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NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2020

BEST DESSERTS

TOP LAWYERS

CHRIS ROSE

COZY STYLE PICKS

myneworleans.com

NOVEMBER 2020

$6.95


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NOVEMBER 2020


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NOVEMBER 2020


MYNEWORLEANS.COM

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Contents

NOVEMBER 2020

/ VOLUME 55 / NUMBER 2

Pecan Pie at Gracious Bakery + Cafe 26

FEATURES 26 Best Desserts The city's sweetest treats

BY JYL BENSON

38 Legal Matters Choosing the right counsel

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BY TOPHER BALFER

42 Lawyers New Orleans' top rated

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STANDARDS 8

FROM THE EDITOR

Just Desserts

10 NOTES Top things to try, do and read 12

THE DISH

16 STYLE Feelin' Fall

64 TRAVEL Park Place

74 CHEERS The Other Redhead

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66 GROWING PAINS Living in the Future

76 DINING GUIDE Listings from around the city

CHRIS ROSE

Behind the Mask

20 PERSONA Abraham Felix

68 HOME ADVICE Z Event Company

22 MODINE Kit and Caboodle

70 TABLE TALK Food Flip

24 VINTAGE 1913

72 NOSH Bowled Over

News from NOLA kitchens

14 BAR TAB Best in bars, drinks and more

96 STREETCAR Best of the Bunch

DIAL 12, D1 ON THE COVER

Mile High Ice Cream Pie at Jack Rose, p. 26 Photographed by Sam Hanna

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NOVEMBER 2020

Outwit the opposition—or get run over. Hugh Laurie stars in a political thriller scripted by David Hare. Watch the premiere of “Masterpiece: Roadkill” on Sundays, November 1-22 at 8:00 p.m. on WYES-TV and on wyes.org. Get access to thousands of hours of video on demand with WYES Passport. To learn more about the many ways you can show support to WYES, your local PBS member station, go to wyes.org/support.


FROM THE EDITOR EDITORIAL

N

ovember is a time of giving thanks, and this month we give thanks for the sweeter side of life, both inside the kitchen and dining room and out about town. Celebrity chef Gail Simmons once said, “There is no better way to bring people together than with desserts.” We couldn’t agree more. From New Orleans classics like our iconic cover star Mile High Pie and southern pecan pie, to new favorites such as roasted banana zeppole and peanut butter pie, we have the not-so-skinny on all the best creations to satisfy your sweet tooth. Even better, order extra for the table or pick up another pie for Thanksgiving and share the wealth with family and friends. As the holidays approach, we tend to loosen our diets and enjoy culinary delights a little more. And why not? You deserve that extra spoonful of pie, that new libation creation calling your name or the ooey gooeyest thing on the menu. Inside this issue you’ll find plenty of things to do and ways Have something you want to share with to celebrate the fall season, including delightful tips, shopping us? Email ashley@ selections and restaurants and taverns designed to tickle your myneworleans.com. taste buds and bring some cheer. Our Nosh recipe is a treat of a holiday dish that’s sure to be a new family favorite, and our Cheers cocktail creation is both spicy and sweet. Life is short: Eat dessert first. That same “seize the day” mentality holds true for many things in life, especially in an extraordinary year such as 2020. In New Orleans, we embrace family and community. We share our favorite recipes for sweet potato and pecan pie, and the best places to pick one up in a pinch. We share the highs and lows of Saints games and pandemic closings and re-openings. Like enjoying dessert first, remember to do the things that bring you, your family and neighbors joy, and the rest will follow. Sweet tidings and happy fall. Enjoy!

Executive Editor Errol Laborde Editor Ashley McLellan Creative Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Contributing Writers Toya Boudy, Cheré Coen, Lee Cutrone, Fritz Esker, Jay Forman, John Kemp, Misty Mioltio, Liz Scott Monaghan, Andy Myer, Elizabeth Pearce, Eve Crawford Peyton, Chris Rose ADVERTISING

Advertising Sales Manager Kate Henry Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executives Nancy Dessens, Meggie Schmidt, Rachel Webber

RENAISSANCE PUBLISHING MARKETING

Coordinator Abbie Dugruise PRODUCTION

Manager Emily Andras Designer Rosa Balaguer CIRCULATION

Subscriptions Jessica Armand Distribution John Holzer ADMINISTRATION

Office Manager Mallary Wolfe Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne

WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511

Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Tiffani R. Amedeo NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE

Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 MyNewOrleans.com

For subscription information call (504) 828-1380 New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/ Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2020 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

WHERE’S JULIA?

She and Poydras have flown the coop! You can find them, and answers to your questions, monthly at MyNewOrleans.com.

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THERESA CASSAGNE PHOTO


NEWS+NOTES

BY FR ITZ E SKE R

TRY THIS

1 ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT

“MENDING THE SKY” AT THE NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART (NOMA)

It’s exciting news for New Orleans arts lovers! On Oct. 9, NOMA opened “Mending the Sky,” its first major exhibition since the city shut down for months as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Open through Jan. 31, the exhibition features 11 artists’ projects. These works are bound by a common theme: a world turned upside down. That theme is explored through the fields of art, animation and performance. The show’s title comes from a Chinese fable where a rip in the sky causes the Earth to split open, bringing fires, floods, famines, and disease until a goddess mends the broken sky. “Mending the Sky” features several major new acquisitions by local and international artists, giving a global perspective to issues facing New Orleans and the rest of the world. These projects have roots in places as diverse as Brazil, Europe, China, the American South, India, Vietnam and Jamaica. “’Mending the Sky’ touches on the many complex ideas that we, as a community, have been challenged to address in the times of COVID-19,” said Susan Taylor, the Montine McDaniel Freeman Director at NOMA. “This is an exhibition about loss and uncertainty, but also creates space for recovery, healing, and hope.”

On Sept. 25, New Orleans’ oldest restaurant (180 years young) announced that it would be reopening for lunch and dinner on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as brunch on Sundays. The private dining rooms are also open. Reservations can be made by calling the restaurant at 581-4422.

2 OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART

If you’re looking to take a trip downtown to enjoy some art, call the Ogden Museum of Southern Art at 539-9650 and reserve a time to visit the museum. Because of social distancing and safety protocols, all visits must occur during a pre-arranged window of time.

LISTEN TO THIS

Songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and New Orleanian Leyla McCalla just re-released her album “Vari-Colored Songs: A Tribute to Langston Hughes” after a limited 2013 release. McCalla’s music combines Haitian influences with classic American folk music for a unique sound that pays tribute to the world renowned poet and thinker.

“A STAR IS BORED” BY BYRON LANE

Loyola University of New Orleans graduate Byron Lane spent three years working as the personal assistant to “Star Wars” legend Carrie Fisher. Lane’s new book, “A Star Is Bored,” is a fictionalized tale of Charlie, a young gay man dealing with the demons of a traumatic childhood. Charlie is hired to assist an aging actress who starred in a blockbuster science-fiction film. There are late night shopping sprees, a spur-ofthe-moment trip to see the Aurora Borealis and other adventures. Charlie also befriends other assistants, who trade darkly funny stories of the crazy demands their famous employers make. The story isn’t all comic. There’s a darker side to the actress, who has a pillpopping habit and a sizable self-destructive streak. But ultimately, the relationship between Charlie and his boss is an affectionate one. “The Los Angeles Times” calls it “savage satire leavened with compassion.”

BARATARIA PRESERVE

If you live in a city, sometimes you can take its special attractions for granted. The same is true for New Orleanians. With outdoor activity increasing in the wake of COVID-19, consider taking the 30-minutes-or-so (depending on where you are in the city) drive to the Barataria Preserve. It’s part of the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve and features some wonderful nature hikes through swamps and wetlands. As of press time, the visitor center remains closed, but the trails, restrooms, and parking lots are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Barataria Preserve is located at 6588 Barataria Blvd. in Marrero. For up-to-date information, visit the website at nps.gov/jela.

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THE DISH

BY MISTY MIL IO TO

CULINARY BOOK CLUB

BEEBE TRAN PHOTO

PIZZA PIE

Noodles, Please! Jeff Gapultos and Chef Nhat “Nate” Nguyen came up with the idea for Union Ramen Bar after a night out on the town. While they planned to open in the Lower Garden District on Apr. 4 (National Ramen Day), they delayed until July 8 due to the pandemic. The interior, designed by Gapultos, his wife Cat Vo and Collectivo Design, is purposely modern mixed with industrial elements. The restaurant is unique thanks to its Tori (poultry-based) and Miso (plant-based) broths—rather than the heavier Tonkotsu (pork-based) broth found at most ramen restaurants. Also on offer is Mazemen—a saucier style of ramen, minus the broth—with options like Dirty Mazemen and Slap Ya Kim-chi Mazemen on the menu. 1837 Magazine St., Ste. B, 459-2819, unionramen.com.

The team behind NOLA Brewing is using its knowledge of water, yeast and fermentation to bring a new pizza parlor to the Crescent City. NOLA Pizza Co., set to open this month at the Tchoupitoulas Street taproom, will offer New York City-style pizza that pairs perfectly with beer. The trick to making a tasty NYC style-pizza starts with the water, and the team is using its brewery expertise and in-house lab to make authentic pizza dough. Expect the toppings to be as varied as the beer choices. 3001 Tchoupitoulas St., 896-9996, nolabrewing. com.

EXPANDED OUTDOOR DINING

Boucherie, known for its in-house smoked and cured meats, reopened with an expanded outdoor dining area and new menu. Executive Chef Nathanial Zimet and his long-time staff member, Amilcar Bautista, built the covered outdoor seating area by hand. It features trellises covered in wisteria, picnic tables and benches, and four-top tables with purple chairs to match the vines as they bloom. The new dinner menu boasts items like whole hog pulled pork, W Black Farms wagyu skirt steak, creamed corn gnocchi, duck breast, pan seared puppy drum and applewood smoked scallops. A robust wine menu and seasonal cocktails complement the menu. Zimet also just launched Happy Hour, Tues.-Sat. from 5-6 p.m. 8115 Jeannette St., 862-5514, boucherie-nola.com.

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The New Orleans Chapter of Les Dames d’Escoffier International (an organization of women leaders who create a supportive culture in their communities to achieve excellence in the food, fine beverage and hospitality professions) has announced a new virtual book club. The next meeting takes place Nov. 21, when the group will discuss “History of American Cuisine” by Paul Friedman. While the book club is free to foodies who are interested in discussing food-related fiction and nonfiction, a suggested donation of $5 helps to support the organization’s work in the community. Advance registration is required. facebook.com/ lesdamesnola.

DECADENT DESSERT

Mason Romain and Kelsey Fisher recently opened Parish Parlor Ice Cream in the Lower Garden District. According to Romain, the decision came about purely from quarantine boredom. They started experimenting with baking, which eventually led to making their own ice cream from scratch. The duo opened the ice cream parlor in mid-September, specializing in French-style ice cream (meaning egg yolks are added to the base, thereby lending a rich, fattiness to the dessert). Parish Parlor also has some Philadelphia-style flavors (minus the eggs), plus a few vegan ice creams and sorbets. Overall, they currently have 18 flavors that include blackberry cheesecake, salted caramel and lemon ricotta honey. As a pet-friendly shop, they also offer pupcicles for Fido. 1912 Magazine St., 302-2244, parishparlor.com.


BAR TAB

B Y MISTY MIL IO TO

Happy Hour Beloved local restaurant Sylvain—part of LeBLANC + SMITH’s collection of restaurants—has launched a new Happy Hour just in time for fall. Taking place Wednesday through Sunday from 4-6 p.m., it features a group of Lucky 7 cocktails (all are $7) served with a lagniappe of chili roasted almonds. Choose from drinks like the Sazerac, Moscow Mule, Mexican Firing Squad, Sylvain Gibson, Champagne cocktail or wine by the glass. Also, all LeBLANC + SMITH restaurants (Cavan, Longway Tavern, Meauxbar and Sylvain) are now accepting reservations through Tock, allowing customers to book tables either on the patio or indoors when applicable. 625 Chartres St., 265-8123, sylvainnola.com.

Tales of the Cocktail Foundation—a non-profit organization that educates, advances and supports the hospitality industry—has announced its winner of the 2020 Spirited Awards. The award, which recognizes top beverage professionals, products and establishments across the global spirits and cocktail community, was presented on Sept. 21 and 24. This year’s virtual TOTC conference had the theme of catalyst (to spark change). Each of this year’s award winners represent a global class of change-makers. The first round of winners announced on Sept. 21 included Best American Bar Team presented by William Grant & Sons (Café La Trova, Miami); Best American Cocktail Bar presented by Pernod Ricard (Pacific Cocktail Haven, San Francisco); and Best New American Cocktail Bar presented by Elijah Craig (Silver Lyan, Washington, D.C.). The second round of winners on Sept. 24 included American Bartender of the Year presented by Pernod Ricard (Kevin Diedrich, Pacific Cocktail Haven, San Francisco); the Pioneer Award presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation (Shannon Mustipher, Beverage Director, Glady’s Caribbean, New York, and author of Tiki: Modern Tropical Cocktails); and the Helen David Lifetime Achievement presented by William Grant & Sons (Audrey Saunders, founder of Pegu Club, New York). Locally, Jewel of the South was a finalist for both the Best American Restaurant Bar and the Best American Bar Team awards. talesofthecocktail.org.

COMPÈRE LAPIN PHOTO

SPIRITED AWARDS

FALL COCKTAILS

Top-tier local restaurants Compère Lapin and Bywater American Bistro— both from celebrity chef Nina Compton—have introduced new fall cocktails that are sure to warm from the inside out. At Compère Lapin, try the Florio & Fauna, made with Florio fernet, Dolin Blanc, Huana Guanabana liqueur, lemon, Bitter Queen’s thai spice bitters and Drumshanbo gunpowder Irish gin. Another new option is the Wayward Isles, made with Tattersall Aquavit, Bonal, Miletti Amaro, Benedictine and Peychaud’s bitters. Meanwhile, Bywater American Bistro is offering the Romagna Fizz, made with Rittenhouse rye, Elizabeth Allspice Dram, simple syrup, lemon, lime, egg white, heavy cream, Angostura bitters and Fattoria Moretto Lambrusco. 535 Tchoupitoulas St., 599-2119, comperelapin. com; 2900 Chartres St., 605-3827, bywateramericanbistro.com.

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

Broussard’s, the historic French-Creole restaurant in the Vieux Carré, is marking its 100th anniversary this year. To celebrate, the restaurant is offering bottles of wine for $19.20 (to coincide with the year the restaurant opened) as well as a three-course wine pairing for $19.20 to go along with a special pre-fixe menu spotlighting pecans. 819 Conti St., 581-3866, broussards.com.

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Style

BY ANDY MY E R

The fedora-style Carlo Mack hat in soft, structured Australian wool with leather band is the perfect autumnal accessory, from Monomin, 2104 Magazine St., 827-1269, monomin.com.

Designed to inspire sweet dreams, Hillery Sproatt’s whimsical knit blankets are made from 80 percent recycled cotton and 20 percent poly, making them the perfect weight, Polite Society, 3616 Magazine St., 304-6225, politesocietynola.com.

Bring on the cold front! This luxe cashmere sweater by JoosTricot is the perfect staple for transitional weather, available at SoSusu Boutique, 3427 Magazine St., 309-5026, sosusuboutique.com.

Feelin’ Fall Embrace the season with these cozy picks

Hit the streets with a little extra pep in your step in these comfortable metallic leather sneakers from Shop Em’s, 246 Metairie Rd., 834-2795.

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BENE’s Holmes Bag in mint green gator is made in the Italian tradition of fine leather craftmanship and inspired by the colorful culture of founder Ellie Schwing’s native New Orleans. Each bag is lined with custom printed fabric featuring original artwork by a local female artist, available at Angelique Boutique, 7725 Maple St., 866-1092, shopangeliqueboutique.com.

Relax body and mind with Sanctuary Body Oil, made locally by Oxalis Apothecary, a blend of cedarwood, benzoin, blood orange, petitgrain, golden jojoba, organic pumpkin seeds, meadowfoam and calendula. Available at Whole Foods Market, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119, wholefoodsmarket.com.


MYNEWORLEANS.COM

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CHRIS ROSE

The best part about this November is that I didn’t hear a single Christmas Carol in a store in October. I suppose that’s probably because I didn’t go to any stores in October. But still, it’s the little things that make you smile in times like these. No trick-ortreaters meant I saved $40 in candy. You look for things to be thankful for in this time of Thanksgiving. But I do hope that somebody will tell me when it’s beginning to feel a lot like Christmas. Otherwise, I won’t know. My parked car got hit by a food delivery truck. There are a lot of food delivery trucks on the road these days. I went to my local body shop, a small independently owned business on the north shore to get the damage fixed. It’s a cozy joint, just the owner and two employees. Nobody wears masks. The owner, he drove my car back to my place when the job was done. A fine job, I might add. So naturally, I offered to drive him back to his shop. I put on my mask and started the car. He said to me: “You’re always wearing that. You don’t have to worry about me; I don’t have it.” It. “And I don’t go anywhere, anyway,” he added for reassurance. Point made. But maybe he’s forgetting that, even if he goes nowhere, about 20 people a day come to him, unmasked. I’m in the Cone of Possibility, or whatever it’s called. The Death Trap. The Suicide Rap. By age, respiratory condition and a lifetime of general debauchery, insouciance and doing

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customers to please wear masks, for the safety of other shoppers. Some do, some don’t. I make sure not to buy the produce that I see other shoppers fondle bare handed and then toss back onto the pile. If they don’t want that apple, I sure as hell don’t either. Me, I ain’t great looking, so the mask doesn’t bother me. My only remaining physical asset is that – at my advanced age – I’m told I still have pretty eyes and generous eye lashes so, in fact, I’m totally down with it. That’s all you can see of me. My kids are in school and that terrifies me. But I get it. Cooped up at home since too much of what people shouldn’t do, I am COVID-19 March can make a person crazy, especially waiting to happen. kids. Me, I was shut in and crazy long before I have masks hanging from my rearview mirror like I all of this started so – other than having used to have Mardi Gras beads or panties snagged off a no job or income – it’s all good with me. float. Frankly, I’m scared. And I don’t mind dying, to tell Just another day at no office. November marks nine months of the four you the truth. I’ve crossed a lot of things off my bucket list. Ps: pandemic, panic and perpetual pajamas. No need to be greedy. You know you’re cooped up too long when But I just don’t want it to be that way. Not the way I hear about it. Alone, surrounded by what look like extras from a you begin to notice that Turner Classic contagion movie except this time it’s my movie. Movies keeps playing the same For more Chris classic movies over and over I don’t want to watch. Rose check out his I went to my local laundromat. Now that I and that, when an episode of blog "Me Again"on Tuesday mornings at Law & Order comes on, you live on the north shore, it’s no longer called a myneworleans.com washateria. I miss that part of living in the city. already know whodunnit. The part where everybody gets everything wrong, but in Can I get a witness? A vaccine is on the way. Or it isn’t. A just the right way. President is on the way, or he isn’t. The Our appliances are broken so I had to drive down the New Normal is on the way, or it isn’t. I road to a place where no one wears masks or gloves and they file in with piles of dirty clothes and everybody touches just want to know when crawfish season all the same dials and buttons. It’s a veritable infectorium. starts again. Or will it? And I don’t know if that’s a real word but it should be. Because then I can feel good again. Then And it is now. I can feel home again. At the local grocery, there’s a sign on the door asking

Behind the Mask

Looking for a new normal

JASON RAISH ILLUSTRATION


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PERSONA

BY KE L L Y MASSIC O T

F

or 31 years, the New Orleans Film Festival has highlighted the Big Easy’s mark on the film industry and the local creators that are making a difference in the field. This year, southeast Louisiana native and current New Orleans resident Abraham Felix is set to debut two short films at the 2020 festival. Like many this year, Felix had to pivot as COVID-19 threw a wrench in to everyone’s plans. Ahead of the virtual festival, we caught up with the filmmaker to talk about his films, what motivates him as an artist and what’s next in his future. Q: Who is Abraham Felix? I’m a New Orleans-based film director by way of writing and editing for print and television. My work often falls within the realm of observational cinema, as I constantly find myself exploring humanity, interiority, and relational complexity across project type. Q: What attracted you to filmmaking? Before I ever picked up a camera, I grew up involved in church and theater productions, while always copping a ticket to as many movies as I could afford. I think there’s a connective tissue to each of those arenas that left an unknowable but profound imprint on me as a young person. As I grew older, I learned there is also a tremendous responsibility in each of those arenas to seek and cultivate honesty - even more so now than when I started in this industry a decade ago. Today, reality is as fractured as the number of different sources from which we consume stories. Perception is as prismatic as the amount of eyeballs witnessing an

Q

ABRAHAM FELIX FAVORITE NEW ORLEANS FILM

"Ruby Bridges" by Euzhan Palcy (1998)

A

event. Truth, honesty, and integrity in the stories we tell ourselves are as important as which stories we tell and support because those stories shape us, our behaviors, our potential, and our reality individually and collectively. It is not always easy to be honest and look at ourselves with honesty, ready to accept what we see. So I’m drawn to the challenge of being one of many filmmakers, artists, storytellers and activists who grabs every opportunity to do just that. Q: What motivates you as an artist? As a journalism major, I learned precisely how media shapes reality, and beyond what I learned in school, how perception creates reality. From words on a page, to actors on a stage, to video games, television, movies and other works of art, the things we see with our eyes are influenced by in our souls, shape our behavior. For generations so many of the stories we’ve seen reflected don’t always thoughtfully interrogate the effects of gun violence, racism, sexism, all manner of harmful world views. And to put it mildly, I think our current shared reality demands better from us. We simply cannot continue on telling the same stories in the same way because that’s a big part of what got us here. It’s on those of us who call ourselves storytellers and artists to be leaders in that change. So in that light, I feel a tremendous motivation and responsibility to be as much of a force as I can for shifting the American paradigm in a more just, humanistic, and inclusive direction.

To continue this conversation, and find out what’s next for Abraham Felix, visit our website for exclusive online content. MyNewOrleans.com

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GREG MILES PHOTO


MODINE GUNCH

Kit and Caboodle Storming the bar

Well, this was all I needed — a Cat One moving in. Now, I ain’t talking ‘bout the weather. This Cat One is a cat. One cat. At first. I got to explain. My gentleman friend Lust is manly enough, being the owner of The Sloth Lounge, the kind of bar that don’t stick little umbrellas in your drink, but where everybody knows your name and your business and how much you can hold before you do something stupid. (And which, being in the French Quarter, has been doing zilch business during the pandemic.) But Lust got a soft spot for cats. I live behind the Sloth, in a nice apartment across the courtyard, with my youngest daughter Gladiola, and Lust lives up above the bar, and we visit a lot, and maybe we’ll get married before the end of the world, if that don’t happen too soon. Anyway, a couple months ago, Lust opened the Sloth front door for some air, and this cat strolled in and hopped up on a bar stool like she was waiting to be served. Lust went behind the bar and found a dusty can of pet milk, and poured her a shot, which she licked up, very dainty, with one paw on the bar. So, she became the new bar cat. (Lust usually keeps a bar cat, but he was between cats at the moment.) And since we were watching one of them tropical storms, Lust named her Cat One, since we were hoping that’s all it would amount to. Well, Cat One had a secret, which we didn’t find out about until she holed up for a long time under the stairs one day. Then she presented us with Cat Two, Cat Three, Cat Four, Cat Five, and little Invest, the runt of the litter. Because the bar was closed, Cat One took her brood and moved in with me and Gladiola. I have to admit, them kittens made the pandemic lively. With kittens around, every time you open a door to go outside, you first do the cat dance, stomping your feet around to scatter the kittens so they won’t dash out with you. And if you’re dumb enough to put the cat litter box in

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your own bathroom, you can forget about solitude in there. Every time I sit, Cat One escorts her little ones to the litter box for a lesson in what to do in there. Every time. Naturally, we have been ordering a lot from Amazon, and everything comes in boxes, and cats love to sit in boxes and stare. So, we got boxes around, each with its own sitting, staring cat, until the place looks like a cat-wrapping factory. The vet says kittens got to stay 12 weeks with their mama, at which point she will get sick of them, so we figure they’ll be moving out by Christmas. My friend Awlette, my sister-in-law Larva, and my older daughter Gumdrop each want a Christmas kitty. That will take care of Cats Two, Three, and Four. Cat One will take over the bar cat position, and little Invest will wind up with me and Gladiola. That leaves us Cat Five.

