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MAY 2020


Contents Local Color On the Cover: Emery Whalen, CEO/owner QED Hospitality

Marquee Top event picks 8

Persona Eric Paulsen 10

Photograph by Theresa Cassagne

Modine Gunch Zoom to Do 12

Joie d’Eve Home-School Hullabaloo 14

Home Seeing the Potential 16

CHRIS ROSE: A WORLD TURNED UPSIDE DOWN, P. 28

Features

In Every Issue

Top Female Achievers

Inside

Seven success stories 20

Rose on the Rise 4

A World Turned Upside Down

Julia Street

And the search for what was 28

Questions and answers about our city 6

Streetcar Italy: Taking the Ride 64

DIAL 12, D1 WYES-TV proudly presents KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS, a new cooking series that turns the spotlight on women who are changing the culinary landscape of New Orleans. The new series premieres on Saturday, May 16 at 10:00 a.m. Learn more about the extraordinary women whose unique voices and recipes will be highlighted in the 26-part series at wyes.org.

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The Menu Table Talk Comfort Food for the Soul 32

Food Pick of the Crops 34

Last Call Doin’ the Home Thing 36

Dining Guide Listings by Neighborhood 38

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MAY 2020 / VOLUME 54 / NUMBER 8 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Staff Writers Topher Balfer, Kelly Massicot Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Advertising Sales Manager Kate Henry Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executives Nancy Dessens, Meggie Schmidt, Rachel Webber Digital Operations Manager Sarah Duckert Director of Marketing and Events Jeanel Luquette Event Coordinator Abbie Dugruise For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Manager Emily Andras Production Designers Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney Special Projects Art Director Molly Tullier Patty Traffic Coordinator Lane Brocato, Jeremiah Michel Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Audience Development Claire Sargent WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Tiffani R. Amedeo NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 MyNewOrleans.com

For subscription information call (504) 828-1380

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2020 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 3


INSIDE

Rose on the Rise

SINCE 2006, IT HAS BEEN COMMON

when referring back to an incident in contemporary time to refer to it as being “pre-Katrina.” Now we, and the world, will be speaking about “pre-Corona.” For “pre-” to have some boundaries there must be a “post-” and may that come quickly. Actually, thinking back about post-Katrina gives me some encouragement about our newest recovery. At least there is no physical destruction to contend with, though there are lots of questions about re-shaping the future, maybe even for the better. Something that remains constant is the power of the written word; something that doesn’t just recite the same old stuff, but that manages to move us. Chris Rose, at the time a columnist for The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate, provided such commentary in the days after Katrina, taking us on a carpet ride though the world of survival. Rose’s columns were so popular that a book, featuring a compilation of his articles entitled “1 Dead in Attic,” became a local best-seller that achieved bookdom’s highest honor by even attracting the attention of Oprah. When Rose had a book signing at Jazz Fest, he drew a Neville-sized line to the book tent. We’re pleased that Rose waxes on about the latest storm in this edition. Turn off the phone, close the door, relax and read it. We think this will be one of post-Corona’s most important pieces of writing. Our annual gathering of Top Female Achievers is also in this issue. It is a very impressive list; one that gives us hope that wherever the future takes us, we have the best people on our side. May the post-Corona era of our lives be filled with well written stories of not just recovery but joy.    

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MEET THE SALES STAFF

Kate Henry Advertising Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Meggie Schmidt Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7220 Meggie@myneworleans.com

Rachel Webber Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Rachel@MyNewOrleans.com

Nancy Dessens Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Nancy@MyNewOrleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 5


JULIA STREET WITH POYDRAS THE PARROT

U.S. Immigration Station in Algiers. Alexander Allison photo courtesy of New Orleans Public Library

Dear Julia, I have a question about the transport of German prisoners of war through the Port of New Orleans during World War II. When I was a young boy of nine, I traveled, during the war, by train with my aunt to Memphis, Tennessee to attend the ceremony where her son received his Marine Air Core Wings after graduating from the Naval Reserve Flight Training Center. The train we traveled on was full of German prisoners, guarded by Army MP’s. The prisoners seemed to have a free run of the train, moving from car to car with few restrictions. Being young and having seen the news reels about the war in the theaters every week, I found this very disturbing and uncomfortable. The trip went without any problems and I was impressed with the ceremony. It made me want to enlist and fight. Be careful what you wish for. I got to serve during the Korean War and fortunately did not have to fight on the front lines. My question is: was New Orleans a regular port of entry for prisoners coming to the United States during the war? I do not remember seeing, hearing or reading anything about this operation going on in the city. As a point of interest, we recently lived near Crossville, a small town in Tennessee, where they had a prison camp for German officers. This may 6 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

have been where the prisoners were headed to back in the 1940s. I know Poydras is too young to remember this, but maybe his father told him what was going on during that time. I know they had to be careful flying around New Orleans with all of those Navy planes in the air. Thomas Roberts (Fort Mill, South Carolina) In July 1941, New Orleans was designated a Port of Embarkation for the U.S. Army. Located at the head of Poland Avenue, the Port of Embarkation was one of several Louisiana military installations to house German prisoners of war during WWII. Across the river in Algiers, the former U.S. Immigration Station saw wartime service as an Enemy Alien Detention Center. It was located on Patterson Street between Horace and Flanders Streets and was demolished in March 1959. In neighboring Jefferson Parish, Camp Plauche also housed German prisoners of war. Located in Harahan near the Huey P. Long bridge, the camp was later demolished.

Dear Julia, While taking a shortcut between River Road and Jefferson Highway, I noticed a line of older oak trees along Brookhollow. Do you happen to know what occupied

the site before it became an office park? Fred Bourgeois’ (New Orleans) Although the oaks are mature, I believe they are relatively young compared to survivors of plantation days like their neighbors at Elmwood. None of them appear to be members of the Live Oak Society, which honors the state’s largest and most venerable oaks. For almost half a century, the site was home to the Freiberg Lumber Company. In 1916, the Illinois Central Railroad leased part of its Harahan property to the Freiberg Lumber Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, which made mahogany veneer and other products. In 1965, the Brookhollow Corporation of Dallas, Texas, announced plans to redevelop the 25-acre site, which would become Brookhollow Business Park.

Dear Julia and Poydras, I remember, not too long after Hurricane Camille, when some Mississippi fishermen said they were abducted by space aliens. Do you remember that? Where, exactly, did it happen? R.O. Smith (New Orleans)

HAVE A QUESTION FOR JULIA? Send your question to: Julia Street, New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Julia@myneworleans.com.

In the fall of 1973, Charles Hickson and Calvin Parker, Jr., both of Pascagoula, Mississippi, attracted worldwide attention after claiming that, on the night of October 11, a trio of short reddish extraterrestrial beings abducted them as they fished along the Pascagoula River. The men alleged the beings took them aboard an alien vessel and proceeded to examine them before eventually returning them to their fishing spot. Last summer, the city of Pascagoula dedicated a commemorative historic marker in Lighthouse Park recalling the famous and controversial 1973 incident which is said to have occurred nearby.


MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 7


MARQUEE

Local Virtual Events Our top picks for this month by Fritz Esker

Ogden Museum of Southern Art Virtual tour of exhibitions, live online programming OgdenMuseum.org

WWOZ Virtual Gigs A variety of local musicians playing live shows, WWOZ.org

New Orleans Museum of Art Virtual tour of the museum, NOMA.org

Old Ursuline Convent Museum Virtual tour of exhibits, OldUrsulineConventMuseum.com

New Orleans Cemeteries A virtual tour of all of the city’s Catholic cemeteries, NOLACatholicCemeteries.org/ 360-virtual-tour

M.S. Rau Antiques Virtual tour of the special collection The Art of Stone, RauAntiques.com

The Historic New Orleans Collection Virtual tour of exhibits and collections (stories, videos, photos, podcasts, and more), Hnoc.org

National World War II Museum Digital deliveries including oral histories, videos, articles, photography, Facebook live events, and more. NationalWorldWar2Museum.org

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* All events are subject to change or cancellation due to ongoing coronavirus situations. Please check with the event to confirm date and times.


MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 9


PERSONA

Eric Paulsen WWL-TV Journalist by Ashley McLellan

DURING HIS LONG CAREER AT

WWL-TV, journalist and anchor Eric Paulsen has seen politicians come and go, scandals and celebrations, tragedies and triumphs. While New Orleanians can still start their day waking up to Paulsen hosting the channel’s morning show, he recently retired from the noon anchor desk after 18 years to pursue special stories and reporting. New Orleans Magazine caught up with Paulsen to see what he’s been up to, his recent reporting trip to Cuba, what it’s like to be a journalist during a global pandemic and what advice he has to reporters who are just 1 0 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

starting their own careers behind the microphone.

Q: Who or what inspired you to go into a career in journalism? The people who inspired me in journalism are several, all of them are not with us anymore. First had to be Walter Cronkite, and locally Phil Johnson and Bill Elder. All old school and all absolute professionals.

Q: What are your favorite kinds of stories to follow and craft reports about? Early in my career I loved getting scoops, stories that took a lot

of digging by making contacts with politicians and business people. Later in my career, it’s been storytelling, whether it’s a business story, a famous musician or the story behind how a favorite restaurant got started. And with the coronavirus those stories became critical. We’ve worked very hard to tell that story out including the impact it’s had on thousands of workers and business owners across the region.

Q: What was the inspiration behind your recent trip to Cuba with the Trombone Shorty Foundation? Why

did you want to follow along and why was it an important for New Orleans? It was a great chance to combine my love for music and follow a group of local musicians, Trombone Shorty, The Soul Rebels, Tank and the Bangas, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux and Anders Osborne for a cultural exchange to a country that has been pretty much forbidden for most of my life. The trip was amazing and opened my eyes to so much. It’s one of the things I love about my job, I get to learn something new every day.


Born: I was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. Education: I went to University City High School in suburban St. Louis. It’s the same school that Tennessee Williams attended, as did Jeremy Davenport and Nelly, all in different years, of course. I went from there to getting a journalism degree from Southern Illinois University. Favorite TV show: CBS Sunday Morning News and, for sheer entertainment, probably Showtime’s “Homeland.” What I’m reading: Finishing up Walter Isaacson’s Leonardo da Vinci and have just started the Eric Clapton autobiography. Favorite restaurant: The one I’m eating at on any given day. There are way too many to pick out a favorite. I should mention, during the coronavirus we did try to support as many restaurants as we could. They are the lifeblood of this city, just like music.

TRUE CONFESSION: I did not start out to be in broadcast news. I was going to be a veterinarian but got hooked on broadcasting in my third year of college and for me it was a good choice.

Q: What was your favorite memory from that trip? My favorite memory was the New Orleans Second Line meeting the Cuban Conga in Old Havana, it was amazing. The second [favorite memory] was the concert at the most beautiful rooftop outdoor restaurant with Anders Osborne and Cuba’s Carlos Varela (known as the Bob Dylan of Cuba). That night was magical.

Q: With a decades-long career in journalism, you have certainly seen your fair share of breaking news stories. What are one or two unusual moments that have made an impact on your career? Some of the biggest impacts on my career go way back. First was the devastating Continental Grain Elevator explosion back in 1977. I was the first reporter on the scene and I was totally overwhelmed. The carnage, the loss of life and talking to family members. I was young at the time and ill-prepared to deal with all that around Christmas time that year. I learned a lot about humanity and compassion. You had to cover a disaster but keep in mind all the people who lost loved ones on that terrible day. On a happier note, getting to know people like Tennessee Williams, Al Hirt, Pete Fountain and of course the legendary Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. I’m still close to both Fats’ and Dave’s families.

Q: What advice do you have for young reporters looking to have a career in journalism? Do this if you really want to be a journalist, not simply someone who wants to be on TV. This business has changed a great deal over the years. The work is getting harder and the pay is getting lower. But the rewards if you are a curious person who wants to learn every day are immense. But it is not for the faint of heart.

Q: What has it been like to be a part of so many New Orleanians’ start to their day or lunchtime routine? The noon show was a juggernaut, it was a staple for many of our viewers. It was bittersweet when I gave it up last year, but it did free me up to do stories I really cared about in addition to the Eyewitness Morning News. Mornings are different from other new shows. It is more personal and you bond with the audience because you are on so long. That has been one of my greatest pleasures to be in peoples’ homes in a very friendly manner.

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 1 1


MODINE GUNCH

EVERY DISASTER HAS A

bright side. My niece Flambeau probably won’t remember her second birthday, back on April Fools’ Day. But the rest of us will. That was just when everybody finally got serious about isolating theirselves in place because of the virus. But her mother, my sisterin--law, Gloriosa, ain’t about to cancel her birthday party. Flambeau is her youngest. Just like Gloriosa herself was the youngest. But there ain’t hardly any pictures of Gloriosa, when she was little, despite the fact that she was a gorgeous child. Or so she’s been told. Maybe that gorgeousness didn’t happen until later, when her boobs sprung out. She’ll never know. So Flambeau is going to have photographic evidence of every single milestone. Including her second birthday. Gloriosa had this party planned and the favors and the cake ordered and the six little guests decided on months ago. She just has to make few adjustments. So she called my brothersin-law-law Leech and Lurch, who have started their own temporary business: MMD, for Masked Men’s Delivery (Motto: “Six Feet Away & Sterilized”). She has them deliver pre-packaged cupcakes and plastic-sealed party hats for each little guest and their 1 2 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

Zoom to Do Chasing Technology by Modine Gunch

mommy —all friends from the Diapers to Destiny play group (Motto: “We’ll get into Harvard without bribes”). She sends email invitations to explains how each mommy can use her smart phone to get onto the online birthday party, presented through that Zoom website everybody’s using now. When each mommy-and-child clicks in, they appear in little frames like Hollywood Squares. Everybody is wearing party hats, and the mommies have even put on their bras again for this rare social occasion. I am in a frame too, and Gloriosa shares her frame with her two older kids and Flambeau, plus Flambeau’s grandma, Ms. Larda, standing on a box outside peering through the window behind them, because she don’t want to expose herself and she ain’t figured out Zoom yet. Everybody gets introduced. Everybody

sings Happy Birthday—but before everybody unwraps their cupcakes, Gloriosa plays a cute little cartoon video about handwashing. All the guests are supposed to watch it and sing the song while washing their hands in their own bathroom. It’s a lot to do at one time, even if you are destined for Harvard. There’s a lot of splashing, and then panicky mommy voices, and Flambeau’s friend Zooey disappears from the screen. We see a pattern of soap bubbles on Derya’s image, then she disappears. Theo and Quinn blink out at almost the same time. But the handwashing song chirps on, cheerful as can be, until the only two kids left are Elyza, whose hands are being cleaned by another set of hands (Maybe Daddy’s home?) and Flambeau, whose brother is holding the smartphone while Gloriosa does the washing.

