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E TS EC N PI E R ES TE ” PR AS UR V T F M VO S- O EA YE N 4 ND W O E “ AS E S


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approach to care that places the patient in a partnership with their physician and addresses their health concerns from a full range of factors, such as environmental, nutritional, physical, social, and spiritual, etc., with various evidence-based and peer-reviewed therapies,” explains LeNae, who recently completed the Duke University Integrative Medicine Center’s Leadership Development Program. Dr. Trip’s approach to integrative medicine is centered on emerging information from the Precision Medicine Initiative along with growing clinical health optimization and longevity data. These data focus on the effects that information received by the cells in our body, from inside or outside, has on a person’s inherited genetic information. The influences that the cells are subjected to can modify our genetic infrastructure, yielding positive or negative DNA expression and interpretation. Our cells create healthy (or unhealthy, as the case may be) replacement cells for our bodies as they age and are specific to each individual. These epigenetic responses are therefore the key to understanding how well we age and, ultimately, the length of good health, otherwise known as a person’s healthspan. Dr. Trip employs a comprehensive, four-pillars approach to care that is tailored to the specific goals, abilities, and biological profile of the patient-partner. These pillars, in a general sense, include nutrition,

physical fitness, metabolic and hormonal optimization, and Dr. Trip’s proprietary transformational mind-body health mindfulness motivation program. Each of these pillars is founded upon significant clinical information that is continually evolving. Inclusion of effective complimentary treatments often enhances and improves clinical outcomes. Infinite Health encourages their patients to bring in any unproven treatments or homeopathic therapies for consideration and then assesses their scientific background and therapeutic potential. “What we have found is that when our patient-partners show up, invest in themselves through their time and energy, they not only experience transcendent health but they also experience improved quality of life. Nearly every week we are seeing our patients heal themselves of life-long diabetes, overcome stress, anxiety and depression, eliminate dependence upon narcotic pain medications, and reach weight loss goals despite previous failed attempts,” says Dr. Trip.

For more information about Dr. Trip and Infinite Health Integrative Medicine Center and to schedule an initial consultation, visit YourInfiniteHealth. com or call the practice at (504) 306-0077.


AUGUST 2017 / VOLUME 51 / NUMBER 10 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Editor Liz Scott Monaghan Food Edit­or Dale Curry Dining Edit­or Jay Forman Wine and Spirits Edit­or Tim McNally Restaurant Reporter Robert Peyton Home Editor Lee Cutrone Web Editor Kelly Massicot Staff Writers Jessica DeBold, Melanie Warner Spencer Intern Marie Simoneaux Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Sales Manager Kate Sanders Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Lisa Picone Love, Jessica Marasco Account Executives Claire Cummings, Peyton Simms Director of Marketing and Events Cheryl Lemoine Event Coordinator Whitney Weathers Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Manager Jessica DeBold Production Designers Monique DiPietro, Demi Schaffer, Molly Tullier Traffic Coordinator Topher Balfer Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Subscriptions Manager Brittanie Bryant

WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek

NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE

Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 Subscriptions: (504) 830-7231 MyNewOrleans.com

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2017 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a selfaddressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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contents

70 FEATURES

IN EVERY ISSUE

70

Blade Runners

22

Inside

By Chris Price

“The Truth About Ticks”

84

Best Doctors

32

Speaking Out

34

Julia Street

Local Barbershops, Old School and New

559 Physicians in 77 Specialties

By Sarah Ravits

Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon

Questions and Answers About Our City

214 Try This

“Playing with Fire”

216 Streetcar

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“Election Day in Liverpool”

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ON THE COVER

Dr. Akingbola, 2017 Best Doctors, starting on pg. 84. Photographed by Theresa Cassagne


contents

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66

174

THE BEAT

LOCAL COLOR

THE MENU

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Chris Rose

172 Table Talk

“Closing the Door”

56

Modine’s New Orleans

174 Restaurant Insider

“Bless Her, Father”

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Joie d’Eve

60

In Tune

“Hot Weather, Cool Concerts”

178 Last Call

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Marquee

Entertainment calendar

Persona

New Orleans Saints’ OT Zach Strief

Biz

“Paying for College”

Education

“Taking the Fast Track”

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Health

“Help in the Office”

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Healthbeat

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“Paging Dr. Right”

Chronicles

“A Rose is a Rose”

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“Bye-Bye Baby”

In Other Words A look at the latest books

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Jazz Life

66

Home

“Clean Eats”

News From the Kitchens: Public Service, Piece of Meat Butcher & Restaurant + Sprout and Press

176 Food

“Net Gain”

The Saltwater

180 Dining Guide

“Deb Cotton, Now and Forever”

“Prime of Their Lives”

DIAL 12, D1

The highly anticipated fourth season of MASTERPIECE “Endeavour” premieres Sunday, August 20 at 8 p.m. Season 4 is once again penned by acclaimed writer Russell Lewis and is comprised of four episodes, entitled “Game”, “Canticle”, “Lazaretto” and “Harvest”. For all program details, visit wyes.org.

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inside

The Truth About Ticks My first malady that involved some sort of procedure was the removal of a tick—the annoying little bug that digs into skin and feeds off of blood. This is not a topic that comes to mind often, except during our annual Best Doctors issue when I am reminded of that day as a kid when the world of medicine was reduced to its most basic. To remove the critter a kindly adult blew cigarette smoke on the affected spot, which supposedly caused the tick to loosen his grip. That proved to be a fatal mistake for the tick, as he was quickly speared by a needle and his carcas flicked into eternity. After a splash of antiseptic I was deemed cured and able to rejoin the tick- free world. Though not without some misconceptions. I seem to recall that my tick diagnosis came during a camping trip, and the likely source was said to be moss which I was told ticks inhabit. I did not need to be told twice. Anyone who knows me knows that they never see me wearing moss. While others envision a romantic drapery on Southern trees, I see an encampment for bloodsuckers. But here’s the rub. While preparing for this column I discovered a list of outdoor myths, one of which is that moss is inhabited by ticks. Not so, says the article. Ticks prefer plants with longer leaves so that they can better swing on to living organisms including, their favorite, dogs. And all this time I could have dressed like a Moss Man for Mardi Gras. Then I discovered another tick myth: cigarettes are not always effective for chasing them away. Supposedly they usually don’t mind the heat. Again, I was disillusioned. One of my earliest childhood cures was based on a discredited method. Next thing someone will say that leeches really don’t cure measles. I guess it is good that there are so many Best Doctors. This medicine stuff can get complicated.

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letters to the editor Tour Guide Defense Hi, I am a proud graduate of the Friends of the Cabildo tour guide training class and I take direct exception to the article Chris Rose wrote about those of us who hold a tour guide license.  His characterization that placed all guides into the same category as the haunted tours is way off base! Seems to me had Mr. Rose taken either of the classes offered he would certainly have a different opinion than the one he put out in your magazine!  Those of us telling the accurate stories of New Orleans to our guests from around the world deserve an apology from this publication and Mr. Rose. Barbara Miller, Slidell Volunteer Tour Guide for Friends of the Cabildo Ed. Response. We appreciate your sensitivity to your colleague tour guides. We have great respect for most tour guides, particularly those who work for institutions such as the Friends of the Cabildo. This article was written as a whimsical piece highlighting one very creative writer’s perceptions of his adventures. We trust our readers will see it that way. “Fish on the Half Shell” July issue As I read your inside column every month in New Orleans Magazine, this month I was looking for a “flashback”. I am a Houstonian with a lot of Nola ties and I can say, without a doubt, Houston inherited Redfish on the half shell from New Orleans restaurants. At least 10 years ago, maybe longer, I vividly remember having the dish in New Orleans at Dante’s Kitchen. I, like you, am just finding it on certain menus in Houston but I’ve been duplicating the dish for over a decade because of my experience at Dante’s. No biggie, but thought you should be aware. I imagine other New Orleans locals will remind you of Chef Loubier’s creation. In my almost 20 years experience in Houston dining, there is rarely a dish originated here that’s not of Latin influence. Enjoy your work. Kyle Ward, Houston Ed. Response. Thank you. We are willing to concede that any gulf dish worth eating is a New Orleans invention. t

have something to say?

Letters to the Editor are welcomed. Be sure that they include your name and town. Please also include your phone number (for verification and not publication.) Letters are subject to editing for brevity and content. Write to: letters@myneworleans.com (use Letter to the Editor as subject line.) Or Letter to the Editor 110 Veterans Boulevard, Suite 123, Metairie, La. 70005 24

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on the web

New Orleans Magazine is on the web, are you? Follow New Orleans Magazine on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Pinterest for all of the latest in New Orleans cuisine, music and more. Make sure to sign up for the daily MyNewOrleans.com newsletter, too. Be the first to read our blogs, get the 411 on top events around the city and see the features and columns from all seven of our publications all in one place. Follow us: Facebook: Facebook.com/NewOrleansMagazine Twitter: @NewOrleansMag Instagram: @NewOrleansMag Pinterest: Pinterest.com/NewOrleansMag Sign up for our newsletters at MyNewOrleans.com/Newsletter

facebook.com/NewOrleansMagazine | twitter.com/neworleansmag pinterest.com/neworleansmag

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2017 Press Club of New Orleans Winners

Ashton Phelps Memorial Award for Editorial Writing: Errol Laborde Special Section: Tiffani Reding Amedeo, Morgan Packard, Sarah Ravits Layout Design: Tiffani Reding Amedeo Cartoon: Mike Luckovich

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meet our sales team

Kate Sanders Henry

Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Lisa Picone Love

Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7263 Lisa@myneworleans.com

Jessica Marasco

Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7220 JessicaM@myneworleans.com

Claire Cummings

Account Executive (504) 830-7250 Claire@myneworleans.com

Peyton Simms

Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Peyton@myneworleans.com

Colleen Monaghan

Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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speaking out

The Monuments Demythifying the “Cult”

As sinister sounding phrases go, it is a whopper. Throughout the monuments controversy Mayor Mitch Landrieu, and the media that supported him, have made reference to something called, “the Cult of the Lost Cause.” During his speech on the day that the Robert E. Lee statue was removed, the mayor used the phrase several times, and the media dutifully followed. Even if someone does not know what the phrase means, a “cult” for a “lost cause” sounds dastardly, clearly something that might require inoculations. What could be worse than combining the implied mystery of a cult with the hopelessness of a lost cause? Yet, it is really not as bad as it sounds, and may even have some curative qualities. “Lost cause” arguments trace back to the early years after the war when Southern leaders were being memorialized. As frequently happens after wars, the defeated side is recalled in terms of what might have been. War recollection becomes akin to the fisherman’s tale about the one that got away. There is, however, a key point in in

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evaluating wars. CIVIL WARS ARE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER WARS AND THEIR AFTERMATH NEEDS TO BE CONSIDERED DIFFERENTLY. Soon after the Lee statue went down, a guest columnist in the Chicago Tribune defended the removal of all Confederate monuments. He pointed out that American colonialists took away a statue of England’s King George III as their revolution intensified. George, however, was a distant despot not to be seen as part of colonial life. Civil wars are neighbors vs. neighbors; sometimes kin vs. kin; certainly familiar destinations embattled against each other. Because of the proximity of people and places there needs to be more sensitivity to the healing. London is a distant outpost; Vicksburg and Gettysburg are not, There are now scholars who argue that the sensitivity to the Lost Cause was good, in that the statues and monuments provided the South some dignity in soothing its wounds. That, in turn, would create a stronger feeling about the nation, perhaps explaining why the South has generally tended to be the most patriotic section of

the country, frequently waving the American flag even in the presence of the Confederate stars and bars, Bruce Catton, one of the distinguished scholars of the war whose books include This Hallowed Ground and A Stillness at Appomattox, for which he won a Pulitzer Prize, argued that the Lost Cause myth helped achieve national reconciliation between North and South: “The legend of the lost cause has served the entire country very well.” Certainly our nation was much more benevolent in its Civil War reconstruction than other countries, such as France, where the guillotine became a symbol. To the credit of the nation’s leaders, they allowed the Confederacy to be remembered but not to rule. We are blessed that the Confederacy lost the war; otherwise the continent, and perhaps the world, would be more fragmented. Slavery might have lasted a little longer but not endured. Ultimately the social issues touched off by the evils of slavery would be fought, and won, more in the courtroom and not the battlefield. Most of all, with the South’s loss we would remain forever as united states. We could have done better though: Imagine if the monuments had not been removed but embellished with plaques providing more context of their history. Imagine also if there was currently a community drive to create new monuments to celebrate diversity. We think there would have been strong community support, including ours. (The idea is not unique to us but we like the suggestion of establishing a monument to musical genius Allen Toussaint to be located somewhere near the Fair Grounds where the Jazz Fest is held.) Instead, in the year leading to our Tri-Centennial, when we could have been united as a city, we were needlessly divided by cult phobia. Our own personal cult is that of What Could Be. n

AN ORIGINAL ©MIKE LUCKOVICH CARTOON FOR NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE


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julia street | WITH POYDRAS THE PARROT THE PURSUIT TO ANSWER ETERNAL QUESTIONS

time in New Orleans back then, but they were struggling with little money. She was completing her nursing training at Hotel Dieu and he was a young newspaper reporter. Uncle Walt told me they had “a great deal” on their ground-floor apartment that used to be the carriage house, off a beautiful courtyard with a fountain. The one-bedroom apartment with a sitting room rented for $30/month, including all utilities and twice-a-week maid service! He said there was a well-known writer for Collier’s magazine also living there. Would you have any way of knowing who that magazine writer might have been? Or, would you know of any other famous residents of 616 Royal? Thanks so much for your fascinating insights into Old New Orleans.

The Corral as it appeared soon after completion.

Milt Grishman Biloxi, MS Dear Julia, Since a recent move to Mid-City I have been exploring this wonderful side of town by walking my shaggy little dog all over the place. The Bayou St. John and City Park are really such lovely areas! On some of my longer walks I have come across a dilapidated building that has made me curious. It is in the middle of City Park, near where I-610 crosses over. It is located off of Golf Drive and across from the greenhouse right there. The architecture is so interesting but it is such a state of neglect I can’t figure out what it is for. Can you shed some light on this topic for me? Thanks, Emily (and Benji the dog) New Orleans You found “the Corral,” also known as the New Orleans City Park Corral Maintenance Facility, which architect Richard Koch designed in the Louisiana Revival Style. Constructed under the auspices of the Work Projects Administration (WPA), the Corral was built in 1936-37 using an estimated 150,000 Louisiana-made bricks

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salvaged from the recent demolitions of the old Presbyterian Hospital and the Orleans Parish Prison that formerly stood at the corner of Saratoga and Gravier streets. The Corral, which cost $50,000, originally housed park equipment and workshops and included living quarters for the Park Keeper and a foreman. The photograph accompanying this column is from the WPA Photograph Collection at the Louisiana Division of the New Orleans Public Library and shows the Corral as it appeared in April 1937, shortly after its completion. Future plans for the facilities’ use are uncertain although one of the buildings might be incorporated into an administrative area for a proposed Splash Park if and when state funding materializes. Another idea involves developing some sort of food service facility. Nothing is definite yet. Dear Julia, My Mom and my Uncle Walt, when they were young and single in 1939, shared an apartment in the French Quarter at 616 Royal Street. It must have been an exciting

When the 1940 city directory was being compiled in late 1939, only five people were listed as residing at 616 Royal Street - Gertrude Demarest, Walter G. Cowan (your uncle), Elizabeth Cowan and Mr. and Mrs. Elbert J. Soskis. Gertrude Demarest’s profession was unspecified and your mother, Elizabeth Cowan, was then working as a nurse for Dr. Julian H. Lombard. Your Uncle Walter, was a reporter for the Item-Tribune and became a very prominent local journalist. Aileen Hall Soskis, a recent Newcomb College graduate, was employed as an industrial artist for the National Youth Administration and was residing at 616 Royal with her husband. Elbert. While I certainly believe your late uncle’s assertion that a Collier’s writer once rented rooms at 616 Royal, I have been unable to prove it and am uncertain to whom he may have referred. On the other hand, your mother and uncle are known

photo Courtesy of louisiana division/city archives, new orleans public library


to have had a noted artist as their neighbor. Aileen Hall Soskis (1915-1988) was a Newcomb-educated artist who worked in several media including pottery, watercolor and pastel. She later moved to Florida with her husband, Dr. Elbert Joque Soskis, whom she divorced in 1974. Aileen Hall Soskis died in 1996 at the age of 83. Dear Julia When I was in college in the early seventies, we used to drive to Picou’s bakery late at night to watch fresh donuts being made (and eating them too!) - afterwards we drove to see the “sparkle houses.” These houses were painted with something that when illuminated by car lights the houses “sparkled.” If I remember correctly the houses were shotguns side by side. Am wondering if anyone else remembers these and where they are located (and if just maybe, they are still there). All I remember is that they weren’t too far from Picou’s bakery. Thanks! Rob Pisani New Orleans, LA I remember Picou’s quite well but I have never heard of the “sparkle houses.” If any of our readers recalls a pair of shiny houses in the Bayou Road area near Broad, please write and let us know what you remember about them. Picou’s Bakery was originally located at 3915 Baronne Street and opened a second location at 2138 Louisiana Avenue before adding the Bayou Road location near the end of WWII. In April 1944, Picou’s purchased Theodore P. Helwick’s well-known bakery at 2501 Bayou Road at North Dorgenois Street. Helwick, formerly pastry chef for the Grunewald Hotel

and later a partner in the Al Jensen Baking Company, was especially famous for his Danish. In the late 1920s, he established the LeBreton Market Bakery and Confectionery. Located across the street from the LeBreton public market, Helwick’s bakery was famous for its extensive line of expertly prepared baked goods. Soon after Helwick retired and sold the bakery on Bayou Road, Picou’s modernized it and changed its name. Picou’s was open around the clock. In its early years, this made them especially popular with shift workers and those employed in wartime industries. The neighborhood got rougher in the years leading up to its closure and sale in the mid-1980s. I’m sure many readers recall going down there for donuts or some other sweet snack such as the ever-popular Washington Pie and putting the payment through a bulletproof compartment then receiving the goodies the same way. n

t Win a restaurant gift certificate

Here is a chance to eat, drink and have your curiosity satiated all at once. Send Julia a question. If we use it, you’ll be eligible for a monthly drawing for a Jazz Brunch for two at The Court of Two Sisters. To take part, send your question to: Julia Street, c/o New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Errol@MyNewOrleans.com. This month’s winners are Milt Grishman, Biloxi, MS and Rob Pisani, New Orleans. myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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The Beat MAR Q U EE | PERSO N A | B I Z | E D U C ATIO N | HEALTH | C HRO N I C LES

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persona, PG. 40

“I knew there was room in the market for more breweries and I wanted to be a part of building something in New Orleans.”

greg miles photograph


THE BEAT | marquee

August Events By Fritz Esker

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TOP PICKS

Whitney White Linen Night

Dirty Linen Night

Red Dress Run

One of summer’s premier see-and-be-seen events in New Orleans, Whitney White Linen Night is a way to drink, socialize, and look at art from some of the city’s wonderful galleries on Julia Street on Saturday, Aug. 5. While not a requirement, it’s recommended to wear (you guessed it) white linen, or at least white clothing. It’s free and open to the public. Information, cacno.org.

On August 12th, White Linen Night’s less formal offshoot, Dirty Linen Night, takes over Royal Street. Attendees can enter Royal Street galleries and antique shops, as well as enjoy food, drinks, and music. Many participating businesses give away dirty martinis and dirty rice. It’s free and open to the public. Information, DirtyLinenNOLA.com.

On August 12th, men and women alike put on their best red dresses and run through the French Quarter. Okay, many of them don’t run, they just walk, drink beer, and socialize. But it’s all in fun and all for a good cause. Registration benefits more than 100 charities, so please make sure you register at NOLARedDress.com and don’t just show up in the Quarter on the 12th with a cooler full of beer. This year’s event will start at Crescent Park.

t CALENDAR

Aug 1-Oct 1: New at NOMA: Recent Acquisitions in Modern and Contemporary Art, New Orleans Museum of Art. Information, Noma.org.

Aug 5: Bring It! Live - 2017, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Aug 1-Aug 31: Coolinary New Orleans, Various Restaurants. Information, CoolinaryNewOrleans.com.

Aug 6: Lionel Richie with Special Guest Mariah Carey, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Aug 3: James Taylor with Special Guest Bonnie Raitt, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Aug 6: Bryson Tiller, Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu.

Aug 3: 2 Chainz, Joy Theater. Information, JoyTheater.com.

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Aug 9: John Mayer, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.


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SPOTLIGHT

three stages of music, the Satchmo Symposium, kids’ activities, and food from local restaurants. For information about Satchmo SummerFest, visit fqfi.org. What makes Satchmo SummerFest stand out?

Satchmo SummerFest is the only local festival dedicated to Louis Armstrong…It’s not just about listening to great music - it’s also about learning from the most renowned Satchmo scholars in the world. And then there’s the food. Jambalaya, crawfish pie, sweet potato pie, crepes… and, of course, red beans, Armstrong’s favorite dish!

