southern Aviators also offers

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

discovery flights, commercial transport flights, scenic flights and city tours. Founder Quintin Gerard Wilson is a man of many talents, having studied under the renowned jazz master, Ellis Marsalis, in addition to working as a recording artist and a pilot. After moving to Los Angeles to pursue a career as a professional saxophonist, he returned home to his Louisiana roots and pursued a degree in Business Administration and Management at Southeastern Louisiana University. When he decided to look for a new challenge outside of the world of music, starting a flight training school was a natural fit. “In many ways, it’s a lot like music,” Wilson said. “It’s never the same and

Quintin Gerard Wilson, Founder of Southern Aviators Flight Training


is always changing from day to day.” Wilson said that music and flying have always been his two main passions. The south Louisiana native took his first flight in Los Angeles in 1998 and said he has been hooked on flying ever since. When Wilson was learning to fly, his favorite task was mastering the flight training curriculum and meeting the goals set forth by his flying instructor. He said he hopes to bring that same joy and sense of achievement to his students. “There is no greater feeling than passing an FAA checkride, so I want all those who ever dreamed of safely navigating an airplane from one place to another to experience the joy of this tremendous accomplishment,” he said. Wilson spends nearly all his free time at the Port of South Louisiana Executive Regional Airport, where he maintains, cleans and flies his 1974 Cessna Skyhawk 172M. As a tenant of the airport himself, choosing the Port as the location for his school made perfect sense to him, as he knew that every necessary resource would be available in one place. He said he is fully invested in the future of the airport and appreciates his flight training school’s role in that vision, a sentiment shared by Paul Aucoin, Executive Director of the Port of South Louisiana. “Southern Aviators adds another piece to the puzzle and is helping to attract more people to our airport,” said Aucoin. “We’re always looking for ways to improve and to make the airport better and more attractive, and this fits right in with our growth plan.”

With a completely new transient hangar, extended runways, improved taxiways, and 10 more hangars set to be built within the next eight months, the growth plan that Aucoin envisions is taking shape with new endeavors like Wilson’s. The Port’s new airport assets are already being put to good use, even while further developments are still in the works. “We have people in industries up and down the river using the airport to land and visit plant sites and even to conduct business in our boardroom, right there in the airport.” Aucoin said. He added that executives from Noranda Alumina and Marathon Petroleum Corporation regularly pass through the regional airport to take advantage of a wide range of perks, including the cheapest jet fuel around and zero landing fees. As the airport continues to grow, Aucoin said the addition of a flight school has become less of a luxurious new amenity and more of a necessity. “As we continue to expand, we will need this program,” said Aucoin, who had been getting call after call over the years from people looking to earn their pilot’s license. Now, anyone interested in getting their license no longer has to seek an education at another airport, thanks to Wilson’s vision and hard work. Prospective students, or anyone looking for more information about the school, can visit SouthernAviators.com or call the Port of South Louisiana Executive Regional Airport main office at (985) 652-9278. •

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C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

IMPROVING THE FUTURE OF LOUISIANA BY MISTY MILIOTO

The Committee of 100 for Economic Development, Inc. promotes public policy that improves Louisiana’s competitiveness and the quality of life for Louisiana residents.

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hen it comes to the economic health of Louisiana — more specifically, promoting positive change in government, education and the economy — the Committee of 100 for Economic Development, Inc. is the go-to organization for business engagement in public policy. The non-profit, nongovernment organization is supported by private sector business leaders and operates as a business roundtable. Its main purpose is to build coalitions and partnerships that affect public policy in terms of economic and business development in Louisiana. The organization began in 1992 to impact public policy that made a difference in how state government approached business and economic development. The membership is composed of senior executives from businesses across the state and includes 10 university presidents. Members are invited based on their interest in a nonpartisan approach to public policy issues that affect business and economic development. Michael J. Olivier is former Secretary of Economic Development for the State of Louisiana and a Certified Economic Developer who was recruited to become the CEO in October 2009. In this role, Olivier provides leadership for Committee members and coordinates the