By the cupcake-eating time, only three frames are left (I washed ahead of time), Elyza’s, and the one with Gloriosa’s family. Gloriosa don’t care. She snapped a screen grab of the party when everybody’s picture was still in the frame, before all the other smartphones drowned. She’ll put it in Flambeau’s memory book, which was the point. She probably has wine in that birthday punch cup. Anyway, she don’t notice that outside Ms. Larda throws up her arms and flails and disappears. It takes me a couple minutes myself, to realize that it wasn’t just Ms. Larda’s picture that vanished. It was Ms. Larda herself. My heart ticks. She is in the virus target group. Did it get her that quick? My phone rings, and it’s Ms Larda. I click off Zoom and answer. Come to find out, the dog got out, and put his cold nose up her skirt and she shrieked and fell and got to her feet and stepped in dog poo and scraped it off and sprinted to her car, and wants to know if dogs carry the virus. I Google it. Nope, not dogs. Just bats. Fine, she says. She’s going home now, and she’s getting online, and she’s going to figure out Zoom. Just like she figured out how to text after Katrina. So that’s the bright side.

LORI  OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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JOIE D’EVE

Home-School Hullabaloo A report from the living room classroom by Eve Crawford Peyton

THE EXPERIMENT DIDN’ T GO

so well. Every so often, I get frustrated with some aspect of my life and make stupid, unrealistic pronouncements. “We’re all becoming nudists!” I’ll declare after spending an entire Sunday afternoon washing, drying, folding, and putting away laundry. Or: “We’re just going to eat sandwiches for dinner twice a week!” or “Let’s just use paper plates and plastic cutlery from now on!” I’ll say when I’m fed up with all the dishes that accumulate in my sink. Every so often, annoyed at a school project that seems to take up too many resources and too much time, I’ll announce with a flourish, “That’s it! We’re just going to home-school!” I’m here to say now that I meant none of it – but especially the homeschooling part. I’d sooner become

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a nudist who destroys the environment with plastic forks than I would spend a minute longer than I have to trying to home-school my kids right now. Ruby is actually doing fine. She’s a planner who thrives on routine, and at age 13, she’s both adept at using technology and able to be responsible for her own work. Last Tuesday, she holed up in her room with poster board and markers and didn’t emerge until she’d FaceTimed all of her friends to come up with a color-coded school schedule that worked for all of them. Georgia though? She’s 7 and a huge extrovert whose favorite part of school is seeing her friends, and although she has many strengths, being a self-starter isn’t really one of them. She also lacks her own phone and computer, deficits she laments on an almost-hourly basis

these days. about their feelings. I’m reading to My husband and I have to work them and with them. We’re taking during work hours – yes, working walks. We’re playing with the dog. from home is a luxury, and I am And yeah, they’re watching a ton not complaining! – which means of YouTube and playing Roblox and that Georgia’s schoolwork usually Minecraft much more than they’re doesn’t even start until 5:30 p.m., doing online lessons. and we’re all tired and stressed and I’m a good mom, I think, but cranky by that point (more so even I’m busy and stressed and trying to than usual). take care of my 82-year-old father I see my friends online who are without having a complete panic teaching their kids to bake bread. attack every hour. Home-schooling Teaching them to shoot on top of this just isn’t videos. Teaching them to really happening for me. garden or paint or sew. Excerpted from Eve But this will end one Really embracing the Crawford Peyton’s day, and they’ll catch blog, Joie d’Eve, which home-schooling thing. appears each Friday on back up, I’m sure, in I … am not doing MyNewOrleans.com no time. any of that. I’m keeping And when they go them alive. I’m feeding them and back, if they haven’t already by the making sure they bathe and brush time you read this, I promise I will their teeth. I’m hugging them (thank never joke about home-schooling God I don’t have to socially distance ever again. from them) and letting them talk

JANE SANDERS ILLUSTRATION


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HOME

Seeing the Potential An Uptown townhouse with inspired vision by Lee Cutrone photographed by Greg Miles

WHEN MIKE MOREMAN AND JOSH GURVITZ DECIDED TO

relocate from Indianapolis so Mike could take a job as VP of Human Resources at Ochsner Health Systems, downsizing to a condo or townhouse was initially part of the plan. Instead, they landed upon a house that not only checked their priority list – a garage and spare bedrooms for Mike’s two grown daughters and guests — but also delivered other amenities important to their lifestyle. Built in 2003 in a 19th century double-gallery side-hall style, it had classic architectural features without the wear and tear of age. It was located in the heart of Uptown with restaurants, coffee shops, groceries and other conveniences within walking distance. It even offered the manageable 2,500 square-foot size and 1 6 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

turn-key security of a townhouse, a limited commodity where older homes are the norm. The couple’s vision required looking past some of the fussier, more traditional details of the house. It also meant they’d have to renovate both the dark wood kitchen and the master bath upstairs. “Josh and I both can see the potential in a house,” said Mike, who’s renovated multiple homes. “Both of us can walk into a space and quickly say what I would do here,” Josh said. Sold on the pluses and willing to revise the minuses, they purchased the house and turned to their realtor, Alton Smith, for help finding a reliable contractor. Smith recommended Russel Olschner of OLSCH LLC, whom

The floorplan of the kitchen is the same, but the remodel blends white and gray cabinets, thick leather-finished marble, openshelving and an area for wine storage. The corner brick wall is original. Josh commissioned Pirates Alley artist Adam Allen to create the Café du Monde work for the wall.


Left: The dining room’s furnishings are a mix of periods. Vintage dining table from Magazine Merchant House. The 1950s Dunbar credenza at right is from Josh’s grandfather’s office. The chandelier was in the house when the current owners purchased it. Top, right: Mike (left) and Josh (right) on the back porch of their home. Bottom, right: The house was built in 2003 in a classic double-gallery side-hall style. The initial of the previous owner is centered in the wrought iron rail of the upper gallery. Landscaping in front and back by Bowman Landscaping.

the couple describe as an ideal collaborator. “He is willing to work with people who have desires, opinions and a budget,” said Josh, whose strong visual sense was honed working in retail and as a wedding and event planner and is today put to use managing the Giving Tree Galleries located Uptown and in the French Quarter. Key to the remodel was stripping away some of the ornamentation that obscured the bones of the house. The floorplan stayed the same, but rosettes above the living room windows,

a pair of columns separating the kitchen and living area, and curvilinear moldings on top of the living room’s built-in wall of shelves were all removed in favor of a more pared down backdrop. The kitchen, dated and dark was gutted and redesigned with gray and white cabinets, a herringbone backsplash, new appliances and thick leather-finished marble counters. The upstairs master bath was also a complete overhaul. The finished space, like the kitchen, mixes contemporary tiles with leather-finished marble and has a classic masculinity reminiscent MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 1 7


Facing page: Top, left: The fireplace is a replication of the one in the Airbnb that they rented during their renovation. Tiles from Floor & Decor, chairs from Arhaus, painting was purchased on Jackson Square. The fireplace is vented to give off minimal heat so it can be used year-round. Walls are painted Dove White. Top, right: The custom vanity is topped with four-inch leatherfinished marble and paired with a Louis Philippe mirror. Opposite the vanity is an Empire cabinet from Dop Antiques. The modern light fixtures are from Shades of Light. Bottom, left: The master bath has both a glass shower and a soaking tub. A herringbone tile floor and large hexagonal shower tiles add pattern to the space. Accent table by Michael Aram. Bottom, right: Furnishings from a previous guest room were used to create a sitting area on the second story landing. Daybed and light fixture from West Elm, table from Arhaus. This page: Built-in shelves occupy the wall opposite the fireplace in the living room. The homeowners reworked them by removing crown molding, painting them and backing them with silver grass cloth by Cole & Son. Rug from New Orleans Auction.

of the late Bill Blass’s famous New York apartment. While Josh’s tastes lean more toward industrial than Mike’s, the two admit to having complementary styles. Both have an affinity for mid-century modern design, color (especially orange), contemporary art, and what they call “weird stuff” or “oddities,” a category that includes a framed taxidermied bat, a seagrass boar, and a whimsical simian wallpaper. Both also like collecting (Josh favors coffee table books and china, Mike taxidermy and German beer steins) and wanted their home to have an acquired-over-time aesthetic. “We wanted it to look lived in and collected,” said Josh. “We didn’t want it to look like a designer had picked everything.” “We have a common mentality that mixing old and new is interesting and feels good,” said Mike, who credits his southern roots with informing his half of the

shared approach. The couple, who met in Indianapolis — Josh’s hometown and the city where Mike relocated multiple times for his career — first merged their styles in a previous home. They sold that home along with some of the furnishings and art, gifted several inherited pieces to Mike’s niece and brought the rest with them. Purchases for their current home have come from major retailers like Arhaus and West Elm, trips, local auction houses, consignment businesses

and antique stores. On the other hand, downsizing and remodeling their new home were at times a challenge. For instance, Josh wanted to remove the living room’s built-in shelves, while Mike voted to simplify, paint and back them with grass-cloth, a transformative combination that satisfied both. With limited space, they are also more thoughtful when buying something new and like to periodically rotate things in and out of the mix. Mike’s cooking and Josh’s talent

for presentation are frequently put to tandem use as the two love to entertain. In a short time since they moved in, they’ve hosted most of their neighbors and have made many new friends. “I always have music playing, I love having a candle lit, we want our home to feel comfortable and to be an experience,” Josh said. “This house 100 percent reflects who we are,” Mike added. “We got a whole lot more than we wanted and we’ve become the house where people like to gather.” MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 1 9


I ALWAYS BELIEVED THAT ONE WOMAN’S SUCCESS CAN ONLY HELP ANOTHER WOMAN’S SUCCESS. -GLORIA VANDERBILT

TOP FEMALE ACHI EVERS

E

ach year New Orleans Magazine profiles a selection of extraordinary women from across our community continuing to make a difference. We present here seven women whose stories are worth knowing, and honor them not so much for breaking new ground, but for expanding the territory. Their talents and hard work have been felt in education,

hospitality, the environment and business fields, and beyond. The easy part is finding worthy candidates, for the list is long. The complex part is narrowing the list. As always, we feel enriched by those who have been selected and encouraged by knowing there are so many others to consider.

BY K I MBERLEY S I NG L E TA R Y P HOT OG R A P HY B Y T HE R E S A C A S S A G NE


C E O/ OWNE R QE D HOSPI TALI T Y

A

native New Orleanian, Emery Whalen began her work in the culinary world as a hostess at Restaurant August in 2010 and worked her way up in the Besh Restaurant Group. Three years ago, Whalen teamed with chef Brian Landry to form QED Hospitality, a restaurant operations management group that runs all the food and beverage for the Pontchartrain Hotel — which includes Jack Rose restaurant, the Bayou Bar, Hot Tin rooftop bar and the Silver Whistle Café — as well as three Nashville properties: Marsh House restaurant, L.A. Jackson rooftop bar and restaurant and coffee shop Killebrew at the luxury boutique hotel Thompson Nashville. ¶ Once named to Forbes Magazine’s “30 Under 30,” Whalen is a strong advocate for women in the hospitality industry. Whalen is an active member of Facebook’s #SheMeansBusiness,

representing female-owned culinary businesses at industry meetings nationwide; and serves on the board of Women in Hospitality United, a movement born under #MeToo whose mission is to foster leadership through mentorship. ¶ Working within an industry hit especially hard by COVID-19,Whalen worked quickly to save as many jobs as she could by partnering with a telehealth company. ¶ “Our staff is now working from home,” she said. “We’ve got servers and bartenders that are now using their strong people skills to make sure people are comfortable with telehealth, they have the apps they need downloaded, their passwords reset, things like that. ¶ “I’m so proud of all of them,” she said. “And I’m happy to say that out of our 220 employees, we’ve been able to keep more than half this way. Everyone who wanted to stay on was able to.”

Emer y Whalen


TONY THAGARD PHOTO

C O-F OUNDE R A ND E X E C UT I V E DI R E C T OR Y OUT H E M P OWE R M E NT P R OJ E C T

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Melis s a Sawyer

native of Canada, Melissa Sawyer first came to New Orleans as a teacher with Teach for America. After leaving for a few years to earn a master’s degree in education at Harvard University with a focus on urban education, she returned to the city where she spent three years working with Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana (JJPL), helping to reform the state’s juvenile justice system. ¶ In 2004, Sawyer and two colleagues from JJPL broke off and started their own organization,Youth Empowerment Project (YEP), in order to meet the specific needs of young people involved in the juvenile justice system. Over the past 13 years, YEP’s mission has expanded greatly. ¶ “Now less than one-third of the 1,200 young people we serve each year have a juvenile justice connection,” said Sawyer. YEP is currently

the largest and most comprehensive organization in the New Orleans region that addresses the needs of underserved, court-involved and out-of-school youth. ¶ Individualized mentoring and support services, a growing high school equivalency program, summer camps, a digital media training program and full-service bicycle repair shop and thrift store are just a few of the ways Youth Empowerment Project works to provide area young people with the skills and support they need. ¶ After leading a young organization as it survived and thrived following Hurricane Katrina, Sawyer said she’s turned her focus again to remaining nimble and adaptive and getting back to basics. ¶ “Right now, we’re really focusing in on our core values,” she said. “It’s going to be especially important in the months and years to come.”