He’s the one always stuck halfway up a curtain, squalling. If you leave a cup of anything on the coffee table—he’s the one who hops up there and knocks it off with his little paw. When it crashes down, he skitters away hysterically, and when the sky don’t actually fall, he sits and licks his back leg, like: “Crash? What crash?” One day he prances across my computer keyboard while I am on a Zoom call with Gladiola’s teachers at Celibacy Academy. And he somehow unmutes my sound so everybody gets an earful of bad words I am yelling at him. Would you believe, that Zoom meeting found him a home. Seems they got a mouse problem at the retired nuns’ home. And they need an “aggressive cat” to solve it. So, come Christmas, he’ll join the convent. They’ll call him, “Cattus Quinque,” which means “Cat Five” in Latin. (Some nuns still love Latin.) His mama, the bar cat, will be proud.

LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


MYNEWORLEANS.COM

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VINTAGE

BY JO HN R . KE MP

1913

“T

wo of the very youngest newsboys I could find in New Orleans. Seven and nine years old. Such little fellows are rare, Nov. 1913. Lewis Hine.” So read the caption that accompanied this image taken by the famed Wisconsin-born photographer and social reformer Lewis Hine. Little did these little boys know that they were part of a nationwide effort to eliminate abusive child labor practices in the United States. During Hine’s 1913 visit to Louisiana, he found these two young boys selling newspapers, in violation of child labor laws, on the streets of New Orleans. Working for the National Child Labor Committee, or NCLS, this image was just one of thousands Hine took across the United States between 1908 and 1918 to document child labor in America. During his travels, Hine found small children working in factories, glassworks, textile mills, coalmines, cigar factories, cotton fields, along city streets, and in the oyster and shrimp

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canneries along the Mississippi and Louisiana Gulf Coast. He found textile mills to be the worst offenders of child labor laws, followed by the tobacco industry and newsboy and messenger services. In 1914, Hine complimented Louisiana’s enforcement of child labor laws in an article he wrote for the NCLC. He visited sawmills and sugar and rice plantations, but found few age violations. New Orleans, he wrote, was better regulated than most other American cities. But there remained at least one significant flaw in the city’s record. Young messenger boys 12 to 14 years old were often called into Storyville, the city’s red-light district, to deliver messages and drugs to prostitutes and pimps. Hine, known in earlier years for his soulful photographs of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island, left the NCLC in 1918 and joined the American Red Cross to photograph the destruction in post-World War I Europe. In 1932 he documented the construction of the Empire State Building for his book “Men at Work.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION


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DE E L I GH T F U L DE S SE RT S ' F R E SH ST R AW B E R RY CUPCAKES W I T H I TA L I A N BU T T E R CREAM

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BEST DESSERTS

C

hoosing the best of the best in New Orleans food is an almost Herculean task; one that requires discipline, an open palate and some set guidelines. It’s hard work, but someone has to do it. ¶ In an effort to bring some kind of order to the task of determining which among New Orleans’ thousands of worthwhile desserts should make the final cut, I limited the contenders to those available to us throughout the year (or most of the year, as in the case of snowballs) as opposed to those tied to a specific holiday, such as king cakes.¶ If the traffic in area bakeries, confectioneries and ice cream parlors is any indication, during the pandemic people have rediscovering the simple joy to be had in a sweet treat.

by Jyl Benson

photography by Sam Hanna


CAKES + MORE

MILE H I GH ICE CREAM PI E The signature dessert at Jack Rose—and before that The Caribbean Room—in the Pontchartrain Hotel is a dreamy gravity-defying, threetier pie crafted of layers of house-made chocolate, vanilla, and peppermint ice cream topped with marshmallow fluff, and finished with a chocolate drizzle. Generations of New Orleanians have huffed out special occasion candles parked in slices of the towering confection. Jack Rose, in the Pontchartrain Hotel, 2031 St. Charles Ave., 323-1500, jackroserestaurant.com.


L E MON C H A N T I L LY CAKE AND C H OC OL AT E PE A N U T BU T T E R DA R K C A K E Born and raised in upstate New York near the Culinary Institute of America (CIA), on Saturday nights Chaya Conrad’s mother frequently hosted dinners for CIA students, sparking her young daughter’s interest in the culinary arts. After moving to Vermont, the budding chef lied about her age (14) and got her first job at a local bakery decorating tarts and cakes. At 18 she enrolled in the CIA and did her externship in New Orleans. After working in several positions around the country she returned again to New Orleans, ultimately to head the pastry department for Whole Foods at Arabella Station, where she created the Berry Chantilly Cake, a celebrated, often replicated creation which is now sold nationwide across the Whole Foods brand. In 2017, Conrad opened Bywater Bakery. Beyond the obvious, the vibrant space also serves as an art gallery, informal community center, and live music venue. “We support all of the things we love,” Conrad said. “Bywater Bakery has become what we dreamed it would be.” Choosing the standout was a maddening task but, ultimately, two radically different cakes rose— however incrementally—above the others. The ladylike, pastel-hued “Lemon Chantilly Cake” consists of delicate layers of yellow butter cake soaked in lemon simple syrup, filled with whipped lemon-kissed Chantilly cream, and topped with fresh fruit. Conrad’s “Chocolate Peanut Butter” is as hearty as its counterpart is not: Layers of dense, moist chocolate cake filled with peanut butter fudge, iced in intense chocolate buttercream, and dripped with peanut butter. Bywater Bakery, 3624 Dauphine St., 336-3336, bywaterbakery.com.

H UM M I NGB I R D CAKE Crowded with chunks of pineapple and banana and finished with a rich cream cheese frosting, Chef Nealy Frentz’s Hummingbird Cake is a house favorite at LOLA, the popular restaurant she operates and co-chefs in downtown Covington with her husband, Keith, a fellow Culinary Arts graduate of Johnson & Whales University. “The recipe is from my grandmother, Bertie Bledsoe,” Nealy said. “She was an amazing home baker. We offer a lunch special and we give the customer a choice of salad or hummingbird cake. I would like to think offering a slice of delicious cake sets us apart from the rest.” Lola, 517 N. New Hampshire St., Covington, (985) 892-4992, lolacovington.com.

T I R A M I SU Sometimes our first instincts are our best. “My tiramisu is the first dessert I put on the menu the week I became the pastry chef at Coquette,” said James Cubie. “I developed it on the fly for a private party.” To make his masterpiece Cubie fashions a “cake” of repeating layers of ladyfingers, chocolate pudding laced with Sambuca liqueur, pistachio, and candied lemon. “This is my favorite dessert I’ve ever made, so it remains on our menu year-round.  It has been served at weddings, anniversaries, birthdays and baby showers. I rarely eat dessert but if this one is around, I always eat an entire plate.” An Atlanta native with a graduate degree in sculpture, after culinary stints in Chicago he apprenticed under Chef Zak Miller at Coquette starting 2014 and became Pastry Chef in 2016. Coquette, 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, coquettenola.com.

OR A NGE HAZELNUT T ORTA Is it a cake or something else? “The Italians and the French frequently use meringue held together by some kind of nut flour as cake layers,” said Maggie Scales, the ridiculously talented pastry chef for the Link Restaurant Group. She very humbly describes the technique for making the stellar, best-selling torta she created for Gianna as “a little involved.” The laborious process effectively ensures Scales’ job security as few mere mortals could successfully pull off what it takes to make this most desirable piece of bliss. But it is a cakewalk for the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts graduate and Philadelphia native who worked under Lydia Shire in Boston before finding her way to New Orleans. “Making the hazelnut daquoise cake first involves whipping egg whites and sugar to a meringue, folding in chopped hazelnuts and piping it on to parchment in perfect round circles," Scales said. "We bake it until it’s crispy on the edges and a bit soft in the middle. We then make a ricotta mousse with gelatin and whipped heavy cream and fold in candied citrus. [We] recently added mini chocolate chips to the mousse to spice things up a bit.” Gianna, 700 Magazine St., 399-0816, giannarestaurant.com.

F R E SH ST R AW B E R RY CUPCAKES WITH I TA L I A N BU T T E R CREAM Light as a dream and tinted a hue worthy of a couture ball gown, pastry chef Dwynishia “Dee” Lavigne’s fluffy Fresh Strawberry Cupcakes are flavored with pure vanilla and frosted with lofty swirls of Italian butter cream kissed with a hint of almond and tinted blush pink with fresh strawberry puree. The elegant puffs are also offered with a finish of lightly sweetened, freshly whipped vanillascented cream. Fresh, hand-cut strawberries adorn the crowns of both versions. “As a child, strawberries were my favorite everything,” said the New Orleans native and Culinary Institute of America graduate. “I started making these in 2006. Everyone loves them.” Deelightful Desserts, by appointment only, 655-1195, deelightful. cupcakes@gmail.com. (Seen on previous page)


PIES+ TARTS

PISTACHIO MOUSSE TART

B A NA NA B ROW N BU T T E R TA RT E

A M A R E T T O, PE A R A N D DR I E D C H E R RY PI E Nicole Eiden and Marielle Dupre met while working in a restaurant before Katrina. The storm/flood sent Dupre, a Mandeville native and Tulane grad, running for the California Culinary Academy. Eiden, a filmmaker, writer, and self-taught baker, returned home to Columbus, Ohio, started working in another restaurant, married a guy from New Orleans and moved back. The friends reunited and started Windowsill Pies out of Eiden’s home kitchen in 2011, mostly fulfilling orders for friends and family. They recently opened their brick and mortar business. “”When we conceived the idea for the Amaretto, Pear and Dried Cherry Pie it was almost fully formed,” Eiden said, “a rare and welcome gift.” The complex concoction of fragrant, juicy pears and Lazzaroni amaretto liqueur-soaked dried cherries arrives under a golden pastry lattice of crisp, buttery Autumn leaves and clusters of cherries highlighted with freshly grated nutmeg and lemon zest. Windowsill Pies, 381-4953, 4714 Freret St., windowsillpiesnola.com.

The deep, nutty underpinning of this intensely satisfying tarte starts with very slowly browning whole butter for about an hour. The caramel-hued butter is then blended with aromatic spices and custard. The mixture is poured into a par-baked shell atop sliced ripe bananas then baked until golden. The tarte is served with dollops of fresh whipped cream and sliced bananas encased in candied caramelized sugar. The play between the shards of candied fruit and the lush richness of the custard is a sort of crème brulee gone stratospheric. Herbsaint, 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, herbsaint.com.

PE A N U T BU T T E R PI E Unlike most barbecue shops dessert is no afterthought at The Joint, Pete and Jenny Breen’s standard bearing smokehouse/restaurant in the Bywater. The pies on offer are scratch-made in house, a point of serious pride for the staff. But it is the peanut butter version introduced by Carrie Lott, a former employee who moonlighted as a baker as a side hustle to her teaching job, that really stands out. Lott’s immortal creation has a graham cracker crust that crackles against a smooth and creamy filling, which has a faint, pleasing tang from the addition of Creole cream cheese from Mauthe’s Dairy. The Joint, 701 Mazant St., 949-3232, alwayssmokin.com.

Breanne Kostyk earned a degree in design from the Pratt Institute at the height of the Great Recession. No jobs were available, so she joined Project M, a program employing creatives to benefit social change, placing them throughout the country. Her team ended up in impoverished Greensboro, Alabama, where they were asked to build something —they did not know what, that was their challenge—that would unify people. Kostyk recalled overhearing a girl marvel over a piece of pie. “She was just saying how much she loved pie, and we all got into a discussion about how you can't really argue with pie. Everybody loves pie. We decided to unify people around pie." No matter that Kostyk had never baked a pie in her life. PieLab, a combination pop-up cafe, design studio, and civic clubhouse, was a success, a “negative-energy inverter, fueled by pie.” It attracted a diverse crowd and fostered the exchange of ideas and the forging of intergenerational friendships. Pie was served on ceramic plates, creating instant community because, as Kostyk told The New York Times, "people were forced to stick around and talk to each other, and not take their pie and run." Kostyk discovered that she preferred making pie to working as a designer. She has been the Pastry Chef at the Ace Hotel and Josephine Estelle restaurant since the hotel opened in 2016. “When I think back to all the desserts I’ve created at Josephine Estelle, one always comes back to me," she said. "It was a bowl of pistachio mousse with passion fruit sabayon, blackberry granita, and a crunchy topping made with pistachio paste, brittle, and feuilletine." Her show stopping, perhaps divinely inspired, “Pistachio Mousse Tart” brings all of those elements together in a tart form while merging a symphony of colors, textures, flavors, and fragrances. In addition to her work at The Ace Hotel, in May she started Flour Moon Bagels, a small baking business, out of her home. Check it out at @ flourmoonbagels on Instagram. Josephine Estelle, in the Ace Hotel, 600 Carondelet St., 930-3070, josephineestelle.com.


NEW ORLEANS CLASSICS


B A NA NA S F OST E R BAKED ALASKA Antoine’s signature dessert is made from Angelo Brocato’s vanilla ice cream layered atop an oval of house-made butter pound cake, the entirety of which is encased in whirls of meringue. The resulting bombé is dramatically set aflame then sliced and served with warmed dark chocolate sauce. “ We sell hundreds a week” said Lisa Blount, a member of the family that owns the 180-year old restaurant. “We actually have a special custom freezer to hold the desserts prior to serving.” Antoine Alciatore, the restaurant’s founder, is alleged to have served a version of the impressive dessert on his menu. Antoine’s Restaurant, 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, antoines.com.

It was late afternoon, the French Market was closed, supermarkets had yet to exist, and restaurateur Owen Brennan challenged his sister Ella Brennan, and Chef Paul Blangé to concoct a show-stopping dessert in honor of his friend Richard Foster. “Damn you, Owen,” Ella recalled saying in her memoir, “Miss Ella from Commander’s Palace.” The dessert would have to be fabricated from pantry items already on hand. Though still exotic in other parts of the U.S., in 1951 bananas were abundant in New Orleans due to the presence of United and Standard fruit companies, both of which imported them from Central and South America. On any given day, bananas were usually on hand at Brennan’s due to family ties to Standard Fruit. Remembering a childhood dish of caramelized bananas sautéed in butter and sprinkled with cinnamon that her mother made as a treat, Ella and the chef decided to sauté some bananas. Tableside flambé was just catching on in New Orleans so they added some rum, set it aflame in the dining room and created a legacy. Brennan’s, 417 Royal St, 525-9711, brennansneworleans.com.

BREAD PU DDI NG Bread pudding is not a New Orleans invention. It’s not even an American invention. Merit for the creation of the confection we hold so dear belongs to unnamed yet clever and frugal Medieval European or Middle Eastern cooks with bread scraps too precious to waste. With a heritage of Creole thrift, creativity and a supply of “French” bread with its fragile yet crisp crust and light, airy center, it was preor-

dained that bread pudding would become New Orleans’ best known concoction of leftovers. The recipe for the “Bread Pudding” chef Jeffrey Heard serves at Heard Dat Kitchen in Central City belongs to his mother, Audrey Mae Heard. “My mom thrived in the kitchen, and I believe that is what instilled my passion for cooking,” said chef Heard. “Bread pudding is the one and only dessert that is served here. I think the texture as well as the homemade caramel sauce topped with fresh pecans, and shortbread cookie crumbles elevates it.” Heard Dat Kitchen, 2520 Felicity St., 510-4248, hearddatkitchen.com

SW E E T P OTAT O PI E When she died last year at age 96, chef Leah Chase, the embodiment of the term “New Orleans icon,” left behind a mourning city transformed by her grace, wisdom, lifelong civil rights activism, and expansive Creole culinary acumen. Her cuisine was humble and straightforward, elevated by the freshness and purity of her ingredients and the surety of her skills. Such is the case with her unrivaled “Sweet Potato Pie,” the recipe for which hailed from her childhood home in Madisonville where her family grew much of their own food, including sweet potatoes, in a garden surrounded by pecan trees. With an unsweetened crust made sturdy with chopped pecans, the pie’s filling is earthy, lightly spiced, and sweet. The recipe is so simple and straightforward Mrs. Chase chose to include it in “A Long Way from the Strawberry Patch: The Life of Leah Chase,” a recently published book of recipes and pearls of wisdom for middle-school students that she was writing with Carol Allen at the time of her death. Not a fixture on the daily menu,

the Sweet Potato Pie was reserved for special occasions and holidays, Thanksgiving in particular, a tradition continued by Chef Edgar “Dooky” Chase IV, Mrs. Chase’s grandson, who now mans the kitchen at the Treme landmark. Dooky Chase Restaurant, 2301 Orleans Ave., 821-0600, dookychaserestaurant.com.

PE C A N PI E With the 2012 opening of Gracious Bakery + Café, Meghan Foreman fulfilled her dream of making artisan baked goods accessible in her hometown. She returned to New Orleans after earning a degree from the New England Culinary Institute and professional experience in NYC. “We soon outgrew our first kitchen and decided to build out a commissary capable of supporting multiple locations as well as wholesale and catering, “ chef Foreman said. Gracious now has three locations serving breads, pastries, desserts, salads, and sandwiches, employs 60 people, has a growing product line available at Rouses supermarkets, and provide breads and pastries to many local coffee shops and restaurants. The Gracious take on pecan pie is a standout among many. “We wanted to put our own twist on it and hit upon the idea of using Sazerac’s Praline Liquor in the filling. It has this way of intensifying the pecan flavor. We always use local Bergeron pecans and for the crust we use European Plugra butter with a high butterfat content that makes it extra flaky.” Gracious Bakery + Cafe, locations Uptown, Mid-City, and Garden District, graciousbakery. com. (As seen on page 8)


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FROZEN TREATS

LEMON ICEBOX PIE Clancy’s has been impervious to change since Brad Hollingsworth bought it from a group of local businesspeople in 1987. The seasonally driven menu is allowed to drift enough to keep it interesting, but a core group of dishes has been reliably, soothingly, on offer every day. One of them in the restaurant’s signature “Lemon Icebox Pie,” which was introduced by Christine Hall, a luncheon chef who departed the restaurant years ago, leaving this enduring legacy behind. The pie, which bears the same butter-cup yellow hue as the exterior of the building, arrives on a chilled plate, straight out of the freezer, with a bit of whipped cream — sometimes it has been piped neatly atop the pie, sometimes it is spooned on, sometimes it is adorned with a transparent slice of lemon and a sprig of mint, sometimes not. Let your slice of pie sit for a few minutes. Drink you cup of coffee as the edges soften just a bit, but the center remains to the firm side, then brace yourself for the first bite. What could be shockingly sweet and rich, the pie is cut through by the bright refreshing tang of lemon. A graham cracker crust holds it all together. Clancy’s Restaurant, 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, clancysneworleans.com.

ICE CREAM The folks at Creole Creamery offer simple advice for a fulfilled life: "Eat Ice Cream, Be Happy." With a vibrant, seasonal, continually changing roster of over 100 flavors of ice cream, sherbet and sorbet, Creole Creamery is in the business of spreading joy. Those good vibes start back in the kitchen with chef Bryan Gilmore, a man with a vivid imagination, a brilliant palate, and the skill to manifest his ideas into ice cream. Gilmore and his business partner, David Bergeron, met while attending Brother Martin High School and both worked part-time at Swensen’s ice cream parlor in Metairie. Following college, both men pursued other careers, but when Swensen’s closed, Bergeron bought all of their equipment, put it in storage, and started making a plan. “Dave came to me about running the kitchen and making the ice cream,” Gilmore said. “I enjoyed making it at home to share with friends—unusual flavors like avocado ice cream, or pear and Champagne sorbet.” When the lease came up on the original McKenzie’s Bakery on Prytania Street in 2004, they set up shop. “David handles the business. I control production and the creative side,” Gilmore said. “Our mission when we started was—and remains—to make

the highest quality ice cream possible and still get a family of four out the door for 20 bucks or less. I still make all the ice cream for all of our locations myself.” He said his inspiration comes from myriad sources including seasonal produce, special occasions and people he knows. “We have lots of unique and innovative flavors, but I try not to be gimmicky. Being good is more important than being unusual and setting trends is better than following them. We are uniquely New Orleans and yet unique in New Orleans. I love that.” Creole Creamery, four locations, Uptown, Lakeview, Old Metairie, Bay St Louis, MS., creolecreamery.com

THE AT OM I C H OT - ROD SNOB A L L Ashley Hansen lovingly stewards Hansen’s Sno-Bliz, the historic snoball shop her grandparents founded in 1934. “My grandfather was the creative force of the business,” Hansen said. “He made all the things that make Hansen’s unique.  He came up with the “Hot-Rod” in the 1950s. He loved cars and named snowballs with ice cream in the center after them. Now they are known around town as ‘stuffed’ snoballs. We have been making them for decades.” Hansen’s over-the-top Atomic Hot-Rod is a stunning work of edible art. A snoball —both Blueberry Cream and Nectar

flavors work impressively for the base— is topped with the works: cream, crushed strawberries or crushed pineapple, marshmallow cream, ice cream and a cherry on top. Hansen’s Sno-Bliz, 4801 Tchoupitoulas St, 891-9788, snobliz.com.

SA LT Y M A LT Y ICE CREAM PI E There is an evil sorcerer lurking in Michael Nelson. “ You will not be able to stop eating this,” he said, plunking down a slab of his “Salty Malty Ice Cream Pie” in front of three extremely over-fed diners who, clutching their swollen stomachs, refused dessert. “ This is the perfect combination of salt, sugar and umami. It hits every note. You will not be able to stop.” Three weary diners lifted their spoons into the plate. Just one bite. Just one more, again, and again, until it was gone. Nelson, executive chef of GW Fins and best known for his sheer brilliance with finfish, conceived the idea for Salty Malty “eight or 10 years ago” as a New Year’s Eve special dessert featuring pretzels (his wife’s favorite) and malt powder (his favorite). “This is a balancing act of sweet, salty and umami, “Nelson said. “There are extreme amounts of all three, so when they all hit your palate at the same time, it’s a flavor explosion.” GW Fins, 808 Bienville St., 581-3467, gwfins.com.

