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august 2018 / VOLUME 52 / NUMBER 10 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Mary Lou Eichhorn, Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Brobson Lutz, M.D., Jason Berry, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton, Mirella Cameran Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Social Media Assistant Becca Miller Staff Writers Topher Balfer, Kelly Massicot, Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Advertising Sales Manager Kate Sanders Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Claire Cummings Account Executives Meggie Schmidt, Rachel Webber Director of Marketing and Events Cheryl Lemoine Event Coordinator Whitney Weathers Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Manager Jessica DeBold Production Designers Emily Andras, Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney Special Projects Art Director Molly Tullier Traffic Manager Topher Balfer Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Subscriptions Manager Brittanie Bryant For subscription information call (504) 828-1380 WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 MyNewOrleans.com

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2018 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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Contents fe a t u re s

56 Eat. Play. Self-Love. Living your best life in NOLA By sarah ravits

on the cover Dr. Chi Dola, M.D., MPH, Associate Professor at the Tulane D  epartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology; residency program director; section chief, maternal-fetal medicine photo by craig mulcahy

64 Recovery’s Long Road Searching for light on a twisted street By chris rose

70 Best Doctors 536 Physicians in 75 Specialties profiles By sarah ravits


Contents dep a r t men t s

140

Local Color Modine Gunch Bubble Trouble 42

Joie d’Eve The Dating Game 44

In Tune Live and Reliable 46

Book Review This Month’s Best Reads 48

28

Jazz Life Swamp Pop Romp 50

Home

The Beat

Seventh Heaven 52

Marquee Entertainment calendar 26

Art Making a Statement 28

Persona Tania Tetlow 30

Biz Up and Coming 32

Education Orleans Public Schools 34

Health Lawn Mower Safety 36

Chronicles Child Prodigies 38

The Menu Table Talk Ya-Ya’s Comfort Food 128

Restaurant Insider News from the Kitchen 130

Food Freshly Picked 132

Last Call Cavan Mule 134

In Every Issue

Dining Guide Plus Restaurant Spotlights 136

Inside Big Charity - The Revival 16

Speaking Out Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 20

Julia Street Questions and Answers About Our City 22

Try This Keep Rollin’, Rollin’, Rollin’ 166

Streetcar From K&B, Rite Aid and Onward 168

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DIAL 12, D1 Enjoy hilarious clips and comments from friends and co-stars in BETTY WHITE: FIRST LADY OF TELEVISION airs on WYES-TV/ Channel 12 on August 18 at 5:30 p.m. and August 21 at 7:00 p.m. Don’t miss exciting ticket offers to Paul Simon and Mannheim Steamroller by supporting WYES. Head to page D2 to learn more. For all WYES program and event details, visit wyes.org.


inside

Big Charity The Revival

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here are lots of possibilities for the building that once housed Charity Hospital, but one thing it will never be—a hospital. That is not just an opinion, but a fact. Part of the condition of the federal funding to build the new University Hospital complex was that the old hospital had to have a different use. So it will be something else. What it will be is almost certain: a multi-use complex. That is the most sensible use for it. One day it will be bustling with condos, a hotel, restaurants and offices. The only question is how much of each. Since Katrina, the building has stood unused and unoccupied. When a contract was awarded to clear out the building, workers found beds still intact from the day of the hurricane, there were even specimen bottles that were never emptied. Now that it is mostly cleared, the magnificence of the art deco-era 20-story building is showing through. There is an organized competition among developers to show their plans. In this, our annual Best Doctors issue, the emphasis is on the physicians, but there is something to be said about the places in which they work. A great building can be a part of the community health. One local visionary told me that he hopes the Big Charity development will bring a whole new

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population to the lower Mid-City neighborhood. He envisions a shift toward Canal Street, which can draw more interplay to the bustling activity along the Canal/ Carrollton corridor. Tulane Avenue, which for so long has teetered on blight, could also have a resurrection. Already there are signs of that happening. A symbolic throwback will be when the new Nick’s Bar opens. Just as in the old Nick’s, once again folks will be swigging banana banshees and Dixie Beer in the neighborhood. Ernie K-Doe, the late flamboyant rhythm and blues singer was proud to frequently proclaim that he had been a “Charity Hospital baby.” At its prime, the hospital’s maternity ward and emergency room were among the two busiest places in town. I suspect there won’t be many babies born in the new Big Charity, but it will certainly be part of a neighborhood’s rebirth.


meet the sales staff

Kate Sanders Henry, Sales Manager (504) 830-7216, Kate@myneworleans.com

Claire Cummings, Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7250, Claire@myneworleans.com

Rachel Webber, Account Executive (504) 830-7249, Rachel@MyNewOrleans.com

Meggie Schmidt, Account Executive (504) 830-7220, Meggie@myneworleans.com

Colleen Monaghan, Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215, Colleen@myneworleans.com

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speaking out

Public Education Savor the Moment

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e recall the spectacles as being the “Monday Night Fights.” We watched them during the 10 p.m. news whenever the Orleans school board would meet. The board was an ugly thing to watch, with people screaming back and forth at each other, and that was just the parents in the audience. While there were always at least one or two good people on the board who had no agenda other than to improve education, there was usually a majority of hacks who represented special interests (many eyeing lucrative school board contracts or political factions.) And if there should be a

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brief moment of civility, someone would stir up race as though to restart the tensions. For public education in New Orleans to ever survive its own governance, something dramatic would have had to happen. Miraculously something did: Hurricane Katrina. Rebuilding the city provided the impetus to rebuild education. Most of the city’s schools were taken away from the school board and put under the administration of a state-run recovery district. Before Katrina, the school board had always stood fast against charter schools, not wanting to sacrifice

any of their deal-making power. After Katrina, the board, seeing the desperate state of education, supported the charters. In the years to follow, some of the downtrodden old schools would have remarkable turnarounds, and New Orleans would become a national leader in the charter school movement. There is still an Orleans Parish school board and last June, after more than ten years, all the schools were returned to its jurisdiction. But the distribution of power is different. While the school board continues to oversee the administrative chores of the system, the charter concept has given parents

and activists more opportunities to be involved. More power has shifted away from the board and to the school level. Public education, with some exceptions (i.e. Ben Franklin and Lusher,) had a bad reputation for so long that people are shy to say what seems to now be true, so we will: PUBLIC EDUCATION HAS IMPROVED CONSIDERABLY. Yes, we know there is a lot more to be done, but let’s at least savor the moment. Watching the Monday night news is not the raucous experience that it used to be. That is what happens when an ill wind becomes a fresh breeze. •

AN ORIGINAL ©MIKE LUCKOVICH CARTOON FOR NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE


julia street

with poydras the parrot

on to create other concept bars? Laurence Vinson (Birmingham, Alabama)

Dear Poydras and Julia, Dear Julia and Poydras, My grandmother used to talk about an In 1970, my girlfriend (now wife) lived on excursion boat that ran in Audubon Park Edenborn Avenue in Metairie near what later before WWII. I had heard of the swan boat, became Fat City. When I would drive down but Grandmother insisted there was once from Tuscaloosa to visit her on weekends, a pelican boat. Do you know if we would go to a club which was there was? Thank you. Jane Jones based on someone’s concept of (Westwego) what it must be like to be inside a Bill the Pelican at Audubon Park computer (a mainframe computer, March 2, 1919 mind you - this was before the In 1923, Audubon Park introduced the pelican boat, predepersonal computer was unleashed cessor of its more famous swan boat. on the world). I think it was between Veterans Measuring 28 feet long and six feet wide and I-10. and covered with an awning, the craft was You had to get a computer punch card a pontoon boat roughly similar to pedal- (remember them?) at the door to enter. The powered swan boats that had entertained walls inside were silver metallic. Every drink Boston and New York residents since the late had a “digital” name. All drinks were ordered 1870s. Audubon Park’s slightly modernized on punch cards, and I think the check came interpretation accommodated up to 30 young on a punch card. It was a happening place passengers and was propelled by a large at the time, always crowded. outboard motor concealed behind a pair of I think its name was simply “The wooden pelican cutouts said to immortalize Computer,” or something like that. It was Old Bill, the park’s notoriously cantankerous so popular, and then it seems like suddenly pelican. Audubon Park’s pelican boat was it was gone. in service less than seven years; by 1930, What happened to it? How long was it the better-known and immensely popular open? Was it succeeded by another club or bar? Did the creator of the concept go swan boat had taken its place. 22

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The Computer, Jack Mark Boasberg’s futuristic nightclub, first “activated” on June 27, 1969 at 4738 Utica Street in Metairie, near I-10 and Clearview Parkway. Sporting a groovy mix of gadgets and glam, The Computer was a self-described “psychotheque” - a computerized and evolved form of discotheque. A hemispheric cage containing the electronic brains of the operation hung over the dance floor while a dozen smaller light domes interpreted color as bands such as Everybody’s Pillow, Armadillo and The Gants performed. Each evening’s entertainment was presented as a three-part immersive experience comprised of “Environments,” “Mind Energy” and “Inter-Media.” The Computer experience lasted only about a year. By October 1970, the Japanese Steak House of New Orleans, part of a national chain, had opened at The Computer’s former location; it lasted only about two years. Since 1974, 4738 Utica Street has been home to The Balcony reception hall. Film buffs should note that The Computer was at the forefront of film as well as multimedia entertainment. In January 1970, the Yale Alumni Association of Louisiana hosted a one-day seminar there discussing film as an art form and screening excerpts from Yale’s Griggs Collection of Classic Films. Joining Yale film instructor Standish D. Lawder on the discussion panel was a then-obscure writer named Erich Segal who had penned the screenplay for Yellow Submarine. Within the year, Segal would explode onto the national scene and achieve widespread fame as the creator of the immensely popular film and novel “Love Story.”

Have a question for julia? Send your question to: Julia Street, c/o New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Errol@MyNewOrleans.com.

John T. Mendes, photographer. Courtesy of the Historic New Orleans Collection. Gift of Waldemar S. Nelson.


The Beat MAR Q U EE . AR T . P E R S O N A . B I Z . E D U CA T ION . H EAL T H . C H RONICLES

greg miles photo

Loyola President Tania Tetlow


THE beat . marquee

August Our top picks for this month’s events By fritz esker

Satchmo Summerfest On August 3-5, Satchmo Summerfest returns to Jackson Square to celebrate the life and music of New Orleans’ beloved Louis Armstrong. There will be live music featuring some of Armstrong’s classics as well as seminars and culinary delicacies. Children ages 12 and younger get in free. Information, Fqfi.org.

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MJ Live: Michael Jackson Tribute Concert Take a trip back to the 80s with the #1 Michael Jackson tribute concert in the country August 10-11 at the Saenger Theater. You’ll hear the King of Pop’s classics sung in a manner that sounds uncannily like the late Jackson. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Imagine Dragons Pop superstars Imagine Dragons visit New Orleans on August 5 at the Smoothie King Center as part of their “Evolve” tour. They’ve sold 12 million albums and 35 million singles worldwide and will be accompanied on their tour by special guest Grace VanderWaal. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

NOLA Downtown Music and Arts Festival On August 23-26, stop by the Warehouse District to enjoy one of New Orleans’ newest festivals. The NOLA Downtown Music and Arts Festival will feature films, music, and art as well as tailgating with BBQ before the New Orleans Saints’ preseason game. Information, CuttingEdgeNola.com/NOLAdowntown-festival.

cheryl gerber photo


calendar Events, Exhibits & Performances

July 29-September 16

August 14

Changing Course: Reflections on New Orleans Histories, New Orleans Museum of Art. Information, Noma.org.

J. Cole with Special Guest Young Thug, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

August 2

August 18-26

Brian Posehn, Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com.

Lulu White, Queen of Storyville, Teatro Wego. Information, Jpas.org.

August 3

Bring It! Live, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

August 18

Tab Benoit, House of Blues. Information, HouseOfBlues.com.

August 3-5

Mary Poppins, Jr., Jefferson Performing Arts Center. Information, Jpas.org.

August 19

An Evening with Gillian Welch, Civic Theater. Information, CivicNOLA.com.

August 4

Whitney White Linen Night, Julia Street. Information, Cacno.org. August 5

New Orleans Track Club 55th Anniversary Race, Garden of Memories. Information, RunNOTC.org. August 5

Imagine Dragons, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com. August 8 & 29

The Best of Sinatra, Stage Door Canteen. Information, NationalWW2Museum.org.

August 22

Evanescence and Lindsey Stirling, Champions Square. Information, Champions-Square.com. August 25

Lil’ Weezyana Fest Presented by Q93, Champions Square. Information, Champions-Square.com. August 25

Tony Bennett in Concert with Very Special Guest Antonia Bennett, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com. August 27

August 11

Dirty Linen Night, Royal Street. Information, DirtyLinenNOLA.com.

Journey & Def Leppard, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

August 11

The Cult, Stone Temple Pilots, Bush, Champions Square. Information, Champions-Square.com.

August 30

August 11

August 30

Red Dress Run, Crescent Park. Information, NOLARedDress.com.

Umphrey’s McGee, Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com.

Southern Decadence, French Quarter. Information, SouthernDecadence.net.

August 11 & 25

Dine and Dance with the Victory Swing Orchestra, Stage Door Canteen. Information, NationalWW2Museum.org.

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THE beat . art

Making A Statement Art that — like NOLA — can’t be duplicated By Alexa Renée Harrison

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oni Point and Alysia Fields met while studying Architecture at Mississippi State University. It was that love of architecture and culture that brought the pair to New Orleans years later. After graduating from MSU, Fields pursued a second degree in sociology, and then went on the earn her MBA, which she put to good use while working a corporate job at Saks Fifth Avenue. A 28

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few years in, though, Fields realized she missed being creative. In 2016, she quit her job and reunited with Point to form Statement Goods — modern and unique art and goods that make a statement. “We’re of course inspired by the local architecture and culture, but there’s also just something in the air that’s a bit indescribable,” says Point of her adopted hometown. “There’s an energy in this

city that we just can’t get enough of.” The duo now spend their days making art, creating patterns, designing cards, and crafting jewelry. Their products, which can be found around town at Home Malone, Nola Boards, Glitter Box, and Zele, are all very southern in sentiment. “We’re constantly taking in things from our surroundings,” Point says. “It can start with seeing an interesting color combination on a house and going into a really cool store, which sparks an idea.” Working with a variety of mediums — printmaking, painting, and ink drawings — most of their artwork is pattern-based with a modern, minimalist aesthetic. “We’re both huge foodies, so obviously this is what inspired our New Orleans Food Print and our Jambalaya Print,” says Fields. “We’ve also created abstract shotgun house illustrations, which are a nod to the local architecture,” Point adds. The creation of a Louisiana State print inspired the pair to do prints for all 50 states, further expanding the reach of their homegrown products, which can now also be purchased from stores including Beacon Home in Temecula, California and Oliver & Chatfield in Cornwall, New York. But while their range continues to grow, New Orleans will remain home for the artists, as it provides something it seems no other city is able to. “I think that the thing that we love the most about New Orleans is that it feels completely unique and original,” says Fields. “This city can not be duplicated, which makes this the perfect place to be a creative person.” • eugenia uhl photos


THE beat . persona

True Confession: I am an epically bad bowler and once got a strike in a lane that was not mine.

greg miles photo


Tania Tetlow Loyola’s New President by Ashley McLellan

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n May 2, Loyola University broke with tradition by selecting Tania Tetlow as the school’s first female and layperson president. A graduate of Tulane University and Harvard law school, Tetlow has worked in New Orleans in a variety of non-profit, civic and community organizations, engaging in work targeting sexual assault cases and post-Katrina rebuilding of the New Orleans Public Library, just to name two. Tetlow will be leaving her post as senior vice president and chief of staff at Tulane to move into her new office at Loyola. For Tetlow, the position will not only employ the career skills she has learned, but also the values she has embraced as a member of the Catholic church; and a family tradition of service. Q: How does it feel to be the first female, non-Jesuit president of Loyola? I am honored and humbled. It is a great responsibility to carry on the Jesuit mission as a layperson and to lead this university that means so much to me. Q: What is it about Jesuit values that inspire you? The many Jesuits in my family raised me to have courage and discipline. They taught me to challenge the way things have always been and to spend my life trying to make the world a better place. Q: What advice would you give to young women who are looking to break into careers traditionally held by men? Before you arrive, people will not always be able to picture you in the role. Sometimes that means you have to work harder and clear the bar by more. That isn’t fair, but once you are

there, it will get a little bit easier for those who follow in your footsteps. Q: How can women in leadership roles today provide unique guidance to a new generation of men and women? Talent is distributed equally in men and women, in people of every race and creed -- and the world cannot afford to squander that talent. I hope that the presence of leaders such as Mayor Cantrell, Gayle Benson and so many others helps remind young people of that fact and helps ensure that they won’t overlook talent in others or in themselves. Lindy Boggs did that for me. Q: Why is volunteerism important to you? This city is my heart, and nothing makes me happier than finding ways to help it. I think that Katrina unleashed the collective power of the New Orleans people. When we set our mind to something, it turns out there is very little we can’t accomplish. We need to keep that determination going. Q: How has New Orleans influenced you? I have chosen to build a career in New Orleans because this city and this community matter so much to me. New Orleans is creative, passionate, frustrating and joyful. It inspires me and drives me.

At a Glance Education: Sacred Heart, Holy Name, Ben Franklin, Tulane and Harvard Law Favorite Book: Portrait of a Lady, Henry James Favorite Food: Oysters Favorite Movie: The Mission Hobbies: Training police officers, singing opera, cooking Favorite Restaurant: Cochon my n e w or l e a n s . com

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THE beat . biz

Up and Coming Big-deal announcements show tech job growth is ‘for real’ By Kathy Finn

A

decade or so ago, when New Orleans began garnering attention in the business press as an up-and-comer in technology and entrepreneurial innovation, it was fair to wonder whether the praise marked the start of a lasting change or merely a short-term ripple generated by the city’s post-Hurricane Katrina recovery. Today, the answer is becoming clearer. Two recent business announcements have helped solidify New Orleans’ place in the country’s technology landscape. In November 2017, Virginia-based DXC Technology announced it would open its first U.S. “digital transformation center” in New Orleans, bringing a global tech focus and 2,000 jobs to the city in the next five years. DXC, which operates similar 32

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centers in the UK, Belgium and Australia, has not only put its name atop a Poydras Street office tower, but also inked a partnership deal with the state to support STEM training at several Louisiana universities. Site Selection Magazine named the DXC’s New Orleans announcement one of the top 20 economic development deals in the U.S. for 2017. But wait, there’s more. In June, another multi-national tech company, Austin-based Accruent, announced it will open a technology center in downtown New Orleans to employ some 350 people in job areas ranging from software engineering, human resources and cloud operations to project management and sales. Accruent, too, will work with Louisiana colleges to expand the local tech talent pool.

“Since 2012, New Orleans has led the nation in technology job growth, and we are pleased to continue this trend with the talent we need to support our strong acceleration in new technologies,” Accruent CEO John Borgerding said in making the announcement. While these companies are evidence that New Orleans’ appeal to outside tech companies is “for real,” the increasing success of home-grown enterprises shows that the city’s growing reputation as an entrepreneurial hub is also well deserved. Of the many startups that launched during recent decades in the humble quarters of this or that business incubator, one of the most successful is the company now known as Lucid. Founded in 2010 as market research innovator Federated Sample LLC, Lucid now

occupies several floors in a downtown office tower and employs 225 people in offices from its New Orleans headquarters to the UK and India. All of these businesses, and hundreds more, are benefiting from a robust set of incentive programs that Louisiana offers to encourage businesses to launch and grow in the state. Many of the incentives are tax breaks that are tied to the number of jobs a company promises to create here. Equally important are the educational incentives that urge companies to partner with Louisiana colleges and universities to develop workers with skills tailored to the needs of a particular industry. The state has shown foresight in creating these economic development incentives. While tax breaks cannot guarantee the success of an enterprise that starts or chooses to grow in Louisiana, such programs have helped the state stay in the game in the face of ever-stiffer competition. Most importantly, economic development officials and lawmakers increasingly understand that business incentives should not focus merely on drawing companies to the state, but should also, as Governor John Bel Edwards has said, ensure the availability of a talent pool to keep those businesses in place. “Our ultimate goal is not just to attract new projects, but to create a technology sector where our people have a diverse offering of opportunities to solve the challenges of tomorrow,” Edwards said recently. Such thinking helped Louisiana rise to No. 5 in the country last year for growth in software employment, according to a Software. org report that said some 12,000 people now hold software jobs in Louisiana. •


THE beat . education

Orleans Public Schools Is education actually improving? By Dawn Ruth Wilson

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new survey shows that the public-at-large and more parents believe the quality of New Orleans schools has improved, even though a downturn in student achievement looms on the horizon. The public’s increasing optimism is based on a decade of improved student test scores, college entrance test scores and graduation rates, but public mood could reverse in the future if achievement continues to drop in the face of tougher standards enacted at the state level. Local test scores and school letter grades took a huge hit last year, even though all schools were graded on a curve to offset the effect of tougher standards. Local officials are concerned that the scores could drop even more in the future because curved grading is ending.

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“It is a huge challenge and one the OPSB (Orleans Parish School Board) is addressing with the utmost priority,” one board spokesperson said. The downturn in student achievement comes at a bad time for the OPSB. The board took oversight of all the city’s schools in July for the first time since Katrina hit 13 years ago this month. Local officials are taking over schools that have improved since 2005 when most were seized by the state because they were “failing” by state standards. The state relinquished control of Recovery School District schools after two years of preparation on both sides, following through on its original goal to return schools after they had recovered academically. The Cowen Institute at Tulane University conducts an annual poll

to gauge the public’s perception of schools. In the 2018 poll, more participants believed schools to be “getting better” – 39 percent compared to 33 percent in 2017. However, more participants also believe that schools are “staying the same” – 41 percent compared to 36 percent. The Cowen Institute also reported that support for charter schools “remains consistently high,” stating that about 66 percent believe “charter schools have improved public education in New Orleans.” Unlike other large cities, 90 percent of New Orleans public school students attend charter schools today. Critics of charter schools refuse to give them credit for improved achievement – arguing state measurements have changed so much that past and present

comparisons are unfair. However, improvements in college entrance test scores undercut the criticism. A report delivered to the OPSB recently shows that New Orleans schools are “outperforming similar districts nationally on the ACT.” For example, the staff report showed that New Orleans students scored an 18.9 out of a possible 36 on the exam recently, compared to 18.6 for Atlanta’s students. Unlike New Orleans, the OPSB report said, Atlanta does not require all students to take the test. The notation is significant because Atlanta’s score reflects only students intending to attend college, while New Orleans’ score also includes less prepared students. New Orleans also outperformed Denver, Chicago, Memphis and Indianapolis on the ACT, the report noted. An ACT score of 18 reflects college readiness. Another OPSB staff report, however, showed that the district’s performance score compared to other state districts declined last year for the fourth year in a row. In 2013, New Orleans schools ranked in the middle of the pack. Last year, the city’s ranking dipped to near the bottom, at the 12th percentile; a sharp drop from 2016. •


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THE beat . health

Lawn Mower Safety Keep the kids away By Brobson Lutz M.D.

“Y

ou need to get the word out about lawn mower injuries. Summer is on the way,” said Dr. Katherine Faust as I was fishing for health topics a few months ago. “Children end up with mangled fingers, hands, and feet. I saw my first lawn mower injury when I was in medical school at LSU. As a resident at Tulane, I saw many more. They are really nasty injuries.” Dr. Faust has both New Orleans and hand surgery in her DNA. She was born in the hospital across the street from her now office on Napoleon Avenue. After medical school and an orthopedic residency, she left for speciality hand and upper extremity training with microvascular surgical techniques at Duke. Then she completed an additional fellowship in pediatric 36

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hand surgery in Atlanta before returning to New Orleans two years ago. Like daughter, like father, Dr. Donald Faust, is a hand surgeon with a reputation for tackling complex hand problems. “Like my father, I find the hand an extremely interesting appendage. Hands are subject to a variety of congenital, medical, and traumatic problems. I like to craft ways that allow people to get back some functions they may have lost,” said Dr. Faust when I asked her how she ended up in her father’s speciality. “I like making treatment decisions with patients that allow them to resume sports, hobbies, and other recreational activities.” Nationwide over 17,000 children sustain lawnmower injuries each year including 75 or so deaths.

Toddlers 1 to 3 years old and teenagers are most at risk. Gunshot wounds and summer drownings get more press, but New Orleans homes probably harbor more lawn mowers than guns and swimming pools. In cooler climates, the lawn mower hibernates for winter, but in New Orleans grass cutting can be a year around chore. The lawn mower is a below the radar childhood hazard. Children’s Hospital sees one to two children a month with serious lawn mower related injuries according to Dr. Faust. These injuries are more commonly emergency referrals from rural areas, but lawn mower injuries from burns to amputations are not uncommon in the metropolitan New Orleans area. “Last summer a parent in rural

Louisiana was operating a riding lawn mower with a small child in lap. The mower hit a bump, and the child fell off with a hand going under the mower causing a near-amputation. Only skin was holding three of her fingers to the hand. She was rushed to a local hospital which arranged for her to be helicoptered to Children’s Hospital here in New Orleans,” said Faust. The child had emergency surgery to clean the wound and reattach two fingers followed by multiple follow-up surgeries. Dr. Faust and her team were able to reattach tendons and save the girl’s middle and index fingers. Recovery included extensive hand therapy. Besides missing a ring finger, the child has at least a mostly functioning hand. “These lawn mower injuries are dirty wounds involving twisted and mangled tissues. Blood vessels are not cleanly cut like say knife wounds. These injuries usually involved long hospitalizations, antibiotics to fight infections, and multiple returns to the operating room for wound washouts and staged repairs. “The worst mower injury I have seen was a 9-year-old boy whose foot was mangled. It was so infected that his leg had to be amputated,” Dr. Faust said. Riding mowers are more dangerous than walk-behind models. Children should never be passengers on mowers. The Pediatric Orthopedic Society compares the rotating blade of a power lawn mower to a 0.357 Magnum gun. For their specific recommendations and commentary, check out orthokids.org/ Safety/Lawnmower-Safety. •


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THE beat . chronicles

Gottschalk’s compositions would provide a fresh musical viewpoint that won him acclaim and influenced other composers. A master showman, he toured extensively and was known for working with large ensembles in showy performances. He would die before his 40th birthday, after a concert in Brazil. Another creative Orleanian, Paul Morphy also came to his talent early. He was born in 1837 at 1131 Chartres street, today the Beauregard-Keyes House. He grew up at 417 Royal street, today Brennan’s Restaurant. According to legend, he had shown no interest in chess until, at the age of 10, his father (an attorney) and his uncle (a judge), were playing a game while he watched. The match came to a stalemate and the adults were about to sweep up when the boy announced: “Uncle, you should have won,” and proceeded to demonstrate how. The amazed adults New Orleans whiz kids realized he was correct. Paul Morphy seemed to be by Carolyn Kolb able to envision games during and after play, and to know instincn the 1840s it wasn’t unusual good instruction. But, it was as a tively how to defeat opponents. for New Orleans musicians to composer that he made his mark He played occasionally and was perform in benefit concerts on music while still in his teens. a serious opponent, but did not for themselves. What was odd As the Daily Picayune explained enter competitions until he had about the April 20, 1841 event at on May 10, 1849, “this young graduated from Spring Hill College the St. Louis Ballroom was that pianist … has acquired consider- in Mobile, and read for the law, the pianist was all of 11: and had able fame in Paris, not only as studying with noted local attorneys. In 1856, Morphy’s been performing in public since an instrumentalist, but as a composer.” father died suddenly, he was 10. The young pianist Louis Moreau One of the professors Two Orleanians earned and rather than early acclaim: Louis Gottschalk was playing that at the conservatory immediately begin a Moreau Gottschalk, evening to help earn his way to declared “his intenlaw practice, Morphy pianist, and Paul France to study music. He had tion to introduce… began playing Morphy, chess player, performed the year before at the Gottschalk’s composi- exhibited their special competitive chess. St. Charles Hotel, and so was a tions into his classes In 1857, age 20, skills at a young age. veteran of the stage before he as regular studies for he entered a Chess embarked for Europe. Congress in New York, and won his most advanced pupils.” Gottschalk was a hit as a Using folk tunes (some learned first prize. Morphy traveled to performer in Paris, and he was from household members who England and France, playing noted able to perfect his technique with had emigrated here from Haiti), opponents, and even played games

against multiple opponents while blindfolded. After his European sojourn, Morphy returned home, gave up chess competitions and set up a law office. Meanwhile, the approach of the Civil War meant that the Morphy family would be leaving New Orleans, to travel while the conflict raged. After the war ended and Paul Morphy was home again, his demeanor changed. Irrational fears, anxiety, and mental torment overcame the brilliant gamesman. He would die of apoplexy (a stroke) in 1884 at the age of 46.