V P OF P UB L I C R E L AT I ONS , SPEARS G R OUP

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public relations and brand strategist, Malana Joseph Mitchell is the vice president of public relations for Spears Group, a strategic communications, creative and PR firm. Mitchell develops high-level PR strategies and manages media relations for clients such as the NBA, Verizon, the National Fried Chicken Festival and NOLA Public Schools. ¶ Mitchell said she got her feet “soaked or drowned” in PR while working in crisis communications as a mayoral fellow in New Orleans in 2005. She spent several months in the city’s Emergency Operations Center coordinating national and international press following Hurricane Katrina. ¶ For the past 10 years, Mitchell has led communications for Lemonade Day Louisiana, an entrepreneurship program that has attracted more than 200,000

Louisiana youth since 2011. ¶ In addition to her work, Mitchell is a past president of the local chapter of the Public Relations Society of America and is on the faculty at Dillard University, where she teaches junior and senior-level coursework. She said she’s driven by a desire to give back to an industry traditionally lacking in diversity. ¶ “I was fortunate to have an incredible mentor during my time at Dillard named Monica Pierre,” said Mitchell, who has since served as advisor to the university’s Public Relations Student Society of America chapter. ¶ “I give out my cell phone number freely,” she said. “I always tell the students, ‘You could be my boss someday,’ and I mean it. I didn’t have a lot of people who looked like me in the field when I was coming up and I’d love to be that for someone else.”

Malana Joseph Mitchell


P R E S I DE NT A ND C O-F OUNDE R , Y OUT H F OR C E NOL A

I

Cate Swinburn

n 2015, 10 years into its recovery from Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans was facing a different kind of problem — far too many of the city’s youth (ages 16 to 24) were neither working nor in school. ¶ “We had the third highest rate of what they call 'opportunity youth' in the country,” said Cate Swinburn, president and co-founder of Youth Force NOLA. “The thing was, 60 percent of those students had high school diplomas, they were just running into other problems like with financial aid, or they were struggling with a lack of direction.” ¶ Former president and executive director of the Washington D.C. Public Education Fund and a longtime educational consultant, Swinburn created Youth Force NOLA in 2015 with the ambitious goal of making sure all high school students graduate with the skills and support they need to go on to college or secure a good job. ¶ “We work with an incred-

ibly strong network that includes the City of New Orleans, the Urban League, Greater New Orleans, Inc., Junior Achievement of Greater New Orleans and NOLA Public Schools, on behalf of 25 open enrollment high schools,” said Swinburn. “Together we provide youth with internships, soft-skills training and access to industry-recognized certification programs in high-wage, high-demand fields.” ¶ In only five years, the number of high school students earning industry-recognized credentials in New Orleans has increased 875 percent, nearly 800 have received work experience, more than 10,000 attended soft-skills programs and more than 5,000 have engaged with employers during YouthForce’s annual career expos. ¶ Swinburn said the key to success lies in collaboration. ¶ “This is too big of a job for one organization to do,” she said. “Together we can make sure these kids succeed in work and in life.”


F OUNDI NG DI R E C T OR OF T HE L OUI S I A NA B UC K E T B R I G A DE

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nne Rolfes’ mission, as she sees it, is to provide a complete picture of Louisiana’s petrochemical industry. ¶ “I was born and raised in Lafayette, so I grew up surrounded by the jobs, the economic benefits the industry brings,” she said, “but I also know what science tells us, and that is the rates of cancer, of respiratory illness, that we see. The facts are the facts. These chemicals being created are carcinogens.” ¶ For the past 20 years, Rolfes has run the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, an organization dedicated to ending pollution in the state. Though small — her staff ranges from three to five people — the Bucket Brigade is empowered by hundreds of volunteers and partnerships with groups such as Rise St. James, 350 New

Orleans and Tulane Environmental Law Clinic. ¶ The organization is currently focusing on challenging the permit for the Formosa plastics plant planned for St. James Parish. ¶ “This would be one of the largest plastics plants in the world,” she said. “Our state is allowing it even though the company’s own country, Taiwan, is not allowing the plant to be built there because it’s too dirty. We are allowing other countries to use our state as their dumping ground.” ¶ Rolfes said she believes there’s another way. ¶ “This industry could be a win/win for everyone,” she said. “We could be employing people to repair pipelines, fix equipment. I’d like to see us pivot to something more positive for everyone, including the petrochemical industry.”

Anne Rolfes


JEFFERY JOHNSTON PHOTO

F OUNDE R S OF NAT I V E NA I L P OL I S H

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Allis on Hoffman & Julie Hoffman

f New Orleans was a nail polish color, what color would it be? ¶ There’s obviously no way you could pick just one, which is why Native Nail Polish has been putting out about a dozen shades a year since its founding by sisters-in-law Allison and Julie Hoffman in 2015. ¶ Inspired by their young daughters, Native polishes are vegan, cruelty free and “10 free,” which means they don’t contain 10 harmful chemicals typically found in polish like formaldehyde, xylenes and parabens. ¶ Since launching with its first retailer, Two Sprouts, Native is now offered at 37 locations locally, including The Spa at Windsor Court, The Woodhouse Day Spa and Ritz Carlton Spa. The company has also started to pair with other organizations and businesses

such as Mignon Faget, Buff Beauty Bar, Bliss Bridal, the Merry Antoinettes and the Krewe of Iris to craft custom colors. ¶ “This has been one of the most exciting evolutions of our business,” said Allison Hoffman. “It’s a totally different creative outlet for us that can involve months of back and forth to create the perfect shade. It’s been so rewarding to support local female-run businesses and organizations.” ¶ Native’s spring line, launched March 23, gives back to COVID-19 coping efforts. ¶ “One dollar from each bottle sold will go to the Krewe of Red Beans, which is making meals for healthcare workers,” said Julie Hoffman. “They’re also employing local musicians to deliver the meals, so that’s an extra component we really wanted to support.”


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n the nine years Sandra Lindquist has been at the New Orleans Chamber of Commerce, she has developed multiple community-wide events and organizations that benefit the region and seen the chamber’s membership grow from 500 members in 2011 to more than 1,300 today. ¶ It is Lindquist’s work specifically with women, however, that she has found her calling. ¶ In addition to creating the chamber’s Women’s Business Alliance, which meets monthly, Lindquist co-founded the business and social networking event Women & Wine on Wednesday. Her latest accomplishment was last year’s inaugural Power Up: Women’s Leadership Conference, a day-long professional development event designed specifically for women.

¶ “We were hoping to draw 200 to 300 people,” said Lindquist, “but we ended up selling out one month before the event with 550 ladies.” ¶ This year’s event, scheduled for March, had a capacity for 800 women. Before it was postponed to August 7, 700 tickets had already been sold. ¶ Lindquist said she sees the popularity of the event, and other female meetup opportunities and leadership programs as the dawning of a new era. ¶ “Early in my career, women I worked with would try and keep other women down,” she said. “But that is no longer the case. Women are really coming together now. They’re realizing there’s strength in numbers and that women with a strong peer group are achieving greater success.”

Sandra Lindquist


TURNED

AWORLD

UPSIDE DOWN

AND THE SEARCH FOR WHAT WAS

WHAT IF EVERYTHING YOU WISHED FOR CAME TRUE? I wish I had more time. I wish I didn’t have to go to school. I wish I didn’t have to go to work. I wish I could sleep in. I wish I could spend more time with my kids. But I wish I didn’t have to waste three hours a day driving them back and forth to practice. I wish I could plant a garden. I wish I had time to read. I wish there wasn’t so much traffic on the Twin Span. I wish I could find a parking spot at Lakeside Mall. I wish Port ‘O Call wasn’t always so crowded. I wish I didn’t have to wear a jacket to Galatoire’s. I wish it was 2019. Can you imagine you would ever think that? And then there’s Bourbon Street. How many times have you

heard someone say – or said it yourself: I wish Bourbon Street would just shut down. Go away. Disappear. What a nuisance. What an embarrassment. New Orleans’ lowest common denominator attraction for social intercourse; a place where – even if it hasn’t rained for two weeks – there are still puddles along the curbside. Bourbon Street Gravy. A mixture of spilled beer, cigarette ash, crushed oyster shells and involuntary human emissions. Wouldn’t you almost fever dream of taking a deep breath of that fetid aroma now? To inhale all of that iniquity, incivility and filth. To fight and jostle among the Philistines and drag queens, covering your eyes and ears to save your soul, cursing the very existence of karaoke, Jimmy Buffett cover bands, mechanical

BY CHRIS ROSE » ILLUSTRATION BY JASON RAISH


bulls and Huge Ass Beers. Just to feel alive again? After Katrina, remember how all the righteous holy folks said the storm was God’s wrath upon a wicked city? How they opposed the notion of trying to save this place. How it was better left to wash into the sea. The great irony, of course, being that basically everywhere except the French Quarter got whacked in that one. It’s like the Garden of Eden, Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Calvary, Galilee and the Mount of fishes and loaves all got smote, but Sodom and Gomorrah remained. But what’s all that got to do with the price of tea in China? I was being ironic with that statement. In times of pandemic, sometimes you need to make that clear. The Chinese curse, right? Be careful what you wish for.

Comparisons between Corona and Katrina are inevitable. But also impossible. Other than preying upon our faith in Government, they are no two-headed beast. They are worlds apart. They are the physical versus the existential. After Katrina, people stayed away from their homes, lost their homes. For Corona, we were confined to them. Katrina made for horrifying TV images of pandemonium and terror, running wild in the streets. Now, just empty streets. No shock and awe. Not so good for ratings. Not like choppers and flood waters and looting and the howling mewls of the dead and dying. They go silently now into the not-so-good night. And we can’t blame State Farm for any of this. Although it seems tempting to do so. Somehow, there must be a link, right? Unfortunately – like Katrina -- we had a heads up to prepare. And – like Katrina -- we didn’t do so well with that. What is not dissimilar are the doomsday phrases within reach. The hidden enemy. The enemy within. The enemy is us. Inimicus intus, for you folks out there with Jesuit educations. Whatever. Here’s some new Latin for you: Nos omnes interfectionis meae. Translation: We’re all screwed. But after Katrina we were able to reach out to each other. That’s what kept us alive, gave us hope, kept us in touch. Now, no touching. Evita: I kept my promise. You keep your distance. Back then, we commandeered plasma screen TVs in a city with no electricity and looted choice athletic wear in a city with no gyms. Nobody ever said panic brings out the best in us. Now it’s baby wipes and hot dog buns. A world gone mad, yes. A city gone madder. As of press time, New Orleans was not only the fastest growing COVID-19 incubator in America, it was the fastest growing in the world. I hope that term “was” stands the test of time. Was it Mardi Gras that did this to us? Or just our consti-

tutional incapability of not socializing, of not bear hugging, bro-bumping, of crawfish shakes and second lines. But you can’t have a second line without a first line. For Katrina, we had our stoops, our porches, our sidewalks and our (blown apart) pulpits from which to commingle, commiserate, commend, command and condemn. Now we just have our premium cable and our pets to scream at. And our partners and kids and parents but...don’t. Really. Don’t.

Weird that one of those itinerant preachers who throng to New Orleans for Mardi Gras to tell us all that we’re going to burn in hell caught the virus here this year and has since died. I admit, that was investing your all into your faith. I guess there’s something noble in that. But what? I reckon they’re happy now, the self-righteous and the selfdamning. Watching all those TV images of deserted streets here in the Big (un)Easy this spring. The difference between now (C) and then (K) being that this one could come to their hometown also, unbeknownst. This ain’t no Bourbon Street flesh/flash dance, absorbed and admired from a distance. It’s time to show your own wits. The clock ticks. Droplets in the air, traversing our once-safe havens, poisoning our complacency, encroaching upon our man caves. “Don’t you just love these long rainy afternoons in New Orleans when an hour isn’t just an hour – but a whole little piece of eternity dropped into your hands – and who knows what to do with it,” said Blanche Dubois in “A Streetcar Named Desire.” What to do with it, indeed. Strange how, even in a worldwide pandemic, New Orleans somehow finds/found its way to the center of the story. As is her way. Even when she can’t dress out and paint her face and sashay down Bourbon Street, she still finds a way to say to the world: Look at me. I am gorgeous. I am legend. I am still here. God, I love this place. An epidemiological hotbed of intrigue. An impossibility of possibilities. Staying six feet away from everyone else – in New Orleans? You’ve got to be kidding, right? Katrina’s got nothing on this. You either stayed away or floated away.

At least this time, we are grateful for our grocery stores – walking through the front door rather than going through smashed windows. Gratefully ponying up money for our (hoarded) goods. But I guess hoarding is better than looting. Or maybe it’s just another word for white-collar looting. People have been trying their best to adapt, adjust, amuse. Musicians playing laptop concerts from their bedrooms. Blowing horns on their balconies. Writers reading new stories


on YouTube. Art markets online. Carry-out and drive-through for the brave. And the hungry. Oh, how we try in times of danger and despair. But we’ve done this before. Sort of. We’ve got this, right? But, face it: There’s no such thing as a virtual Lucky Dog. (Funny side note: Lucky dog guys always wear/wore food service protective gloves and nets over their beards. Way ahead of their time. My partner calls them the Lucky Dog Prophets. They knew way before the rest of us how the End of Times would arrive. With mustard or onions? Was Ignatius Reilly the true Messiah?) Lucky Dog Prophets. Great name for a band. My partner, she has a gift with words. And what fun is eating crawfish alone? Hell, I have friends who don’t even like – or are allergic to – crawfish, but they treasure the tradition. The process. The ceremony. The steam. The smell. The Abita. The oohs and ahhs of the first ceremonious bug dump onto laid out newspapers, corn and sausage and onions spilling down the sides, even rolling off the table. Do you remember a time when we would pick that up off the sidewalk and eat it? Now we bleach it first. This is/was the fellowship that is New Orleans’ most treasured form of performance art. Now the crawfish shake is the art of the deal across America. I kept my promise. You keep your distance.

We’ve been living in a movie all this time. Several movies. Actually, a whole bunch of movies. Oddly, most of them are quite good, if not chillingly prescient. “Contagion.” “Outbreak.” “I Am Legend.” “12 Monkeys.” “And the Band Played On.” “Blade Runner.” “The Andromeda Strain.” Lots more. All the way back to “Nosferatu,” the 1922 silent classic. And, of course, the New Orleans classic, “Panic in the Streets.” I imagine they all had a good run on Netflix last month. But imagine an alternate universe. What was reality as the New Year began, as a new season approached, the time for rebirth, for the birds and bees -- not the Silent Spring we have inherited. Inherit the wind. But wear a mask. Imagine. Tiger Woods won the Masters again. Gonzaga won the NCAA. LSU is barnstorming the SEC baseball season. Zion Williamson leads the Pelicans into the 8th seed of the Western Conference and then steamrolls all the way through to the finals. He wins Rookie of the Year, MVP and a really cool trophy. In reality, with the season canceled, he volunteered to pay the salaries of laid off workers at the Smoothie Kind Center. The vendors. The folks who wear protective gloves and face masks for a living. Doling out our dogs and Dippin’ Dots. Zion is still a teenager. Larger than life with a heart as big as

the moon and a smile even bigger. Do they make people like this anymore? Where and how did he become this person he is, this behemoth of laughter and generosity. This is his world now. Will you remember Zion?