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Memorandum of Understanding with the Louisiana Department of Economic Development. C100 GOALS The Committee of 100 fulfills its mission to assist the state in attracting and retaining industry through a three-part program. First, the organization cooperates with and assists the Louisiana Economic Development Department and regional economic development organizations. Secondly, C100 engages with other entities — such as the Council for a Better Louisiana, Public Affairs Research Council, the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry, and others — that seek to positively inf luence public policy on business and economic development. Finally, C100 keeps its members informed about the organization’s activities so their views are heard regarding specific projects and policy. “As Louisiana’s Business Roundtable, we are in our 27th year of operation, always seeking to maintain a nonpartisan impact on public policy that will be good for all of Louisiana,” Olivier said. “There are 25 Business Roundtables in the USA, and C100 is recognized as one of the most successful.”

SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

PAST ACCOMPLISHMENTS Over the years, the Committee of 100 has had numerous successes. “C100 worked with state government leadership supported by KPMG to develop practical strategies to reduce the cost of government, improve its services and devise a plan to carry the state forward into the 21st century,” Olivier said. “In 1993, the state’s public and private sectors joined in creating and funding the Select Council on Revenues and Expenditures in Louisiana’s Future (SECURE), working for two years in developing these recommendations.” In 1995, SECURE completed a two-year study and made 400 recommendations to reduce the cost and improve the services of state government. Six years later, the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry conducted a study showing that the actions recommended by SECURE and implemented by the state, had generated approximately $2.1 billion that was used to reduce the state’s debt, solve problems with Medicaid funding, and increase education funding at all levels. Other important projects over the years have included working with business leaders in New York City after hurricanes Katrina and


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

Pictured at a recent Committee of 100 event is (standing) Governor John Bel Edwards, Executive Director Paul Aucoin, (seated) Port Commissioner Joey Murray, Port Commission Chairman Paul Robichaux, Michelle Citron, Dynamic Industries, Marissa Lingoni, Providence Engineers; and Louisiana OFI Commissioner John Ducrest

Rita to promote recovery in the state, as well as meeting with finance and business contacts in New York City after the BP oil spill to show that Louisiana was still in business. C100 also co-financed a study with the Economic Development Administration to establish a business development strategy focusing on Latin America, and has led business missions to France, Panama and Mexico in support of business development in Louisiana. LOOKING AHEAD “Our current focus is Reset Louisiana’s Future, a coalition with the Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana and the Council for a Better Louisiana,” Olivier said. “The coalition is sharing public policy with every candidate seeking

legislative office in the 2019 election. The Reset coalition is conducting 10 meetings in every part of the state with candidates to provide the best public policy that can be used in each candidate’s election campaign in the areas of education, public safety, transportation infrastructure and tax/fiscal reform.” C100 chooses industry sectors on which to focus that directly affect business attraction and retention through a memorandum of understanding with the Louisiana Department of Economic Development (LED) that has existed since 2010. “LED focuses on a targeted industry approach based on Louisiana’s assets and resources,” Olivier said. “We must stay current with the principles of economic and business development utilizing the

newest tools in the profession to make Louisiana competitive. C100 support of the LED through the MOU is an important feature of the business roundtable activity.” As a result of Louisiana’s multimodal assets, especially its deep-water and river ports system, the state has maintained a competitive position in International Trade. “Louisiana’s location on the Gulf of Mexico and our Mississippi River location, combined with our natural resource capacity, distinguish our state from many areas of the country and the world,” Olivier said. “C100 is pleased to have both the Port of South Louisiana and the Port of New Orleans as members, as both represent two of the largest ports in the world and are critical to the economic success of our state and region.” •

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C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

I F F C B ANO: STAYING TRUE TO ITS M I S S ION FOR MORE T H A N A CENT URY BY WILLIAM KALEC

Established in 1913, the International Freight Forwarders and Customs Brokers Association of New Orleans serves the needs of its membership by lobbying for or against policy that shapes international trade.