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SWEET TREATS C R A N B E R RY A N D ROSE LABNEH C H E E SE C A K E

BU T T E R M I L K DROP B R E A D PU DDI NG Partners in life and business, chefs Alison Vega-Knoll and Drew Knoll found inspiration in their favorite childhood treats. They started with the McKenzie’s buttermilk drop donuts Drew enjoyed as a child. “We turned those into a bread pudding, soaking them in Sauce Royal overnight before baking,” Vega-Knoll said. Portions of the belt-buster are warmed before serving so it remains light and fluffy on the inside with crunchy crags on the outside that are ladled over with warm, sweet/salty butterscotch sauce and served with whipped cream on the side. “It reminds me of Christmas when you’d get those lifesaver books,” VegaKnoll said. “The roll of butterscotch was always my favorite. So, the dessert has endearing memories for us both.” Station 6, 105 Metairie-Hammond Hwy., Metairie, 345-2936, station6nola.com.

MILK C H OC OL AT E DOM E Oxlot 9 chef Jeffrey Hansel’s “Chocolate Dome” starts with a soft, rich dark chocolate cookie as a base topped with pillows of light milk chocolate mousse. The entire affair is enrobed in a shell of bitter dark chocolate, drizzled with buttery salted caramel, and topped with a vanilla cream infused with macadamia. A scatter of toasted macadamia nuts finishes it off. “We garnish with whatever fruit is in season to brighten the dish as

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well,” Hansell said.” The portion is also just right, about five to six bites so you've completely satisfied your sugar craving without going over the edge.” Oxlot 9, in the Southern Hotel, 428 E. Boston St., Covington, (985)400-5663, oxlot9.com.

C R E OL E B R E A D PU DDI NG S OU F F L É W I T H W H I SK E Y SAUC E The late, beloved chef Paul Prudhomme achieved immortality through many of the dishes he created during his lengthy career. Among them is the enduring “Bread Puffing Soufflé” he concocted during his tenure at Commander’s Palace for the restaurant’s 100th anniversary in 1980. The menu advises you to order the labor-intensive dessert at the same time you order your entree. In the kitchen the employee devoted solely to this task will fold clouds of meringue into a cinnamon and vanilla custard foundation heavy with soaking cubes of Leidenheimer bread and dark raisins. The result arrives at table a puffed golden dome atop a pristine soufflé cup. On cue, your server cracks the dome with a spoon and ladles in whiskey cream sauce until it flows down the sides. The best part? The thin candy-like rim where the puff meets the edges of the dish. Make the effort to chisel it all out with your spoon. Commander’s Palace, 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, commanderspalace.com.

Rome was not built in a day. Neither was the ethereal, faintly floral cheesecake at Saba. “Labneh is strained yogurt and it adds a delicate texture and a distinct tang to the dessert,” said Alon Shaya, executive chef and owner of Saba. “This, with cranberries and rose, was developed by our amazing culinary team. Candied nuts give it the crunchy texture it needs.” Saba, 5757 Magazine St., 324-7770, eatwithsaba.com.

T H I A K A RY PU DDI NG W I T H F R E SH F RU I T A serendipitous encounter in a Senegal airport in 2016 brought chef Serigne Mbaye—an American citizen raised and educated in Senegal—to New Orleans where he quickly landed a job as a line cook at Commander’s Palace. There, he quickly rose to sous chef, before leaving for Café Adelaide for a top role in the kitchen. In 2018, he started hosting pop-up dinners exploring the connections between the foods of Louisiana and Senegal. He left New Orleans to hone his skills at Atelier Crenn, a 3-Michelin Star restaurant in San Francisco, and at L’Atelier Joel Robuchon, a 2-Michelin Star restaurant in New York. The rolling stone returned this spring to New Orleans, a city he vows he loves above all others, to stay. His pop-up, Dakar, regularly features Thiakary, a feast for the eyes. To make the gorgeous dish Mbaye cooks millet, West African grain with a light, nutty flavor, in sweet cream with raisins to form a pudding. He tops it with toasted coconut and a rainbow of seasonal fresh fruit. Dakar, 249-8966, dakarnola.com.

ROASTED BANANA ZEPPOLE Born and raised in St. Lucia, the flavors and textures of chef Nina Compton’s native Caribbean home merge with worldly influences and techniques she gleaned while living and working in celebrated restaurants in France and Italy. “During the holidays I like to make my ‘Roasted Banana Zeppole’ with rum caramel,” Compton said. “It’s a Caribbean spin on the traditional Italian dessert. Sometimes I even add pecans or other nuts to add more texture and depth to the dish. It’s the perfect fall treat.” Compére Lapin, in the Old No. 77 Hotel & Chandlery, 535 Tchoupitoulas St, 5992119, comperelapin. com.


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LEGAL MATTERS WHERE TO TURN AND WHAT TO ASK WHEN YOU NEED A LAWYER BY TOPHER BALFER

A

s much as we rely on the legal system to guide, shape and govern our lives, it’s not often we afford legal conflicts much thought until we’re faced with them. But in situations that require the intervention of an attorney, knowing where to turn and who to call can become the biggest determinant in how stressful or stress-free your case becomes. We spoke with several attorneys in the Greater New Orleans region — encompassing practice areas like immigration law, professional liability, discrimination law and criminal defense — to answer some of our biggest questions about their unique specialties. In the following pages, these area professionals share their methods for approaching each new case, their clients’ most common misconceptions, and their advice for those seeking representation in order to help our readers act quickly and confidently when taking on a complex legal matter. FOR MATTERS RELATING TO INSURANCE DEFENSE & PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY, MELISSA LESSELL OF DEUTSCH KERRIGAN, L.L.P. From car accidents and medical malpractice to flood damage and work-

ers’ compensation, a vast spectrum of legal issues are encompassed by the insurance and liability umbrella. But what it all boils down to is one question: Who is at fault? Melissa Lessell, the youngest attorney at Deutsch Kerrigan to ever become an equity partner, most frequently represents professionals — such as other lawyers, insurance agents and healthcare providers — who are faced with lawsuits or complaints. Lessell says that one of the most common issues professional policyholders encounter in matters of insurance and liability is also one of the most detrimental: not reading the policy. “A lot of professionals do not read their insurance policies and do not understand the full scope of coverage afforded under it,” Lessell says. “I strongly urge professionals to read their insurance policies in full to get an understanding of what their policy actually provides in terms of coverage. And, under Louisiana law, if a policyholder receives a copy of their policy, they are legally deemed to know the contents of it.” In other words, ignorance is not bliss: if you have received a copy of your policy, you are bound to its terms whether or not you’ve read and understood them. Lessell says that familiarizing yourself with the kind of policy you have, and provisions contained within it, is critical to


understanding how legal fees might impact both the extent of coverage and any resulting judgements or settlements. “A policy could be an eroding or wasting limits policy, which means that the costs of defense deplete the policy limits,” Lessell says. “Other policies provide that defense costs are outside of the limits. This means that the costs and fees have no impact on the limits of coverage available to respond to a judgment or settlement. Either type of policy is fine, but if a professional has an eroding limit policy and did not realize, they may not have the appropriate coverage.” Because the nuances of this niche practice area might be difficult for professionals to understand, Lessell prides herself on being readily available for her clients and doing whatever she can to provide a top-quality defense. “The stakes are high because a professional’s reputation, and sometimes very livelihood, is at issue,” she says. “I know it sounds cheesy, but I can really empathize with that professional, and it is a source of motivation for me. I use a team approach with my clients — we are on the same team and working together to achieve the same goals. I want to work with them to figure out a solution that fits best for them.” FOR MATTERS RELATING TO IMMIGRATION LAW, CRISTIAN SILVA OF SILVA LAW FIRM The many complexities and technicalities of immigration law would be near impossible to navigate without the guidance of an experienced and knowledgeable attorney. Cristian Silva, a French, Spanish and English-speaking attorney who is himself an immigrant from Nicaragua, has more than a decade of experience working on employment-based immigration, family-based immigration and defensive litigation cases. Silva explains that employment-based immigration applies to foreign nationals who are recruited by employers seeking expertise not readily fulfilled by U.S. citizens. Familybased immigration deals with foreign nationals who are petitioned by relatives who are U.S. citizens, while defensive litigation immigration encompasses a broad range of issues, such as asylum and Special Immigration Juvenile Status, and is meant to provide relief from deportation. “The most common misconception is that every immigrant is afforded with a pathway to legal status such as legal permanent resident or U.S. citizenship status,” Silva says. “The truth is that immigration laws are quite narrow and exclude many persons from being able to immigrate to the U.S. legally. The sad part of

the U.S.’s current immigration system is that it’s easier to come to the U.S. illegally than it is to come legally.” Because immigration is personal to him, Silva approaches each client with empathy and compassion — especially in cases of family-based immigration, where the stakes are incredibly high for individuals who face separation from their families. “I know what many foreign nationals are going through and understand their reasons for wanting to immigrate to America; my family and I were once one of them,” Silva says. “It is an extremely difficult choice to leave one’s country, culture, language and belongings. Having lived as an immigrant and witnessed the struggles that my parents went through to survive and later thrive in America drives my motivation to help others who are in similar circumstances. I understand them. I empathize with them. I know their fears.” Even so, Silva says that anyone facing an immigration-related legal issue should consult several attorneys to find the best match for their needs and circumstances. “I recommend having a consultation with at least two different immigration lawyers; preferably three. Ask a lot of questions and pay close attention to each attorney’s responses,” Silva says. “An attorney who takes their time in answering your questions and makes sure you understand the process is someone who will have your best interest in mind.”

THE STAKES ARE HIGH BECAUSE A PROFESSIONAL’S REPUTATION, AND SOMETIMES VERY LIVELIHOOD, IS AT ISSUE. - MELISSA LESSELL

FOR MATTERS RELATING TO LGBTQ+ FAMILY LAW, ANDREA RUBIN OF STERNBERG, NACCARI & WHITE, LLC Starting a family is a big step for any couple, but LGBTQ+ families often face obstacles and nuances that do not typically apply to heterosexual couples. Andrea Rubin, herself a member of the LGBTQ+ community and a partner at Sternberg, Naccari & White, has focused her practice on LGBTQ+ adoption, child custody, child support and other domestic issues. “The laws were written with heterosexual people in mind, so sometimes LGBTQ+ community members need extra protections that they don’t necessarily realize,” Rubin says. “For example, many families believe that if both parents’ names are on a birth certificate, the second parent has all the rights of a heterosexual father. This is not the case. In LGBTQ+ families, the second parent must legally adopt the child for parental rights under the law.” Rubin says that fear of discrimination is sometimes a deterrent for LGBTQ+ couples who need to navigate the legal system before

I KNOW WHAT MANY FOREIGN NATIONALS ARE GOING THROUGH AND UNDERSTAND THEIR REASONS FOR WANTING TO IMMIGRATE TO AMERICA; MY FAMILY AND I WERE ONCE ONE OF THEM. - CRISTIAN SILVA


I WANT TO BE A BEACON IN MY COMMUNITY AND MAKE MY REPRESENTATION OF LGBTQ+ FAMILIES KNOWN SO THAT ANYONE CAN FIND ME WHEN THEY NEED ME. - ANDREA RUBIN

starting a family, and for that reason, she strives to be visible and accessible for her clients. “It was only earlier this year that LGBTQ+ employees became protected under the law from being fired for being gay, so they’re looking for someone who’s sensitive to their needs when navigating those issues,” she says. “I want to be a beacon in my community and make my representation of LGBTQ+ families known so that anyone can find me when they need me.” When approaching a new case, Rubin strives to inspire confidence in her clients by demonstrating the extent of her knowledge and experience, setting expectations, and opening the lines of communications from the outset. “I think it’s important for them to know that I’m experienced with these cases, I have institutional knowledge of the court system as it relates to LGBTQ+ clients, and I make it a point to stay up to date on legal decisions around the state and country that could affect LGBTQ+ clients specifically,” she says. Most importantly, Rubin urges anyone taking on a legal challenge, be they LGBTQ+ or heterosexual, to contact an attorney right away in order to avoid any pitfalls that could become detrimental to accomplishing their goals. “Just make the phone call. Send the email,” she says. “You don’t have to navigate legal questions alone. Even if you’re not sure you need an attorney, we can help you figure that out, too.” FOR MATTERS RELATING TO DISCRIMINATION, MICHELLE CRAIG OF TRANSCENDENT LAW GROUP

SOMETIMES A SUPERVISOR TREATS EMPLOYEES DIFFERENTLY BECAUSE OF UNCONSCIOUS BIAS OR LEARNED BEHAVIOR. THAT IS WHAT TRAINING IS FOR. SOMETIMES A SUPERVISOR DISCRIMINATES BECAUSE HE OR SHE CAN GET AWAY WITH IT. THAT’S WHAT THE LAW IS FOR. - MICHELLE CRAIG

No business can be successful without strong relationships between the employer and employees, but what happens when an employee suspects they’ve been treated differently because of their race, religion, disabilities or other legally protected factors? The question is sometimes easier asked than answered, and Michelle Craig, Founder and CEO of Transcendent Law Group, says confusion often arises when employees are unable to distinguish differential treatment and legally actionable discrimination. “Despite what employees sometimes believe, an employer can treat employees differently for a ‘legitimate business reason,’” says Craig. “As a general rule, it is a bad business practice to treat people differently just because an employer wants to do so. It can be legally actionable discrimination if that discrimination is based on a legally protected reason, if the behavior fits the statute.”

Discrimination claims can occur under Federal and state law. Under Louisiana state law, unlawful discrimination occurs when an employee is treated differently on the basis of “race, color, religion, sex, disability, age, sickle cell trait, pregnancy, childbirth and related medical conditions,” Craig says. “Additionally, people come to me all of the time saying they are in a hostile work environment. They may, for instance, describe mean bosses or catty behavior. While this is bad for morale and bad for business, it typically will not create an actionable hostile work environment claim unless it is based on a protected characteristic and there are other factors.” Because of the extreme nuances present in such cases, Craig says it’s of utmost importance to let a professional navigate discrimination claims. The easiest way to avoid incidents of legally actionable discrimination is for employers to have sound human resources policies and procedures, train employees on those procedures, set Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) standards for their organizations and infuse them into the company culture — something Craig is happy to help any leader accomplish. “A lot goes into creating DEI responsive initiatives for my clients,” she says. “As an overview, I meet with the owners/employers and determine what their needs are. Do they want training because of a specific incident? Have they identified a systematic cultural or workplace issue that needs to be addressed? I then have honest conversations with the decision-makers about what they hope to achieve. Once we know the problems and the goals, then we develop a plan to implement.” No matter what the circumstances may be, Craig prides herself on being a resource for both employers and employees seeking to rectify workplace conflicts. “Sometimes a supervisor treats employees differently because of unconscious bias or learned behavior. That is what training is for. Sometimes a supervisor discriminates because he or she can get away with it. That’s what the law is for,” Craig says. “Practicing this type of law is one of the ways I feel like I am able to make the world a better place.” FOR MATTERS RELATING TO CRIMINAL DEFENSE, GREGORY CARTER OF THE G. CARTER LAW FIRM, LLC When someone is arrested — be it for misdemeanor charges, felonies, juvenile crimes or federal crimes — seeking representation from


an experienced criminal defense attorney can be the most influential factor in determining acquittal, case dismissal or charge reduction. Gregory Carter, who founded his private practice in 2011, says that when a person’s future is at stake, there’s no time to hesitate in seeking aggressive, strategic representation. “Speaking generally, if you are being questioned by a member of law enforcement, then you should have a criminal defense attorney with you,” Carter says. That rule, he says, applies to anyone, whether or not they’ve committed a crime. Even if the accused is innocent, an attorney can ensure their clients’ rights are being honored from start to finish — and if any rights have been violated, the outcome of the criminal case could be drastically altered. “A common misconception is that only guilty persons need a lawyer. This is absolutely not true,” Carter says. “The reason to retain a lawyer is to protect your rights. Law enforcement has no obligation to look out for your best interests, and even if you believe you are in the right, you can still be charged criminally.” Considering the disproportionately high carceral rates of Black Americans, taking on this kind of work and relentlessly advocating for his clients is personal for Carter, so much so that he makes himself available for free consultations 24/7. It’s his way of trying to restore hope and justice to underprivileged and vulnerable communities. “I believe that everyone deserves an equal chance at justice,” Carter says. “I understand that, historically, persons who look like me haven’t always been given that shot. I want to be part of changing that.” And because early intervention by a criminal defense attorney can help produce favorable judgements, Carter says there’s no harm in seeking a consultation, even if you’re not sure criminal defense will become necessary. “If you think you need a lawyer, then you probably do. You cannot go wrong by at least consulting a lawyer — it’s always in your best interests,” Carter says. “When searching out a lawyer, find someone you trust and someone who makes you comfortable. You are trusting your lawyer with your life, and you want to be comfortable that they are fighting for you.” FOR MATTERS RELATING TO FAMILY LAW, JEFFREY HOFFMAN OF LOWE, STEIN, HOFFMAN, ALLWEISS & HAUVER LLP When going through a divorce, seeking child support or custody, partitioning property or navigating any difficult family situation, it’s

natural that emotions run high — which is why Jeffrey Hoffman sees himself as not just a family law attorney, but also as a source of compassion and support for his clients. “Often, the issues involved in a family law case are very emotional and private; your client’s life could be in a state of chaos,” Hoffman says. “Many clients are scared and anxious due to the uncertainty of how their case will turn out. The key to helping your client feel more at ease is good and effective communication. Family lawyers are often more counselors than attorneys.” Hoffman says that a common source of stress for involved parties is the fear of prohibitive expenses, but family law proceedings do not necessarily have to become costly. For that reason, Hoffman enters each new case with an open mind, seeking first and foremost to reach an understanding with the other party’s attorney “to find creative paths to settlement” before moving a case to trial. “While there are several examples of divorces or child custody cases being incredibly expensive, most are not,” Hoffman says. “The key to reasonably managing family law cases is working together with the other side to reach agreements and stipulations, which will cut down on costly hearings and trials. Cases involving people focused on the children and co-parenting do not spend nearly as much money as those constantly fighting every issue.” Regardless of whether the case moves to trial, Hoffman’s ultimate goal in every situation is to help families find peace of mind as they move forward. It’s a passion that was instilled in him by his father, Mitchell Hoffman, who along with his partners founded what is now one of the largest family law firms in the state. “When they invited me to join the firm and work as a family law attorney, it was an easy decision,” Hoffman says. “One of the best aspects about practicing family law is that you get to know your clients on a personal level and see the direct impact this has on them and their families.” Hoffman advises anyone seeking a family law attorney to find someone “who is experienced and has a good reputation, but most importantly, someone that you feel you can trust, who will be honest with you, and who you believe will give your case the proper attention it deserves.”

EVEN IF YOU BELIEVE YOU ARE IN THE RIGHT, YOU CAN STILL BE CHARGED CRIMINALLY. - GREGORY CARTER

THE KEY TO HELPING YOUR CLIENT FEEL MORE AT EASE IS GOOD AND EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION. FAMILY LAWYERS ARE OFTEN MORE COUNSELORS THAN ATTORNEYS. - JEFFREY HOFFMAN


2020

TOP LAWYERS M

ost people hope not to need them, but when they do, they want the good ones on their side. To help with that we present our annual list of Top Lawyers. The list was prepared by Detroit-based Professional Research Services. ¶ PRS provided this explanation of its methodology: The voting was open to all licensed attorneys in New Orleans. They were asked which attorney, other than themselves, they would recommend in the New Orleans area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each specialty are reflected in the following list. ¶ As always when making professional services choices, second opinions are encouraged. In the end, you’re the judge.

ADMINISTRATIVE/ REGULATORY LAW METAIRIE John D. Miranda Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Erin B. Rigsby Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-833-5600 NEW ORLEANS Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0816 Jacob D. Young Young Law Firm 1010 Common St. Suite 3040 504-522-4322 ADMIRALTY & MARITIME LAW METAIRIE Tommy J. Badeaux The Law Office of Tommy J. Badeaux 4608 Rye St. 504-323-4777

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NEW ORLEANS Wilton E. Bland III Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-494-9321 Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-494-7651 David L. Carrigee Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 Bert. M. Cass Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0643 Stanley J. Cohn Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5251

Gregory Lawrence Ernst The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-322-1368 S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4122 Adelaida J. Ferchmin Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7083 Delos E. Flint Jr. Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Thomas D. Forbes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7041 Glenn G. Goodier Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8174 Christopher M. Hannan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8612

Scott R. Huete Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2439 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8224 Georges M. Legrand Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-583-9425 Kevin A. Marks Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2432 André J. Mouledoux Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-421-6967 William B. Schwartz Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900

H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Floor 30 504-569-2908 Lacy M. Smith The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith, LLC 1820 St. Charles Ave. Suite 203 504-249-8242 ANTITRUST LAW NEW ORLEANS Craig L. Caesar Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9272 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8536 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5222

David B. Sharpe Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Alexander M. McIntyre Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5215

Jefferson R. Tillery Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8616

David G. Radlauer Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8210

Cheryl Wild-Donde’Ville Waltzer Wiygul & Garside, LLC 14399 Chef Menteur Hwy. Suite D 504-254-4400

APPELLATE PRACTICE COVINGTON Lieu T. Vo Clark Law Office of Lieu T. Vo Clark 810 N. Columbia St. Suite A 985-238-1100

Jon W. Wise Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7549

METAIRIE Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4291

Timothy J. Young The Young Firm 400 Poydras St. Suite 2090 866-703-2520 ALTERNATE DISPUTE RESOLUTION MANDEVILLE Danny G. Shaw ShawADR, LLC 3 Sanctuary Blvd. Suite 201 985-789-0701 NEW ORLEANS Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0822 Sarah Pfeiffer Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer 400 Poydras St. Suite 1125B 504-366-4025

Walter Woodruff Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 NEW ORLEANS Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5266 Jennifer C. Deasy Jennifer C. Deasy, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300


Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3300 504-569-0064 Michael R. Fontham Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0810 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2102 Douglas L. Grundmeyer Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7028 Harry Simms Hardin III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8170 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0606 Donald J. Miester Jr. Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8510 Martin A. Stern Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0289 BANKING AND FINANCE LAW METAIRIE Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4105 NEW ORLEANS Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9351 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7289 Lauren E. Campisi Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP 900 Camp St. Floor 3 504-904-8061 Philip deV. Claverie Sr. Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9223 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7212

Barry H. Grodsky Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8535 J. Marshall Page III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8248 Leon J. “Trey” Reymond III Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4028 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2101 James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9239 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0828 Frank A. Tessier Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3809 Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3810 Sterling Scott Willis Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5264 BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS/INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW COVINGTON Rachel Thyre Vogeltanz The Law Office of Rachel Thyre Vogeltanz, LLC 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-377-9271 METAIRIE Jenny Abshier Big Easy Law Group 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd. Suite 215 504-229-0679 Frank J. DiVittorio Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

NEW ORLEANS Edward H. Arnold III Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5204 Alicia M. Bendana Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Christopher T. Caplinger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Rudy J. Cerone McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2786 John M. Duck Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0226 J. David Forsyth Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1521 Elizabeth J. Futrell Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8260 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5465 Jan M. Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8645 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0819 Fernand L. Laudumiey Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7052 Tristan E. Manthey Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3314

Andrew D. Mendez Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0821 David J. Messina Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7055 Mark A. Mintz Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8368 Cherie Dessauer Nobles Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3318 William H. Patrick III Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3345 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Lacey Elizabeth Rochester Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5292 Patrick “Rick” M. Shelby Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9263 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8194 Michael Q. Walshe Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0881 BET-THE-COMPANY LITIGATIONS METAIRIE George B. Recile Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4100 NEW ORLEANS Judy Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9720

Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5266 Nancy S. Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5249 Ewell E. (Tim) Eagan Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-582-1115 George C. Freeman III Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9732 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0804 BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW METAIRIE Taylor M. Norton Norton IP Law Firm 345 Metairie Rd. 504-858-0198 NEW ORLEANS William P. Buckley Willis & Buckley, APC 3723 Canal St. 504-488-6301 COMMERCIAL LITIGATION METAIRIE Fred L. Herman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Melanie M. Mulcahy The Derbes Law Firm, LLC 3027 Ridgelake Dr. 504-207-0916 Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4130 NEW ORLEANS Jack M. Alltmont Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1507 Matthew S. Almon Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0976 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

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Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5464

Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5440

Peter J. Butler Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5427

Taylor C. Stone The Law Office of Taylor C. Stone, LLC 627 Cherokee St. Suite 205 504-717-4874

Nancy S. Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5249

COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS/LLS LAW METAIRIE Rory V. Bellina Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4124

John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0819

Melanie M. Mulcahy The Derbes Law Firm, LLC 3027 Ridgelake Dr. 504-207-0916

Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2970

Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504- 962-4280

Mark W. Mercante Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 985-819-8410

NEW ORLEANS Brian A. Cowan Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6303

Denise C. Puente Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Floor 30 504-569-2983

Lawrence R. DeMarcay III Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7761 Michael Finkelstein Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-881-1906 George C. Freeman III Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9732 James C. Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0817 John W. Joyce Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9752 Stephen H. Kupperman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9728 Kent Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5252 Donald J. Miester Jr. Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8510

Natalie Taylor Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6315 CONSTRUCTION LAW METAIRIE Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4284 NEW ORLEANS Keith J. Bergeron Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0789

Michael Mims Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6136

Michael E. Botnick Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-679-9814

Kerry Murphy Lasky Murphy LLC 715 Girod St. Suite 250 504-603-1502

Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0605

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Mark W. Frilot Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 985-819-8417

NEW ORLEANS Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0852

Elizabeth L. Gordon Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445

CORPORATE LAW METAIRIE Meredith E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4251

Daniel Lund III Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9325

Charles F Seemann Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0608 Lloyd N. “Sonny” Shields Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445 John W. Sinnott Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2116 Kelly E. Theard Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0667 CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND COMPLAINTS LAW METAIRIE Jennifer A. Lee Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Walter Woodruff Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504- 962-4280 NEW ORLEANS Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0845 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7212 Edward N George Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7253 Abid Hussain Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-383-0716 Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0852 William H Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7037 Andrew Legrand Spera Law Group, LLC 3110 Canal St. 504-300-9938 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8386 David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0920 Clayton White Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-2141

Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 John D. Wogan Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4032 CRIMINAL DEFENSE NON WHITE-COLLAR COVINGTON Stephanie Griffith Beard Stephanie Griffith Beard, Attorney at Law 90 Louis Prima Dr. Suite A 985-639-1875 KENNER Stephen R. Rue Stephen Rue & Associates 3309 Williams Blvd. 504-529-5000 MADISONVILLE Keith Couture Couture Law, LLC 337 Hwy. 21 Suite D 985-792-7746 METAIRIE Louis A. DiRosa Jr. The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC 4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272 John Garrison Jordan Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 NEW ORLEANS Katherine Z. Crouch Crouch Law, LLC 2372 St. Claude Ave. Suite 224 504-982-6995 Stephen D. Hebert Stephen D. Hebert, LLC 700 Camp St. Suite 216 504-528-9500 Cody C. Loggins The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-322-1368 Stephen H. Shapiro Stephen H. Shapiro, Attorney at Law, LLC 700 Camp St. 504-309-8442 Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0811


CRIMINAL DEFENSE WHITE COLLAR METAIRIE John Garrison Jordan Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Richard T. Simmons Jr. Hailey McNamara Hall Larmann & Papale LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1400 504-836-6516 NEW ORLEANS Walter F. Becker Jr. Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7046 Brian J. Capitelli Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-582-2425 Ralph Capitelli Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-582-2425 Billy Gibbens Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-680-6065 Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8110 Sara A. Johnson Sara A. Johnson, Attorney at Law 700 Camp St. 504-528-9500 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9219 Kyle Schonekas Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-680-6052 Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0811 ELDER LAW METAIRIE Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4207 Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Elsbet C. Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 NEW ORLEANS Bernard J. Bagert The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-322-1368 Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7885 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1519 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7854 EMINENT DOMAIN AND CONDEMNATION LAW METAIRIE Barry W. Sartin Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504- 962-4286 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS LAW METAIRIE Sarah J.L. Christakis Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4294 Jennifer A. Lee Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 NEW ORLEANS Jane E. Armstrong Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9244 Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000 Timothy P. Brechtel Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8236 Susan K. Chambers Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8394

Kathy Conklin McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2876

Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4143

Sandy Feingerts The Benefits Practice 1510 Joseph St. Suite C 504-434-4988

Edward B Poitevent II Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0889

Robert W. Rachal Jackson Lewis P.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 504-208-5847 Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8206 Charles F. Seemann III Jackson Lewis P.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 504-208-5843 ENERGY LAW NEW ORLEANS Miles P. Clements Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9247 Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0831 Ewell E. (Tim) Eagan Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-582-1115 C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-569-1858 Aimee W. Hebert Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St. Suite 1812 504-522-1812 Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4156 Charles D. Marshall Jr. Milling Benson Woodward L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000 Cynthia A. Nicholson Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-569-1658

Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0816 Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0818 Adam Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5210 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW NEW ORLEANS Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0858 Greg L. Johnson Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4115 Terrence K. Knister Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-569-1865 Mark L. McNamara Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4166 David M. Melancon Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2117 David W. O’Quinn Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2111 Stephen P. Schott Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 Mark C. Surprenant Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0213

FAMILY LAW COVINGTON Brittany V. Carter Brittany V. Carter, Attorney at Law, LLC 90 Louis Prima Dr. Suite A 985-789-4508 Peggy Vallejo Vallejo Law Firm 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-892-6855 KENNER Stephen R. Rue Stephen Rue & Associates 3309 Williams Blvd. 504-529-5000 METAIRIE Philip R. Riegel Jr. Philip R. Riegel Jr., Attorney at Law 3017 21st St. Suite 150 504-834-5345 NEW ORLEANS Jeffrey M. Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Lucy Killen The Law Office of Lucy Killen, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 1002 504-383-3771 Steven J. Lane Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 Robert C. Lowe Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Mark J. Mansfield Tranchina & Mansfield, LLC 1100 Poydras St. 504-581-5456 Elizabeth S. Meneray Meneray Family Law, L.L.C. 710 Carondelet St. 504-581-4334 Edith H. Morris Morris Lee & Bayle LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1420 504-524-3781 Kim Ngan Nguyen Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Sarah Pfeiffer Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer 400 Poydras St. Suite 1125B 504-366-4025

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David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Lacy M. Smith The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith, LLC 1820 St. Charles Ave. Suite 203 504-249-8242 Brooke C. Tigchelaar Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0862 Frank P. Tranchina Jr. Tranchina & Mansfield, LLC 1100 Poydras St. 504-581-5456 Marc Winsberg Winsberg & Arnold, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2050 504-229-4999 Barbara J. Ziv Barbara J. Ziv, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 4100 504-525-4361 FIRST AMENDMENT LAW NEW ORLEANS Jennifer C. Deasy Jennifer C. Deasy, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300 Scott Sternberg Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1887 GAMING LAW METAIRIE John D. Miranda Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 NEW ORLEANS Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5464 J. Kelly Duncan Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8218 Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0915 C Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0842

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GENERAL SERVICE LAW METAIRIE Anya Jones Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Peter E. Sperling Frilot L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3700 504-599-8015

Elsbet C. Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Jack M. Stolier Sullivan Stolier & Schulze 909 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-561-1044

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS PRACTICE NEW ORLEANS Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5440 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0420 Bryant S. York Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0803 HEALTH CARE LAW METAIRIE Adrienne L. Ellis Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4141 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4110 NEW ORLEANS Rene A. Louapre IV Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6306 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0420 Margaret M. Silverstein Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5226

Perry R. Staub Jr. Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8513

Danielle Trostorff Degan, Blanchard & Nash 400 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-529-3333 IMMIGRATION LAW METAIRIE Elaine Dorothy Kimbrell Ware Immigration 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 555 504-830-5900

Martha Y. Curtis Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2111 Sidney W. Degan III Degan, Blanchard & Nash 400 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-529-3333 Richard N. Dicharry Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9232 Gerard J. Dragna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-655-4871 Céleste D. Elliott Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

David A.M. Ware Ware Immigration 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 555 504-830-5900

Leah Nunn Engelhardt Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7081

NEW ORLEANS Brandon Davis Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9312

George D. Fagan Leake & Andersson LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1700 504-585-7612

Brenda J. DeArmas-Ricci Law Offices of Brenda J. DeArmas-Ricci 400 Poydras St. Suite 2525 504-522-4217 Kathleen Gasparian Gasparian Spivey Immigration 829 Baronne St. 504-262-9878 INSURANCE LAW METAIRIE Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4284 Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4291 NEW ORLEANS Michael A. Balascio Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9773 Judy Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9720

Madeleine Fischer Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8208 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3300 504-569-0062 Gus A. Fritchie III Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2106 George B. Hall Jr. Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9234 Mark E. Hanna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-400-1081 Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7263 John W. Joyce Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9752

Richard E. King Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2435 Edward F LeBreton III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8754 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0814 H. Minor Pipes III Pipes Miles Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-322-7101 Andrew Plauché Jr. Plauché Maselli Parkerson LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3800 504-586-5275 Marshall M. Redmon Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9208 Seth A. Schmeeckle Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Shaundra M. Schudmak Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Jay Sever Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9271 Jennifer L. Simmons Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2494 William D. Treeby Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0807 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9721 Kristopher T. Wilson Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Jacob D. Young Young Law Firm 1010 Common St. Suite 3040 504-522-4322


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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW METAIRIE Taylor M. Norton Norton IP Law Firm 345 Metairie Rd. 504-858-0198 NEW ORLEANS Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3803 William P. Buckley Willis & Buckley, APC 3723 Canal St. 504-488-6301 Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0822 Brad Harrigan Tolar Harrigan & Morris LLC 1055 St. Charles Ave. Suite 208A 504-571-5317 Lesli D. Harris Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St. Suite 1812 504-434-6727 Abid Hussain Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-383-0716 Andrew T. Lilly Lilly, PLLC 4907 Magazine St. 504-249-8670 David L Patrón Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9295 Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9254 Vincent Trombatore Spera Law Group 3110 Canal St. 504-300-9938 Michael Q. Walshe Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0881

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INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION NEW ORLEANS Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5251 Andrew T. Lilly Lilly, PLLC 4907 Magazine St. 504-249-8670 LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW MANDEVILLE Kevin S. Vogeltanz The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, LLC 823 Carroll St. Suite A 985-377-9033 METAIRIE George B. Recile Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4100 NEW ORLEANS H. Mark Adams Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8258 Steve Beiser McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2756 Magdalen Blessey Bickford McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2726 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7271 Laura L. Catlett Catlett Law 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-521-7958 Walter W. Christy Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 504-529-3831 Brooke Duncan III Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0220 Steven F. Griffith Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5225

Edward F. Harold Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 504-592-3801

Keith M Pyburn Jr. Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave Suite 3710 504-522-3303

Steven Hymowitz Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3500 504-648-2600

Timothy H. Scott Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave Suite 3710 504-529-3834

Clyde H. Jacob III Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave Suite 3710 504-312-4424

G. Phillip Shuler Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7011

Rachael Jeanfreau Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5467

Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0911

Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0915

LAND USE AND ZONING LAW METAIRIE Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4294

Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5222 Sidney F. Lewis V Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8352

NEW ORLEANS Jon F. “Chip” Leyens Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8628

Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7007

Joseph Marriott Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1886

Ernest R. Malone Jr. The Kullman Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-596-4105

Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2104

Eve B. Masinter Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5468 Thomas J. “Tommy” McGoey II Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6101 Ellis B. Murov Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0655 Kerry Murphy Lasky Murphy LLC 715 Girod St. Suite 250 504-603-1502 E. Fredrick Preis Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5470

Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0835 LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW METAIRIE Dane S. Ciolino Dane S. Ciolino 18 Farnham Pl. 504-975-3263

Melissa M. Lessell Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0689 Lisa A. Montgomery The Montgomery Law Firm 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-458-1885 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0842 McDonald G. Provosty Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2156 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 Edward W. Trapolin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2115 William E. Wright Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0623 MASS TORT LITIGATION/ CLASS ACTIONS METAIRIE James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4287 NEW ORLEANS W. Raley Alford III Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 Barbara L. Arras Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9246 Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9762

NEW ORLEANS James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4116

Timothy F Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2203

Gus A. Fritchie III Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2106

Madeleine Fischer Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8208


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Darryl J. Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6304 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2102 William B. Gaudet Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0263 Tim Gray Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2100 504-799-4386 James C. Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0817 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3340 Craig Isenberg Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9753 Mary S. Johnson Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 21357 Marion Ln. Suite 300 985-246-6544

Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2114

Jeffrey A. Mitchell The Cochran Firm 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 1500 504-309-5000

Dwight C Paulsen III Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6305

Stephen M. Pizzo Blue Williams, L.L.P. 3421 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 900 504-830-4925

Maura Z. Pelleteri Pugh Accardo LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3300 504-799-4526

Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4277

Jeffrey E. Richardson Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0403 Peter J. Rotolo Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7022 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9733 Charles B. Wilmore Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6113 MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW MANDEVILLE Chip Wagar Wagar Hickman, LLC 1425 W. Causeway Approach 985-888-8740

Kent Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5252

METAIRIE Rebecca J. Beck Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4274

Kerry J. Miller Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-556-5549

Kurt S. Blankenship Blue Williams, L.L.P. 3421 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 900 504-830-4936

Michael Mims Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6136

Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4281

Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2163 Kim E. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2108

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Ricky Gallagher Gallagher & Westholz 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd. Suite 1400 504-887-2220 Conrad Meyer IV Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4141

NEW ORLEANS Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates 4173 Canal St. 504-618-1596 Benjamin J. Biller Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6120 C. Wm. Bradley Jr. Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6302 Richard S. Crisler Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6308 Robert J. David Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Michael J. Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Charles F. Gay Jr. Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0295 James Klick Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 Michael C. Luquet Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5441 Walter C. Morrison IV Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304

Tracey Rannals Rannals Law Firm 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-500-0517 Peter E. Sperling Frilot L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3700 504-599-8015 MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS LAW METAIRIE Rory V. Bellina Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4124 George A. Mueller III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4282 NEW ORLEANS Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0845 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5250 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9324 Edward N. George Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7253 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8308 Keith Naccari Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1876 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8386 Leon J. “Trey” Reymond III Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4028 David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0920

Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 MORTGAGE BANKING FORECLOSURE LAW NEW ORLEANS J. Dalton Courson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0812 MUNICIPAL LAW NEW ORLEANS William D. Aaron Jr. Aaron & Gianna, PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3800 504-569-1807 Mark E. Hanna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-400-1081 David A. Marcello Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2136 NATURAL RESOURCES LAW NEW ORLEANS Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0831 Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5258 John Y. Pearce Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-585-7674 NON-PROFIT/ CHARITIES LAW NEW ORLEANS Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0975 Julie D Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7007


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Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 Leon H. Rittenberg III Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7845 OIL AND GAS LAW NEW ORLEANS C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-569-1858 Aimee W. Hebert Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St. Suite 1812 504-522-1812 Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5258 Justin P. Lemaire Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0942 Cynthia A. Nicholson Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-569-1658 Scott A. O’Connor Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-569-1860 John Y. Pearce Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-585-7674 Edward B. Poitevent II Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0889 PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION LULING Loyd J. Bourgeois Loyd J Bourgeois, LLC 13755 River Rd. Suite A 985-441-3448 52

NOVEMBER 2020

METAIRIE Tommy J. Badeaux The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC 4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272 Louis A. DiRosa Jr. The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC 4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272 Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4281 Jeffrey S. Gennusa Gennusa Firm, L.L.C. 3001 Division St. Suite 207 504-308-0301 Fred L. Herman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Taquincia E. Jairles Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 TMJ@CHEHARDY.COM Megan C. Kiefer Kiefer & Kiefer 2310 Metairie Rd. 504-828-3313 Ana M. Rodrigues Gennusa Firm, L.L.C. 3001 Division St. Suite 207 504-308-0301 James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4287 NEW ORLEANS Morris Bart Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 800-537-8185 Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates 4173 Canal St. 504-618-1597 Joseph “Jed” E. Cain Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 Lawrence J. Centola Martzell, Bickford & Centola 338 Lafayette St. 504-581-9065

Justin M. Chopin The Chopin Law Firm LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 1550 504-475-2429 Stevan C Dittman Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Andrew J. Geiger Allan Berger & Associates 4173 Canal St. 504-618-1598 Louis L. Gertler Gertler Law Firm, LLP 935 Gravier St. Suite 1900 504-581-6411 Mark P. Glago Glago Law Firm, LLC 909 Poydras St. Floor 29 504-500-2020 Anthony Irpino Irpino Law Firm 2216 Magazine St. 504-525-1500 Brian D. Katz Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 Frank E. Lamothe III Lamothe Law Firm, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 1760 504-332-0284 Glenn Lieberman Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-613-4771 Terry Loup Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-613-4771 M. Suzanne “Suzy” Montero Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-308-1395 Irving J. Warshauer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION MANDEVILLE Bruce A. Cranner Talley Anthony Hughes & Knight, L.L.C. 2250 7th St. 504-957-5364 Chip Wagar Wagar Hickman, LLC 1425 W. Causeway Approach 985-888-8740

NEW ORLEANS Francis Philip Accardo Pugh Accardo LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3300 504-799-4531

John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7241

Camala E. Capodice Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2196

Dwight C. Paulsen III Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6305

Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9762

David E. Redmann Jr. Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6307

Richard S. Crisler Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6308

Edward J. Rice Jr. Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0333

Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2203 Terry Christovich Gay Christovich & Kearney LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-593-4214 James C. Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0817 Lynn M. Luker Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 Kathleen A. Manning McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2737 David M. Melancon Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2117 Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2163 Kim E. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2108 Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2114 David W. O’Quinn Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2111

Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-589-9733 James R. Silverstein Kean Miller LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-620-3363 John W. Sinnott Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2116 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7059 Quentin F. Urquhart Jr. Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2107 RAILROAD LAW MANDEVILLE Joseph M. Miller Davis, Saunders & Miller, PLC 450 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite D 985-612-3070 Benjamin B. Saunders Davis, Saunders, & Miller PLC 450 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite D 985-612-3070 NEW ORLEANS Blake G. Arata Jr. Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly 650 Poydras St. Suite 2017 504-274-4578 Bradley R. Belsome Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6309


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Katharine R. Colletta Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7708

Tina Campbell Hebert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0929

Steven C. Serio Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5240

Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5250

Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2203

Brian Robert Johnson Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7819

Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2101

Mark A Fullmer Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9324

Kelly Juneau Rookard Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2214

Neal J. Kling Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2112

Taylor C. Stone The Law Office of Taylor C. Stone, LLC 627 Cherokee St. Suite 205 504-717-4874

C. Perrin Rome III Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly 650 Poydras St. Suite 2017 504-274-4580

Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

James A Stuckey Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9239

Ben R. Slater III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7516 REAL ESTATE LAW METAIRIE Frank J. DiVittorio Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 NEW ORLEANS Marguerite L. “Peggy” Adams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4142 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7289 Elwood F. Cahill Jr. Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2103 Philip deV. Claverie Sr. Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9223 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7212 James T. Dunne Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0824 Gary J. Elkins Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4400 504-529-3600

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Jon F. “Chip” Leyens Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8628 Carl Little Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-304-5836 Joseph Marriott Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1886 R. Lewis McHenry Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8300 Richard B Montgomery III Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0663 Marie A. Moore Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2108 Robert W. Mouton Locke Lord, LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2660 504-558-5113 Wesley M. Plaisance Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5471 Anne E. Raymond Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0835

Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0828 Peter S. Title Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1542 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8298 Marion Welborn Weinstock Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 504-569-1833 SECURITIES REGULATION METAIRIE P. J. Stakelum III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4155 NEW ORLEANS Jessica M. Vasquez Vasquez Law 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-571-9582 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0827 SECURITIES/CAPITAL MARKETS LAW NEW ORLEANS John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4177

Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8308 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8386 David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0920

Robert S. “Bob” Angelico Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4112 William M. Backstrom Jr. Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8228 Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000 Susan J. Burkenstock Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4400 504-529-3600 Jaye A. Calhoun Kean Miller LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-293-5936

Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7226

John W. Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0832

Jessica M. Vasquez Vasquez Law 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-571-9582

J. Grant Coleman King & Jurgens, L.L.C. 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 45 504-569-1637

John D. Werner Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5265 TAX LAW METAIRIE Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4294 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4110 NEW ORLEANS Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0809

Paul D. Cordes Jr. Guarisco, Cordes & Lala, LLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 2355 504-587-7007 Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0247 James C. “Jim” Exnicios Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4034 Mandy Mendoza Gagliardi Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7018 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2105

Jesse R. Adams III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8364

Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4156

A. Albert Ajubita Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, L.L.C 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300

William H Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7037


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Keith Naccari Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1876 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0838 Jerome J. Reso Jr Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 Richard J. Roth III Roth Law Firm 2727 Prytania St. Suite 14 504-525-7792 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7854 Carli B. Simpson Roth Law Firm 2727 Prytania St. Suite 14 504-525-7792 Andrew T. Sullivan Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7734 Matthew A. Treuting Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 TRANSPORTATION LAW NEW ORLEANS Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5251 Gerard J. Dragna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-655-4871 Christopher M. Hannan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8612 Kelly Gayle Juneau Rookard Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2214

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NOVEMBER 2020

Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5258 C. Michael Parks Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-655-5419 Eric Winder Sella Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-655-6195 TRUSTS AND ESTATES COVINGTON Brittany V. Carter Brittany V. Carter, Attorney at Law, LLC 90 Louis Prima Dr. Suite A 985-789-4508 METAIRIE Frank J. DiVittorio Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4207 Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Amanda Sullivan Lagarde & Sullivan 4141 Veterans Blvd. Suite 212 504-885-3332 NEW ORLEANS Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0809 Bernard J. Bagert The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-322-1368 Dara L. Baird Dara Baird Law 5523 S. Johnson St. 504-865-9004 David F. Edwards Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8184

Mervatt El Jaouhari Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-605-2463 Miriam Wogan Henry Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8436 Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0975 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1519 John C. Overby Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0964 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0838 Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 F. Kelleher Riess Hickey & Riess, Attorneys at Law, LLC 1139 Arabella St. 504-525-1120 Leon H. Rittenberg III Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7845 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7854 David “Bruce” Spizer Bruce Spizer, APLC 1010 Common St. Suite 1964 504-524-2880 WORKERS COMPENSATION LAW COVINGTON Stephanie Griffith Beard Stephanie Griffith Beard, Attorney at Law 90 Louis Prima Dr. Suite A 985-639-1875 METAIRIE Arthur J. Brewster Brewster Law Firm LLC 433 Metairie Rd. Suite 209 504-717-4971

Meghan E. Ruckman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 NEW ORLEANS Alan G Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-494-7651 Scott R. Huete Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2439 Scott B. Kiefer Courington, Kiefer, Sommers, Marullo & Matherne, LLC 616 Girod St. 504-524-5510 Lindsay F. Louapre Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-655-3498 Kevin A. Marks Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2432 Dawn Danna Marullo Courington, Kiefer, Sommers, Marullo & Matherne, LLC 616 Girod St. 504-524-5510 Robert N. Popich Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 600 504-583-0298 •