Child Prodigies

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Why did he give up competitive chess? Biographer Ernest Jones would discuss “The Problem of Paul Morphy” in the International Journal of PsychoAnalysis in 1931, making much of the necessary chess end-move of checkmating the king/father figure, but suggesting that Morphy’s brief foray into the competitive chess world essentially took away the meaning the game had for him. Neither Gottschalk nor Morphy reached old age, but they both left legacies – Gottschalk’s music is still played and Morphy’s chess games are still studied. •

The Historic New Orleans Collection, acquisition made possible by the Boyd Cruise Fund courtesy of the historic new orleans collection


Local Color MO D INE G U NC H . J OIE D ’ E V E . I N T U N E . B OO K RE V IEWS . J A Z Z LI F E . H OME

the tin men perform wednesdays at d.b.a.


LOCAL COLOR . modine gunch

Bubble Trouble Or, making peace with a pacifier By Modine Gunch

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shred of pink paper on my sister-in-law’s kitchen counter reads: “Do not hold between your knees.” What am I not supposed to hold between my knees? Why would I want to do that, anyway? The reason I am standing and staring at this shred of paper, is because I am afraid to move. I am babysitting Gloriosa’s baby, Flambeau, who just fell asleep in her little swing. She looks like a little angel with her pink pacifier bobbing in her mouth. But if I make any noise whatsoever, she will erupt. They should have named this child “Volcano.” Not that she spouts actual lava, but she spouts everything else. With sound effects. Poor heart, she ain’t what any of us expected — other than human. We expected her to be a boy, like the prenatal test said. She’s a girl.

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We expected her to be bald as a doorknob, like every other Gunch baby. She got bright red hair. It sticks out all over her head like lightning bolts. While I am standing there, I realize that this pink shred is torn off a container that matches a lot of other little containers in a big open box next to the counter. Each one holds a baby pacifier attached with three twist-ties to pink cardboard backing, and the whole thing is sealed in a clear plastic bubble. There are directions on how to open this bubble printed on the pink cardboard. “Use a sharp object, and cut away from your body. “Avoid opening in a crowded area.” And.... “Don’t hold between your knees.” Aha.

Just then, Flambeau’s pacifier slides out of her mouth. She whimpers. Now, Gloriosa, being a germ freak, would freak out if I just snatched it off the floor and plugged it back in, even if I rinse it first. So I reach in the box and grab a pacifier still in its bubble. I try to pop it open, but that don’t work. Flambeau is whimpering louder. I try the kitchen scissors, but that don’t work. I stab it with a carving knife, (not holding it between my knees) but that don’t work. Then Gloriosa walks in. It takes us 10 minutes and a box cutter and pliers to hack open the new pacifier. By which time, Flambeau is howling. I tell Gloriosa we got to talk. It turns out Flambeau was going through so many pacifiers, Gloriosa ordered a entire case off the internet. But they all came encased in these armored bubbles,

like miniature armadillos. She ain’t had time to hack into them all. It was easier giving birth to this baby than opening these pacifiers, she says. Next day, all the Gunches are getting together for our end-ofsummer crab boil. I tell her to bring the case of pacifiers and we can all can open these things like we open crabs. Come to find out, it ain’t that easy. But my daughter Gumdrop comes up with a idea. Since everything comes encased in clear plastic steel now, once we do figure out a quick and efficient opening method, we can set up in the Wal-mart parking lot and offer to open anything for $1. It would be a nice project for a scout troop. Well, if we are going to go public, we have to figure out how to do this in about a minute. So we divide into groups and set the stove timer. We try hammer and tongs and kitchen shears and running over one with a car. Nothing works quick enough. It would have been easier to hack into the Russian internet than into these plastic bubbles. Then Leech goes out in the garage and finds an air compressor, like you use to fill truck tires. He jabs a hole in the plastic bubble, and before I can tell him not to hold it between his knees, he pulls the compressor trigger and FLOOM, the plastic bubble explodes. Took ten seconds. It takes15 minutes for the ambulance to come. And even longer to be sure his privates are intact. They are, but he won’t walk too good for awhile. Goes to show. Always read directions. •

LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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LOCAL COLOR . JOIE D’EVE

The Dating Game Hypothetical advice for young romantics By Eve Crawford Peyton

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don’t want to say Ruby has gotten increasingly private as she’s gotten older as that is not strictly true. She has, in fact, started to develop her own social media presence, albeit in a very limited, locked-down way, as I’ve allowed her to get an Instagram account and join the online Google groups and group chats for her fifth grade class. (I check all of these things frequently. The other day, she indignantly asked me why I got to read her texts but she didn’t get to read my texts,

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and I immediately responded, “Because I pay the cell phone bill, that’s why.” I have become that mom.) But what she has become more critical of – which I understand and support – is her privacy via what I share about her here and on my own social media accounts. I’ve always tried to be aware of that, even before she was able to read any of it. I never wanted to post anything too personal or embarrassing about her. Now that she is old enough to care, I get her approval before I

write a single word, post a • Be yourself – and if it’s single picture. awkward, just acknowledge And so I am not going it and joke about it. to disclose whether she is As I said, some of this starting to go to dances or is obsolete now – remote out to the movies with boys unlocking doors and cell … but I am finding myself phones have rendered a lot revisiting some of the old of the list moot – and some dating advice I was given – is sort of sexist – who cares both by my parents and by if your stomach growls or my friends – only to find some if you get spaghetti sauce of it still spot-on and some on your chin! Order what of it completely antiquated. you like, and eat until you’re Among these dating rules: full! Some of it is still good • Never take too long to do advice, like having your own your hair and makeup. Boys money and your own way love a girl who can be ready home, like not drinking too much with someone you don’t to go in 10 minutes. • Eat two crackers before know that well (Ruby is not you go out to stop your drinking yet at all, of course, stomach from growling. but as those PSAs tell me, • If the boy opens your car it’s never too young to start door, make sure to lean over talking about it.) Some advice and open his for him. I’d give Ruby now wasn’t • Never order either the relevant at all when I was most expensive or least first dating – I would certainly expensive item on the menu. advise her that being on her • Always bring phone texting along your own constantly is rude money, including and not acceptExcerpted from Eve a quarter for the able, which would Crawford Peyton’s pay phone. have seemed like blog, Joie d’Eve, which appears • Be sure you gibberish to me each Friday on have cab fare. back in 1993. MyNewOrleans.com • Don’t order The basic anything too principles are messy – pasta or soup – or the same, though: Be nice, garlicky or that might get be courteous, be careful, be caught in your teeth. independent. • Leave at least one bite Those are the things that of food on your plate, even I hope always apply, no matter how much technology if you’re still hungry. • Keep an eye on how much changes. • you’re drinking.

jane sanders illustration


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LOCAL COLOR . in tune

calendar must-see music august 1

Bodega rocks Gasa Gasa. august 5

Imagine Dragons pop into the Smoothie King Center. august 12

Vacationer psyches out Gasa Gasa. The Hot 8 Brass Band

august 14

Live and Reliable Local favorite standing gigs By Mike Griffith

J. Cole raps the Smoothie King Center. august 19

Gillian Welch soothes The Civic. august 27

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n the late summer, I always like to take advantage of the smaller crowds to check in with some of our veteran brass bands and troubadours whose weekly gigs are institutional around the city. The Hot 8 Brass Band is one of the hardest working groups in the city (and their cover of Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing” is really one of the best things you will see). You can catch them every Sunday night in the Howlin’ Wolf Den. This is an intimate room with great food, perfect for a sultry Sunday night. Up next is Rebirth Brass Band’s standing gig at The Maple Leaf on Tuesday nights. Rebirth are absolute legends and celebrating their 35th anniversary this year. This one goes late, so you have plenty of time for dinner at Jacques Imo’s next door. If you’re going to be down Frenchmen way on a Wednesday, d.b.a. has a

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great standing one/two featuring honor the man or his music than The Tin Men early and Walter at the festival that bares his name. “Wolfman” Washington late. Last This year Satchmo Summerfest but not least, most Thursdays you falls August 3-5 at the New Orleans can catch the Soul Rebels down Jazz Museum at The Mint. The at Le Bon Temps. When I lived in festival always features a stunning that neighborhood, I was a regular selection of food and a deep lineup at this show. It’s a close, of local heavies. You can sweaty celebration of catch Aurora Nealand New Orleans’ best and The Royal Roses, sounds (pro-tip Le Bon Bonerama, Charmaine Playlist of mentioned bands Temps also has tradiNeville, Ellis Marsalis, available at: tional piano and raw Jeremy Davenport, The bit.ly/InTune8-18. oysters on Fridays—so Preservation Brass, The check that out as well). Storyville Stompers You really can’t go wrong with Brass Band and many more. I love any of these shows and it’s nice this fest because the performers to revisit those performances that often focus on the traditional keep the torch burning. sounds of New Orleans music and you know you are going to Satchmo Summerfest find some excellent versions of It’s August, which means that Armstrong’s favorite red beans we are about to celebrate Louis and rice. • Armstrong’s birthday once again. There really is no better way to

Journey/Def Leopard rock the Smoothie King Center. august 30

Umphrey’s McGee jam the Joy Theater.

Dates are subject to change; email Mike@MyNewOrleans. com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.


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LOCAL COLOR . book reviews

The 5 O’Clock Band

Florists to the Field

by Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews

by Christian Owens, Greg

and Bill Taylor, illustrated by Bryan Collier

Campbell and Erick New

Published by Abrams

Published by Southerly Media

“Where y’at, Shorty?” When young Troy, “Trombone Shorty” Andrews runs late to rehearse with his friends in the 5 O’Clock Band, he takes a walk through the city to try and find them. Along the way, he meets up with a colorful cast of characters that teach him about what it means to be a leader. With rich illustrations by Caldecott Award winning illustrator Bryan Collier, The 5 O’Clock Band is Trombone Shorty’s love letter to his hometown, New Orleans. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Trombone Shorty Foundation.

While New Orleans Magazine does not usually review books of poetry, we’d like to give a mention to The Diary of Mister Eno by local artist Mr. Eno Edet. The book of stories and poems is published by Your Time Publishing and is now available online at Amazon.

H = Did not finish

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HH = Sort of ok, but kind of meh

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Floral designers extraordinaire Greg Campbell and Erick New treat readers to a virtual feast for the eyes in Florists to the Field. With rich photos, backdrops from Tennessee to Louisiana and beyond, design tips and sample settings, the designers inspire a celebration. A local wild game dinner catered by Covey Rise Farms and decorated richly with flowers literally pulled from the fields surrounding the farm in Hammond highlights the tour through Louisiana. The book is available locally at Hazelnut, 5525 Magazine Street, or online at SouthernMedia.com.

Tinderbox: The Untold Story of the Up Stairs Lounge Fire and the Rise of Gay Liberation by Robert W. Fieseler

Published by Liveright Publishing

Robert Fieseler examines the painful, largely ignored historic tragedy of the UpStairs Lounge fire in New Orleans’ French Quarter in 1973, when an arsonist, in an act of rage, set fire to the club, trapping patrons of the gay-friendly establishment and leading to the deaths of 32 people. The fire and the painful aftermath for survivors and their families, while kept under wraps locally, led to a national outpouring of support and unification within the gay rights community. “Tinderbox” is an important reminder of a chapter that should never be forgotten.

By Ashley McLellan, Please send submissions for consideration, attention: Ashley McLellan, 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005

HHH = Enjoyable HHHH = Really, really liked it HHHHH = Loved it; a new favorite!


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LOCAL COLOR . jazz life

Swamp Pop Romp Yvette Landry sings songs of love By Jason Berry

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he adage that people remain loyal to the music of their youth well suits Yvette Landry. Her fourth CD, Louisiana Lovin’ celebrates the dancehall music from her formative years in Breaux Bridge. Landry had a teaching career when she began playing music. Her 2010 debut, Should Have Known, won Offbeat’s “Best Country/Folk Album.” Ranging across the terrain of Cajun and country-western music, she drew a legion of fans. But swamp pop, the Cajun variation on rhythm-and-blues she heard as a teenager in dancehalls 50

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near Breaux Bridge, was a longburning flame. Deacon John and the Ivories caught the R&B train in the 1960s and never got off. Acadiana sensations in that vein, who kept playing as another generation came along, include Warren Storm, G.G. Shinn, Cookie and the Cup Cakes. Shinn’s version of the heart-melter, “Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye,” touched Landry. “Shinn played what you heard when you pressed the jukebox. I heard him at Pat’s Showboat Club in Henderson. I loved to dance.” The first R&B song Landry recorded, “I’m Leaving It Up To

You,” was a gem popularized in 1963 by Dale and Grace. She laid tracks with Roddie Romero, the multi-instrumentalist and vocalist leader of the Hub City All-Stars. A video cameraman roamed at La Louisianne studio in Lafayette, the same space where Dale and Grace cut their chart-buster. Landry: “Almost 50 years later, we used the same equipment they had, recorded the same way, around one mic. Nothing digital. Roddie got Eric Adcock, his keyboard player. I had my drummer, Trevor Landry, my son; and Josef Butts [from the Yvette Landry Band] on bass. Recording it was magical.”

Sixty-five-thousand YouTube spectators bestirred Landry to include it on her last c.d., “Me & T-Coe’s Country.” Landry made concert tours in summer and school breaks; she performed in Russia as a Library of Congress cultural ambassador. Last year, Landry toured Germany with Romero and fiddle player Beau Thomas. During long hours in a van, her thoughts reeled back to the dancehalls, and “Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye,” a 1960’s hit in the Crescent City for Danny White and the Cavaliers.       Landry wanted to do a CD with Romero. Both had bands, coordinating their schedules took time. In January they went into Dockside Studio in small town Maurice. Richard Comeaux on steel pedal, and Beau Thomas, a mainstay from her band, sat in on a few cuts. Landry’s voice, by turns bluesmoaning and sultry-seductive, fits the range of songs like fingers to a glove. In the duet, “Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye,” Romero sings the jilted lover: “Tomorrow, was our wedding day, but with my own eyes, I saw you kissing my best friend.” Landry the fianceé, sings in guilt: “How could I break your heart, break our plans, with our wedding day so close?” The heart is a merciless organ. Louisiana Lovin’ pays homage to the late Bobby Charles of Abbeville with his compositions, “Homesick Blues,” “Grow Too Old,” and “Take it Easy Greasy.”        But the sizzling stand-out is “Daddy Daddy” with Landry in a thrall over the big boy in bed at 4 a.m. “I was thinking about the songs I liked growing up when [music writer] Ben Sandmel sent me a song, ‘Daddy Daddy’ that Ruth Brown had sung. He said I think you’ll rock this tune.” And how. • Lucius Fontenot photo


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LOCAL COLOR . home

The dining room is now part of an open floor plan that allows dining, living and kitchen areas to flow into one another; the dining table, which has a brass base and a porcelain slab top is by E. Kraemer Fine Metal & Woodwork; B&B Italia blush velvet chairs were custom ordered; Moooi copper and polycarbonate chandelier; custom cabinetry by Nordic Kitchens and Baths.

Seventh Heaven Open, airy and light River Ridge reno By Lee Cutrone

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arian and Larry Gibbs know the fine points of renovation. Larry owns Gibbs construction, a 42-year-old commercial construction busi-

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ness now run by his daughter and son-in-law. He also built the family’s River Ridge house, and together, as their family grew and changed, the Gibbses have reno-

m yne w o r l eans .com

vated their house seven times. (A previous incarnation was featured in the July 1999 issue of New Orleans magazine.) With only one of their combined eight

children still at home, the couple embarked on the last renovation with the aim of updating the first floor of the residence (the second floor, which includes six bedrooms and an exercise room has already been refreshed) and solving a few problem areas. “We looked into moving or downsizing with a condo but we liked the location,” Marian said. “So, we decided to stay where we were. Living in one place for so many years was like putting down roots.” In addition to being convenient to Larry’s office, the Gibbses’ house is in close proximity to two of their daughters and their daughter’s families. Once they’d made the decision to stay, they called in architect Ken Gowland of Metro Studio, who’d worked on projects with Gibbs Construction. They also hired All Star Homes (rather than calling in one of Gibbs’s crews, which specialize in commercial properties) and interior designer Lauren Bombet of Lauren Bombet Interiors. The overall idea was to open and renew the first floor. The Gibbses also wanted to eliminate areas to which they referred as the “the bottleneck” - a portion of the downstairs hall where guests

Greg Miles photographs


tended to congregate rather than entering the living room – and “the dead zone” an under-utilized dining room. “My husband used to say, “we have the most beautiful dining room that no one’s ever eaten in,” Marian said. Gowland’s design called for gutting the first floor, knocking out walls and reconfiguring the space without adding to the existing footprint. The kitchen, renovated just three years earlier, was carefully disassembled and reused in what it is now a second, galley-shaped kitchen or pantry, carved

out of what was the dining area, powder room and laundry room. A new kitchen now flows into the living area so that the spaces function well for day-to-day living as well as gathering and entertaining. A new dining area is also part of the wide-open downstairs. “We told the architect what we wanted and he was easy to talk to, understood what we were looking for and was able to put it on paper,” Marian said of the alliance. In Bombet, Marian found another simpatico team member, who likewise understood

Top, left: The sitting room next to the kitchen is done in neutral grays and flesh tones; swivel chairs from Villa Vici, coffee table from Horchow, leather pouf from Pied Nu, small table from Monochrome. Top, right: The Gibbses’ house is located on an acre-and-a-half lot in River Ridge. Bottom, right: Marian Gibbs with her prize winning oak leaf hydrangeas.

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Facing page: Top, left: The living room ceiling was raised during a previous renovation to add even more volume to the existing double height space; the sofas and chairs are from Villa Vici, accent table and pillows, from Jade; the paint color is Benjamin Moore’s Classic Gray; abstract paintings on either side of the fireplace by Joyce Howell; rug from NOLA Rugs; large vase left of fireplace, Katie Koch Home; interior plants, Luna Botanicals. Top, right: The Gibbses’ re-decked the pool area, changed the shape of the pool and re-landscaped as part of their most recent renovation; landscaping by Terry Ibert; installation and maintenance of landscaping by Steve Benton. Bottom, right: The media room is furnished with contemporary furniture and art from Ann Connelly Fine Art; sofas from Monochrome, abstract painting by Carlos Ramirez; octagonal and round tables, both from Jade, pillows and accessories Katie Koch Home, small vase from Sunday Shop. Bottom, left: A chair and ottoman by Minotti in the media room; table from Jade. This page: The new kitchen, which overlooks the living room, has a massive quartz topped island. Bar-height chairs from Monochrome; custom cabinetry by Nordic Kitchens and Baths. Glass and brass pendant light fixtures from Arteriors.

the couples’ desire for a lighter, brighter interior and also nudged them to try things they hadn’t considered. “She took me out of my comfort zone,” she said, who also confessed that she “wound up loving” Bombet’s suggestions. Case in point: the powder room’s graphic black and white marble mosaic floor, which the couple initially nixed as an unnecessary expense. It eventually won out as one of the standout features that makes the room. At the same time, Bombet focused on making the house as family friendly as it is refined. “When I first met with Marian to talk about aesthetic direction, it was important to her to have an elegant, pristine space that was also easy to maintain,” Bombet said. “The kids and grandkids are over all the time, so that balance is what I ran with. I tried to incorporate warm, rich finishes that are easy to care for.”

Bombet and Marian furnished the remodeled downstairs with new, more contemporary pieces (many of them custom) and kept the previously draped windows in the public spaces uncovered. The house now has more natural light and the outside views can be enjoyed from inside. For the final touches, Bombet and the Gibbses worked with Ann Connelly of Ann Connelly Fine Art in Baton Rouge on the selection and placement of art, which includes a variety of contemporary works. Outside, the Gibbses re-decked and changed the shape of the existing pool and had the property re-landscaped by Terry Ibert of The Ibert Group, a move which enhanced both the home’s exterior and interior spaces. An outdoor kitchen is being added as well. “I loved my house before and had a little trouble letting go,” Marian said. “But now I love this house as much if not more.” •

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The Daily Beet serves high-energy foods that allow people to flourish throughout the days.


Eat. Play. SelfLove. Living your best life in NOLA

by sarah ravits photographed by sara essex bradley


Eat. Sip. When most people think of New Orleans cuisine, they probably don’t immediately conjure up mental images of green smoothies or acai bowls. Over the past 300 years we’ve cultivated a reputation for being a place that serves dishes featuring lots of butter – and batter. And in the midst of all the tricentennial celebrations that have been taking place all year, we’ve all been enjoying ourselves and all our city has to offer, food-wise. But if you’re looking to tone down the calories and maximize your nutrition intake, fortunately, the city also boasts some guilt-free eateries that serve dishes that are more likely to give you energy instead of motivating you to take a nap. Good Karma Prasad Cafe This vegan lunch and dinner spot is situated on the first floor of the vibrant yet soothing atmosphere of the Swan River Yoga Mandir on Canal Street in Mid-City. Whatever you do, don’t let the word “vegan” scare you away if you’re just beginning to delve into a healthier lifestyle. Even the most staunch carnivores will be pleasantly surprised by its robust offerings — sizable sandwiches with meat alternatives such as tofu and house-made veggie burgers; avocado toast; wraps, smoothies, salads, gluten-free options, desserts and coffee are all featured on its extensive menu. It’s a great place to stop for a snack after you take one of its yoga classes upstairs, or a stand-alone meal spot when you’re on the go. 2940 Canal St., 401-4698, SwanRiverYoga.com/ good-karma-prasad-cafe Seed This contemporary, airy vegan restaurant opened in the Lower Garden District, featuring New Orleans and Southern classics – with a plant-based twist: Think Southern-fried tofu, vegan gumbo, fresh beignets, an array of spreads, and even nachos (made with vegan cheese, of course). Seed’s mission isn’t just to provide customers with

healthy, garden-based food; it also takes the environment as a whole into consideration with its use of menus on recycled paper and available compost. 1330 Prytania St., 302-2599, SeedYourHealth.com Carmo – A Tropical Cafe & Bar Carmo is a colorful vegetarianfriendly restaurant in the Central Business District with lots of options for business lunches. It’s also a cute date spot for

The Daily Beet Dylan Maisel opened the Daily Beet as a food cart a few years ago before establishing the brick-and-mortar in the CBD. “There is so much beauty in New Orleans’ rich food heritage,” he said. “However, the American food system is in deep trouble. We eat nutrient-empty, ultraprocessed food laden in fats that often suck the energy right out of our days,” he said. As a business owner, he strives to have a

head back to work, rather than grabbing pizza.” 1000 Girod St., 605-4413, TheDailyBeetNola.com Bearcat Cafe Over on the Freret Street corridor Bearcat Cafe is a full-service cafe that emphasizes highquality, fresh breakfast and lunch options, along with sustainable, micro-sourced coffees, tea and other bottled beverages. Its menu is cleverly divided into two sections: the “Good Cat” section, which offers lighter fare, and a “Bad Cat” section, that highlights heavier options. The place is a good spot for a group, as it accommodates a variety of dietary restrictions, including vegan, vegetarian, paleo and gluten-free. 2521 Jena St., 309-9011, BearCatCafe.com Big Easy Bucha Kombucha is a variety of fermented, effervescent black or green tea drinks that are allegedly good for the gut and contain both antioxidants and probiotics. Some of the brands out there have a distinctly vinegar-y taste which can turn some people off from it, but Big Easy Bucha’s creative flavors are sweeter, lighter and easier to enjoy. For example, the “Basin Street Blues” contains a combination of blueberry and mayhaw. The company uses regionally sourced and organic ingredients when possible and can be a refreshing alternative to an iced tea or iced coffee during the hot summer months. Plus, it’s sold at most local grocery stores, including Rouses and Whole Foods.

Sweet Soulfood serves creative and vegan variations of New Orleans staples

couples who are looking to bond over healthier fare. It draws its inspiration from tropical locales around the globe, including Southeast Asia, West Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. 527 Julia St., 875-4132, CafeCarmo.com

positive influence on the way that New Orleanians eat. The Daily Beet, “serves high-energy foods that allow people to flourish throughout their days. We are vegetarian; however a tiny percentage of our customers are vegetarians — our customers just realize that they feel better when they leave our place and

Sweet Soulfood This newly opened venture on Broad Street serves creative and vegan variations of New Orleans staples, and offers new items daily. Some of the hits include vegan jambalaya (made with a sausage alternative), okra gumbo and collard greens, along with smoothies, salads and desserts. 1016 N. Broad St., 821-2669, SweetSoulFood.net Satsuma Restaurant This trendy but laid-back coffee house has two locations across town from each other, in the


Seed is a contemporary, airy vegan restaurant in the Lower Garden District


Bywater and in the Riverbend. It opened in 2009 with a mission to provide freshly made juice, breakfast, brunch and lunch items using healthy, high-quality ingredients and no preservatives. Since then, it has garnered the likes of college students, young professionals, residents from around the city, and even visiting celebrities including David Byrne and Connie Britton. Its atmosphere is conducive to a sit-down meal, or for an afternoon perusing the Internet on your laptop while sipping coffee. 3218 Dauphine St., 304-5962; 7901 Maple St., 309-5557, SatsumaCafe.com.

Grow Dat Youth Farms In a seemingly hidden part of City Park, Grow Dat Youth Farms has quietly made an impact on the lives of children, local residents and the environment of south Louisiana as a whole. Its mission is to nurture young people by teaching them how to grow food; every year this lush space generates more than 20,000 pounds of fresh produce. But it’s not just for the kids: Grow Dat also seeks adult volunteers, who can become “agricultural adult apprentices” to deepen their knowledge and experience

Canoe and Trail Adventures Canoe and Trail Adventures seeks to blend outdoor recreation with education, by offering guided tours around the local swamps and bayous, via canoe and kayak. One of its most popular activities is the Twilight Paddle series, wherein a group of up to 16 participants can book a threeto four-hour canoe or kayak tour, under the guidance of a Louisiana Master Naturalist, who provides safety equipment and expertise. Launch sites are about 30-45 minutes away from New Orleans, but depending on the

Aloha Lei The creation of Tracey Davenport and her husband, Dave Kirtland, opened in the sleek contemporary Auction House market on the corner of Magazine and Julia streets just this past year. Aloha Lei brings a taste of the South Pacific to New Orleans in the form of sushi rolls and poke bowls, which are characterized by chunks of raw, marinated fish tossed over rice with vegetables and umamipacked sauces. (There’s also a tofu option.) Some of its options incorporate a Louisiana twist; options include Creole-inspired redfish and spicy crawfish. Ultimately, the dishes here are simple, fresh, and well-balanced. 801 Magazine St., 504-372-4321, AuctionHouseMarket.com/alohalei/

Swan River Yoga The light-filled studio at Swan River is spacious and welcoming. What differentiates Swan River from other local yoga studios is its commitment to developing spiritual growth, in addition to the physical practice of yoga. It hosts all-level classes throughout the day, as well as kirtan (singing) sessions, guided meditations, and other alternative healing sessions. The teaching staff is notably patient and helpful, dedicated to seeing their students’ spiritual, physical and mental growth. 2940 Canal St., 5422 Magazine St., SwanRiverYoga.com.

Play. With our famously indulgent food and drinking scene in New Orleans, it can often seem difficult to find hobbies that are on the healthier side. But if you’re looking to switch out an occasional happy hour for something new or different, something that could improve your health (and maybe even your bank account), here are some recommendations for new workouts, recreational activities and even educational opportunities to teach you more about your surroundings and the environment.

New Orleans Boulder Lounge While there are no mountains or cliffs in sight of the Crescent City, rock climbing enthusiasts (and beginners, too!) can gain expertise at the New Orleans Boulder Lounge, a gym with an everexpanding membership base, due to the increasing popularity of this multidisciplinary activity. Anyone can sign up for a drop-in class; and it’s also kid-friendly. The Boulder Lounge is not just a fitness and health outlet, either: it’s also a social place, where climbers of all skill levels build not just physical strength, but confidence, as well. It also hosts parties, camps and other community events. 2360 St. Claude Ave., 962-7609, ClimbNOBL.com.

City Surf Fitness offers aerobics, yoga, strength-training and cardio activity balanced on top of a surfboard.

of sustainable urban agriculture through hands-on experience and by working alongside mentors and farmers. 150 Zachary Taylor Drive, 300-1132, GrowDatYouthFarm.org.

time of the year, Canoe and Trail Adventures can often provide a shuttle. The company also offers activities and adventures geared toward youths, as well. CanoeandTrail.com.

Higher Power Yoga/TRX/Spin classes With two studios in the Greater New Orleans area (downtown and Mid-City), Higher Power offers a variety of yoga, spin and TRX classes in a boutique setting. The fitness lessons support and challenge students of all levels, ages and body types, and though each instructor has a unique style, they all offer encouragement and positivity while setting — and helping people meet — challenges (and yes, burning tons of calories). The studio also offers a variety of packages: A drop-in class will cost $22, while the $36 all-you-can-do-in-a-week is a steal for fitness buffs and those who aspire to become one. They also offer monthly membership passes and other deals. 514 City Park Ave., 1000 Girod St., 302-7497, HigherPowerNOLA.com.