Satchmo SummerFest

Satchmo SummerFest President & CEO Wendy Madero discusses this year’s fest. The festival celebrating Louis Armstrong, the Crescent City’s most famous son, returns Aug 4-6 at the New Orleans Jazz Museum at the Old U.S. Mint. The $5 admission helps support local musicians and pays for staging the event, which includes

What’s new this year? The

move back to the Mint is huge. In addition to shade tents at the outdoor stages, we will also have an indoor stage featuring dance lessons.

What are you most excited about? I can’t wait for

(Grammy award-winner) Nicholas Payton’s

performance - we know having him in our lineup would make Satchmo proud.

Are there any tips you would pass on to someone attending for the first time?

Stay hydrated and have fun. We wish Armstrong could’ve been born in October, but the reality is, we’re celebrating his birthday during the peak of summer. The shade and misting tents, not to mention air conditioning at the Mint, will help you beat the heat. First-timers should also add the Sunday jazz Mass at St. Augustine to their itinerary. It’s a beautiful service that’s followed by a very special second-line to the Mint. How does Louis Armstrong still influence the festival?

His influence is strongly present in the musical and educational lineup, as well as the food. But there’s also something less tangible… the love and energy are palpable. n

Aug 11: R. Kelly, Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu.

Aug 27: MattyB, Joy Theater. Information, JoyTheater.com.

Aug 12: Big Easy Rollergirls, Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu.

Aug 30-Sept. 4: Southern Decadence, French Quarter. Information, SouthernDecadence.net.

Aug 13: Lil Yachty, Joy Theater. Information, JoyTheater.com. Aug 17: Van Jones - We Rise Tour, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com. Aug 23: Lost 80’s Live Tour, Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu.

cheryl gerber photographs

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THE BEAT | PERSONA

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at a glance

Age: 33 Born/Raised: Cincinnati, Ohio Education: Bachelor’s degree in communications studies from Northwestern University Favorite Book: The Endurance Favorite Movie: The Goonies Favorite TV Show: Chef’s Table Favorite Food: King Crab Legs Favorite Restaurant: The Stokehold

Zach Strief

Brewing success, both on the field and off By Ashley McLellan

Most Saints fans know him as number 64, Offensive Tackle. Zach Strief has been an integral part of the New Orleans Saints team since he joined in 2006. Taking on his 12th season this fall, he has been a starter for every game he has played since

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2011, has served as offensive team captain four times, and is currently ranked 17th on the team’s all-time games played list. He consistently uses his strength and experience to mentor rookies and support his fellow team members.

What fans may not know about are the leadership roles Strief commands when he’s off the field, where beer, barbecue and business are major players in the off season. The Ohio native and Northwestern graduate annually channels his love of cooking into the “Hogs for a Cause” barbecue competition, which raises money for pediatric cancer research. He also lends his voice and energy to volunteer and leadership efforts throughout the city. Additionally, Strief has combined his love of food and drink with boosting the burgeoning beer brewery business in the city with his recent investment in Port Orleans Brewery - a business that transformed a neglected warehouse into a thriving craft beer and restaurant destination. Port Orleans, 4125 Tchoupitoulas Street, only opened in May, but in three short months has caught the attention of craft beer lovers and foodies alike with in-house restaurant Stokehold. We definitely think Strief is on to something. What’s a better combination than New Orleans Saints football, beer and food?

greg miles PHOTOGRAPH


Q: In your words, describe

your role in your words as a team member of the Saints? First, I’m the starting tackle. That is job number one. After that I think I play a leadership role having been in New Orleans as long as I have.

Q: What is your favorite

thing about your job? I love being in the locker room every day. From my very first season of football my freshman year of high school, it’s been the comraderie that has always appealed the most to me.

Q: What do you do to pre-

pare for a new season every year? First thing I try to do is take an inventory of any new issues or limitations that my body has. Then I make a plan to address those issues. Finally it’s just time to start running and getting in shape. Then our Strength Coach Dan Dalrymple takes over and gets me into ideal condition for playing in the NFL.

Q: What are your passions

off the field? I love cooking, and I love golf. I could do either of them every day and be completely happy.

Q: What got you interested

in craft beer brewing? I was home in Cincinnati a few years ago at a place called the Taft Ale House. The moment I walked in I thought to myself that New Orleans needed more places like this. Then fast forward three years, and two of our partners, Ricky Thomas and Tommy Discon, approached me with the idea of opening a brewery. I was in. I knew there was room in the market for more breweries and I wanted to be a part of building something in New Orleans.

Q: Is there a career goal, either on or off the field, that you aspire to achieve? As a Saint I want to see some of the young guys that are with us now to be here in a decade. I want to feel like I was a part of the continuing development of guys like the guys before me were with me. Off the field, I want to grow Port Orleans into the biggest and best brewery in New Orleans. That’s not going to be an easy road because there are already a bunch of them here and they’re all doing great stuff. n

Q: As a New Orleans

resident since 2006, what appeals to you most about the city? When I moved here, I was told New Orleans was one of the toughest places in the world to move to and one of the toughest to move from. I couldn’t agree more. My favorite thing about this city hands down is the people. There is no better place in the world to sit down and talk to a stranger.

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true confession

When we were kids my dad had to sell a 68’ Corvette that he had rebuilt to support his family. It has always been a goal to be able to build him a 68’ Corvette to replace the one he sacrificed over 30 years ago… He’s taking delivery this year.

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THE BEAT | BIZ

Paying for college

Don’t let financial fear thwart your child’s future By Kathy Finn

It’s the time of year that often sparks anxiety among parents of teenagers. In some cases, moms and dads are preparing to launch a son or daughter into their first college experience, meaning that tearful farewells may lie ahead. But in families where those poignant moments are still a year or more away, the stress could be even higher as parents struggle to figure out how they will pay for the college where their kids will ultimately enroll. The cost of higher education has continued its steady upward march at rates easily exceeding inflation. According to figures from the College Board, total average costs for tuition, room and board at four-year public universities jumped 2.7 percent last year, while the tab for private institu-

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tions rose 3.4 percent. The total average bill at a public university reached $20,090, as privateschool bills hit $45,370. Obviously, the average cost does not come close to the actual tab at the most elite institutions. Kids whose sights are set on Harvard University could owe an eye-popping $63,000 a year. And if their long-term goal is to practice law or medicine, they can expect to add another $100,000 a year in order to earn an Ivy League law or medical degree. For parents and grandparents who are searching for a smidgeon of good news in this pricey discussion, here it is: Very few students pay the full tab at most U.S. colleges and universities. Despite a widespread belief that financial aid for college students is a vanishing asset, total federal, state, in-

stitutional and private assistance for higher education remains substantial. Total aid has, indeed, declined about 9 percent since hitting a peak in 2010-11, but assistance over the past decade has grown by more than 50 percent, with much of the growth coming in federal loans and grants. Only a small portion of students – as few as 10 percent, by some estimates – pay the list price for their college education. That’s because, generally, the only kids who fail to qualify for financial aid are those in families whose household income exceeds $200,000 a year. Promising students in middle-class families will find that a highly selective college could, in fact, be within their reach. It is important that families planning ahead for college understand this fact so that bright kids with potential to become tomorrow’s leaders will not be discouraged from setting their sights high. For anyone who doubts the value of pursuing an educational dream, a College Board publication entitled “Education Pays 2016, The Benefits of Higher Education for Individuals and Society,” offers these findings: • Individuals with higher levels of education earn more, pay more taxes, and are more likely than others to be employed. • Median earnings increase with level of education, but there is considerable variation in earnings at each level of educational attainment. • College education increases the chance that adults will move up the socioeconomic ladder and reduces the chance that adults will rely on public assistance. • College education is associated with healthier lifestyles, reducing health care costs. Adults with higher levels of education are more active citizens than others and are more involved in their children’s activities. All that being said, the cost of access to a college education is still significant and poses a challenge to many families, which is why it is important that they get familiar with financial aid resources. For students who plan to enroll in a Louisiana university, the Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance – www.osfa.


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What it costs

Here are estimated costs for tuition, fees, room and board at selected Louisiana institutions, for residents of the state. Contact financial aid offices at the individual schools for suggestions on how you might whittle down these prices. 2017-18 undergraduate costs* Louisiana State University Tuition and fees: $11,318 Total including fees, room and board: $20,070 University of New Orleans Tuition and fees: $8,854 Total including fees, room and board: $17,519 Loyola University of New Orleans Tuition and fees: $39,492 Total including fees, room and board: $52,158 Tulane University Tuition and fees: $52,960 Total including fees, room and board: $69,760 * Estimates published by the institutions

la.gov/index.jsp – has details of all state-sponsored aid, including: TOPS – a program of state scholarships for Louisiana residents to attend public institutions and schools that are part of the state’s community and technical education system. START Saving Program – an innovative way for families to save toward college via a tax-exempt, managed investment fund, and receive a partial match of funds from the state

LA GO Grant – need-based support for nontraditional and low- to moderate-income students who need additional aid to afford college. Students eyeing out-ofstate institutions should make early contact with their chosen institution to get an idea of what may be available both from the school and various federal sources. A good initial step would be to review the Free Application for Federal Student Aid – available at fafsa.ed.gov – and become familiar with the details it requires. This form is used by most colleges, states and the federal government to determine need and eligibility for a wide range of education grants and work-study programs. A site called NextGenVest – nextgenvest.com – offers a free online mentor who can help suggest scholarship sources and other aspects of financial aid. Students who need to borrow money for college should turn first to the federal government, as federal loans generally are less costly and carry more protections than those available from private lenders. And here’s an encouraging word for parents: Remember that after you fork over a bundle to help secure little Johnny’s future, the federal government offers an American Opportunity Tax Credit of $2,500 a year, per child, against costs for college tuition, fees, books, room and board. [Ed. note: Last month's column should have read "many restaurants" listed on Harrison have opened in the last 10 years; several we listed have been open for much longer, with a history of business on Harrison.] n myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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THE BEAT | education

Breanna Portier

Taking the Fast Track Online links to higher education By Dawn Wilson

Breanna Potier and M. Hunter Gravois have something in common: sizable goals that require a special kind of school to achieve. Potier and Gravois, both 9th graders, think they have found that special school in University View Academy, a public K-12 online school. For the 2017-2018 academic year, UVA is piloting an early college program that allows students statewide to be high school students and college students at the same time.

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Because UVA offers a high school degree that is taken totally online, their students have the flexibility to take on-campus classes at any college in the state. They can also take college classes online. Chartered by the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, UVA has been approved for 50 students for this year’s Early College pilot program, according to UVA Superintendent Lonnie Luce. Eligible students set to graduate high school in 2021

could be handed two degrees when they walk the stage. In addition to the high school diploma, they could also get a two-year associate’s degree from the community college that is nearest them and offers the degree they wish to obtain. Students will have options. They can take 60 credit hours of general education courses that will allow them to attend a four-year college as a junior straight out of high school or get an associate’s technical degree or diploma. With a technical degree, students could enter the workforce straight from high school with the credentials for careers such as paralegal, medical assistant, or process technology, a degree that trains people to operate complex equipment at chemical plants. If the college course covers the same material that a required high school course covers, the college course counts as both college credit and high school credit, Luce said. In the cases of Gravois and Potier, if they stay on track, they will be college graduates two or more years earlier than their peers. Gravois’ goal is to attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a university known internationally for its science and engineering programs. Potier’s goal is to receive a Ph.D. in psychology. “I am very excited,” Potier said. “I want to jump start my career.” Even better, the associate’s degree is free for the student. UVA will use its per-student state allotment to pay for each student’s college tuition, Luce said. UVA is able to pay for college classes because most community college instructors earn less than certified high school teachers. Because the first two years of college will be free for eligible UVA students, any student who is also eligible for the state’s TOPS college scholarship could have two years left of free tuition after graduating to use for a graduate program. If all goes well, that Danley C. Romero PHOTOGRAPH


savings means that Potier could be well on her way to the Ph.D. by the time she’s 21, the age college students typically graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Until recently, UVA, which is located in Baton Rouge, was called Louisiana Connections Academy, and it was affiliated with a national network that offers high school degrees via the web. According to Luce, student performance scores in the past necessitated a change and a new name. “We want to show that we can take online student performance to a higher level,” he said. UVA teachers will focus on student engagement and personalizing education to fit each student. While it’s common for local K-12 school systems in Louisiana and nationally to have agreements with nearby community colleges to allow students to be dual enrolled, Luce notes that as far as he knows, UVA is the only statewide program in the nation. All of UVA’s high school students are encouraged to earn some college credits before they graduate. Luce especially wants students to take college English and math courses because these are the courses that have high dropout rates. If students take them while still in high school, they have access to UVA teachers for help, he said. Even though UVA is an online school, it encourages early college students to attend classes on campus, so that they will have experience with the college environment before heading off to a university. Parents choose web-

based K-12 schools rather than brick and mortar schools for a variety of reasons. In some classes, bullying requires a change. Sometimes the parents travel and want their children to travel with them. Occasionally, the students themselves need location flexibility because they are actors or training for sports competitions. Virtual learning programs such as UVA’s are also alternatives to home schooling. When parents home school their children, they direct most of the learning themselves. Both Potier and Gravois started attending UVA several years ago because their schools didn’t meet their special needs. Because of attention disorder problems, Potier found regular classrooms too noisy to concentrate. Gravois required a more challenging academic environment. “Hunter has always been an early learner,” according to his mother, Amy Gravois. Even after he skipped two grades, she said, “he still needed more.” Because of his gifted status, his mother acknowledges that it has been difficult to find a school capable of moving him in the direction of a university as demanding as MIT. “He wants to learn at a rate that is going to challenge him to reach that goal,” she said. “I am happy we have found a good fit for him.” Hunter Gravois, who is only 12, is looking forward to attending college classes in a regular classroom. He is comfortable around older students, and, he said, “I like the idea of being close to a library.” n myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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THE BEAT | health

Help in the Office

The Physician Extender Will See You Now By Brobson Lutz M.D.

Want to know a medical trade secret? If you call a physician’s office or a clinic for a new patient appointment these days, your first visit is likely to be with a physician extender. Answer one of those ads promising same day doctor appointments, and your odds of face time with an actual physician are like winning a $100 payout on a single play from a nickle slot machine. What is a physician extender? Medical assistants, mostly high school graduates, have been the extra hands in most physician t

term. For nurses, the buzz word is advanced practice clinician. Physician assistants are becoming physician associates. “New patients typically see the nurse practitioner for their first visit, and I see them on their second visit. Once patients become established, they usually see the nurse practitioner, but I try to see all patients at least once yearly,” said a prominent primary care physician in the New Orleans area who asked to remain anonymous. “We have a large managed care practice with several physicians. We hired our first nurse practitioner over 10 years ago. They are a tremendous help as true physician extenders. They take care of the non-critical stuff and do a good job. If the nurse encounters something complicated or out of the ordinary, they ask me to say

Licensing of physician assistants and nurse practitioners in Louisiana

The Louisiana Board of Nursing currently licenses over 3,000 nurse practitioners, a threefold increase since Hurricane Katrina. Requirements include a nursing degree plus additional coursework and training. In Louisiana, nurse practitioners can diagnose and prescribe for patients, but they must be in a defined working relationship with a collaborating physician. This collaborative agreement must include clinical practice guidelines specific to the practice setting. The physician must be available in person or by telephone for any needed advice or assistance. Nurse practitioners have pushed state law changes, so far unsuccessfully, that would allow them to

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practices for eons. They answer the phone, check in patients, take vital signs, help the physician with simple procedures and maybe draw blood. Physician assistants began as a carve out for returning military medics almost 50 years ago. The Veterans Administration embraced the concept, and training programs for “more than a nurse, less than a doctor” proliferated. The nursing profession took umbrage and hatched nurse practitioner programs. Since Hurricane Katrina, the employment of physician extenders in medical practices, clinics and hospitals has soared. Today, newly minted physician extenders do much that was once the sole prevue of physicians. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants were once known as mid-level providers, a now despised

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practice independently from physicians and on their own. Unlike nurse practitioners, physician assistants are licensed by the same state board as physicians. They must first pass a national certifying examination after completing two plus years of curriculum study in an accredited program followed by clinical rotations providing hands on patient experience. Our state board website is difficult to navigate; but according to a national database Louisiana has 769 licensed physician assistants as of April 2017. “The number of persons with chronic conditions such as hypertension,


hello and take a look. By working eight-hour days, our nurse practitioners probably see twice as many patients a week as our physicians who all like to have days off.” Hospitals, especially those lacking intern and resident helping hands, first hired physician extenders to work in their emergency rooms. Happy number crunchers and patient acceptances led to expanded use all over the hospital. Only one emergency room in Orleans and Jefferson parishes does not utilize physician extenders as primary treaters. “At East Jefferson General Hospital emergency room, you will be cared for by a board-certified ER physician. When your life is on the line, our patients deserve and receive the highest quality of care. Whether it’s a heart attack or a little heart burn, we believe that board certified ER physicians provide the highest quality emergency room care,” said Dr. Charles Ochello, an LSU-educated physician who did an emergency medicine residency at Duke before returning to Louisiana. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants now work as hospitalists, in addition to performing speciality consultations especially in the Ochsner system. They interact directly with patients

performing duties once limited to credentialed physicians such as ordering blood tests, imaging studies, drugs, and other treatments. They make daily rounds seeing patients without accompanying physicians. They write discharge orders, issue new prescriptions, and suggest follow-up appointments. All of this is in collaboration with staff physicians who may or may not actually lay hands on the person in the bed. “There are some very good physician extenders. However, I have also seen floor nurses who took online courses and poorly supervised ‘clinical rotations’ suddenly turn in to graduate nurse practitioners. And bingo. Suddenly they are making some frankly scary medical decisions. Over the past few years I am seeing more and more patients that have been misdiagnosed or mistreated by physician extenders. A straightforward “sore throat” is not always so straightforward in the presence of a peritonsillar abscess,” said a local otolaryngologist who asked me not to use his name. Patients and their families should remember that nonphysician providers should always honor requests for direct physician involvement, according to a veteran physician I interviewed. n

diabetes, and lung diseases has increased. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants can help treat these patients. However, we need to assure quality and evidence based care,” said Keith Ferdinand, a noted cardiologist at Tulane who recently served as the interim head of the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. Dr. Vincent Culotta is a well-known gynecologist with strong ties to the Louisiana State Medical Society who took over from Dr. Ferdinand as executive director: “My goal is to make sure we have the best possible medical providers with whatever supervision is needed to protect the citizens of Louisiana.”