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n the world of International Trade, particularly as it relates to freight forwarders and custom brokers, a lot has changed in the past six years, let alone the last 106 years. While today’s methods of moving cargo and the instruments used to do so would have been completely unimaginable when the International Freight Forwarders and Customs Brokers Association of New Orleans (IFFCBANO) was founded in 1913, the ultimate objective of this collective group remains steadfast then to now. As a regional offshoot of the National Customs Brokers and Freight Forwarders Association, IFFCBANO develops new economic opportunities for its membership through active promotion of shipping via the lower Mississippi River (and all the advantages of doing so), lobbying for positive trade legislation at the local and national level, and creating a natural networking alliance within its vast membership. “It’s all about helping our clients,”

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SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

said Cole Trosclair, President of IFFCBANO. “So anything that might affect the way our clients do business, we make sure they’re aware of it through accessible information. For example, say a specific regulation comes out for a product line that some of our clients handle. That information is disseminated to our members right away. The same holds true with the ports, with steamship lines, trucking — if there’s something new or a pressing issue, our clients will know about it. “Basically, anything that affects our (members’) day-today operations is our concern.” Because of the wide range of companies and agencies all underneath the IFFCBANO umbrella, the Association splits its members into two factions. IFFCBANO’s “regular members” — essentially its core members — consists solely of local International Freight Forwarders and Customs House

Brokers. Then, there are the associate members of IFFCBANO, which are persons, agencies or corporations regularly engaged in international trade or support services of international trade, i.e. truckers, fumigators or entities like the Port of South Louisiana. Despite the diversity within its membership, IFFCBANO’s strength lies in creating a united voice when it comes to broader, universally relevant issues instead of getting bogged down in the individual, specialized minutiae of handling a certain type of cargo. “The idea is, we’re all in the same industry. We’re all in international trade,” Trosclair said. “So whether you have a commodity that’s specialized — let’s say coal — you’re still affected by many of the same mechanics as everyone else. It’s moving cargo in and out. How does it get there? What are the problems with getting it there? Those are the things we discuss as a membership. “A thing like Port Congestion is talked about and discussed within our membership much more than a singular commodity, because that affects everybody — not just a couple of brokers.” Those belonging to IFFCBANO have found a wealth of informational resources and networking opportunities through fellow members. Trosclair said a symbiotic relationship exists between IFFCBANO members. Companies will often lean upon other companies listed in IFFCBANO’s annual directory for specialized services, or even just know-how in an area of international trade with which they aren’t familiar.


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

IFFCBANO members tour the U. S. Customs & Border Protection Office in New Orleans

Each year, the Association hosts an International Trade Symposium, bringing together the top brass within its membership for a two-day educational and networking conference. For the 2019 event, which was held in Point Clear, Alabama, the Port of South Louisiana sent three members of its team. “IFFCBNO does a great job with all its freight organizations,” Port of South Louisiana Executive Director Paul Aucoin said. “They connect the dots, if you will, with all the different freight

forwarders, customs brokers, transportation services. They do a great job representing all those professional organizations.” Aucoin went on to commend IFFCBANO for its spirited support of customs and border protection initiatives, and for its dedication in aligning with the Port’s mission to convince the government of the vital importance of dredging the lower Mississippi River to 50 feet to allow safe passage of new Panamax vessels. “The Ports are critical, because that’s what all of the cargo is

moving in and out through,” Trosclair said. “So knowing the offerings of the Ports, and what their pain points are, is really important so that we can join together in that lobbying sense. I know the Port of South Louisiana is really up on the importance of dredging (the Mississippi River) and that’s something we’ve supported as well. When you have all aspects — the Ports, the corporations, the truckers, the broker forwarders — of the supply chain unified, I feel it brings that much more to our position on certain issues.” •


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

C-RIVER LOGISTICS BY FRITZ ESKER

From stevedoring to terminal handling and more, C-River Logistic s is a one-stop shop for transpor tation ser vices.