New Orleans Boulder Lounge features climbing walls for all skill levels.


Simone’s Market is packed with high-quality goods for all types of dietary needs and preferences.


Dancing Grounds This dance studio on St. Claude is community-driven and supports dancers of all ages and skill levels: whether you’re a pro, a semi-pro, an enthusiast, or just someone who likes to twirl around in the living room when no one’s around. Dancing Grounds offers a number of classes in different genres, including salsa, hip-hop, tap, jazz-funk fusion and even “twerkshops” to help participants channel their inner Big Freedia. Don’t be surprised if you not only work up a sweat, but also make some new friends in the process. 3705 St. Claude Ave., 535-5791, Dancingrounds.org.

are just a sampling of the many forward-thinking shops and businesses, owned by visionary entrepreneurs who have invested their time and energy into creating shopping experiences that don’t just benefit themselves and the customer, but to suppliers, farmers, and everyone involved along the way. Green Serene Owned by former international aid worker Jamie Menutis, Green Serene is a women’s

St. Claude Social Club Eclectic, worldly and colorful, the St. Claude Social Club in the Lower Garden District is an experiential shop that offers vintage jewelry and clothing, costume pieces and imported goods. As the name implies, it’s more than just a store: It’s also a social outlet that hosts special events that give it an old-school “women’s parlor” vibe, bringing in entrepreneurs, demonstrators and artists who showcase their methodologies. For example,

City Surf Fitness A few years ago, people might have given you skeptical looks if you talked about surfing in New Orleans, but if you stop in for a class at City Surf on Magazine Street, you’ll find yourself on top of a board, despite being on dry land. Depending on which class you take, you might find that it incorporates elements of aerobics, yoga, strengthtraining and cardio activity; performing these exercises on top of a surfboard allows for an extra challenging but satisfying workout. 5924 Magazine St., 281-4174, CitySurfFitness.com.

YNOT Dock This newly opened lakefront park in eastern New Orleans suits a variety of interests for families and visitors of all ages. With party barge rentals, jet skis, kayaks, stand-up paddleboards and flyboarding, the expansive spot along Lake Pontchartrain also sells food and drinks, and frequently hosts DJ’s. It’s a spot where one can either relax on its spacious seating area, or get out on the water and show off — or at least, learn — watersports skills. 6701 Stars and Stripes Blvd., 982-8346, YNOTdock.com.

Shop. New Orleanians tend to have a lot of local pride, which extends to supporting local businesses in lieu of major chains. These

SImone’s Market Simone’s Market, an artisanal grocery shop and deli on Oak Street, is modestly sized but packed with high-quality goods for all types of dietary needs and preferences, along with a bounty of handmade items that aren’t found anywhere else in the city. Owner Simone Reggie has an extensive culinary background, and seeks to provide customers with high-quality, healthy and affordable food, while also supporting local farmers and food producers. If you’re not in the mood for major grocery shopping, though, it’s also a great casual lunch spot that serves fresh sandwiches, grain bowls, salads and dips. 8201 Oak St., Suite 2, 273-7706, SimonesMarket.com Glitter Box NOLA Located in the French Quarter, Glitter Box is a shop that offers handmade crafts, accessories, art pieces and gift items, all with feminist flair. The shop is also community-minded and supports marginalized groups and social justice activism. (Each month, it donates proceeds to a nonprofit that supports education and empowerment of women, and those who identify as such.) Owner Lila Heymann and shop manager Alice McGillicuddy also host events after-hours, aimed to bring members of the community and local artists together. 1109 Royal St., 568-0955, GlitterBoxNO.com.

Crescent City Farmers Market offers fresh produce and ingredients in a variety of locations across the city.

boutique on Magazine Street in the Lower Garden District that sells sustainable, eco-friendly clothing, jewelry and gifts, often made from repurposed and recycled materials and fabrics. The inventory at the shop also consists of items made by local artisans and other conscientious entrepreneurs. 2041 Magazine St., 252-9861, GreenSereneNOLA.com.

during Carnival season, you can show up and learn how to create costumes; it also hosts makeup tutorials, cocktail hours and other design-oriented events geared toward helping women express themselves. 1933 Sophie Wright Place, 218-8987, SaintClaudeSocialClub.com.

Crescent City Farmers Market For fresh produce and ingredients, the Crescent City Farmers Market operates multiple days a week in a variety of locations across the city. For aspiring home cooks, the market also brings in demonstrators who show customers how to use seasonal bounty, and work within budgets to maintain a healthy diet and support local farmers and growers, as well. Multiple Locations, CrescentCityFarmersMarket.org.


•••

Recovery’s Long Road Searching for light on a twisted street by chris rose illustration by jason raish

M

y story begins like most. An injury. A visit to the doctor. A medical procedure. Painkillers. That was the late 1990s. There were pleasantries in the beginning, of course. A warm fuzzy feeling that is unmistakably benign. No pain. No worries. Nothing at all, really. I could lock and load and write for hours. I got really good at cleaning the house. I could suffer through bad cartoons on TV with my kids for hours. It goes on for weeks, then months. Prescription after prescription of Vicodin. Percocet. Lortab. Oxycodone. Hydrocodone, usually 10mg each, several a day. Follow up visits with the doctor. He asks: How’s your pain? Bad still, I say, although it’s not really that bad anymore. My leg is sore after physical therapy for the knee surgery, but otherwise, not so bad. What is bad is the way I feel when I run out. Real bad. Can’t sleep. Pacing. Self-soothing rocking motions, back and forth. Try to read but can’t focus. Try television, but now it always sounds too loud. Lights are too bright. Music becomes annoying. Terminal lethargy and restlessness at the same time. It’s always too hot or too cold. Never in between. A relentless sense of dread and despair. Weight loss. It’s difficult to bend over. You need to steady yourself with a railing when going up or down steps. You’re 45 years old and you feel 80. And a not-so-peppy 80 at that. Plus, it works wonders on my depression. I seem to forget that

I am even depressed when I take painkillers. I justify my drug use by devising my own self-medication process. Who needs a psychiatrist when you’ve got the magic pills? There isn’t an addict alive who doesn’t believe he or she knows more than their doctor when it comes to the magic pills. Those guys in lab coats; they don’t understand squat. Then comes a second knee surgery. Ten days after that, an emergency appendectomy. More meds. Lots of meds. Endless meds. Later on, reconstructive hand surgery. Casted from my finger nails to my bicep. The pills flow like Hawaiian lava, red hot and deadly. They make the pain go away. That’s good. That’s important. But time passes. At each follow up visit, doctors ask: What’s your pain level? Very high, I tell them. I’m lying now. The most insidious aspect of opiates – as opposed to just about every other category of drugs and medicines – is that you develop a physical dependency on them. Not just psychological cravings like most underground narcotics, but a true and actual physical dependence that needs to be fed or your mind and body come crashing down. Your body builds up tolerance to opiates over time. As time goes on, you need more for them to work. This is not psychological. It’s neurological. What were two pills a day become four. Four becomes eight. Eight becomes … the doorway to the dark passage. Many folks, myself included, keep using for years just to avoid that three or four weeks of withdrawals; that’s how bad it is. Trade out ten years of your life for one month. Imagine the insanity. Welcome to the American Nightmare. That once warm fuzzy glow


is now a burning fire of regret and remorse, now unable to shake the addiction, unable to live without it. And when the prescriptions run out, you’ll do most anything to get to find more. Anything, anything at all to keep the withdrawals at bay. From the despair of long term addiction and its attendant guilt, shame and failure, inevitably come ideations of suicide. Which is kind of superfluous. You’re killing yourself already. Nobody ever said addiction was logical. ••• The National Institute on Drug Abuse, a branch of the NIH, estimates that more than 64,000 people will die of drug overdoses this year, the great majority of those being opiate-related. Maybe that’s a small sample size in a country of hundreds of millions. But that statistic is more than double from 10 years ago. The rise of the “super opiates” like Oxycontin and Fentanyl, each more powerful than the other, and the steady uptick in heroin use is one of our nation’s long running dirty secrets. But not so secret now. Now that opiates killed Prince. They killed Tom Petty. And they killed a lot of people you’ve never heard of. Sons and daughters and brothers and sisters all. Caught in the trap. There’s no official statistic to directly connect opiate use to the country’s surging suicide rates – the highest in our nation’s history --- but trust an addict on this one: They’re connected. But the death rate doesn’t tell the story of American addiction any better than the murder rate tells the story of American violence: Consider all the people still living through the nightmare, not quite dead. Living casualties in our schools, homes, workplaces and medical institutions. ••• Standard opinion holds that addiction is a disease. I’m no doctor, so I suppose it is. But there’s no getting past this point: Someone with diabetes wakes up every day with diabetes. A drug addict does have a choice. You can simply not use it. You will feel like shit for weeks and never sleep and slog through work and every basic life skill and probably stop brushing your teeth or answering the phone. But know this: Whether you believe in the medical model of addiction or consider it a lethal character flaw, understand that nobody who becomes long-term hooked on opiates does it for fun. Nobody. It’s no party drug. Quite the opposite; it leads to isolation from any social engagement and human touch. If you’ve got a friend or family member who is addicted, judge them as you will. But understand that they don’t want to be that way any more than you want them to be that way. They are living in a self-defeating cycle of more humiliation and reprobation and fear than you could ever dish their way. And you do know an addict. I promise you: You know an opiate addict. You just may not know it. Yet. I could play a parlor trick and tell you that there are some painkillers in somebody’s pocket or purse within a hundred yards from where you are reading this, and I’d bet the ranch I’m correct. (Yes, I once had a gambling habit too.) Opiates, from the low end 5mg Oxycodone and Hydrocodone – the generic and clinical terms that encompass all of the brand-name painkillers -- to powdered heroin, are no longer the realm of skid row greasers and basement freaks. They have infected every level of society, every workforce, every family. Teachers, doctors, clerks, drivers, accountants, lawyers, anyone, everyone. And the step from

painkillers to heroin has never been easier nor more prevalent. And the reason is elementary: It’s the economy, stupid. Prescription painkillers are synthetic heroin. It all comes from the poppy fields of Asia, Africa and South America. Whereas heroin was for many decades associated with the Woodstock generation and back alleys and shooting galleries, it’s now on the streets of suburbia, sufferers crouched in the dark in their classrooms, cubicles and cul de sac split-levels. Heroin has made its surging comeback for one simple reason: Painkillers are getting harder and harder to get prescriptions for, now that America’s opiate pandemic is making the front page and doctors are tightening their once loose scrip writing. And their street value is through the roof – one dollar for every milligram. So what happens when you are taking ten 10mg Oxycodone a day? Do the math. What happens when you are taking eight 80 mg Oxycontin a day? You better be good at calculus to tally that bill. So once you get past the stigma, and once you realize you don’t need to use needles, heroin is a profoundly cheaper – and often more accessible – alternative to pills. But there’s no way of knowing how strong it is, who made it, and if it’s real. There’s that drawback. But people, ordinary people, make that leap when they run out of pills. People who you’d never suspect would take such a step. Trust an addict on this one, too: Neither did they. ••• I am not a doctor, nor a trained scientist. I don’t know what I know from academic studies and clinical trials. I know what I know from nearly a decade of addiction, three trips to rehab and endless sessions of therapy, counseling and meetings. I possess the wisdom of experience. And here’s what I know: First, a lot of the platitudes are true. They always tell you that addiction ends one of three ways: Prison, institutionalization, or death. After experiencing the first two, I decided to get clean for good. And that leads to another platitude: You can only do it for yourself. The first time I went to rehab was to save my marriage and my sister’s life. She needed a bone marrow donor and I was the match. I had both been praying that I would be the one to save her life, at the same time dreading what it would take to do so. So I went to rehab. My insurance covered it. Rehab is really hard work. That is, unless you get to go to one of those treatment retreats in Sedona or Malibu where they put hot stones on your back and cucumber slices over your eyes and you spend the day doing art therapy and taking walks in the woods. That’s not what most folks get to experience, a soft landing from the existential dread of opiate addiction. We can’t all be Britney Spears. Rehab is an endless cycle of inconvenience. Waking up too early, being tired all day, sitting in circles under fluorescent lights all day, talking about it with a bunch of other folks who are just like you. No matter how different they are, they are…Exactly. Like. You. Opiate addiction does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, religion, gender or socio-economic distribution. The Walking Dead, we are everywhere. They ruined their families. Fucked up at work. Quit their hobbies. Started staying home all day and night. Rooting through medicine cabinets and dresser drawers of friends and family. Finding a reliable pain doctor to feed your habit and when he cuts you off, finding a reliable street dealer. Or two. Or three, just to be sure. Spent all their money. Started by borrowing some, then stealing it. And then


you all end up in the same room, talking about it. For thirty days, sometimes longer. After my first trip to rehab, my wife divorced me. Then my sister died before she ever got strong enough for the transplant. Then I went back to painkillers. The second time I went to rehab was to save my job. It was an ultimatum from my boss at the Times-Picayune. I’d been arrested as a public nuisance. My insurance covered it again. Then I took a voluntary buyout from the paper. And I went back to painkillers.

“Nobody ever said addiction was logical.” The third time I went to rehab, I went to save my life. I had no insurance. I paid for it myself. That’s how you make it stick. You have to do it for you, not for somebody else. It doesn’t work that way. I have been opiate-free for seven years now. Yay, me. All it takes to succeed is ruining your life, alienating friends and family, running through your savings, and a helluva lot of determination. And Suboxone helps. There’s a drug on the market called Suboxone. Maybe you’ve heard or read about it, now that the opiate pandemic is finally as newsworthy as immigration, tax reform and whatever the hell else is going on in Washington these daze. Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Together, they do an overhaul of your brain chemistry. They tamp down withdrawals, reduce cravings, reduce pain. Suboxone had become standard rehab treatment by my third trip. I’d never heard of it before then. And there’s a reason for that. I went to see Dr. Brij Mitruka, a general practitioner in Algiers, for my “issues.” I told him how I started on painkillers and how I kept with it as a way of self-treating my depression. If you don’t feel anything, you don’t feel depressed. Pretty simple, right? Mitruka says most of his patients have the same story. “Behavioral change is the primary objective with my patients,” he says. “It’s a matter of perception versus reality. Your body tells you that you are depressed; you take something for it. You go around and around, thinking it’s good for you. It energizes you. It relaxes you. You have to treat addiction first to find the true underlying reasons for depression or anxiety. Suboxone helps you do that. It separates the perception from the reality.” Suboxone tears away the temporal jagged edges of withdrawals and cravings. And yes, the paradox of treating drug addiction with another drug is counter-intuitive. But Suboxone is not meant for long-term maintenance. In a program like Mitruka’s, you start with a dosage to knock down the immediate dread and remove the cravings and then

ween down over time. Ween down to nothing. Ween down to real life, like all the Normies out there are living it. “Addiction is a mental disease,” Mitruka says. “Giving up a daily habit is a long process.” And that’s where a second paradox comes in: Suboxone is intensely regulated by the FDA and the DEA. Consider this: Any MD can write you a prescription for painkillers. Any dentist can write you a scrip for Percocet. Psychiatrists, some RNs and even some veterinarians can write you a scrip for painkillers – that is, if you have a vet who is predisposed to helping you kick withdrawals. There are roughly 60 physicians in the greater New Orleans area licensed to prescribe Suboxone. That’s all. And that’s a lot considering how small a market this is. And convincing them to treat you is no easy feat. They are in high demand, pardon the pun. They are the Holy Grail for addicts who really want to quit. (Note: For a list of Suboxone-licensed doctors in the New Orleans region, go to suboxone. com. Be advised: You will likely be required to enter a treatment program before they agree to work with you. They’re generally not up for wasting your time or theirs.) But here’s how stupid it can be: A friend of mine just had a tooth extraction this summer and was written a prescription for 45 Vicodin. A tooth extraction. Forty five pills. That’s insane. He took a couple the first day and then sold the rest. And so it goes. And that brings us back to the economy. The Pharma Nation. “It’s a big lobby,” Mitruka says. “The people who make Oxycodone, Oxycontin – they are depressing this new medicine.” Indeed, with wider distribution, Suboxone could put a serious dent in the multi-billion dollar painkiller industry. And there are other similar drugs coming to market with the same neurological promise as Suboxone. One drug protocol leads you down a path to perdition and slowly chews down your humanity. The other one halts and then reverses those effects. Guess which one you can find on any commercial block in the New Orleans area, in any medicine chest, at any gathering of humans? Nobody ever said addiction was logical. Nor its cure. ••• I wanted to write this story ten years ago. I was still bouncing in and out of rehab, fighting all along the way, destroying things and people around me. I wanted to share my story and maybe tell people: You are not alone. Because nothing – nothing – feels lonelier than addiction. At the time, I was still working at the Times-Picayune. My editor told me: We think our readers have heard enough about your personal life. And that’s certainly true. I am the king of TMI. They didn’t want an admitted addict confessing in their pages. So I finally found a place to tell my story. I wrote this not to regale you with my tales of woe and triumph. I wrote it to try to tell you what it’s like to be there if you never have. To maybe help you understand the mind – and actions – of the addicts around you. To know that there are options beyond the traditional 12 steps and cold turkey methods of recovery – although those do work for some folks. And mostly, to tell you that the statistics you read about or hear on TV, now that opiate addiction has claimed its rightful place as an American pandemic, are much more than statistics. They are your friends and your family, your classmates and your workmates, whether you think you know one or not. Trust an addict on this one. You do. Handle with care. Handle with love. •


Q best doctors 536 physicians in 75 specialties

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here is no responsibility that we take more seriously than publishing our annual list of best doctors. We totally want to be right about this and we want you to understand our methodology. How are the selections made? We partner with Best Doctors, Inc.®, a global benefits provider and medical information services company that connects individuals facing difficult medical treatment decisions with the best doctors. Best Doctors serves more than 40 million members worldwide. Best Doctors undertakes the largest, continuous, peer-topeer survey of the medical profession to develop the Best Doctors in America® List. The Best Doctors in America List is the companion to the Best Doctors proprietary database of close to 50,000 global physicians in over 450 specialties and subspecialties. Close to 40,000 Best Doctors in America, are peer selected as the best 4% of U.S. Physicians. What question is asked of the doctors who nominate and vote? Best Doctors contacts each doctor on the previous list and asks the same question: “If you or a loved one needed a doctor in your specialty, to whom would you refer them?” Do doctors get a chance to respond to other names recommended? Every doctor has the opportunity both to comment (confidentially) on the other doctors included in his or her specialty and related specialties, and to make additional nominations. As new nominees are added to the database, each undergoes the same peer review process. What happens to the data? Best Doctors has developed proprietary software that analyzes the votes and provides an aggregate score for each physician candidate. This yields a preliminary set of physicians who meet the initial criteria for inclusion. Only physicians who earn consensus of their peers and meet all additional criteria are selected to the database. Best Doctors verifies all physicians in its database for clinical activity and medical licensure. How does this differ from local surveys? Only currently listed Best Doctors physicians are eligible to submit nominations and vote in the poll. Best Doctors does not survey the medical community randomly or in its entirety. The large pool of voting physicians helps eliminate the commercial, financial and other biases of smaller-scale surveys and the potential distortion that results from a random survey of the entire physician community. Why do some hospitals seem to have such a preponderance of doctors listed? Because they have so many doctors. As hospitals expand and open more facilities, their number of doctors increases. Through the years the dominant hospitals have shifted, and they may shift again in the future. The Best Doctors in America database represents the top four percent of physicians

practicing in the country and includes many department heads, chiefs of staff and doctors in other major positions at the largest medical centers and health systems nationwide. Do doctors have to pay to be on the list? No! We would never use the list if that were the case. Here is the company’s own statement on that issue: “Best Doctors never takes compensation of any kind from doctors or hospitals in return for listing doctors in its database, nor does Best Doctors pay doctors to participate in its poll.” What are some of the rules that the company uses? Doctors are allowed to vote on others in their hospital and medical practices. The feeling is that those doctors know their peers best – that’s where the survey gets some of its most outspoken evaluations, good and bad. • All of the voting is strictly confidential. • Once a consensus of peer support is achieved, additional research is conducted on credentials, disciplinary actions and clinical activity. • Doctors aren’t notified of their inclusion on the list until after the survey process is completed. Doctors aren’t allowed to pay a fee or required to make a purchase to be included. Are the surveys administered randomly? No. To get opinions with weight and professional credibility, Best Doctors consults the very best. Researchers contact all current physicians on the list, which includes many department heads at major teaching hospitals, and asks them to rate specialists outside their own facilities. According to Best Doctors. Where is the bias? There is no perfect, bias-free way to conduct a ranking of any sort. Though Best Doctors has refined its techniques to eliminate biases through the years, any nomination process that relies on peer evaluations will naturally favor more senior doctors who have had time to develop a reputation. Those who are new in their profession or those who haven’t had much peer interaction will sometimes get less recognition. The breadth and the depth of the voting pool help to eliminate biases and cronyism that might be reflected in smaller surveys. In addition to the peer evaluation, Best Doctors conducts research on each physician’s credentials, disciplinary actions and clinical activity to determine selections. How were the doctors who are profiled in this section selected? The editorial staff of New Orleans Magazine selected them. We tried to choose people who represented a variety of specialties. Is this the definitive list? No. We have no doubt that there are many worthy doctors who weren’t included in the list. We are confident, however, that all who are listed are truly among the best doctors.

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These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America 2017-2018 database, which includes close to 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 40 medical specialties and 400 subspecialties. The Best Doctors in America database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site.

Addiction Medicine New Orleans Dean Anthony Hickman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Allergy and Immunology Houma Robert Douglas Haydel, Jr. Haydel Asthma and Allergy Clinic 4752 Hwy 311, Ste 108 985-873-4395 Metairie Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans W. Edward Davis III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-6742 Luis R. Espinoza LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Rheumatology 2025 Gravier St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517 Kenneth Paris Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 Ricardo U. Sorensen Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589

Anesthesiology Covington Thomas Anzalone St. Tammany Parish Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1202 S Tyler St 985-898-4431 Hammond Richard J. Grisoli North Oaks Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 15790 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-345-2700

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Alan David Kaye LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Anesthesiology 1542 Tulane Ave, Ste 656 504-568-2319

H. Jerrel Fontenot Jefferson Ambulatory Surgery Center 2701 Lake Villa Dr 504-274-3100

James Riopelle LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Anesthesiology 1542 Tulane Ave, Ste 659 504-568-2319

Patrick Houstoun Waring The Pain Intervention Center 701 Metairie Rd, Unit 2A310 504-455-2225 New Orleans David M. Broussard Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Eric H. Busch Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Emilie Donaldson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Bryan M. Evans Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Jason B. Falterman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Donald Robert Ganier, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Laurianne G. Wild Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600

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Metairie Joseph T. Crapanzano, Jr. East Jefferson Pain Management 4320 Houma Blvd, 6th Fl 504-503-4109

Stuart R. Hart Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 John Frederick Heaton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456

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Melissa Russo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Section of Obstetric Anesthesiology 2700 Napoleon Ave 504-842-3755 Robin B. Stedman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 W. David Sumrall III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Metairie Roland J. Bourgeois, Jr. East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842 Fortune Anthony Dugan East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170 Yvonne E. Gilliland Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 8th Fl 504-842-4168 James Jude McKinnie Jefferson Electrophysiology 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 300 504-503-6188 Gary D. Menszer East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170

Leslie C. Thomas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Nicholas D. Pappas East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842

T. Michael Truxillo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

David Warren Snyder East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170

Slidell Carl A. Mayeaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center - North Shore Department of Anesthesiology 100 Medical Center Dr 504-842-3755

Gregory D. Tilton East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842

Cardiovascular Disease Houma Richard P. Abben Cardiovascular Institute of the South 225 Dunn St 985-876-0300 Peter S. Fail Cardiovascular Institute of the South 225 Dunn St 985-876-0300 Marrero Leslie Wayne Levenson West Jefferson Heart Clinic of Louisiana 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N613 504-349-6800

New Orleans Freddy Michel Abi-Samra Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Murtuza J. Ali LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520

Patrick C. Breaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Mark M. Cassidy Tulane University Heart and Vascular Institute 4201 Woodland Dr, 2nd Fl 504-378-5080 Tyrone Jean Collins Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727 Ivory Crittendon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-5200 Clement C. Eiswirth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Robert C. Hendel University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Cardiovascular Disease 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 James Stephen Jenkins Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3724 Carl Joseph Lavie, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Thierry H. Le Jemtel Tulane Medical Center Cardiac Transplant and Advanced Heart Failure Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-6113


one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

Dr. Misty Suri, M.D., M.S. Ochsner Health System Specialty: Orthopedic surgery, fellowship trained in Sports Medicine; Specialist in shoulder surgery

Complex Revision Shoulder Surgery As the former New Orleans Saints team physician

and current director of medical services and head team physician for the New Orleans Pelicans, Dr. Misty Suri, a New Orleans native, has cured a number of high-profile athletes over the course of his career. He also is head team physician for the University of New Orleans, and several high schools in the area, and works as a consultant for LSU Athletics. “Taking care of professional athletes is both enjoyable and demanding,” he said. “My responsibilities are significant, but are a welcome challenge. Keeping the players healthy and  performing at their highest level and returning them from injury safely is a fine balance that I enjoy.” The toughest case of his career involved a revision shoulder arthoscopic surgery, involving a massive rotator cuff tear and a suprascapular nerve decompression that had two prior shoulder surgeries in another state. “The nature of the tear and the quality of the tissue necessitated several different surgical techniques to get the rotator cuff tear closed and re-repaired,” he said. In fact, “the repair needed to be supplemented with a special patch on top of the repair” in order to fortify the tissue and increase its chance of healing. In complex shoulder problems and in sports medicine in general, he says it’s important to fully examine the patients’ history. “Basic imaging such as X-rays are important, as well,” he said. “Advanced imaging, MRI and CT scans are also often indicated and can confirm the initial diagnosis, adding further information such as the size of the rotator cuff tear, quality of the tissue, cartilage status and biceps tendon damage.”. The prognosis was good in this specific case, he says, given that the repair quality was strong. “The rehabilitation process was slow and gradual with extensive physical therapy to regain motion of the shoulder and increase the strength of the shoulder. Ultimately, the patient did excellent and had a great outcome with a pain-free and strong shoulder with full range of motion.” For Suri, it was another example of how determination, hard work and persistence can lead to improved outcomes for his patients. “It also showed me the value of continued lifelong learning and being on the forefront of new techniques in sports medicine and shoulder surgery, in order to help solve real-world problems.”

Undergraduate: University of Pennsylvania Medical School: Chicago Medical School Hometown: New Orleans my n e w or l e a n s . com

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Paul A. LeLorier LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1358 Stacy Mandras Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Richard Virgil Milani Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Hamang M. Patel Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Rajan A. Patel Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727 Stephen Robert Ramee Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3724 J. P. Reilly Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727 Sangeeta Shah Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Frank Wilson Smart LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520

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Hector Osvaldo Ventura Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721

Critical Care Medicine Hammond Richard J. Grisoli North Oaks Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 15790 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-345-2700

Christopher James White Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3724

Arvind Yertha North Oaks Pulmonology North Oaks Clinic Bldg, Ste 401 15813 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-230-1580

Colon and Rectal Surgery Metairie Jeffrey Farrow Griffin Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates 3100 Galleria Dr, Ste 303 504-456-5108 Jennifer D. Silinsky Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates 3100 Galleria Dr, Ste 303 504-456-5108

Kenner Carol M. Mason LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705 Metairie Thomas Gerard Nuttli East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205

New Orleans David E. Beck Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060

New Orleans Bennett Paul DeBoisblanc University Medical Center New Orleans Comprehensive Pulmonary Hypertension Center 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

David A. Margolin Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060

Stephen Phillips Kantrow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Guy R. Orangio LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Colorectal Surgery 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520

Bobby D. Nossaman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Herschel D. Vargas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060

Jairo I. Santanilla Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Charles B. Whitlow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060

Leonardo Seoane Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonology, Lung Transplant and Critical Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4400

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David E. Taylor Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Dermatology Metairie William Patrick Coleman III 4425 Conlin St 504-455-3180 Mara A. Haseltine Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225 Jeffrey C. Poole Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225 Nicole E. Rogers Hair Restoration of the South Galleria Medical Bldg, Ste 201 3100 Galleria Dr 504-315-4247 New Orleans Erin E. Boh Tulane Medical Center Dermatology Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-1700 Julie Mermilliod Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Dermatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 11th Fl 504-842-3940 Peter W. Simoneaux Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Dermatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3940 Emergency Medicine New Orleans Liza DiLeo Thomas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460 Joseph S. Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460 Erik Sundell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1516 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460

Endocrinology and Metabolism New Orleans Samuel Andrews Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4023 Vivian Andrew Fonseca Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Endocrinology 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 Brandy A. Panunti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4023 Family Medicine Covington Richard George Marek, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Kevin C. Plaisance Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Timothy Lacey Riddell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Hammond Michael Ashley Dunn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Tangipahoa Department of Family Medicine 41676 Veterans Ave 985-543-3600 Ted Joseph Hudspeth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Tangipahoa Department of Family Medicine 41676 Veterans Ave 985-543-3600 Mandeville Paul Guilbault Mandeville Private Physician Group 521 Asbury Drive 985-630-9618 Daniel Keith Jens Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Mandeville Department of Family Medicine 3235 E Causeway Approach 985-875-2340


one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

Dr. Angela M. McLean, M.D., FACP LSUHSC School of Medicine Specialty: Internal Medicine

It Wasn’t Asthma; So What Was It?