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THE BEAT | HEALTHBEAT

Paging Dr. Right

Finding the perfect M.D. for you By Kelly Massicot

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Even the healthiest of people confide in the care of a doctor every once in a while – and if they don’t, they should. But confiding in a doctor can be an intimate relationship. So how does one make sure they find the right M.D. for them? Before I found my rheumatologist, Dr. Madeleine Feldman with The Rheumatology Group, I went through countless doctors who did not believe me when I told them something was off with my health. Through this process, and the multitude of doctors I saw (I lost count at five), I learned how to go into an appointment prepared and confident to ensure a positive outcome, whether I ultimately liked the doctor or not. I think it’s important to remind people that it is okay to not like a doctor. Just because you have been referred to them, or because they have a bunch of letters after their name, does not mean that they are the right doctor for you. It’s okay to go to one appointment and decide to find someone new. Ask your friends and family. Chances are, you are similar in personality to your friends and, at least a few, family members. They will be able to share what they like about their doctors and whether or not you will too. Google It. The internet is a vast and magical place, use it to your advantage. Take the time to Google a new doctor, or even a current physician, and see what the rest of the world is saying about them. This is a great time to find if they have any malpractice suits or complaints held against them. Play the field. Just because you go to one appointment does not mean you are stuck in a relationship with this new doctor. Get another opinion and interview other candidates. Bring questions. Go into your appointment ready and armed with your questions. Not only health-related, but it’s also okay to ask them about themselves as well. In the days or weeks leading up to the appointment, jot down questions, comments or concerns you may have and take them with you. Trust your gut. Ultimately, you know yourself better than anyone. If you aren’t feeling a connection with a doctor, or maybe a bad vibe or two, it’s time for a new candidate. You are the one with the health questions or concerns; if you don’t trust your medical professional you won’t get the help you truly need and deserve. n


THE BEAT | CHRONICLES

A Rose is A Rose Bayou Road Renaissance By Carolyn Kolb

In the earliest days of New Orleans, Bayou Road was a major route from Lake Pontchartrain and Bayou St. John to the French Quarter. Today Bayou Road, near Broad Street, is developing into an artistic crossroads. The Joan Mitchell Arts Center, the Southern Repertory Theater, and the Waldorf School of New Orleans will all have homes in this revitalized neighborhood, with the aid of the architects and planners of Alembic Community Development and the involvement of area residents. Alembic (the name comes from the process by which alchemists turned base metal into gold) offers planning and development services to nonprofit organizations, neighborhoods and cities, with a presence in New York City and in Biloxi, Mississippi. Michael Grote is director of the building programs in the New Orleans office. Grote noted that the Bayou Road project was begun by the late Hal Brown and his wife Shawn 50

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Kennedy as the Rose Community Development Corporation, with a board of directors. An agreement to lease and possibly purchase the St. Rose de Lima Church was signed. A request for proposals brought in Alembic as a development partner, the church was purchased (with two other buildings) and the project began in earnest. The Bayou Tremé Center will focus on the arts, Grote explained. “You can’t leave vacant buildings around. We think these are community assets.” Local businesses have also benefitted from neighborhood improvement. “It’s a commercial strip, and the Historic District Landmarks Commission can speak up on demolition and neglect,” Grote added. “We want to see this an active place yearround.” The Southern Repertory Theater will have its first home base, with a theater constructed inside the church. “We are not changing the space or intention of the building,”

Aimée Hayes, Southern Rep Producing Artistic Director, asserted. Southern Rep will open in the 20182019 season, but they are active now. “We are out in front of the church every second Saturday for an event, and we will be back in September,” Hayes said. One recent Saturday saw a bike fest. “This is a terrific crossroads, and it’s a vibrant, interesting community.” Besides theatrical productions, “the theater has an extensive arts education program, school to stage, five year olds to adults - and we will be offering theater classes through NORD. Those programs will be offered in various forms at this new space,” Hayes noted. Art is also an important part of the curriculum of the Waldorf School of New Orleans, which will occupy an old parochial school building. Another building on site will be office space. Margaret Runyon, enrollment and outreach director, noted that Rudolph Steiner, who set up the first school in Germany after World War I, devised his own education method. “It’s not just arts based, it’s arts integrated. Students create their own lesson books and they illustrate these books, and that is like a record of their learning.” The centennial of Waldorf education is 2019: by then the new school will be open. Currently there are 109 children in Waldorf School elsewhere in town, from pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. Although the school is private, “we will have scholarships for a child from the neighborhood in each grade,” Runyon said. New Orleans native Gia Hamilton, Joan Mitchell Center Director, came home from working in the arts in New York to oversee the center’s local programs: monthly community open houses and a by-invitation residency program. The center’s namesake, Joan Mitchell, was an abstract expressionist painter, and the organization is based in New York. Visual artists in residence are encouraged in creativity by the light-filled studio space and the attractive layout of the campus, which features an eighteenth-century home moved there from Esplanade Avenue in years past. There is communal space as well as housing for the artists. The site is also well designed for New Orleans’s climate, with rain retention facilities. Between 35 and 50 artists a year come through the program, with local artists included. There are 40 nominating organizations, and the awards are coveted. A jury selects the applicants. “I try to be very responsive to artists’ needs.” Hamilton said. “If we see that teaching artists are not applying, we can open up more summer slots. There’s a really nice flexibility in the program.” Local photographer Clifton Faust summed up his time in residence at the Joan Mitchell Center: “This is a beautiful space. I have been productive here.” His fellow artists would agree. n cheryl gerber photograph


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Local Color C H R I S R O S E | M O D I N E G U N C H | J O I E D ’ E V E | in t une | in o t her words | J A Z Z L I F E | H O M E

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In tune, PG. 60

Kate Crutchfield (pictured) and her band Waxahatchee will perform Aug. 7 at One Eyed Jacks.


LOCAL COLOR | chris rose

Closing the door And opening another one By Chris Rose

I have said it a million times: The most important four letter word in the English language is not love. It is home. It’s a lesson I learned in the days, weeks, months and years after Katrina. Home – less as a physical property than an emotional foundation – was what we all clung to, hoped for, dreamed of and set about our lives to rebuild. And it is a lesson that was driven home to me (pun inescapable) these past few weeks with blunt force trauma. I said goodbye to my home. Forever. And what a heartbreaker finality can sometimes be. Let me explain. My dad died in 2013. My mother passed this January. This is not a cry for pity, nor sorrow. Dad was a month short of his 90th birthday; mom was 94. They were married 63 years and lived rich, full, active lives, socialized often, traveled the world and had a bunch of kids of whom they were proud. In short, they crossed off everything on their bucket list. Including their final wishes: To die peace-

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fully in their home. Our home. My home. They brooked no talk of assisted living facilities or hospice as they grew infirm over the years. And so they both stayed. And they both died peacefully, in that house. My dad bought our house in the little Town of Somerset, MD., in 1963. It was a three-story Victorian with three porches, seven bedrooms, a den, two living rooms, two kitchens, five bathrooms, four attics, God knows how many closets and an enormous underground basement that would sometimes flood up to a foot of water after heavy rains. It had a big yard – the greatest Whiffle Ball field ever created by man or nature – a swimming pool, huge old trees and an old rickety garage where the previous owner had committed suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning. Needless to say, taking out the trash late at night when I was a kid used to scare the living bejesus out of me. But otherwise, if I didn’t make it clear enough: It was a kid’s paradise. So much fun we had: My parents, grandparents, my brothers and sisters, our cousins, aunts and uncles, and all of our friends who walked through that front door. And me. And, as of last month, the house even had the same phone number for 54 years: Oliver6-0149. (Remember when phone number began with words and letters? You’d have to be of a certain age, to be sure. As in....old! Trivia fun facts: The Ricardo’s phone number on “I Love Lucy was MUrray Hill5-9975; Rob and Laura Petrie’s number on “The Dick Van Dyke Show” was New Rochelle6-9970.) Ah, memories. Well, that’s all I’ve got now. We sold the house this spring. My remaining family members gathered there last month to clean it out and rummage around for stuff that all seemed meaningless – or even

invisible – during our childhoods, but suddenly all seemed so precious and invaluable. (Side note: If you ever want to find out who the true assholes in your family are, wait until your parents die and leave a house full of stuff behind!) Yeah, it wasn’t pretty on all sides. Me, I’m no prince, but I also wasn’t up for a fight over a piece of furniture. I packed some old photographs, teacups (my mother collected them), sea shells (my dad collected them) and just some other small random things that struck me: The decks of cards my folks used once a month for 50 years to play bridge with their best friends, Larry and Ellie Lillienfield. Small engraved brass and wooden containers and boxes and other delicately painted tchotchkes and souvenirs that my parents gathered from their dozens of cruises and exotic travels over the years. Rooting around in drawers and closets, I found my old stamp collection, my grade school report cards, (not so good), my grade school class portraits (worse!) and a trove of books, toys and just plain stuff accumulated from my youth, my nostalgia, my formative years. My life. My home. And then I walked out of that house for the last time in June, just a few weeks ago. Pulling the door closed behind me left another small piece of my heart somewhere in the irretrievable past. And then I flew back.....to my home. In New Orleans. Funny, how in New Orleans, if you weren’t born here, custom, ritual and plain old native stubbornness never lets you claim this city as your “home.” Well, I’m an orphan now. And I’ve put in 33 years of time, service, triumph, failure, laughter and forgetting here. It’s where I raised my kids. And it’s all I’ve got left. I’m really home now. For true. n


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LOCAL COLOR | MODINE’S NEW ORLEANS

Bless her, Father For she has sinned (sort of) By Modine Gunch

Plastic is the new mortal sin. It used to be sex, but now it’s plastic grocery bags. That’s what my daughter Gladiola says. Well, I hate to tell her what I am going to Hell for. It was not my fault, but God won’t believe me. I was in my cups (34-B) and had also drunk too much. I got to explain. I was at Belle of the Bras, where you get a perfect fit, but the ladies room was occupied, and I had drunk three cups of coffee that morning. So I paid for my new bra and dashed over to Dionne’s art gallery, but it ain’t opened yet. So I run across the street to Laylady, this new little gift shop. There is a sign that says “Restroom for customers ONLY!!!” on the door. I grab something off a shelf labeled “$4 Sale” — I am desperate enough to pay $4 to pee — and look at it — and immediately drop it like a hot banana. I look around. Laylady is an adult toy shop. I assume that is Laylady herself standing behind the big red counter, glaring at me behind her fur-lined glasses. No way will she let me pee for free. 56

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A sign on the counter reads “S-s-s-special! Cool Down After Hot Action!” over a row of little purple mini fans mounted on water bottles that squirt cooling mist on you. I say, “I’ll take this,” shove my credit card at her, and hustle to the ladies’ room. When I come out, my fan-mister is in a plain brown wrapper and I owe Laylady $8.99. This was a expensive bathroom break, I think. But it turns out I can actually use this thing. I am a French Quarter walking tour guide, so my job is extremely hot this time of year, and I don’t mean the same kind of hot as Laylady is talking about. Everybody in New Orleans either stays up to their neck in a pool, or sets in front of a air conditioner, or else temporarily goes to Alaska in the summer, if they can. But I can’t. I got to walk around outside with tourists who love to sweat. But now I can carry my purple fanmister. When my daughter Gladiola asks where I got it, I tell her the health store, being as I am not about to bring up Laylady. Now, Gladiola is into essential oils these days, and she says I should put a few drops of lavender oil in it to make me smell nice while I sweat. So I do. And it turns out, she’s right. Misting myself as I lead keeps me cooler, and I like the smell so much, that when I see a bottle of purple lavender syrup at Rouse’s, I buy that. When my grandkids, Lollipop and Go-Cup, come over, I pour some on vanilla ice cream and they love it. I got to run out and lead a quick tour — a group of nuns

from Minnesota— while the kids are here, so Gladiola says she will take them to the show. I am rushing around getting ready, and little Lollipop says she will put my lavender in my mister-fan for me. I thank her and grab it as I leave. Since the bottle is purple, I don’t realize anything is wrong until halfway through the tour when I start feeling sticky. Then I notice the nuns have stopped chatting amongst theirselves and their eyes are big and round behind their rimless spectacles. Turns out Lollipop didn’t exactly understand about the lavender. Instead of two drops of lavender oil, she poured half a bottle of lavender syrup in my bottle. I thought the nuns were paying close attention because my tour was so educational. It was evidently because I am gradually turning purple. I escort them into Dionne’s Art Gallery, so I can wash off in the restroom, but would you believe, it’s out of order. So I slip out a side door quick and into Laylady’s. I zip past Laylady, into the bathroom and take a while washing off. But when I come out, there, clustered in the middle of the shop, are my nuns, and their eyes are VERY big and round. I shoo them out of there and finish the tour, but I don’t think they are paying a bit of attention. They have seen things they can’t unsee, and there ain’t nothing I can do about it. I hereby promise I will never use plastic grocery bags no more. I hope God takes that into consideration. n LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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LOCAL COLOR | JOIE D’EVE

Bye-Bye Baby Sentiment and relief By Eve Crawford Peyton

My baby just turned five, and I am delighted, and I am sad. With Ruby, I looked forward to every new stage, excited to watch her become more a kid and less a baby. With Georgia, I also look forward to every new stage … but with the bittersweet awareness that each stage she leaves behind is the last time for me. I’m not having any more babies. “I don’t have anywhere to put them!” I joke when the kids ask me why I’m not having any more – and that’s as true as anything. I don’t have anywhere to put them. I also don’t have the energy to raise more kids or the money to raise them with all the things I’d like them to have. (Yes, I know that sounds selfish and materialistic – and yes, I know there are parents who scrimp and save to have like 12 children, and that’s completely noble and fantastic. It’s just not the right choice for me.) I also have high-risk pregnancies, which will only be more complicated now that I am over 35, and I am not emotionally equipped to go through that again.  I have two wonderful daughters and a terrific stepson, and I’m done. But yeah, it’s still sad to sort through the overgrown

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clothes and realize that I’m not going to have another kid to put into the pink-checked overalls that I loved so much. Or that I’ll never need another stroller or baby swing or womb sounds teddy bear or cloth diaper or gliding rocker for nursing. It’s easy to fall into melancholy about it, but the truth is, I’m actually pretty excited about having a five-year-old. And while I might miss the sweet baby smell, here are five things I won’t miss at all:  1. Late-night feedings. There was a time when I truly believed I’d never sleep again. I recently looked at a picture of me from Georgia’s first birthday, and I looked exhausted. That was around the time when she would wake up and want to play every single day from 3:30 to 6. Then at 6, she would promptly fall asleep for a “morning nap” right as I had to get up for work. Now she goes to bed around 9:30 and sleeps until I wake her up. It’s the best.  2. Diapers. “Sometimes I’m sad I’ll never have another baby,” I told my friend Amy, who also has two daughters and whose uterus is also closed for further business. “But mostly I’m really psyched to not ever again have to teach another human how to use the toilet.” We high-fived. 3. Being someone’s sole source of nutrition. Georgia wouldn’t take a bottle, so for several months, I had to plan my entire life around when she might be hungry. More than once, I misestimated, and Robert would call me as I was stuck in traffic coming home from Target or somewhere, and just listening to a hungry baby crying on the other end of the phone while he asked me when I might be home made me start crying while my milk soaked through my shirt. Now when Georgia says she’s hungry, I hand her some peanut

butter crackers. So much better. 4. Crying. Not that she doesn’t still have her fits of pique, but crying is no longer her only form of communication. She can tell me her socks are uncomfortable; she can tell me that she wants to hear a certain lullaby at bedtime. I (mostly) love listening to all the things she can tell me now.  5. “Caillou”. I have no idea why that show appeals so much to children, but it’s actually physically painful to listen to. That is not an opinion. That is a fact. Georgia loved it, and I would sometimes let her watch it if I could arrange to be in another room, but now she doesn’t even ask for it. Now we watch “The Great British Baking Show” or “Wild Kratts” – both vastly preferable to “Caillou” by a factor of about 80 bazillion.  Watching my baby grow up – start kindergarten, do ballet and cheerleading, make friends, master new skills, start sounding out words – is the greatest gift. And yet watching my baby grow up – leaving behind shaky first steps and chubby hands and bottles and the unmistakably nostalgic scent of baby shampoo – is the strangest, deepest sorrow. How can you miss someone who isn’t gone? But, at the same time, how can you deny that, in a very real sense, that baby, that toddler, that eager preschooler is gone forever?  No matter how old she gets – no matter how old either of them get – though, they will both always, always be my babies. n t

blog

Excerpted from Eve Crawford Peyton’s blog, Joie d’Eve, which appears each Friday on MyNewOrleans.com. jane sanders ILLUSTRATION


myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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LOCAL COLOR | in tune

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Dylan LeBlanc

Hot Weather, Cool Concerts Escape the heat with great live music By Mike Griffith

As the summer reaches its height in New Orleans, the music scene quiets down a bit, but there is still a surprisingly wide array of things to do. The month begins with Satchmo Summerfest. After a stint in Jackson Square, the festival is returning to the Mint and partnering with the newly opened Jazz Museum at that site. I love this festival, as it focuses exclusively on the music of New Orleans. The Sunday morning Jazz Mass and Sunday evening Trumpet Tribute are among the highlights of the event. This year the festival runs from August 4-6 and kicks off with a reception at the Omni Royal Orleans. The lineup includes Kermit Ruffins, Topsy Chapman, Nicholas Payton and more. If you’re looking to catch some legends without exposure to the August heat, there are a couple of great shows coming to the Smoothie King Center. On August 3, James Taylor and Bonnie Raitt come to town. Usually I’ll avoid large stadium shows but this pairing is just too good to miss. A few nights later, on the 6th, Lionel Richie will play the same venue. If you missed Richie’s rather wet set at Jazz Fest a few years back, this

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is a great chance to see him in a more controlled environment. For something a little more intimate on the singer/songwriter front, Adam Torres will be at Gasa Gasa on August 3rd. The Austin based Torres released the excellent Pearls to Swine last year and the outstanding EP I Came to Sing the Song was released in February. This will be a great chance to see him up close. There is a quiet elegance to Torres’ playing that will suit Gasa well. Local indie darlings Sweet Crude will host a two night stand at Gasa Gasa on the 4th and 5th. On the funkier side of things, guitarist and singer Mike Zito will take the stage at the Maple Leaf on the 4th. Zito is a co-founder of the Royal Southern Brotherhood, which features a fair number of Maple Leaf regulars. I would expect an exciting show. On August 7 Waxahatchee will roll into One Eyed Jacks with Palehound in tow. This is an excellent pairing. Lead singer Katie Crutchfield will have her full band with her, rather than the bare bones version of Waxahatchee that come through town in May. Their new

Local Talent

With the national concert scene a bit quiet, it’s a great time to catch up on the local scene. First off, the most innovative cat in New Orleans right now, Nicholas Payton will have his Trio at the Prime Example on August 5th (he will also be at Satchmo Summer Fest). The Tipitina’s Free Fridays Concert Series continues this month with The IKO Allstars on the 4th, Gravity A on the 11th, Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes on the 18th, and John “Papa” Gras on the 25th. These shows are fantastic and a great chance to visit an iconic New Orleans venue for free.

record Out in the Storm debuted in July and contains some of the best work Crutchfield and Co. have done to date. These songs are going to swell through the space with a full company of musicians. Americana singer and Shreveport native Dylan LeBlanc will play One Eyed Jacks on the 12th. In a similar vein, the excellent country group Western Centuries will drop in at Siberia. The outstanding Australian born and New York based pop singer Betty Who will be at Republic on August 21st. I had the pleasure of catching a stellar performance from Betty Who at Bonnaroo in 2015. If you’re in the mood to dance, this will be a great night for it. The month ends with a couple of heavier shows at Siberia. On the 27th, Midnight Ghost Train will bring their insanely energetic southern metal to the stage. Finally Inter Arma will close out the month with their grungy sludge rock on the 31st. Even with the heat, there are a ton of things to do this month. Get out and see some great music. Note: Dates are subject to change. Playlist of mentioned bands available at: http://bit. ly/InTune8-17 n

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contact

email Mike@MyNewOrleans.com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.


LOCAL COLOR | in other words

Jazz bio: Local jazz fans will enjoy Queen of Bebop: The Musical Lives of Sarah Vaughn by Elaine M. Hayes. Legendary singer Sarah Vaughn’s story not only encompasses her rise to fame as a performer, but also her fight for equal rights as a woman of color during a time when the radio waves were not accepting across the dial. Although Vaughn was not from New Orleans, she performed here, bringing her voice to such places as Rosy’s jazz club, which recently inspired an acclaimed live album recording. Vaughn’s story, deftly told by Elaine Hayes, is a true American success story and an inspiring summertime read.

New Orleans sketches: Covington native Emma Fick sees the world, and New Orleans, in “Snippets,” colorfully sketched moments in time that capture the true flavor of the city. Fick explores neighborhoods, restaurants, New Orleans notables, and food (check out her cross section of what makes a true poor boy sandwich) with a unique view: she combines the overjoyed wonder of a tourist, with the in-depth knowledge of a well seasoned local, for a guidebook both will enjoy; Snippets of New Orleans would make for a great gift for out of town visitors and NOLA friends alike.

Summer treat: Crescent City Snow by Megan Braden-Perry is exactly what it claims to be: “The Ultimate Guide to New Orleans Snowball Stands” (emphasis on the word “ultimate.”) The book opens with a map, guiding the reader to the coolest treats from Metry to Kenner-brah, Uptown to Gentilly. Snowball stands are listed alphabetically with essential details, such as location, seating and line-queuing information, and whether or not they provide other necessary summertime snacks, including nachos and hot dogs. Braden-Perry also provides important woman-on-the-street coverage of locals’ favorite flavors. Our favorite? Café au Lait or Wedding Cake at Hansen’s Sno-Bliz.

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submissions

By Ashley McLellan. Please send submissions for consideration, attention: Ashley McLellan 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. 62

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LOCAL COLOR | Jazz Life

Deb Cotton, Now and Forever The Final Goodbye By Jason Berry

When Deb Cotton moved to New Orleans before Hurricane Katrina, she wanted to write about food. With a background in journalism and union work in California, she had a hunger for life that pulls people to this disaster-prone city where the music never stops and politics is a wayward bus. “Big Red Cotton” became a Gambit blogger, covering the second line parades for Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs. She dyed her hair red; her face glowed. In 2007 she published Notes from New Orleans, a grand book with a voice to echo across time. “I am sincerely tripping on the amount of play white men throw at me here in New Orleans. Never in all my cumulative years and several cities of residence have white men been so forward in their overtures towards me as New Orleans, proving once again New Orleanians’ compulsive drive to do everything the opposite of everybody everywhere else.” Born in Los Angeles in 1965 to a black father and Jewish mother, Cotton spent her formative years in Oklahoma City with her father’s family, reconnecting later with her mother in California; she graduated from

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San Francisco State. She converted to Judaism, her mother’s faith. Jewish and black, scourge of bad politicians and champion of the second line, Deb Cotton was a life force. “Foot-and-mouth syndrome aside, our biggest issue with Mayor Nagin is his lack of leadership in creating a real plan to rebuild the city,” she wrote in the aching post-K year. “Well, you can’t be a little bit mayor any more than you can be a little bit pregnant....Get packing on the leadership front pronto!” Her book, Notes from New Orleans, does a lot more than bash Nagin, who moved into a penitentiary after it came out. “With each second line that rolled down Ursulines Avenue, New Orleans lured me from my dark brooding funk and tossed me into the fire of dancing Black folks and brass instruments bobbing down the street, burning, sweating, marching from one end of town to the other,” she wrote. “This went on every week for months until one day, between the parades and sessions with my shrink and onset of spring, I began to feel alive again. And the haunting images of dead floating bodies faded away.