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hen companies are shipping goods from one location to another, there are several logistical issues to consider. Often, these issues are more than one company can handle — but at Metairie’s C-River Logistics, they provide a package of transportation services including barge service, barge chartering, trucking, stevedoring, rail services, terminal services, and more for their clients. C-River Logistics is the brainchild of its president, Pamela Cascio, who has worked in the industry since 1978. Shipping is in Cascio’s blood: Her father was a senior vice president for a shipping agency and her husband currently works for a shipping agency as well. In the late 1990s, after working for a barge company headquartered in St Louis, she left that job and founded C-River Logistics in 1999. “I took the leap and I started my own company,” Cascio said. Many of the clients and contacts Cascio accumulated through her career followed her to her new business. In February 2001, Cascio sold the business to SSA Marine in Seattle, one of the largest stevedoring companies in the world.

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SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

SSA started in 1949 as a familyowned cargo-handling company in Bellingham, WA and then became a global enterprise that spans more than 250 locations across five continents. Cascio still runs her three-person office at C-River Logistics in Metairie under the SSA umbrella; however, she feels C-River works better within SSA Marine because the Seattle company has more contacts, and she feels that together, they can offer more services to their customers. Cascio said C-River’s work is important because many companies often fail to plan anything other than the barge aspect of the shipping journey. There is frequently a reason for this oversight: When many larger companies go through layoffs, they often let go of operational employees. These are the employees that would typically handle the logistics of barge, trucking, rail services, terminal handling and storage requirements, and more. When such situations arise, SSA can provide the important “incidental” services. “It’s a one-stop shop,” Cascio said. “A lot of times, what the shippers want is not what

barge companies can provide on their own.” As an example of what C-River offers, Cascio said most companies’ traffic managers are so overwhelmed with dealing with ports all over the world that they are unable to keep up with day-to-day activities. But C-River can arrange stevedoring at the arrival port; transportation via barge, truck or rail; unloading at inland terminals and transportation to the final destination. Customers also receive daily updates that include river conditions, lock/dam forecasts and more. C-River monitors these conditions 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Cascio said their location in Metairie is also optimal for business. “We are located in the best region for our company, as most barge loadings are done in New Orleans and the Port of South Louisiana,” Cascio said. Cascio said that SSA


frequently uses the Port of South Louisiana for its shipping needs, which is mostly made up of dry bulk shipments — but they also transport steel, aluminum, stone and other materials. Cascio said the Port of South Louisiana is convenient and easy to work with through the entire process, as they are always easy to get in touch with if there is a question or a problem, more so than many other ports. “The Port of South Louisiana works like clockwork,” Cascio said. Even though she has worked in the shipping industry for over 40 years, Cascio said the work has never gotten

old or monotonous for her. She said each assignment presents its own unique set of challenges. Clients sometimes change itineraries at the last moment, and she must scramble to adjust plans. The drafts of the river can change with each journey, and they must account for it every step of the way. There are seemingly endless variables to consider: A lock on the river might unexpectedly be down with no timetable on when it will go back up. It’s not always easy, but it’s never boring. “I learn something new every day,” Cascio said. “There’s always a new problem to solve.” •


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Hydrogen storage system in waste incinerator

FUELING GROWTH BY MISTY MILIOTO

A new hydrogen plant in St. James P a r i s h i s a t e s t a m e n t t o L o u i s i a n a ’s economic development.

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inde, a leading industrial gases and engineering company based in the United Kingdom, will begin construction on a $250 million world-scale hydrogen plant in St. James Parish late this year. Hydrogen, which is used to produce ultra-low-sulfur diesel and other transportation fuels, as well as intermediate and specialty chemicals, is a critical requirement for oil refineries and chemical companies. The new facility is expected to be one of the largest hydrogen plants in the United States once commercial operations begin, which could be as soon as 2021. Linde will build, own and operate the steam methane reformer, which will have a capacity of more than 170 million standard cubic feet per day of highpurity hydrogen. Once complete, the plant will increase the company’s Gulf Coast hydrogen capacity to more than 1.7 billion standard cubic feet per day. Linde has already invested more than