In that alternate universe, Pre-C, you started reading this article but realized you don’t have time to finish this article because Amanda Shaw is playing an early set at Jazz Fest and it’s time to vamoose. Because her set at the French Quarter Festival (which didn’t happen) was smoking hot and you want to catch her again (but you won’t). The good news: All of your Fest Freak friends and family who were going to descend upon the city, six of them coming to stay in your two-bedroom apartment, aren’t/didn’t. Which prevents another run on toilet paper at the grocery, so that’s good. The downside: What would it be like to go an entire Spring without a Vaucresson sausage po-boy? Oh, the horror. It’s makes you realize that – despite all the condescending side-eye – first world problems are legit.

New Orleans is and always has been a petri dish. For disease, epidemic, fire, flood, violence, sex and obesity. It’s our thing. It’s what we do. Too much of everything against the advice of everyone. America says no, we say yes. America says HELL NO, we say HELL YES! And so it goes. To our reverie and detriment, to our revelry and demise. But still standing. Like Katrina, our community is thinned out by disaster, some folks never coming home again, the rest of us trudging on. We have to. It’s a time to show our wits, not our tits. A time for everything. Turn, turn, turn. Remember that song? Well, remember this: If you’re going to sneeze, turn away from me. The lyrics to that classic Byrds hit from 1965, a defining song for the moment, were actually written by Pete Seeger, adapted from the Book of Ecclesiastes. To every season. Prophecy tell us that the meek shall inherit the earth. But who else is there? Keith Richards? Actually, that would be a place to start. An intractable, indefatiguable, indestructable immuno-system – blessed with the gift of rock and roll and the blues. A start for the Brave New World. Too bad he doesn’t live in New Orleans. It seems like he should. Where keeping on just to keep on is a way of life. The thing we do, the dance we dance. The song we sing. We are the world. We are the children.


TABLE TALK

VODKA PASTA

MEET THE CHEF

Executive Chef Talia Diele was drawn to the kitchen from an early age. The Denver native learned the art of pasta making from her grandmother and turned her passion for cooking into a career, graduating at the top of her culinary school class. Diele honed her craft in kitchens from Colorado to Florida before taking the reins at Sofia, where she fires pizzas, forms pastas by hand and oversees a menu that, even in a curtailed form, hits some of the highest notes of contemporary Italian fare.

Comfort Food for the Soul Sofia serves up comfort in a time of crisis by Rebecca Friedman

IN A PERIOD OF UNPRECEDENTED UNCERTAINTY,

one thing is clear. New Orleans restaurants, which have vanquished foes ranging from storms to economic recessions to oil spills, have never

32 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

confronted an enemy as dangerous as COVID-19. Even though they’re in the fight of their lives, members of the restaurant community are still looking out for each other.

JEFFERY JOHNSTON PHOTO


As restaurants shuttered across Unlike some cuisines whose the city, New Orleanians found dishes must be consumed straight themselves without access to places from the fire, Sofia is fortunate that have historically offered solace. that its specialties, like woodAt the time of this writing, dine-in fired pizzas, are well-suited to service is prohibited. Many restau- travel. The restaurant’s signature rants have shut their doors, either offerings, such as kale salad with temporarily or for good, unable to beets and hazelnuts, sliced octopus weather the economic battering. with Romesco sauce and tender Thousands of service industry meatballs with zesty amatriciana workers have lost their jobs. sauce, make excellent at-home fare. Some restaurants hoped to Though Sofia’s food is delicious ride out the storm by offering in any setting, including a semitake-out and delivery quarantined kitchen, the service. One of these experience is undoubtSofia, 516 Julia St., holdouts is Sofia, the edly diminished away CBD, 322-3216, Warehouse District from the restaurant’s SofiaNola.com; check Italian eatery that artful dining room and for hours of service. sleek tufted banquettes. opened in January 2019. In more than a Nor does the experiyear, the young restaurant earned ence of cooking for an invisible critical acclaim (including being audience match the real thing, named Restaurant of the Year by acknowledges Gordon. this magazine) and a strong local Despite those challenges, Sofia following. hopes to carry on doing the thing According to General Manager that Italian kitchens do best: Peter Gordon, that local support serving meals made with love to has helped them through a perilous people craving comfort. There’s time, with devoted customers never been a greater need for it. purchasing gift cards for future use and ordering takeout pizzas, pastas and salads. Not only has Sofia committed to continue operating for as long as possible, it has pledged to help colleagues in the service industry whose livelihoods have been affected, offering a daily “Industry FAMILY MEAL Family Meal” at a deep discount Toups Meatery in Mid-City, for fellow industry workers. helmed by chef and James Beard “We felt it was very important semi-finalist, Best Chef South, Isaac to aid while we could,” says Toups, serves up modern Cajun Gordon. “It’s really affecting more cuisine in a family-style atmosphere people than just our staff… It’s where diners always feel at home. a huge issue throughout New New happy hour specials offer Orleans, and we felt that it was discounts on wine on Wednesdays our responsibility to do anything and a selection of bar bites, that we could.” including Toups’ legendary According to Gordon, Sofia’s cracklings. Toups and his staff have relatively small size is an advan- also provided “family meal” to tage in the current climate, with hospitality and service industry lower overhead costs and the workers looking for homestyle ability to execute a to-go menu dishes, like red beans and rice, with a “skeleton crew.” The chicken and sausage gumbo and management hopes to push on, rabbit stew, during the coronavirus even in the face of drastically crisis. Toups’ regular menu has reduced sales, to continue giving been available for curbside to-go back to the community. pickup and delivery.

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 3 3


FOOD

34 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

STYLED BY PHOTOGRAPHED BY EUGENIA UHL


Pick of the Crops

SPRING VEGETABLE PASTA

Shopping at the Farmers’ Markets

Ingredients

by Dale Curry

1 medium purple eggplant Fine sea salt

LATE SPRING THROUGH EARLY SUMMER IS FARMERS

market paradise in south Louisiana. Creole tomatoes, Ponchatoula strawberries and north shore blueberries, along with local asparagus, herbs, peppers, new potatoes and so much more await us at markets throughout the metropolitan area. Just google “local farmers markets” to get on board. Because we are among the warmest spots in the country, our beautiful bounty of produce fresh from the farm arrives early before the blistering heatwave hits in mid-June. I live in River Ridge and like to get up early on a Saturday morning and drive up the River Road to the German Coast Farmer’s Market in Destrehan because it makes me feel like I’m on a trip to the country where many of the farmers live. That’s not to say that farmers aren’t parking their trucks all over the east bank, west bank, north shore and south shore, especially on Saturdays with regular appearances of the multi-market Crescent City Farmers Market on days throughout the week. They are there with fruits and vegetables and sometimes fresh fish and shellfish, locally made sausages, barbecued meats, jams and jellies. My favorite dish in springtime is pasta with fresh Creole tomatoes, fresh sweet basil, garlic, extra-virgin olive oil and Parmesan cheese. I do have other favorites. For example, asparagus cooked al dente with sliced boiled egg and homemade mayonnaise; green beans with new potatoes, seasoned with ham chunks and onion; spinach cooked for seconds in heavily garlicked extra-virgin olive oil; corn maquechoux with sweet peppers of all colors; field peas seasoned with ham as a side for pot roast; strawberry shortcake with real whipped cream, and blueberry cobbler a la mode. Following is my latest warm-weather, fresh-veggie combo that happens to be a vegetarian entrée with appeal to all ages. Or serve it as a side with meat or fish. Any vegetables that are good roasted can go into this dish. You might try Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, broccoli or summer squash.

½ red bell pepper ½ green bell pepper 2 ears yellow corn Extra-virgin olive oil 1 small onion, chopped 3 large cloves garlic, minced 1 large red--ripe Creole tomato, cut in bite-size pieces Handful sweet basil leaves, roughly chopped Handful baby spinach leaves, roughly chopped 12 ounces penne or other pasta ½ cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Freshly ground black pepper Directions U-PICK If you like to visit farms and pick your own fruit and vegetables, there are plenty of opportunities. Find them on Google under Louisiana’s PickYour-Own Farms. Call to make sure they will be open and ask what is provided and what you need to bring. Go on a clear day, and be sure to wear a wide-brimmed hat, plenty of sunscreen and sunglasses.

1. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Peel eggplant and cut into 1-inch cubes. Place on a plate and salt lightly, tossing to salt all sides. Cover with another plate for about 30 minutes. Drain, dry eggplant with paper towels and place on a large baking sheet, lightly greased with olive oil. Trim peppers and cut into 1-by-1/4-inch strips and place on baking sheet. Place cleaned corn on baking sheet. Drizzle all vegetables lightly with extra-virgin olive oil, turning as you drizzle. Roast in oven for about 20 to 30 minutes or until done and lightly browned. You can test vegetables with a fork to see if they are done. 2. Heat 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil in small skillet and sauté onion and garlic until wilted. 3. Boil pasta in lightly salted water until al dente. Drain and place in large serving bowl. 4. Add all other ingredients to pasta and toss, adding more olive oil, salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot or at room temperature. Serves 6 to 8.

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 3 5


LAST CALL

Doin’ the Home Thing Making Your Own “Aviation Cocktail” by Tim McNally

THERE IS LIKELY NO OTHER TOWN IN

America where food preparation at home is so glorious. Most of our great chefs learned the craft at their mother’s, grandmother’s, aunt’s or dad’s side. This tribute to generations has not fully translated to cocktails. I guess the prevailing view is that the bars are so good and adept at their craft, we can go out and have a great mixed drink, putting someone else in charge of drink preparation. Well, let’s advance the mixologist’s craft and do the home-thing. We will keep it simple, straightforward and fun. The “Aviation Cocktail” was invented around 1916 by a German immigrant to America, Hugo Ennslin, who was “behind the stick” at a number of East Coast bars and restaurants. Sadly, late in his life, he was unable to continue his mission to make a legal Aviation Cocktail as he committed suicide in 1928, before Prohibition ended. The name of the drink did indeed come from the aeronautical success of the Wright Brothers who were still considered heroes in the days of World War I which saw the

world’s first air battles. One of the ingredients, Crème de Violette, has been both in and out of favor during most of the 20th century, but it is with us now. It gives the drink its distinctive color of the twilight sky. A word of caution: while the recipe is simple, the exact proper measure of each ingredient is crucial. Even a little too much or too little of any ingredient dramatically changes the taste and aroma of the cocktail. Measure all ingredients precisely during preparation.

Aviation Cocktail 2 oz. Gin 1/2 oz. Maraschino Liqueur 1/4 oz. Crème de Violette or Crème Yvette 3/4 oz. Fresh lemon juice Garnish: Brandied cherry Add all ingredients into a shaker with ice and shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with brandied cherry. With thanks to Liquor.com.

36 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

EUGENIA UHL PHOTO


DINING LISTINGS H= NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER

BYWATER

H Pizza Delicious PIZZA 617 Piety St., 6768482, PizzaDelicious.com. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant, that also offers excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes. Outdoor seating a plus. $ CARROLLTON Breads on Oak BAKERY/BREAKFAST 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak St. serves breads, breakfast, sandwiches, 100 percent vegan. $ CITY PARK Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Cir., NO Museum of Art, 482-1264, CafeNoma. com. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $ CBD/WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

H BH Steak STEAKHOUSE Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne SEAFOOD 601 Loyola Ave., 613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. Coastal Louisiana with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$

H Cochon LOUISIANIAN FARE 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski feature Cajun and Southern cuisine. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine Reservations recommended. $$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse STEAKHOUSE 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this menu, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$ Drago’s LOUISIANIAN FARE Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

H Domenica ITALIAN The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. Authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products. $$$$ Emeril’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from 38 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

$ = AVERAGE ENTRÉE PRICE

$ = $5-10 $$ = $11-15 $$$ = $16-20 $$$$ = $21-25 $$$$$ = $25 & UP

all over the world. $$$$$

desserts. $$$$$

coffee. Delivery available.