“This is the beauty – and the problem – with living in New Orleans. At any given moment, life and death change places with each other when you least expect it.” What haunting prescience, those words. On Mother’s Day 2013, Deb Cotton was one of eighteen people wounded in the crossfire of drug gangsters at the Original Big Seven second line parade. After a long hospitalization with severe internal injuries, she was, miraculously, able to walk. She testified in federal court, asking the judge to give lenience to her shooter, one of three brothers who agreed to a plea bargain. She wanted him to do time, but have a chance at rehabilitation in middle age. Complimenting her, the judge gave him life. She’d had 36 surgeries when we met last year through Mark Hertsgaard, a journalist friend wounded in the lower leg at the same parade. I’ve been working on a documentary about jazz funerals. I was struck by her belief in redemption, so strong that she visited the penitentiary to forgive the dude who shot her. They began corresponding. “What’s better – to hate him?” she said. “Our society turns its back on these boys. What’s wrong with us that we can’t help them?” Day after day, mass shootings flicker past us on the news. The country that put men on the moon won’t halt unrestricted access to military weapons. Duck hunters don’t use AK-47s.     Deb Cotton died of her wounds a month before Steve Scalise was shot. I prayed for his recovery and prayed at her funeral. She was a martyr to the parading tradition she loved for its beauty of music and dance. What a deep soul she was. n frank harris illustration


LOCAL COLOR | home

Left: The living room’s neutral underpinnings are brightened with notes of crimson; antiques from the McNulty’s previous home were combined with new upholstered pieces and acrylic tables (both through Dixon Smith); hand-knotted Khotan rug from NOLA Rugs; the framed landscapes are by Louisiana artist Rhea Gary. Facing Page: Left: An antique farm table and Irish pine sideboard are modernized with the addition of midcentury modern style chairs; the abstract painting above the sideboard is by Alexandria, Louisiana artist Lynn Eustace Sanders. Custom chandelier by Chris Wynne of Chris Wynne Designs. Top, right: The façade of The Octavia. Bottom, right: Mike and Mary McNulty.

Prime of Their Lives Retiring in style on St. Charles Avenue By Lee Cutrone

With all three of their grown children living in New Orleans, and a grandchild on the way, Lake Charles residents Mary and Mike McNulty knew they wanted to be closer to their growing family. The first step was a pied-a-terre in The Octavia, a venerable St. Charles Avenue apartment building that was renovated and converted into condominiums in the 1970s. Turnover of properties in the 18-unit 1907

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building is rare and coveted. But the McNultys lucked into a one-bedroom on the ground floor and began spending weekends in the city, where they’d met years earlier. Mike, a native of Franklin, Louisiana, attended Tulane. Mary, raised in Lake Charles, attended Newcomb. “Mike said ‘what are the chances of all three of our sons landing in the same city and a city that we love?’” says Mary of the couples’

impetus for returning to New Orleans. The McNultys fell in love with The Octavia’s location, amenities and residents, and made it known to the owners of one of the building’s two penthouse units, that they’d like to purchase the space if it ever became available. It did and the McNultys moved quickly. After 40 years of practicing law, Mike retired and the couple began a new adventure as full-time New Orleanians. Their retirement, which is anything but sedate, involves daily visits from family, lots of travel, frequent houseguests, non-profit work, tennis and Mike’s part-time job as a DJ at WTUL. Though Mike initially had reservations about condo-living vs. home owning, the condo’s Photographed by greg miles


convenience and comfort proved tailor-made to their lifestyle in New Orleans. “The reality is that it fit our retirement needs,” he says. “We’re best suited for the condo.” In Lake Charles, the McNulty home was a 5,500 square foot raised coastal cottage they’d built new, but imbued with a sense of age. It was on the water and centrally located to important things, including tennis and Mike’s law firm. In New Orleans, the three-bedroom penthouse, which the couple likens to a treehouse, offered something fresh and different. In addition to having the perfect amount of space for downsizing, while still being large enough to entertain family and guests, it has wide-ranging views of the river and city, several enclosed porches high above the street, plenty of privacy, the sound of streetcars rumbling by and ample morning and afternoon sun. “The first thing I noticed was the light,” says Mary. “The

condo is just above the trees and has three exposures. The light is beautiful.” Like the Lake Charles house, it also is within easy access of the things that matter most to the McNultys. Family members, tennis activities and Tulane University are all nearby. The couples’ grandchildren live just two blocks away. Rather than the wide-plank pine floors and the cozy French Country antiques of their previous home, Mary envisioned a simpler look that would make the most of the condo’s abundant light. She enlisted the help of her friend Joel Fazende of Dixon Smith Interiors in Baton Rouge and told him that the goal was “a clean, quieter, simpler vibe.” “I was particularly struck by the need for simplicity,” she says. Together, with Protocol Construction, they refurbished the myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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Top, left: Blue and white toile and white bed linens lend a crisp feel to the master bedroom, which has views of St. Charles Avenue; toile by Brunschwig & Fils, Matouk duvet and shams from The Linen Registry; at right, is a portrait of the McNultys’ three sons by Lafayette artist Bobbie Houston. Bottom, left: The galley style kitchen with room for a dining table and chairs at one end, was lightened with Carrara marble counters and backsplash and with ripple glass tear drop pendants from West Elm. Top, right: Above the foyer’s English Regency mahogany sideboard is a signed Leroy Neiman lithograph titled “Love Story,” purchased by the McNultys when they married in 1974. Bottom, right: Blue and white Chinese porcelain and a painting by Connie Chapman accent the living room mantel.


Top, left: The bathrooms, like the kitchen, were updated with Carrara marble; the same toile used in the master bedroom is carried through to the master bath. Bottom, left: The McNultys kept the library the same warm brick-red color favored by the previous owners. Top, right: Mary changes the guest room’s bedding and appointments to accommodate both her grandchildren and adult guests.

condo’s already good bones with white walls, dark stained floors, new lighting, renovated bathrooms and Carerra marble in the kitchen; then created an interior that Fazende describes as bright, airy and easy. Antiques from the McNultys’ former home and new upholstered pieces anchor the rooms and are lightened and modernized with touches of acrylic and gilt. In an effort to streamline their home environment, Mary sifted through the couple’s years of mementos, keeping some and letting others go. She also made the conscious decision to make the house completely user-friendly. She uses the fine silver every day rather than keeping it stored away, changes throw pillows according to the mood or season, relishes having her grandchildren visit and never worries over spills. “There is nothing precious in this house that people can’t use,” she says. In fact, she confesses to being more comfortable in this space than in any other home. “I had some reservations about condo living at first, but having lived here now, I have none,” agrees Mike. “It was the right decision for us.” n


Blade Runners By Chris Price Photographed by Craig Mulcahy

“L

ook good, feel good” is a simple maxim around the neck. Then the sounds of the snip of the barbers have stood by for more than scissors and the warm buzz of the clippers give way to 5,000 years and one that seems to prove the feel of hot lather and a razor to taper clean lines true time and again. Everyone has a around the ears, sideburns, and neckline. Finally, it is mental picture of a barbershop and the experience. the brushing off and sprinkle of cool, clean scented Most of it is sensory. Of course, the red, white, talcum powder to prevent razor burn to finish and blue helix-striped barber’s pole marks the job. As the chair swings around toward the location. It starts when the knob the mirror, the sight of the finished work turns. The bell hanging behind the door brings a boost in confidence and changes Local rings. Inside, men gather. Some are a person’s attitude, as well as the way barbershops, waiting for a haircut. Some are just they are perceived by others. old school there to discuss current events, sports, Of course the relationship between and new politics, or gossip. It is a happy place, the barber and the client is paramount. and if only for a moment, an escape A man lets few people touch them in from the worries of the world. If you have such an intimate way. Comfort is built on to wait, you search the ample reading material a foundation of trust, which in turn leads to the available – generally men’s, sports, and car magazines ability to relax and escape. – to pass time. Once your turn, you sink into the New Orleans Magazine surveyed several wellchair’s soft leather and rest your feet on the footstool, established and new ventures to discuss the trade, giving the barber the right angles for the best cut. Next the cultural significance of the barbershop, and its comes the feel of paper tape and an apron wrapped influence on men’s identity.


Aidan Gill for Men


hen asking for recommendations on where to get a men’s haircut in New Orleans, Aidan Gill for Men is usually top of mind. Gill’s passion for barbering is largely credited with helping to save the barbershop from extinction. He entered the trade as a teenager as a barber’s apprentice in Dublin. Too poor to go to college, at 17, he left Ireland for a factory job in London. Soon, he was cutting fellow workers’ hair on the side. He studied at Vidal Sassoon’s school and the London Institute of Fashion, still working and cutting hair. After 10 years of dual careers, he gave up the factory job and opened a shop featuring his newly launched collection of antiques of the barbering trade. “A barber wasn’t exactly the most glamorous job with a future in it,” Gill said. “Everything was going unisex. In the 80s, it was Boy George and color and chemicals.” The shop failed, which gave Gill time to visit his sisters in New Orleans. He met a local girl, and was soon a local, too. He opened a shop on Adams Street, but made his name in 2000 when he moved his shop as part of the avant-garde that helped to revitalize Magazine Street. “I had a savant view of what I wanted to do,” he said. “I was on a mission from God.” Gill established a high-end shop richly stocked with artifacts of the trade, including vintage leather upholstered barber chairs carved from oak and walnut, rich wood cabinetry with marble counter tops, blown-glass bottles, vintage ceramic-coated metal signs, antique towel heaters, an antique collection of leather bound books which chronicle the history of barbershops and shaving back to the 12th Century, and red, white, and blue stained glass barber balls and poles that make the space a working barbershop museum. When he opened on Magazine, he said he barely had enough money to pay his power bill, much less any marketing or advertising. He started inviting groomsmen’s parties to come in for a 30-minute, seven-hot-towel shave before the ceremony. Soon word of mouth spread. Today, his store has shaved someone from every state in the country. Several former apprentices have opened their own shops, including eight who have opened their own shops in New Orleans and one who copied Gill’s idea and décor in a shop in New York. Today, Aidan Gill for Men has two locations, on Magazine and on Fulton Street in the CBD. “The barbershop is valid. The trade is valid. The job is valid,” he said. “My commitment was to make it bigger than me. I didn’t realize it would become a movement. It’s nice to see recognition for the work done and having gotten the resurgence going.”

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Garden District, 2026 Magazine St., 587.9090 CBD, 550 Fulton St., 566.4903

Sunday-Wednesday, Friday: 10 am – 6 pm Thursday: 10 am – 7 pm Saturday: 9 am – 6 pm

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Haircuts: $40 Shaves: $40


Dennis' Barber Shop on Freret


f a quintessential barbershop were needed for a movie set, Dennis’ Barber Shop on Freret Street would be an ideal location. The business has been open for 54 years; proprietor Dennis Sigur has been behind the chair for 45. The interior is reminiscent of the barbershop in the movie “Coming to America,” and serves a similar purpose. “We’re basically a neighborhood shop, but people from all over the city come here. It’s a gathering place. It’s more like a family than a business at times. You know, we go ahead and talk about sports, religion, and politics, but everybody gets their say.” One of the rather unique things about Dennis’ is the hours. The shop has a 15-hour day on Tuesdays and 12-hour days Wednesdays through Saturdays. “I had people coming in late telling me I should open before they go to work. So, I started opening early and people started coming and coming.” Sigur has seen the surrounding neighborhood go through drastic changes in his time at the shop. When he started, he said it was a close knit black community. Over the last 12 years, the neighborhood has gentrified. Still Dennis’ Barber Shop remains a strong connection to the past. “It’s a gathering place, a club without the alcohol,” he said. With a chuckle, Sigur says he got into barbering after a short stint as a welder. “When I got out of high school, I worked at a shipyard in Morgan City and saw this welder coming out of a tight little space like a closet with all of these fumes coming out, and I thought I can’t do that. That’s when I became a barber. I thought you could hang out, get paid, watch TV, listen to the radio all at work. I decided to be a barber right at that moment.”

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4615 Freret St., 895.3834

Tuesday: 6 am – 9 pm Wednesday – Saturday: 5:30 am –5:30 pm Closed Sunday & Monday

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Haircuts: $ Varies Shaves: $ varies


Factotum Barber + Supply


ourbon swirls as it is added to ice cold water while psychedelic Peruvian guitar music spins on the turntable at Factotum Barber + Supply. Master Barber Jason Jones opened his shop in March 2016 after friends bought the legendary Bud Rip’s Old 9th Ward Bar, which had an attached space that housed Jack’s Barber Shop from the late 1960s until 2005. The former owners used the space for storage and offered it to Jones to set up shop. After working at other locations in town, he jumped at the opportunity to have his own place. Today, his appointments are booked out two weeks in advance and he’s adding another barber this month. While the trade always fascinated him, the Algiers native didn’t start his career as a barber. He trained as an electrician and worked in San Francisco steadily until the 2008 recession hit. When the economy tanked, he found himself out of work. “I always had an interest in barbering,” Jones said. “I thought it was a good trade, and that was my opportunity to do something that I’m actually interested in. I enrolled in barber school, and from day one I felt like this is what I should be doing.” In the Bay Area, Jones apprenticed under a third generation barber before returning to New Orleans in 2011. He worked at shops around town, until he got the call about the space at the bar. “I’ve tried to create a neighborhood vibe,” he said. “There are local characters coming in all the time from the street.” He’s built an inviting one-room, two-chair space in which he greets guests at the door with a sipping whisky. A small seating area is stacked with varied reading material from Southern lit journal The Oxford American to vintage 1970s Playboys and Thrasher skateboarding magazine. “It’s different than a salon,” Jones said. “There, a customer might not be handled by someone who is trained and regularly works with clippers and a straight razor. There are little details – hot lather on the back of the neck. But my training is different than a cosmetologist. I know short hair, but I’m not the guy to come to for layering out hair below the shoulder.”

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Bywater, 902 Piety St., 208.9801

Tuesday-Friday: 10 am – 6:00 pm Saturday: 9 am – 5:30 pm Closed Sunday & Monday

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Haircuts: $20 for a 30 min. cut, $35 for 45 min. cut Shaves: $40


Modern Men Barbershop


herie Williams and Paula Niven are anomalies among barbers in that they’re women, but their business, Modern Men, is one of the hottest shops in town. Located in the University neighborhood, Williams, a native New Orleanian, and Niven, originally from Surrey, a quaint village south of London, started their business after working in other area shops for years. With “Handsome on Hampson” as their tagline, the shop sits catty-corner from another New Orleans icon, the house where John Kennedy Toole wrote “A Confederacy of Dunces.” They’ve combined traditional barbershop services in a contemporary ambiance in gear with the neighborhood. “We have a very modern environment,” Niven said. “The ambiance is quite upscale when you walk in, but it feels like family. We have people who will pop in not intending to get a haircut, just to talk.” It’s not uncommon to see all of the chairs at Modern Men turned toward each other in a circle, allowing customers to interact with each other and the other barbers. “It’s a lot of fun. It doesn’t feel like a factory in here,” she said. “And the staff feels like a team, like family, more than employees.” In addition to shaves and haircuts, Modern Men provides nose, ear, and eyebrow waxing. Niven said it is the relations she develops with people in her chair that keeps cutting hair exciting for her. Over her career though, she’s developed a penchant for men’s hair. “I was drawn to guys’ hair because of the relationships that develop,” she said. “It’s more about the interaction than the haircut. The first two haircuts you get instruction on what they want, after that it’s about the relationship. Guys are consistent. They want to come back, and they don’t want to keep telling someone over and over again what they want. With ladies’ hair, it’s all about the haircut.” Niven shared that she thought cutting men’s hair provided more risk than women’s hair. Longer locks provide more room to cover mistakes. “A man’s haircut is harder because you can see if somebody’s jacked your hair up.”

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7701 Hampson St., 309.7103

Monday: 10 am – 5 pm, Tuesday-Wednesday: 10 am – 6 pm Thursday: 10 am – 7 pm, Friday: 10 am – 6 pm Saturday: 9 am – 4 pm, Closed Sunday

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Haircuts: $35 Shaves: $40


Mr. Chill' s First Class Cuts


ilbert Wilson says it takes 20 years for a barber to become a neighborhood institution, but he managed to do it in 17 months. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Wilson, better known as Mr. Chill the Barber, displayed the type of grit and determination that helped New Orleans rise again. His barbershop at South Derbigny and General Pershing flooded and was without electricity. With a pop-up tent and a generator to power his clippers, Wilson went around the corner to an abandoned gas station on the corner of Claiborne and Napoleon avenues and began cutting hair days after the storm passed. “It was a time in your life where if you had any kind of get up in you, you dug deep down in your soul or spirit and came up with a creative idea,” Wilson said. “Going on Claiborne and Napoleon was my creative idea to bring back what I did as a barber, my trade, to a city that had been drowned.” Storm first responders were among his first customers. They shared first-hand accounts with him, and he shared that information with his customers. Soon, he had lines. “Getting a hair cut meant there was a service available and then there might be another and another,” Wilson said. “It gave a glimmer of hope that we were going to come back, that there’s going to be a next step. If Mr. Chill is there, everything is going to be all right.” With the help of his family, fellow barber Aiden Gill, and the Idea Village, a community fundraiser was held to get Wilson a new shop. After 17 months of adjusting the tent to block out the sun’s rays, he opened a shop at the corner of Carrollton and Walmsley avenues. Wilson cut 8,100 heads of hair under that tent, but he said leaving it was like waking up from a nightmare. He exchanged the elements for central air and heat, had a phone and an actual bathroom for his customers. “I had woken up,” he said. “I went from the extreme to the elite.” Today, he says customers can expect the best from Mr. Chill’s First Class Cuts. “It’s like they went to heaven and done met an archangel,” he said with a grin. “Naw, seriously, I’m just like any other barber. I just may have a better story.”

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2736 S Carrollton Ave., 861.7530

Tuesday - Friday: 9 am – 6 pm Saturday: 9 am – 3 pm Closed Sunday & Monday

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Haircuts: $30-35 Shaves: $40


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Q&A

here is no responsibility that we take more seriously than publishing our annual list of best doctors. We totally want to be right about this and we want you to understand our methodology. How are the selections made? We partner with Best Doctors, Inc.®, a global health company headquartered in Boston, which, according to the company, serves more than 40 million users in every major region of the world and works with the best four percent of doctors practicing in the United States to find the right diagnoses and treatment plans. Best Doctors® surveys doctors nationwide, asking them for an assessment of the clinical abilities of their peers and yielding highly qualitative insight into the medical profession. Each physician’s credentials and disciplinary actions are checked, as well as their clinical activity. The Best Doctors in America® database includes doctors in 40 specialties and more than 450 subspecialties of medicine. What question is asked of the doctors who nominate and vote? Best Doctors® contacts each doctor on the previous list and asks the same question: “If you or a loved one needed a doctor in your specialty, and you couldn’t treat them yourself, to whom would you refer them?”

Do doctors get a chance to respond to other names recommended? Every doctor has the opportunity both to comment (confidentially) on the other doctors included in his or her specialty and related specialties, and to make additional nominations. As new names are added to the pool, each undergoes the same peer-evaluation process. What happens to the data? There is a continual refinement of both the voting pool and the nominee pool. Each time a poll is conducted, the list is sifted, refined and improved for better representation and more solid consensuses. How does this differ from local surveys? One major difference: Doctors are evaluated by their peers nationwide – not just by doctors in their community. In many areas doctors may be better known and evaluated by those within their specialty groups, regardless of where they live, than by local doctors who may not be as knowledgeable in specific specialty areas. Why do some hospitals seem to have such a preponderance of doctors listed? Because they have so many doctors. As hospitals expand and open more facilities, their number of doctors increases. Through the years the dominant hospitals have shifted, and they may shift again in the future. The Best Doctors in America® database represents the top four percent of physicians practicing in the country and includes many department

heads, chiefs of staff and doctors in other major positions at the largest medical centers and health systems nationwide.

Do doctors have to pay to be on the list? No! We would never use the list if that were the case. Here is the company’s own statement on that issue: “Best Doctors® never takes compensation of any kind from doctors or hospitals in return for listing doctors in its database, nor does Best Doctors® pay doctors to participate in its survey process.” What are some of the rules that the company uses? Doctors are allowed to vote on others in their hospital and medical practices. The feeling is that those doctors know their peers best – that’s where the survey gets some of its most outspoken evaluations, good and bad. • All of the voting is strictly confidential. • Once a consensus of peer support is achieved, additional research is conducted on credentials, disciplinary actions and clinical activity. • Doctors aren’t notified of their inclusion on the list until after the survey process is completed. Doctors aren’t allowed to pay a fee or required to make a purchase to be included. Are the surveys administered randomly? No. To get opinions with weight and professional credibility, Best Doctors® consults the very best. Researchers contact all current physicians on the list, which includes many department heads at major teaching hospitals, and asks them to rate specialists outside their own facilities. According to Best Doctors®. Where is the bias? There is no perfect, bias-free way to conduct a ranking of any sort. Though Best Doctors® has refined its techniques to eliminate biases through the years, any nomination process that relies on peer evaluations will naturally favor more senior doctors who have had time to develop a reputation. Those who are new in their profession or those who haven’t had much peer interaction will sometimes get less recognition. The breadth and the depth of the voting pool help to eliminate biases and cronyism that might be reflected in smaller surveys. In addition to the peer evaluation, Best Doctors® conducts research on each physician’s credentials, disciplinary actions and clinical activity to determine selections. How were the doctors who are profiled in this section selected? The editorial staff of New Orleans Magazine selected them. We tried to choose people who represented a variety of specialties. Is this the definitive list? No. We have no doubt that there are many worthy doctors who weren’t included in the list. We are confident, however, that all who are listed are truly among the best doctors.