A New Orleans native, Dr. Angela McLean, M.D., F.A.C.P,

practices internal medicine and serves as an associate professor of medicine at LSU School of Medicine. She said that one of her toughest cases happened when she consulted on the case of a patient who had arrived in the emergency room, presumably for severe asthma. “He did not improve, despite optimal treatment,” she says. The patient’s symptoms included shortness of breath, coughing and wheezing; “he appeared as if he was having an asthma attack,” McLean said. After steroid treatment, his symptoms worsened. Following blood work, medical staff noticed he had eosinophilia — an increase in eosinophils, which are disease-fighting white blood cells that often indicate a parasitic infection. He underwent further testing for his sputum (mixture of saliva and mucus) and his stool. Ultimately, he was diagnosed with strongyloides, a parasitic infection that is caused by a nematode, or roundworm. According to the CDC, strongyloides is classified as a “soil-transmitted helminth. This means that the primary mode of infection is through contact with soil that is contaminated with freeliving larvae.” Experts recommend preventing it by wearing shoes when one is walking on soil, and to avoid contact with fecal matter or sewage. While the majority of people infected with it experience no symptoms, it can be life-threatening in others with compromised immune systems or other medical conditions. Diagnosing this patient, Dr. McLean said, “reinforced the basics we all learn in training importance of a thorough history, particularly travel history.” Close examination of lab values, she says, can “always help solve a puzzle.” The patient was treated with an antihelmintic (anti-parasite medication), and ultimately, he responded well to the treatment, she said. Dr. McLean noted that in addition to treating her patients, she enjoys getting to know them and their families; seeing them improve and “most of all, training the physicians of the future,” she said. “I get to reinforce the importance of empathy for others, and why it is an honor and a privilege to care for patients.”

Undergraduate: Xavier University of Louisiana Medical School: University of California San Francisco 23 years of practice my n e w or l e a n s . com

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Marrero James Theis 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N408 504-349-2908 Metairie Robert Combel Ryan East Jefferson Family Medicine Clinic 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-7878 New Orleans Leandro Area Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lakeview Department of Family Medicine 101 W Robert E Lee Blvd, Ste 201 504-846-9646 Tara G. Berner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lakeview Department of Family Medicine 101 W Robert E Lee Blvd, Ste 201 504-846-9646 Sarah W. Holt Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lakeview Department of Family Medicine 101 W Robert E Lee Blvd, Ste 201 504-846-9646 Rade N. Pejic Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Department of Family and Community Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000 James Taylor Tebbe, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Mid-City Department of Family Medicine 411 N Carrollton Ave, Ste 4 504-842-7400 Pamela Wiseman University Medical Center New Orleans Family Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Clinical Bldg, 2nd Fl, Ste B 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Slidell James Howard Newcomb, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Slidell Department of Family Medicine 2750 E Gause Blvd 985-639-3777 Gastroenterology Covington Steven Anthony Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Section of Gastroenterology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Houma Nathaniel S. Winstead Houma Digestive Health Specialists 1023 Wood St 985-772-6997 76

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Marrero Shantiprakash Kedia Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401

New Orleans Luis A. Balart Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344

Sanjeeva Reddy Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401

Christopher N. Barrilleaux Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500

Gary (Taavi) Reiss Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Charles G. Schibler II Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Rian Moss Tanenbaum Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Steve George Venturatos Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Metairie Howard I. Brenner Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 George E. Catinis Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 Elizabeth Ann McDonald 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 308 504-456-5070 William Morrison Meyers, Jr. Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 Nicholas John Persich Metairie Gastroenterology 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 120 504-456-6701 George Richard Puente Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 David Ralph Silvers Metairie Gastroenterology 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 120 504-456-6701

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John (Jerry) Alfred Evans Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Gastroenterology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4015 Benjamin Alfred Guider, Jr. Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 720 504-896-8670 James D. Lilly Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 720 504-896-8670 Fredric Gary Regenstein Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 James William Smith Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Gastroenterology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4015 Thibodaux Charles J. Monier, Jr. Digestive Health Center 764 N Acadia Rd, Ste A 985-446-1958 Geriatric Medicine New Orleans Lumie Kawasaki Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Geriatrics and Extended Care Service 2400 Canal St 504-507-2072 Hand Surgery Metairie Eric R. George Hand Surgical Associates Hand Center of Louisiana 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 600B 504-454-2191 Harold M. Stokes Pontchartrain Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 3939 Houma Blvd, Ste 21 504-885-6464

New Orleans Donald C. Faust 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 600 504-899-1000 Hepatology New Orleans Luis A. Balart Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 Natalie H. Bzowej Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Nigel Girgrah Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Shobha Joshi Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Fredric Gary Regenstein Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 Infectious Disease Covington Michael Kevin Hill St. Tammany Parish Hospital Department of Hospital Medicine 1202 S Tyler St 985-898-4000 Houma Mary Louise Eschete Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Specialty Care Clinic 1978 Industrial Blvd 985-873-1880 Metairie Richard Stephan Witzig East Jefferson General Hospital Department of Hospital Medicine 4200 Houma Blvd, 6th Fl 504-503-4331 New Orleans Katherine Baumgarten Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005

Christopher M. Blais Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Rebecca Adair Clark CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273 Joseph Raymond Dalovisio Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Julia B. Garcia-Diaz Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Michael Edward Hagensee University Medical Center New Orleans Infectious Disease Services 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Sandra Abadie Kemmerly Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Mary J. Murphy CrescentCare Specialty Clinic NO/AIDS Task Force 2601 Tulane Ave, Ste 500 504-821-2601 David Michael Mushatt Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Infectious Diseases 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 George A. Pankey Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4006 Nicholas J. Van Sickels CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273 Slidell Mary Faith Joubert IMG Physicians 1051 Gause Blvd, Ste 260 985-641-5523


one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

Dr. Pedro Cazabon, M.D., System Service Line Leader for Primary Care and Urgent Care, Ochsner Health System

An Intermittent Kinking of an Artery Dr. Pedro Cazabon believes a team effort is important

when it comes to medicine, and he encourages patients to pursue multidisciplinary approaches when it comes to rare or confusing symptoms. Years back, he recalled, he was following a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which included some pulmonary nodules that required annual CT scans for follow-up. “He developed a pattern of chest pain with exertion suspicious for a cardiac blockage,” he said. “We evaluated him for heart disease.” But the angiogram was normal. A subsequent CT scan of the chest suggested, however, a rare congenital (present at birth) abnormality of the pericardium (the membrane enclosing the heart). “He had a gap in the sack around the heart,” Cazabon said. The diagnosis became clear when the patient’s radiologist called Cazabon and reported the faint finding she saw, incidentally, on the CT scan. “She was able to see his recent visits for chest pain in our electronic medical record, which resulted in a focused MRI to confirm the abnormality,” he said. The doctors suspected this was causing an intermittent kinking of the patient’s main coronary artery, triggered only when he exerted himself. Once the congenital abnormality was discovered, it was corrected with surgery. “He underwent a removal of the pericardium and has been pain-free ever since,” Cazabon said. “His prognosis is very good for having no further complications.” It was a confounding case, and solidified the importance of working with physicians in other fields, according to Cazabon. “It was a great team effort including the patient, primary care, radiology, rheumatology, cardiology and the cardiac surgeon.” In the meantime, Cazabon continues to pursue both clinical and administrative duties at Ochsner. “My role allows me to work on the systems that help people get timely access and resources for their medical needs in primary care and beyond,” he says. “Helping them navigate our health system and get the care they need brings me a lot of professional satisfaction. Our team continually works to improve in patient experience, which we hope will result in better engagement by patients in their care.”

Undergraduate: Louisiana State University Medical School: LSU Health Sciences, Shreveport Hometown: River Ridge my n e w or l e a n s . com

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Internal Medicine Harahan Joseph A. Miceli III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Internal Medicine 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 4th Fl 504-842-4747 Stacy D. Siegendorf Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Internal Medicine 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 4th Fl 504-842-4747 Fayne M. St. John Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Internal Medicine 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 4th Fl 504-842-4747 Metairie James Donald Conway Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820 Janine M. Ferrier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veteran’s Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820 Lawrence Levy JenCare Senior Medical Center 3530 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-264-5142 Jo Ellen Plunkett-Kasparek Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820 New Orleans Mary Moore Abell St. Thomas Community Health Center 1020 St Andrew St 504-529-5558 Alys Alper Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Ambulatory Primary Care 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000 Leslie Anne Blake Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

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Karen Blessey Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist Napoleon Medical Plaza Department of Internal Medicine 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 890 504-897-4250 David M. Borne LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 James W. Bragg Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Todd Burstain Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Pedro Cazabon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Terry L. Cummings Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Sections of General Academic Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-5263 Nona Epstein Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Sara E. Fernandez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Steven J. Granier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Timothy S. Harlan Tulane Medical Center Internal Medicine Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-1001 Kristin Johnson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

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Michael Landry Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Department of Internal Medicine 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000 Gloria Leary Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Christopher J. Lege Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 460 504-897-7999 Betty P. Lo-Blais LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 Marlowe Maylin Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5800 Angela M. McLean LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 Eboni G. Price-Haywood Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Charles Clarence Smith III Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500 Benjamin F. Springgate LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 James D. Stoll Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Jeffrey Wiese Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5800

Internal Medicine/Hospice and Palliative Medicine Metairie Kenneth B. Smith East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205

Medical Genetics New Orleans Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101

New Orleans Christopher M. Blais Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005

Medical Oncology and Hematology Marrero James K. Ellis West Jefferson Medical Center Cancer Center 4513 Westbank Expy 504-349-6360

Internal Medicine/Hospital Medicine New Orleans John R. Amoss Touro Infirmary Section of Hospital Medicine 1401 Foucher St 504-568-4624

Metairie Robert Woody Veith 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 200 504-455-0600

Oren Blalock Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 11th Fl 504-842-5766 Steven Deitelzweig Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 11th Fl 504-842-5766 Lee Engel University Medical Center New Orleans Section of Hospital Medicine 2000 Canal St 504-702-3000 Danielle King Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Medicine Services 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000 Marianne Maumus Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 11th Fl 504-842-5766 Geraldine E. Menard Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-7518 David W. Spruill Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5800

New Orleans Archie Watt Brown, Jr. Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910 Salvador Caputto Crescent City Physicians 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8970 John Thomas Cole Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910 Bridgette M. Collins-Burow Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Jyotsna Fuloria University Medical Center New Orleans Section of Hematology and Oncology 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Marc J. Kahn Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Cindy Anne Leissinger Tulane Medical Center Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders 1430 Tulane Ave 504-988-5433 Hana F. Safah Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300


one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

Dr. Chi Dola, M.D, MPH, Associate Professor at the Tulane Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; residency program director; section chief, maternal-fetal medicine

An Unborn Child with a Chromosome Condition As an ob-gyn, Dr. Chi Dola considers it a privilege to

be responsible for the care of her patients and their unborn children. She has undoubtedly dealt with many difficult cases over the course of her 21-year career, but one in particular sticks out to her. The patient was pregnant with her first child and was referred to Dola at 18 weeks because an ultrasound exam revealed that her pregnancy showed oligohydramnios, a lack of amniotic fluid around the fetus. “We diagnosed her with early rupture of the membranes in the early second trimester,” she recalled. “In the course of the work-up, a genetic amniocentesis [a sampling of the fluid] indicated that her baby had Turner Syndrome,” a chromosomal condition that affects females. Ovaries develop normally at first, but egg cells, aka oocytes, die prematurely and most ovarian tissue degenerates before birth. Affected girls do not undergo puberty unless they receive hormone therapy, and most are unable to conceive. The patient accepted the news with “grace and courage,” Dola said. Her baby had a high possibility of having pulmonary hypoplasia, an incomplete development of the lungs, from early and prolonged rupture of membranes. This carries a very “grave” prognosis, according to Dola. The patient remained on hospital bedrest until her premature delivery at 27 weeks via an emergency C-section. All through her difficult pregnancy and delivery, she remained “so pleasant to everyone.” “She dealt with the challenges with such grace, and the word ‘fair’ was never in her vocabulary,” Dola said. “At times, it was she who made sure that I was all right, rather than the other way around.” The baby was born alive and discharged from the intensive care nursery; the patient returned two years later with a new pregnancy and updates on the first child, complete with photographs. “I am grateful that my patients entrust the care of themselves and their unborn child to me,” Dola said. “The special bond between physician and patient is very inspiring to me.”

Specialty: OB-GYN, Subspecialty maternal-fetal medicine Hometown: Born in Saigon, Vietnam, but considers New Orleans to be hometown Undergraduate: Louisiana State University Medical School: combined M.D/MPH degree from Tulane School of Medicine and Tulane School of Public Health my n e w or l e a n s . com

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Oliver Sartor Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Chris Theodossiou Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910 Nephrology Houma Shaminder M. Gupta Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Division of Nephrology 1978 Industrial Blvd 985-850-2328 Metairie Jill Suzanne Lindberg New Orleans Nephrology Associates 4409 Utica St, Ste 100 504-457-3687 New Orleans A. Brent Alper, Jr. Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5800 Vecihi Batuman Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 Jorge C. Garces Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 L. Lee Hamm Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-9831 N. Kevin Krane Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 Laselle St 504-988-5030 Eric Edward Simon Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030

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Juan Carlos Velez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Nephrology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3930

Amparo (Amy) Gutierrez LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 2025 Gravier St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517

Ralph R. Chesson, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Urogynecology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600

Rubin Zhang Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344

Roger Everett Kelley, Jr. Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Department of Neurology 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9190

Chi P. Dola Tulane Center for Women’s Health Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 302 504-988-8070

Thibodaux Allen W. Vander Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Nephrology 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 405 985-446-0871

Piotr Wladyslaw Olejniczak LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 2025 Gravier St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517

Susan G. Jeanfreau Fleur De Lis Ob-Gyn Associates 3040 33rd St 504-897-4287

Neurological Surgery Metairie Najeeb M. Thomas Southern Brain & Spine 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-0141

R. Eugene Ramsay Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 6th Fl 504-842-4111

Rand Marcel Voorhies Southern Brain & Spine 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-0141 New Orleans Aaron Dumont Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561 Neurology Metairie Donald Adams East Jefferson Neurological Associates 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 205 504-885-7337 Archibald L. Melcher III East Jefferson Neurological Associates 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 205 504-885-7337 New Orleans Terence C. D’Souza Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist Napoleon Medical Plaza Department of Neurology 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 810 504-894-2700 John D. England LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 2025 Gravier St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517 John Freiberg Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561

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Richard Zweifler Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 7th Fl 504-842-3980 Obstetrics and Gynecology Covington Patricia S. Braly Women’s Cancer Care 606 W 12th Ave 985-892-2252 Hammond William G. Black North Oaks Obstetrics & Gynecology 15748 Medical Arts Plaza 985-542-0663 Timothy Joseph Mooney 42333 Deluxe Plaza, Ste 7 985-345-2555 Mandeville Richard P. Dickey Fertility Institute of New Orleans 800 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 2C 985-892-7621 Metairie Robin B. Bone Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Clearview Women’s Services 4500 Clearview Pkwy, Ste 101 504-885-8563 Stephen Champlin East Jefferson Women’s Care 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 410 504-454-0606 Ann Catherine Chau LSU Healthcare Network Woman and Child’s Clinic 4200 Houma Blvd, 4th Fl 504-456-5446

Peter Lu The Fertility Institute of New Orleans 4770 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 201 504-454-2165 Gabriella Pridjian Tulane Center for Women’s Health Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 302 504-988-8070 Belinda Sartor The Fertility Institute of New Orleans 4770 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 201 504-454-2165 Kathleen T. Sullivan Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Clearview Women’s Services 4500 Clearview Pkwy, Ste 101 504-885-8563 New Orleans Pui (Joan) Cheng Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 320 504-897-7142 Louis Paul DuTreil Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 130 504-897-7580 Jacob M. Estes Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Gynecologic Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4165 Stephen Fortunato Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2700 Napoleon Ave, 4th Fl 504-842-4151 Veronica C. Gillispie Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clara St, Ste 500 504-842-9617

Richard Carl Kline Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Gynecologic Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4165 Sherri Anne Longo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2700 Napoleon Ave, 4th Fl 504-842-4151 Robert T. Maupin, Jr. Touro Infirmary Maternal Fetal Medicine Clinic Buckman Bldg, Ste 105 3434 Prytania St 504-897-8213 Joseph Matthew Miller, Jr. Touro Infirmary Maternal Fetal Medicine Clinic Buckman Bldg, Ste 105 3434 Prytania St 504-897-8213 George Morris IV Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clara St, Ste 640 504-842-9616 George Brazil Morris III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clare St, Ste 400 504-842-4155 Rebecca Perret Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 130 504-897-7580 Florencia G. Polite LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Alfred Godfrey Robichaux III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2700 Napolean Ave, 4th Fl 504-842-4151 Stacey Scheib LSU Healthcare Network Saint Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3700 St. Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520


William F. von Almen II Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 320 504-897-7142 Donna S. Waters Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 320 504-897-7142 Felton L. Winfield, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Ophthalmology Metairie Ronald Andrew Landry Eyecare Associates 4324 Veterans Blvd, Ste 102 504-455-9825 New Orleans Maria Bernal LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Ophthalmology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 Delmar R. Caldwell Tulane Medical Center Tulane Ophthalmology Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-5831 Jonathan Nussdorf Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Ophthalmology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 10th Fl 504-842-3995 Jayne S. Weiss LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Ophthalmology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 Orthopaedic Surgery Covington Kevin Darr Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117 Mark J. Hontas St. Tammany Parish Hospital Bone and Joint Clinic 71211 Hwy 21, Ste A 985-893-9922 H. Reiss Plauche Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117 Jason L. Rolling Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117

Harahan Deryk Jones Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1201 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, Ste 104 504-736-4800 Scott C. Montgomery Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, Ste 104 504-736-4800 Misty Suri Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, Ste 104 504-736-4800 Kenner Vinod Dasa LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 671 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 100 504-412-1700 Michael W. Hartman LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 671 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 100 504-412-1700 Marrero Matthew R. Grimm Jefferson Orthopedic Clinic 920 Ave B 504-349-6804 Mark Juneau, Jr. Jefferson Orthopedic Clinic 920 Ave B 504-349-6804

Donald C. Faust 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 600 504-899-1000 Paul Gladden Tulane Medical Center Tulane Orthopaedic Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-2177 Andrew G. King Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Peter C. Krause University Medical Center New Orleans Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 James F. Mautner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Mark S. Meyer Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Chad Millet Southern Orthopaedic Specialists 2731 Napoleon Ave 504-897-6351 Michael J. O’Brien Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476

Metairie David W. Aiken 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 650 504-456-5152

J. Lockwood Ochsner, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970

John B. Cazale IV Crescent City Orthopedics 3600 Houma Blvd 504-309-6500

Felix H. Savoie III Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476

Luis M. Espinoza Orthopedic Center for Sports Medicine 4921 Airline Dr 504-889-2663

Robert Treuting Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970

New Orleans George Chimento Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970

Robert D. Zura University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

Slidell James C. Butler Elite Orthopaedic Specialists 1150 Robert Blvd, Ste 240 985-646-3662 Thibodaux Neil James Maki Thibodaux Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Clinic 525 Saint Marys St 985-446-6284 Otolaryngology Covington R. Graham Boyce Associated Surgical Specialists 350 Lakeview Ct, Ste C 985-845-2677 Marrero Moises A. Arriaga CNC Hearing & Balance Center 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S630 504-934-8320 Metairie Bryce J. Leblanc 3901 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-454-1080 Newland Knight Worley 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 640 504-456-5120 New Orleans Ronald G. Amedee Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080

Timothy Blake Molony Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Brian A. Moore Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Plastic Surgery 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642 Elisabeth Rareshide 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 820 504-895-7707 Thibodaux James Vance Broussard Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Paul Thomas Gaudet Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Justin M. Tenney Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079

Paul L. Friedlander Tulane Medical Center ENT Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5451

Guy Paul Zeringue III Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079

H. Devon Graham III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080

Pathology Marrero James E. Brown West Jefferson Medical Center Department of Pathology 1101 Medical Center Blvd 504-347-5511

Christian Hasney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Edward D. McCoul Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080

New Orleans Edwin Norquist Beckman Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-3330 Edgar Shannon Cooper Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3510

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Randall Douglas Craver Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Pathology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 2nd Fl 504-896-9873

Daniel P. Corsino Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Thomas Young Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-5200

Philip J. Daroca, Jr. Tulane University School of Medicine Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1430 Tulane Ave 504-988-5224

Stanley Martin Hall Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456

Pediatric Cardiovascular Anesthesia New Orleans Jimmie E. Colon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Pamela Canale Martin Touro Infirmary Division of Dermatopathology 1401 Foucher St, 2nd Fl 504-897-8418 Elise Occhipinti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3510 Francis Rodwig Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3510 Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Metairie Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans Kenneth Paris Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 Ricardo U. Sorensen Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 Pediatric Anesthesiology New Orleans Brandon Black Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 Jimmie E. Colon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

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John Frederick Heaton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 George P. Koclanes Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 Sheryl Lynn Sawatsky Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 Louis G. Shenk III Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 Pediatric Cardiac Surgery New Orleans Joseph Caspi LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Surgery 1542 Tulane Ave 504-568-4751 Pediatric Cardiology New Orleans Michael Brumund Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3309 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9751 Kelly Gajewski Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3309 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9751 Victor William Lucas, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Ernest S. Siwik Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3308 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9751

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Pediatric Critical Care Metairie Olugbenga Akingbola Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Section of Pediatric Critical Care 4700 S I-10 Service Rd W 504-780-4401 Edwin Michael Frieberg Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Section of Pediatric Critical Care 4700 S 1-10 Service Rd W 504-780-8282 Robert Lee Hopkins Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 New Orleans Bonnie Desselle Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9230 Pediatric Dermatology Metairie Jeffrey C. Poole Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225 Pediatric Endocrinology Metairie Mary A. Younger Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Endocrinology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans Stuart A. Chalew Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Endocrinology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Ricardo Gomez Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Endocrinology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3020 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

Pediatric Gastroenterology Marrero Ilana S. Fortgang Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401

Russell Barrett Van Dyke Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253

Pediatric General Hepatology Marrero Ilana S. Fortgang Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401

New Orleans Lorna Seybolt CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273

Pediatric HematologyOncology New Orleans Renee V. Gardner Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 Craig Lotterman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Hematology and Oncology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 Tammuella E. Singleton Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 Maria C. Velez-Yanguas Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 Raymond G. Watts Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 Pediatric Infectious Disease Metairie Thomas Alchediak Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 Margarita Silio Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253

Russell Wesley Steele Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 Pediatric Medical Genetics New Orleans Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101 Pediatric Nephrology Metairie Samir S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Nephrology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 New Orleans Diego H. Aviles Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Nephrology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9238 Pediatric Obesity Metairie Mary A. Younger Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Endocrinology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 Pediatric Ophthalmology New Orleans George S. Ellis, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Ophthalmology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3104 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9426 Horatio Sprague Eustis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Ophthalmology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 10th Fl 504-842-3995


Robert Allen Gordon Tulane Medical Center Tulane Ophthalmology Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-5831 Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery Metairie Stephen Douglas Heinrich Tulane Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 301 504-988-8010 New Orleans William K. Accousti Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Joseph A. Gonzales, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Andrew G. King Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Sean Waldron Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center For Children Section of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery 1315 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3970 Pediatric Otolaryngology New Orleans Adele K. Evans Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Otolaryngology Ambulatory Care Center, 1st Fl 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 John Lindhe Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Kimsey Rodriguez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Pediatric Pathology New Orleans Randall Douglas Craver Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Pathology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 2nd Fl 504-896-9873

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Pediatric Pulmonology Metairie Scott H. Davis Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 Robert Lee Hopkins Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 Michael Philip Kiernan Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans Kristin N. Van Hook Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 Pediatric Radiation Oncology New Orleans Troy Gene Scroggins, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3440 Ellen (Elly) Zakris Touro Infirmary Department of Radiation Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8387 Pediatric Radiology New Orleans Jane D. Congeni Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Radiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9565 Arthur J. Kenney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Pediatric Rheumatology Metairie Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253

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New Orleans Abraham Gedalia Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Rheumatology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3030 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9385 Pediatric Specialist/Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine Metairie Sue Ellen Abdalian Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 Pediatric Specialist/Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Covington Daphne Ann Glindmeyer 601 River Highlands Blvd, Ste 100 504-392-8348 Madisonville Gordon Lane Blundell, Jr. 179 Hwy 22 E, Ste 100 985-845-8101 Metairie Stacy Drury Tulane Pediatric Behavioral Health Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 309 504-988-4794 Mary Margaret Gleason Tulane Pediatric Behavioral Health Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 309 504-988-4794 New Orleans Milton Webster Anderson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Ted Bloch III 3525 Prytania St, Ste 211 504-897-7939 Charles Calvin Coleman Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Calhoun Behavioral Center 935 Calhoun St 504-896-7790 Robert A. Dahmes 4480 General DeGaulle Dr, Ste 107 504-393-6355 Martin J. Drell LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 2025 Gravier St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 Jessica Hof 1426 Amelia St 504-810-7590

Lakisha Y. Mamon LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Psychiatry 1542 Tulane Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-5800 Richard Howard Morse 4417 Danneel St 504-891-2354 Paul G. Pelts 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 300 504-581-3933 Jason Murphy Wuttke 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 300 504-581-3933 Charles Henry Zeanah, Jr. Tulane Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology Services 131 S Robertson St 504-988-5402 Pediatric Specialist/ Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Houma Bedford Nieves-Cruz Terrebonne General Medical Center Division of Neonatology 8166 Main St 985-858-7300 Metairie Jay Paul Goldsmith Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Section of Neonatology 4700 S I-10 Service Rd W 504-988-5315 New Orleans Brian Barkemeyer Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Minnie Marlene Buis Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Staci Marie Olister Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Dana L. Rivera Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Pediatric Specialist/ Neurology, Epilepsy New Orleans Shannon McGuire Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Neurology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900

Pediatric Specialist/ Neurology, General Metairie Stephen L. Nelson Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Neurology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 New Orleans Stephen Russell Deputy Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Jessica R. Gautreaux Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Shannon McGuire Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Neurology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3340 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458 Maria Weimer Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Joaquin Wong Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Movement Disorders New Orleans Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3340 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458 Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Muscular Dystrophy New Orleans Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3340 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458


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Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Neuromuscular Disease New Orleans Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3340 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458

Bernard Ferrer Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440

Pediatric Specialist/Pediatric Metabolic Diseases New Orleans Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101

Carlos Alberto Trujillo Jefferson Pediatric Clinic 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N813 504-349-6813

Pediatric Surgery New Orleans Vincent Robert Adolph Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pediatric Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3907 Rodney B. Steiner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pediatric Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 6th Fl 504-842-3907 Pediatric Urology New Orleans Frank Raymond Cerniglia, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pediatric Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083 Joseph Ortenberg Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Urology Ambulatory Care Center 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9233

Houma Kimberley J. Barner Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440 Richard Louis Brooke Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Pediatric Clinic 1990 Industrial Blvd 985-873-1730 Robert W. Clarke, Jr. Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440

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Metairie Thomas Alchediak Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 John S. Barbara Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374 Cary A. Culbertson Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374 Hosea Joseph Doucet III Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 David Anderson Estes, Jr. Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880 Patrice B. Evers Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 Amy Glick Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133

Pediatrics/General Covington Kathryn Quarls Fairway Pediatrics 7020 N Hwy 190, Ste C 985-871-7337

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Marrero Marc A. Fisher 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N313 504-361-0234

Patricia Granier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133 Michael G. Heller, Jr. Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880 Amanda Brown Jackson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133

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Mark Vincent Morici Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374 Jeanne Rademacher Carousel Pediatrics 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 240 504-885-4141 Sam Jude Solis Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880 Stephen M. Weimer Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 Mary A. Younger Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Endocrinology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 Scott Rory Zander Lakeside Children’s Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, 2nd Fl 504-883-3703 New Orleans Daniel Richard Bronfin Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Samira Brown Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Terry L. Cummings Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Sections of General Academic Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-5263

Charles Maurice Kantrow III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Betty P. Lo-Blais LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 Elizabeth Swanson Milvid Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744 M. Nora Oates Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744 Jennifer M. Parkerson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Renee F. Reymond Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Harahan Sindhu Pandit Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Ste 200 504-842-3998 Metairie Joseph J. Biundo, Jr. 4315 Houma Blvd, Ste 303 504-889-5242

Theresa Lynn Dise Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Section of General Academic Pediatrics 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000

New Orleans Stephen Kishner University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

Kathleen Gorman Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744

Gregory W. Stewart Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476

Stephen Wilson Hales Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744

Plastic Surgery Covington R. Graham Boyce Associated Surgical Specialists 350 Lakeview Ct, Ste C 985-845-2677