H Herbsaint LOUISIANIAN FARE 701

Sac-A-Lait SEAFOOD 1051 Annunciation St., 324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. $$$$

BB King’s Blues Club BARBECUE 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/ new-orleans. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician with a menu loaded with BBQ and southern specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$

The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. Modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$

Bayou Burger BURGERS 503 Bourbon St., 529-4256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$

St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint. com. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$

H La Boca STEAKHOUSE 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Lüke WORLD 333 St. Charles Ave., 378-2840, LukeNewOrleans.com. Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, house-made pâtés and plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$ Mother’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net.Locals and tourists alike endure long lines to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$ Mulate’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 201 Julia St., 522-1492, Mulates.com. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$ Palace Café WORLD 605 Canal St., 5231661, PalaceCafe.com. Cassic New Orleans restaurant, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates at the Black Duck Bar. $$$

H Pêche SEAFOOD 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by Chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven, and an excellent raw bar. $$$ HRed Gravy BAKERY/BREAKFAST 125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. Farm-to-table brunch restaurant offers a creative array of items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$

Tommy’s Cuisine ITALIAN 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. Classic CreoleItalian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$ CENTRAL CITY Café Reconcile LOUISIANA FARE 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile.org. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$ FAUBOURG ST. JOHN

H Café Degas FRENCH 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

H 1000 Figs WORLD 3141 Ponce De Leon St., 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. Vegetarianfriendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-to-table alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$ FRENCH QUARTER Acme Oyster House LOUISIANIAN FARE 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster. com. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant. com. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$

H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. James Beard Award-winning menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$

Arnaud’s Remoulade ITALIAN 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. Home of the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$

Rock-N-Sake ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake. com. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$

Antoine’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$

Ruth’s Chris Steak House STEAKHOUSE Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution. There are also great seafood choices and top-notch

Antoine’s Annex SPECIALTY FOODS 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/ Antoines-Annex. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and

Bourbon House SEAFOOD 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes, bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Bayona WORLD 430 Dauphine St., 5254455, Bayona.com. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ Brennan’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 417 Royal St., 525-9711, Brennansneworleans.com. Innovative Cerole menu borrows influences from French and Spanish ancestry with modern updates and distinct seasonal offerings. $$$$ Broussard’s FRENCH 819 Conti St., 5813866, Broussards.com. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table GASTROPUB 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. Open late, this chef-driven rustic colonial cuisine with rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House ITALIAN 601 Chartres St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters LOUISIANIAN FARE 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters. com. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo LOUISIANIAN FARE Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various Louisiana cultures, with a contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster SEAFOOD 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery SEAFOOD 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. Crowd-


pleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood SEAFOOD 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House SEAFOOD 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse STEAKHOUSE 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan STEAKHOUSE 620 Chartres St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. Innovative steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro WORLD 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. Central Mexican cuisine along with handmuddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak STEAKHOUSE 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails and classic steakhouse fare and inspired dishes. Reservations accepted. $$$

H GW Fins SEAFOOD 808 Bienville St., 581FINS (3467), GWFins.com. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$ House of Blues LOUISIANIAN FARE 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues.com/ NewOrleans. Good menu complements music in the main room. World-famous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Irene’s Cuisine ITALIAN 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen LOUISIANIAN FARE 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul. com/KPaul. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to the nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish SEAFOOD 337 Charters St., 598-5005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with

carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chef-driven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou SEAFOOD 208 Bourbon St., 525-4755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafood-centric destination on Bourbon Street. $$$ Muriel’s Jackson Square ITALIAN 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. Enjoy local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-be-haunted establishment. $$$$ Napoleon House ITALIAN 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas. A Sazerac or Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $ NOLA LOUISIANIAN FARE 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedar-plank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill SEAFOOD 739 Conti St., 525-6002, OceanaGrill.com. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro GASTROPUB 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. Wine is the muse at this bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin GASTROPUB 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin. com. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 SEAFOOD 424 Bourbon St., 309-1574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster. $$$ Port of Call BURGERS 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/ restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

H Restaurant R’evolution ITALIAN 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola. com. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Jana Billiot and executive sous chef Gabriel Beard are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Red Fish Grill SEAFOOD 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. This vibrant, seafood-centric polished-casual landmark delivers innivative twists on casual New Orleans seasfood, including local favorites BBQ oysters and double chocolate bread pudding. $$$ Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. Old World elegance, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib,

stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$

China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Private dining rooms available. $$

Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant LOUISIANIAN FARE 301 Dauphine St., 5860972, RichardFiskes.com. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street is this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse STEAKHOUSE

Royal House LOUISIANIAN FARE 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant. com. Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$ SoBou LOUISIANIAN FARE 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on an accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tableau LOUISIANIAN FARE 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter. com. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre. $$$

H The Bistreaux LOUISIANIAN FARE New Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy.com/ dining.html. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$ The Bombay Club LOUISIANIAN FARE Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

H Tujague’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant. com. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$ GARDEN DISTRICT Commander’s Palace LOUISIANIAN FARE 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Award-winner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$ District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders.com. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $ Hoshun Restaurant ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. A wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from

2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$ METAIRIE

H Andrea’s Restaurant ITALIAN 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant. com. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$ Acme Oyster House LOUISIANIAN FARE 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Austin’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$ Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this family-friendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 8854845. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options, and gourmet coffee and espresso drinks create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. $ Crabby Jack’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. Outpost of JacquesImo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Deanie’s Seafood SEAFOOD 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$ Don’s Seafood SEAFOOD 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials. $$$ Drago’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$ Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant SEAFOOD 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House STEAKHOUSE 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris. com. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution, and great MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 3 9


seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine ITALIAN 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS Café du Monde BAKERY/BREAKFAST CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $

MID-CITY H Crescent City Steaks STEAKHOUSE 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$ Five Happiness ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and housebaked duck. $$ Gracious Bakery + Café BAKERY/ BREAKFAST 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery. com.Boutique bakery offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar LOUISIANIAN FARE 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

H Liuzza’s ITALIAN 3636 Bienville St., 4829120, Liuzzas.com. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

H Mandina’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$

H Mona’s Café WORLD 3901 Banks St., 482-7743. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros. The lentil soup and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H MoPho ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola. com. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-and-match pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$ Parkway Bakery and Tavern AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys.com. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $ Ralph’s On The Park LOUISIANAIAN FARE 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$

H Toups’ Meatery LOUISIANIAN FARE 845 N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides

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CC’s Coffee House BAKERY/BREAKFAST CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $

com. Historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ UPTOWN Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute. org. B, A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$

Copeland’s LOUISIANIAN FARE CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$

Bouligny Tavern GASTROPUB 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern. com. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$

Little Tokyo ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN LittleTokyoNola.com. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$

Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $

Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, burgers, soups, salads and deli-style sandwiches. $

Casamento’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. The familyowned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and for all major holidays. $$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House SEAFOOD MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar.A seafood lover’s paradise offers an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. A raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw. $$$

Clancy’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. Their Creoleinspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$

Reginelli’s Pizzeria PIZZA Reginellis.com. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café BAKERY/BREAKFAST TheRubySlipperCafe.net. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$ Theo’s Pizza TheosPizza.com. The crackercrisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with local ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN ZeaRestaurants.com. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular spot serves a variety of grilled items, appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Catering services available. $$$ RIVERBEND

H Boucherie LOUISIANIAN FARE 1506 S.

H Coquette FRENCH 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from the chefs. $$$ Dick and Jenny’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys.com. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$

H Gautreau’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant. com. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics.

H La Crêpe Nanou FRENCH 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery FRENCH 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$

Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola. com. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$

Lilette FRENCH 3637 Magazine St., 8951636, LiletteRestaurant.com. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

Brigtsen’s LOUISIANIAN FARE 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

H Magasin ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN 4201

HCarrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$ UPPER 9TH WARD St. Roch Market LOUISIANIAN FARE 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket.

and steaks are also solid. $$$$

H Patois WORLD 6078 Laurel St., 8959441, PatoisNola.com. French food, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$ Pizza Domenica PIZZA 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. A pizza centric spinoff of the popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitan-style pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

H Shaya WORLD 4213 Magazine St., 8914213, ShayaRestaurant.com. James Beard Award-winning menu pays homage to Israel at this contemporary Israeli hotspot. $$$ H The Company Burger BURGERS 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger. com. Custom-baked butter-brushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $ The Delachaise GASTROPUB 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise. com. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$ H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger presents this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$ H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 309-0069, WayfareNola.com. Creative sandwiches and southern-inspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine ITALIAN 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ WAREHOUSE DISTRICT Lucy’s WORLD 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 523-8995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. Islandthemed oasis with a menu that cherry-picks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay into the wee hours. $

Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe. com. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budgetfriendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $ Pascal’s Manale ITALIAN 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. A neighborhood favorite since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

SPONSORED

Acme Oyster House

Antoine's

Bonci

3000 Veterans Blvd., Metairie (504) 309-4056 AcmeOyster.com

713 St. Louis St. New Orleans (504) 581-4422 Antoines.com

726 Julia St., New Orleans (504) 766-6071 BonciUSA.com

Born in the French Quarter, Acme Oyster House has been pleasing the palates of discriminating diners for over 100 years. It's quality you can taste in the fresh, handshucked Louisiana oysters. Whether served ice cold on the half shell, chargrilled and sizzling in garlic butter, or fried to golden perfection, Acme oysters are some of the best you'll ever have.

Following our re-opening on May 1st, we will be offering our Mother’s Day Jazz Brunch menu on both Saturday, May 9th and Sunday, May 10th. Bottomless mimosas, sparkling wine and rose program during brunch. Book your reservations now through OpenTable. Contact Lisa at lblount@ antoinesrestaurant.com to book your next event. We look forward to serving you!

Order our samplers online or call for Curbside Pick-up & Delivery. Pizza selections change daily, but a few New Orleans favorites include Potato with Mozzarella, Meatball and Lemon Zucchini Ricotta. Made from specially crafted dough, the crust is both crispy and airy.

Boulevard American Bistro

Brady’s Wine Warehouse

Breads on Oak

4241 Veterans Blvd., Metairie (504) 889-2301 BoulevardBistro.com

1029 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., Suite C New Orleans (504) 662-1488 BradysWineWarehouse.com

8640 Oak St., New Orleans (504) 324-8271 BreadsOnOak.com

With a guest-centric approach always top of mind, Boulevard American Bistro strives to make the world a better place to dine by providing high-quality wood-fired American Bistro cuisine and professional yet friendly service in an upscale environment. NEW location coming soon at 5171 Citrus Blvd in Elmwood!

4 2 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

We're open for business as usual (but encouraging social distancing). Call the store and we'll happily deliver your order or have it packed and ready for pick up! Place on-demand delivery orders on our Brady's app, our store website or through Drizly.

Breads on Oak has take-out, online ordering/pickup, curbside pickup, and delivery. Temporary hours are Thursday through Sunday 9am-3pm. From our organic Old World sourdough breads to our popular beet and mushroom burger, pumpkin cheddar biscuit sandwich and carrot cake, everything is 100% plantbased.


SPONSORED

Dat Dog

Effervescence

701 South Peters, New Orleans (504) 302-7496 BriquetteNola.com

3336 Magazine St., New Orleans (504) 324-2226 DatDog.com

1036 N Rampart St., New Orleans (504) 509-7644 NolaBubbles.com

Our Blackened Redfish dish includes grilled gulf shrimp, fried green tomatoes, fresh arugula, and Chardonnay butter sauce. We offer an extensive wine list and beautifully crafted cocktails to accompany your meals.

This colorful and unapologetically authentic New Orleans hot dog stand is known for unique gourmet sausages, wide variety of unlimited toppings, local craft beers, and the best tots and fries in town. Guaranteed to put a smile on your face. Takeout and Curbside Delivery available daily at Magazine and Freret Street locations.

Celebrate everyday with bubbles and bites in a relaxed, chic setting on the edge of the French Quarter. Effervescence features sparkling wine with flights of sparklers from around the world, bubbly cocktails and an extensive bottle list. Meticulously prepared bites highlight the best local ingredients to pair with your bubbly. Happy hour Wed-Fri till 6pm. Find upcoming events, gift cards and inquire about private party on our website.

Galatoire's 33 Bar & Steak

Gattuso's

GW Fins

215 Bourbon St., New Orleans 504-335-3932 Galatoires33BarandSteak.com

435 Huey P Long Ave., Gretna (504) 368-1114 Gattusos.net

808 Bienville St, New Orleans (504) 581-3467 GWFins.com

Whether stopping in for a short visit or a comfortable stay, Galatoire's "33" Bar & Steak offers classic, hand-crafted cocktails and the finest wines and spirits, alongside USDA prime steaks from the dinner menu and lighter fare at Bar "33".

Gattuso’s is your neighborhood spot in Old Gretna and enjoy a great meal. We are currently open for curbside pickup. We offer daily happy hour from 4pm-7pm with 14 beers on tap. Gattuso’s can also cater any event.

Host an unforgettable event, highlighted by a customized menu and worldclass service, in GW Fins’ spectacularly redesigned Private Dining Room. Our award-winning cookbook, The Deep End of Flavor is the perfect keepsake, allowing guests the opportunity to recreate their favorite seafood dishes at home.

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 43

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Briquette


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

SPONSORED

Josephine Estelle

Justine

La Petite Grocery

600 Carondelet St., New Orleans (504) 930-3070 JosephineEstelle.com

225 Chartres St., New Orleans (504) 218.8533 JustineNola.com

4238 Magazine St., New Orleans (504) 891-3377 LaPetiteGrocery.com

Name after each of their daughters, Josephine Estelle reflects the collaborative spirt of James Beard Award-nominated chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman whose renowned culinary tell is the unlikely marriage between classic Italian recipes and the bright and mystifying flavors of the American South. With an emphasis on season ingredients, homemade pastas and recipes pass down from our Maw Maws, Josephine Estelle is open for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour.

Justine is a Parisian-style brasserie by husband-and-wife team Justin and Mia Devillier. Combining the sophistication of a brasserie with the playfulness of the French Quarter, Justine honors the technique and simplicity of French classics in a bustling, multi-roomed restaurant with vibrant decor and grand presentation.

Owned by husband-and-wife team Justin and Mia Devillier, La Petite Grocery pays homage to its century-old home that’s acted as a cornerstone of the community throughout the years. In the kitchen, Chef Justin Devillier puts a creative spin on traditional New Orleans cuisine with dishes like Turtle Bolognese and Blue Crab Beignets.

New Orleans Creole Cookery

Nola Caye

Orleans Grapevine

510 Toulouse St., New Orleans (504) 524-9632 NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com

898 Baronne, New Orleans (504) 302-1302 NolaCaye.com

720 Orleans Ave., New Orleans (504) 523-1930 OrleansGrapevine.com

Enjoy some of the best food and drink the city has to offer in a classic New Orleans environment. Savor authentic Creole dishes such as gumbo, shrimp Creole and crawfish etouffee. You haven’t experienced New Orleans until you’ve been to New Orleans Creole Cookery!

The word ‘CAYE’ is a literal translation of “New Orleans Island”. Given our close proximity to the Caribbean nations, owners Brooke and Bryan Zar chose their favorite recipes to showcase authentic representations of these nation’s most popular dishes.

Enjoy true New Orleans atmosphere in a beautiful, tropical courtyard. Orleans Grapevine serves high quality cuisine and one of the largest selections of wine by the bottle or by the glass.

4 4 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM


SPONSORED

Pascal's Manale

Pythian Market

538 Hagan Ave., New Orleans (504) 482-3047 ParkwayPoorBoys.com

1838 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans (504) 895-4877 PascalsManale.com

234 Loyola Ave., New Orleans (504) 481-9599 PythianMarket.com

Parkway can now take your phone orders no matter how busy or long the line is. Our new call in kitchen makes it easy to call, pickup, and enjoy some of the best poorboys in town! We hope to reopen with a brand new online ordering system.

Welcome back! Ready to serve you again. Thanks for all you’ve done to keep us as safe as possible. Home to the original B-B-Q Shrimp. Enjoy fresh seafood, Italian, steaks, cocktails and a great selection of wines.