Gallup® has audited and certified Best Doctors, Inc.’s database of physicians, and its companion The Best Doctors in America® List, as using the highest industry standards survey methodology and processes. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America 2017-2018 database, which includes close to 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 40 medical specialties and 400 subspecialties. The Best Doctors in America database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site.

ADDICTION MEDICINE NEW ORLEANS Milton L. Harris, Jr. Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System New Orleans VA Outpatient Clinic Department of Psychiatry 3434 Canal St 504-539-5744 Dean Anthony Hickman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of General Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY HOUMA Robert Douglas Haydel, Jr. Haydel Asthma and Allergy Clinic 4752 Hwy 311, Ste 108 985-857-8271 METAIRIE Carolyn Beach Daul Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Associates 2005 Veterans Blvd, 7th Fl 504-885-2121 Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 NEW ORLEANS W. Edward Davis III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-6742 Luis R. Espinoza LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Rheumatology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 4th Fl 504-412-1517 Kenneth Paris Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 Ricardo U. Sorensen Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589

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Laurianne G. Wild Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600

Jason B. Falterman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Leslie C. Thomas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

ANESTHESIOLOGY COVINGTON Thomas Anzalone St. Tammany Parish Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1202 S Tyler St 985-898-4431

Donald Robert Ganier, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

T. Michael Truxillo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

HAMMOND Richard J. Grisoli North Oaks Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 15790 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-345-2700

Stuart R. Hart Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

METAIRIE Joseph T. Crapanzano , Jr. East Jefferson Pain Management 4320 Houma Blvd, 6th Fl 504-503-4109

John Frederick Heaton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456

SLIDELL Carl A. Mayeaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center - North Shore Department of Anesthesiology 100 Medical Center Dr 504-842-3755

H. Jerrel Fontenot Jefferson Ambulatory Surgery Center 2701 Lake Villa Dr 504-274-3100

Alan David Kaye LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Anesthesiology 1542 Tulane Ave, Ste 656 504-568-2319

Patrick Houstoun Waring The Pain Intervention Center 701 Metairie Rd, Unit 2A310 504-455-2225

Austin Guy Phillips, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

NEW ORLEANS David M. Broussard Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Eric H. Busch Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Emilie Donaldson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Bryan M. Evans Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

James Riopelle LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Anesthesiology 1542 Tulane Ave, Ste 659 504-568-2315 Melissa Russo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medial Center Division of Obstetric Anesthesiology 2700 Napoleon Ave 504-842-3755 Robin B. Stedman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 W. David Sumrall III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE HOUMA Richard P. Abben Cardiovascular Institute of the South 225 Dunn St 985-876-0300 Peter S. Fail Cardiovascular Institute of the South 225 Dunn St 985-876-0300 MARERRO Leslie Wayne Levenson West Jefferson Heart Clinic of Louisiana 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N613 504-349-6800 METAIRIE Roland J. Bourgeois , Jr. East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842 Fortune Anthony Dugan East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170 Yvonne E. Gilliland Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 8th Fl 504-842-4168

James Jude McKinnie Jefferson Electrophysiology 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 300 504-503-6188 Gary D. Menszer East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170 Nicholas D. Pappas East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842 David Warren Snyder East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170 Gregory D. Tilton East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842 NEW ORLEANS Freddy Michel Abi-Samra Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Murtuza J. Ali LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1366 Patrick C. Breaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Mark M. Cassidy Tulane University Heart and Vascular Institute 4201 Woodland Dr, 2nd Fl 504-378-5080


Olugbenga Akingbola, M.D., Ph.D., FAAP, CPE Pediatric Critical Care Specialist Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at Tulane University

one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

The Boy with Sickle Cell Anemia and Respiratory Failure Dr. Olugbenga Akingbola is a native of Lagos, Nigeria who has lived in the United States since 1987 when Case Western in Cleveland offered him a residency after he completed medical school in his native country. He then further pursued his studies, finishing a fellowship in Ann Arbor, Michigan, before settling in New Orleans to work as a pediatric clinical care specialist at Tulane Medical Center and raise his family. As a devout Christian who also plays tenor saxophone in a gospel group, Akingbola — who is currently the director of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit — says that both his faith and his background in science are driving forces in his work as a successful physician and clinical professor at Tulane. Dealing with sick children requires extra sensitivity, and Akingbola says that even during his own youth, his father encouraged him to go into a healing profession because of his kindly demeanor. “I would describe myself as patient,” he says. “I have three boys of my own, and I grew up in a large family so I am comfortable with children and I relate to them,” he says. One of his toughest cases involved a 10-year-old boy — an only child — with sickle cell anemia who experienced sudden respiratory failure. “We were faced with a very tough decision,” he says regarding treatment. “We had to put him on the ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) which uses a modified cardiopulmonary bypass circuit for temporary life support].” It’s a life-saving machine, but it can cause complications. Fortunately, after two weeks, the child’s condition improved. He has now reached adulthood and still receives treatment at the Tulane University Sickle Cell Center. Akingbola has maintained a relationship with the patient and his family. Proud yet humbled by his work, Akingbola hopes to continue his work and eventually return to Nigeria to help share the profound knowledge he has gained along the course of his career.

Undergraduate: University of Ibadan (in Ibadan, Nigeria); Medical School: University of Ibadan (in IBadan, Nigeria); Hometown: Lagos, Nigeria

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Tyrone Jean Collins Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727

Richard Virgil Milani Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135

Christopher James White Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727

Ivory Crittendon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Division of Pediatric Cardiology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-5200

Hamang M. Patel Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721

COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY METAIRIE Jeffrey Farrow Griffin Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates 3100 Galleria Dr, Ste 303 504-456-5108

Rajan A. Patel Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727

Jennifer D. Silinsky Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates 3100 Galleria Dr, Ste 303 504-456-5108

Clement C. Eiswirth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Robert C. Hendel Tulane Medical Center Tulane University Heart and Vascular Institute 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-944-6113 James Stephen Jenkins Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727 Carl Joseph Lavie , Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Thierry H. Le Jemtel Tulane Medical Center Cardiac Transplant and Advanced Heart Failure Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-2096 Paul A. LeLorier LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1358 Stacy Mandras Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721

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Stephen Robert Ramee Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727 J. P. Reilly Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727 Sangeeta Shah Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Frank Wilson Smart LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Hector Osvaldo Ventura Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

NEW ORLEANS David E. Beck Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060 David A. Margolin Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060 Guy R. Orangio LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Colorectal Surgery 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Herschel D. Vargas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060 Charles B. Whitlow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060 CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE HAMMOND Richard J. Grisoli North Oaks Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 15790 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-345-2700

Arvind Yertha North Oaks Pulmonology North Oaks Clinic Bldg, Ste 401 15813 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-230-1580

DERMATOLOGY METAIRIE William Patrick Coleman III 4425 Conlin St 504-455-3180

KENNER Carol M. Mason LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705

Mara A. Haseltine Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225

METAIRIE Thomas Gerard Nuttli East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 NEW ORLEANS Bennett Paul DeBoisblanc University Medical Center New Orleans Comprehensive Pulmonary Hypertension Center 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Stephen Phillips Kantrow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Bobby D. Nossaman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Jairo I. Santanilla Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-4055 Leonardo Seoane Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonology, Lung Transplant and Critical Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4400 David E. Taylor Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Jeffrey C. Poole Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225 Nicole E. Rogers Hair Restoration of the South Galleria Medical Bldg, Ste 201 3100 Galleria Dr 504-315-4247 NEW ORLEANS Erin E. Boh Tulane Medical Center Dermatology Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-1700 Julie Mermilliod Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Dermatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 11th Fl 504-842-3940 Peter W. Simoneaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Dermatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 11th Fl 504-842-3940 EMERGENCY MEDICINE NEW ORLEANS Jeffery A. Baker Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460 Liza DiLeo Thomas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460 Joseph S. Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460


Luis A. Balart, M.D., MACG

one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

Professor of Medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine Director of Hepatology

A New Treatment for Hepatitis C A native of Cuba, Luis Balart, M.D., arrived in New Orleans at the age of 12, and was raised in a medical family. Now a gastroenterologist and hepatologist, Balart primarily deals with patients suffering from serious liver damage and failure. A fellowship early in his career made him realize that the city of New Orleans has especially high rates of liver diseases. “I noticed a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis,” he says, referring to chronic liver damage from a variety of causes (including alcohol abuse) leading to scarring and liver failure. By the time he began his practice, the viruses Hepatitis A and B had been recognized — but a third type, later deemed Hepatitis C, was an emerging mystery to researchers and doctors. Balart explains that Type A is contagious and can be caught by consuming contaminated food; Type B is usually transmitted sexually in the United States. Vaccines now exist to prevent both. To cure the burgeoning epidemic of Hepatitis C, which is contagious through infectious fluids and secretions — commonly through contaminated needles — it has been a nearly three-decade-long challenge, full of trial-and-error and experimental therapies, bureaucratic red tape and partnerships with pharmaceutical companies. But Balart and his peers persevered and opened the door for more research and new medications for Hepatitis C, including Interferon in the late 80’s; their groundbreaking findings of the drug‘s success were published in the New England Journal of Medicine and spurred continuous research in the field. At the time, he says, “we were only curing about 10 percent of patients,” he notes. But thanks to faith and perseverance and continued resources dedicated to curing this illness, three years ago, the first all-oral, direct-acting antiviral agents were approved; now roughly 95 percent of those who suffer from Hepatitis C can fully recover. Balart is amazed by the progress that has been made in treatments for liver ailments, and says it is a joy to have helped accomplish wonderful end results after years of hard work and commitment.

Undergraduate: Louisiana State University Medical School: Louisiana State University Hometown: Guantanamo, Cuba

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Erik Sundell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1516 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460 ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM NEW ORLEANS Samuel Andrews Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4023 Vivian Andrew Fonseca Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Endocrinology 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 Brandy A. Panunti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4023 FAMILY MEDICINE COVINGTON Paul Guilbault Mandeville Private Physician Group 141 Lakeview Cir 985-630-9618 Richard George Marek , Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 E. Edward Martin , Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Kevin C. Plaisance Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Timothy Lacey Riddell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828

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HAMMOND Michael Ashley Dunn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center Tangipahoa Department of Family Medicine 41676 Veterans Ave 985-543-3600 Ted Joseph Hudspeth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center Tangipahoa Department of Family Medicine 41676 Veterans Ave 985-543-3600 LULING Walter Birdsall Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Luling Department of Family Medicine 1057 Paul Maillard Rd 985-785-3740 MANDEVILLE Daniel Keith Jens Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Mandeville Department of Family Medicine 2810 E Causeway Approach 985-875-2340 MARERRO James Theis 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N408 504-349-2908 METAIRIE Gordon M. Magonet East Jefferson Family Medicine Clinic 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-7878 Robert Combel Ryan East Jefferson Family Medicine Clinic 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-7878 NEW ORLEANS Leandro Area Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lakeview Department of Family Medicine 101 W Robert E Lee Blvd, Ste 201 504-846-9646 Tara G. Berner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lakeview Department of Family Medicine 101 W Robert E Lee Blvd, Ste 201 504-846-9646 Sarah W. Holt Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lakeview Department of Family Medicine 101 W Robert E Lee Blvd, Ste 201 504-846-9646

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

Rade N. Pejic Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Department of Family and Community Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000 James Taylor Tebbe , Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Mid-City Department of Family Medicine 411 N Carrollton Ave, Ste 4 504-842-7400 Pamela Wiseman LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Family Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 SLIDELL James Howard Newcomb, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Slidell Department of Family Medicine 2750 E Gause Blvd 985-639-3777 GASTROENTEROLOGY COVINGTON Steven Anthony Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Division of Gastroenterology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 HOUMA Nathaniel S. Winstead Houma Digestive Health Specialists 1026 School St 985-772-6997 KENNER Christopher N. Barrilleaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner Gastroenterology Clinic 180 W Esplanade Ave 504-443-9500 MARRERO Shantiprakash Kedia Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Sanjeeva Reddy Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Gary (Taavi) Reiss Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401

Charles G. Schibler, II Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Rian Moss Tanenbaum Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Steve George Venturatos Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 METAIRIE Howard I. Brenner Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 George E. Catinis Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 Elizabeth Ann McDonald 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 308 504-456-5070 William Morrison Meyers, Jr. Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 Nicholas John Persich Metairie Gastroenterology 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 120 504-456-6701 George Richard Puente Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 David Ralph Silvers Metairie Gastroenterology 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 120 504-456-6701 NEW ORLEANS Luis A. Balart Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 Robert Stephen Bulat Tulane Medical Center GI and Surgery Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5110

Melvin Herman Gold, Jr. University Medical Center New Orleans Division of Gastroenterology 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Benjamin Alfred Guider, Jr. Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 720 504-896-8670 James D. Lilly Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 720 504-896-8670 Fredric Gary Regenstein Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 James William Smith Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Gastroenterology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4015 THIBODAUX Charles J. Monier , Jr. Digestive Health Center 602 N Acadia Rd, Ste 101 985-446-1958 GERIATRIC MEDICINE NEW ORLEANS Lumie Kawasaki Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Geriatrics and Extended Care Service 2400 Canal St 504-507-2072 HAND SURGERY METAIRIE Eric R. George Hand Surgical Associates Hand Center of Louisiana 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 600B 504-454-2191 Harold M. Stokes Pontchartrain Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 3939 Houma Blvd, Ste 21 504-885-6464 NEW ORLEANS Donald C. Faust 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 600 504-899-1000


Liza di Leo Thomas, M.D.

one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

Emergency Physician Ochsner Hospital

Convincing A Patient He Had a Heart Attack Medical mysteries abound in the emergency room, and the challenges that physicians deal with are vast and challenging in mental, physical and emotional ways. Liza Di Leo Thomas, M.D., who has worked at Ochsner since 2001, knew most of her life that she would become a physician one day. As a child, she spent time with her father in his anesthesiology office and keenly listened in on conversations about medicine at “the Sunday dinner table” between her dad and other medical professionals in the family. Being raised by a doctor and a compassionate mother helped her prepare for her role as a doctor. Twelvehour shifts can be physically exhausting for Dr. Thomas — who is also a mother of five —as she often can’t even take a break to eat. Other aspects of the job are emotionally draining for her and the patients and families: No one wants to deliver the tragic news to a someone experiencing balance issues that her symptoms are a result of brain cancer. One of the toughest cases she dealt with recently involved a man who was brought in via ambulance for chest pain. Diagnostically, she says, it was easy: His EKG, done by paramedics, showed signs of a heart attack. Dr. Thomas alerted the cardiologist that the man would likely need an angiogram. Surprisingly, though, when the patient arrived his symptoms subsided. “He actually rolled in on the stretcher, talking on his cell phone and insisted he was just having a panic attack,” she recalls. Cardiologists conferred and decided what to do since his pain had resolved. “He said his pain began after drinking a Coke and taking Ibuprofen, and he believed his pain was a result of that,” recalls Dr. Thomas. She had to convince him that the results of the EKG indicated a heart attack; a panic attack would not produce such changes. The cardiology department finally convinced him to undergo the procedure— though he remained on his cell phone — to receive a stent in one of his coronary arteries for what turned out to be a massive blockage. “It was challenging to communicate the severity of his condition,” she notes. “But I’m proud our team was able to provide lifesaving care to him.”

Undergraduate: Duke University Medical School: Louisiana State University Hometown: New Orleans myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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HEPATOLOGY NEW ORLEANS Luis A. Balart Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 Natalie H. Bzowej Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Nigel Girgrah Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Shobha Joshi Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Fredric Gary Regenstein Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 INFECTIOUS DISEASE COVINGTON Michael Kevin Hill St. Tammany Parish Hospital Department of Hospital Medicine 1202 S Tyler St 985-898-4194 HOUMA Mary Louise Eschete Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Specialty Care Clinic 1978 Industrial Blvd 985-873-1880 METAIRIE Susan Leslie Favrot McLellan Tulane Lakeside Specialty Clinic Section of Infectious Diseases 4724 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 101 504-988-8050 Richard Stephan Witzig East Jefferson General Hospital Department of Hospital Medicine 4200 Houma Blvd, 6th Fl 504-503-4331

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NEW ORLEANS Katherine Baumgarten Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Christopher M. Blais Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Rebecca Adair Clark CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273 Joseph Raymond Dalovisio Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Julia B. Garcia-Diaz Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Michael Edward Hagensee University Medical Center New Orleans Infectious Disease Services 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Sandra Abadie Kemmerly Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Mary J. Murphy CrescentCare Specialty Clinic NO/AIDS Task Force 2601 Tulane Ave, Ste 500 504-821-2601 David Michael Mushatt Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Infectious Diseases 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 George A. Pankey Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4006

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

Nicholas J. Van Sickels CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273 SLIDELL Mary Faith Joubert IMG Physicians 1051 Gause Blvd, Ste 260 985-641-5523 INTERNAL MEDICINE HARAHAN Joseph A. Miceli, III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Internal Medicine 1221 S Clearview Pkwy 504-842-4747 Stacy D. Siegendorf Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Internal Medicine 1221 S Clearview Pkwy 504-842-4747 Fayne M. St. John Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Internal Medicine 1221 S Clearview Pkwy 504-842-4747 METAIRIE James Donald Conway Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820 Janine M. Ferrier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veteran’s Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820

NEW ORLEANS Mary Moore Abell St. Thomas Community Health Center 1020 St Andrew St 504-529-5558

Nona Epstein Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Alys Alper Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Ambulatory Primary Care 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

Sara E. Fernandez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Leslie Anne Blake Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Steven J. Granier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Karen Blessey Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist Napoleon Medical Plaza Department of Internal Medicine 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 890 504-897-4250

Timothy S. Harlan Tulane Medical Center Internal Medicine Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-1001

David M. Borne LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 James W. Bragg Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Todd Burstain Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Lawrence Levy East Jefferson Internal Medicine 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 325 504-888-7111

Pedro Cazabon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Jo Ellen Plunkett-Kasparek Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820

Terry L. Cummings Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Sections of General Academic Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000

Jeffrey Wiese Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Department of Internal Medicine 4700 S I-10 Service Rd W 504-780-8282

Richard Edward Deichmann , Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Kristin Johnson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Michael Landry Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Department of Internal Medicine 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000 Gloria Leary Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Christopher J. Lege Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 460 504-897-7999 Betty P. Lo-Blais LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 Marlowe Maylin Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5800 Angela M. McLean LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366


one of MY TOUGHEST CASes

Dr. Piotr Olejniczak, M.D., Ph.D Director of the Epilepsy Center, LSUHSC

Stimulating the Brain Piotr Olejniczak, M.D, Ph.D., a native of Poland, serves as Director of an accredited Clinical Neurophysiology Residency (fellowship) program at LSUHSC. In late high school, he was inspired by his paternal grandmother, a midwife; and his father, a physician, to enter the field of medicine. He opted to specialize in neurology, and the motivation behind this was simple and clear: “All of our humanity is contained in our brain,” he says. As a neurologist, he encounters —and solves — medical mysteries on a daily basis, and like most health care professionals and scientists, must deal with regulatory and financial hurdles. One case in particular, though, stands out as a stunning example of his own perseverance and the power of trialand-error — along with his bedside manner that fosters trust among his patients. Olejniczak gives credit to the patient himself, who suffered from medically intractable focal onset epilepsy — a condition for which there is still no ultimate cure. The patient has been able to make some progress because he has placed his trust in the doctor, who experimented with multiple types of therapies and medications before finding one that worked the best. “He tried all available medications and encountered dangerous medication side effects on the way,” says Olejniczak. Then, they decided to try a ‘smart brain stimulator’ — an implanted device that delivers electrical stimulation to regions deep in the brain. At the time, it was still in the experimental phase and so far the results have been progressive if not perfect. “We have been fine-tuning that device all the time to achieve modest improvement,” he says. Over the course of his career, the doctor and his patients have learned together to never give up. In his capacity as a physician, Olejniczak says that he is proud of the ability to overcome adversities to set up epilepsy care accessible to all patients.