Metairie Eileen S. Black 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 100 504-883-8900 Elliott B. Black III 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 100 504-883-8900 David Albert Jansen 3900 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 200 504-455-1000 New Orleans Robert Johnson Allen The Center for Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction 4429 Clara St, Ste 330 888-890-3437 Frank J. DellaCroce Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 H. Devon Graham III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Michael H. Moses 1603 2nd St 504-895-7200 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Plastic Surgery 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642 Hugo St. Hilaire LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 3rd Fl 504-412-1240 Scott K. Sullivan, Jr. Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Chris Trahan Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Psychiatry Covington Daphne Ann Glindmeyer 601 River Highlands Blvd, Ste 100 504-392-8348 Harminder Singh Mallik Tulane Medical Center Section of Forensic Psychiatry 100 Innwood Dr, Ste A 504-592-9500


Gretna Charles Kelso Billings, Jr. 720 Lafayette St 504-366-9707 Hammond Schoener Michele LaPrairie Florida Parishes Human Services Authority 835 Pride Dr, Ste B 985-543-4333 Mandeville John Robert Macgregor, Jr. 1502 W Causeway Approach, Ste D 985-626-3400 Metairie Charles Chester Center for Individual and Family Counseling 3500 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 1410 504-838-9919 P. Michael Mahony Center for Individual and Family Counseling 3500 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 1410 504-838-9919 A. Kenison Roy III Addiction Recovery Resources 4933 Wabash St 504-780-2766 New Orleans Dean Edward Robinson Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Mental Health Service 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

George Cecil Daul, Jr. Professional Psychotherapy Network 1529 River Oaks Rd W, Ste 123 504-729-4414

John Walter Thompson, Jr. Tulane University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 1440 Canal St, Ste 1000 504-988-0847

David Galarneau Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Kendall Genre 8438 Oak St, Ste B 504-322-3936 Dean Anthony Hickman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Janet Elaine Johnson Tulane Medical Center Section of Adult Psychiatry Tidewater Bldg, 10th Fl 1440 Canal St 504-988-2201 Donna M. Mancuso 1301 Antonine St, Ste 500 504-208-1035 Christopher D. Meyers 3525 Prytania St, Ste 518 504-895-5533

Andrew E. Morson Integrated Behavioral Health 400 Poydras St, Ste 1950 504-322-3837

J. Robert Barnes 1301 Amelia St, Ste A 504-891-7000

Nicholas G. Pejic Atlas Psychiatry 1301 Antonine St 504-899-1682

John William Bick III 3705 Coliseum St 504-891-0094 Ted Bloch III 3525 Prytania St, Ste 211 504-897-7939

Jose Manuel Pena Tulane Medical Center Tulane Behavioral Health Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-4794

Stephen R. Cochran 1426 Amelia St 504-891-6020 Charles Calvin Coleman Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Calhoun Behavioral Center 935 Calhoun St 504-896-7790 Erich J. Conrad LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 2025 Gravier St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580

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Janet Seligson-Dowie 1301 Antonine St, Ste 500 504-507-8201

Richard Howard Morse 4417 Danneel St 504-891-2354

James G. Barbee 3439 Magazine St 504-891-8808

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Robert A. Dahmes 4480 General DeGaulle Dr, Ste 107 504-393-6355

Arwen Podesta Podesta Wellness 4322 Canal St 504-252-0026 Charles Theodore Reveley 3525 Prytania St, Ste 514 504-388-6605 Alvin Martin Rouchell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025

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Mark Harold Townsend LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 2025 Gravier St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 Thibodaux Maria Cruse Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 201 985-493-9304 Pulmonary Medicine Kenner Carol M. Mason LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705 Judd Ernest Shellito LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705 Metairie Thomas Gerard Nuttli East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 Kenneth B. Smith East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 New Orleans Juzar Ali LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 Clifford Braddock Burns Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Bennett Paul DeBoisblanc University Medical Center New Orleans Comprehensive Pulmonary Hypertension Center 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Susan H. Gunn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Surma Jain Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Stephen Phillips Kantrow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Ross C. Klingsberg Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600 Joseph Alexander Lasky Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600 Jaime Palomino Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Section of Pulmonary Disease 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

David E. Taylor Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Slidell Matthew L. Schuette SMH Physicians Network Pulmonology 1051 Gause Blvd, Ste 290 985-280-7456 Radiation Oncology Metairie Paul David Monsour East Jefferson Radiation Oncology 4204 Houma Blvd, Ste 100 504-454-1727 New Orleans Troy Gene Scroggins, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3440 Ellen (Elly) Zakris Touro Infirmary Department of Radiation Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8387 Radiology Covington Joseph Daniel Hajjar Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Evangelos A. Liokis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828

Nereida Alicia Parada Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600

Robert Restrepo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828

Leonardo Seoane Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonology, Lung Transplant and Critical Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4400

New Orleans Edward Bluth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470

Charles Clarence Smith III Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500

James Gary Caridi Tulane Medical Center Department of Radiology 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-7627


Daniel A. Devun Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470

Surgery Covington Michael J. Thomas Surgical Specialists of Louisiana 7015 Hwy 190 E Service Rd, Ste 200 985-234-3000

John Patrick Hunt III University Medical Center New Orleans Section of Trauma Surgery 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

Dennis Kay Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470

Kenner J. Philip Boudreaux LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500

Mary T. Killackey Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344

Charles Claiborne Matthews Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 James Milburn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Dana Hampton Smetherman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Richard Tupler Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Rheumatology Metairie Joseph J. Biundo, Jr. 4315 Houma Blvd, Ste 303 504-889-5242 New Orleans William Eugene Davis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920 Luis R. Espinoza LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Rheumatology 2025 Gravier St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517 Madelaine T. Feldman The Rheumatology Group 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 530 504-899-1120 Robert James Quinet Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920

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Metairie Kelvin Contreary 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 310 504-454-6338 Joseph Frank Uddo, Jr. 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 450 504-454-4441 New Orleans Humberto Bohorquez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 John S. Bolton Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Surgical Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070 David Bruce Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Ian Carmody Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Ari J. Cohen Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Christian Hasney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080

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George E. Loss, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Plastic Surgery 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642 William S. Richardson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070

George Michael Fuhrman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070

Eric Laborde Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083

Alan Jerry Stolier Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800

Melissa M. Montgomery Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083

Thoracic Surgery Covington Charles J. DiCorte Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center Covington Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 New Orleans P. Eugene Parrino Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070

Alan Jerry Stolier Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800

Thibodaux Tommy L. Fudge Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Heart and Vascular Center 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 409 985-449-4670

Michael C. Townsend Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070

Urology Houma Robert M. Alexander Houma Surgi-Center & Urology Clinic 1020 School St 985-868-7091

Surgical Oncology Kenner J. Philip Boudreaux LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500

Metairie Stephen M. Lacour LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600

Eugene A. Woltering LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500 New Orleans John S. Bolton Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Surgical Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070

Jack Christian Winters LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 New Orleans Harold Anthony Fuselier, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Wayne John G. Hellstrom Tulane Medical Center Tulane Urology and Fertility Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5271

Raju Thomas Tulane Medical Center Tulane Urology and Fertility Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5271 Richard M. Vanlangendonck Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 450 504-897-7196 Thibodaux Paul Truett Ray, Jr. Thibodaux Urological Specialists 504 N Acadia Rd 985-447-5667 Chester Frank Weimer Thibodaux Urological Specialists 504 N Acadia Rd 985-447-5667 Vascular Surgery Marrero Robert Craig Batson LSU Healthcare Network Westbank Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Vascular Surgery 4500 10th St, Ste B 504-412-1960 Malachi G. Sheahan LSU Healthcare Network Westbank Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Vascular Surgery 4500 10th St, Ste B 504-412-1960 New Orleans Larry Harold Hollier LSU Health Sciences Center Section of Vascular Surgery 433 Bolivar St, Ste 815 504-568-4800 W. Charles Sternbergh III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070


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to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and proprietary balloting software, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® List, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information. Best Doctors’ innovative services include access to an unrivaled database of physicians who have been selected as the best in their field by other leading physicians, analytics and technology. With every service offered, the goal remains the same: to help people in need get the right diagnosis and treatment, significantly improving health outcomes while reducing costs.•

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2018 MEDICAL PROFILES INDEX Allergy and Asthma

Lisa D’Onofrio, MD

Harold Stokes, MD

Irum Alisha Qureshi, MD

Chi Dola, MD, MPH

Michael Zeringue, MD

B. Steele Rolston, MD

Cecilia Gambala, MD

Pain Management

Alan Sheen, MD

Gabriella Pridjian, MD, MBA

Firas Hijazi, MD

Andrea Murina, MD Audiology

Brittany Oswald Stumpf, MD

Plastic Surgery, Eyelid

Daniel Bode, AuD, FAAA

Laura Williams, MD

Kyle V. Acosta, MD

Orthopedics

Plastic Surgery, General

Dentistry

Nicole O. Bourgeois, PA-C

Dr. John P. Guste, MD

Jason Alvarez, DDS

John Burvant, MD

Dr. David Jansen, MD

Bridget Brahney, DDS

John Carradine, MD

Mohammad Suleman, MD

Damon DiMarco, DDS

Brandon Donnelly, MD

Dr. Ravi Tandon, MD

Joanne Hoppe, DDS

Luis M. Espinoza, MD

Margaret Patterson, DDS

Joseph Finstein, MD

Psychiatry

Troy Patterson, DDS

Charles Haddad, MD

Arwen Podesta, MD

Troy Patterson, Jr., DDS

Thomas R. Lyons, MD

Lisa Wyatt, DDS

Neil J. Maki, MD

Alaina W. Johnson, AuD, FAAA

Keith Melancon, MD Dermatology

Chadwick P. Murphy, MD

Zeena Al-Dujaili, MD

Charles P. Murphy, MD

Erin E. Boh, MD, PhD, FAAD

William F. Sherman, MD

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Hospital Buzz

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rea hospitals are always trying to find new ways to better serve patients, and whether that means growing literally or virtually, their creative additions usually mean more access to care. From dedicated cancer centers to video consults with physicians, affiliations with larger entities, and special screenings or clinical trials, there are a number of ways these institutions improve and grow their reach. Keeping an eye on hospital news will help you find programs, physicians, research, and screenings related to the disease or injury that ails you or your loved one, and the Greater New Orleans region has a lot to offer with a variety of specialized hospitals in addition to the familiar, household names who’ve served patients for generations. Among the beeping computers, overhead pages, rolling carts, and clipboard scribbling are well-oiled machines with teams of healthcare providers making sure you’ve got access to the care you need. Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, located in Lafourche Parish, recently announced plans to construct a new state-of104

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the-art cancer facility. The new cancer facility will accommodate the growth the Center is experiencing, and will position Thibodaux Regional for the future of care, treatment, and support for those affected by cancer. According to Greg Stock, Thibodaux Regional CEO, “The new Cancer Institute will provide the springboard for continued growth and development of cancer services—into the future. That future aligns with our vision and includes important innovations such as integrating wellness into the clinical aspects of cancer care.” The $35 million, five-story building will provide nearly 100,000 square feet, allowing for growth of the hospital’s cancer program, and will include Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy/Infusion Area, Medical Oncology Clinic, Education Center, Wellness Services, Activity Center, Library, Diagnostics Center, Conference Center, Laboratory, Pharmacy, and a Chapel. Construction is expected to begin December 2018. For more information on Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, visit Thibodaux.com.


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Injury and illness don’t often strike during the convenience of business hours. When a child is hurt or sick, but doesn’t need emergency room care, families don’t want to wait for the next business day or available appointment to try and resolve their concern. To assist in these situations, Children’s Hospital launched Virtual After Hours, a phoneand tablet-based app that allows parents to speak with a provider during off hours, such as in the evenings or on weekends. The Hospital’s provider will contact you over live video to discuss your child’s minor issues and conditions or let you know whether you should seek emergency care. This allows parents to have peace of mind when issues arise at inconvenient hours. To download the app, visit chnola.org/telemedicine-clinic. To reach Children’s Hospital’s After Hours walk-in clinics in Metairie and River Ridge, visit chnola.org/Pediatrics/ AfterHours. For more information on Children’s Hospital, visit chnola.org. Touro hosts free PSA screening during prostate cancer awareness month. Each year, more than 200,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States. One in six men will develop the disease sometime in his lifetime. September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and Touro is hosting a free PSA screening event for men age over the age of 40. One of the best screening tools available for detecting prostate cancer is the prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test. For men 40 and older, the blood test can provide them with a baseline PSA value that they can then track from year to year. It can also help health care professionals identify potential risk and determine if patients need to be followed more closely from year to year. The screening will take place on Thursday, September 13, at Touro Infirmary from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. To learn more or register for the screening visit  touro.com/events or call 504-897-8500. Crescent City Surgical Centre (CCSC) is America’s premier physician-owned surgical hospital. Owned and operated by a combination of 32 elite local practicing physicians and Louisiana Children’s Medical Center, CCSC offers eight operating rooms and two procedure rooms. Using cutting-edge DaVinci robotic laparoscopic technology, CCSC offers patients minimally invasive surgery resulting in less pain and faster recovery time. Twenty VIP private rooms are available, and CCSC can make accommodations for those whose loved ones wish to stay overnight. Catered restaurant-style meals are served and designed to meet patients’ personal dietary needs. They offer expedited wait times on appointments in a relaxing and comfortable environment. CCSC features surgical specialists in the fields of Bariatric, Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, ENT, Colo-Rectal, General Surgery, Gynecological Procedures, Urology, Interventional Radiology, Pain Management, Plastic, Reconstructive and Advanced Cosmetic Surgery. For more information about Crescent City Surgical Centre, please call 504- 830-2500, or visit ccsurg.com. West Jefferson Medical Center (WJMC) is the only hospital in the Greater New Orleans area to be named to the Top

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5% in the nation for Patient Safety Excellence by Healthgrades and one of only three hospitals in the state of Louisiana to achieve the Patient Safety Excellence Award for three consecutive years. In addition, WJMC was named to the Top 10% in the nation for Stroke Care by Healthgrades. WJMC would like to thank its physicians, nurses, and staff who work diligently every day to ensure the hospital provides a safe environment and the best care possible to their patients and community. WJMC is a proud member of LCMC Health, a Louisianabased, not-for-profit hospital system serving the healthcare needs of the Gulf Coast region. LCMC Health currently manages award-winning community hospitals including Children’s Hospital, Touro, New Orleans East Hospital, University Medical Center New Orleans, and West Jefferson Medical Center. To learn more about WJMC’s services, visit WJMC.org. The Tulane doctor’s vision, “Healing people, defining medicine,” is supported by its mission to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research, and clinical care. Diverse and inclusive, Tulane educates medical students, scientists, health care professionals and the public, conducts biomedical research, and provides patient-centered medicine to prevent, diagnose, and treat human illness. Your family deserves the best, and you can feel confident that the doctors at Tulane are working to deliver the best quality healthcare to you and those you love. Whether you’re looking for life-saving treatment or just a primary care physician, choose the doctors at Tulane and be a part of the institution’s long legacy of expert care. Find your Tulane doctor by calling 504-988-5800, or visit TulaneDoctors.com. Tulane—healing people, defining medicine. As Louisiana’s only MD Anderson affiliated hospital, East Jefferson General Hospital (EJGH) has access to the latest treatment protocols/plans used by the cancer center voted #1 by US News and World Report. But beyond that affiliation, EJGH’s outcomes and commitment to personalized care separate it from any other cancer center in the region. State-of-the-art technologies allow the hospital to treat prostate, head and neck, breast, and other cancers in ways that are more successful and patient friendly than ever before. EJGH’s Cancer Care Navigators give patients someone to turn to in setting appointments, understanding treatments/medicines, and helping the patient concentrate on only one thing: getting better. Most of all, the hospital’s oncology division is comprised of physicians, nurses, and ancillary staff who choose to work in the unique and ever-changing field of fighting cancer. These individuals thrive on helping people through their toughest challenge and seeing them beyond treatment to being cancer free. That commitment from EJGH’s team to each patient is the reason the hospital was voted the #1 hospital in Louisiana for Medical Outcomes. Find out more about EJGH offerings at EJGH.org. •


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Specialty Medicine

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he body is a mesmerizing, intricate machine with complex parts that can break or break down for any number of reasons. Television shows like “House” fascinate us because they show just how unusual certain diagnoses can be or how sensitively the body react to unexpected factors. To many doctors, the body and its behaviors present a puzzle to solve and a solution to explore while also serving as a life to save or a quality of life to be improved. Many doctors choose to specialize and learn as much about a particular area of medicine as possible so that when a specific concern arises, they can confidently apply a specific treatment in response. Whether you’re looking to improve the firmness of your skin or the range of motion of your back, you can find a physician who is an expert on the topic. Whether you’ve come home sick from a foreign country or developed cataracts or even cavities, you can find providers who know what questions to ask and what options are available. Aesthetics & Plastic Surgery Stephen E. Metzinger, MD, MSPH, FACS, welcomes patients to Aesthetic Surgical Associates, his cosmetic plastic surgery practice serving the Greater New Orleans area. Dr. Metzinger’s team puts your safety and well being before anything else. Understanding that pursuing cosmetic plastic surgery is an extremely personal and often emotional choice, Aesthetic Sur108

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gical works to provide an inviting, spa-like atmosphere where you feel welcome and relaxed. Dr. Metzinger has over three decades of plastic surgery experience and is the only triple board-certified plastic surgeon in all of Louisiana. Dr. Metzinger and his staff use some of the most advanced surgical techniques to provide outstanding natural results while minimizing scarring and recovery time. Whether you want to improve the look of your face, nose, breasts, or body, Dr. Metzinger can create a customized surgical or non-surgical plan to help improve your appearance and self-confidence. To learn more about Dr. Metzinger and Aesthetic Surgical Associates, or to schedule a consultation, contact the office at 504-309-7061 or visit AestheticSurgical.com. Eyes are the most expressive feature of the face, and for those looking to enhance the appearance of their eyes, Dr. Kyle V. Acosta of the Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center offers numerous highly specialized procedures for recreating youth and beauty. An award-winning, highly trained, and experienced physician, Dr. Acosta is board-certified in Ophthalmology and fellowship trained in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center has a state-of-the-art, onsite, private surgical facility with experienced anesthesia care


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provided for your comfort. The highly qualified staff will make your surgical experience pleasant and effortless from the initial consultation to discharge from the surgical suite. In addition to cosmetic procedures for the eyes, Dr. Acosta also treats age-related changes to the eyelids, congenital abnormalities, and the repair of unsuccessful cosmetic eyelid procedures. For more information, call 985-898-2001. Does your appearance reflect your inner energy? If it doesn’t, consider a consultation with board certified plastic surgeons Dr. Elliott Black or Dr. Summer Black. There are a variety of surgical and non-surgical techniques available to help individuals enhance and refresh their appearance. “Surgery is not the only option these days,” Dr. Elliott Black emphasizes. “Laser technology and other developments in the cosmetic field such as Botox and fillers offer alternatives to surgery with excellent results,” Dr. Summer Black adds. “The patient benefits with little downtime and minimal or no swelling or bruising. Many non-invasive procedures also provide immediate results,” she says. With a new office, the father and daughter team have expanded their facilities to house a full range of laser equipment, including SculpSure non-invasive fat melting, IPL, laser hair removal, fractionated erbium, and fractionated CO2. For information on available surgical or non-invasive cosmetic procedures, contact Dr. Elliott Black or Dr. Summer Black at 504-883-8900, or visit their office at 3798 Veterans Memorial Blvd. in Metairie.

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Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center specializes in cosmetic dermatologic procedures that include facial injectables, laser treatments, body contouring, and cellulite reduction. Co-owned by board-certified dermatologists Dr. Lisa Donofrio and Dr. Kyle Coleman, Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center is equipped to provide patients with anything from subtle changes to dramatic results. In addition to rejuvenation with Botox, Fillers and Lasers, Etre also specializes in non-and minimally-invasive body contouring procedures like Coolsculpting, Laser Liposuction and Cellulaze. “Because we offer both non-invasive and minimallyinvasive surgical body contouring procedures, we are able to tailor treatment to each patient’s specific problems,” says Dr. Coleman. “When it comes to cosmetic procedures, there is no one-size-fits-all,” says Dr. Donofrio. Drs. Coleman and Donofrio use cutting-edge therapies along with combination treatments to optimize their patient results. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit EtreCosmeticDerm.com or call 504-227-3873. Chronos Body Health and Wellness is a wellness center for the whole you. Chronos offers a comprehensive venue that combines fitness, nutrition, and beauty resources all under one roof, from the first-class, 24-hour fitness center with live and virtual classes and personal trainers to physician supervised weight-loss programs, day-spa, and medical-spa services. From coolsculpting to laser treatments, dermal fillers to hydrafacials, massages and nail services, the center has you covered and eliminates the need to drive to multiple providers.


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Dr. Mace Scott has 15 years of experience in medicine and is certified in aesthetics. He performs procedures in the clinic and oversees the team of medical aestheticians. The goal of Chronos Body Health and Wellness is to help people become their best through personalized treatment that focuses on the individual. Every relationship between a provider and an individual is therefore unique to each person’s needs. For more information call 504-267-4549.

and expand the remarkable experiences and services for the patients, often meeting and exceeding their expectations. For a complimentary consultation, please call today to begin your journey to better hearing, or visit  AssociatedHearingInc.com for more information. Associated Hearing treats patients at its Metairie (504-833-4327) and Covington (985-249-5225) locations as well as at assisted living and nursing care facilities on both sides of the lake.

Microfat use in aesthetic surgery is fast becoming one of the best methods for skin rejuvenation and is available at Jansen Plastic Surgery, the practice of Drs. David Jansen, Ravi Tandon, and John Guste. The rejuvenate cell in the microfat contains millions of growth factors and other key components that, when placed directly in the affected skin area, cause restoration of the skin and surrounding tissues. The skin is able to produce more and better collagen and elastin, two key components of healthy, youthful appearing skin. This is the same science and physiology behind the use of microfat injections to promote an arthritic joint surface to repair itself when used in orthopedic surgeries. A minimal amount of fat is harvested under local anesthesia, and the microfat cells are prepared and isolated. These cells are then placed in the areas needing rejuvenation. The results appear within two months as the skin has a new luster and less wrinkly appearance. While the longevity of these rejuvenative cells is unknown, recent European studies have shown long-lasting effects. For more information and to discuss your options, contact Jansen Plastic Surgery at 504-455-1000.

Bariatric Surgery Is obesity keeping you from enjoying life to the fullest? Are you suffering from high blood pressure, diabetes, or sleep apnea? Are you tired of seesaw diets that aren’t working? Obesity affects over 60% of adults in Louisiana and is a leading cause of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, joint destruction, and other life-threatening conditions. At West Jefferson Medical Center and the Surgical Clinic of Louisiana, Dr. David Treen and Dr. Peter Lundberg have treatment options that can rescue you from obesity and greatly reduce your risk of these potentially deadly diseases. Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy is the safest surgical weight loss procedure and requires only a one-day stay in the hospital in most cases. Change your life for the better, and live again. Call their office today at 504-349-6860 or visit SCLAWeightLoss.com to make an appointment or to reserve a seat at one of their free weight loss surgery seminars.

Allergy & Immunology Alan Sheen, MD, is a well-known and highly respected allergist serving both the Northshore and Southshore regions of the New Orleans metropolitan area. A graduate of LSU’s School of Medicine in New Orleans and a known specialist in allergies and asthma, Dr. Sheen has been recognized several times as one of the city’s Top Doctors by New Orleans Magazine. With a focus on immunology and allergies, Dr. Sheen’s long-standing medical practice treats patients of all ages. He has a strong interest in the management of childhood and infant allergies, especially food allergies and problems with formula. Dr. Sheen also treats conditions such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, hives and related allergic conditions. He has two convenient locations to greater serve area patients. For Dr. Sheen’s Metairie office, located at 3701 Houma Blvd., call 504-456-1999. Dr. Sheen’s Covington office, located at 208 Highland Park Plaza may be reached by calling 985-246-6077. Find out additional information on Dr. Sheen and his practice at DrAlanSheenAllergist.com. Audiology For more than 40 years, the Doctors of Audiology at  Associated Hearing have been impacting patients’ lives by reconnecting those with hearing loss and tinnitus to their loved ones. Drs. Daniel Bode and Alaina Johnson use state-ofthe-art diagnostic equipment to create customized treatment plans based upon the patient’s individual lifestyles and listening environments. Employing the latest hearing aid technology from leading manufacturers, Associated Hearing’s experts create a listening experience second to none for a more natural blend of sound. Doctors at Associated Hearing continue to improve 112

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Behavioral Health & Addiction Resources With early positions as both a massage therapist and biochemist, Arwen Podesta MD, psychiatrist, addiction specialist, and holistic medicine doctor, has merged her interests in mind-body wellness and biology by opening Podesta Wellness. Operating in Mid-City, she collaborates closely with an extraordinary team of providers, all experts at whole health. Jennifer Creedon, MD, is an adult, child and adolescent psychiatrist specializing in addiction, trauma, and life transition. Tricia Brown, LPC-S, is trained in EMDR and CBT and specializes in addiction, depression, and trauma. Jeffrey Dupuis, LCSW, has extensive training in addiction treatment and intervention and also treats co-occurring issues. EnricaAnne Montalbano, a licensed massage therapist, specializes in Ortho-Bionomy, sports massage, craniosacral, and healing touch. She works well with clients with anxiety, depression, trauma, injuries, and lymphedema. Nutritionist and Functional medicine specialist, Jan Johnson, RD, LDN, CLT, helps people achieve whole health by addressing the underlying disease etiology through nutrition and habits. To inquire about an appointment, please visit  PodestaWellness.com. Cardiovascular Care Your solution for varicose veins and venous disease is now located on both the Southshore and Northshore. At La Bella Vita Laser and Vein Center, Dr. Randall S. Juleff works to resolve venous insufficiency problems with a non-invasive laser therapy called Endovenous Laser Ablation. Performed in a comfortable office setting under oral or IV sedation, the procedure requires no down time and, due to its medical nature, is covered by numerous insurance plans. According to Dr. Juleff, varicose veins are much more than an aesthetics issue—they are signs of venous disease, which can jeopardize one’s health. Venous insufficiency is a chronic and often hereditary condition that affects 80 million Ameri-


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cans. When left untreated, it can cause leg swelling, chronic pain and cramps, restless leg syndrome, varicose veins, and even skin damage. Dr. Juleff is triple-board-certified in Phlebology, General Surgery, and Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery. For information, a consultation, or Center locations, call 504-836-6000 (Metairie) or 985-892-2950 (Covington) or visit LaBellaVitaVein.com. Dentistry All that is good begins with a smile. At Dr. Bridget  Brahney Family Dentistry, your smile is a top priority. Dr. Brahney and her team are dedicated to helping you achieve and maintain long-term dental health and a beautiful smile, whether it be through routine cleanings and checkups or through finding a solution to a more complex dental concern. When you visit Dr. Bridget Brahney Family Dentistry, you will experience all that modern dentistry has to offer, including the latest advancements that reduce discomfort and expedite care. Dr. Brahney offers a comprehensive list of general, restorative, and cosmetic dental services to meet the needs of the whole family, from Velscope oral cancer screening to fillings, crowns, and tooth whitening. Not only are Dr. Brahney and her team focused on the beauty of your smile, but they’re also concerned about your health. To that end, they focus on thorough exams and routine cleanings. For more information about Dr. Bridget Brahney and her practice, or to schedule an appointment, visit SmileNewOrleans.com or call 504-888-6860. 