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$500 million in Louisiana, including a new syngas processing plant at BASF’s facility in Geismar, Louisiana, slated to start up in 2020, and the completion of a new syngas plant in Geismar that increases carbon monoxide supply to customers in the surrounding region. The new hydrogen plant will create 15 new direct jobs with an average salary of $80,000 per year, and Louisiana Economic Development estimates the project will result in 62 new indirect jobs. Furthermore, the project will generate an estimated 150 construction jobs. “St. James Parish welcomes Linde and their construction of a $250 million steam methane reformer facility,” said St. James Parish President Timmy Roussel in a press release issued by LED. “This type of project works well with our land use plan in every way. We also look forward to working with Linde in placing as many local

SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

hires as possible to fill those $80,000 annual average wage positions.” As part of Linde’s 90-mile Mississippi River corridor hydrogen pipeline system that stretches from Baton Rouge to St. Charles Parish, the new facility will supply some of the leading chemical manufacturing companies in Louisiana’s Southeast and Capital regions. This development furthers the company commitment as the preferred hydrogen supplier in the U.S. Gulf Coast. LED began formal discussions with Linde about its new hydrogen plant in May 2018, showing just how far negotiations have come in such a short amount of time. The company is expected to use the state’s Industrial Tax Exemption Program, which offers attractive incentives for manufacturers who make a commitment to jobs and payroll in the state. Meanwhile, the company also has launched several educational programs and scholarship opportunities through its Skills Pipeline Workplace Development Program and Global Giving Program to emphasize the importance of STEM education to Louisiana students. “Linde’s commitment to Louisiana is a vote of confidence in our state’s industrial corridor, and it represents another great win for Louisiana’s growing economy,” said Gov. John Bel Edwards in the press release. “Our business-friendly climate, our natural resources, our world-class infrastructure, and our highly skilled and highly engaged workforce are all contributing to the industrial expansion we’re seeing in Louisiana. This new investment from Linde will create new opportunities for our people and support increased economic activity in the region.” Michael Hecht, president and CEO of GNO Inc., also commended Linde for its expansion in the River Region, saying that this project further demonstrates economic growth in the state. “We are seeing record industrial investment in Louisiana, from around the world, thanks to our unbeatable combination of access to natural gas, pipeline infrastructure and world-class workforce.” •


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PROTECTING THE PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA BY FRITZ ESKER

Using top-of-the-line technology, the Por t’s Maritime Securit y Operations Center ensure that water ways are safe and ef ficient.

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ver 4,400 oceangoing vessels and over 63,000 barges travel through the Port of South Louisiana each year. It is the top-ranked port in the country for import tonnage and total tonnage. With such a high volume of annual business, the work of the port’s Maritime Security Operations Center is more important than ever. Thankfully, its Maritime Security Operations Center makes monitoring maritime traffic easier. The Maritime Security Operations Center opened in 2013. It was a $1.2 million project funded by the DOTD and a $965,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The center is housed in a 2000 sq. ft building made of steel and concrete. The structure was designed to withstand winds of up to 150 miles per hour. State-of-the-art surveillance and communications equipment are kept inside of the building. Brian Cox, director of operations for the Port of South Louisiana, said the Maritime Security Operations Center has seven full-time employees

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and two part-time employees. They monitor cameras for the Globalplex Intermodal Terminal in Reserve and monitor all marine radio traffic within the port’s jurisdiction. They also keep an eye on police, fire and emergency services in St. Charles, St. John and St. James Parishes. “We’re the eyes and the ears of the Coast Guard within our jurisdiction,” Cox said. There are two full-time and two part-time police officers permanently assigned to the Port. They are POST certified police officers, but the Port employs them and assigns them their uniforms and vehicles. The Port has three emergency response vessels for fire and emergency response. These vessels can take photos and video of any incidents and transmit them to the security center. In the past, monitoring systems used separate software programs for different tasks, but the Port of South Louisiana’s current program puts it all together in one package. Video, photos and radio transmissions

SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

are all bundled together. Previous programs did not interface with each other and made communication between other ports and agencies difficult. One port may have used one kind of software, while another port’s software might not be compatible to the first port’s software. As a result, the old ways were timeconsuming and often headacheinducing. However, the new system allows for greater ease of communication between the Port of South Louisiana and neighboring ports. For an example of how well the new system works, Cox pointed to a small chemical spill that occurred at one of the docks. The port was able to stream live video to the Coast Guard, as well as send them pictures of the event. When spills happen, the port and Coast Guard can use these visuals and combine them with up-to-date information on the river (e.g. latest data on currents) to best judge the speed and impact areas of the spill. If it were a major spill, they can then use this info


to make decisions on shutting down water intakes or closing the river itself. They are also able to immediately notify nearby ports in the case of such an emergency. While there has not been a major event affecting multiple ports yet under the new system, Cox said the Port of South Louisiana believes it is better to be safe than sorry. “We want to be prepared to manage the worst-case scenario and hope that it

never happens,” Cox said. The Port of South Louisiana also uses AIS (automatic identification system) technology to monitor vessel traffic via transponders. Port employees can see any cargo ship, tugboat or large vessel on the river. In the event of an accident, this technology can be used to go back in time and reconstruct the events leading up to the accident to see who was at fault. This is especially

important in cases where a captain does not realize he brushed against a dock and keeps going. Such a scenario may sound implausible to a layperson, but Cox said this can happen if the river is moving fast enough. The technology all adds up to a safer, stronger Port of South Louisiana. “It helps streamline our operations and makes us more efficient and effective,” Cox said. •

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P O R Ts i d e

P E O P LE OF T HE POR T KIM LANDRY Purchasing Agent Kim LeBouef Landry has been through a lot with the Port — including the devastating fire that destroyed the Guest House in 1993. After that, she worked closely with the insurance company to make sure that the facility was restored to a welcoming, pleasant atmosphere, and she considers it one of her most satisfying accomplishments. Along with her husband of 31 years, Brent “David” Landry, she has four children: Justin, Jordan, Kaitlyn and Jacob. She enjoys hunting, fishing, gardening, and spending time with her family, whether they are gathered around the dinner table or cheering on her children’s sports teams. DAN TAILLON After more than 30 years at the Port, Fireboat Captain Dan Taillon has learned the value of dedication and positivity, which he believes are the keys to a happy life. “I wouldn’t trade the friends I have made here for anything in the world,” he says. On the water, he and his crew work hard to create a unified, supportive environment, so that every worker knows they will receive the help they need. In his free time, Taillon enjoys tending to his farm, construction and restoring classic cars. His top priority is attending church, which also allows him to raise money for several great causes. ALEXANDRA “ALEX” HERNANDEZ Alexandra “Alex” Hernandez has served in several capacities at the Port since joining the team in July 1998. Starting as an administrative assistant, she graduated to the role of research analyst before assuming her position as Public Information Officer. She is an avid follower of current and political events, having immigrated to the United States from Colombia in 1980. She is also passionate about animals, photography, graphic design and movies -- particularly Sci-Fi.

LEON ROBINSON Maintenance Repairer Leon Robinson has been a valued member of the Port of South Louisiana since July 1998. After all this time, he still loves his job -- he says it has provided him with unlimited opportunities for learning and growth, as well as the stability needed to follow his passions. When not at the Port, he enjoys weightlifting, mentoring children and spending time with his family.

VICKIE LEWIS CLARK Since joining the Port team in March 2000, Vickie Lewis Clark has worked her way up from a paralegal role to her current ranking as Port Manager. She is skilled at event planning and enjoys shopping and watching movies. She says she has been fortunate to work with some extraordinary individuals at the Port, whom she truly views as part of her family.