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hen you need help with a legal issue, New Orleans offers a vast market of skilled attorneys and well-known firms specializing in every area of law. From single-attorney or boutique firms to largescale, national firms, the following businesses are just a few area resources who may be able to help with your unique situation and get the resolution you seek. Herman, Herman & Katz, LLC Since 1942, Herman, Herman & Katz, LLC, (HH&K) has worked tirelessly to protect the rights of New Orleans citizens, and today the results of those efforts are clear. HH&K has argued before the Louisiana and United States Supreme Courts and in courts across the United States. HH&K attorneys have achieved epic recoveries for individuals in milestone cases including Vioxx, Big Tobacco, and BP Oil. Locally, HH&K has represented thousands of individuals impacted by natural and man-made disasters, including hurricanes, tainted Chinese drywall, the BP oil spill, and personal injury cases. The firm served as Plaintiffs Liaison Counsel in both the Chinese drywall and BP Oil Spill litigation and represents many local businesses. HH&K attorneys have been named to Best Lawyers in America and the American Trial Lawyers Hall of Fame; they are Adjunct Professors at Tulane and Loyola Law Schools. Through high quality work, excellence, and commitment to public justice, HH&K continues its tradition of excellence. For more information, call 504-581-4892 or visit hhklawfirm.com. Melchiode Marks King, LLC  Melchiode Marks King LLC (MMK) may only be in its sixth year of existence, but its attorneys have practiced together for decades, and recent accolades are a testament to both their talents and the breadth of services they provide to clients. This year, four MMK attorneys were recognized as Top Lawyers in New Orleans Magazine: Jerry Melchiode (Construction Law), Kevin Marks (Admiralty & Maritime Law and Workers’ Compensation), Rich King (Insurance Law) and Scott Huete (Admiralty & Maritime Law and Workers’ Compensation). While awards are gratifying, the best endorsement is the loyalty of MMK’s clients who have enthusiastically supported the firm. It is that trust and commitment which inspires MMK to achieve successful outcomes while controlling costs. Through increased efficiency and advances in technology, MMK delivers big firm capabilities with small firm agility and attentiveness.  For more information, visit MMKfirm.com. Lamothe Law Firm, LLC Lamothe Law Firm, LLC congratulates founder Frank Lamothe on being named a Top Lawyer in New Orleans Magazine. Lamothe Law Firm aims to help disadvantaged people who have limited recourse to seek justice for being harmed. Corporations can spend large sums of money for lawyers to service their interests. The everyday person has limited resources to hire lawyers to make their lives better. We like to even the score. The Firm is selective about the number of cases it accepts and wants to make sure its attorneys can devote full attention to each client. The Firm has particular experience in litigation involving sexual abuse and assault by clergy and other employees of religious institutions, as well as by teachers, coaches, and hospitality employees. The Firm also represents workers, and their families, injured by maritime and oilfield accidents, industrial explosions, and other major catastrophes. For more information about Lamothe Law Firm, visit LamotheFirm.com. Betsy A. Fischer, LLC A go-to legal resource for all family law matters including divorce across Southeast Louisiana, Betsy A. Fischer offers real-world, stepby-step guidance for clients facing important life transitions. Families going through hardships want peace of mind and confidence in their 58

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future, and Betsy and her team offer the knowledge, care, and attention necessary to ensure clients’ rights and best interests are protected along the way.  With nearly three decades of experience helping families reach resolutions, Betsy A. Fischer, lawyer and founder, is a skilled trial attorney, strong negotiator, and qualified domestic mediator in child custody, divorce, and other family law matters. She has authored a book on Louisiana divorce law and is a member of numerous prominent professional associations while also serving with the New Orleans Pro-Bono Project. Whether your case proceeds in a collaborative direction or turns into a full-fledged court dispute, you can rely on this firm to protect your interests. The firm serves Orleans, Jefferson, St. Tammany, St. Bernard, St. John the Baptist, and St. Charles Parishes. For more information or to arrange a confidential consultation with Betsy A. Fischer visit louisianafamilyandelderlaw.com or call 504-384-7376. Barbara J. Ziv and Esther L. Greenbaum The shifts in family dynamics that accompany divorce can be difficult and sometimes painful for the parties involved. To avoid the common problems largely responsible for the fear and suffering related to divorce, individuals going through the process need to understand the system and know what to expect. Counsel from an experienced family law attorney can be invaluable when making tough decisions and planning for the future. With 45 years of experience in domestic relations, Barbara J. Ziv, LLC is a small firm committed to helping people seeking advice about divorce and family law matters, including child custody, child and spousal support, and property divisions. During your initial consultation, Barbara J. Ziv and Esther L. Greenbaum will explain what they need to know about you, why they need to know it, and what you should expect from both the process and your attorney. Their clients can expect competence in family law and matters related to it, clear-cut billing, and trouble-free accessibility. For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit  neworleansdivorces.com or call 504-525-4361. Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore Since its founding 20 years ago, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore has concentrated its practice in areas where it can offer clients superior service and results. It serves as local, regional, and national counsel for public companies, privately owned businesses, governmental entities, non-profit organizations, individuals, and insurers with civil litigation needs.  Irwin Fritchie’s team is made up of accomplished trial attorneys, seasoned litigators, appellate advocates, negotiators, and trusted advisors. With over 50 attorneys in its New Orleans and Baton Rouge offices, the firm achieves superior results by seizing the initiative in litigation and finding cost-effective solutions that meet clients’ goals. Irwin Fritchie prioritizes excellence in legal representation combined with a strong sense of community, purpose, and civic responsibility. For more information, visit irwinllc.com. Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP is a national law firm with offices in New Orleans, Houston, Jackson, Detroit, and New Jersey. Attorneys in the New Orleans office represent a number of corporate clients, including several Fortune 500 companies, in a wide-range of litigation in Louisiana and throughout the country. The Firm is proud of its recognitions as a “Top Workplace” in 2020 by The Times-Picayune, as well as a “Best Place to Work” in 2019 by New Orleans CityBusiness.  Primarily a litigation firm, Forman Watkins’ attorneys are trial ready. The firm tries cases across the country. Most recently, in September of 2020, attorneys from the New Orleans office tried one of the first federal court civil jury trials in the country during Covid-19, which resulted in a defense verdict. Attorneys in the New Orleans office also counsel clients in commercial transactions and employment matters. For more information, visit formanwatkins.com.


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SPONSORED Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC, (SNW) wishes to congratulate its nine attorneys listed as Top Lawyers in New Orleans Magazine: Scott Sternberg, Keith Naccari, Clayton White, Suzy Montero, Michael Finkelstein, Carl Little, Mervatt Eljaouhari, Abid Hussain, and Joseph Marriott. SNW practices across the state of Louisiana in the areas of business litigation and business counsel, mergers and acquisitions, tax, bankruptcy, media and intellectual property, personal injury, significant family matters, estate planning, real estate and other complex and high-profile matters. SNW began 2020 with a significant expansion, and when the coronavirus hit, its lawyers didn’t miss a beat—clients saw that SNW’s operations were built for uncertain times like these. The firm’s early commitment to technology and virtual communication systems allowed the firm to continue fighting for clients even as the physical office shut down. On social media, firm attorneys began offering a free educational program for clients and friends about coronavirus recovery. In just three years, SNW has built its reputation with tenacious litigators and thoughtful business counsel complemented by a tech-forward mindset centered on innovation and efficiency. Find out more at snw.law. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP Established in 1928, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP, (BSW) is one of the oldest law firms in the state of Louisiana. The firm takes great pride in its long history of client service. With more than 75 attorneys, the firm is among the largest firms in the state and one of the larger law firms in the South. BSW’s clients range from individuals and start-up companies to Fortune 500 corporations, governmental entities, and not-for-profit institutions. Since the firm was established, two standards have remained constant: to strive for legal excellence and to be involved in local communities. Members of the firm have served as presidents, directors, and officers of community and business organizations. BSW’s primary focus is growing and protecting each client’s business. Whether it is in litigation, negotiating contracts, advising on management restructures, or assisting in the purchase or sale of a business, BSW attorneys possess the skill set to help their clients achieve their goals. For more information, visit bswllp.com. Kelly Hart Pitre Kelly Hart Pitre wishes to congratulate its attorneys listed as Top Lawyers in New Orleans Magazine: Lesli Harris and Aimee Hebert. Kelly Hart Pitre is a leader addressing the most challenging aspects of doing business and protecting Louisiana’s working coast’s vulnerable environment. The firm’s experience includes project development and operations, including related transactions, litigation, regulatory work, and crisis management. It has represented oil and gas and other industrial companies, real estate developers, financial institutions, ports, levee districts, and other public entities. In addition to its experienced Louisiana team, the firm has the backing of a full-service firm of over 160 lawyers. Kelly Hart’s team builds collaborative relationships and constructs creative solutions to solve complex legal problems. Among its practice areas are appellate, aviation and transportation, bankruptcy, business and civil litigation, corporate and finance, energy, environmental, estate planning, intellectual property and technology, labor and employment, mergers and acquisitions, public finance, real estate, regulatory and administrative, and tax law. Kelly Hart Pitre offices are located at 400 Poydras Street in New Orleans and 301 Main Street in Baton Rouge. For more information, visit kellyhart.com. Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly, LLC Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly, LLC, (RABS) offers unmatched legal representation throughout the entire United States, wherein their representation is primarily focused on FELA/railroad injury cases. The firm has successfully tried FELA jury cases in many states and has achieved numerous significant verdicts and settlements, including multi-million dollar results in compensation for its clients in several instances. The firm has helped clients with their cases in Alabama, Connecticut, 60

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Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Washington State, and Virginia. The firm congratulates Perrin Rome and Blake Arata on being named Top Lawyers in New Orleans Magazine.  RABS was founded in 2000 and has been very proud of its representation of thousands of railroad workers and their families following often catastrophic and life-altering accidents, including horrific derailments resulting in multiple deaths and other terrible physical consequences. For more information, visit romearata.com or call 800-249-1306 to schedule a free consultation. Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, LLC Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, LLC, is a nationally recognized litigation firm known for trying challenging and highstakes cases throughout the country. The firm has served as lead trial counsel in national multidistrict products liability cases and in mass actions for corporations and insurers hit with thousands of claims following chemical releases and natural disasters. The firm’s lawyers have tried dozens of cases nationwide for financial services companies after severe downturns in the bond and equity markets sparked a multitude of lawsuits. And this represents only a small part of what the firm does.  Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver is, first and foremost, a firm of trial lawyers. The proof is in its track record of success. Benchmark Litigation has recognized this record by naming the firm the Louisiana Litigation Firm of the Year for seven of the past eight years.   For more information, visit BarrassoUsdin.com.   Blue Williams, LLP Blue Williams, LLP, has been providing high-quality representation to clients throughout the Gulf South in commercial litigation, healthcare and construction law, and business matters since 1983. By recruiting motivated and experienced attorneys in diverse areas of law, Blue Williams is able to provide a full spectrum of services and create lasting solutions to the legal dilemmas faced by clients. The firm’s attorneys practice in seventeen areas of law, including Commercial Litigation, Estate and Tax Planning, Corporate Law, Healthcare Law, Construction Litigation, Insurance Law, Products and Professional Liability and more. Blue Williams has a history of rising to the challenge and has defended clients in multi-million dollar exposure cases. The firm provides services to a broad spectrum of clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to international corporations, local businesses and individuals. Attorneys focus on each client’s individual needs and all available options.  For more information on Blue Williams’s commitment to providing lasting solutions, visit bluewilliams.com or call 504-831-4091. Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP, was formed in 1987 by attorneys who had previously worked at two of the largest law firms in the city of New Orleans. They brought with them the practices and high standards of the larger law firms and integrated that with a smallfirm atmosphere, making them one of the most select boutique law firms in the city. The firm’s practice areas are diverse and include family law, tax and estate planning, insurance defense, employment law, civil rights litigation, workers’ compensation, and commercial litigation.   The firm is AV Pre-eminent rated by Martindale Hubbell, and many of its attorneys have been recognized as Top Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and Best Lawyers in America among other various honors. The firm is dedicated to personal service and to meeting its clients’ needs as expediently and as inexpensively as possible. To find out more or schedule a consultation, call the firm at 504-581-2450 or visit LoweStein.com. Jones Walker LLP Jones Walker LLP is among the largest 120 law firms in the United States. With offices in Alabama, Arizona, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New York, and Texas, the firm serves local, regional, national, and international business interests


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR 2020 TOP LAWYERS!

MERVATT ELJAOUHARI

MICHAEL FINKELSTEIN

ABID HUSSAIN

CARL LITTLE

JOSEPH MARRIOTT

M. “SUZY” MONTERO

KEITH NACCARI

SCOTT STERNBERG

CLAYTON WHITE

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SPONSORED and provides a full complement of legal services addressing the needs of a broad spectrum of global and domestic businesses. The firm is committed to providing a comprehensive range of legal services to major multinational, public and private corporations, Fortune® 500 companies, money center banks, worldwide insurers, and emerging companies doing business in the United States and abroad. Clients have recognized Jones Walker for consistent excellence in areas such as client focus, anticipating client’s needs, and understanding the client’s business. The firm has been named to the 2020 Client Service A-Team by The BTI Consulting Group, which conducts hundreds of in-house counsel interviews to identify law firms providing top client service. For more information, visit joneswalker.com. Chehardy Sherman Williams Law Firm For nearly three decades, the attorneys at Chehardy Sherman Williams Law Firm have been solving complex legal problems with skillful imagination. The firm’s experienced attorneys have breadth of knowledge, providing clients with a diverse array of perspectives in a variety of practice areas, from Business & Corporate Law to Healthcare Law, Personal Injury to Estate Planning, and all types of Litigation. Outside of the courtroom, community involvement has been a hallmark of Chehardy Sherman Williams. The firm’s attorneys are associated with charitable groups, educational institutions, industry councils, economic leaders, and civic organizations that make up a broad scope of the greater New Orleans community. This involvement and the firm’s dedication to individual and business clients has earned Chehardy Sherman Williams attorneys recognition among peers on a local and national level, and the firm has been ranked among the nation’s best.  Chehardy Sherman Williams has offices in Metairie and Hammond. For more information on the firm’s practice areas, attorneys, and legal approach, visit Chehardy.com or call 504-833-5600.  Brittany V. Carter, Attorney at Law, LLC Brittany V. Carter is a proud Southeast Louisiana native working hard to give clients a voice during difficult times with compassionate guidance and support. Her practice focuses on Family Law, Estate Law, and Collections Law and also offers Notary Public services. Since opening her law practice in 2012, Brittany has served as an advocate for clients, advising them and keeping them informed to put them at ease. She is a true solo practitioner, communicating personally with clients from the first phone call to the final signature. “Most people have no idea what to expect when they file for divorce or inquire about a will or succession,” she says. “I believe in being truthful and transparent, so they enter into every proceeding fully informed and confident.” Brittany also works to resolve disputes and matters amicably outside of the courtroom as a preferred option for many clients. Her goal is to maintain civility—making the process easier for everyone. Brittany is honored to have been voted a Top Lawyer by her peers. For more information, call 985-789-4508, email bcarterlaw@gmail. com, or visit brittanyvcarterattorneyatlaw.com. Morris Bart In 1980, Morris Bart ran a simple ad on television. Since that time, his advertising and his law firm have grown to the extent where he has become a household name throughout Louisiana. However, Morris Bart, LLC is much more than just a name. For over 40 years, Morris Bart and his team of over one hundred attorneys fight hard to get the injured the compensation they deserve. With offices statewide and throughout Mississippi and Alabama, Morris Bart, LLC is proud to be the largest personal injury firm in Louisiana and one of the largest in the United States.   If you or someone you know has been injured, call 855-GET-BART or go to MorrisBart.com for 24-hour access. You know what to do: “One Call, That’s All!”

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Taggart Morton Taggart Morton is a New Orleans-based law firm that provides a complete array of legal services to individuals and the business community. Traditionally, the firm’s primary practice involved representing companies engaged in regulated industries (including the healthcare, public utilities, insurance, transportation, media, communications, and technology fields). Taggart Morton’s attorneys now represent clients in business transactions, commercial litigation, and appellate practice, and even handle referred commercial cases and appeals from other firms.  Taggart Morton’s attorneys are skilled in such specialized areas as business disputes, healthcare, insurance regulatory services, bankruptcy, employment, ERISA, appellate practice, antitrust and trade regulation, intellectual property, media/technology, workers’ compensation, real estate, and managed care law. Taggart Morton is small enough to provide a high level of personal attention to each of its clients yet large enough to address almost any legal need its clients may have. The firm is active in the community and takes great pride in having two former bar presidents among its members, Barry H. Grodsky (Louisiana State Bar Association) and Perry R. Staub, Jr., (New Orleans Bar Association).  For more information, visit TaggartMortonLaw.com.  Allan Berger and Associates Allan Berger and Associates is a New Orleans based personal injury firm whose main practice areas include automobile accidents, medical malpractice, pharmaceutical litigation, and product device litigation. Allan Berger and Associates has been recognized as one of the top rated firms in Louisiana’s Legal Leaders magazine, providing the highest level of professional excellence. With over 40 years of legal experience, great pride in community roots, and a strong belief in the heritage of Louisiana, the firm is committed to having its clients’ voices heard throughout the legal process. In today’s legal environment, matching your legal needs with the correct law firm is crucial to the successful outcome of your case. The attorneys and staff at Allan Berger & Associates ensure that their clients receive the best representation available and that their clients’ legal concerns receive personal attention. For more information, visit bergerlawnola.com or call 504-526-2222. McGlinchey Stafford McGlinchey Stafford congratulates its attorneys listed as Top Lawyers in New Orleans Magazine: Steve Beiser, Mag Bickford, Rudy Cerone, Kathy Conklin, and Kathleen Manning. McGlinchey is a premier midsized business law firm creatively delivering best-in-class, full service, scalable solutions for clients nationwide by leveraging bold innovation, diverse talent, and leading-edge technology across its networked platform of 15 offices. Instead of being bound by convention and tradition, McGlinchey attorneys stay nimble and responsive, affording greater creativity and flexibility to help clients address their business and legal challenges. McGlinchey is proud to provide firmwide resources to clients of various sizes and jurisdictions at the local, regional, and national levels, and internationally. “We give you more” isn’t just a spirited tagline or an aspirational claim. It is a commitment you can count on. For more information, visit mcglinchey.com. The Derbes Law Firm, LLC The Derbes Law Firm, LLC’s nine attorneys represent clients in business and financial matters. Practice areas include complex and multi-party commercial litigation and transactions (contract drafting and negotiations, commercial leases, breach of contract litigation, real estate, construction law, and employment law); bankruptcy (chapters 7, 13, 11) for creditors, committees, trustees, and debtors; business formation, break-up, liquidation, dissolution, and member/shareholder disputes; commercial mediation services; end-of-life matters (estate planning, successions and interdictions); representation before taxing authorities; and preparation of retirement orders (including QDROs). Melanie M. Mulcahy, Esq., The Derbes Law Firm, LLC, 3027 Ridgelake Dr., Metairie, LA 70002, 504-837-1230, DerbesLaw.com. •


TRAVEL

B Y CHE R É CO E N

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During the development of the Buffalo Bayou Greenway, the old Houston Cistern, a below-ground drinking water reservoir built in 1926 and decommissioned in 2007, was discovered. Cistern history tours are offered Thursday through Sunday but opt for the Sound Healing Meditation series with the city’s Pralaya Yoga and Youniversoul, where sound bowls and wind chimes help participants relax every Wednesday evening and Saturday morning. Art lovers may want to tour the city’s innovative street art that ranges from giant murals to window coverings and spontaneous graffiti. The Houston Mural Map shows you where to go with its interactive guide at Houstonmuralmap.com.

Park Place Houston is remarkably green

With its endless strip shopping centers, freeways and urban sprawl, Houston may appear to most as just another concrete jungle. What may surprise many is that the nation’s fourth largest city is home to 580 parks, including two of the country’s expansive urban parks, Cullen Park and George Bush Park. In fact, the Space City ranks first among the nation’s most populous cities in total parkland acreage. And that number is only going to increase, which is great news during these pandemic times when having space to enjoy the great outdoors remains in great demand. New parks and greenspace developments are in the works this year, many being completed by the end of 2020. But you don’t have to wait until all those improvements happen. Here are a few unique outdoor places to enjoy this fall, along with some special events that allow for social distancing: Visitors can bike or hike along the 10-mile stretch of Buffalo Bayou, from Shepherd Drive through downtown into the East End and the Port of Houston Turning Basin. The waterfront was developed by the Buffalo Bayou Partnership and includes bike and boat rentals, public art, playgrounds, a dog park and numerous places to picnic and just enjoy the fall weather. If your speed runs higher, Discovery Green in the heart of downtown Houston offers a variety of fitness classes, from Hatha yoga and Tai Chi to belly dancing. The park contains numerous dining options with outdoor seating, a Flea by Night market selling both collectibles and eclectic items and special holiday events such as ice skating. Be sure to check the website for updates and possible cancellations due to COVID-19. The 30-acre Rockstar Energy Bike Park offers numerous attractions for the bike lover, such as a world-class BMX track, BMX Super Cross track, and a track for children. It’s also home to the largest free skate park in North America at 78,000 square feet, and the second largest in the world. To learn more about Houston’s parks and greenspace, Visithoustontexas.com/things-to-do/parks-and-outdoors/.

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STAY

In addition to being touted as a green city, Houston has also gone to the dogs, which is great news for outdoor lovers with canines in tow. Dog lovers may check into the JW Marriott and Four Seasons Hotel Houston where pets are greeted with treats and toys and Discovery Green’s dog runs and greenspace is only a short walk away — with leashes, of course. The historic Hotel Icon welcomes dogs and it’s located downtown near Market Square Park with its dog runs and dining options. Downtown’s Hyatt Regency features an indoor “Dog Walk” with dog bowls and beds.

EAT

To enjoy the balmy fall weather, in addition to avoiding crowds, try the upstairs balcony at The Grove in Discovery Green. This eco-friendly restaurant serves up local and sustainable dishes and signature cocktails as well as features a rooftop herb garden and a great view of downtown Houston. For more casual dining and a waterfront view, visit the park’s Lake House.