Oak Family Dental, the private practice of Dr. Troy L. Patterson, Dr. Margaret “Garet” Patterson, and Dr. Troy Patterson Jr., is conveniently located on Causeway Boulevard in the heart of Metairie. Having proudly served the Greater New Orleans area for over 35 years, this practice has evolved to offer the latest dental technologies and cutting-edge procedures to create beautiful smiles for patients of all ages. Every patient is welcomed into a warm, friendly, family-based environment where they are given personal attention to address existing concerns and learn how to prevent oral health problems. Focusing on comprehensive care, a variety of treatments are offered including implant procedures, crown and bridge, veneers, same day crowns, dentures, root canals, extractions, Invisalign, tooth colored fillings, dental sleep medicine, cleanings, and numerous other procedures. A membership package is offered to patients without insurance which includes preventative and emergency visits as well as discounts on all procedures. For more information and to see patient testimonials, visit oakfamilydental.com or call 504-834-6410. Owned and headed by Dr. Jason Alvarez, Beau Sourire Family Dentistry in Mandeville takes a unique approach to dentistry.  “Traditionally, visiting the dentist focused on getting a cleaning and receiving an exam for periodontal disease and cavities,” says Dr. Alvarez. “But we focus on the bigger picture.” The practice takes a whole-health, holistic, and personalized approach to dental medicine. Since diseases in the oral

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cavity have been shown to cause inflammation in other parts of the body, Dr. Alvarez and his team emphasize prevention and educate their patients on how to reduce the pathogens that contribute to systemic diseases like arthritis, diabetes, hypertension, and even cancer. Hygienists at Beau Sourire use AIR-FLOW® technology to remove the slimy biofilm and stains from teeth. This therapy is less damaging to the gum tissues, providing for less bleeding and a more comfortable experience. Beau Sourire Family Dentistry offers early morning appointments to accommodate busy schedules. “We want what is best for our patients and want to give back to our patients what they give us—a reason to smile,” says Dr. Alvarez.  Schedule an appointment by calling 985-626-8980, or visit BeauSourireFamilyDentistry.com. Dr. Jason Parker is a pediatric dentist specializing in comprehensive children’s dental needs from age 1 to teens. Dr. Parker received the Louisiana Dental Association’s New Dentist Award in 2008 for his outstanding contribution of time and talent for the betterment of mankind. He has served the LDA and NODA in many capacities, including serving as a delegate at the House of Delegates Annual Legislative Session, on the NODA Conference Committee, on the LDA Council on Communications, and on the LDA Council on Governmental Affairs. He was appointed to the NODA Board of Governors and served as the second Vice President of NODA. Parker was bestowed the honor of 2004 New Dentist Award of Excellence by NODA. In the community, Dr. Parker has volunteered, organized, or helped raise money for events citywide for children’s dental health. He also helped produce a post-Katrina documentary involving dentistry in New Orleans that he presented with Barbara Walters at the ADA Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Dr. Parker offers three locations to serve you in Metairie, Covington, and Slidell. For booking and information, visit DocParker4Kids.com. DeFelice Dental is committed to a conservative approach in patient care—focusing on preventative measures and maintenance as well as on patient education. They provide top quality care in a relaxed atmosphere. For patients who may require more complex treatment, the DeFelice Dental team provides comprehensive care with a gentle, caring touch. Services provided at the practice include gentle cleanings, tooth-colored fillings, nonsurgical gum care, teeth whitening, porcelain veneers, natural looking crowns, and implants. In addition to visual cancer screenings completed during appointments, Velscope oral cancer early detection technology is available for patients needing or requesting more advanced screening. Prior to leading his team at DeFelice Dental, Dr. Tre DeFelice worked as the Clinical Director of a unique specialty practice in New Orleans, where he planned, delivered, and coordinated patient treatment along with a team of dental specialists, gaining tremendous experience and knowledge along the way. Dr. DeFelice spends many hours in continuing education to advance in areas of comprehensive patient care, esthetics, and dental implants. DeFelice Dental is conveniently located on at 1900 N. Causeway Blvd. near I-10. For more information, visit DeFeliceDental.net or call 504-833-4300.     Your smile is one of your most important features; it’s unique to you. Everyone’s oral health, overall health, and 114

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financial position is different, so at DiMarco Dental, Drs. Damon DiMarco and Joanne Hoppe provide individualized care and solutions that fit your specific needs. From routine cleanings, custom snore guards, and whitening, to implants and Invisalign, DiMarco Dental provides a variety of oral health services that will keep you both healthy and happy. It’s never too early to visit DiMarco Dental. Patients start as early as two years old, as developing good habits early can lead to a lifetime of healthy smiles. Young patients often require sealants and other preventative measures to combat the temptations of the modern diet, especially sugar found in foods and beverages. To schedule an appointment or for more information on DiMarco Dental and the practice’s holistic approach to medicine, call 504-366-5611 or visit DiMarcoDental.com. New patients are welcome at their Gretna-based of office at 309 Gretna Blvd. Dermatology Led by Erin Boh, MD, PhD, Tulane’s Department of Dermatology employs experts in psoriasis care, skin cancer care, and cosmetic dermatology. These doctors offer numerous surgical and nonsurgical treatments for skin cancer including state-of-the-art treatment in Mohs surgery for nonmelanoma skin cancers and other specialized treatments. Tulane Dermatology offers Mole Mapping as a new service. It is a painless, noninvasive tool in the early detection of melanoma by utilizing digital photography to track changes in moles. Tulane dermatologists treat all spectra of skin diseases in pediatric and adult populations and also provide cosmetic treatments and services such as neurotoxins for wrinkles, fillers for deep wrinkles, and chemical peels. The faculty are national leaders in dermatology who train the next generation of dermatologists while providing state of the art treatments. Tulane faculty serve as principal investigators in clinical trials and research and are able to offer new therapeutic modalities not yet offered by other dermatologists. To schedule an appointment, call 1-504-988-1700  (Downtown) or 985-893-1291 (Covington). Eye Care Eyecare Associates physicians are extremely pleased with the cataract surgery technology available for their patients. The Catalys Precision Laser System makes cataract surgery safer and more accurate, while new lens implant options, such as the latest in multifocal and extended focus intraocular lenses, are providing patients with the best-corrected vision for both distance and near. The Ora System, when used at the time of surgery, delivers the most accurate calculation for determining the power of the intraocular lens implanted. In addition to the advanced technology offered for cataract patients, Eyecare is excited to offer a non-dilated thorough retinal examination with the OPTOS ultra-wide retinal imaging system. This system allows physicians to detect diseases such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer much earlier than previous options. The optometrists at Eyecare Associates always offer the latest options in daily wear contact lenses known for exceptional comfort and extraordinarily clear vision. Eyecare patients have access to comprehensive routine and medical examinations as well as refractive surgery, glaucoma treatment, and retina services and procedures. For more information, call 504-455-9825 or visit eyecareneworleans.com.


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Gastroenterology Since 1983, Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates, Inc. (MGA) has ambitiously provided gastrointestinal (GI) services all across Greater New Orleans. A practice that started with four founding gastroenterologists is now home to 22 gastroenterologists who serve from three convenient locations across the metro area. In addition to providing painless colonoscopy with the assistance of staff anesthetists, MGA is on the cutting edge of all new GI modalities. The staff includes subsubspecialists additionally trained in advanced endoscopic procedures and hepatology. A pediatric gastroenterologist is available for children’s GI needs. MGA has been the city’s premier GI group for 35 years and is poised to continue this tradition in your area for years to come. State-of-the-art, compassionate care is just a call away. MGA’s offices and endoscopy centers are conveniently located Uptown, in Metairie, and on the West Bank. Call 504-349-6401 for a prompt consultation. Hair Restoration “I thought it was magic” says Dr. Nicole Rogers about the first time she observed hair transplant surgery. “The idea that you could take follicles from the back of the head, move them to the front, and observe them to grow really excited me.” Following that significant day 20 years ago, Dr. Rogers became a board certified dermatologist and completed fellowship training in hair transplantation in Manhattan. Today, her Metairie-based practice, Hair Restoration of the South, is devoted exclusively to hair restoration.  Dr. Rogers offers her patients a choice between FUE (follicular unit excision, where follicles are harvested individually with no linear scar), FUT (traditional donor strip surgery), and PRP (platelet rich plasma). The growth factors that are released through PRP can serve as a great stand-alone treatment for hair loss or serve to enhance one’s surgical results. In every case, Dr. Rogers strives to make sure that her patients get outstanding results and feel great for a lifetime. Call 504-315-4247 or visit HairRestorationoftheSouth.com for more information. Healthcare Network The LSU Healthcare Network (LSUHN) is a group of multispecialty physician practices with 11 convenient locations in Greater New Orleans and Baton Rouge. LSUHN is a not-forprofit organization that operates the private practices for LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine faculty.     LSUHN is proud to offer more than 30 specialties and numerous subspecialties to meet a wide range of outpatient healthcare needs—all connected by one network that has served the community since 1997. Advancing the art of medicine through teaching and clinical research at LSU Health New Orleans, their providers remain on the leading edge of medical innovation.  For more information on the LSUHN or to find a doctor near you, visit LSUdocs.com. HIV/AIDS The Tulane Total Health Clinic offers comprehensive care for those who are living with HIV and AIDS. Services that the Tulane Total Health Clinic offer include HIV testing for people of all ages, complete primary care for people living with HIV/ AIDS, on-site medical and non-medical case management, mental health services, and assistance for uninsured patients needing primary care and medication. In addition, the clinic 116

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provides referrals to subspecialists and legal support services. The clinic is staffed with several multilingual physicians and support staff. Appointments may be scheduled online or by phone.  If you or someone you know is living with HIV/ AIDS and need a new clinic, please schedule an appointment by calling 504-988-3002 or by visiting medicine.tulane.edu/ tulane-doctors/total-health-clinic-fertel. Infectious Disease / Travel If you are traveling to exotic parts of the world, consult first with the expert physicians at the Tulane Travel Clinic. According to Medical Director Dr. Jeffrey Percak, half of all travelers to developing countries will develop some health problem during their trip. Many travelers turn to their travel agents for advice, but it is impossible for travel agents to stay abreast of all the latest information. Even most physicians are not upto-date on traveler’s health, which encompasses much more than immunizations. Tulane Travel Clinic offers pre-travel consultations available for travelers of all ages, including children, and are individualized based on each traveler’s itinerary, medical history, and personal health considerations. “Whether on a leisurely cruise, a mission trip to a remote village, a high altitude trek, or a posh safari, it’s important to learn what to do to try to stay healthy during your trip,” says Dr. Percak. Tulane Infectious Disease doctors also treat travelers who return ill at their regular Infectious Disease clinics. For more information about the Travel Clinic, call 504-988-1947 or visit tulanetravel.com. Internal Medicine & Geriatrics The faculty of Tulane University’s Section of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics are dedicated to providing high quality patient health care and resident education through several clinical programs and locations across New Orleans, including Tulane Medical Center, University Medical Center, and the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System. Their Internal Medicine clinics provide excellent care in the areas of wellness, prevention, management of chronic illness, and acute care for adults. Faculty are trained in a variety of areas such as ambulatory medicine, geriatrics, hospital medicine, medicine-pediatrics, palliative care, and preventative health care. To find a clinic near you, visit Tulane.edu/som and select Medicine under Departments. Under General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics, you can find additional information. Schedule an appointment by calling 504-988-1001 (Tulane Internal Medicine Practice), 504-988-8050 (Metairie-Lakeside Hospital) or 504-988-9000 (Tulane-Uptown Square). Multi-Specialty Community Health Care Centers Stuck with long delays in getting care? High copays? St. Thomas Community Health Center can help! With their affordable, income-based sliding scale, you can receive care with or without insurance. Since 1987, St. Thomas Community Health Center has continued its mission of providing comprehensive primary care to the community regardless of ability to pay. As a Federally Qualified Health Center and Patient-Centered Medical Home, their robust teams of dedicated providers work to address individual health needs and ensure delivery of the highest quality of care.


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Completing their 30th year of providing the community with primary care, pediatrics, OB-GYN, optometry, behavioral health, and mammography, St. Thomas now offers same-day and next-day cardiology appointments at the new St. Thomas Heart and Vascular Center.   All St. Thomas sites offer same-day and next-day appointment scheduling with office hours from 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday-Friday. Call 504-529-5558 to schedule an appointment for basic services at any of their eight convenient locations. For the St. Thomas Heart and Vascular Center, call  504-529-9115. CrescentCare provides whole-person health services to anyone living in the greater New Orleans area, regardless of income, insurance, or any other circumstance. So often, all sorts of barriers to care stop New Orleanians from accessing vital health services—especially those who work in the service industry or who are part of the LGBTQ community. That’s why as a Federally Qualified Health Center, CrescentCare is dedicated to serving the unique needs of those individuals. It doesn’t stop there—to anyone who needs services, CrescentCare offers primary care, dentistry, behavioral health, OBGYN, gender-related care, pediatrics, sexual health services, insurance/medicaid enrollment assistance, and so much more, all on a sliding scale. Building on over 30 years of history as the NO/AIDS Task Force, CresentCare is also a leader in HIV care in Southeast Louisiana. CrescentCare operates facilities across the city and continues to expand its reach to care for more New Orleanians.  For more information, visit CrescentCare.org or call 504-207-CARE (2273).

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Neurology & Neurosurgery It takes a team to diagnose and treat complex neurological disorders. Culicchia Neurological Clinic is one of the largest neuro practices in the region, with doctors who work together to diagnose and treat disorders such as aneurysm, stroke, epilepsy, migraines, brain tumors and spinal disorders. The Clinic’s physician specialties include Neurosurgery, Neurology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Management.  Culicchia Neurological Clinic’s affiliate, CNC Hearing and Balance Center, offers a medical staff trained to provide the latest in hearing healthcare. Hearing loss may indicate a more serious condition, and the Center’s staff is uniquely qualified to provide a full evaluation. The Center offers a wide array of treatment options from assistive devices to microsurgical hearing restoration, surgically implantable hearing devices, digital hearing device fittings and follow-up service, cochlear implants, hearing tests, and more. Culicchia Neurological accepts most major insurances and its physicians are among the most highly trained in the Gulf South, respected for their expertise and high level of patient care. Clinics are located in Marrero, New Orleans (Uptown), Slidell, and Covington. Call 504-340-6976 for an appointment or visit culicchianeuro.com or cnchearing.com. Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Serving the West Bank and Greater New Orleans region, Westside Orthopaedic Clinic provides superior general orthopaedic treatment with a specialty in spinal care. The clinic has been in operation since 1961, making it one of the longest standing orthopaedic clinics in the city.


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Dr. Ralph. Katz is a board certified and fellowship trained orthopedic specialist who has performed over 500 minimally invasive procedures with consistently excellent outcomes. For the right patient who has failed conservative treatment (e.g. medication, physical therapy, injections), a minimally invasive microdiscectomy can be done in an outpatient setting with an incision that can be covered by a band-aid. The procedure typically takes less than an hour. Most patients can return to normal activities within three to six weeks. Additionally, Dr. Katz performs cervical and lumbar spinal fusions, utilizing small incisions with minimally invasive systems. He is one of few local surgeons who perform both cervical and lumbar disc replacements. Westside offers full-service, in-house x-rays, EMG/NCS, as well as physical therapy services with access to new rehabilitation equipment. Same day appointments can be accommodated. For more information, visit westsideortho.com or call 504-347-0243.  Tulane Orthopaedics doctors are elite, fellowship-trained surgeons who combine their expertise and sub-specialty areas into a single comprehensive program. Patients have access to some of the most capable surgical care in the nation as well as one of the finest rehabilitation programs. This ensures a faster and more effective recovery, regardless of whether you’re trying to get back on the sports field or back to daily life. Specialists offer care and prevention of sports medicine injuries, total joint replacements of hips, knees, shoulders, elbows, and ankles, treatment of pelvic and other bone fractures, and treatment of spine-related conditions ranging from scoliosis in children to adults with disc herniations and spinal stenosis. Other conditions treated include painful foot ailments such as bunions and painful nerve compressions. With multiple locations, including the Institute of Sports Medicine, in Uptown New Orleans, Tulane-Lakeside in Metairie, and downtown at Tulane Medical Center, their doctors and staff are able to serve the entire Greater New Orleans community. For more information, call 877-Tortho-1 (877-867-8461), or 504-988-6032, or visit OrthoTulane.com. At Southern Orthopaedic Specialists, patients experience care that goes above and beyond normal expectations. A group of seven orthopaedic surgeons, six physical therapists, and a hand therapist, Southern Orthopaedic Specialists offers prompt, comprehensive Orthopaedic care to Greater New Orleans with locations in Uptown (2731 Napoleon Avenue) and Metairie (1615 Metairie Road). Each Physician not only specializes in Orthopaedic Surgery but also has a sub-specialty as well. Their specialties and subspecialties include: General Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine, Total Joint Replacements and Revisions, Upper Extremity, Hand, Shoulder, Foot and Ankle, and Back and Spine Care/ Surgery. This level of advanced specialization allows Southern Orthopaedic Specialists to provide the absolute best treatment for patients. As a team, they can treat just about any orthopaedic problem. For more information, visit SOSNewOrleans.com. Both locations are easily accessible and provide complimentary parking. For all departments, as well as scheduling, call 504897-6351. They accept all major health insurance plans and worker’s compensation insurance plans.

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One of the region’s top orthopaedic surgeons, Dr. Neil Maki practices in Thibodaux and is on staff at Thibodaux Regional Medical Center. Six staff members, including physician assistant Nicole Orgeron Bourgeois, PA-C, insure that patients’ individual needs are met by the most effective means. Dr. Maki specializes in the shoulder and has pioneered many shoulder arthroscopic procedures including obtaining patents on arthroscopic instrumentation. He also performs joint replacements and is one of few specialists in the region who performs endoscopic carpal tunnel (wrist) and endoscopic cubital tunnel (elbow) surgery. Board-certified in both orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, Dr. Maki is fellowship trained in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery. He has served on the medical staff of the New Orleans Saints and the Nicholls State University athletic programs. Dr. Maki holds a distinction as a Clinical Professor in Orthopaedics and Honorary Alumnus at LSU Medical School. He may be reached by calling 985-446-6284 or 800-521-2647. New Orleans Shoulder Institute specializes in the management of all problems affecting the shoulder with a particular emphasis on arthroscopic reconstruction, joint replacement, arthritis, and management of failed treatments. Dr. Kindl and his staff take pride in the quality of care they deliver to patients, always taking time to talk through patient concerns, answer all questions, and provide detailed yet understandable information on each patient’s condition and all possible treatments. Board certified by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Dr. Kindl earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from Louisiana State University before advancing his training in orthopedic surgery at Charity Hospital in New Orleans and University of Alabama in Birmingham, where he was trained under world-renowned orthopedic physician James Andrews. Following his residency, he completed a yearlong fellowship specializing in sports medicine at Orthopedic Research of Virginia. Dr. Kindl has tremendous experience in the field of minimally invasive arthroscopic techniques that offer a potentially easier and quicker recovery. For more information or to book an appointment, call 504-867-NOSI (6674) or visit nolasi.com. At the Orthopaedic Center for Sports Medicine (OCSM), Charles Murphy, MD, Thomas Lyons, MD, Luis M. Espinoza, MD, and William Sherman, MD, are all fellowship-trained, board-certified orthopaedic surgeons who specialize in treatment of the shoulder, knee, and hip. Additionally the practice welcomes Chadwick Murphy, MD, a fellowship-trained and board certified Pain Medicine/Interventional Spine specialist. “We are a general Orthopaedic practice with subspecialty expertise in sports medicine, joint replacement, and arthroscopic surgery,” says Dr. Lyons. They deliver state-of-theart care for local athletes and are the official team physicians of the Triple-A New Orleans Baby Cakes. Additionally, the practice specializes in evaluation and treatment of work-related injuries and conditions as well as in evaluation and management of legal cases. OCSM physicians can see patients the same day of injury and provide a plan to quickly return the patient to pre-injury form. To improve care, OCSM provides in-house MRI and physical therapy for close monitoring of patients and modification of treatment plans. For scheduling, call the Metairie (504-889-2663) or New Orleans offices (504 943-5777), or visit nolasportsmedicine.com.


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At Pontchartrain Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, the goal is to achieve 100% patient satisfaction from any service provided. Their physicians specialize in the care of the musculoskeletal system, which includes bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves and related structures of the body. All orthopedic problems from the neck down to the feet of both adults and children are treated from their full-service, advanced facility. Patient input is given the highest consideration during all courses of treatment, and conservative treatment is always considered before a decision for surgery is made. The comprehensive orthopedic management program at Pontchartrain Orthopedics & Sports Medicine includes procedures such as arthroscopic surgery, total joint replacement, carpal tunnel surgery, and fracture management as well as sports medicine and worker’s compensation cases. Pain management services include interventional spine, ultrasoundguided injections, and Botox injections. Pontchartrain Orthopedics maintains offices with in-house physical therapy departments in Metairie and Boutte. For information and appointments, visit posm.org or call the office at 504-885-6464. For over 40 years, the physicians and staff of The Hand  Center of Louisiana have pursued a passion for patient-centered care. A one-stop shop for all medical and surgical services for patients with upper extremity conditions, the Hand Center is proud of their facility upgrade, and excited to bring

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the Therapy Center back under one roof. With comprehensive services all-in-one facility, the Hand Center of Louisiana is the leading provider in the region. Board certified Hand Center surgeons are widely recognized for their expertise and successful outcomes. Using the most current approaches in surgical and non-surgical treatments, they develop a plan of care suited to each individual patient. Certified Hand Therapists at The Hand Therapy Center use advanced techniques and protocols for post-operative management of surgical patients. Therapists are often able to move patients into therapy more quickly, resulting in earlier clinical results and recovery. At The Center for Rheumatology and Neurological Testing, advanced diagnostic tools such as ultrasound imaging, Bone Mineral Density, and Nerve Conduction Studies are being used to customize treatments. For information and scheduling, visit  handcenteroflouisiana.com. Pain Management Southern Pain & Neurological is happy to offer Superion Indirect Decompression System, a new, minimally invasive approach to treat lumbar stenosis that fits in the gap of treatment offerings between conservative care and invasive surgery. FDA approved and covered by Medicare, this outpatient treatment is especially helpful for older patients and those not able to tolerate more invasive laminectomy to treat significant limitation


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in walking or continuous standing. Clinical trials indicated 90% patient satisfaction through 60 months. Successful reduction in leg pain was rated at 75% for Superion, which was better than a laminectomy and for the same evaluation period. Doctors Paul Hubbell, Barry Faust, and Donald Richardson understand that chronic pain, especially stenosis and resultant claudication, creates a prison for patients which disables them from an active lifestyle. The stress from the walking and standing pain negatively affect personalities and decreases freedom. If you are suffering from chronic pain, contact Southern Pain and find out if the Superion minimally invasive indirect decompression system or something else is right for you. For information and scheduling at the Metairie, Marrero and Covington office, please call 1-800-277-1265. Too many suffer from chronic pain conditions that impact their personal lives and make working nearly impossible. Modern interventional pain techniques are effective alternatives to surgery and addictive opioid pain medicines. Dr. Patrick Waring, founder of the Pain Intervention Center, is a leader in the field of precision pain management and devoted to the diagnosis and innovative treatment of chronic pain and related disorders. As a board-certified anesthesiologist and pain management specialist, Waring targets and treats pain through non-narcotic, non-surgical, minimally invasive techniques performed under fluoroscopic X-ray guidance. All procedures are performed in a state-of-the-art private facility, conveniently located in Old Metairie Village. Patients avoid the delays and intimidation of big hospitals and benefit from the comprehensive team approach of expert clinicians, personalized service and customized follow-up care in a comfortable setting. Patrick Waring and his staff have helped thousands of satisfied patients get back to the business of living their lives. Visit PainInterventionCenter.com or call 504-455-2225 today. No referrals necessary. Pharmacy & Medical Equipment Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-thecounter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy and the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long-term care as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Long Term Care, and Consultant Pharmacy Services. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Boulevard in Metairie. For more information, call 504-889-7070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.” Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation For nearly two decades, Crane Rehab Center’s team of therapists and techs have worked with thousands of patients in overcoming challenges, assisting them in achieving and returning to their highest level of function through individu124

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alized, innovative care. Offering physical, occupational, and speech therapy, ABA services, and wellness and enrichment programs, Crane Rehab is uniquely positioned to help you and your family eliminate pain and improve overall health. Crane is excited to expand their reach with a new facility located downtown in New Orleans’ CBD. This central, convenient location makes it possible for the city’s working population to access therapy before work, afterward, or even during a lunch break. The Crane team can help identify pain-causing habits in the workspace or at home and provide ergonomic solutions and healthier outcomes. Both the CBD and River Road locations treat lower back and spinal injuries, neurological disorders, arthritis, orthopedic/musculoskeletal injuries, and work-related and sports injuries, Additionally, they offer LSVT BIG Parkinson’s Treatment, post-surgical rehabilitation, and dry needling. Physician referrals are not required. For more information, visit CraneRehab.com or call 504-828-7696. Urology Has someone you love been diagnosed with prostate cancer, kidney cancer, or bladder cancer? The Department of Urology at Tulane University Medical Center, a national leader in providing minimally invasive surgical procedures for various urologic maladies, stands at the forefront of cancer treatment through state-of-the-art robotic procedures, breakthrough treatments, and research. Tulane Urology is proud to be recognized as the first and most experienced robotic urologic surgical center in the entire Gulf South. Using the daVinci high-definition robot, Tulane Urology’s expertly trained surgeons offer patients a highly advanced therapeutic option for cancer treatment. This cutting-edge, minimally invasive surgical technology, combined with the extensive experience of the Tulane Urology team, has made Tulane Urology the go-to center for the treatment of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancers. Visit myprostatecancer.com and tulaneurology.com for more information on the various treatments and procedures offered at Tulane Urology. Call 504-988-2536 to schedule an appointment or get a second opinion today. Women’s Health Selecting an OB/GYN is a very important choice, and  Crescent City Physicians, Inc. hopes to make that choice a little easier. Whether you are becoming a mother for the first time, expanding your growing family, or looking for a doctor for annual wellness and pre- or post-menopausal health needs, Crescent City OB/GYNs offer unique, comprehensive care to women at every stage of life. The extensive OB/GYN services at Crescent City Physicians include comprehensive gynecology for adolescents and adults, family planning and contraceptive, peri/postmenopausal care, preconception counseling, prenatal, birth, postpartum care, and STI testing and counseling. Additionally, the practice is pleased to offer midwifery services to patients. Their Certified-Nurse Midwives help care for women across their lifespan and assist expectant mothers with their individualized birth plan. Midwives are available to care for patients at Crescent City Physicians’ Uptown, Mid-City, West Bank, and St. Claude locations. Crescent City Physicians offers eleven convenient locations throughout Greater New Orleans with delivery at Touro’s Family Birthing Center—“the place where babies come from.” Learn more at CrescentCityPhysicians.com or call 504-897-7197. •


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ence disciplines and provides an improved continuity of care for neuro patients. The center, in partnership with the world-class physicians at Tulane University School of Medicine’s Center for Neurosciences, offers the expertise and capabilities to effectively diagnose and treat spine, brain, and neurological conditions. To continue their tradition of excellence and expertise in providing the best quality care, education and research are integrated through the combined resources of Tulane University Hospital and Clinics and the Tulane School of Medicine. The Center for Clinical Neurosciences operates an outpatient clinic located in Tulane Hospital that can be reached at 504-988-5561. Visit online at TulaneNeurosciences.com.

Cuttingedge Health

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e may not be driving flying cars, but in the world of medicine, recent advances have made available treatments and procedures that were not so long ago considered unimaginable. Advancements in medicine have dramatically changed health outcomes over the years, and new studies are consistently making headlines and altering recommendations. Health care providers of all different specialties have news to share throughout the year as they add new technologies, procedures, and medications to their arsenal of treatment tools. New Orleans physicians are no different, and the city hosts a number of world-class treatment centers. Find out what’s new in cutting-edge health and see if you or someone you know might benefit from the latest and greatest offerings from local physicians and surgeons. From clinical trials to new devices and minimally invasive surgical techniques, there’s bound to be a treatment worthy of attention. Advances in Neuroscience Tulane University School of Medicine’s Center for Clinical Neurosciences is dedicated to providing the highest quality patient-centered care by combining cutting-edge technology with personalized attention. The center allows for faster consults between physicians who specialize in different neurosci-

Cutting-edge Dental Care Wyatt Family Dentistry, the practice of Dr. Lisa Wyatt, is proud to announce its expansion with a second location in Metairie Village Shopping Center on Metairie Road. With a goal of treating patients like family, Dr. Wyatt’s highly trained team is dedicated to providing each patient with outstanding care with quality general, cosmetic, restorative, surgical, and sedation dentistry, including implants, veneers, and crowns as well as cosmetic services such as Botox, Dermafil, Pellevé, and bleaching. The team provides the top quality care and maintains the highest standard for safety and cleanliness. The practice incorporates the latest in cutting edge technology exemplified by a new in-house, one-day crown CEREC technology. Well known among the community and dental professionals, Dr. Lisa Wyatt has been working with patients of all ages for more than thirty years, first as a dental hygienist and then as a dentist. She is able to treat the general public as well as those with special medical needs in-office and in hospitals. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 504-827-1910 or visit MetairieVillageDentistry.com. New Treatments for Chronic Pain Surgeons at Southern Brain & Spine (SBS) are excited to announce a new option for patients who previously required fusion surgery for replacing diseased disks in the back. Unlike fusion surgery, Mobi-C® Cervical Disc replaces diseased discs in the neck and is designed to maintain motion. “We are pleased to be able to offer patients this state of the art procedure which is supported by the highest level of medical evidence available for a medical device. Mobi-C offers patients who suffer from two-level cervical disease a superior treatment option to traditional cervical spine fusion that maintains motion,” says Dr. Thomas. At Southern Brain & Spine, physicians treat all spine and brain related problems, specializing in brain microsurgery and cutting-edge, minimally invasive spinal procedures. The practice’s five neurosurgeons include Drs. Lucien Miranne, Jr., Everett Robert, Jr., Najeeb Thomas, Manish Singh, and Rand Voorhies. The practice has offices in Metairie, New Orleans and Covington. SBS participates in all major insurance plans and can typically arrange same-day or next-day appointments. For information and scheduling, call 504-4540141, Ext. 1 or visit sbsdoc.net. Occasional pain is a natural part of life, but chronic pain can rule your life, interfering with your ability to work, sleep and have fun. When chronic pain disrupts your quality of life and does not improve with standard treatments, LA Pain Doctor is here to help. my n e w or l e a n s . com

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There are many safe, proven effective treatments available that can help manage your chronic pain. At LA Pain Doctor, Dr. Firas Hijazi treats a variety of conditions such as back, neck, and joint pain, arthritis, fibromyalgia and more. He is an expert in treating chronic neck and back pain, spondylosis, and sciatic pain with medications and procedures such as Radiofrequency Ablation. He is also an expert in treating a variety of other pain conditions including headaches, interstitial cystitis, post-laminectomy syndrome, and complex regional pain syndrome. In order to produce the best possible outcomes, Dr. Hijazi works together with patients and their families to explore options designed to maximize quality of life and overall function. The pain stops here. Visit LAPainDoc.com for more information, or call 504-229-4866. Four offices are conveniently located on the Westbank, in Metairie, New Orleans, and Laplace. Developments in Psychiatry At Atlas Psychiatry, Dr. Nicholas Pejic and his team do whatever it takes to get you or your child well. This begins with advanced diagnostic tools and evidence-based treatments to make the correct diagnosis and provide you with the care and results you need. Atlas psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers work together, harnessing a wide range of expertise to deliver the best care possible. Their full range of services and advanced technologies includes psychological testing, individual therapy, group therapy, couples therapy, psychiatric genetic testing, medication, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).  