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SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


P O R Tr a i t s

E M PL O YEE APP R E C I AT I ON D AY - M I LE STON E S

Kim Landry - 35 YEARS

Joseph Benn - 30 YEARS

Celeste Deslatte - 25 YEARS

Grant Faucheux - 25 YEARS

Lana Simon - 10 YEARS

Joey Oubre - 10 YEARS

Vincent Caire - 5 YEARS

Roy Quezaire - 5 YEARS

Tamara Kennedy - 5 YEARS

Other employees who reach their work anniversaries in 2019 and were not present for the event include: 25 YEARS: Alvin Morris Kevin Poche Guadalupe Torres

20 YEARS: Lenora Davis

5 YEARS: Brandon Green Ronnie Feist Richie Zito

10 YEARS: Ahmad Young

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P O R Tr a i t s

INDUSTRY APPRECIATION BREAKFAST River Region Economic Development Initiative (RREDI) hosted its annual industry appreciation breakfast, a tribute to the industrial facilities within the river parishes for their impact on the local economy and the vitality of the Port. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guest speaker was LED Secretary Don Pierson. RREDI was established by the parishes of St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, St. James and the Port of South Louisiana to promote economic growth for the river region.

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SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


P O R Tr a i t s

Port Executive Director Paul Aucoin

LED Secretary Don Pierson

St. James Parish President Timmy Roussel

St. Charles Parish President Larry Cochran

St. John Parish President Natalie Robottom

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P O R Tr a i t s

E C O N O MIC DE V E LOP M E NT B R E A K FA ST

Paul Aucoin, Port Executive Director

Laverne Toombs, St. John Parish CAO

Chassity McComack, Executive Director, River Region Chamber

Quintin Wilson, Southern Aviators Flight Training

The River Region Chamber held a ribbon cutting of the Southern Aviators Flight Training located at Port of South Louisiana Executive Regional Airport. Pictured: (L-R) Vincent Caire, Airport Director, Port of South Louisiana; Buddy Boe, Executive Director, River Parishes Tourism Commission; Lisa Braud, Port Manager, Port of South Louisiana; Larry Soraparu, Councilman At Large, St. John Parish; Stacy Scott, River Region Chamber; LaVerne Toombs, CAO, St. John Parish; Paul Aucoin, Executive Director, Port of South Louisiana; Quintin Wilson, Southern Aviators; Mohamad Chehab; Patricia Wilson; Roy Quezaire, Deputy Director, Port of South Louisiana; Chassity McComack, Executive Director, River Region Chamber and Roger Tamplain, LaPlace Ford

W I MO - L UN C H & LE A R N

The Port hosted Women in Maritime Organzations (WIMO) which consisted of a presentation, windshield tour of the Port facilities and a lunch. Companies represented at the Lunch & Learn program were Ingram Barge, St. John Fleeting, Riverlands Resources, ARTCO, ADM, Control Union USA, Associated Terminals, Host Agency, Cooper Consolidated, Port of New Orleans, Crescent Towing, Cargill, and Port of South Louisiana.

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SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


P O R Tr a i t s

N E B RASK A SO Y B E A N B OA R D

Members of the Nebraska Soybean Board visited the Port recently to discuss shipments of grain that travel down the Mississippi River.

Pictured is Port Executive Director Paul Aucoin, and Cale Buhr, Market Development Coordinator for the Nebraska Soybean Checkoff

L E GISL ATIV E CA P I TA L OU T LAY P R OJE CTS DI N N E R

Back Row: Senator Ed Price, Rep. Gregory Miller, Commissioner Joey Murray, Commission Chairman Paul Robichaux, Roy Quezaire, Rep. Joe Stagni Front Row: Dale Hymel, Paul Aucoin , Senator Gary Smith, Senator Eddie Lambert, Rep. Johnny Berthelot, Commissioner Judy Songy, Rep. Ken Brass, Commissioner Robert “Poncho” Roussel. Seated: Commissioner Stanley Bazile

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P O R T O W N E D FA C I L I T I E S