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GROWING PAINS

I’ve worked in the magazine world for quite a while now, and I know you’ve got to plan several months out. I always found it slightly jarring to be working on a Christmas issue while everyone in the real world was planning Halloween costumes or staging a pink-and-red Valentine’s Day cover while the world around you is decked out in red and green … but I got used to living on “magazine time.” Yes, I was superstitious enough that it always made me nervous to be putting out cutesy Halloween copy in the thick of hurricane season, always secretly worrying that our reality could look truly scary by the time Oct. 31 rolled around – in a way that had nothing to do with ghosts, goblins and witches. But overall, I made my peace with the fact that my work life would always be about two months ahead of my real life. (It’s not so different from making my peace with the fact that in my professional life, I would extol the virtues of vibrant wallpaper in the powder room or cranberry chutney in a cut-glass bowl … while in my actual home, my bathroom roof was leaking and I was eating my kids’ leftover pasta out of plastic bowls with my fingers before loading them in the dishwasher.) In this new reality of 2020, though, I find it hard to feel comfortable with anything I write with an eye toward the future. Who even knows anymore what’s just around the corner? The things I thought I could count on as safe topics this time of year– Thanksgiving, the election, school holiday pageants – are all big unknowns. By the time you

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BY E VE C R AWFO R D PEYTON

into the next month and beyond: I am thankful. For my health, for my family, for my city – safe yet again after a nail-biting hurricane season. Whether things are inching back toward normal or sliding back into isolation, I am grateful to have my husband and my kids with me, every day, and grateful to have a roof over our heads (even if it leaks). I am lucky to have a job I adore and that brings me joy and gives me purpose, whether I do it from home or from my office. And even if I can’t welcome them into my home this holiday season, I am blessed beyond words to count my parents and my in-laws as not only family, but also true friends. Ultimately, this crazy, tumultuous year has been a good lesson in the fact that nothing is ever certain, but that you can always find something to be thankful for. The time my father spent in the hospital made me realize how much I’d been taking him for granted. Not being able to hug people made me realize how important human touch can be. And, of course, the months of home-schooling made me realize how incredible teachers are. So now, whatever form Thanksgiving takes this year, I know that it will have extra meaning. I hope that all of you, wherever you are and whatever your holiday table might look like this year, are your Thanksgiving menu decided equally thankful and blessed. … OR you will be planIf nothing else, the end ning a very scaled-down For more Eve of 2020 is in sight, and version of the holiday check out her blog it will be 2021 before we “Joie d’Eve” on with only the members Tuesday mornings at know it. And in magazine of your household in myneworleans.com time, I will get to write attendance. about it even sooner! That’s just one more thing to be Here is what I do know, at this very moment, and what I hope thankful for! dearly will hold true as we move

Living in the Future When no one really knows what’s next

read this, my kids will be back at school … OR school will have been canceled again and we’ll all be back in quarantine. By the time you read this, the election will be over with a clear winner … OR everyone on all sides will be stricken with COVID-19 and our entire political system will be in disarray. By the time you read this, you will have

JANE SANDERS ILLUSTRATION


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HOME ADVICE

BY L E E CUTR O NE

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SUSAN ZACKIN Party plan ahead with Z Event Company

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oliday entertaining is sure to look a little different this year. Large events have been curtailed and small-scale, personalized gatherings have become the order of the day. Whether working with an event planner or handling the details yourself, Susan Zackin, owner of Z Event Company, offers the following guidelines for honoring holiday traditions while social distancing. To begin, Zackin suggests visiting sites like Pinterest, Instagram and Partyslate.com for inspiration. Next, she advises making a guest list, as the number of people will determine whether you want to hire a planner, choice of venue, food and beverages. She notes that many people opt for DIY plans to save money but says the savings may be minimal in terms of time and stress. “When you want to be a guest at your own party, hire a planner,” she advises.

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Don’t get stuck on things; go with an open mind.

2 Personalize your small event by incorporating things you have.

3 Working with a professional party planner minimizes the stress and time that goes into an event. For a DIY approach, Eventglossary. com, a division of Z Event Company, offers web-based one-stop shopping by providing resources and price quotes in one place.

Next, choose your venue. ABOUT THE Celebrating at home or booking a DESIGNER private room at a restaurant are two New Orleans native ways to come together safely. Tenting Susan Zackin’s experience in an outdoor area so people can spread event planning out is another option. When choosing spans 30 years. After running her sites and caterers, Zackin advises own event business giving as much notice as possible in Florida, she opened Z Event in order to get what you want. She Company in 2014. designed a website, Eventglossary. Zackin specializes in handling all com, to make the process easier. aspects of an event Customers can shop its assorted – space, technical, decorative, vendors and venues rather than culinary, searching individual websites and entertainment and more. In May, she receive a price quote for the items used her creative they want. know-how to organize a drive-in Small, budget-friendly affairs don’t movie night where have to skimp on distinctive touches. locals could enjoy a safe evening out. Zackin suggests using things you have: crystal, silver and china add instant luxury. Family heirlooms, mix-and-match tablewares, and centerpieces made with fruits, vegetables or succulents also make an impression without breaking the bank. While food and beverages are often the largest entertaining expense, good food comes in a variety of price points. “If you’re on a budget, don’t serve prime beef,” says Zackin. Instead, she recommends a menu of comfort food (a popular trend), locally sourced foods and even meal kits offered by local restaurants and grocery stores. Zackin adds that individual plates with assorted tastings, appetizers in individual containers, and food stations with one attendant provide an extra measure of security in a time where handwashing and social distancing are paramount. “We’ve all had to make concessions,” says Zackin. “Cherish the people you can be around and entertain in the most special way you can.”


TABLE TALK

BY JAY FO R MAN

Food Flip Mawi Tortillas expands

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t the start of 2020, Mawi Tortillas was a company on the move. A successful family enterprise spearheaded by chef Will Avelar, Mawi’s focus was purveying fragrant corn tortillas served in an impressive collection of New Orleans restaurants. In January they were preparing to level up from their initial Metairie location to a larger production facility in Kenner to increase capacity. Then, well, you know what happened. Like most businesses, the Avelars had to pivot to find their footing in this new landscape. With restaurants closed and wholesale accounts evaporating, they settled on a hybrid model. They equipped their original Metairie location with a full kitchen and retail cases, flipping it into a takeout spot and specialty food store. “We put in a flattop, stove and fryer to do lunches and hot plates,” Avelar said. “In our grocery section, we sell imported cheeses and make fresh salsa, dips and also fry chips to go along with it all.” A visit there reveals a counter-service operation tucked into a strip mall off West Esplanade Avenue. The storefront is suffused with the delicious aroma of fried corn and tacos sizzling on a griddle. Customers queue up to purchase fresh tortillas by the pound as well as Honduran and El Salvadorian cheeses, salsa, fresh crema and more. Coupled with a strong social media presence detailing the shifting menus and hours, this new model soon proved a success. Then the introduction of the Birria Taco kicked it into overdrive. A compulsively delicious amalgam of braised beef, garlic, melted Oaxacan cheese and corn tortilla, the Birrias are griddled on the flattop and served with a portion container of braising liquid for dunking between bites. “I just had one today. I forgot how crazy-delicious those tacos are,” Avelar said. Per Avelar, whose roots are in El Salvador, Birria actually hails from Mexico, where it traditionally featured braised goat.“But places in LA and Houston swapped goat for beef and started putting it into tortillas with some nice melty cheese,” he said. “Then they used the braising liquid as a dipping au jus. You have the leftover

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BIRRIA

stock, right, so why not make a broth out of it?” A chef by trade with fine dining cred, Avelar tailors his Birria to reflect regional tastes. “I use more tomato, bell pepper, onion, and fresh herbs like parsley and cilantro. It is also extremely heavy on the garlic. It is more approachable to people who live here as the flavors are familiar but just served in a new kind of dish,” he explained. Along with the Birria tacos (only offered a few days a week, so check in advance) other options include a variation, Birria Quesadillas, which swap corn tortillas for flour and feature crema and pico de gallo. Pupusas are also offered – try the Mixta, with chicharrons and cheese – or the Revuelta, with everything. Interesting case items also include the Quesadilla Salvadorena. Different from the quesadilla most diners will be familiar with, this one is akin to a savory pastry flavored with Morolique, a salty, crumbly, Nicaraguan cheese. Desserts, including Tres Leches, are provided by Pastry Chef Jeremy Fogg, who recently left Emeril’s restaurant group to open his own business Mae’s Bakeshop. Mawi’s hours are limited and the menu changes frequently; their social media feed is the best source of current info. Order ahead when possible as walk-up lines can be long and the birria tacos move fast. Mawi Tortillas, 5050 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite C, Metairie, 644-2624.

ABOUT THE CHEF Mawi Tortillas is a family enterprise headed up by Will Avelar and his father Carlos along with Will’s brothers Fernando and Raul. A chef by trade, Will spent 15 years with Emeril Lagasse’s restaurant group, eventually working his way up to chef de cuisine at Meril. The Avelars purchased a pre-existing Tortilla company and relaunched it as Mawi, employing Will’s fine dining chops and sourcing to elevate the brand. The result is a boutique Central American specialty food store and tortilla hub, adding yet another dimension to the local culinary landscape.

JEFFERY JOHNSTON PHOTOS


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NOSH B Y C H E F T O Y A B O U DY

Bowled Over Savory soup made to impress

Everyone needs an impressive soup under your belt, and nothing says “I’m about to impress the hell out of my guests” better than a good bisque. In some cities they call it “chowder,” but in New Orleans, when we make a super-rich and creamy, full of flavor, thick soup, we call it “bisque”. It can go either way, appetizer or entrée; it’s all about how you put it together. This recipe is an example of bisque as an entrée. Partner it with good hot bread and a salad and, honey, you are SA-TIS-FIED. As an appetizer, I suggest serving casually in a mug or small cup. Honestly, I feel like this could be a new contender on the family “must haves” list for Thanksgiving. Trust me, you probably won’t have any leftovers, which is a big A+ for the cook!

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Begin by prepping the sweet potatoes for the hash so it can be done when you’re finishing up with the bisque.

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Garnish soup with sweet potato hash, to your taste and preference, and serve skewers on the side.

3 For the bisque, you’re looking for a smooth creamy soup kind of feel. (But it’s also up to you if you want it to be a little chunky.)

4 For a plant-based bisque option, substitute the chicken stock for veggie stock, plant butter for regular butter and use non-dairy heavy cream.


SWEET POTATO BISQUE WITH CURRIED CHICKEN SKEWERS

Sweet Potato Bisque 2 pounds chunky chopped sweet potatoes 1 white onion, chopped 1 bundle of green onions, chopped 3-4 cloves of garlic, chopped 4 cups of chicken stock 7 cups of heavy cream 1 teaspoon of smoked paprika All-purpose seasoning to taste EVOO as needed 1. Sauté the onions, green onions, and garlic in EVOO until they’re a nice caramelized color. 2. Add sweet potatoes and 4 cups of stock; let that simmer uncovered until the potatoes are nice and soft. 3. Add heavy cream, then begin to emulsify with a hand blender or transfer it to a food processor. 4. Once it’s in the sweet spot, which is really creamy, season it to taste with the smoked paprika and all-purpose seasoning blend. 5. Set aside. Sweet Potato Hash Garnish 1 pound chopped sweet potatoes 1 can of corn, drained 2 tablespoons of minced onion 2 tablespoons of minced green onion 2 tablespoons of chopped cilantro 1. Coat the sweet potatoes with EVOO and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 30 mins at 425 degrees. Remove from the oven and set aside. 2. Add two tablespoons of butter to a pan and sauté the onions, green onions, and corn until softened. Add cilantro and combine. 3. Add roasted sweet potatoes to the pan and combine gently. Set aside to garnish soup. Curried Chicken Skewers 3 boneless chicken breasts 3-4 tablespoons of curry seasoning 6 tablespoons of salted butter 3 teaspoons of curry seasoning (for curry butter garnish) Salt and pepper

SCAN

FOR THE LIVE VIDEO OF THIS RECIPE OR VISIT MYNEWORLEANS.COM/NOSH

1. Season the chicken with 3-4 tablespoons curry seasoning (to your taste), and salt and pepper on both sides. 2. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet and sauté chicken until cooked through. 3. Slice the chicken into hearty chunks to make putting it on a skewer or stick easier. 4. To make the curry butter, melt the remaining 4 tablespoons of butter and mix in 3 teaspoons of curry seasoning, until well combined. 5. Drizzle that butter over the chicken and you’re done!

SAM HANNA PHOTO MYNEWORLEANS.COM 73


CHEERS

B Y E L IZ ABE TH P E AR C E

THE OTHER REDHEAD

2 oz. Tullamore D.E.W. Irish Whiskey 0.5 oz. Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur 0.5 oz. Ancho Reyes chili liqueur 2 dashes Regan’s orange bitters

1. Stir all ingredients

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SUGAR AND SPICE

Everything’s nice in The Other Redhead

Take time stirring so the drink is nice and cold. Chill your glass as well.

NOVEMBER 2020

2. Garnish with an orange twist.

2 Choose an Irish whiskey like Tullamore which is not too sweet.

3 Chili liqueur is made from Poblano chilis, which yield a smoky, not too spicy, liqueur.

Andrea Heming’s “The Other Redhead,” a riff on the classic Manhattan, was created when she worked with redhead Kimberly Patton Bragg. Customers would ask if she was Kim and she’d say “No, I’m the other redhead.” The drink is a great fall warmer and easy to put together. When COVID-19 disrupted the service industry, Heming helped launch Culture Aid Nola(www.cultureaidnola. org/). What began with customers dropping off food for needy workers has supplied over 1.5 tons of food to those in need. Heming has now returned to her previous professional life, working with the Coast Guard and though she isn’t mixing drinks for work anymore (no alcohol offshore,) she remains the default bartender for friends’ functions. “The Other Redhead” is always popular there.

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and strain into a coupe glass.

PODCAST

LISTEN TO ELIZABETH’S PODCAST “DRINK & LEARN;” VISIT ELIZABETH-PEARCE.COM

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DINING GUIDE The Dining Guide is comprised of restaurants recently reviewed and visited by New Orleans Magazine. The list will change regularly to provide information on others that are also worth noting and acknowledging. Please check restaurant websites for up-to-date hours and locations. If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com. $ = AVERAGE ENTRÉE PRICE

AMERICAN

Acorn City Park, $ AcornNola.com Audubon Clubhouse Uptown, $$ AudubonInstitute.org Boulevard American Bistro Multiple Locations, $$$ BoulevardBistro.com

$ = $5-10

$$ = $11-15

Upperline Uptown, $$$$ Upperline.com Ye Olde College Inn Carrollton, $$$ CollegeInn1933.com Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill Multiple Locations, $$$ ZeaRestaurants.com ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN

$$$ = $16-20

$$$$ = $21-25

BURGERS

Bayou Burger French Quarter, $$ 5SportsBarNewOrleans.com

The Company Burger Uptown, $ TheCompanyBurger.com

Arnaud’s Remoulade French Quarter, $$ Remoulade.com

FRENCH

Chartres House French Quarter, $$$ ChartresHouse.com

Café NOMA City Park, $ CafeNoma.com

Little Tokyo Multiple Locations, $$ LittleTokyoNola.com

Camellia Grill Riverbend, $ 309-2679

Magasin Uptown, $ MagasinCafe.com

Carrollton Market Riverbend, $$$ CarrolltonMarket.com

MoPho Mid-City, $$$ MoPhoNola.com

District Donuts Sliders Brew Multiple Locations, $ DonutsAndSliders.com

Rock-N-Sake Multiple Locations, $$$ RockNSake.com

Five Happiness Mid-City, $$ FiveHappiness.com

Union Ramen Bar Lower Garden District, $$ UnionRamen.com

Martin Wine Cellar Multiple Locations, $ MartinWineCellar.com

BAKERY/BREAKFAST

La Petite Grocery Uptown, $$$ LaPetiteGrocery.com

Breads on Oak Carrollton, $ BreadsOnOak.com.

Lilette Uptown, $$$$$ LiletteRestaurant.com

Café du Monde Multiple Locations, $ CafeDuMonde.com

GASTROPUB

Restaurant August CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ RestaurantAugust.com Rib Room French Quarter, $$$ RibRoomNewOrleans.com The Grill Room CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ GrillRoomNewOrleans.com The Pelican Club French Quarter, $$$$$ PelicanClub.com

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CC’s Coffee House Multiple Locations, $ CCsCoffee.com Gracious Bakery + Café Multiple Locations, $ GraciousBakery.com Ruby Slipper Café Multiple Locations, $$ TheRubySlipperCafe.net BARBECUE

BB King’s Blues Club French Quarter, $$$ BBKings.com/new-orleans

ITALIAN

Andrea’s Restaurant Metairie, $$$ AndreasRestaurant.com

Hoshun Restaurant Uptown, $$ HoshunRestaurant.com

Parkway Bakery and Tavern Mid-City, $ ParkwayPoorBoys.com

The Delachaise Uptown, $$ TheDelaichaise.com

Port of Call French Quarter, $$ PortOfCallNola.com

Caffe! Caffe! Metairie, $ CaffeCaffe.com

New Orleans Social House CBD/Warehouse District, $$ NOSocialHouse.com

$$$$$ = $25 & UP

Broussard’s French Quarter, $$$$ Broussards.com Café Degas Faubourg St. John, $$ CafeDegas.com Coquette Uptown, $$$ 2CoquetteNola.com Justine French Quarter, $$$ JustineNola.com La Crêpe Nanou Uptown, $$$ LaCrepeNanou.com

Bouligny Tavern Uptown, $$ BoulignyTavern.com Cane & Table French Quarter, $$ CaneAndTableNola.com Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro French Quarter, $$$ OrleansGrapevine.com Patrick’s Bar Vin French Quarter, $$ PatricksBarVin.com Sylvain French Quarter, $$$ SylvainNOLA.com

Domenica CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ DomenicaRestaurant.com Gianna Restaurant CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ GiannaRestaurant.com

PARKWAY    

Fall weather evokes cravings for comfort food. You can’t do much better than Parkway’s classic “Surf and Turf.” Featuring their signature slowroasted beef and fried Louisiana shrimp, it comes topped with gravy and dressed on flaky Leidenheimer French bread. Parkway offers dine-in, take out, and contactless parking lot pickup. Picnic spots in City Park and Bayou St John are a stone’s throw away. Roll up your sleeves and tuck into the perfect comfort food for a chilly day.

Irene’s Cuisine French Quarter, $$$$ IrenesNola.com Josephine Estelle CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ JosephineEstelle.com Liuzza’s Mid-City, $$ Liuzzas.com Muriel’s Jackson Square French Quarter, $$$$ Muriels.com Napoleon House French Quarter, $ NapoleonHouse.com Pascal’s Manale Uptown, $$$$ PascalsManale.com Red Gravy Uptown, $$ RedGravy.com Restaurant R’evolution French Quarter, $$$$$ RevolutionNola.com Tommy’s Cuisine CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ TommysNewOrleans.com

RED GRAVY

Homemade gnocchi, ravioli and other pastas await diners at Red Gravy’s new location in the heart of Uptown at 4206 Magazine St. Come by for brunch favorites like “Skillet Cakes,” oven-baked pancakes that feature lemon curd and cream cheese for a one/two sweet and savory punch. Italian twists on brunch fare include “Cannoli Pancakes” and “Si Si Toscana” made with fresh ricotta. For dinner, consider the “Wild Boar Ragu.” Patio seating is offered as well.  


Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Multiple Locations, $$$ VicentsItalianCuisine.com

Drago’s Multiple Locations, $$$$ DragosRestaurant.com

SoBou French Quarter, $$ SoBouNola.com

GW Fins French Quarter, $$$$$ GWFins.com

LOUISIANIAN FARE

Emeril’s CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ EmerilsRestaurants.com

Tableau French Quarter, $$$ TableauFrenchQuarter.com

Kingfish French Quarter, $$$ KingfishNewOrleans.com

The Bistreaux French Quarter, $$ MaisonDupuy.com/dining

Le Bayou French Quarter, $$$ LeBayouRestaurant.com

The Bombay Club French Quarter, $$$$ TheBombayClub.com

Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Metairie, $$ AustinsNo.com

Acme Oyster House Multiple Locations, $$ AcmeOyster.com Antoine’s French Quarter, $$$$$ Antoines.com Arnaud’s French Quarter, $$$$$ ArnaudsRestaurant.com Austin’s Metairie, $$$ AustinsNo.com Boucherie Carrollton, $$ Boucherie-Nola.com Brennan’s French Quarter, $$$$ Brennansneworleans.com Brigtsen’s Riverbend, $$$$$ Brigtsens.com Café Reconcile Central City, $$ CafeReconcile.org Casamento’s Uptown, $$ CasamentosRestaurant.com Clancy’s Uptown, $$$ ClancysNewOrleans.com Cochon CBD/Warehouse District, $$ CochonRestaurant.com Copeland’s Multiple Locations, $$ CopelandsofNewOrleans. com Commander’s Palace Garden District, $$$$ CommandersPalace.com Court of Two Sisters French Quarter, $$$$$ CourtOfTwoSisters.com Crabby Jack’s Metairie, $ CrabbyJacksNola.com Criollo French Quarter, $$$ CriolloNola.com Dooky Chase Restaurant Treme, $$ DookyChaseRestaurant.com

Galatoire’s French Quarter, $$$$$ Galatoires.com Gautreau’s Uptown, $$$$$ GautreausRestaurant.com Herbsaint CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ Herbsaint.com House of Blues French Quarter, $$ HouseOfBlues.com/ NewOrleans Jack Rose Garden District, $$$$ JackRoseRestaurant.com Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Mid-City, $$ KatiesInMidCity.com Mandina’s Mid-City, $$ MandinasRestaurant.com Mother’s CBD/Warehouse District, $$ MothersRestaurant.net Mulate’s CBD/Warehouse District, $$ Mulates.com NOLA French Quarter, $$$$$ EmerilsRestaurants.com/ Nola-Restaurant Palace Café CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ PalaceCafe.com Ralph’s On The Park Mid-City, $$$ RalphsOnThePark.com Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant French Quarter, $$$ RichardFiskes.com Royal House French Quarter, $$$ RoyalHouseRestaurant.com St. Roch Market Upper 9th Ward, $$ StRochMarket.com

Toups’ Meatery Mid-City, $$$ ToupsMeatery.com Tujague’s French Quarter, $$$$$ TujaguesRestaurant.com PIZZA

Pizza Delicious Bywater, $ PizzaDelicious.com Reginelli’s Pizzeria Multiple Locations, $$ Reginellis.com Theo’s Pizza Multiple Locations, $$ TheosPizza.com Pizza Domenica Multiple Locations, $$ PizzaDomenica.com SEAFOOD

Borgne CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ BorgneRestaurant.com Briquette CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ Briquette-Nola.com Deanie’s Seafood Multiple Locations,$$$ Deanies.com Desi Vega’s Seafood and Steaks Metairie, $$$$ DesiVegaSeafood.com

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Multiple Locations, $$$ MrEdsRestaurants.com/ oyster-bar New Orleans Creole Cookery French Quarter, $$$ NewOrleansCreoleCookery. com

La Boca CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ LaBocaSteaks.com Mr. John’s Steakhouse Uptown, $$$ MrJohnsSteakhouse.com Ruth’s Chris Steak House Multiple Locations, $$$$$ RuthsChris.com The Steakhouse at Harrah’s CBD/WarehouseDistrict, $$$$$ HarrahsNewOrleans.com WORLD

1000 Figs Faubourg St. John, $$ 1000Figs.com

Oceana Grill French Quarter, $$ OceanaGrill.com

Bayona French Quarter, $$$$$ Bayona.com

Pêche CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ PecheRestaurant.com.