Pythian Market is open Monday-Saturday from noon to 8pm for touch-free delivery, takeout and curbside pickup. Simply place your order online at pythianmarket.com/ order, choose your order type, select from any of our open vendors, and check out with cashless payment.

Ralph Brennan

Red Gravy

Restaurant August

504-539-5510 neworleans-food.com/giftcards

125 Camp St., New Orleans (551) 404-5696

Calling all Moms, Dads and Grads! Give the gift of good taste with a Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group gift card. No expiration date. Valid at Brennan’s, Red Fish Grill, Ralph’s on the Park, Napoleon House and Cafe NOMA. Purchase e-cards or physical gift cards online now.

We have changed our hours and are now offering pre-orders for every Wednesday. Please call or text for orders. Check out our Facebook page for upcoming menus as well as a link to purchase our sauce online. Pick-ups at the restaurant will be between 1pm and 2pm and pick-ups at the house will be between 4pm-6pm.

301 Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans (504) 299-9777 RestaurantAugust.com Restaurant August boasts historical architecture and luxurious detailing to offer the perfect setting for your special event. The Private Dining Room and the Chef's Tasting Room offer different experiences hosting up to 100 or a small table of 12.

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 45

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Parkway


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

SPONSORED

Restaurant R'evolution

Seaworthy

Tito’s Ceviche & Pisco

777 Bienville St., New Orleans (504) 553-2277 RevolutionNola.com

630 Carondelet St., New Orleans (504) 930-3071 SeaworthyNola.com

5015 Magazine St., New Orleans (504) 267-7612 TitosCevichePisco.com

Chefs John Folse and Rick Tramonto present imaginative reinterpretations of classic Creole cuisine in a setting that blends antique and contemporary details of grand French Quarter homes. Serving Lunch Fridays, Dinner nightly, Sunday Jazz Brunch and Happy Hour at Bar R’evolution. Re-Opening May 31st.

Seaworthy showcases wild-caught and sustainably harvested oysters from American waters – Gulf Coast, East Coast and West Coast alike – as well as locally sourced fish and game. The celebrated beverage program offers both classic and proprietary cocktails, with a smart selection of beer and wine.

Peruvian restaurant in uptown New Orleans with premier handcrafted cocktails, hearthealthy Peruvian wine, a variety of melt in your mouth ceviches, tiraditos, savory meat and seafood. To go orders available for pick up and delivery.

4 6 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM


SPONSORED

Auraluz 4408 Shores Dr., Metairie (504) 888-3313 ShopAuraluz.com LAMPE BERGER...the perfect Mother's Day gift! It's both decorative and functional. Made in France for over 120 years, each Lampe Berger cleanses, purifies and fragrances the air with over 50 fragrances to choose from. Improve the air you're living in by getting rid of those kitchen, pet and household odors. Available at AURALUZ and shopauraluz.com

Home Malone 629 N Carrollton Ave., Mid-City (504) 324-8352 4610 Magazine St., Uptown (504) 766-6148 HomeMalonenola.com Golden Oyster Oval Serving Tray. Hand painted 22K golden rimmed oysters on a ceramic serving tray measuring 15” x 11”. Food safe, hand wash only. Due to the handmade nature, no two are alike and product may vary slightly. $72.

Bleu Blow Dry 5228 Magazine St., New Orleans (504) 325-5625 701 Metairie Rd. Ste.112-2A, Metairie (504) 309-5999 BLEUaBlowdryBar.com Give the gift of fabulous Hair and Makeup for Mother’s Day. BLEU Gift Cards are money to “blow” but definitely not wasted. Can be purchased for any monetary amount desired and applied towards the purchase of services, products and even gratuity.

Monomin 2104 Magazine St., New Orleans (504) 827-1269 Monomin.com A super chic and super easy gift for the Mom in your life is our black and gold Air Hearts by Le Spec from Australia. This thick-framed cat eye style features metal top bar detailing and premium zero base flat lenses, which suits all face shapes! Finished in classic black favored by celebrities worldwide - as seen on Meghan Markle, Olivia Palermo, Reece Witherspoon and Toni Braxton.

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 47


SPONSORED

The Pontchartrain Hotel 2031 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504-941-9000 ThePontchartrainHotel.com Pontchartrain Pink Robes. Cozy up in the plush signature Pontchartrain robe. With 100% combed cotton velour, shawl collar and two front pockets, this is the perfect at-home indulgence for any mom. Available in medium and large. $99.

4 8 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

Queork Queork.com 838 Chartres St., New Orleans 504-481-4910 3005 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-388-6803 This cork bag with leather straps is as smart as it is stylish. If you like extra pockets and sections for everything you will love the Jackson! Perfect for Mother’s Day! $295. We are currently online only, and locals can use code NOLALOCAL for 30% off. Free US Shipping.

Sosusu Boutique 3427 Magazine St., New Orleans (504) 309-5026 Sosusu.MyShopify.com The Rani Arabella Luxury Lifestyle collection is handcrafted in Italy. The weekender scarf printed bag made with cotton fabric and matching hat is the perfect gift for Mom this Mother’s Day.


SPONSORED

Around the House

At the heart of NOLA Wood Windows is a passion for professionalism and craftsmanship, and it’s what drives them to restore existing doors, windows and shutters instead of simply replacing them with modern, less sustainable finishes. Using the tried and true methods of the past, NOLA Wood Windows partners with clients to bring new life to historic wood pieces. Repairs and fabrications are performed with a commitment to upholding the original craftsmanship, ensuring any piece can continue serving for generations to come. Specialties include historic glass matching, sash restoration and weather stripping for windows, in addition to refinishing and rot repairs for doors and shutters. Each piece is treated with the utmost care, and every client is guaranteed service that meets their needs and surpasses their expectations. It’s all the reason you need to #RestoreNotReplace. For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit NolaWoodWindows.com or call 504-302-2829.

ome is where the heart is — so why not treat them with as much care as we give ourselves? Whether you’re looking to do a little spring cleaning, to find a new apartment in the heart of the New Orleans community, or just to give your existing space a refresh, all the resources you need are right here in the city. From passionate craftsmen who are ready to restore your space’s classic wood fixtures, to expert renovators who can make any vision a reality, and to luxury apartments that promise top-quality living with all the amenities you could want, there’s no limit to the possibilities for you and your home. We’ve put together a list of local businesses that are ready to make your dreams come true, and they’re just a phone call or click away.

With Southern Refinishing, you don’t get a contractor — you get a family. Southern Refinishing offers more than 40 years of experience in bathroom and kitchen reglazing projects for customers in the Gulf South. In addition to saving homeowners the cost of replacing their bathroom and kitchen fixtures, the company’s goal is to make every customer’s experience as comfortable and painless as possible. They know how stressful it can be to have a contractor disrupting your personal space, so the company works to minimize disruption throughout the remodeling process. From tile walls, countertops, and sinks to fiberglass and acrylic tub repairs and tub/shower conversions to clawfoot tubs, Southern Refinishing has the equipment and expertise to work with any fixture. A local New Orleans company, Southern Refinishing is experienced with both small and large jobs, from residential homes to commercial projects such as hotels. Get a customized quote today by calling 504-348-1770. Visit SouthernRefinishing.com for a gallery of projects and additional information.

Set in the vibrant and stylish Mid-City and just steps away from the Lafitte Greenway, Lumina Apartments offers luxurious living spaces with sleek, modern amenities. Both one- and two-bedroom floor plans feature high ceilings and contemporary finishes, with designer touches including vinyl plank floors, spacious walk-in closets, pendant lighting and granite countertops. In addition to top-quality living, Lumina invites residents to indulge in the rich culture of the surrounding city with community and social spaces. These exquisite features range from a resort-inspired pool and 24-hour wellness center to a clubroom and a lounge, while additional perks like a dog-washing station, covered bike racks and package lockers ensure convenience and easy living. With popular restaurants, bars and retail shops just a short walk away, Lumina is nestled in the heart of a thriving and active community. For more information and to set up an in-person or virtual tour, visit LuminaMidCity.com.

All the luxury and amenities of Mid-City’s Lumina are coming soon to the Lower Garden District with The Delaneaux Apartments. This modern living community is designed to cater to your busy schedule and to ensure comfort, convenience and relaxation when you return home. Chef-inspired kitchens feature sleek, stainless steel appliances and custom island dining tables, and each floor plan is accented with contemporary finishes that set these spaces above all the rest. Amenities unique to The Delaneaux include a movie theater, a grand two-story clubroom and a resort-inspired pool, allowing residents to savor the rich history of their neighborhood whether inside their apartments or spending time with neighbors in communal spaces. The elegance of these spaces combines the beauty, distinction and originality that make New Orleans an exceptional place to live, with modern comforts and exquisite touches that create an unrivaled residential experience. For more information or to sign up for the VIP waiting list, email delaneauxmgr@greystar.com today! •

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MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 49


SPONSORED

Summer Travel

S

ummer is just a few weeks away, which means it will soon be time to bask in the sun and rejuvenate your spirit. Sunshine is aplenty across the Gulf Coast, and from Mississippi to Florida, you’ll find plenty of opportunities for summer fun, both on and off the water. From shimmering waterfront destinations in Hattiesburg to the white sands in Biloxi, your sun-kissed vacation awaits. When your toes aren’t in the water, there are plenty of options for indoor fun: historical tours, mouthwatering restaurants, art exhibits, museums, relaxing hotel rooms, and eclectic shops. Travel resources are also available to help get you where you want to go, whether that’s a simple drive down the highway or scouting for shells on the beach in Florida. Take a look at the following destinations, and plan your summer travels now. Now is the perfect time to dream about your future road tri p escape! When the time is right and you’re ready to jump in the car, you can make sure your road trip stays on track with the peace of mind that accompanies AAA 24/7 Roadside Assistance. AAA covers you in any car, SUV, or pick-up truck even if you’re not the driver. AAA provides members with free towing, free tire change, free lock-out assistance, free minor mechanical first aid, free jump start, and free delivery of emergency fuel. For a limited time, readers of New Orleans Magazine can join AAA for only $52 and get two household members free for one year (promo code 175606). Current AAA members can add two new household members free for one year (promo code 175608). For more details, see AAA’s ad in this issue, call 844-330-2173, or visit AAA.com/SaveOffer. Join AAA today. 5 0 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

Big Bay Lake is a one-of-a-kind planned community on one of Mississippi’s largest private recreational lakes. Located just outside of Hattiesburg, and only 90 minutes from New Orleans, Big Bay Lake blends seamlessly into its natural surroundings. Waterfront homesites are available for building custom homes and retreats starting at $70,000 and several resale homes are usually available for immediate purchase. Both the homes and homesites within this community provide unique opportunities to create the perfect home or weekend getaway. It’s time to relax, unplug, make memories and create new traditions at Big Bay Lake. Whether you are a boating or fishing enthusiast or just a family who loves to make a big splash, Big Bay Lake is simply about the lure of the water. Come enjoy sun-kissed, fun-filled days at Big Bay Lake, where the little things make life…“Big!” Call for a boat tour today at 877-4BIG-BAY or visit BigBayLake.com. Take an island adventure this summer that won’t break the bank and is located only about 70 minutes from New Orleans. Mississippi’s finest beaches are located on Ship Island, approximately 11 miles offshore from the Gulf Coast cities of Gulfport and Biloxi. The undeveloped sand island is accessible only by boat. Ship Island Excursions offers daily passenger ferry service from Gulfport and Biloxi. Watch for Atlantic Bottlenose dolphins during an enjoyable 60-minute cruise. Part of Gulf Islands National Seashore, Ship Island offers visitors the first high quality, natural beaches for swimming and shelling east of New Orleans. Travel to a special place where the main attractions are long, quiet beaches, beautiful green water, and clean Gulf air. The nine-mile long barrier island also features historic Fort


SPONSORED

Massachusetts (circa 1858). Food service is available on the boats and the island. Chair and umbrella rentals are also available. During summer, the National Park Service offers a lifeguarded swim beach and fort tours. Ferry service operates March through October. Visit MSShipIsland.com for info. Take a walk through time as you enjoy a glimpse into the lives of fascinating people who have called St. Joseph Plantation home. Learn about the Priestly family and grandson H. H. Richardson, who was born at St. Joseph and became one of America’s most important architects of the 19th century. Explore the story of Valcour Aime, known as “The Louis XIV of Louisiana,” and his two daughters, Felicite and Josephine, to whom he gave St. Joseph Plantation and neighboring Felicity Plantation. Discover the stories of the slaves that lived here and the work they did. In 1877, the story of St. Joseph’s Plantation’s current family began when Joseph Waguespack purchased the plantation. Joseph’s descendants, the Waguespack and Simon families, have kept this sugarcane plantation thriving for over 135 years, operating the plantation with over 1,000 acres planted. Visit and learn about the sugarcane industry and its regional significance. Additionally, see where scenes from All The King’s Men, Skeleton Key, 12 Years a Slave, Underground, Queen Sugar, the remake of Roots, and four-time Oscar nominee Mudbound were filmed.

Vicksburg Moments Await When the time is right, Vicksburg will be ready to welcome visitors to experience American history, Mississippi music and Southern charm. Vicksburg’s historic attractions including the Vicksburg National Military Park give visitors the opportunity to make their own historic memories while learning about our nation’s past. Check out one of our tour homes, walking tours, or ghost tours for an unforgettable experience. The downtown and entertainment district is a must-stop while in Vicksburg. Walk the brick-paved streets and check out the many restaurants, museums, galleries, shops, and trails. Entertainment is covered with gaming action at one of our four casinos, the family arcade at Margaritaville, and live performances at venues throughout the city offering rock, country and the Mississippi Delta blues. With views beyond your imagination, you cannot miss a Vicksburg sunset along the mighty Mississippi River. Relax — it all runs on river time in Vicksburg, the Key to the South. •

MYNEWORLEANS.COM MAY 2020 5 1


SPONSORED

Women’s Health

W

ith all the stress of careers, families and everything in between, it can be all too easy to overlook the most important factor of a healthy, happy life: your own well being. May is Women’s Health Month, and for all the movers and shakers of our community who could benefit from a little “me time,” there’s no greater opportunity to refresh and rejuvenate. Our Women’s Health resources are perfect for any women looking to reward their hard work this summer, or for anyone wanting to show their appreciation for the women in their lives.