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TMS is a non-invasive outpatient procedure that reduces symptoms of depression in up to 70 percent of patients. TMS is an alternative treatment when medications haven’t worked. Dr. Pejic uses an advanced localizing technique and faster frequency allowing for shorter and more cost-effective treatments than typical TMS. TMS does not cause side effects commonly associated with antidepressants, such as weight gain, sedation, and sexual problems. For more information, visit AtlasPsychiatry.com or call 504-899-1682. Surgical Options for Eyelids Eyes are the most expressive feature of the face, and for those looking to enhance the appearance of their eyes, Dr. Kyle V. Acosta of the Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center offers numerous highly specialized procedures for recreating youth and beauty. An award-winning, highly trained, and experienced physician, Dr. Acosta is board-certified in Ophthalmology and fellowship trained in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center has a state-of-the-art, on-site, private surgical facility with experienced anesthesia care provided for your comfort. The highly qualified staff will make your surgical experience pleasant and effortless from the initial consultation to discharge from the surgical suite. In addition to cosmetic procedures for the eyes, Dr. Acosta also treats age-related changes to the eyelids, congenital abnormalities, and the repair of unsuccessful cosmetic eyelid procedures. For more information, call 985-898-2001. •


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Health Resources

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s the state’s oldest and largest health insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is committed to improving the health and lives of Louisianians. The company and its subsidiaries offer a full line of health insurance plans for people of every age—from birth through retirement, including supplemental coverage such as dental and senior plans, at affordable rates. The Blue Cross provider networks offer the peace of mind that comes with being covered by the Cross and Shield. Blue Cross is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association and headquartered in Baton Rouge. To better serve customers, Blue Cross operates regional offices in Alexandria, Houma, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Monroe, New Orleans, and Shreveport. Louisiana-owned and operated, Blue Cross is a private, fully taxed mutual company owned by policyholders—not shareholders. To learn more, call a Blue Cross agent or visit bcbsla.com. Pure to Joseph Pilates’ original Reformer-based Contrology Method, but modernized with group practice and expanded state-of-the-art equipment, Club Pilates offers high-quality, life-changing training at a surprisingly affordable price. It’s more than just Reformers. Club Pilates teaches classes using TRX, Barre, Exo-Chair, Bosu ball, mats, rollers and more. Their certified instructors perform hundreds of hours of training to meet teacher standards and maximize your workout. Dynamic class sessions are available at a variety of levels and at convenient class times. The Club Pilates team believes that Pilates is 128

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the path to a fuller, more satisfying physical existence and that being in control of your body helps you to be in control of your life. And best of all, you can start anytime. No matter your level of fitness, there’s a Pilates class for you. Book your own stressfree intro class for free at clubpilates.com/oldmetairie, or call 504-484-9650 for more information. Home Care Solutions, newly acquired by Poydras Home, specializes in compassionate in-home care, Alzheimer’s care, and Aging Life Care Management™ services to help your elderly loved ones extend their independence at home. They are committed to providing the highest quality of care, keeping loved ones safe and comfortable while giving families peace of mind. Caregiver’s are carefully matched to meet both your loved one’s needs and personality. Home Care Solutions Care Managers navigate the care of your loved ones with expertise and heart and are experienced advocates with creative solutions for complex situations and all care concerns. Care Managers’ familiarity with local resources saves you time and often saves you money while their compassionate understanding of the aging process saves you unnecessary distress. Home Care Solutions, a licensed Personal Care Attendant Agency, is a member of Home Care Association of America and Aging Life Care Association™. Call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com. Home Care Solutions would be honored to assist your family in navigating elder care.


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Humana Inc.’s successful history in care delivery and health plan administration is helping them to create a new kind of integrated care with the power to help patients achieve their best health at lower costs. As one of the leading Medicare health benefits companies in Louisiana, Humana’s efforts are leading to a better quality of life for people with Medicare, families, individuals, military service personnel and communities at large. Humana hopes to continue this success by setting a Bold Goal to improve the health of the communities it serves by 20 percent by 2020. To help achieve this, Humana has set up neighborhood centers in New Orleans and Baton Rouge to close the gap between people and the care they need. These facilities are designed to help improve physical and mental health and to reduce social isolation through activities, seminars and educational classes. The Center is open to both Humana members and non-members at no cost, and the Metairie location is open to the public Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit Humana at 747 Veterans Memorial Blvd, or call 504-840-0906 for more information. When it comes to living and aging well, Lambeth House, a full-service retirement center, offers the best of all worlds—independent living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care, and Memory Care in the event it’s ever needed. Lambeth House recently received top ranking in the Best Retirement Community category of City Business’s 2018 Reader Rankings. Nestled in the heart of Uptown New Orleans, Lambeth House offers luxury retirement living at its best and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its last expansion. With a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities including the fitness center with a stunning indoor, salt-water swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options, and engaging activities and social events. Nonresidents (55+) can access Fitness Center memberships, and Lambeth House’s Wild Azalea Café is open to the public for breakfast and lunch, Tuesday-Saturday. For more information, call 504-865-1960 or explore online at LambethHouse.com. It’s no secret that anxiety and depression can have a tremendous impact on the wellbeing of both children and adults, but Courtney McWilliams knows that even dogs are susceptible to the side effects of such obstacles. At MaryMac’s Doggie Retreat, McWilliams and her team of experts are dedicated to providing care for animals who suffer from stress, anxiety and depression. With personal attention and specially designed enrichment activities, the MaryMac team strives to help each animal build confidence so that they—and their owners—can live happily and comfortably. Services include standard offerings like boarding, pet sitting and doggie daycare, but this retreat goes far beyond the traditional. Pet owners can book a “House Pawty” for dogs who prefer to be cared for in the comfort of their own homes, “Day Pawty” for dogs who easily grow restless and require several hours of activity, and even a “Bridal Pawty” designed to reduce stress in animals who are participating in wedding ceremonies. For more information, visit MaryMacsDoggieRetreat.com or call 504-812-6923. Patrick Douglass and Ross Morel, former employees of C’s Pharmacy, opened NOLA Discount Pharmacy to continue the tradition of a local, family-owned drugstore with superior cus-

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tomer service and discount prices. In addition to filling your prescriptions, they offer immunizations, compounding, and unique over-the-counter items. The stores feature an extensive retail selection with your favorite local and national brands, and if they don’t have it, you can ask Patrick to order it for you! They accept all insurance plans and offer affordable cash prices on prescriptions. Transferring your prescriptions is quick and easy—just speak with a friendly staff member by calling one of their two convenient Metairie locations: 504-8889411 (4305 Clearview Parkway) or 504-835-6060 (1107 Veterans Memorial Blvd.). NOLA Discount Pharmacy is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. More information and prescription refill services available at NolaPharmacy.com. Nola Pilates & Yoga/Xtend Barre is one of Lakeview’s premier fitness studios. There’s no need to drive across town or to multiple studios to satisfy your personal fitness goals.  This studio is outfitted with a constantly evolving array of equipment and classes to provide the best workout available. Instructors are all highly trained and certified professionals who are dedicated to your well-being and safe, effective instruction and have diverse experience and specializations. “We believe that fitness and a healthy lifestyle should not only be achievable for everyone, but should also be enjoyable and diverse,” said Kim Munoz, Owner. “That’s why our studio is designed to be a full-service fitness facility, with a wide variety of both group exercise classes and one-on-one instruction.” The studio’s extensive schedule features more than 65 classes per week including Pilates Reformer, Pilates Tower, Pilates Mat, Yoga, MELT Method, TRX Suspension and Xtend Barre. Oneon-one sessions are available in the private equipment studio seven days per week. Classes range in focus and intensity from open-level Pilates Mat and Yoga classes to muscle-sculpting, calorie-torching classes like TRX and Xtend Barre. Visit the studio online at NolaPilates.com to schedule a complimentary 30-minute private Pilates reformer session.  For more information, call (504) 483-8880. In April of 1998, an idea was hatched by Al Clifton to start a company providing live-in care to the elderly. His vision was to provide a 24/7 live-in service for those who wanted to remain at home during their twilight years. Twenty years, and thousands of clients and caregivers later, Personal Homecare Services is still going strong. When you can’t be at home to care for your family member, you want peace of mind knowing that the person who is there will treat your loved one with the same level of care and concern that you would. Personal Homecare Services is one of the first non-medical services specializing in live-in care and working in conjunction with doctors, healthcare providers, and hospices to provide continuous around-the-clock care without the worry and expense of hourly services. They’ve built a solid reputation with word-of-mouth referral, evidence of the trust their clients have in their caretakers and services. Services include meal preparation, help with personal hygiene, medicinal reminders, light housekeeping, transportation to/from appointments and companionship. To learn more, visit PersonalHomecare.net or call 877-336-8045. Poydras Home is reaching deeper into the Greater New Orleans area to fulfill the diverse care needs of even more


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seniors with the acquisition of an independent, in home, sitter companion services company, Home Care Solutions. Continuing Care Retirement Communities such as Poydras Home recognize that community living is not the only option available to our aging population. By offering support at home, seniors and their families can choose their optimum environment. For the first time in their 201-year history, Poydras Home will now be able to offer in home sitter companion services to those who elect to remain at home. Through Home Care Solutions, Poydras Home can also deliver Life Care Management services, personally advising seniors and their families as they face a wide variety of healthcare choices. This new venture will allow greater flexibility to meet the growing needs of more New Orleanians. For more information about Poydras Home, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-897-0535. The unique workout experience at Orangetheory Fitness combines the energy of a group workout with the attention and personal care of one-on-one training. Over the course of a 60-minute class, you can expect to burn between 500 and 1,000 calories, but the positive effects don’t stop there — the after burn can continue to burn calories for up to 36 hours post-workout. Orangetheory is just launching their newest app, OTconnect, which will provide even more individual data for participants during their workouts. “Currently you have to remember the distances you run and row, but moving forward OTconnect will keep track of all of that for you.  The data collected on distances, heart rates, calories burned, etc. will appear in the OTconnect app,” said Elle Mahoney, Area Developer and Franchise Owner. “It will deliver

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more information, more accurately. When you exercise anywhere wearing your OTBeat heart rate monitor, the technology challenges you to set personal records and will feed into your fitness Personal Record.” Orangetheory currently has eight Louisiana studios, including three in New Orleans — Uptown, Mid-City and in the Downtown Warehouse District this fall. Local residents receive their first, free introductory class by visiting OrangetheoryFitness.com. Dale Gedert has focused on foot care for more than 45 years. He brings his expertise to Greater New Orleans with Therapeutic Shoes, a shopping resource for those suffering from a wide variety of conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, flat feet, heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, bunions, calluses, edema and leg length discrepancies, as well as knee, hip and back pain, and more. “We specialize in custom accommodative foot orthotics, stylish extra depth shoes, diabetic shoes, custom shoes, shoe modifications, compression wear, and diabetic socks,” says Gedert. “We’ve got over 500 styles and color of men’s and women’s shoes.” Therapeutic Shoes features an in-house orthotic lab with certified personnel who handle all custom orthotics and shoe modifications. They offer a large selection of compression wear as well as socks shaped to fit the foot for reducing fatigue and preventing circulation problems. They offer UV Total Recovery Shoe Sanitizer for those who’ve been treated for toenail fungus by a podiatrist or medical professional to prevent reinfection.  Therapeutic Shoes is located at 5017 River Road in Harahan, Louisiana. For more information and hours, call 504-731-0013. •


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The Menu

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T A B L E T A L K . RES T A U RAN T I NS I D ER . F OO D . LAS T CALL . D I N I N G L I S T I N G S

Bubba Poy Boy Fried shrimp tossed in housemade remoulade sauce at ya ya’s


THE MENU . TABLE TALK

meet the chef conner Mullins

Duck and Waffles: Crispy pieces of handbattered duck, fried to perfection, on top of a freshly baked Belgian waffle with a strawberry glaze.

Ya Ya’s Comfort Food Quality upgrade in Harahan By Jay Forman

H

arahan just upped its breakfast game with Ya Ya’s, a new restaurant from first-time owner and chef Conner Mullins. This is not your average spot for ham and eggs. For starters,

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A former college football player, Conner Mullins later graduated from the John Folse Culinary Institute before returning home for externships at Commander’s Palace and Brigtsen’s. At Commander’s he learned speed, but at Brigtsen’s he met his mentor, Chef Frank. “He taught me everything,” Mullins says. “He’s the kind of guy that would give you the shirt off his back.” Mullins opened Ya Ya’s in Harahan to bring high-quality comfort food to his part of town. “I’m a sports guy and I really relate to the team aspect of the kitchen,” he says. “Everybody has a job and everybody needs to do their job for the restaurant to succeed.”

Mullins spent the last six years honing his chops under the tutelage of chef Frank Brigtsen. Then there is the fact that he opened Ya Ya’s in the part of town where he grew up. When you put

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these two ingredients together, and housemade pico de gallo. the skills and the love of home, His lunch menu is built around a core of poor boys – say ‘hello’ you’ve got a recipe that works. Ya Ya’s took over the spot to the “Ya Ya’s Special” with pork formerly occupied by Hillbilly belly and pimento cheese – along BBQ. It is tucked away a bit, but with a rotating array of daily at a recent service the restaurant specials. Tuesdays might offer a was nevertheless so slammed choice of pot roast, BBQ brisket that they opened a common door or a catfish plate for example, into the adjacent honkey tonk all with sides. Make an effort bar to handle the to be there for spillover crowd. his Duke’s Fried The restaurant is Chicken, soaked Ya Ya’s Comfort Food, counter service in buttermilk and 2317 Hickory Ave., crystal hot sauce only, helping to Harahan; 575-3434; overnight then keep the prices B, L Tues.-Fri., Brunch fried to a perfect low, especially Sat. & Sun; closed Mon; crunch. Other considering the Yayascomfortfood.com popular sand. quality of the food. And while wiches include the menu is casual, the food “The Bubba,” fried shrimp is carefully considered. “I’m tossed in a remoulade sauce. trying to bring comfort food up On weekends, try the cinnamon to a new level out here,” Mullins rolls, which are baked in-house says. “People don’t need to drive by Mulllins’ mom. It is a family Uptown or go to the CBD to eat affair here, with both his mom like this.” While the recipes are and dad pitching in to help out. largely based on dishes he ate Duck and waffles aside, at its growing up, he brings a refine- heart Ya Ya’s draws a traditional ment in ingredients and technique crowd with traditional tastes. that sets Ya Ya’s apart. Conner serves plenty for these Take for instance his duck and customers, and the attention waffles. “I wanted to do chicken to detail comes through in the and waffles, but everyone does humble dishes as well. “When that now,” he says. “I wanted to you cook, there is so much love make mine different so I came up you put in the effort,” Mullins with this.” Fried duck tenders are says. “It is hard to explain how tossed in a special glaze and laid good this feels but I love it.” • atop a crisp Belgian waffle. The menu description – which cites strawberry – is a bit misleading as Mullins spikes his berry preserves with pepper jelly and Steen’s Cane syrup, which offer nuance that play well with the duck and the pastry pairing. Breakfast of Champions Other notable breakfast choices Another restaurant offering include the French toast, made creative twists on breakfast and with Dong Phuong Bakery bread brunch staples is Surrey’s Juice that is staled then soaked in batter Bar, with two locations along before a dunk in the fryer. “The Magazine Street. Here you’ll find insides stay moist and the outside everything from bananas Foster gets a nice crunch – it makes for a French toast to boudin breakfast perfect textural contrast,” Mullins biscuits alongside a slew of says. Sweet choices aside, savory vegetarian and health-forward dishes that sell best include his offerings. The corned beef hash Latin-inspired El Jefe Omelet with might not be vegan-friendly, but chorizo, avocado, black beans it is delicious.

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THE MENU . restaurant insider

News From the Kitchen Piece of Meat, Three B’s Burger, Zocalo By Robert Peyton

Charcuterie Board: Butcher’s Choice of 5 Meats, pickles, mustard, almonds,toast points

Piece of Meat

Three B’s Burger

Zocalo

The folks behind Bayou Wine Garden and Bayou Beer Garden have a new spot around the corner from both. Piece of Meat is a place to grab a sandwich, fresh sausage or a whole chicken. Leighann Smith and David Jackson, who run the place, are butchers at heart but skilled cooks too. Try the boudin egg rolls and the ever-changing charcuterie plate. Piece of Meat, 3301 Bienville St., 372-2289, Mon., Tues. and Thurs. 11-8, Fri. until 9, and Sat. and Sun. 10-9 (Sat.) and 4 (Sun.), Pieceofmeatbutcher.com.

Three B’s Burger and Wine Bar has taken over the spot occupied by Lakeview Harbor restaurant for more than two decades. Burgers were always a draw at the address, but now there’s an emphasis on wine, including 10 on tap, beer and craft cocktails. It’s also still a family-friendly place, with a dedicated “Little B’s” menu for those 12 and under. Three B’s Burgers and Wine Bar, 911 Harrison Ave., 249-0825, Mon. – Sat. 4-10, Sun. 11-4, Threebs.com.

Zócalo, a new restaurant by Edgar Caro and Antonio Mata, recently opened a few doors down from Brasa, the pair’s Latin steakhouse. The Mexican cuisine on offer at Zócalo is ambitious. An enchilada with duck confit and Oaxacan mole is one option; taco fillings include cauliflower with Veracruz-style salsa macha in addition to pork cooked al pastor, beer-battered fish and grilled skirt steak. Zócalo, 2051 Metairie Rd., Metairie, 252-9327, Tues.-Sat., 5-10, until 9 on Sun. Lunch hours TBA, Zocalonola.com.

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THE MENU . food

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styled by, photographed by eugenia uhl


Freshly Picked

RECIPE Blue Crab Salad with Summer Succotash

This is the season BY Dale Curry

Ingredients 1 pound lump crabmeat, jumbo preferred ¼ cup chopped celery

T

he only redeeming grace for August in New Orleans is that it falls at the peak of peak season for blue crabs, the dead-on center of the May to November season. We used to go out crabbing with the kids until I decided that nothing could be enough fun to withstand the heat and humidity. Especially when so many neighborhood restaurants serve crabs up deliciously seasoned, and a half dozen makes a bargain dinner. I’m lucky enough to live near a great seafood store, so sometimes I pick them up already boiled and bring them home for dinner. On occasion, I choose a pound of succulent lump crabmeat for a summer salad or creamy casserole. We used to boil them in the backyard before crawfish found their way to New Orleans, but soon learned that October or November makes a cooler setting. On a trip to Baltimore, I learned that the fewer ingredients, the better, when it comes to making crab dishes. In Maryland, another blue-crab capitol, they make their crab cakes with lump crab meat and very little else. Why? Because the taste of crabmeat is delicate and you don’t want to overpower it. The same goes when making a crab salad, which is best when the perfect taste of crab is the dominant force. Creole restaurants traditionally offered Crab Louis,

¼ cup chopped Vidalia onions a dressed up version that might add boiled eggs and other ingredients including a richer dressing. If desired, sliced eggs and avocado partner well with the salad, making it even more substantial as an entrée. A chilled or roomtemperature meal peaks my taste in summer, especially when there’s no heat in the kitchen and little cleanup.A summer succotash with August produce such as corn, sweet peppers and lima beans accompanies a crab salad with balance and color. For lagniappe, you have a healthful and low-calorie meal. I’m all about seasons, not just football and Carnival, but, especially when it comes to food. Yeah, I hate heat and humidity, but if I’m stuck here in August, at least I can look forward to some of my favorite foods.

¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley 1 clove garlic, minced 1 tablespoon small capers, optional 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon good-quality or homemade mayonnaise 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon olive oil Salt, freshly ground black pepper and Creole seasoning to taste Dash Tabasco Boston or butter lettuce leaves For succotash: 3 ears fresh corn 1 ½ cups lima or butter beans, preferably fresh, or 1 12-ounce package frozen 1/2 red bell pepper, chopped 1 cup grape tomatoes, sliced in half 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar A handful of fresh basil leaves, julienned Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions 1. Pick over crabmeat and remove any shells. Set aside. 2. In a large bowl, mix celery, onions, parsley, garlic and capers, if using. In a small bowl, mix lemon juice, mayonnaise, oil, seasonings and

on the side Lemon Ice Chaser

Tabasco. Add to vegetables and mix. Add crabmeat and toss gently, being careful not to break up crabmeat. Taste and adjust seasonings. Refrigerate until time to serve. 3. Cut whole kernels from corn cobs, holding corn in a large bowl and

Follow a cool summer dinner with a thirstquenching Lemon Ice. Mix 4 cups water and 2 cups sugar in a medium pot and bring to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes. Cool. Add 1 tablespoon grated lemon rind and 1 cup lemon juice, and freeze in an ice cream freezer according to manufacturer’s directions. Serves 4-6.

using a sharp knife. 4. Bring 1 cup of water to boil in a medium pot, add lima or butter beans, reduce heat and simmer until tender. Remove beans with a slotted spoon to a small bowl and place corn into the same water. Bring to a boil and simmer for about 1 to 2 minutes. Strain and place in the large bowl. Add beans and remaining ingredients. Mix and allow the mixture to come to room temperature. 5. Serve chilled crab salad on leaves of lettuce and summer succotash cold or at room temperature on the side. Serves 4 to 6. Note: Boiled eggs, sliced, and avocado wedges can be added to dress up the salad, if desired.


THE MENU . last call

Kickin’ the Heat! Cavan Mule By Tim McNally

A

“man bites dog” kind of story: August, and no one has to be told or convinced it’s hot. The Founding Fathers of this nation were not talking about New Orleans weather in summer, but they could have been, when they wrote, “We hold these truths to be self-evident….” The challenge to stay cool is met in many ways, but because we are who we are, there has to be an adult beverage answer. There are, in fact, many. We swap possible solutions like so many old baseball cards. “That sounds good, but have you tried this?” Let’s take a crowd favorite, change the core spirit, which changes the nationality of origin, and enjoy something thirst-quenching from a restaurant named for an Emerald Isle county. Irish luck never tasted so rejuvenating.

RECIPE CAVAN MULE

2 oz. Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey 1.5 oz Mule Mix (0.5 oz. ginger juice, 0.5 oz. lemon juice, 0.25 oz. lime juice, 0.25 oz. simple syrup) Top with soda in a Collins glass or copper mug. Lots of ice. Mint garnish. Cavan Restaurant and Bar, 3607 Magazine St., 509-7655, Cavannola.com.

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THE MENU . dining listings H= New Orleans Magazine award winner

Abita Springs Abita Brew Pub Gastropub 72011 Holly St., (985) 892-5837, AbitaBrewPub.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Better-than-expected pub food in its namesake eatery.“Tasteful” tours available for visitors. $$ Akers Middendorf’s Seafood Interstate 55, Exit 15, 30160 Hwy. 51 S., (985) 386-6666, MiddendorfsRestaurant.com. L, D Wed-Sun. Historic seafood destination along the shores of Lake Maurepas is world-famous for its thin-fried catfish fillets. Open since 1934, it’s a Sun. drive tradition. $$ Avondale

H Mosca’s Italian 4137 Hwy. 90 W., 4368950, MoscasRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sat. Italian institution dishes out massive portions of great food, family-style. Good bets are the shrimp Mosca and chicken à la grande. Cash only. $$$ Bywater H Pizza Delicious pizza 617 Piety St., 676-8482, PizzaDelicious.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant , that also offers excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes. Outdoor seating a plus. $ Carrollton Bourré AMERICAN 1510 S. Carrollton Ave., 510-4040. L, D Tue-Sun.“Elevated” street food along with quality daiquiris and wings are the draw at this newcomer from the team behind Boucherie. $$ Breads on Oak Bakery/Breakfast 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. B, L WedSun. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak St. serves breads, sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan-friendly options. $ City Park Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Cir., NO Museum of Art, 482-1264, CafeNoma. com. L, (snacks) Tue-Sun. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $$ Morning Call Bakery/Breakfast 56 Dreyfous Dr., City Park, 885-4068, NewOrleansCityPark.com/in-the-park/ morning-call. 24 hours a day; cash-only. Chicory coffee and beignets make this the quintessential New Orleans coffee shop. $ CBD/Warehouse District H Annunciation Louisiana Fare 1016 Annunciation St., 568-0245, AnnunciationRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Steven Manning brings a refined sensibility to this refined Warehouse District oasis along with his famous fried oysters with melted brie. $$$ Balise Louisiana Fare 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. L Tue-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired 144

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$ = $5-10

bistro in the CBD. Carefully crafted fare fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

H BH Steak Steakhouse Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. D daily. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne Seafood 601 Loyola Ave., 613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Coastal Louisiana with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$ Café Adelaide Louisiana Fare Loews New Orleans Hotel, 300 Poydras St., 595-3305, CafeAdelaide.com. B, L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. This offering from the Commander’s Palace family of restaurants has become a power-lunch favorite for business-people and politicos. Also features the Swizzle Stick Bar. $$$$ Calcasieu Specialty Foods 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2188, CalcasieuRooms.com. For large and small gatherings, the catering menus feature modern Louisiana cooking and the Cajun cuisine for which chef Donald Link is justifiably famous. Chophouse New Orleans Steakhouse 322 Magazine St., 522-7902, ChophouseNola.com. D daily. In addition to USDA prime grade aged steaks, Chophouse offers lobster, redfish and classic steakhouse sides. $$$

H Cochon Louisiana Fare 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. L, D, Mon-Sat. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski feature Cajun and Southern cuisine. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine Reservations recommended. $$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. L Mon-Fri, D Tue-Sat. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this menu, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$ Drago’s Louisiana Fare Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D daily. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

H Domenica Italian The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products. $$$$

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$$$ = $16-20

$$$$ = $21-25

Emeril’s Louisiana Fare 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from all over the world. $$$$$ Gordon Biersch Gastropub 200 Poydras St., 552-2739, GordonBiersch.com. L, D daily. Local outpost of this popular chain serves specialty brews made on-site and crowdpleasing lunch and dinner fare. $$

H Herbsaint Louisiana Fare 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$ Johnny Sanchez World 930 Poydras St., 304-6615, JohnnySanchezRestaurant. com. L, D daily. Contemporary Mexican mecca offering locally sourced produce accompanying the Bistec a la Parilla. Popular happy hour and downtown locale next to South Market District add to the appeal. $$$

H La Boca Steakhouse 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. D Mon-Sat. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Lüke World 333 St. Charles Ave., 3782840, LukeNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, house-made pâtés and plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$ Manning’s AMERICAN 519 Fulton St., 5938118. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. A partnership between New Orleans’ First Family of Football and Harrah’s Casino, Manning’s offers sports bar fans a step up, with a menu that draws on both New Orleans and the Deep South. $$$

$$$$$ = $25 & up

dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$ Palace Café World 605 Canal St., 523-1661, PalaceCafe.com. B, L, D daily. Cassic New Orleans restaurant, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates at the Black Duck Bar. $$$

H Pêche Seafood 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by Chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven, and an excellent raw bar. $$$ Q&C Hotel/Bar AMERICAN 344 Camp St., 587-9700, QandC.com. B, D daily, L Fri-Sun. Boutique hotel bar offering a small plates menu with tempting choices such as a Short Rib Poor Boy and Lobster Mac and Cheese to complement their sophisticated craft cocktails. $$

HRed Gravy Bakery/Breakfast 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. B, Br, L, Wed-Mon. Farm-to-table brunch restaurant offers a creative array of items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$ H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. L Fri, D daily. James Beard Award-winning menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Rock-N-Sake Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake.com. L Fri, D Tue-Sun, late night Fri-Sat. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$

St., 571-9580, MerchantNewOrleans.com. B, L daily. Coffee, creative crêpes, sandwiches and more are served at this sleek and contemporary café on the ground floor of the Merchant Building. $

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution. There are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

Morton’s The Steakhouse Steakhouse 365 Canal St., One Canal Place, 566-0221, Mortons.com/NewOrleans. D daily. Private elevator leads to the plush, wood-paneled environs of this local outpost of the famed Chicago steakhouse popular with politicians and celebrities. $$$$

Sac-A-Lait Seafood 1051 Annunciation St., 324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. $$$$

Mother’s Louisiana Fare 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net. B, L, D daily. Locals and tourists alike endure long lines to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$

The Grill AMERICAN 540 Chartres St., 522-1800. B, L, D daily. A diner with local character staffed by local characters. $

H Merchant Bakery/Breakfast 800 Common

Mulate’s Louisiana Fare 201 Julia St., 5221492, Mulates.com. L, D daily. Live music and

The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent


Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine Italian 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. D daily. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$ Walk-On’s Bistreaux & Bar AMERICAN 1009 Poydras St., 309-6530, Walk-Ons. com. L, D, daily. Burger, sandwiches, wraps and more with a Louisiana twist are served at this sports bar near the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. $$ Warehouse Grille AMERICAN 869 Magazine St., 322-2188, WarehouseGrille.com. L, D daily, Br Fri-Sat. Creative fare served in an art-filled environment. Try the lamb spring rolls. $$ Victory Gastropub 339 Baronne St., 522-8664, VictoryNola.com. D daily. Craft cocktails served by owner and acclaimed bartender Daniel Victory, as well as refined small plates and gourmet pizza. $$ Central City Café Reconcile Louisiana fare 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile. org. L Mon-Fri. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$

Covington Don’s Seafood seafood 126 Lake Dr., (985) 327-7111, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Popular neighborhood seafood joint offers an array of crowd-pleasing south Louisiana dishes, including char-broiled oysters and Zydeco shrimp. Kid’s Menu makes it a good choice for families. $$$ Darrow Café Burnside Louisiana Fare Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Hwy. 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. L daily, Br Sun. Historic plantation’s casual dining option features dishes such as seafood pasta, fried catfish, crawfish and shrimp, gumbo and red beans and rice. $$ Latil’s Landing Louisiana Fare Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Hwy. 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. D Wed-Sun. Nouvelle Louisiane cooking served in an opulent setting features dishes like rack of lamb and plume de veau. $$$$$ Faubourg Marigny Feelings Cafe, Bar and Courtyard Lounge Louisiana Fare 535 Franklin Ave, 446-0040, FeelingsCafeBar.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri. The All New Feelings Marigny is a complete relaunch of the much beloved “Feelings Cafe”. Executive Chef Scott Maki has transformed the menu with an emphasis on contemporary Creole-Louisiana fare.$$$$ Langlois AMERICAN 1710 Pauger St., 934-1010, LangloisNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D

Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-totable alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$

Wed-Sun. *Reservations only Supper club and boutique cooking school in the Marigny serves up culturally informed, farm-to-table fare with the added bonus of instruction. Open kitchen and convivial atmosphere add up to a good time. $$$

French Quarter Angeline AMERICAN 1032 Chartres St., 308-3106, AngelineNola.com. B Mon-Thu, D daily, Br Sat-Sun,. Modern southern with a fine dining focus is this bistro’s hallmark. Southern Fried Quail and Duck Confit Ravoli represent the style. $$$

H Mona’s Café World 504 Frenchmen St., 949-4115. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros.The lentil soup and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

Acme Oyster House Louisiana Fare 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/ Breakfast 2001 Burgundy St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

H Arnaud’s Louisiana Fare 813 Bienville

The Marigny Brasserie AMERICAN 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472, MarignyBrasserie. com. L, D daily. Chic neighborhood bistro with traditional dishes like fried green tomatoes and innovative cocktails such as the cucumber Collins. $$$ Faubourg St. John H Café Degas French 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. L, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

H 1000 Figs World 3141 Ponce De Leon St., 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. L, D Tue-Sat.