Compére Lapin CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ CompereLapin.com

Pier 424 French Quarter, $$$ Pier424SeafoodMarket.com Red Fish Grill French Quarter, $$$ RedFishGrill.com Sac-A-Lait CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com SPECIALTY FOODS

Antoine’s Annex French Quarter, $$$ Antoines.com/AntoinesAnnex STEAKHOUSE

Crescent City Steaks Mid-City, $$$$ CrescentCitySteaks.com

Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House French Quarter, $$$$ BourbonHouse.com

Desi Vega’s Steakhouse CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ DesiVegaSteaks.com

Don’s Seafood Metairie, $$$ DonsSeafoodOnline.com

Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse French Quarter, $$$$ DickieBrennansSteakhouse. com

Grand Isle Restaurant CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ GrandIsleRestaurant.com

Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak French Quarter, $$$ Galatoires33BarAndSteak. com

El Gato Negro Multiple Locations, $$ ElGatoNegroNola.com Lucy’s CBD/Warehouse District, $ LucysRetiredSurfers.com Lüke CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ LukeNewOrleans.com Mona’s Café Mid-City, $ MonasCafeAndDeli.com Patois Uptown,$$$ PatoisNola.com Saba Uptown, $$$ EatWithSaba.com Seaworthy CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ SeaworthyNola.com Shaya Uptown, $$$ ShayaRestaurant.com

Doris Metropolitan French Quarter, $$$$ DorisMetropolitan.com

MYNEWORLEANS.COM

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

SPONSORED

Antoine’s

Briquette

Copper Vine

Antoines.com 713 Saint Louis St, New Orleans 504-581-4422

Briquette-nola.com 701 South Peters St, New Orleans 504-302-7496

CopperVineWine.com 1001 Poydras St, New Orleans 504-208-9535

Antoine’s World Renowned French Creole Cuisine, impeccable service and celebrating our 180-year historical atmosphere create an unmatched French Quarter dining experience. Timeless Favorites and Fresh Classics are served our 14 themed dining rooms and the Hermes Bar. Open for Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Jazz Brunch. Call for reservations or book through Open Table.

Enjoy a Creole Thanksgiving feast with us this year! Make Your Reservations Now. $45 per person for a 3-course menu featuring gumbo, turkey, seafood cornbread dressing, Cajun dirty rice, pecan sweet potato casserole, and decadent cinnamon-spiced pumpkin pie.

Copper Vine is full of tropical charm steeped in a historic space that dates back to 1876. Executive Chef Amy Mehrtens’ inventive Louisiana cuisine boasts familiar New Orleans favorites with fresh classics like Herb Roasted Mushroom Pasta and Semolina Gnocchi & Duck Confit; pairing perfectly with Sommelier Lydia Kurkoski’s extensive cellar list and thirty wines on tap.

New Orleans Creole Cookery

Parkway Bakery and Tavern

Pascal’s Manale

NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com 508 Toulouse St, New Orleans 504-524-9632

ParkwayPoorBoys.com 538 Hagan Ave, New Orleans 504-482-3047   Parkway can now take your phone orders no matter how busy or long the line is. Our new call in kitchen makes it easy to call, pickup, and enjoy some of the best poorboys in town! Parkway is now open from 10am to 4pm Wednesday through Sunday for dine in and parking lot pickup. 

PascalsManale.com 1838 Napoleon Ave, New Orleans 504-895-4877

You haven’t experienced New Orleans until you’ve dined with us! Our signature items include Shrimp Creole and Gumbo three different ways. Happy Hour daily from 3-6 and Brunch Sat and Sun 11am3pm. Open Thanksgiving Day with a traditional 3-course turkey dinner. Make your reservation now!

A New Orleans tradition since 1913. Renowned for its raw oyster bar, famous BBQ Shrimp, traditional Creole and Italian cuisine and thick juicy steaks. Two private rooms that seat 10-14 guests in one and up to 20 guests in the other. Join us Tues, Wed, Thurs for select appetizer and drink specials.


SPONSORED

EdwardDufresneCommunityCenter.com 274 Judge Edward Dufresne Pkwy, Luling 985-331-3795

Gautreau’s Restaurant GautreausRestaurant.com 1728 Soniat St, New Orleans 504-899-7397

Justine JustineNola.com 225 Chartres St, New Orleans 504-218-8533

St. Charles Parish’s multi-functional facility is designed to host numerous functions from meetings to formal banquets and receptions. Full-service, on-site caterer is available to meet all your food and beverage needs; all gatherings and events will be hosted according to CDC guidelines with proper social distancing.

Nestled in a lush garden spot Uptown, Gautreau’s is one of the city’s premier, fine dining neighborhood restaurants known for their elegant, yet approachable menu that is both inventive and down to earth. Gautreau’s will be open for dinner service Wednesday through Saturday. Reservations are required and can be made by phone or Open Table. Masks required.

Justine is a Parisian-style brasserie by husband-and-wife team Justin and Mia Devillier. Combining the sophistication of a brasserie with the playfulness of the French Quarter, Justine honors the technique and simplicity of French classics in a bustling, multi-roomed restaurant with vibrant decor and grand presentation.

Red Gravy Cafe

Saffron NOLA

Seaworthy

RedGravyCafe.com 4206 Magazine St, New Orleans 504-561-8844

SaffronNola.com 4128 Magazine St, New Orleans 504-323-2626

SeaorthyNola.com 630 Carondelet St, New Orleans 504-930-3071 

Visit Red Gravy at their new location Uptown on Magazine Street with a spacious backyard patio as well as indoor seating! Red Gravy has a new dinner menu including handmade ravioli and lasagna. Dinner is available Wednesday-Saturday, 5-9, and brunch on Saturday-Sunday, 10-2. Reservations recommended.

Saffron NOLA, a swanky Indian restaurant by the lauded Vilkhu family. Intertwining Indian tradition with New Orleans soul on a modern stage. The Vilkhus pay tribute to where they come from while also honoring where they live, New Orleans. Saffron is a one-of-a-kind experience on Magazine Street.

Seaworthy showcases wild-caught and sustainably harvested oysters from all over North America – as well as locally sourced fish and game. The celebrated beverage program offers both classic and proprietary cocktails, with a smart selection of beer and wine.

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Edward A. Dufresne Community Center


SPONSORED

holiday gift guide 1. Diamonds Direct DiamondsDirect.com 3230 Severn Ave, Metairie 504-383-3900 This beautiful Diamonds by the Yard necklace is the perfect holiday gift for all ages! The classic diamond necklace is available in a variety of carat weights set in 14 karat white gold. Pricing starts at $1,450.

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2. Home Malone HomeMaloneNola.com 629 N Carrollton, Mid-City, 504-324-8352 4610 Magazine St, Uptown, 504-766-6148 Mini versions of our door hangers that you can now hang on your tree or use for a little lagniappe on your gift wrapping. $10. 3. Art Gumbo WhitneyMJeffreys.com artgumbodesigns@gmail.com Give a mini of your favorite city this holiday season. 4x4x1.5" canvas with gold, textured Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain. Includes handpainted streets to make up the New Orleans map. Perfect gift for New Orleans lovers and the neutral color palette will match any home's decor. $39.

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4. Auraluz ShopAuraluz.com 4408 Shores Dr, Metairie 504-888-3313 Lampe Berger is always a great holiday gift for anyone on your list! Over 50 fragrances and lamps to choose from. We also have numerous local New Orleans-themed items for kids to adults!

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5. Perlis Perlis.com 6070 Magazine St, New Orleans 600 Decatur St, French Quarter 1281 N. Causeway Blvd, Mandeville 8366 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge French Quarter Daytime 24K Gold Cloisonné Christmas Ornament handcrafted in a rare, eight step process by highly trained artisans. Shatterproof with a copper base to ensure durability with keep safe gift box. 6. Queork Queork.com 3005 Magazine St, New Orleans 504-388-6803 Structured and refined. The Geaux Bag is the perfect cross-body bag for a lunch date with friends, a polo match, or any occasion that calls for a refined, fresh modern look. The Geaux bag is lined with ultra-suede and has one interior pocket. $165. 7. Southern Refinishing  SouthernRefinishing.com 708 Barataria Blvd, Marrero 504-348-1770 Give a gift card to Southern Refinishing this holiday season. With the refinishing/restoration process, your worn-out fixtures and tile can be restored to their original luster in less than a day. You can even change the color of your fixtures and tile to have the bathroom of your dreams. 80

NOVEMBER 2020

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SPONSORED

Senior Care W

hile the pandemic has disrupted everyone’s lives, perhaps the most affected population is our senior community, older adults who find themselves both more at risk and more prone to isolation. Area seniors deserve added support and love during these difficult times, and whether you’re caring for a loved one in your own home or assisting in their care elsewhere, it’s important to understand the necessary precautions for safety while seeking the best ways to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle and independence. IN-HOME CARE Dependable In-Home Care Aging in the home has always been the preferred choice for the elderly— now it is also one of the safest. “Exposure to fewer people today is paramount,” says Joni FriedmannLagasse, Owner of Dependable In-Home Care. “That doesn’t mean you cannot safely bring in home care.” An experienced, professional caregiver understands and uses universal precautions such as wearing a mask and washing hands, but it is the families who must be vigilant concerning others in the home, especially younger family members. Everyone should be observing these simple precautions. With over 100,000 successful referrals over 50 years, Dependable In-Home Care holds high standards for referring caregivers. It is the only nationally accredited caregiver registry in the region. They help you find the right caregiver who can provide everything from total care to basic supervision, help with daily activities, meal prep, transportation plus bathing, dressing, and mobility assistance. For more information on the company’s vetted pool of nearly 100 experienced caregivers, visit dependablecare.net. Personal HomeCare Services When you can’t be at home to care for your family member, you want peace of mind knowing that the person who is there will treat your loved one with the same level of care and concern that you would. At Personal HomeCare Services, your family is their family. For over 22 years Personal HomeCare Services has been providing 24/7, in-home companion care. The company offers clients the ability to remain in the comfort of their own home with their personal memories and possessions while you regain the time and energy needed to experience being a real family again. Personal HomeCare Services is one of the first non-medical services specializing in live-in care and working in conjunction with doctors, healthcare providers, and hospices to provide continuous around-theclock care without the worry and expense of hourly services. They’ve built a solid reputation with word-of-mouth referral, evidence of the trust their clients have in their caretakers and services. Services include meal preparation, help with personal hygiene, medicinal reminders, light housekeeping, transportation to/from appointments, and companionship. References are available upon request. To learn more, visit PersonalHomecare.net or call 877-336-8045. Home Instead Now more than ever, aging adults see home as the safest place to be. Fortunately for these adults and their families, Home Instead offers peace of mind with a dedicated staff of CAREGiversSM, essential workers who are fully trained to provide—in the home—the care and companionship your loved one deserves. In addition to offering CAREGivers, a homecare tablet has been added to improve protection and connection for seniors during isolation. A local franchise owned by New Orleans native Lisa Rabito, Home Instead offers the added benefit of staff who understand New Orleans’ culture and hospitality. CAREGivers provide support through nonmedical services like meal preparation, transportation, personal care, medication reminders, and more, while working in tandem when needed with healthcare providers, home health, and hospice. CAREGivers are available from 12 hours a week to 24 hours a day. Aging adults no longer in the home can also request Home Instead services at the retirement

community or nursing facility where they reside. For more information, visit HomeInstead.com/339 or call 504-455-4911. Home Care Solutions Home Care Solutions is a locally owned and operated company specializing in compassionate in-home sitting services, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Care as well as Aging Life Care Management™ services to help your elderly loved ones extend their independence at home. Their mission is to help clients age in place gracefully while maintaining as much independence as possible. Since the onset of Covid-19, many families have been under additional pressure to provide care for an aging loved one. Many of these families are also coping with massive changes to their own lives, and Home Care Solutions can step in and provide an extra arm of support that provides less risk of exposure than at a retirement community while allowing for continued connection with family. Caregivers are carefully matched to meet your loved one’s needs and personality while Care Managers’ familiarity with local resources can save you time and often money. Caregivers’ and Care Managers’ compassionate understanding of the aging process relieves you of unnecessary distress. For more information, call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com. RETIREMENT LIVING Vista Shores Vista Shores—a luxury senior living community offering the highest quality assisted living and memory care in Greater New Orleans—is now welcoming new residents. Vista Shores delights residents with chefprepared meals in the bistro and quaint dining rooms, its relaxing lounge for coffee or cocktails, and a wrap-around porch on Bayou St. John perfect for sunset. Vista Shores diverse social and cultural activities and fitness programs keep residents active and engaged, while weekly housekeeping, laundry, and transportation services ensure that residents can relax and focus on living their best lives. Vista Shores residents are provided with 24-hour personal care and individualized assistance plans. The Filmore Neighborhood is an entire floor dedicated to Memory Care residents. The care team has been rigorously trained in Alzheimer’s/dementia care to enrich the lives of memory care residents. If you have a loved one living with Alzheimer’s or Dementia, find support at Vista Shores’ free Alzheimer's Association Caregivers Monthly Support Group on the second Saturday of every month at 11 a.m. To find out how a move to Vista Shores is both easy and affordable, visit vistashores.com or call 504-288-3737. Peristyle Residences Peristyle Residences offer Residential Assisted Living and Memory Care in the comfort of luxurious, intimate homes complete with private bedrooms and congregate dining and living areas. This alternative approach to senior living is ideal for seniors who seek assistance with day-to-day living in a more private setting than traditional assisted living communities can provide. Peristyle Residences consists of ten beautiful homes throughout Greater New Orleans finest neighborhoods. Opened in 2019, Old Metairie Gardens I & II, are the only senior living homes in Old Metairie. Peristyle Residences is pleased to announce its newest home, The Jefferson, is now accepting priority reservations. Located on Central Avenue near the river in Jefferson, this beautifully appointed home offers 10 spacious private bedrooms. Peristyle’s quaint, lovely residences provide the highest level of care, comfort, and compassion to seniors, along with convenience and peace of mind for their loved ones. Peristyle Residences caregivers are highly trained in dementia care and have ample experience caring for seniors. Schedule a tour today at PeristyleResidences.com or by calling 504-517-3273. SPECIALIZED MEDICAL CARE Tulane Doctors Tulane Doctors is proud to introduce Connected Care, a medical practice that specializes in caring for the most vulnerable patients – physically fragile, elderly people with complex, chronic health issues. MYNEWORLEANS.COM

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SPONSORED Dr. Ricardo Febry, Medical Director, explains the care model, “Our medical professionals coordinate all preventive and chronic care, working with medical specialists based on patient needs. All care is provided in the comfort of the patient’s location, whether it’s at a private residence, nursing home, assisted living center, or long-term care facility. Urgent Care is delivered via telemedicine.” The team consists of physicians, nurse practitioners, and other clinical experts and provide the full spectrum of the patient’s healthcare needs. The team coordinates with emergency physicians and hospitals if inpatient admission is required. The mission of Tulane Doctors - Connected Care is to provide care to patients in Orleans and Jefferson Parishes when and where it’s needed. This comprehensive care model is designed for their convenience and comfort. To learn more, call 504-456-9199.

HEALTH INSURANCE & PHARMACY ASSISTANCE Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is devoted to its mission to improve the health and lives of Louisianians. Now more than ever, it’s important to stay on top of your healthcare, especially if you’re over 60 or have a long-term condition like diabetes or high blood pressure. Getting your annual wellness visit is a great opportunity to talk to your primary care provider about any health concerns you may have to be sure you’re staying on track. If you’ve been putting off needed care because of COVID-19, now is the time to make your annual wellness visit a priority. You may even be able to have a virtual visit right from your home. Call your primary care provider today to make an appointment. And while you’re there, be sure to ask about getting a flu shot to help you avoid getting sick. For more on keeping up with care, visit bcbsla.com/keepupwithcare.

PLANNING & ARRANGEMENTS Jacob Schoen & Son Jacob Schoen & Son has been providing pre-need and funeral services to families in Greater New Orleans since 1874. Whether you are looking for funeral, cremation, or memorial services, their mission is to offer a home, a comforting place to gather in remembrance and celebration of lives well lived. The Schoen family and staff is committed to this vision and passionate about making sure your time with them is as memorable and uplifting as possible. They bring together decades of experience caring for families of all cultural backgrounds and diverse walks of life. They pledge to treat you and your loved ones just like family, and they guarantee to offer services that meet your specifications while exceeding all of your expectations. Located at 3827 Canal Street, a city landmark, Jacob Schoen & Son invites you to see the difference by touring their one-of-a-kind space, discussing what innovative options they have available, and learning more about how they can help you or a loved one fulfill their wishes. Stop by or call 504-267-2924 to learn more and get started.

Patio Drugs Patio Drugs has a full-service retail pharmacy including compounding and medical equipment services. Seniors in our community benefit from the services offered in their long-term care pharmacy. In business since 1958, Patio Drugs has a unique awareness of their customers’ needs and gears their services accordingly. Free prescription delivery is offered in certain areas. They offer unit dose medication and multi-dose drug packaging cards to assist patients with remaining adherent and independent with their drug therapies. With their medication synchronization program, they coordinate with patients to have all their prescriptions filled on the same day, avoiding running out of medication or forgetting to call in refills. Patio Drugs pharmacists offer a comprehensive medication review with patients to discuss any questions about medications, diet, and overall health. Their team works collaboratively with your physician to ensure you are receiving the highest quality care and the clearest understanding of your medication therapies. •

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NOVEMBER 2020


MYNEWORLEANS.COM

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SPONSORED

Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

J

oint pain and back pain are common problems for people, especially older adults or those who’ve been hard on their bodies at work or in athletics. Finding a solution to pain can be a difficult journey to begin, but when pain starts affecting your life, an expert should be sought. Orthopaedic Medicine is one specialty that treats such issues, and a number of resources are available in this specialty across New Orleans. A specialist can help you determine what diagnostics should be done, would treatments are available, and what therapies might most benefit you. They often know about the latest research and clinical trials and can help determine what advancements or technologies can offer life-changing solutions. Whether you suffer pain from a chronic condition or an injury, consider checking in with a specialist on what options might be available today.

CLINICAL TRIALS

Aesculap Biologics If you are experiencing continued knee issues following a previous cartilage injury, you may be a good candidate for Aesculap Biologics’ Phase 3 clinical trial for NOVOCART® 3D, a tissue engineered cell-based product designed to repair articular cartilage defects of the knee. Exciting advances in cellular research have allowed medicine to begin a new focus on regenerative medicine, which encourages the body to repair damaged or diseased tissue by recreating and integrating new tissue in the place of old tissue. Using a combination of cells and smart biomaterial devices, Aesculap Biologics’ products may stimulate and support the synthesis of new tissue and enhance the body’s own regenerative power. Through the overlap of cell and molecular biology, biomaterial and bioengineering disciplines, the vision of restoring and extending a patient’s normal, active lifestyle without the use of plastic, metal or foreign tissue parts is no longer science fiction. To learn more and potentially join the NOVOCART® 3D clinical trial, visit aesculapbiologics.com/en/patients.html. • 84

NOVEMBER 2020


A Special Section of New Orleans Magazine WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM & EVENTS GUIDE

NOVEMBER 2020

Watch on WYES-TV and wyes.org on Sundays, November 1-22 at 8:00 p.m.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF (C) THE FORGE

OUTWIT THE OPPOSITION—OR GET RUN OVER.

“ROADKILL” HUGH LAURIE STARS IN A POLITICAL THRILLER

SCRIPTED BY DAVID HARE


WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS

PBS NEWSHOUR ELECTION NIGHT COVERAGE Tuesday, November 3 at 5:00 p.m. The PBS NewsHour politics team will provide in-depth reports, extensive analysis and live results. Anchored by Judy Woodruff.

GREAT PERFORMANCES “Lea Salonga in Concert” Friday, November 27 at 8:30 p.m. The Tony Award- winner performs songs from Broadway’s “Miss Saigon,” “Les Misérables,” and "Once On This Island," in addition to movies like “Aladdin” and “Mulan.” The special was filmed at the Sydney Opera House in Australia with Gerard Salonga conducting the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. Photo Credit: Raymund Isaac DOLLY PARTON: I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU (MY MUSIC) Monday, November 30 at 7:00 p.m. The program focuses on the first two decades of the beloved singersongwriter’s career as she crossed over from her rural Tennessee country roots to become one of the world’s most popular and celebrated artists on stage, television and film with hits including “Coat of Many Colors,” “Here You Come Again,” “Islands In The Stream” (with Kenny Rogers) and “9 To 5.” Narrated by Pam Tillis.

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LIVING IN THE NEW NORMAL: HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IMPACT Thursday, November 12 at 7:00 p.m.; Friday, November 13 at 10:30 p.m.; Sunday, November 15 at 10:00 a.m.; Monday, November 16 at 10:30 p.m. Visitors from across the world travel to New Orleans to enjoy the food, music and warm hospitality. But COVID-19 has caused travelers to stay home which has taken a toll on the region’s hospitality industry. The next episode of the WYES series LIVING IN THE NEW NORMAL looks into how restaurants, hotels, area musicians and the tourism industry have handled the challenges brought on by the pandemic. WYES Community Projects Producer and INFORMED SOURCES host, Marcia Kavanaugh, will moderate the discussion.

MASTERPIECE “50 Fabulous Years” Sunday, November 29 at 7:00 p.m. Celebrate the iconic series that introduced generations of PBS viewers to the delights of British drama. From “Upstairs Downstairs” to “I, Claudius” to “The Jewel in the Crown” and “Downton Abbey,” MASTERPIECE has stood the test of time.


holiday

WYES ONLINE AUCTION!

QUALITY SHOWS. ON YOUR SCHEDULE.

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

Coming in December, bid on staycations, vacations, home furnishings, art, food and wine, family fun, holiday gifts, decor and more! Details coming soon at wyes.org.

FLESH AND BLOOD

With WYES Passport you can binge newly added series and programs like Flesh and Blood, Classic Albums and Great Performances’ "Romeo and Juliet.” Passport also keeps you up-to-date on your favorite PBS programs like Austin City Limits, American Masters and Finding Your Roots. WYES is pleased to also include in Passport our nostalgic local documentaries and cooking series from Kevin Belton and most recently — Kitchen Queens: New Orleans. Members who donate $60 or more will receive a one year subscription to both New Orleans Magazine and to WYES Passport. To become a WYES Member go to wyes.org/support or call 504.831.1503. D3


1 SUNDAY

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

6pm MASTERPIECE “Howard’s End” (Episode 1 of 4) 7pm THE TROUBLE WITH MAGGIE COLE (Part 3 of 6) Peter Cole is visibly jittery from public and press attention following Maggie’s interview. Author Marcus bonds with Jill and Maggie continues her mission to right all of her wrongs, with a tense visit to local hairdresser Kelly.

8pm FRONTLINE “The Choice 2020: Trump Vs. Biden”

individuals who survived the sinking of the RMS Titanic.

10pm IRISH NEW ORLEANS

10pm NATURE “Primates: Secrets of Survival” (Part 1 of 3)

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

3 TUESDAY

5 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THIS OLD HOUSE 7:30pm ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

NEW

8pm MASTERPIECE “Roadkill” (Episode 1 of 4) Ambition knows no bounds, nor does corruption in a political thriller written by David Hare and starring Hugh Laurie as a scheming UK government minister. Crime may not pay, but politics sure does. In the premiere episode, having just come off a libel case, Peter Laurence faces a pair of family scandals. 9pm COBRA (Part 5 of 6) With the crisis worsening, Fraser deals with issues in his personal life. The Prime Minister is forced to consider more extreme measures to retain control and apply order over the country. 10pm MASTERPIECE “Sherlock, Season 4” ‘The Six Thatchers’ (Episode 1 of 3) Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Sherlock Holmes, with Martin Freeman as John Watson.

5pm PBS NEWSHOUR ELECTION NIGHT COVERAGE The PBS NewsHour politics team will provide in-depth reports, extensive analysis and live results. Anchored by Judy Woodruff.

8pm MASTERPIECE “Sanditon” (Part 3 of 8) A health emergency throws Charlotte and Sidney together. 9pm MASTERPIECE “Sanditon” (Part 4 of 8) Charlotte aids a forbidden romance.

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

10pm JAMESTOWN, SEASON 1 (Part 2 of 8) Farlow and Redwick look to send the women a powerful message as their disdain for their new female neighbors intensifies.