5 2 MAY 2020 MYNEWORLEANS.COM

A specialist in facial aesthetics, Dr. Sean Weiss is one of a select few surgeons in the world who are double board certified in Facial Plastic Surgery and Head and Neck Surgery. Considered one of the best plastic surgeons in the New Orleans area, he performs cosmetic surgical procedures on men and women seeking enhancement of the face, head, and neck. Dr. Weiss also performs non-surgical procedures including injectable fillers and wrinkle reduction. Board Certified and Fellowship trained, Dr. Weiss is known for excellence in facelift, facial rejuvenation, blepharoplasty, rhinoplasty, hair restoration, and other procedures, providing comprehensive care for your aesthetic needs. Dr. Sean Weiss - Facial Plastic Surgery is located in Metairie just minutes from downtown New Orleans. Learn more at seanweissmd.com or call 504-814-3223 to schedule your consultation. •


A Special Section of New Orleans Magazine WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM & EVENTS GUIDE MAY 2020

WYES’ New Cooking Series Spotlights Outstanding Women Chefs In New Orleans! Premieres Saturday, May 16 at 10am

National funding for KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS was provided by The Melvin S. Cohen Foundation and The L.E. Phillips Family Foundation. Local funding by Rouses Markets.

M K EE Q I TC T O U H U EE E R N N S

Repeats Sundays at 1:30pm


Susan Spicer

Sue Zemanick

Alison Vega-Knoll

Cara Benson

Rebecca Wilcomb

Christina do Carmo Honn

Cynthia VuTran

Amarys Herndon

Ericka Michelle Lassiar

Luot Nguyen

Jana Billiot

Leighann Smith

Lenora Chong

Haley Bittermann

Maribeth Del Castillo

Meg Bickford


Who Runs the World, Girls! Megan Forman

Melissa Martin

Christie Plaisance

Melissa Araujo

Nicole Mackie

Becky Wasden

The series premieres on WYES-TV on Saturday, May 16 at 10am KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS will include 26 episodes featuring 26 local chefs. From James Beard Award-winners to a bumper crop of talented women at the helm of local restaurants, the series will share food and stories from chefs with roots in Creole New Orleans, Louisiana Cajun country, Italy, Vietnam and Latin America. All of the dishes in the series were shot on location in kitchens that ran the gamut from an expansive teaching kitchen at the New Orleans Culinary and Hospitality Institute, to the compact Diva Dawg food truck, to homey digs in Mosquito Supper Club’s Creole cottage. Recipes and more at wyes.org.

Allison Vines-Rushing

Tanya Dubuclet

THE QUEEN OF CREOLE CUISINE

The series is dedicated to culinary pioneer Leah Chase

Tia Henry

Leah Chase TRIBUTE

Chase's grandson Edgar “Dooky” Chase, IV, and niece Cleo Robinson prepare three of Leah’s signature dishes throughout the series, while reflecting on her life and legacy.


1 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

7pm INFORMED SOURCES

11pm WAYLON JENNINGS — THE OUTLAW PERFORMANCE captures this hidden 1978 concert and features a 16-song set combined with Jennings’ own words about his life and music. Songs include “Mamas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys,” “This Time,” “Good Hearted Woman,” “Luckenbach, Texas” and “Are You Ready For The Country.”

3 SUNDAY 6pm CALL THE MIDWIFE, SEASON 9 (Part 5 of 8) A patient’s wife refuses to accept further help. A first-time father frustrates Nurse Crane. 7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT WYES’ weekly local restaurant, arts and entertainment discussion program is now in its 34th season. Host and producer Peggy Scott Laborde welcomes regular guests Poppy Tooker, Alan Smason, plus new roundtable visitors every week. The program also showcases occasional performances by local musicians and presents local history features. Missed an episode? Watch it on YouTube at wyesondemand and at wyes.org. 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm SOMEWHERE SOUTH “How Do You ‘Cue” (Part 6 of 6) 9:30pm AMERICAN MASTERS “Julia Child” 10:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

2 SATURDAY 6pm LAWRENCE WELK: SHOW STOPPERS 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Secrets & Lies” Sigourney Weaver, Justina Machado and Amy Ryan explore their ancestry. 8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Gary Clark, Jr.”

D4

9pm FLY AWAY HOME (1996)

7pm CALL THE MIDWIFE, SEASON 9 (Part 6 of 8) The Turners receive alarming news about their daughter. Fred tries to reinstate a horticulture show.

8pm MASTERPIECE “World on Fire” (Part 5 of 7) Harry and his unit reach Dunkirk, with the odds stacked against them. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Ben Blackall/© Mammoth Screen 2019 9pm BAPTISTE ON MASTERPIECE (Part 4 of 6) Julien finds the money but Edward makes a reckless move that puts the case in jeopardy. 10pm FLY AWAY HOME (1996)

4 MONDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “McNay Art Museum” (Hour 3 of 3) 8pm AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “George W. Bush” (Part 1 of 2) Explore Bush’s tumultuous youth and his unorthodox road to the presidency via the

contested election of 2000. The new administration’s focus on domestic issues is abruptly brought to a halt by the shocking terrorist attacks of 9/11. 10pm 9/11: INSIDE THE PENTAGON tells the story of what happened inside the Pentagon on that tragic day. Using exclusive first-person interviews with Pentagon personnel, first responders, aviation experts and journalists, as well as rarely seen Department of Defense footage taken from inside the Pentagon after the attack. 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

5 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE QUEEN AT WAR

8pm AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “George W. Bush” (Part 2 of 2) Follow the evolution of Bush’s presidency, from 9/11 and the ensuing war in Iraq to his second term challenges, including anthrax scares, threat levels, Hurricane Katrina and the most serious financial crisis since the Great Depression. 10pm WORLD WAR II MEGA WEAPONS “Tunnels of Okinawa” The Japanese decide that the island of Okinawa will be their last bastion of defense. It is a key strategic location for the Americans, but as Japanese territory, the Japanese will defend it at all costs. 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

6 WEDNESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm SPY IN THE WILD, A NATURE MINISERIES “The North” (Part 2 of 4) As seasons change, the animal spies infiltrate.


8pm H20: THE MOLECULE THAT MADE US “Crisis” (Part 3 of 3) Earth’s changing water cycle — and a globalized movement towards water for profit — is forcing changes in humans’ reliance on water. Can a geopolitical crisis be averted?

10pm THE OUTBACK “The Kimberley Comes Alive” (Part 1 of 3) 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

7 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR 8pm MASTERPIECE “Grantchester, Season 3” (Part 4 of 7) 9pm MASTERPIECE “Grantchester, Season 3” (Part 5 of 7) 10pm LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX (Part 4 of 6) 11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

8 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm IN THIS TOGETEHR: A PBS PORTRAIT 9:00pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “La Phil 100” Celebrate the centennial of this landmark orchestra with “La Valse” by Ravel, Stravinsky’s “Firebird” and more led by three renowned LA Phil conductors: Zubin Mehta, Esa-Pekka Salonen, and current music and artistic director Gustavo Dudamel. 10:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT

7pm CALL THE MIDWIFE, SEASON 9 (Part 7 of 8) Kevin sees a troubled patient. The maternity home receives a long-awaited incubator. 8pm MASTERPIECE “World on Fire” (Part 6 of 7) Paris falls to the Nazis, and Webster and Albert’s lives are turned upside down. 9pm BAPTISTE ON MASTERPIECE (Part 5 of 6) Julien plots an audacious move to frame Constantin which ends in blood shed. 10pm KRAMER VS. KRAMER (1979)

11 MONDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

9pm EXPEDITION WITH STEVE BACKSHALL “Mexico - Maya Underworld” Backshall explores a honeycomb of subterranean Mexican caves that the ancient Maya believed were a portal to a terrifying underworld.

offer viewers an in depth look into the important news of metro New Orleans and Louisiana. Repeat Sunday mornings at 9:30 a.m. Missed an episode? Watch it on the WYES On Demand channel at YouTube.com and at wyes.org.

9 SATURDAY 6pm LAWRENCE WELK: 25TH ANNIVERSARY 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Science Pioneers” 8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Herbie Hancock” presents a series highlight: a careerspanning hour with one of the world’s most celebrated artists. 9pm KRAMER VS. KRAMER (1979)

10 SUNDAY

7pm ASIAN AMERICANS “Breaking Ground/A Question of Loyalty” (Parts 1 & 2 of 5) Explore the impact of Asian Americans, the fastest-growing racial/ ethnic group in the United States, on the country’s past, present and future, told through individual lives and personal histories. 9pm SECRETS OF UNDERGROUND LONDON On the surface, London is a buzzing, modern metropolis — but underneath lies a secret, hidden world, all but forgotten by the millions of people above. This program uncovers 2,000 years of subterranean history. 10pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Rewind” Uncover a horrifying secret buried within one tight-knit suburban family’s home video footage – a secret that, when revealed, leads to a media firestorm, a high-stakes court battle and a determination to heal.

7pm INFORMED SOURCES Now in its 36th year, the weekly news analysis program INFORMED SOURCES continues to

6pm CALL THE MIDWIFE, SEASON 9 (Part 6 of 8) The Turners receive alarming news about their daughter. Fred tries to reinstate a horticulture show.

11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

D5


WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

WEEKDAYS ON

WYES OFFERS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WEEKDAYS FROM NOON-5PM

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm ASIAN AMERICANS “Good Americans/Generation Rising/ Breaking Through” (Parts 3-5 of 5) At the turn of the new millennium, the country tackles conflicts over immigration, race, economic disparity, and a shifting world order. A new generation of Asian Americans are empowered by growing numbers and rising influence but face a reckoning of what it means to be an American in an increasingly polarized society. 10pm 10 TOWNS THAT CHANGED AMERICA

WYES continues its effort in providing at-home learning programs and resources with the help of LPB, and its partnership with the Louisiana Department of Education.

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

Through these past weeks, the staff at WYES has continued to work hard to proudly serve the community and fulfill its mission of keeping viewers informed, connected and entertained – giving you the peace of mind in knowing that some things will never change.

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

Free educational resources, for all ages, can be found at wyes.org/ education. TRUSTED. VALUED. ESSENTIAL. 5:00am READY JET GO! 5:30am ARTHUR 6:00am CURIOUS GEORGE 6:30am NATURE CAT 7:00am WILD KRATTS 7:30am MOLLY OF DENALI 8:00am XAVIER RIDDLE AND THE SECRET MUSEUM 8:30am LET’S GO LUNA! 9:00am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD

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12 TUESDAY

9:30am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 10:00am SESAME STREET 10:30am PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC 11:00am DINOSAUR TRAIN 11:30am CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT Noon-5pm EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 5:30pm PEG + CAT 6:00pm PBS NEWSHOUR

13 WEDNESDAY

10pm LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX (Part 5 of 6) Caroline throws herself wholeheartedly into her new relationship, upsetting her mother and her estranged husband, who looks to Gillian for sympathy. Alan, unable to decide which of two friends should be his best man, asks both. 11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

15 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm INFORMED SOURCES 7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK

7pm SPY IN THE WILD, A NATURE MINISERIES “The Islands” (Part 3 of 4) 8pm NOVA “Eagle Power” Find out what makes these predators so special. 9pm EXPEDITION WITH STEVE BACKSHALL “Greenland — Ice Mountain” Climb alongside Steve Backshall as he attempts to summit an unclimbed mountain in Greenland. 10pm THE OUTBACK “The Dry Season” (Part 2 of 3) 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

14 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR 8pm MASTERPIECE “Grantchester, Season 3” (Part 6 of 7) 9pm MASTERPIECE “Grantchester, Season 3” (Part 7 of 7)

8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “Leonard Bernstein Mass” Enjoy Ravinia Festival’s production of Leonard Bernstein’s theater piece starring Tony Award-winning baritone Paulo Szot and featuring the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Baltimore Symphony Orchestra artistic director Marin Alsop conducts. Pictured: Paulo Szot and members of Chicago Children’s Choir. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Patrick Gipson/Ravinia Festival 10:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

16 SATURDAY 6pm LAWRENCE WELK: TRIBUTE TO BING CROSBY 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Slave Trade” Questlove, S. Epatha Merkerson and Ava DuVernay explore the unexpected places where their ancestors were scattered by slavery.


8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Maggie Rogers” Enjoy an hour-long set from pop singer/ songwriter phenom.

10pm THE OUTBACK “Return of the Wet” (Part 3 of 3) 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

9pm PICNIC (1955) Stars William Holden, Kim Novak, Betty Field, Susan Strasberg.

17 SUNDAY 6pm CALL THE MIDWIFE, SEASON 9 (Part 7 of 8) Kevin sees a troubled patient. The maternity home receives a long-awaited incubator. 7pm CALL THE MIDWIFE, SEASON 9 (Part 8 of 8) When the council announces plans to cut Nonnatus House’s funding, Sister Julienne fights back. 8pm MASTERPIECE “World on Fire” (Part 7 of 7) Harry has a second chance at saving Kasia from Warsaw. In Manchester, could Lois be set for happiness at last?

21 THURSDAY 9pm CREATED EQUAL: CLARENCE THOMAS IN HIS OWN WORDS A rare look into the life and perspective of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas as he discusses his life, legacy and legal theories.

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

19 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “Mr. Tornado” Meet pioneering meteorologist Ted Fujita, who transformed our understanding of tornados. His technological advancements saved lives and helped Americans prepare for and respond to dangerous weather phenomena.

8pm GRANTCHESTER, SEASON 4 (Episode 1 of 5) A murder sees racial tensions spike. Geordie investigates a slum connected to a deadly web of vice.

8pm NOVA “Deadliest Tornadoes”

10pm LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX (Part 6 of 6) Caroline gets to the heart of the reason Gillian is reluctant to go through with the wedding. With Celia’s encouragement, Alan takes the first step toward forgiveness.

9pm FRONTLINE

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

FINALE

10pm TBA

22 FRIDAY

9pm BAPTISTE ON MASTERPIECE (Part 6 of 6) Julien discovers the inside source bringing the case to a devastating conclusion. Pictured: Tchéky Karyo as Julien Baptiste and Jessica Raine as Genevieve

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

10pm PICNIC (1955)

18 MONDAY

20 WEDNESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm SPY IN THE WILD, A NATURE MINISERIES “The Poles” (Part 4 of 4)

7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Little Rock” (Hour 3 of 3)

8pm NOVA “Saving Notre Dame” looks at how scientists come together across disciplines to determine how they can reconstruct this icon of history and culture—and how such a catastrophe can be avoided in the future.