Globalplex Intermodal Terminal a d d re s s : 155 West 10th Street, Reserve, La. 70084 ma i l i ng a d d re s s : P.O. Box 909, LaPlace, La. 70069 ph o ne : 985-652-9278 fa x : 985-653-0798 e - ma i l : info@portsl.com we b: www.portsl.com co ntact ( s ) : Paul Aucoin, Executive Director; Roy Quezaire, Deputy Director lo cat i o n: River mile 138.5 e qu i p me nt: Two Manitowoc 2250 rail-mounted gantry cranes; 100,000-pound capacity weighing scale for trucks; 100,000 square foot warehouse; 72,000-square-foot, and 40,000-square-foot transit shed; and a 177,000 square foot paved open storage pad d o ck : 204 ft. x 660 ft. with upstream and downstream mooring dolphins. allow for dockage of panamax size vessels; 700 ft x 65 ft finger pier general cargo operators associated terminals ph: 985-536-4520

Globalplex Bulk Dock ma i l i ng a d d re s s : P.O. Box 909, LaPlace, La. 70069 ph o ne : 985-652-9278 fa x : 985-653-0798 e - ma i l : info@portsl.com we b: www.portsl.com contact(s): Paul Aucoin, Executive Director; Roy Quezaire, Deputy Director lo cat i o n: River mile 138.5 f u nct i o n: Transfer and store bulk, primarily cement fluorspar limestone and wood chips e qu i p me nt: An 800 tons-per-hour continuous Carlsen ship unloader, a 1,800 tons-per-hour ship-loading system, 100,000 tons of cement storage in two storage domes, 70,000 tons of storage for flourspar in an A-frame building and approximately nine acres of paved open storage for wood chips and other products. d o ck :507’ x 44’ with upstream and downstream mooring buoys to allow for panamax-size vessels

ADM Reserve a d d re s s : 2032 La. Highway 44, Reserve, La. 70084 ph o ne : 985-536-1151 fa x : 985-536-1152 we b: ADMWorld.com co ntact ( s ) : Mike Landry, generale manager of commercial operations lo cat i o n: River mile 139.2 f u nct i o n: Grain export elevator. ot h e r: Fully automated

Port of South Louisiana Executive Regional Airport ma i l i ng Ad d re s s : P.O. Box 909, La Place, La. 70069-0909 ph y s i ca l Ad d re s s : 355 Airport Road, Reserve, La. 70084 ph o ne : 985-652-9278 we b: portsl.com/airport-services e ma i l : psl-era@portsl.com co ntact: Vincent Caire, Airport Director lo cat i o n: N30° 05.25’, W30°34.97

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SUMMER 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


P O R T O W N E D FA C I L I T I E S

Plains Marketing L.P. a d d re s s : 6410 Plains Terminal Road, St. James, La. 70086 t e rmi na l ma nag e r: Craig Ellinwood ph o ne : 225-265-2353 fa x : 225-265-3171 we b: PAALP.com lo cat i o n: Mile marker 158.6 f u nct i o n: Storage of petroleum products.

SoLaPort West Bank industrial site acquired for development into an industrial park located adjacent to Dow in St. Charles Parish. co ntact: Paul Aucoin ph o ne : (985) 652-9278

MPLX L.P. (Pin Oak Terminals) a d d re s s : 4006 Highway 44 Mt. Airy, La. 70076 co ntact: Gregg Qualls ph o ne : 504-533-8783 we b: PinOakTerminals.com lo cat i o n: Mile marker 144.1 f u nct i o n: Storage of petroleum products.

PSL Westbank St. James co ntact: Paul Aucoin ph o ne : (985) 652-9278 Property acquired for development.

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INDUSTRY MAP

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FINAL FRAME

There are 7 grain elevators in the Port’s district –Zen-Noh Grain, Cargill, ADM –Destrehan, Bunge North American, ADM –Reserve, ADM –Ama, and ADM –Paulina making the Port of South Louisiana the largest grain exporter in the United States.

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Profile for Renaissance Publishing

Port Log Summer 2019  

Port Log Summer 2019