St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. D daily, Br Sun. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade Italian 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. L, D daily. Home of the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled allbeef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$ Antoine’s Louisiana Fare 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$

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Antoine’s Annex Specialty Foods 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/AntoinesAnnex. Open daily. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available. BB King’s Blues Club Barbecue 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/neworleans. L, D daily. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician with a menu loaded with BBQ and southern specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$ Bayou Burger Burgers 503 Bourbon St., 529-4256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$ Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes, bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Bayona World 430 Dauphine St., 5254455, Bayona.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ Broussard’s French 819 Conti St., 581-3866, Broussards.com. D daily, Br Sun. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table Gastropub 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Open late, this chefdriven rustic colonial cuisine with rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House Italian 601 Chartres St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. L, D daily. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters Louisiana Fare 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters. com. Br, D daily. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Louisiana Fare Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola. com. B, L, D daily. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various Louisiana cultures, with a contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster Seafood 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. L, D daily. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$

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Creole Cookery Seafood 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. L, D daily. Crowd-pleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

restaurant spotlight Broussard’s Centennial Celebrations Deal By Mirella Cameran

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. L Fri, D daily. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan Steakhouse 620 Chartres St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. Innovative steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro World 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. L, D daily. Central Mexican cuisine along with hand-muddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s Louisiana Fare 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$

H GW Fins Seafood 808 Bienville St., 581-FINS (3467), GWFins.com. D daily. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak Steakhouse 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. L Fri, D Sun-Thu. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails and classic steakhouse fare and inspired dishes. Reservations accepted. $$$ Hard Rock Café AMERICAN 125 Bourbon St., 529-5617, HardRock.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Local outpost of this global brand serves burgers, café fare and drinks in their rock memorabilia-themed environs. $$ House of Blues Louisiana Fare 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues. com/NewOrleans. L, D daily. Good menu complements music in the main room.

m yne w orl eans .com

In the early 1900s, Joseph Broussard was an up-andcoming chef in New Orleans. In 1920, on marrying Rosalie Borrello and moving into her family’s mansion on Conti Street, Joseph had the opportunity to open Broussard’s, now one of the city’s landmark restaurants. Joseph was one of the first chefs to combine his native Creole cuisine with influences from his training in Paris. His unique French Creole style lives on today as one of the greatest and earliest “fusion” styles. To celebrate this legacy, diners can enjoy a 1920 Prix Fixe three-course dinner menu for just $19.20 until September 23. Featured dishes include “Cane Glazed Pork Tenderloin” and “Emperor’s Fool,” and bottles of wine are available for $19.20. During happy hour, a delicious punch is yours for $1.92. Broussard’s, 819 Rue Conti, 581-3866, Broussards.com.

cheryl gerber photo


World-famous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$

flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

Irene’s Cuisine Italian 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. D Mon-Sat. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin Gastropub 730

H Italian Barrel Italian 430 Barracks St., 569-0198, ItalianBarrel.com. L, D daily. Northern Italian dishes like Braciola di Maiale as well as an exhaustive pasta menu tempt at this local favorite that also offers al fresco seating. $$$ Killer Poboys Louisiana Fare 811 Conti St., 252-6745, KillerPoboys.blogspot.com. L, D Wed-Mon. This quasi-popup operating out of the Erin Rose Bar serves some of the city’s best poor boys. $ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen Louisiana Fare 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul. com/KPaul. L Thu-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to the nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish Seafood 337 Charters St., 5985005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chefdriven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou Seafood 208 Bourbon St., 5254755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafoodcentric destination on Bourbon Street. $$$

H Marti’s French 1041 Dumaine St., 5225478, MartisNola.com. L Fri, D daily. Classic French cuisine, small plates and chilled seafood platters like Grand Plateau Fruits De Mer are the calling cards for this restaurant with elegant “Old World” feel. $$$ Muriel’s Jackson Square Italian 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Enjoy local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-behaunted establishment. $$$$ Napoleon House Italian 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. L Mon-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas. A Sazerac or Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $$ NOLA Louisiana Fare 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. L Thu-Mon, D daily. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedarplank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill Seafood 739 Conti St., 5256002, OceanaGrill.com. B, L, D daily. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro Gastropub 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. D daily. Wine is the muse at this bistro, which offers vino by the

Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. D daily. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 Seafood 424 Bourbon St., 309-1574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. L, D daily. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster. $$$ Port of Call Burgers 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. L, D daily. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/ restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

H Restaurant R’evolution Italian 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Jana Billiot and executive sous chef Gabriel Beard are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Ralph Brennan’s Red Fish Grill Italian 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. L, D daily. Chef Austin Kirzner cooks up a broad menu peppered with local favorites such as barbecue oysters, blackened redfish and double-chocolate bread pudding. $$$$$ Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. B, D daily, L Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Old World elegance, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$ Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant Louisiania Fare 301 Dauphine St., 586-0972, RichardFiskes.com. B, Bar Lunch daily. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street is this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-andBacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$ Royal House Louisiania Fare 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. L, D daily. B Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$ SoBou Louisiana Fare 310 Chartres St., 5524095, SoBouNola.com. B, L, D daily. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on an accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tableau Louisiana Fare 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. B Mon-Fri, L Mon-Sat, D daily, Brunch Sat-Sun. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre. $$$

H The Bistreaux Louisiana Fare New

a soccer match or MTV Latino at this home for authentic Central American food. Tacos include a charred carne asada. $$

Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy.com/ dining.html. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$

Lakeview H Cava Louisiana Fare 789 Harrison Ave., 304-9034. D daily. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$

The Bombay Club Louisiana Fare Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. D daily. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$

Lakeview Harbor Burgers 911 Harrison Ave., 486-4887. L, D daily. Burgers are the name of the game at this restaurant. Daily specials, pizza and steaks are offered as well. $

The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. D daily. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

Lakeview Pearl Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 6300 Canal St., 309-5711, LakeviewPearl. com. L, D Mon-Sat. A long list of specialty rolls rounds out the offerings of this AsianFusion restaurant. $$

H Tujague’s Louisiana Fare 823 Decatur

2633, MondoNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. This place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$

H Mondo World 900 Harrison Ave., 224-

St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly sixcourse table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$

Prytania St., 267-7672, GreenForkNola.com. B, L Mon-Sat. Fresh juices, smoothies and vegetarian-friendly fare make The Green Fork a favorite for lovers of healthy food. Catering is offered as well. $$

Garden District Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s AMERICAN 2001 St. Charles Ave., 593-9955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sun. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$

The Tasting Room Gastropub 1906 Magazine St., 581-3880, TTRNewOrleans. com. D Tue-Sun. Flights of wine and sophisticated small plates are the calling cards for this wine bar. $$

District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders.com. B, L, D daily. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $

Voodoo BBQ Barbecue 1501 St. Charles Ave., 522-4647, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

Hoshun Restaurant Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. L, D daily. A wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Private dining rooms available. $$

Metairie H Andrea’s Restaurant Italian 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.com. L Mon-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri-Sat. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$

Acme Oyster House Louisiana Fare 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

Gretna H Tan Dinh Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1705 Lafayette St., 361-8008. B, L, D daily. Roasted quail and the beef pho rule at this Vietnamese outpost. $$

Austin’s Louisiana Fare 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. D Mon-Sat. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$

Harahan

H Oak Oven Italian 6625 Jefferson Highway, Harahan, 305-4039, OakOvenRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Wood-fired pizza and seasonal Italian cuisine with a locavore philosophy brings respite to the burbs. Family friendly with patio seating to boot. $$ Kenner H Fiesta Latina World 1924 Airline Drive, 469-5792, FiestaLatinaRestaurant.com. B, L, D daily. A big-screen TV normally shows

Lower Garden District

H The Green Fork Vegan/Vegetarian 1400

Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. L, D daily. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. D daily, L Mon-Fri. Br Sun. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this familyfriendly neighborhood spot. $$$

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Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. B, L Mon-Sat. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. B, L daily; D Mon-Sat. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options, and gourmet coffee and espresso drinks create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. $ Crabby Jack’s Louisiana Fare 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola. com. L Mon-Sat. Lunch outpost of JacquesImo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$ Don’s Seafood seafood 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials. $$$ Drago’s Louisiana Fare 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$ Heritage Grill AMERICAN 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 934-4900, HeritageGrillMetairie.com. L Mon-Fri. This lunch-only destination caters to the office crowd offers an express two-course lunch along with its regular menu. $$ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN 714 Elmeer Ave., 896-7300, MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, burgers, soups, salads and deli-style sandwiches. $ Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Seafood 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

H Royal China Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 600 Veterans Blvd., 831-9633. L daily, D Tue-Sun. Popular and family-friendly Chinese restaurant is one of the few places around that serves dim sum. $$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris.com. L Fri, D daily. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution, and great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sucré Specialty Foods 3301 Veterans Blvd., 834-2277, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available. 148

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Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Voodoo BBQ Barbecue 2740 Severn Ave., 353-4227, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

restaurant spotlight Funky Oasis in Heart of Bywater By Mirella Cameran

Mid-City

H Blue Dot Donuts Specialty Foods 4301 Canal St., 218-4866, BlueDotDonuts.com. B, L Tue-Sun. The Bacon Maple Long John gets all the press, but returning customers are happy with the classics as well as twists like peanut butter and jelly.

H Café Minh Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4139 Canal St., 482-6266, CafeMinh.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Chef Minh Bui and Cynthia Vutran bring fusion to Vietnamese cuisine with French accents and a contemporary flair. $$

H Crescent City Steaks Steakhouse 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. L Tue-Fri & Sun, D Tue-Sun. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$ Five Happiness Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. L, D daily. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and house-baked duck. $$ Gracious Bakery + Café Bakery/Breakfast 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B, L daily. Boutique bakery offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $ Juan’s Flying Burrito World 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 486-9950, JuansFlyingBurrito.com. L, D daily. Hardcore tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Louisiana Fare 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582,

There are so many must-do experiences in New

KatiesInMidCity.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

Orleans, but The Country Club in the Bywater is a hidden

H Liuzza’s Italian 3636 Bienville St.,

anyone over 21. Chef Chris Barbato oversees the recently

482-9120, Liuzzas.com. L, D daily. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

H Mandina’s Louisiania Fare 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$

H Mona’s Café World 3901 Banks St.,

jewel that you should definitely make time for. A fun, funky place, it has an insider’s clubby feel, but is open to renovated restaurant including the weekend brunch and the club’s famous Saturday “Drag Brunch.” The pool and poolside bar are great spots to cool off from the heat, and if it rains there’s happy hour all day. The Country Club, 634 Louisa St., 945-0742, Infotccno.com.

482-7743. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros. The lentil soup and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

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H MoPho Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-andmatch pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$ Parkway Bakery and Tavern AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys. com. L, D Wed-Mon. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $ Ralph’s On The Park Italian 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. Br Sun, L Tue-Fri, D daily. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast 139 S. Cortez St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe. net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

H Taqueria Guerrero World 208 N. Carrollton Ave., 484-6959. B, L, D, Tue-Sat. Friendly staff and authentic Mexican cuisine make this affordable neighborhood restaurant a neighborhood favorite. BYOB $

H Toups’ Meatery Louisiana Fare 845 N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. L, D Tue-Sat. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$

Little Tokyo Asian Fusion/Pan Asian Multiple locations, LittleTokyoNola.com. L, D daily. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$

Trèo Gastropub 3835 Tulane Ave., 304-4878, TreoNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D daily. Craft cocktail bar also serves a short but excellent small plates menu to accompany its artfully composed libations. $$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Seafood Multiple Locations, MrEdsRestaurants. com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. A seafood lover’s paradise offers an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. A raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw. $$$

Multiple Locations Byblos World Multiple Locations, ByblosRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Upscale Middle Eastern cuisine featuring traditional seafood, lamb and vegetarian options. $$ Café du Monde Bakery/Breakfast Multiple Locations, CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Bakery/Breakfast Multiple locations in New Orleans, Metairie and Northshore, CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $ Copeland’s LouisianA Fare Multiple Locations, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$

AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Dakota AMERICAN 629 N. Highway 190, (985) 892-3712, TheDakotaRestaurant.com. L Tue-Fri, D M on-Sat. A sophisticated dining experience with generous portions. $$$$$

H Del Porto Ristorante Italian 501 E. Boston St., (985) 875-1006, DelPortoRistorante.com. L, D Tue-Sat. One of the Northshore’s premier fine dining destinations serving Italian food that makes use of locally sourced meats and produce. $$$

Reginelli’s Pizzeria pizza Multiple Locations, Reginellis.com. L, D daily. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$

Gallagher’s Grill Louisiana Fare 509 S. Tyler St., (985) 892-9992, GallaghersGrill.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Chef Pat Gallagher’s destination restaurant offers al fresco seating to accompany classically inspired New Orleans fare. Event catering offered. $$$

Theo’s Pizza Multiple Locations, TheosPizza.com. L, D daily. The crackercrisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with local ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN Multiple Locations, ZeaRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular spot serves a variety of grilled items, appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Catering services available. $$$ Northshore Acme Oyster House Louisiana Fare 1202 N. Highway 190, Covington, (985) 246-6155,

Riverbend H Ba Chi Canteen Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 7900 Maple St., 373-5628. L, D Mon-Sat. The kitchen plays fast and loose with Vietnamese fare at this eclectic outpost on Maple Street. Try the caramelized pork “Baco”. $

H Boucherie Louisiana Fare 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola. com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$

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Brigtsen’s Louisiana Fare 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

HCarrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. L Sat-Sun, D Tue-Sat. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$

H Chill Out Café Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 729 Burdette St., 872-9628. B, L daily, D Mon-Sat. Thai food and breakfast favorites like waffles and pancakes can both be had at this affordable college-friendly hangout. $

H Cowbell Burgers 8801 Oak St., 298-8689, Cowbell-Nola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Burgers and homemade sauces on potato rolls are the specialty here, along with other favorites. $$ Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market Louisiana Fare 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket.com. B, L, D daily. Historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ Uptown Amici Italian 3218 Magazine St., 300-1250, AmiciNola.com. L, D daily. Coal-fired pizza, with an impressive list of authentic and Creole Italian specialties as well. $$

H Ancora pizza 4508 Freret St., 324-1636, AncoraPizza.com. D daily. Authentic Neapolitan-style pizza fired in an oven imported from Naples. The housemade charcuterie makes it a double-winner. $$ H Apolline Louisiana Fare 4729 Magazine St., 894-8881, ApollineRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sun, Br Sat-Sun. Cozy gem serves a refined menu of French and Creole classics peppered with Southern influences. $$$ Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute. org. B, L Tue-Sat, Br Sun. A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Bouligny Tavern Gastropub 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern.com. D Mon-Sat. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$

H Café Abyssinia World 3511 Magazine St., 894-6238. L, D daily. One of a just few authentic Ethiopian restaurants in the city, excellent injera and spicy vegetarian fare make this a local favorite. $$ Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. B, L, D daily. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $ Casamento’s Louisiana Fare 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. L Thu-Sat, D Thu-Sun. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and for all major holidays. $$

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Chiba Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 8312 Oak St., 826-9119, Chiba-Nola.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Contemporary restaurant features fresh, exotic fish from all over the world and fusion fare to go along with typical Japanese options. Extensive sake list and late night happy hours are a plus. $$$ Clancy’s Louisiana Fare 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. L Thu-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$ Commander’s Palace Louisiana Fare 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Awardwinner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$

H Coquette French 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from the chefs. $$$ Dick and Jenny’s Louisiana Fare 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys.com. D Mon-Sat. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$ Domilise’s Louisiana Fare 5240 Annunciation St., 899-912. L, D Mon-Sat. Local institution and rite-of-passage for those wanting an initiation to the real New Orleans. Wonderful poor boys and a unique atmosphere make this a one-of-a-kind place. $ Frankie & Johnny’s Seafood 321 Arabella St., 243-1234, FrankieAndJohnnys.net. L, D daily. Serves fried and boiled seafood along with poor boys and daily lunch specials. Kid-friendly. $$

H Gautreau’s Louisiana Fare 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along with contemporary creations. $$$$$ Jacques-Imo’s Cafe Louisiana Fare 8324 Oak St., 861-0886, Jacques-Imos.com. D Mon-Sat. Reinvented New Orleans cuisine served in a party atmosphere. The deep-fried roast beef poor boy is delicious. The lively bar scene offsets the long wait on weekends. $$$$ Juan’s Flying Burrito 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000, JuansFlyingBurrito.com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Jung’s Golden Dragon Asian Fusion/ Pan Asian 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280, JungsChinese.com. L, D daily. This Chinese destination is a real find. One of the few local Chinese places that breaks the Americanized mold. $

H La Crêpe Nanou French 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. D daily, Br Sun. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery French 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. L

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Tue-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette French 3637 Magazine St., 895-1636, LiletteRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

H Magasin Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4201 Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN 3827 Baronne St., 899-7411, MartinWine.com. Wine by the glass or bottle with cheeses, salads, sandwiches and snacks. $

H Panchita’s World 1434 S. Carrollton Ave., 281-4127. L, D daily. Authentic, budgetfriendly Mexican restaurant serves tamales, mole and offers free chips and salsa as well as sangria. $ Pascal’s Manale Italian 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. A neighborhood favorite since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$

H Patois World 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441, PatoisNola.com. L Fri, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. French food, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$ Pizza Domenica pizza 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. A pizza centric spinoff of the popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitanstyle pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast 200 Magazine St., 525-9355; 1005 Canal St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

H Shaya World 4213 Magazine St., 891-4213, ShayaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. James Beard Award-winning menu pays homage to Israel at this contemporary Israeli hotspot. $$$ St. James Cheese Company Specialty Foods 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737, StJamesCheese.com. Open daily. Specialty shop offers a selection of fine cheeses, wines, beers and related accouterments. Look for wine and cheese specials every Friday. Sucré Specialty Foods 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily & nightly. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available.

Tracey’s Irish Restaurant & Bar AMERICAN 2604 Magazine St., 897-5413, TraceysNola. com. L, D daily. Neighborhood bar with one of the best roast beef poor boys in town. The gumbo, cheeseburger poor boy and other sandwiches are also winners. Also a great location to watch the game. $

H The Company Burger Burgers 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger. com. L, D daily. Custom-baked butterbrushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $ The Delachaise Gastropub 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise.com. D daily. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$ H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. D Wed-Sun. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger presents this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$ H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 309-0069, WayfareNola.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Creative sandwiches and southerninspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. D Tue-Sat. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sun. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Warehouse District Lucy’s World 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 523-8995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. L, D daily. Island-themed oasis with a menu that cherry-picks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay into the wee hours. $ West Bank Nine Roses Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1100 Stephen St., 366-7665, NineRosesResturant. com. L, D Sun-Tue, Thu-Sat. The extensive Vietnamese menu specializes in hot pots, noodles and dishes big enough for everyone to share. $$ West End Landry’s Seafood Seafood 8000 Lakeshore Drive, West End, 283-1010, LandrysSeafood. com. L, D daily. Kid-friendly and popular seafood spot serves of heaping platters of fried shrimp, Gulf oysters, catfish and more. $$

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com


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TRY THIS

Keep Rollin, Rollin, Rollin Making sushi by KELLY MASSICOT

I

t is safe to say that I could eat some form of sushi, from rolls to sashimi, every day of my life – much to my co-workers dismay. There’s nothing better than fresh salmon or tuna (my favorite) with avocado, rice and endless amounts of toppings. As the path this column typically takes, I bring my obsession to new levels, and so decided to try my hand at making my own sushi. When Chef Dirk Dantin, executive chef and partner of Rock-nSake cafes, dropped a piece of fresh tuna that was about as long as my leg, I knew this “Try This” was going down in my book as one of the best, right behind the time I went skydiving. Rock-n-Sake offers guests an 166

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opportunity to try sushi personally made by the chef, as well as learn a few techniques of their own – and a few of the editors in our office jumped at the opportunity to give it a try. Rock-n-Sake New Orleans has a side room that can be sectioned off for private parties. The four of us were able to sit right at the sushi bar and observe everything Chef Dirk was doing. First he explained a bit of his background (he learned sushi techniques in Tampa after Hurricane Katrina.) Next, while he sliced the tuna, he gave us a few cooking tips – always cut with the grain, not against because it will pull it apart, and the perfect amount of sushi rice is about the size of a bath bomb.

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At the start, Chef Dirk made us a few delicious rolls and said getting to experiment with different fish and flavor combinations was one of the best parts. He eventually let us, the professionals, step in and create our own rolls by picking our own fish, any other additions inside the roll and all the toppings. Mine had tempura shrimp and cream cheese with salmon on top. I even got to use a cooking torch to lightly sear the salmon on top of my roll. Learning how to correctly create one of my favorite things to eat gave me a huge appreciation for what I believe is an art form. I also surprised myself by creating a pretty tasty roll and not slicing a finger off or setting anything on

fire in the process. Rock-n-Sake can accommodate parties of all sizes, from sororities to bachelorette events. But when it comes to the sushi making class, 4 was a perfect number. We each got a hands-on lesson from Chef Dirk, got to make our own creations and really take control of what we were trying…and then eating. My confidence in my sushimaking abilities may be a little high now (although no sushi restaurant is going to hire me), but now when I’m eating Rock-n-Sake’s popular LSU roll, I can say I know exactly how they made it - and that, to me, makes the entire experience a little more special. •

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ETC.

Discover Portofino

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Just a few hours away from New Orleans are a host of resorts to enjoy. Portofino Island Resort is situated on 26 beautiful acres in Pensacola Beach, Florida. Located between the emerald waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the gentle shores of Santa Rosa Sound, it combines everything you could want in a beach vacation. The “Sky Homes” offer modern conveniences and the design is modern and sophisticated. Guests can choose between a vast array of watersports, fishing and golf; or you can just sit back, relax and watch the dolphins swim by. Portofinoisland.com, 866-966-1420.

Club Pilates Strong After One Year Club Pilates, conveniently located in Old Metairie, is celebrating its first anniversary this month. There are more than 55 classes on the schedule each week. The mission of Club Pilates is to bring Pilates to people of all ages and abilities at an affordable price. Pure to the Joseph Pilate’s original Reformer-based “Contrology Method,” the full body workout is modernized with state-of-the-art equipment and all the instructors are comprehensively certified. 2513 Metairie Rd., Metairie, 484-9650, Clubpilates.com/location/oldmetairie.

By Mirella Cameran

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streetcar

by errol laborde

From K&B, Rite Aid and Onward

W

hen I first saw the signs on the Rite Aid drug stores showing the switch to Walgreens, it reminded me of the day in 1997 when I was driving on Canal Boulevard and saw a work crew taking down a store’s big purple K&B sign to be replaced with the Rite Aid logo. No offense to Rite Aid, but “KB” (as it was more commonly known) was part of us. In its prime, locally-owned K&B, which eventually branched out to 185 stores across six states, was more than just a pharmacy, but a mini department store, plus a lunch counter and, perhaps most important, a dispenser of local culture, including the nectar sodas 168

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sold at the lunch counter. The company also had its own label of ice cream with its stellar flavor being a locally inspired Creole cream cheese. There were also K&B brand beer and whiskey, all sporting the famous purple logo. Because of carnival and LSU, purple is already a well-established color in New Orleans traditions, but KB’s color was lighter and more distinctive. To us it was known simply as “KB purple.” (On garbage collection days the streetscape was colored with KB purple cans.) Most of us had never heard of the New Jersey-based Rite Aid chain when it bought out K&B. It would have been a challenge for Rite Aid to pretend to be local, but

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it lost any pretense of that during its first Easter season when it did not carry any Elmer’s products, such as the Heavenly Hash or Gold Brick eggs. Neither did it carry the then locally-produced Merlin’s chocolate rabbits. Word spread quickly. That was corrected in the following Easters, though there would never again be frozen cream cheese ice cream in the freezer. Overall Rite Aid was competent, but not spectacular. It was like the new neighbor who replaced the old neighbor who had been a close friend. The neighborhood wasn’t the same. Whereas Rite Aid was a “new to town” successor to K&B, Walgreens

is a powerhouse already well established in the community. It is not entering, but expanding. While Rite Aid leaves no nostalgia, the K&B name at least survives as an item for memorabilia collectors and as a lyric in Benny Grunch’s song about local businesses that “Aint There No More.” Sadly, Merlin’s chocolate rabbits, which was sold to the national Palmer Chocolate company, could also be on Grunch’s list. But blessed are survivors who still make products called Heavenly Hash and Gold Bricks. Certainly Walgreen’s knows you’re there.•

ARTHUR NEAD Illustration


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine August 2018  

New Orleans Magazine August 2018