4 WEDNESDAY

11:00pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6 FRIDAY

10pm 10 TOWNS THAT CHANGED AMERICA

7pm NATURE “Primates: Secrets of Survival” (Part 1 of 3) 8pm NOVA “Colosseum - Roman Death Trap”

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm INFORMED SOURCES 7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK

11:30pm BEYOND THE CANVAS

2 MONDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Election Collection” Explore political items across history from both sides of the aisle, plus a $600,000-$800,000 find.

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9pm SECRETS OF THE DEAD “Abandoning the Titanic” Join experts searching for a mystery ship that could have saved Titanic passengers but sailed away. Pictured: The New York Times frontpage feature showing some prominent

8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “One Man, Two Guvnors” Revel in this 1960s-era comedy featuring a Tony-winning


10 TUESDAY

performance by James Corden. Adapted from a 1743 farce, Corden plays a musician-turned-bodyguard trying to keep his two mobster clients apart, a tricky predicament resulting in comic mayhem.

11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

7 SATURDAY 6pm LAWRENCE WELK: SALUTE TO FAMOUS MUSICAL FAMILIES 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Hard Times” Filmmaker Michael Moore, as well as actresses Laura Linney and Chloë Sevigny, learn more about their family stories. 8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “John Legend and The Roots: Wake Up!” Enjoy an encore episode that includes two of the biggest names in R&B, soul and hip hop: John Legend and The Roots. Wake Up! features a collection of cover songs from the 60s and 70s that were originally written or performed by some of the most influential and timeless artists of the era, such as Donny Hathaway, Eugene McDaniels, Curtis Mayfield, Bill Withers, and many others. 9pm THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY (1978) 11pm THE KATE “Black Violin” (Part 3 of 6) Kev Marcus plays the violin and Wil B. plays the viola in this performance where classical-meets-hip-hop.

8 SUNDAY 6pm MASTERPIECE “Howard’s End” (Episode 2 of 4) 7pm THE TROUBLE WITH MAGGIE COLE (Part 4 of 6) Maggie continues to seek amends. Gambling debts plague Alex and angry parents threaten Peter’s job. 8pm MASTERPIECE “Roadkill” (Episode 2 of 4) Promoted to justice minister, Peter deals with a prison riot, an angry daughter and alarming contacts from a stranger. Meanwhile, an unknown threat looms abroad.

FINALE

7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “War Stories” Learn about the military roots of Julianne Moore, Bill Hader and Kehinde Wiley.

9pm COBRA (Part 6 of 6) In the final episode, as the crisis reaches boiling point, Fraser (Richard Dormer) and his team reach the endgame, while the Prime Minister and Anna are forced to fight for their political lives with Archie firing his first shots. 10pm MASTERPIECE “Sherlock, Season 4” ‘The Lying Detective’ (Episode 2 of 3) Sherlock faces perhaps the most chilling enemy of his long career, the powerful and seemingly unassailable Culverton Smith, a man with a very dark secret indeed. Estranged from his best friend John Watson, Sherlock seems to have descended into hell.

8pm RISE OF THE NAZIS “Politics” (Part 1 of 3) See how Adolf Hitler and the Nazis rise to power. In 1930, Germany is a liberal democracy. Just four years later, democracy is dead, Germany’s leader is a dictator and the government is in the hands of the Nazis.

11:30pm THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY (1978)

9pm FRONTLINE

9 MONDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Junk in the Trunk 10” An antique Scottish golf club; a 1777 William Faden Philadelphia map; Andy Warhol “Fiesta Pig” and “Turtle” prints.

10pm FIGHTING ON BOTH FRONTS: THE STORY OF THE 370TH tells the little-known story of a unit of African American soldiers from Illinois, largely from Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood, who fought in combat for the United States under the French during World War I. 10:30pm LAST RING HOME

8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Palm Springs” (Hour 1 of 3)

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

9pm SECRETS OF THE DEAD “World War Speed”

11 WEDNESDAY

10pm GRANDPA’S WAR STORY GOES VIRAL shares the remarkable account of James (Jim) Schmidt’s World War II service and military career, and his grandson Henry De Hoop’s efforts to generate interest in his grandfather’s war journey with the help of social media. 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

11pm STEPPIN’ OUT

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm NATURE “Primates: Family Matters” (Part 2 of 3) Family and friends are everything for primates. This episode features devoted monkey dads, playmate apes and tender troops. 8pm NOVA “Petra - Lost City of Stone” 9pm SECRETS OF THE DEAD “Nero’s Sunken City”

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WEEKDAYS ON

10pm NATURE “Primates: Family Matters” (Part 2 of 3)

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

12 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6am & 3pm MOLLY OF DENALI Follow the adventures of curious and resourceful 10-year-old Molly Mabray, an Alaska Native girl who lives in the fictional village of Qyah, Alaska.

5:00am READY JET GO!

Noon SESAME STREET

5:30am ARTHUR

12:30am ELINOR WONDERS WHY

6am MOLLY OF DENALI 6:30am WILD KRATTS 7:00am HERO ELEMENTARY 7:30am XAVIER RIDDLE AND THE SECRET MUSEUM 8am CURIOUS GEORGE 8:30am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 9:00am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 9:30am ELINOR WONDERS WHY 10:00am SESAME STREET 10:30am PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC 11:00am DINOSAUR TRAIN

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11:30am CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG

1:00pm HERO ELEMENTARY 1:30pm LET’S GO LUNA! 2:00pm NATURE CAT 2:30pm WILD KRATTS 3:00pm MOLLY OF DENALI 3:30pm XAVIER RIDDLE AND THE SECRET MUSEUM 4:00pm ODD SQUAD 4:30pm ARTHUR 5pm CAT IN THE HAT KNOW A LOT ABOUT THAT! 5:30pm PEG + CAT 6:00pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm LIVING IN THE NEW NORMAL: HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IMPACT Visitors from across the world travel to New Orleans to enjoy the food, music and warm hospitality. But COVID-19 has caused travelers to stay home which has taken a toll on the region’s hospitality industry. The next episode of the WYES series LIVING IN THE NEW NORMAL looks into how restaurants, hotels, area musicians and the tourism industry have handled the challenges brought on by the pandemic. 7:30pm THIS OLD HOUSE 8pm MASTERPIECE “Sanditon” (Part 5 of 8) Tensions come to a head when Young Stringer, desperate for answers, threatens a worker boycott. 9pm MASTERPIECE “Sanditon” (Part 6 of 8) Charlotte and Sidney must reconcile in order to help a friend. 10pm JAMESTOWN, SEASON 1 (Part 3 of 8) Pamunkey warriors descend upon the colony and the settlers meet with the tribal leader. 11:00pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

13 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm INFORMED SOURCES Hosted by Marcia Kavanaugh.

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT WYES’ weekly local restaurant, arts and entertainment discussion program is now in its 34th season. Host and producer Peggy Scott Laborde welcomes regular guests Poppy Tooker, Alan Smason, plus new roundtable visitors every week. Missed an episode? Watch it on YouTube at wyesondemand and at wyes.org. 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “Fiddler: Miracle of Miracles” Travel through the musical’s history featuring appearances by lyricist Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick as well as famous fans including Lin-Manuel Miranda, Topol and more. 10pm STEPPIN’ OUT 10:30pm LIVING IN THE NEW NORMAL: HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IMPACT looks into how restaurants, hotels, area musicians and the tourism industry have handled the challenges brought on by the pandemic. 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

14 SATURDAY 6pm LAWRENCE WELK: U.S. TOUR 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “War Stories” 8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “White Denim/Jackie Venson”


8pm NOVA “Hagia Sophia - Istanbul’s Ancient Mystery”

11pm THE KATE “Jarrod Spector and Kelli Barrett” (Part 4 of 6)

9pm SECRETS OF THE DEAD “Gangster’s Gold” Three groups of treasure hunters search for the gold fortune buried somewhere in New York by gangster Dutch Schultz in 1935.

15 SUNDAY 6pm MASTERPIECE “Howard’s End” (Episode 3 of 4) 7pm THE TROUBLE WITH MAGGIE COLE (Part 5 of 6) Maggie tries to process the family secret that has been kept from her. 8pm MASTERPIECE “Roadkill” (Episode 3 of 4) Peter is the defendant at the family dinner table. As friends, family, employees and even a dead person turn against him, he follows his motto: “Keep moving forward.” 9pm SECRETS OF ROYAL TRAVEL “Secrets of the Royal Train” (Part 1 of 2) The British Royal Family are the most welltravelled monarchy in history. The Queen alone has been round the world 42 times, clocking up over 1 million air miles. This series tells the inside story of the monarchy on the move, taking us inside some of the most famous and yet secretive transport in the world. 10pm MASTERPIECE “Sherlock, Season 4” ‘The Final Problem’ (Episode 3 of 3) In the final episode of Season 4, long buried secrets finally catch up with the Baker Street duo. Is the game finally over? 11:30pm WHITE NIGHTS (1985)

16 MONDAY

9pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Jonathan Scott’s Power Trip” HGTV home makeover expert Jonathan Scott shines a light on the obstacles and opportunities for America’s solar industry. 10:30pm LIVING IN THE NEW NORMAL: HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IMPACT 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

17 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Flight” Henry Louis Gates, Jr. meets actors Scarlett Johansson and Lupita Nyong’o and chef Lidia Bastianich, whose families crisscrossed the globe to escape oppression and find opportunity, leaving them with questions about those who stayed behind. 8pm RISE OF THE NAZIS “The First Six Months in Power” (Part 2 of 3) Discover the measures Chancellor Hitler takes to dismantle the German state. The Nazis have the power to ban free speech, books are burned, and Jewish people, gay people and those holding anti-Nazi beliefs begin to disappear. 9pm FRONTLINE

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

10pm SECRETS OF THE DEAD “The Woman in the Iron Coffin”

7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Palm Springs” (Hour 2 of 3)

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Our 50 States” (Hour 1 of 3) A Thomas Hart Benton oil on tin; Kentucky sugar chest; a 1960 inscribed copy of the book, “To Kill A Mockingbird.”

18 WEDNESDAY

10pm NATURE “Primates: Protecting Primates” (Part 3 of 3) 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

19 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THIS OLD HOUSE 7:30pm ASK THIS OLD HOUSE 8pm MASTERPIECE “Sanditon” (Part 7 of 8) With the regatta approaching, the success of the resort hangs in the balance—as do a number of romances. 9pm MASTERPIECE “Sanditon” (Part 8 of 8) It is the night of the Midsummer Ball, and romance, jealousy and betrayal fill the air.

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

9pm DR. STRANGELOVE (1964) Directed by Stanley Kubrick.

10pm JAMESTOWN, SEASON 1 (Part 4 of 8) Rumor of a gold mine map sends suspicion around the settlement. 11:00pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

20 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm NATURE “Primates: Protecting Primates” (Part 3 of 3)

7pm INFORMED SOURCES Now in its 36th year, the weekly news analysis program continues to offer viewers an in depth

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WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

SATURDAYS ON

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK

10am KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS The series introduces viewers to female chefs who are making their mark on the city’s food scene with unforgettable and uncommon dishes. Pictured: Melissa Martin of Mosquito Supper Club

5:00AM MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD 5:30AM ARTHUR 6:00AM MOLLY OF DENALI 6:30AM WILD KRATTS 7:00AM GROWING A GREENER WORLD 7:30AM WOODSMITH SHOP 8:00AM AMERICAN WOODSHOP 8:30AM THIS OLD HOUSE 9:00AM THIS OLD HOUSE 9:30AM KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS 10AM KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS 10:30AM CHEF PAUL PRUDHOMME’S ALWAYS COOKING

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look into the important news of metro New Orleans and Louisiana. Repeats Sunday mornings at 9:30 a.m. Missed an episode? Watch it on the WYES On Demand channel at YouTube.com and at wyes.org. Pictured: Host Marcia Kavanaugh and Producer Errol Laborde

11:00AM LIDIA’S KITCHEN 11:30AM AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN FROM COOK’S ILLUSTRATED NOON COOK’S COUNTRY 12:30PM CHRISTOPHER KIMBALL’S MILK STREET 1:00PM MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING 1:30PM DISHING WITH JULIA 2:00PM SARA’S WEEKNIGHT MEALS 2:30PM MY GREEK TABLE WITH DIANE KOCHILAS 3:00PM NOVA 4:00PM NATURE 5:00PM ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn – The Broadway Musical” Enjoy the hit Broadway adaptation of the classic 1942 movie musical, showcasing an Irving Berlin score including the Oscar-winning “White Christmas” with big dance numbers, comedy and a hit parade of the great songwriter’s famous tunes. 11pm STEPPIN’ OUT 11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

21 SATURDAY 6pm LAWRENCE WELK: THANKSGIVING AMERICA, THE MELTING POT 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Flight” 8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “The Mavericks ‘En Español’” En Español flips the band’s usual fusion formula, which adds a striking assortment of genres – salsa, ska, norteño, mariachi, and much more – to its sturdy rock/ country base. 9pm THE NATURAL (1984) 11:30pm THE KATE “Jimmy Webb with Special Guest Ashley Campbell”

22 SUNDAY 6pm MASTERPIECE “Howard’s End” (Episode 4 of 4)

FINALE 7pm THE TROUBLE WITH MAGGIE COLE (Part 6 of 6) As Maggie continues to seek amends with her neighbors, she makes a horrifying discovery in a confrontation with Roxanna. Gambling debts plague Alex and the community’s continued pressure on Peter threatens his job and family. 8pm MASTERPIECE “Roadkill” (Episode 4 of 4) With the prime minister in trouble, Peter makes a shocking announcement to the nation. Is this the end for him or the start of something new? 9pm SECRETS OF ROYAL TRAVEL “Secrets of the Royal Flight” (Part 2 of 2) Take to the skies for an insider’s look at the regal luxury of royal air travel. From 1936 when Edward became Britain’s first reigning monarch to fly as both passenger and pilot, to the present, discover how jet-setting has defined the modern royals. 10pm MASTERPIECE “Dark Angel” tells the extraordinary true story of Victorian poisoner Mary Ann Cotton, played by Golden Globe winner and Emmy award nominee Joanne Froggatt (“Downton Abbey”).

23 MONDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Palm Springs” (Hour 1 of 3) 8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW RECUT “Salt Lake City” (Hour 1 of 3) 8:30pm ITALIAN NEW ORLEANS 10pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Belly of the Beast” Hear the horrifying truth about modern-day eugenics and reproductive injustice in a California prison.


11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

24 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

8pm RISE OF THE NAZIS “Night of the Long Knives” (Part 3 of 3) See how Hitler finds himself caught between Germany’s president and the Nazis’ power base. 9pm FRONTLINE 10pm THE HORSE RELATIVE explores the historic art of horse regalia and how the tradition is being revived and reinterpreted by Dakota communities for a new generation. 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

25 WEDNESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

10:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT

26 THURSDAY

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm MASTERPIECE “Little Women” (Part 1 of 3) Christmas, 1861. The March sisters - Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy - prepare for a Christmas without presents or their father.

9pm MASTERPIECE “Little Women” (Part 3 of 3) A year has passed and there are new additions to the March family - but there is worry all around as Beth’s health and spirits flag. 10pm JAMESTOWN (Part 5 of 8) 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

27 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 7pm NATURE “Santa’s Wild Home” Get an intimate look at the wildlife of Lapland, a region in northern Finland, the fabled home of Santa Claus and actual home of reindeer, wolverines, eagles, wolves, Brown bears and more. Pictured: Reindeer. Lapland, Finland.

9pm SECRETS OF THE DEAD “Building Notre Dame” 10pm 10 MODERN MARVELS THAT CHANGED AMERICA

7am 3 STEPS TO PAIN FREE LIVING

8pm MASTERPIECE “Little Women” (Part 2 of 3) As Marmee waits by her husband’s sickbed, the March sisters must fend for themselves at home.

7pm INFORMED SOURCES

8pm NOVA “Saving Notre Dame” Engineers race to rebuild the roof of the Notre Dame cathedral and secure the medieval structure within five years.

28 SATURDAY

HIGHLIGHT 8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “Lea Salonga in Concert” Enjoy a concert from the Sydney Opera House performed by the internationally acclaimed singer and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra featuring selections from her Broadway career, as well as hits from the animated movie blockbusters “Aladdin” and “Mulan.” 10pm BEYOND THE CANVAS

8:30am EASY YOGA: THE SECRET TO STRENGTH AND BALANCE WITH PEGGY CAPPY shows how yoga poses can increase range of motion, improve awareness of the body, help prevent bone loss and keep the metabolism running efficiently.

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “The Impression”

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

9:30am KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS 10am KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS 10:30am LONGEVITY PARADOX WITH STEVEN GUNDRY, MD Dr. Gundry shares informative, life-changing information with us and shows us a step-by-step easy approach to help us all feel better and more youthful today, no matter your age. 12pm THE BRAIN REVOLUTION 2pm SUZE ORMAN’S ULTIMATE RETIREMENT GUIDE 4pm LAWRENCE WELK: MILESTONES AND MEMORIES At the Champagne Theatre in Branson, Missouri, 47 alumnae of The Lawrence Welk Show (1955) reunite for an evening of song and dance. Bobby Burgess performs with all three of his dancing partners, Barbara Boylan, Cissy King and Elaine Balden.

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WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

SUNDAYS ON

1:30pm KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS WYES’ new cooking series spotlights outstanding women chefs in New Orleans! Pictured: Cara Benson of Toast and Tartine

5:00am MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD

NOON MOVIE/VARIOUS PROGRAMMING

5:30am ARTHUR

1:00pm KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS

6am MOLLY OF DENALI 6:30am WILD KRATTS 7am HERO ELEMENTARY 7:30am XAVIER RIDDLE AND THE SECRET MUSEUM 8am CURIOUS GEORGE 8:30am WASHINGTON WEEK 9:00am FIRING LINE WITH MARGARET HOOVER 9:30am INFORMED SOURCES

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1:30pm KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS 2:00pm SARA’S WEEKNIGHT MEALS 2:30pm PRIMAL GRILL WITH STEVEN RAICHLEN 3:00pm JOANNE WEIR’S PLATES AND PLACES 3:30pm OUTSIDE: BEYOND THE LENS 4:00pm RICK STEVES’ EUROPE

10:00am MOVIE/VARIOUS PROGRAMMING

4:30pm SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LIVE

11:00am MOVIE/VARIOUS PROGRAMMING

5:00pm MOVIE/VARIOUS PROGRAMMING

DIAL 12 | January 2019

7pm ANDY WILLIAMS: GREATEST LOVE SONGS 8:30pm JOSH GROBAN: AN EVENING OF HARMONY

that introduced generations of PBS viewers to the delights of British drama. From "Upstairs Downstairs" to "I, Claudius" to "The Jewel in the Crown" and "Downton Abbey," MASTERPIECE has stood the test of time

10pm DR. FUHRMAN’S FOOD AS MEDICINE

8:30pm SUZE ORMAN’S ULTIMATE RETIREMENT GUIDE

29 SUNDAY

10:30pm RICK STEVES’ FASCISM IN EUROPE

7am WHAT TO EAT WHEN WITH DR. MICHAEL ROIZEN AND DR. MICHAEL CRUPAIN Learn that when you eat, is just as important as what you eat. It also reveals the right foods for life’s toughest circumstances.

30 MONDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

8:30am AGING BACKWARDS 3 WITH MIRANDA ESMONDE-WHITE 9:30am INFORMED SOURCES 10am LONGEVITY PARADOX WITH STEVEN GUNDRY, MD 11:30am 5 DAY RAPID RESET WITH DR. KELLY ANN 1pm KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS 1:30pm KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS 2pm FRONTLINE “From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians” FRONTLINE presents the epic story of the rise of Christianity. Drawing upon new and sometimes controversial historical evidence, the series transports the viewer back two thousand years to the time and place where Jesus of Nazareth once lived and preached and challenges familiar assumptions and conventional notions about the origins of Christianity.

7pm MASTERPIECE “50 Fabulous Years” Celebrate the iconic series

7pm DOLLY PARTON: I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU (MY MUSIC) focuses on the first two decades of the beloved singer-songwriter’s career as she crossed over from her rural Tennessee country roots to become one of the world’s most popular and celebrated artists on stage, television and film with hits including “Coat of Many Colors,” “Here You Come Again,” “Islands In The Stream” (with Kenny Rogers) and “9 To 5.” Narrated by Pam Tillis. 8:30pm JOHN DENVER: COUNTRY ROADS - LIVE IN ENGLAND 10pm JOE BONAMASSA: ROYAL TEA LIVE The two-time Grammy Award-nominated blues rocker recorded “Royal Tea” at Abbey Road Studios in London. Inspired by his British guitar heroes such as Jeff Beck, John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers, Eric Clapton and Cream, the project was co-written by Bonamassa, who was joined by guitarist Bernie Marsden (Whitesnake), Cream lyricist Pete Brown and pianist (Jools Holland). 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY


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FINDING YOUR ROOTS

NEW ORLEANS

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WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2020

WYES’ quality programming and events are brought to you through the generous support of the following businesses and corporations. To join our list of community-minded groups, contact Jim Tapley at (504) 837-8987, jtapley@ wyes.org or Kerri Blache at (504) 483-8487, kblache@wyes.org.

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STREETCAR

BY E R R O L L ABO R DE

Best of the Bunch

N

ot much good can be said about 2020, but I will concede this, it was a good year for bananas, especially those grown in the backyard, maybe too good. When we first bought the house, I knew there was a banana tree in the back. What I did not know, until after Katrina blew down a neighbor’s overhanging pine tree, was that there were two more hidden by the back fence. (Technically they are not trees but very tall plants.) The fallen pine opened more sunlight. Now, the three trees combined comprise a banana factory. There are bunches and bunches of bunches seemingly popping from the branches throughout the year. A banana bunch can be lethal if not heeded. They are heavy, and when their time comes, they can bring a section of the tree crashing on the ground, or a vehicle, causing a huge cleanup, which usually involves swinging a machete. The wise banana grower chops off the bunch before its drops. On this chore, I sometimes fail, though I am proud to be the only person on the block to have a machete. After removing the bunch, the next question is what to do with it, as most people do not have immediate need for 60 or so green ripening bananas. This year I have engaged nature to do the work by providing the

96

NOVEMBER 2020

sunlight once I put the bunch on an outside chair, to let the ripening begin. Here again caution is needed. If the bunch is not tended to, within a few days various critters start attacking the stalk, and what they do not get, the fruit flies will. Usually I am able to salvage maybe four or five consumable ripened yellow bananas per bunch. I will say this about my backyard bananas: For all the trouble they cause, they are genuinely good. These are not those scientifically grown storebought bananas developed to last long on the shelf, but a natural Central American species called a “burro banana.” The fruit are shorter and plumper than the regular kind and have an amazing taste with a touch of lemon flavor. The bananas are ripe as they turn yellow, but the taste intensifies as they develop black spots. When almost totally black, the taste is at its fullest. The problem from the perspective of being neighborly is trying to offer someone black bananas. The fruit are probably most acceptable when peeled in the kitchen and plopped into a daiquiri. Burro bananas are supposedly low in fat and calories and high in Vitamin C, B and fiber. And they are also good for building muscles—if you have to swing the machete enough.

ARTHUR NEAD ILLUSTRATION


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine November 2020  

New Orleans Magazine November 2020  

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