Undergraduate: Medical University in Wroclaw, Poland; Medical School: Medical University in Wroclaw, Poland; Hometown: Kalisz, Poland

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Eboni G. Price-Haywood Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 866-624-7637

Steven Deitelzweig Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-5766

Charles Clarence Smith III Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500

Danielle King Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Medicine Services 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

Benjamin F. Springgate LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 James D. Stoll Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 INTERNAL MEDICINE/HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE MEDICINE METAIRIE Kenneth B. Smith East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 Susan Leala Vogel Guardian Angel Hospice 825 Little Farms Ave 504-737-2244 NEW ORLEANS Christopher M. Blais Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 INTERNAL MEDICINE/ HOSPITAL MEDICINE METAIRIE Susan Leala Vogel Guardian Angel Hospice 825 Little Farms Ave 504-737-2244 NEW ORLEANS John R. Amoss Touro Infirmary Section of Hospital Medicine 1401 Foucher St 504-568-4624 Oren Blalock Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-7518

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Marianne Maumus Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-7518 Geraldine E. Menard Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-7518 David W. Spruill Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5800 MEDICAL GENETICS NEW ORLEANS Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101 MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY HOUMA Harry John McGaw Cancer Care Specialists 8166 Main St, Ste 201 985-857-8093 METAIRIE Robert Woody Veith 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 200 504-455-0600 NEW ORLEANS Archie Watt Brown, Jr. Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910 Salvador Caputto Crescent City Physicians Department of Hematology and Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8970

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

John Thomas Cole Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910

NEPHROLOGY HOUMA Shaminder M. Gupta Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Division of Nephrology 1978 Industrial Blvd 985-850-2328

Bridgette M. Collins-Burow Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-7444

METAIRIE Jill Suzanne Lindberg New Orleans Nephrology Associates 4409 Utica St, Ste 100 504-457-3687

Robert Van Buren Emmons Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910

NEW ORLEANS A. Brent Alper, Jr. Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5800

Jyotsna Fuloria University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Hematology and Oncology 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

Vecihi Batuman Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030

Marc J. Kahn Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300

Jorge C. Garces Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925

Cindy Anne Leissinger Tulane Medical Center Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders 1430 Tulane Ave 504-988-5433 Hana F. Safah Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-7444 Oliver Sartor Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-7869 Chris Theodossiou Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910 Roy Samuel Weiner Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 THIBODAUX James K. Ellis Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Cancer Center 608 N Acadia Rd 985-493-4346

L. Lee Hamm Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-9831 N. Kevin Krane Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 Laselle St 504-988-5030 Eric Edward Simon Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology and Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 Juan Carlos Velez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Nephrology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 866-624-7637

Rubin Zhang Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 THIBODAUX Allen W. Vander Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Nephrology 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 405 985-446-0871 NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY METAIRIE Najeeb M. Thomas Southern Brain & Spine 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-0141 Rand Marcel Voorhies Southern Brain & Spine 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-0141 NEW ORLEANS Aaron Dumont Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561 NEUROLOGY METAIRIE Donald Adams East Jefferson Neurological Associates 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 205 504-885-7337 Archibald L. Melcher III East Jefferson Neurological Associates 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 205 504-885-7337 NEW ORLEANS Terence C. D’Souza Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurology 2700 Napoleon Ave 504-894-2700 John D. England LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 4th Fl 504-412-1517 John Freiberg Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561 Amparo (Amy) Gutierrez LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 4th Fl 504-412-1517


one of MY Biggest Challenges

Rebecca Clark, M.D., Ph.D. Infectious Disease Specialist Crescent Care

Patients Lacking Basic Necessities A native of Seattle, Rebecca Clark, M.D, Ph.D realized as a young girl that she wanted to study medicine. While attending medical school at the University of Washington in the early ‘80s, the HIV/AIDS epidemic was newly recognized and rising rapidly. “Sometimes the diagnosis is not evident,” right away, she notes, “or there is not information on how to treat a disease process, or there is no good treatment option available.” HIV/ AIDS has claimed the lives of more 35 million people, but Clark also notes that “the relatively quick advent of powerful antiretroviral therapies has made working in this field very rewarding, and I have concentrated my work in this area.” Clark currently works at Crescent Care, a community health center that offers a full spectrum of quality care at low to no cost to the entire community with or without insurance. The organization serves more than 9,000 people each year with medical care and over 30,000 through HIV and STI prevention education efforts. “Restrictions on medications placed by insurance companies” are among her biggest challenges when it comes to treating HIV and AIDS, she says. Additionally, the epidemic is complicated in multifaceted ways — patients often lack basic necessities including housing, transportation, and food, and severe disease processes do not always respond to treatments, she notes. Clark believes her role is to provide the patient with “knowledge and information and help them make a mutual decision on the treatment course,” and she firmly believes that each case she deals with offers a learning opportunity.

Undergraduate: Mills College Medical School: University of Washington Hometown: Seattle

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Roger Everett Kelley, Jr. Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Department of Neurology 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9190 Piotr Wladyslaw Olejniczak LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 4th Fl 504-412-1517 R. Eugene Ramsay Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 7th Fl 504-842-7436 Richard Zweifler Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 7th Fl 504-842-3980 NUCLEAR MEDICINE KENNER Richard J. Campeau, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY COVINGTON Patricia S. Braly Women’s Cancer Care 606 W 12th Ave 985-892-2252 HAMMOND William G. Black North Oaks Obstetrics and Gynecology 15748 Medical Arts Plaza 985-542-0663 Timothy Joseph Mooney 42333 Deluxe Plaza, Ste 7 985-345-2555 MANDEVILLE Richard P. Dickey Fertility Institute of New Orleans 800 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 2C 985-892-7621 METAIRIE Robin B. Bone Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Clearview Women’s Services 4500 Clearview Pkwy, Ste 101 504-885-8563

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Stephen Champlin East Jefferson Women’s Care 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 410 504-454-0606 Ann Catherine Chau LSU Healthcare Network East Jefferson High Risk Pregnancy Clinic 4200 Houma Blvd, 4th Fl 504-456-5446 Ralph R. Chesson, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Urogynecology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 Chi P. Dola Tulane Center for Women’s Health Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 4720 S I-10 Service Rd, Ste 302 504-988-8070

Veronica C. Gillispie Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clara St, Ste 500 504-842-9617 Susan G. Jeanfreau Fleur De Lis Obstetrics and Gynecology 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 970 504-897-4287 Richard Carl Kline Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Gynecologic Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4165

Peter Lu The Fertility Institute of New Orleans 4770 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 201 504-454-2165

Sherri Anne Longo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2700 Napoleon Ave, 4th Fl 504-842-4151

Gabriella Pridjian Tulane Center for Women’s Health Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 4720 S I-10 Service Rd, Ste 302 504-988-8070

Robert T. Maupin, Jr. Touro Infirmary Maternal Fetal Medicine Clinic Buckman Bldg, Ste 105 3434 Prytania St 504-897-8213

Belinda Sartor The Fertility Institute of New Orleans 4770 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 201 504-454-2165

Joseph Matthew Miller, Jr. Touro Infirmary Maternal Fetal Medicine Clinic Buckman Bldg, Ste 105 3434 Prytania St 504-897-8213

Kathleen T. Sullivan Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Clearview Women’s Services 4500 Clearview Pkwy, Ste 101 504-885-8563 NEW ORLEANS Pui (Joan) Cheng Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 320 504-897-7142 Louis Paul DuTreil Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 130 504-897-7580 Jacob M. Estes Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Gynecologic Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4165

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

George Morris IV Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clara St, Ste 640 504-842-9616 George Brazil Morris III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clare St, Ste 400 504-842-4155 Rebecca Perret Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 130 504-897-7580 Florencia G. Polite LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520

Alfred Godfrey Robichaux III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2700 Napolean Ave, 4th Fl 504-842-4151 Jerry Joseph St. Pierre Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clara St, Ste 400 504-842-9885 William F. von Almen II Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 130 504-897-7580 Donna S. Waters Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 320 504-897-7142 Felton L. Winfield, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 OPHTHALMOLOGY METAIRIE Ronald Andrew Landry Eyecare Associates 4324 Veterans Blvd, Ste 102 504-455-9825 NEW ORLEANS Laurence W. Arend Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Ophthalmology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 10th Fl 504-842-3995 Maria Bernal LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Ophthalmology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 Delmar R. Caldwell Tulane Medical Center Tulane Ophthalmology Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-5831 Jonathan Nussdorf Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Ophthalmology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 10th Fl 504-842-3995

Jayne S. Weiss LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Ophthalmology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY COVINGTON Kevin Darr Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117 Mark J. Hontas Bone and Joint Clinic at STPH 71211 Hwy 21, Ste A 985-893-9922 H. Reiss Plauche Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117 Jason L. Rolling Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117 HARAHAN Deryk Jones Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B 504-736-4800 Scott C. Montgomery Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B 504-736-4800 Misty Suri Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B 504-736-4800 KENNER Vinod Dasa LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 500 504-412-1700 Peter C. Krause LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 500 504-412-1700 MARRERO Matthew R. Grimm Jefferson Orthopedic Clinic 920 Ave B 504-349-6804


Mark Juneau , Jr. Jefferson Orthopedic Clinic 920 Ave B 504-349-6804

Michael J. O’Brien Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476

METAIRIE David W. Aiken 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 650 504-456-5152

J. Lockwood Ochsner, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970

John B. Cazale IV Crescent City Orthopedics 3600 Houma Blvd 504-885-8225 Luis M. Espinoza Orthopaedic Center for Sports Medicine 4921 Airline Dr 504-889-2663 NEW ORLEANS George Chimento Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Donald C. Faust 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 600 504-899-1000 Paul Gladden Tulane Medical Center Tulane Orthopaedic Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-2177 Michael W. Hartman LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Orthopaedics 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 Andrew G. King Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 James F. Mautner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Mark S. Meyer Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Chad Millet Southern Orthopaedic Specialists 2731 Napoleon Ave 504-897-6351

Felix H. Savoie III Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476 Robert Treuting Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Robert D. Zura University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 SLIDELL James C. Butler Elite Orthopaedic Specialists 1150 Robert Blvd, Ste 240 985-646-3662 THIBODAUX Neil James Maki Thibodaux Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Clinic 525 Saint Marys St 985-446-6284 OTOLARYNGOLOGY COVINGTON R. Graham Boyce Associated Surgical Specialists 350 Lakeview Ct, Ste C 985-845-2677 MARRERO Moises A. Arriaga CNC Hearing & Balance Center 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S630 504-934-8320 METAIRIE Bryce J. Leblanc 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 340 504-454-1080 Newland Knight Worley 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 640 504-456-5120

NEW ORLEANS Ronald G. Amedee Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Paul L. Friedlander Tulane Medical Center ENT Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5451 H. Devon Graham III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Christian Hasney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Ed D. McCoul Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Timothy Blake Molony Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Brian A. Moore Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4080 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Surgical Center 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642 Elisabeth Rareshide 2820 Napoleon Avenue, Ste 820 504-895-7707

THIBODAUX James Vance Broussard Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Paul Thomas Gaudet Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Justin M. Tenney Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Guy Paul Zeringue III Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 PATHOLOGY MARRERO James E. Brown West Jefferson Medical Center Department of Pathology 1101 Medical Center Blvd 504-347-5511 NEW ORLEANS Edwin Norquist Beckman Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-3330 Edgar Shannon Cooper Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3387 Randall Douglas Craver Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Pathology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9873 Philip J. Daroca , Jr. Tulane University School of Medicine Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1430 Tulane Ave 504-988-5224 Pamela Canale Martin Touro Infirmary Division of Dermatopathology 1401 Foucher St, 2nd Fl 504-897-8418

William Proctor Newman III LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Pathology 1901 Perdido St, Ste 5103 504-568-6077 Elise Occhipinti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3510 Francis Rodwig Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3208 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY METAIRIE Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 NEW ORLEANS Kenneth Paris Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 Ricardo U. Sorensen Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY NEW ORLEANS Brandon Black Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 Jimmie E. Colon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Daniel P. Corsino Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Stanley Martin Hall Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456


John Frederick Heaton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 George P. Koclanes Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 Sheryl Lynn Sawatsky Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 Louis G. Shenk III Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9456 PEDIATRIC CARDIAC SURGERY NEW ORLEANS Joseph Caspi Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3309 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3928 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY NEW ORLEANS Michael Brumund Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Cardiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-899-9511 Kelly Gajewski Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3309 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9751 Victor William Lucas, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Division of Pediatric Cardiology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Ernest S. Siwik Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3309 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9751 Thomas Young Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Division of Pediatric Cardiology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-5200

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PEDIATRIC CARDIOVASCULAR ANESTHESIA NEW ORLEANS Jimmie E. Colon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE METAIRIE Olugbenga Akingbola Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Section of Pediatric Critical Care 4700 S I-10 Service Rd W 504-780-4401 Edwin Michael Frieberg Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Section of Pediatric Critical Care 4700 S 1-10 Service Rd W 504-780-8282 Robert Lee Hopkins Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 NEW ORLEANS Bonnie Desselle Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Critical Care 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-899-9511 PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY METAIRIE Jeffrey C. Poole Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225 PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY METAIRIE Mary A. Younger Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Endocrinology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 NEW ORLEANS Stuart A. Chalew Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Ricardo Gomez Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY MARRERO Ilana S. Fortgang Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401

Russell Barrett Van Dyke Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253

PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY NEW ORLEANS George S. Ellis, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Ophthalmology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3104 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

PEDIATRIC GENERAL HEPATOLOGY MARRERO Ilana S. Fortgang Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401

NEW ORLEANS Lorna Seybolt St Thomas Community Health Center 1936 Magazine St 504-529-5558

Horatio Sprague Eustis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Ophthalmology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 10th Fl 504-842-3995

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY-ONCOLOGY NEW ORLEANS Renee V. Gardner Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 Craig Lotterman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Hematology and Oncology 1315 Jefferson Highway, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 Tammuella E. Singleton Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 Maria C. Velez Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 Raymond G. Watts Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE METAIRIE Thomas Alchediak Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 Margarita Silio Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253

Russell Wesley Steele Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 PEDIATRIC MEDICAL GENETICS NEW ORLEANS Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101 PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY METAIRIE Samir S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Nephrology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 NEW ORLEANS Diego H. Aviles Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Nephrology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9238 PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY NEW ORLEANS Clarence S. Greene , Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurosurgery Ambulatory Care Center 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9568 PEDIATRIC OBESITY METAIRIE Mary A. Younger Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Endocrinology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253

Robert Allen Gordon Tulane Medical Center Tulane Ophthalmology Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-5831 PEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY METAIRIE Stephen Douglas Heinrich Tulane Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 200 504-988-8010 NEW ORLEANS William K. Accousti Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Joseph A. Gonzales, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Andrew G. King Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Sean Waldron Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center For Children Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery 1315 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3970 PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY NEW ORLEANS John Lindhe Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080


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Kimsey Rodriguez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 PEDIATRIC PATHOLOGY NEW ORLEANS Randall Douglas Craver Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Pathology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9873 PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY METAIRIE Scott H. Davis Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 Robert Lee Hopkins Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 Michael Philip Kiernan Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Pulmonology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 NEW ORLEANS Kristin N. Van Hook Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Division of Pulmonary Medicine 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 PEDIATRIC RADIATION ONCOLOGY NEW ORLEANS Troy Gene Scroggins, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3440 Ellen (Elly) Zakris Touro Infirmary Department of Radiation Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8387 PEDIATRIC RADIOLOGY NEW ORLEANS Jane D. Congeni Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Radiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9565

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Arthur J. Kenney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY METAIRIE Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 NEW ORLEANS Abraham Gedalia Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Rheumatology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3020 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9385 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT MEDICINE METAIRIE Sue Ellen Abdalian Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY MADISONVILLE Gordon Lane Blundell , Jr. 179 Hwy 22 E, Ste 100 985-845-8101 METAIRIE Stacy Drury Tulane Pediatric Behavioral Health Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 309 504-988-4794 Mary Margaret Gleason Tulane Pediatric Behavioral Health Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 309 504-988-4794 Daphne Ann Glindmeyer 3525 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 600 504-392-8348

Charles Calvin Coleman Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Calhoun Behavioral Center 935 Calhoun St 504-896-7790

Staci Marie Olister Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418

Robert A. Dahmes 4480 General DeGaulle Dr, Ste 107 504-393-6355

Dana L. Rivera Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418

Martin J. Drell LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 2025 Gravier St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 Jessica Hof 1426 Amelia St 504-810-7590 Lakisha Y. Mamon LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Psychiatry 1542 Tulane Ave, 2nd Fl 504-568-6001 Richard Howard Morse 4417 Danneel St 504-891-2354 Paul G. Pelts 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 300 504-581-3933 Jason Murphy Wuttke 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 300 504-581-3933 Charles Henry Zeanah , Jr. Tulane Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology Services 131 S Robertson St 504-988-5405 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE HOUMA Bedford Nieves-Cruz Terrebonne General Medical Center Division of Neonatology 8166 Main St 985-858-7300 METAIRIE Jay Paul Goldsmith Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Section of Neonatology 4700 S I-10 Service Rd W 504-780-4583

NEW ORLEANS Milton Webster Anderson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025

NEW ORLEANS Brian Barkemeyer Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418

Ted Bloch III 3525 Prytania St, Ste 211 504-897-7939

Minnie Marlene Buis Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, MOVEMENT DISORDERS NEW ORLEANS Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3314 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, EPILEPSY NEW ORLEANS Shannon McGuire Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY NEW ORLEANS Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3314 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, GENERAL METAIRIE Stephen L. Nelson Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Neurology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASE NEW ORLEANS Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3314 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458

NEW ORLEANS Stephen Russell Deputy Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ PEDIATRIC METABOLIC DISEASES NEW ORLEANS Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101

Jessica R. Gautreaux Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Shannon McGuire Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3314 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458 Maria Weimer Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Joaquin Wong Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3314 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458

PEDIATRIC SURGERY NEW ORLEANS Vincent Robert Adolph Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pediatric Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3907 Rodney B. Steiner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pediatric Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 6th Fl 504-842-3907 PEDIATRIC UROLOGY NEW ORLEANS Frank Raymond Cerniglia, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pediatric Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083


Joseph Ortenberg Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Urology Ambulatory Care Center 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9233 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL COVINGTON Kathryn Quarls Fairway Pediatrics 7020 N Hwy 190, Ste C 985-871-7337 DESTREHAN Danielle Calix Ochsner Health System Ochsner Children’s Health Center - Destrehan Division of General Pediatrics 13100 River Rd, Ste 250 985-764-6036 GRETNA Marc A. Fisher 12A Westbank Expy, Ste 100 504-361-0234 HOUMA Kimberley J. Barner Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440 Richard Louis Brooke Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Pediatric Clinic 1978 Industrial Blvd 985-873-1730 Robert W. Clarke, Jr. Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440

Cary A. Culbertson Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374 Hosea Joseph Doucet III Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 David Anderson Estes, Jr. Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880 Patrice B. Evers Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 Amy Glick Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Division of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133 Patricia Granier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Division of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133 Michael G. Heller , Jr. Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880

Stephen M. Weimer Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 Mary A. Younger Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane Pediatric Specialty Clinic Section of Pediatric Endocrinology 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 Scott Rory Zander Lakeside Children’s Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, 2nd Fl 504-883-3703 NEW ORLEANS Daniel Richard Bronfin Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Samira Brown Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Terry L. Cummings Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Sections of General Academic Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000

Bernard Ferrer Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440

Amanda Brown Jackson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Division of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133

Theresa Lynn Dise Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Section of General Academic Pediatrics 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000

MARRERO Carlos Alberto Trujillo Jefferson Pediatric Clinic 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N813 504-349-6813

Ellen Blownstine McLean Carousel Pediatrics 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 240 504-885-4141

Kathleen Gorman Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744

Mark Vincent Morici Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374

Stephen Wilson Hales Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744

METAIRIE Thomas Alchediak Tulane Lakeside Hospital for Women and Children Tulane General Pediatric Clinic 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 300 504-988-6253 John S. Barbara Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374

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Jeanne Rademacher Carousel Pediatrics 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 240 504-885-4141 Sam Jude Solis Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880

AUGUST 2017 myneworleans.com

Charles Maurice Kantrow III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Betty P. Lo-Blais LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366

Elizabeth Swanson Milvid Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744 M. Nora Oates Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744 Jennifer M. Parkerson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Renee F. Reymond Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 PEDIATRICS/HOSPITAL MEDICINE NEW ORLEANS Vanessa G. Carroll Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Pediatric Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-3088 PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION HARAHAN Sindhu Pandit Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Ste 200 504-842-3998 METAIRIE Joseph J. Biundo, Jr. 4315 Houma Blvd, Ste 303 504-889-5242 NEW ORLEANS Stephen Kishner University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Gregory W. Stewart Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476 PLASTIC SURGERY COVINGTON R. Graham Boyce Associated Surgical Specialists 350 Lakeview Ct, Ste C 985-845-2677 METAIRIE Eileen S. Black 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 100 504-883-8900

Elliott B. Black III 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 100 504-883-8900 David Albert Jansen 3900 Veterans Blvd, Ste 200 504-455-1000 NEW ORLEANS Robert Johnson Allen The Center for Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction 2525 Severn Ave 888-890-3437 Frank J. DellaCroce Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 H. Devon Graham III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Michael H. Moses 1603 2nd St 504-895-7200 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Surgical Center 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642 Hugo St. Hilaire LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 3rd Fl 504-412-1240 Scott K. Sullivan , Jr. Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Chris Trahan Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 PSYCHIATRY GRETNA Charles Kelso Billings, Jr. 720 Lafayette St 504-366-9707 HAMMOND Schoener Michele LaPrairie Florida Parishes Human Services Authority 835 Pride Dr, Ste B 985-543-4333