8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Celebrating Asian-Pacific Heritage” A Hawaiian kou bowl; a Gandhi presentation spinning wheel; an 1888 Joseph Nawahi painting.

9pm EXPEDITION WITH STEVE BACKSHALL “Suriname — Ghost River” Ride along as Steve Backshall kayaks a Surinamese river that’s so remote, it doesn’t have a name.

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

11am JONI MITCHELL: LIVE AT THE ISLE OF WIGHT

7pm INFORMED SOURCES Watch WYES’ weekly programs anytime online on WYES’ YouTube channel wyesondemand, on the WYES app and at wyes.org. 7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “Harold Prince: The Director’s Life” Revisit the legendary career of the pioneering Broadway producer and director, winner of 21 Tony Awards, with this retrospective celebration featuring Stephen Sondheim, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Mandy Patinkin, John Kander, Susan Stroman, and Angela Lansbury.

D7


SATURDAYS ON

10pm STEPPIN’ OUT

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

10:30pm ARTICULATE WITH JIM COTTER

10am KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS WYES’ new cooking series spotlights outstanding women chefs in New Orleans! Pictured: Chef Tia Henry co-owner of Café Dauphine in the Lower Ninth Ward

5:30am DINOSAUR TRAIN 6:00am SESAME STREET 6:30am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 7:00am GROWING A GREENER WORLD

8:30pm NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY CONCERT

23 SATURDAY

10pm THE GREATEST BOND

6pm LAWRENCE WELK: AMERICA’S WONDERLAND

25 MONDAY

7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Italian Roots” Marisa Tomei, Jimmy Kimmel and John Turturro learn about the sacrifices their ancestors made to bring their families from Italy to America.

7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Charleston” (Hour 1 of 3)

8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Khalid/Mac DeMarco”

11:00am LIDIA’S KITCHEN

10:30pm ARTICULATE WITH JIM COTTER

11:30am AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN FROM COOK’S ILLUSTRATED

11pm BEST OF THE BUDDY RICH SHOW

NOON COOK’S COUNTRY 12:30pm CHRISTOPHER KIMBALL’S MILK STREET

7:30am WOODSMITH SHOP

1:00pm JAMIE’S ULTIMATE VEG

8:00am AMERICAN WOODSHOP

1:30pm JACQUES PÉPIN: HEART AND SOUL

8:30am THIS OLD HOUSE

2:00pm SARA’S WEEKNIGHT MEALS

9:00am ASK THIS OLD HOUSE 9:30am KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS 10am KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS 10:30am CHEF PAUL PRUDHOMME’S ALWAYS COOKING

D8

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

9pm HIGH SCHOOL HIGH (1999) 5:00am MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD

2:30pm PATI’S MEXICAN TABLE 3:00pm NOVA 4:00pm NATURE 5:00pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

the work we are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan.”

24 SUNDAY 6pm CALL THE MIDWIFE, SEASON 9 (Part 8 of 8)

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Charleston” (Hour 2 of 3) 9pm 1ST FIGHT PACIFIC WAR MARINES narrated by actor Jon Seda (HBO’s The Pacific and NBC’s Chicago P.D.), documents the experiences of 1st Marine Division veterans who took part in the historic fight. 10pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Eating Up Easter” See how climate change and a booming tourism trade threaten the fragile economy of Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, and meet the local artists, ecologists and developers balancing their strong cultural heritage with modern-day challenges. 11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

26 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

HIGHLIGHT 7pm NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY CONCERT The concert unites the country in remembrance and appreciation of those who gave their lives for our nation and serves those who are grieving through the mission put forward by Abraham Lincoln in his second inaugural address, “Let us strive on to finish

7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Beyond the Pale” Exploring the Jewish heritages of actor Jeff Goldblum, radio host Terry Gross and comic Marc Maron. 8pm VIRAL: ANTISEMITISM IN FOUR MUTATIONS Filmmaker Andrew Goldberg examines the rise of antiSemitism across the United States and Europe. 9:30pm FRONTLINE 10:30pm TBA


11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

27 WEDNESDAY

into a dark place as skeletons surface. Caroline’s fractious relationship with John leads her to rethink living arrangements as she makes a bold decision involving Kate.

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

8pm NOVA “Last B-24” Dive beneath the sea to the wreckage of a WWII bomber. 9pm EXPEDITION WITH STEVE BACKSHALL “Oman — Desert Fortress” Visit the remote and impenetrable Dhofar Mountains in Oman, where Steve Backshall hopes to become the first to climb unexplored cliffs. Along the way, he encounters one of the rarest animals on Earth.

29 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm INFORMED SOURCES 7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm BEST OF WYES 10pm STEPPIN’ OUT

10pm WONDERS OF MEXICO “Forests of the Maya” (Part 1 of 3) Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, home to the Maya, is a forest rich in wildlife, including monkeys, jaguars and vibrant tropical birds. Here lies a secret underworld which holds the key to life.

10:30pm ARTICULATE WITH JIM COTTER

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

7am 3 STEPS TO PAIN FREE LIVING

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

30 SATURDAY

12:30pm RICK STEVES’ EUROPE: GREAT GERMAN CITIES Travel expert Rick Steves explores five of Germany’s most important cities: Hamburg, Dresden, Leipzig, Frankfurt and Nürnberg. From Baroque palaces to stunning modern skyscrapers, and from riverside promenades to rowdy beer halls, these cities are wonderful places to explore the country’s fascinating culture. 2:30pm DR. FUHRMAN’S FOOD AS MEDICINE provides viewers a roadmap for adding practical, easy-to-follow steps to help prevent disease and improve health.

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

7pm NATURE “Sex, Lies and Butterflies” explores the abilities of butterflies, including their 360-degree infrared vision, camouflage, chemical weaponry and flight.

10:30am CHANGE YOUR BRAIN, HEAL YOUR MIND WITH DANIEL AMEN, MD discards an outdated, stigmatizing paradigm and replaces it with a modern brain-based, whole-person program rooted in science and hope.

4:30pm LAWRENCE WELK: GOD BLESS AMERICA 7pm LINDA RONSTADT: LIVE IN HOLLYWOOD

28 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR 8pm GRANTCHESTER, SEASON 4 (Episode 2 of 5) 9pm GRANTCHESTER, SEASON 4 (Episode 3 of 5)

8:30am AGING BACKWARDS 3 WITH MIRANDA ESMONDE-WHITE uses groundbreaking science to develop a practical six-point plan anyone can use to keep their minds sharp and their bodies active using gentle daily movement. 9:30am KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS

10pm LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX, SEASON 2 (Part 1 of 6) As Alan and Celia seize the day, Gillian finds herself spiraling

10am KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS in this episode titled “Culinary Roots” our KITCHEN QUEENS create Shrimp Boulettes, Caramelized Shrimp and Short Rib Coconut Adobo. For more on the series, visit wyes.org.

8:30pm JOHN SEBASTIAN PRESENTS: FOLK REWIND features the greatest singers and songwriters of the classic 50s & 60s folk era. Photo: Kingston Trio; Courtesy of TJL Productions 10:30pm 3 STEPS TO PAIN FREE LIVING Eliminate the root cause of many painful conditions with this easy to follow plan from neuromuscular therapist, yoga instructor and pain specialist Lee Albert, who teaches five simple exercises to correct muscle imbalance.

D9


WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

SUNDAYS ON

7am DEEPAK CHOPRA: THE SPIRITUAL LAWS OF SUCCESS Explore how understanding our true nature can lead to a sense of well-being, good health, fulfilling relationships, enthusiasm for life and material abundance. Filled with timeless wisdom and practical steps viewers can apply right away. 8:30am WASHINGTON WEEK

Photo Credit: Courtesy of The Julia Child Foundation 3:30pm RICK STEVES’ EUROPE: GREAT GERMAN CITIES 5:30pm RED, WHITE AND ROCK features performances from The Kingsmen, Frankie Avalon, The Righteous Brothers, Frankie Valli, Connie Francis, The Miracles, The Four Tops, The Dixie Cups and The Shondells.

9am FIRING LINE WITH MARGARET HOOVER 1:30pm KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS WYES’ new cooking series spotlights outstanding women chefs in New Orleans! Pictured: Culinary pioneer Leah Chase. In the series, Chase’s grandson Edgar “Dooky” Chase, IV, and niece Cleo Robinson prepare a few of Leah’s signature dishes.

5:00am MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD

NOON MOVIE/VARIOUS PROGRAMMING

5:30am DINOSAUR TRAIN

1:00pm KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS

6:00am SESAME STREET 6:30am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 7:00am PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC 7:30am MOLLY OF DENALI 8:00am XAVIER RIDDLE AND THE SECRET MUSEUM

1:30pm KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS 2:00pm SARA’S WEEKNIGHT MEALS

9:00am FIRING LINE WITH MARGARET HOOVER

4:00pm RICK STEVES’ EUROPE

9:30am INFORMED SOURCES

4:30pm SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LIVE

DIAL 12 | January 2019

10am DR. FUHRMAN’S FOOD AS MEDICINE provides viewers a roadmap for adding practical, easy-to-follow steps to help prevent disease and improve health. Noon AGING BACKWARDS 3 WITH MIRANDA ESMONDE-WHITE 1pm KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATIONS 1:30pm KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS

8pm DOWNTON ABBEY RETURNS! Enjoy a nostalgic celebration of all aspects of the most successful British drama ever – the stellar cast, superb writing, spectacular locations and dazzling costumes. Hosted by Jim Carter, better known as Mr. Carson. Features interviews with the cast and creators and never-before-seen video clips.

3:00pm JOANNE WEIR’S PLATES AND PLACES 3:30pm JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE

11:00am MOVIE/VARIOUS PROGRAMMING

9:30am INFORMED SOURCES

2:30pm PRIMAL GRILL WITH STEVEN RAICHLEN

8:30am WASHINGTON WEEK

10:00am MOVIE/VARIOUS PROGRAMMING

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31 SUNDAY

5:00pm THE DURRELLS IN CORFU

2pm JULIA CHILD’S BEST BITES Celebrate the first lady of cooking with Martha Stewart, Jacques Pepin, Vivian Howard, Marcus Samuelsson, Jose Andres, Eric Ripert, Rick Bayless and more. Chefs and celebrities share personal insights as they screen Julia’s most-beloved episodes.

10pm SUZE ORMAN’S ULTIMATE RETIREMENT GUIDE Join the acclaimed personal finance expert for essential advice on planning for and thriving in retirement. With empathy, straight talk and humor, Suze provides information about key steps for anyone trying to achieve their “ultimate retirement.”


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Betsy Ashton appreciates the PBS programs that have inspired a new generation of talented people to become artists. She believes PBS shares her values. That’s why she has decided to leave her PBS station a gift in her will. Please consider including WYES in your will or future plans. Contact: Robin Cooper 504.486.5511

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WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | MAY 2020

WYES’ quality programming and events are brought to you through the generous support of the following businesses and corporations. To join our list of community-minded groups, contact Jim Tapley at (504) 837-8987, jtapley@ wyes.org or Kerri Blache at (504) 483-8487, kblache@wyes.org.

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D11


STREETCAR BY ERROL LABORDE

Italy Taking the Ride

A TOUR GUIDE AT THE BACK OF

the boat was pointing to some of the sites as the craft raced toward Bellagio (the real village not the hotel in Vegas.) Italy’s lake region is one of the most picturesque spots in a country already stunning with beauty both designed by nature and by ancient architects. Lake Como’s shore is rich with stories of kings, saints, artists and even Benito Mussolini, who was gunned down nearby. Sometimes history can be mindboggling especially when its characters flow as quickly as a motorboat, but there was one name that gave a rise to all the passengers. “See that

6 4 MAY 2020

MYNEWORLEANS.COM

building,” the guide, Mariana, said as she pointed toward the shore at a chateau, “that’s where George Clooney stays.” There was a gasp worthy of Michelangelo. Soon the visitors were overwhelmed by another historic landmark, a restaurant where Clooney sometimes ate. I have been thinking about Italy since it was first hit hard by THE virus. As a united country Italy is younger than the United States having been consolidated into a nation in 1861. As a peninsula the land is ancient. Its pre-Clooney history includes one of history’s all-time famous disasters at Pompeii, but also global impor-

tance: The Roman Empire shaped western civilization. For the pathos of the moment, I am reminded of the little things— the small towns where old men gather at the town squares each evening for animated discussions; nearby, boys kick a ball. There are fountains and ancient churches whose belfries acknowledge each new hour. From the cafés there is the smell of frying garlic, anise and olive oil. At the bars, the tourists sip limoncello while the locals have another Moretti beer. I was once in Italy on an Easter Sunday in a town, Pienza, whose cathedral was commissioned by an early Pope, Pius II (1458-1464).

Pius frequently stayed in an adjacent palace he designed to be his retreat. This, I thought, was going to be quite an experience, Easter Sunday in Italy at a church that a pope built. The church was packed as expected for that day, but what surprised me was that there was no support staff except for one usher. During the Mass the usher also did what an altar boy does, helping the priest, including holding the plate beneath the chalice during communion. There was no choir, so Easter was a two-man show. There was one parable though: Our group was running a little late so that there was no space left in the pews. The usher directed me to a chair that had been set up near the altar. For my tardiness I had the best seat in the house. Or, to quote Matthew, “The last shall be first.” Food is always part of the discussion when Italy is the topic, including the story that in 1889, Queen Margherita of Savoy, wife of Italian King Umberto, visited Naples. To honor her, a local pizzeria operator, Raffaele Esposito, created a pizza topped with the colors of the Italian flag; mozzarella for white, basil for green and tomatoes for red. He named it “Pizza Margherita.” Those ingredients had probably been used on pizza bread before, but never with a name. From that day the Margherita became famous, and so did the pizza business. Dean Martin’s song “That’s Amore” is about love and contains the line “When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that’s amore.” May the moon be bright over Lake Como. And may joy itself soon move from last to first.

ARTHUR NEAD ILLUSTRATION


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine May 2020  

New Orleans Magazine May 2020  

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