MANDEVILLE John Robert Macgregor, Jr. 1502 W Causeway Approach, Ste D 985-626-3400 METAIRIE Charles Chester Center for Individual and Family Counseling 3500 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 1410 504-838-9919 Daphne Ann Glindmeyer 3525 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 600 504-392-8348 P. Michael Mahony Center for Individual and Family Counseling 3500 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 1410 504-838-9919 Alphonse Kenison Roy III Addiction Recovery Resources 4933 Wabash St 504-780-2766 Marilyn M. Skinner 300 Codifer Blvd, Ste B 504-891-3001 NEW ORLEANS James G. Barbee 3439 Magazine St 504-891-8808 J. Robert Barnes 1301 Amelia St, Ste A 504-891-7000 Ted Bloch III 3525 Prytania St, Ste 211 504-897-7939 Jose Calderon-Abbo 3439 Magazine St 504-891-8808 Stephen R. Cochran 1426 Amelia St 504-891-6020 Charles Calvin Coleman Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Calhoun Behavioral Center 935 Calhoun St 504-896-7790 Erich J. Conrad LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 2025 Gravier St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 Robert A. Dahmes 4480 General DeGaulle Dr, Ste 107 504-393-6355

Edward F. Foulks Central City Behavioral Health Center 2221 Philip St 504-568-6650 David Galarneau Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of General Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Kendall Genre 8438 Oak St, Ste B 504-322-3936 Milton L. Harris, Jr. Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System New Orleans VA Outpatient Clinic Department of Psychiatry 3434 Canal St 504-539-5744 Dean Anthony Hickman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of General Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Harminder Singh Mallik Tulane Medical Center Section of Forensic Psychiatry 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 220 504-592-9500 Donna M. Mancuso 1301 Antonine St, Ste 500 504-208-1035 Christopher D. Meyers 3525 Prytania St, Ste 518 504-895-5533 Richard Howard Morse 4417 Danneel St 504-891-2354 Andrew E. Morson Integrated Behavioral Health 400 Poydras St, Ste 1950 504-322-3837 Nicholas G. Pejic Atlas Psychiatry 1301 Antonine St 504-899-1682 Jose Manuel Pena Tulane Medical Center Tulane Behavioral Health Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-4794 Arwen Podesta 4322 Canal St 504-252-0026

George Cecil Daul, Jr. Professional Psychotherapy Network 1529 River Oaks Rd W, Ste 123 504-729-4414

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Dean Edward Robinson Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Mental Health Service 2400 Canal St 504-504-507Alvin Martin Rouchell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of General Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Janet Seligson-Dowie 1301 Antonine St, Ste 500 504-507-8201 John Walter Thompson, Jr. Tulane Medical Center Tulane Behavioral Health Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-4794 Mark Harold Townsend LSU Healthcare Network Gravier Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 2025 Gravier St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 THIBODAUX Maria Cruse Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 201 985-493-9304 PULMONARY MEDICINE KENNER Carol M. Mason LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705 Judd Ernest Shellito LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705 METAIRIE Thomas Gerard Nuttli East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 Kenneth B. Smith East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205

NEW ORLEANS Juzar Ali LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 4th Fl 504-412-1517 Clifford Braddock Burns Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Bennett Paul DeBoisblanc University Medical Center New Orleans Comprehensive Pulmonary Hypertension Center 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Susan H. Gunn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Surma Jain Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Stephen Phillips Kantrow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Ross C. Klingsberg Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600 Joseph Alexander Lasky Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600 Jaime Palomino Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Section of Pulmonary Disease 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

Nereida Alicia Parada Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600 Leonardo Seoane Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonology, Lung Transplant and Critical Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4400 Charles Clarence Smith III Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500 David E. Taylor Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 SLIDELL Matthew L. Schuette SMH Physicians Network Pulmonology 1051 Gause Blvd, Ste 290 985-280-7456 RADIATION ONCOLOGY METAIRIE Paul David Monsour East Jefferson Radiation Oncology 4204 Houma Blvd, Ste 100 504-454-1727 NEW ORLEANS Troy Gene Scroggins, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3440 Ellen (Elly) Zakris Touro Infirmary Department of Radiation Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8387 SLIDELL Steven I. Hightower SMH Regional Cancer Center 1120 Robert Blvd, Ste 100 985-280-8688 RADIOLOGY COVINGTON Joseph Daniel Hajjar Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828


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Evangelos A. Liokis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Robert Restrepo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 NEW ORLEANS Edward Bluth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 James Gary Caridi Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Daniel A. Devun Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Dennis Kay Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Charles Claiborne Matthews Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 James Milburn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Dana Hampton Smetherman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Richard Tupler Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 RHEUMATOLOGY METAIRIE Joseph J. Biundo, Jr. 4315 Houma Blvd, Ste 303 504-889-5242

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NEW ORLEANS William Eugene Davis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920

David Bruce Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925

Luis R. Espinoza LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Rheumatology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 4th Fl 504-412-1517

Ian Carmody Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925

Madelaine T. Feldman The Rheumatology Group 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 530 504-899-1120 Robert James Quinet Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920 SURGERY COVINGTON Michael J. Thomas Surgical Specialists of Louisiana 7015 Hwy 190 E Service Rd, Ste 200 985-234-3000 KENNER J. Philip Boudreaux LSU Healthcare Network Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500 METAIRIE Kelvin Contreary 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 310 504-454-6338 Joseph Frank Uddo, Jr. 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 450 504-454-4441 NEW ORLEANS Humberto Bohorquez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 John S. Bolton Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Division of Surgical Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070

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Ari J. Cohen Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Christian Hasney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 John Patrick Hunt III University Medical Center New Orleans Section of Trauma Surgery 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Mary T. Killackey Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 James R. Korndorffer Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Department of Surgery 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000 George E. Loss, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Surgical Center 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642

William S. Richardson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070 Douglas P. Slakey Tulane Medical Center GI and Surgery Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5110 Alan Jerry Stolier Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Michael C. Townsend Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070 SURGICAL ONCOLOGY KENNER J. Philip Boudreaux LSU Healthcare Network Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500 Eugene A. Woltering LSU Healthcare Network Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500 NEW ORLEANS John S. Bolton Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Division of Surgical Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070 W. Charles Conway Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070 George Michael Fuhrman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070 Alan Jerry Stolier Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800

THORACIC SURGERY COVINGTON Charles J. DiCorte Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Cardiovascular Surgery 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 NEW ORLEANS P. Eugene Parrino Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Division of Thoracic Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070 THIBODAUX Tommy L. Fudge Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Heart and Vascular Center 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 409 985-449-4670 UROLOGY HOUMA Robert M. Alexander Houma Surgi-Center & Urology Clinic 1020 School St 985-868-7091 METAIRIE Harold Anthony Fuselier, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 Stephen M. Lacour LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 Jack Christian Winters LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 NEW ORLEANS Wayne John G. Hellstrom Tulane Medical Center Tulane Urology and Fertility Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-2536 Eric Laborde Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083


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Melissa M. Montgomery Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083 Raju Thomas Tulane Medical Center Tulane Urology and Fertility Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5271 Richard M. Vanlangendonck Crescent City Physicians 3434 Prytania St, Ste 450 504-897-7196 THIBODAUX Paul Truett Ray, Jr. Thibodaux Urological Specialists 504 N Acadia Rd 985-447-5667 Chester Frank Weimer Thibodaux Urological Specialists 504 N Acadia Rd 985-447-5667

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VASCULAR SURGERY MARRERO Robert Craig Batson LSU Healthcare Network Westbank Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Vascular Surgery 4500 10th St 504-412-1960 Malachi G. Sheahan LSU Healthcare Network Westbank Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Vascular Surgery 4500 10th St 504-412-1960 NEW ORLEANS Larry Harold Hollier LSU Health Sciences Center Section of Vascular Surgery 433 Bolivar St, Ste 815 504-568-4800 W. Charles Sternbergh III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070

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Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause.” Copyright 2017, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. “BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.” Best Doctors, Inc. is

transforming and improving health care by bringing together the best medical minds in the world to help identify the right diagnosis and treatment. The company’s innovative, peer-to-peer consultation service offers a new way for physicians to collaborate with other physicians to ensure patients receive the best care. Headquartered in Boston, MA, the global company seamlessly integrates its services with employers’ other health-related benefits, to serve more than 40 million members in every major region of the world. More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists

for their patients. Using a polling method and balloting software, that Gallup® has audited and certified, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® List, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information. n


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2017 MEDICAL PROFILES

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Take the first step towards a more beautiful smile with Lakeshore Family Dentistry, the practice of Edmund Ring, DDS, and Kristie Reine, DDS. Dr. Edmund Ring graduated from LSU in 1998, where he was a NCAA All American on the LSU Swimming & Diving team. While attending LSU School of Dentistry, he represented students on the Quality Assurance Committee. He has practiced in Slidell since 2002 and is a member of the Bayou District Dental Association. Dr. Kristie Reine is a Slidell native and graduate of LSU School of Dentistry, where she received recognitions such as Dean’s List, National Collegiate Scholar, and Who’s Who Among Dental Students. A member of the New Orleans Dental Association, she has practiced on the Northshore since 2003 and was named a Top Dentist in 2017 as listed in New Orleans Magazine. Both doctors are members of the American Dental Association, Louisiana Dental Association, and the Lake Pontchartrain Study Club.

Lakeshore Family Dentistry Kristie Reine, DDS Edmund Ring, DDS 118

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435 Robert Blvd., Slidell 985-643-1852 LakeshoreFamilyDentistry.com


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Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center is built around a talented team of 2 physicians that are devoted to providing exceptional individualized treatments for the patients they serve. Dr. Kyle Coleman and Dr. Lisa Donofrio are Board-Certified Dermatologists that practice the most advanced techniques in cosmetic surgery including body contouring, Botox®, dermal fillers and cutting edge facial rejuvenation and laser procedures. Through popular body contouring treatments like Coolsculpting ®, laser liposuction and minimally invasive facial filling and lifting techniques, the physicians at Etre are constantly innovating and advancing their services. Come see the difference that premium personalized service can provide. For more information or to schedule and appointment, visit EtreCosmeticDerm.com or call 504-227-3873.

Etre Cosmetic Dermatology & Laser Center Lisa Donofrio, MD • Kyle Coleman, MD

1224 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504-227-3873 EtreCosmeticDerm.com

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A D V ERTISIN G SEC TION

2017 MEDICAL PROFILES INDEX ALLERGY & ASTHMA

INTERNAL MEDICINE

Thomas R. Lyons, MD

PSYCHIATRY, GENERAL

Alisha Quershi, MD

Christopher Lege, MD

Neil J. Maki, MD

Emily Carrington, LCSW

Keith P. Melancon, MD

Jennifer Creedon, MD

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

Chadwick P. Murphy, MD

Thomas Hallinan, PhD

Chi Dola, MD, MPH

Charles P. Murphy, MD

Janell Kalifey, LCSW

COUNSELING

Cecilia Gambala, MD

William F. Sherman, MD

Carly LeBlanc, LCSW

B. Gerard Woodrich, LCSW

Rebecca Perret, MD

Jeffery J. Sketchler, MD

Laura Niditch, PhD

Steele Rolston, MD Alan Sheen, MS

Gabriella Pridjian, MD, MBA

Harold M. Stokes, MD

Vivian Piazza, PhD

DENTISTRY

Sissy Sartor, MD

Michael P. Zeringue, MD

Nicholas Pejic, MD

Bridget Brahney, DDS

Louis Paul Du Treil, MD

Joseph Collura, DDS

William Von Almen, MD

PAIN MANAGEMENT

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

Tre Defelice, DDS

Donna Waters, MD

Eric Lonseth, MD

Stephen I. Hightower, MD

Stephen J. Delahoussaye, DDS

Ellen Zakris, MD

Damon DiMarco, DDS

ONCOLOGY & HEMATOLOGY

PLASTIC SURGERY, EYELID

Sarah Haydel, DDS

Salvador Caputto, MD

Kyle V. Acosta, MD

John J. Killeen, DDS

ONCOLOGY, GYNECOLOGY

PLASTIC SURGERY, GENERAL

Kristie Reine, DDS

Pui “Joan” Cheng, MD

John P. Guste, MD

SURGERY, VITEORETINAL

David A. Jansen, MD

Gerald Cohen, MD, FACS

Joanne G. Hoppe, DDS

Mohammed S. Suleman, MD

Edmund Ring, DDS

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ORTHOPEDICS

Frank Lau, MD

Gwen Cousins, MD, FACS

DERMATOLOGY

Nicole O. Bourgeois, PA-C

Ruth Owens, MD

Kathy Ta, MD

Zeena Al-Dujaili, MD

John G. Burvant, MD

Hugo St. Hilaire, MS, DDS

Ronald Willson, MD, FACS

Erin E. Boh, MD, PhD, FAAD

John Carradine, MD

Ravi Tandon, MD

Stanislav Zhuk, MD, FACS

Kyle Coleman, MD

Brandon P. Donnelly, MD

Oren Tessler, MD, MBA

Lisa Donofrio, MD

Luis M. Espinoza, MD

Andrea Murina, MD

Joseph L. Finstein, MD

PSYCHIATRY, ADDICTION

Stephanie Hughes, MD

Brittany Oswald Stumpf, MD

Charles G. Haddad, MD

A. Kenison Roy III, MD, DFASAM

Richard Vanlangendonck, MD

Laura Williams, MD

Ralph Katz, MD

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UROLOGY


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Hospital Buzz

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hen an emergency strikes, or an operation or procedure is in order, Louisiana’s hospitals are the go-to destinations for care, especially when it requires an overnight stay. And from cancer care to broken bones to neurosurgery, they often house the specialties we seek to treat our particular ailment. As larger healthcare systems, hospitals aim to provide comprehensive treatments needed by each nearby community, from the bayou region to metro New Orleans and across the lake to the Northshore. Get the latest news and updates from the following regional hospitals and stay up to date on the latest partnerships, awards and accomplishments, technological acquisitions, and expanded services available for improving the health and wellness of your family and friends in the community. This year, hospitals around the region continue to buzz with all kinds of positive medical news.

Hospitals West Jefferson Medical Center (WJMC) is the only hospital in the Greater New Orleans area to be named to the Top 5% in the nation for Patient Safety Excellence by Healthgrades. The hospital family is proud to receive this prestigious national distinction for the second year in a row. In addition, WJMC was named to the Top 10 percent in the nation for Stroke Care by Healthgrades. West Jefferson would like to thank its

physicians, nurses, and staff who work diligently every day to ensure the hospital provides a safe environment and the best care possible to their patients and community. WJMC is a proud member of LCMC Health, a Louisianabased, not-for-profit hospital system serving the healthcare needs of the Gulf Coast region. LCMC Health currently manages award-winning community hospitals including Children’s Hospital, Touro, New Orleans East Hospital, University Medical Center New Orleans, and West Jefferson Medical Center. To learn more about WJMC’s services, visit WJMC.org. Each year, more than 200,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States. One in six men will develop the disease sometime in his lifetime. September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and Touro and Crescent City Physicians are hosting a special event designed to raise awareness for Prostate Cancer called Pints for Prostates. Pints for Prostates will be held at NOLA Brewing Company on Thursday, September 14th from 5:30-8:00pm and includes McClure’s barbecue, a souvenir pint glass, two pints of NOLA Brewing beer, and a raffle ticket for a chance to win the Pints for Prostates European Beer Trip. The event will offer prostate health information and the opportunity for men over age 40 to sign up for a free PSA screening at Touro Infirmary on myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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Tuesday, September 19 from 9:00am-3:00pm. The Pints for Prostates event tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door, with a portion of proceeds benefitting the national Pints for Prostates organization. To learn more or buy tickets, visit Touro.com/events.   Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, located in Lafourche Parish, has announced plans to construct Phase 2 of its state-of-the-art, innovative Wellness Center. Phase 2 will be constructed behind the Wellness Center on the North Entrance side encompassing 17 acres of land. The $5M expansion project will feature twelve tennis courts, four sand volleyball courts, a football/multipurpose field, an 8-lane track, Pavilion, restrooms, concession area, play area, and spray park for young children. The fields will further integrate services already located in the Wellness Center such as the Sports Medicine and Sports Performance Centers, Imaging Center, Rehabilitation Center, Aquatics Center, and Fitness Center. “Continuing our vision with Phase 2 further exemplifies the hospital’s leadership and continued commitment to the community,” says Greg Stock, Thibodaux Regional CEO. “The expansion will provide even more opportunities for people to improve their overall health and well-being.” Construction of Phase 2 is expected to begin in the next few months. For more information on Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, visit Thibodaux.com. West Jefferson Medical Center (WJMC) in partnership with Children’s Hospital has opened a dedicated pediatric

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emergency room within WJMC. The emergency room is conveniently located across from the West Jefferson adult ER and just off the main lobby. This alliance provides care close to home for the West Bank community with convenient, quick access to emergency care for the whole family from birth through adulthood. The Pediatric Emergency Room at WJMC offers 24/7 emergency care with pediatric-specific equipment, seven exam rooms, and physicians and nurses who are specially trained to work with children. Children’s Hospital and WJMC are proud members of LCMC Health, a Louisiana-based, not-for-profit hospital system serving the healthcare needs of the Gulf Coast region. LCMC Health currently manages award-winning community hospitals including Touro, University Medical Center New Orleans, New Orleans East Hospital, Children’s Hospital, and West Jefferson Medical Center. For more information, visit CHNola.org/emergency or call 504-3491555. As west St. Tammany grows, so does St. Tammany Parish Hospital (STPH). In that spirit, STPH partnered with Ochsner to increase quality, expand services, and elevate the level of care available in the service district. In the first two years of collaboration, the partners have delivered advancements and growth in neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and technology. Neuroscience is an outstanding example of the partnership’s success, pairing Ochsner neurosurgeons and neurologists with STPH’s expanded neuro infrastructure and certified clinical professionals. For their youngest patients, the


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partners opened a pediatric subspecialty clinic staffed by Ochsner pediatric specialists; STPH hired a pediatric orthopedist and opened a dedicated pediatric emergency department. The partners also expanded infusion services at St. Tammany Cancer Center. Patients can now manage their health through MyChart, a component of their shared electronic health record Epic. Together, St. Tammany and Ochsner are keeping the promises they made when they partnered and are delivering results to the community every day. For more information, visit STPH.org/OchsnerPartnership. Beginning August 1, East Jefferson General Hospital is kicking off a new campaign promoting their unsurpassed level of stroke care in our region. This campaign will tout the many facets required to deliver the highest level of stroke care possible. This includes rapid EMS response and field care. That must be followed by experienced, expert care in the emergency department and then continues with rehabilitation and medical care afterwards to complete a continuum of care that can mitigate both the short and long-term effects of stroke on your overall health. This multi-media campaign will urge the community to pay close attention to FAST: stroke symptoms related to Facial distortion, Arm tingling or numbness, Speech-slurred or difficult speech and Time—rapid and effective response is the greatest key to minimizing the risk and severity of stroke. Using television, print, outdoor and digital platforms, the campaign is expected to run throughout

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August, September, and November. Find out more about EJGH offerings at EJGH.org. Ochsner Hospital for Children has been ranked among the top 50 children’s hospitals in the country for pediatric cardiology and heart surgery in the 2017–2018 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings of U.S. News and World Report. It is the only hospital in Louisiana and Mississippi to be recognized and offers one of the largest pediatric cardiology programs in the Gulf South.           Ochsner Hospital for Children cares for patients from around the world with everything from rare brain tumors and leukemia to heart conditions, and it has the only pediatric heart and liver transplant program in the state. Serving more than 76,000 children every year with over 120 physicians in more than 30 pediatric specialties and subspecialties, Ochsner is always looking for ways to offer innovative care exemplified by the recently opened 12-bed Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU).  For more information or to schedule an appointment online, visit Ochsner.org/pediatrics. Crescent City Surgical Centre (CCSC) is America’s premier physician-owned surgical hospital. Owned and operated by a combination of 32 elite local practicing physicians and Louisiana Children’s Medical Center, CCSC offers eight operating rooms and two procedure rooms. Using cuttingedge DaVinci robotic laparoscopic technology, CCSC offers patients minimally invasive surgery resulting in less pain


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and faster recovery time. Twenty VIP private rooms are available, and CCSC can make accommodations for those whose loved ones wish to stay overnight. Catered restaurant-style meals are served and designed to meet patients’ personal dietary needs.            They offer expedited wait times on appointments in a relaxing and comfortable environment. CCSC features surgical specialists in the fields of Bariatric, Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, ENT, Colorectal, General Surgery, Gynecological Procedures, Urology, Interventional Radiology, Pain Management, Plastic, Reconstructive and Advanced Cosmetic Surgery. For more information about Crescent City Surgical Centre, please call 504- 830-2500, or visitccsurg.com. New Orleans healthcare is booming, and it’s the doctors at Tulane leading the way into a healthier future! For over 50 years, Tulane has been developing breakthrough treatments for complex illnesses from organ transplantation and cardiac surgery to neurosurgery, cancer treatment, and more. In addition to breakthrough treatments, they can help with the basics: yearly check-ups, preventative screenings, minor conditions and much more. Your family deserves the best, and you can feel confident that the doctors at Tulane are working to deliver the best quality healthcare to you and those you love. Whether you’re looking for life-saving treatment or just a primary care physician, choose the doctors at Tulane and be a part of the institution’s long legacy of expert care.

Find your Tulane doctor by calling 800-988-5800 or 504988-5800, or visit Tulane.edu/SOM. Tulane—healing people, defining medicine.

Insurance & Provider Networks As the state’s oldest and largest health insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is committed to improving the health and lives of Louisianians. The company and its subsidiaries offer a full line of health insurance plans for people of every age—from birth through retirement, including supplemental coverage such as dental and senior plans, at affordable rates. The Blue Cross provider networks offer the peace of mind that comes with being covered by the Cross and Shield. Blue Cross is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association and headquartered in Baton Rouge. To better serve customers, Blue Cross operates regional offices in Alexandria, Houma, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Monroe, New Orleans, and Shreveport. Louisiana-owned and operated, Blue Cross is a private, fully taxed mutual company owned by policyholders—not shareholders. To learn more, call a Blue Cross agent or visit bcbsla.com. •

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Specialty Medicine

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hile it’s easy to name off a few major organs and bones, when you get down to it, the body is seemingly made up of infinite parts. From our cells to our nerves and their synapses, the complexities of the human body are immense. It’s no wonder today’s doctors spend so many years in medical school before years of study and work in fellowships and research institutions. Knowing the complexities of an area of the body is helpful when we have an injury or ailment located there, and to that end, regional physicians specialize in those areas to offer the latest in care. If you tear a rotator cuff, you’ll probably want to seek an orthopedist. For cosmetic improvements and body contouring, you’ll likely look for specialists in plastics. If you have an allergy you can’t get to the bottom of, a visit to a local allergist is probably in order. Just as the body’s complexities are vast, so are the specialties that bring results. Aesthetics & Plastic Surgery Feeling comfortable in your own skin often goes beyond aesthetics. Being comfortable can mean freedom from pain or a return to a certain body shape after an illness, injury or procedure. As part of the LSU Plastic Surgery team, Hugo St-Hilaire, MD, DDS, FACS, specializes in craniofacial surgery and microsurgery—specifically, perforator flaps used in breast reconstruction and free flaps used in posttraumatic facial reconstruction. St-Hilaire is board certified in both Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Oral and Maxiollofacial Surgery. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, and is licensed in the states of Louisiana, 134

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Mississippi and Georgia. In addition to his various academic and professional appointments, he has authored dozens of peer-reviewed articles and has lectured both nationally and internationally. When the time comes for you to decide to have surgery, Dr. Hilaire will help you understand which surgical method is best for you. The reconstruction procedure varies from patient to patient. Visit LSUplasticsurgery.com or NolaCraniofacial.com to learn more.  ​​ Stephen E. Metzinger, MD, MSPH, FACS, welcomes patients to Aesthetic Surgical Associates, his cosmetic plastic surgery practice serving the Greater New Orleans area. Dr. Metzinger’s team puts your safety and well being before anything else. Understanding that pursuing cosmetic plastic surgery is an extremely personal and often emotional choice, Aesthetic Surgical works to provide an inviting, spa-like atmosphere where you feel welcome and relaxed. Dr. Metzinger has over three decades of plastic surgery experience and is the only triple board-certified plastic surgeon in all of Louisiana. Dr. Metzinger and his staff use some of the most advanced surgical techniques to provide outstanding results while minimizing scarring and recovery time. Whether you want to improve the look of your face, nose, breasts, or body, Dr. Metzinger can create a customized surgical or non-surgical plan to help improve your appearance and self-esteem. To learn more about Dr. Metzinger and Aesthetic Surgical Associates, or to schedule a consultation, contact the office at 


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504-309-7061 or visit AestheticSurgical.com. Eyes are the most expressive feature of the face, and for those looking to enhance the appearance of their eyes, Dr. Kyle V. Acosta of the Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center offers numerous highly specialized procedures for recreating youth and beauty. An award winning, highly trained, and experienced physician, Dr. Acosta is board-certified in Ophthalmology and fellowship trained in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center has a state-of-the-art, on-site, private surgical facility with experienced anesthesia care provided for your comfort. The highly qualified staff will make your surgical experience pleasant and effortless from the initial consultation to discharge from the surgical suite. In addition to cosmetic procedures for the eyes, Dr. Acosta also treats age-related changes to the eyelids, congenital abnormalities, and the repair of unsuccessful cosmetic eyelid procedures. For more information, call 985-898-2001. Does your appearance reflect your inner energy? If it doesn’t, consider a consultation with board certified plastic surgeons Dr. Elliott Black or Dr. Summer Black. There are a variety of surgical and non-surgical techniques available to help individuals enhance and refresh their appearance. “Surgery is not the only option these days,” Dr. Elliott Black

emphasizes. “Laser technology and other developments in the cosmetic field such as Botox and fillers offer alternatives to surgery with excellent results,” Dr. Summer Black adds. “The patient benefits with little downtime and minimal or no swelling or bruising. Many non-invasive procedures also provide immediate results,” she says. With a new office, the father and daughter team have expanded their facilities to house a full range of laser equipment, including SculpSure non-invasive fat melting, IPL, laser hair removal, fractionated erbium, and fractionated CO2. For information on available surgical or non-invasive cosmetic procedures, contact Dr. Elliott Black or Dr. Summer Black at 504-883-8900, or visit their office at 3798 Veterans Memorial Blvd. in Metairie. Recently, there have been significant developments in the art of improving lip size and shape. The use of multi-sized, silicone lip implants has remained a popular option for patients seeking fuller lips. The soft, pliable implants can be placed under local anesthesia in the office.  For patients seeking a custom, non-permanent but longlasting, finer and more delicate improvement to their lips, lip injections with filler has become more and more popular. And, the technology in the filler continues to improve. With improved viscosity, newer fillers offer a smoother contour and

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more aesthetically pleasing look. If you would like to schedule a consultation, call Drs. David Jansen, Ravi Tandon, John Guste, or Ruth Owens at 504-4551000 or for more information, visit JansenPlasticSurgery.com. Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center specializes in cosmetic dermatologic procedures that include facial injectables, laser treatments, body contouring and cellulite reduction. Co-owned by board-certified dermatologists Dr. Lisa Donofrio and Dr. Kyle Coleman, Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center is equipped to provide patients with anything from subtle changes to dramatic results. Etre is now offering the latest procedure in contouring and tightening faces with Silhouette InstaLift. "We are pleased to be the first to offer this procedure in the New Orleans area," says Dr. Donofrio. "The Silhouette InstaLift allows our patients to experience almost instantaneous face lifting results without undergoing the major surgery that normal facelifts require." Silhouette InstaLift is a noninvasive cosmetic technique used to dramatically improve the appearance of sagging skin and deep lines on the neck, jowls and face by smoothing and tightening the skin to create a more youthful appearance with very little downtime. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit EtreCosmeticDerm.com or call 504-227-3873.. Allergy & Immunology Alan Sheen, MD, is a well-known and highly respected allergist serving both the Northshore and Southshore regions of the New Orleans metropolitan area. A graduate of LSU’s School of Medicine in New Orleans and a known specialist in allergies and asthma, Dr. Sheen has been recognized several times as one of the city’s Top Doctors by New Orleans Magazine. With a focus on immunology and allergies, Dr. Sheen’s long-standing medical practice treats patients of all ages. He has a strong interest in the management of childhood and infant allergies, especially food allergies and problems with formula. Dr. Sheen also treats conditions such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, hives and related allergic conditions. He has two convenient locations to greater serve area patients. For Dr. Sheen’s Metairie office, located at 3701 Houma Blvd., call 504-456-1999. Dr. Sheen’s Covington office, located at 208 Highland Park Plaza may be reached by calling 985-246-6077. Find out additional information on Dr. Sheen and his practice at DrAlanSheenAllergist.com. As an allergist/immunologist (commonly referred to as an allergist), Dr. Steele Rolston is a board-certified physician specially trained to diagnose, treat, and manage allergies, asthma, and immunologic disorders including primary immunodeficiency disorders. These conditions range from the very common to the very rare, spanning all ages and encompassing various organ systems. His practice includes the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of hives, eczema, contact dermatitis, eye-lid dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, recurrent and chronic sinusitis, allergic conjunctivitis, food allergy, eosinophilic esophagitis, insect sting allergies, medication allergies, allergically induced headaches, common 136

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variable immunodeficiency, cough, and asthma. An asthmatic himself, Dr. Rolston is especially adept at diagnosing and treating intermittent, persistent, and exercise-induced asthma. Pulmonary function testing is critical in asthma management. Skin testing may be utilized to identify allergen triggers to be avoided. Educating patients and families about proper use of all inhaled and biologic medications currently available is Dr. Rolston’s forte. For more information and scheduling, call 985-893-5780. Dr. Irum Alisha Qureshi is a board-certified allergist and immunologist whose practice focuses on improving the quality of life of children and adults suffering from a broad range of conditions. She specializes in sinus disease, hives, asthma, eczema, reaction to foods, insects and drugs, recurrent ear and upper respiratory infections, eye allergy and immunodeficiency. Advanced diagnostic testing is used to evaluate patients and determine a customized plan of treatment and preventative measures. Dr. Qureshi offers services including allergy skin testing, patch test, spirometry, drug desensitization, allergen immunotherapy with the potential to cure allergies and asthma, immunoglobulin treatment, and administration of biologics for severe uncontrolled asthma. These target the source of asthma as opposed to the symptoms and treat the disease at a cellular level. Dr. Qureshi’s clinical excellence and personalized care, combined with her usage of best practice methods, create a high quality allergy clinic. To schedule and appointment please call her Covington office at 985-893-5780. Behavioral Health Positive Family Solutions is the private practice of New Orleans native, Gerard Woodrich, LCSW. Displaying a commitment to the mental well-being of the community, Positive Family Solutions offers affordable and accessible counseling with evening and weekend appointments available and a sliding fee scale for those with limited income. Located on St. Charles Avenue along the streetcar line and by Audubon Park, Woodrich’s practice offers a safe and nurturing environment for clients experiencing hardship. In practice for five years, Woodrich has experience counseling those with severe mental illness, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. He specializes in disruptive behaviors, developmental disabilities, and sexual trauma. Positive Family Solutions sees clients of all ages and also offers family, grief, and marriage/relationship counseling. Gerard Woodrich, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, has been trained in various evidence-based interventions including: CBT Therapy, Motivational Enhancement Therapy, and Play Therapy. Positive Family Solutions accepts most insurances. In-home assessments are available. For information and scheduling, call 504-339-4938 or email gerard@positivefamilysolutions.net.  With early positions as both a massage therapist and biochemist, Arwen Podestam MD, psychiatrist, addiction specialist, and holistic medicine doctor, has merged her


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interests in mind-body wellness and biology by opening Podesta Wellness. Operating in Mid-City, she collaborates closely with an extraordinary team of providers, all experts at whole health. Jennifer Creedon, MD, is an adult, child and adolescent psychiatrist specializing in addiction, trauma, and life transition. Tricia Brown, LPC-S, is trained in EMDR and CBT and specializes in addiction, depression, and trauma. Jeffrey Dupuis, LCSW, has extensive training in addiction treatment and intervention and also treats co-occurring issues. EnricaAnne Montalbano, a licensed massage therapist, specializes in Ortho-Bionomy, sports massage, craniosacral, and healing touch. She works well with clients with anxiety, depression, trauma, injuries, and lymphedema. Nutritionist and Functional medicine specialist, Jan Johnson, RD, LDN, CLT, helps people achieve whole health by addressing the underlying disease etiology through nutrition and habits. To inquire about an appointment, please visit  PodestaWellness.com. Brain & Spine Patients recovering from a serious brain or spine injury require rehabilitation coordinated by an experienced rehab team. The team of neurologists, physical rehabilitation specialists, rehab nurses and physical, occupational, and speech therapists at Culicchia Neurological Clinic work together to plan each patient’s recovery and transition to

home.  “Our goal is to help our patients achieve a level of independent function so that they feel confident leaving the hospital and returning home,” says clinic physician Andrea Toomer, M.D. The Culicchia Rehab Team treats patients suffering from a brain and/or spine injury, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and other neuromuscular disorders, as well as patients who have weakness as a result of a serious medical illness. Patients are seen on both an inpatient and outpatient basis in New Orleans at Cobalt Rehab Hospital and in Jefferson Parish at West Jefferson Medical Center. Call 504-340-6976 or visit CulicchiaNeuro.com for more information. Cardiovascular Care LSU Health Science Center Section of Cardiology is composed of physicians, scientists and teachers who subspecialize in the area of heart and blood vessel problems. Our doctors care for patients who may have nothing more than an above average risk of heart disease to the individuals that have the most advanced heart problems possible. LSU physicians also work with other world leaders in genetics and personalized medicine to ensure you and your family will have the most comprehensive knowledge about your illness or risk of developing a disease. LSU Health Science Center Section of Cardiology has the

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longest consecutive national acclaim in the area from Castle Connolly’s Americas Top Doctors, by sharing experience and discoveries with physicians and scientists from around the world. Teaching physicians is our mission. In fact, more Louisiana doctors were trained at the LSU Health Science Center than anywhere else. LSU Cardiology physicians are proud to serve the residents of Louisiana and the Gulf South by caring for their heart and vascular needs through our clinics, or the Berenson Center for Healthy Aging. Regardless of the problem, LSU Cardiology physicians are equipped to help. For appointments or to learn more about being a part of the exciting scientific advances being made at LSU call 504412-1390 or visit MedSchool.lsuhsc.edu/cardiology.

Mohammad Suleman, MD, is a General and Vascular surgeon who has operated a successful private practice in New Orleans area since 1981. After completing his residency in General Surgery and fellowship in Vascular Surgery from New York Medical College, he moved to the New Orleans metro area and started private practice at East Jefferson General Hospital. He has trained extensively in Laprascopic Surgery and has been practicing this surgery since its inception in 1980s.  Presently, Dr. Suleman works as Medical Director at the Hyperbaric Medicine and Wound Care Center at Ochsner Medical Center in Kenner, where he performs vascular surgery for dialysis patients and peripheral vascular surgery on patients with vascular disease. He also maintains priveleges at East Jefferson General Hospiatal. Dr. Suleman is the past President of the Jefferson Parish Medical Society and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Pakistan Public Affairs Committee. He is also active within the Association of Pakistani Physicians of North America. For more information on Dr. Suleman’s practice, call 504-712-8872. Dentistry & Oral Surgery Dr. Joseph J. Collura has worked at the forefront of cosmetic dentistry for more than 30 years, providing high-quality care and attractive, bright smiles to patients throughout the New Orleans region. He has extensive experience in cosmetic dentistry, advanced restorative dentistry, single-tooth, as well as complete mouth implant reconstruction, root canal therapy, non-surgical gum care and the prevention and treatment of bite-related problems. Dr. Collura is passionate about advancing his skills and education and has been honored with a guest faculty position with the prestigious Scottsdale Center for Dentistry, which provides the latest in programs, seminars, and hands-on training. Additionally, the Louisiana State Board of Dentistry for conscious sedation and nitrous oxide analgesia licensed Dr. Collura. When you visit Dr. Joseph Collura, you’ll realize you’re in a caring, calm environment designed for patient comfort with an open, relaxed atmosphere facing Lake Pontchartrain. During your one-on-one discussion following an exam by Dr. Collura, he’ll answer questions and give you the 138

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information you need to make confident choices about your oral healthcare. For more details or to make an appointment, visit DrCollura.com or call 504-837-9800.  DeFelice Dental is committed to a conservative approach in patient care—focusing on preventative measures and maintenance as well as on patient education. They provide top quality care in a relaxed atmosphere. For patients who may require more complex treatment, the DeFelice Dental team provides comprehensive care with a gentle, caring touch. Services provided at the practice include gentle cleanings, tooth-colored fillings, nonsurgical gum care, teeth whitening, porcelain veneers, natural looking crowns, and implants. In addition to visual cancer screenings completed during appointments, Velscope oral cancer early detection technology is available for patients needing or requesting more advanced screening. Prior to leading his team at DeFelice Dental, Dr. Tre DeFelice worked as the Clinical Director of a unique specialty practice in New Orleans, where he planned, delivered, and coordinated patient treatment along with a team of dental specialists, gaining tremendous experience and knowledge along the way. Dr. DeFelice spends many hours in continuing education to advance in areas of comprehensive patient care, esthetics, and dental implants.  DeFelice Dental is conveniently located on at 1900 N. Causeway Blvd. near I-10. For more information, visit Dentist-Metairie.com or call 504-833-4300.     Want a brighter, whiter smile? Drs. Kristie Reine and Edmund Ring are eager to answer your questions and help create a beautiful, brilliant smile while boosting your confidence. With a wide range of services and advanced equipment and technology, Lakeshore Family Dentistry can help you maintain clean teeth, restore shine and whiteness to your teeth, or restore lost or damaged teeth with services such as implants. Drs. Reine and Ring are both Louisiana natives and proud graduates of LSU School of Dentistry. They are each active members of the American Dental Association, Louisiana Dental Association, and Lake Pontchartrain Study Club. Take the first step towards a more beautiful smile and call Lakeshore Family Dentistry to make an appointment with Dr. Reine or Dr. Ring. A variety of payment options ensure a beautiful, healthy smile is within reach for everyone. The practice is located at 435 Robert Boulevard in Slidell. Call 985643-1852, and visit LakeshoreFamilyDentistry.com.  Dr. Jason Parker is a pediatric dentist specializing in comprehensive children’s dental needs from age 1 to teens. Dr. Parker received the Louisiana Dental Association’s New Dentist Award in 2008 for his outstanding contribution of time and talent for the betterment of mankind. He has served the LDA and NODA in many capacities including serving as a delegate at the House of Delegates Annual Legislative Session, on the NODA Conference Committee, on the LDA Council on Communications, and on the LDA Council on Governmental Affairs. He was appointed to the NODA Board of Governors and is the second Vice


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President of NODA. Parker was bestowed the honor of 2004 New Dentist Award of Excellence by NODA. In the community, Dr. Parker has volunteered, organized, or helped raise money for events citywide for children’s dental health. He also helped produce a post-Katrina documentary involving dentistry in New Orleans that he presented with Barbara Walters at the ADA Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Dr. Parker recently opened a second location in Slidell at 2330 East Gause Blvd. To book an appointment for your child, call 504-831-2120. From her beautiful, historic Uptown office,  Dr. Elizabeth Riggs practices both restorative and cosmetic dentistry. She performs every procedure to the highest standard
while expertly creating beautiful life-like porcelain veneers, crowns, bonding, and implant/tooth replacement procedures. Additionally, she administers dermal fillers and Botox injections, emphasizing quality and comfort, to enhance the framework of her patients’ smiles. Dr. Riggs also offers platelet therapy, a modern and effective procedure that promotes healing after dental and oral surgery. She has received numerous awards and accolades for her transformative work and her outstanding dedication to her patients, including the “Excellence in Cosmetic Dentistry Award” from the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. She is empathetic and effective, truly dedicating her life’s work to fulfilling her patients’ goals for beautiful, healthy smiles. For more information, call 504-891-1115 or visit SmilesByRiggs.com. The practice is located at 3442 Magazine Street, New Orleans. Between youth and adulthood, our teeth handle a lot— from the sticky sweets of childhood to celebratory steaks and wine in later years, we hopefully experience millions of picture-perfect smiles between. Protecting and improving our teeth takes years of proper attention and care. Routine cleanings and preventative measures build a strong foundation, while cosmetic improvements or more complex services may help along the way.  At Lakefront Dental Care, Drs. Stephen J. Delahoussaye and Sarah Haydel offer comprehensive services and solutions for your family’s dental needs. Serving the Greater New Orleans communities, they are proud to use conservative, state-of-the-art dental procedures that result in beautiful, long-lasting smiles. Services include cleanings, prevention screenings and exams, treatment of periodontal disease, implants, and restorations through CEREC®, which provides same day crowns. Cosmetic dentistry services include porcelain crowns and veneers, Invisalign, as well as Zoom!® whitening and KOR® whitening.  For more information or to schedule a visit, go to MyLakeviewDentist.com or call 504-282-5557.  All that is good begins with a smile. At Dr. Bridget Brahney Family Dentistry, your smile is a top priority. Dr. Brahney and her team are dedicated to helping you achieve and maintain long-term dental health and a beautiful smile, whether it be through routine cleanings and 140

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checkups or through finding a solution to a more complex dental concern. When you visit Dr. Bridget Brahney Family Dentistry, you will experience all that modern dentistry has to offer, including the latest advancements that reduce discomfort and expedite care. Dr. Brahney offers a comprehensive list of general, restorative, and cosmetic dental services to meet the needs of the whole family, from Velscope oral cancer screening to fillings, crowns, and tooth whitening. Not only are Dr. Brahney and her team focused on the beauty of your smile, but they’re also concerned about your health. To that end, they focus on thorough exams and routine cleanings. For more information about Dr. Bridget Brahney and her practice, or to schedule an appointment, visit SmileNewOrleans.com or call 504-888-6860.  At The Perioclinic, Dr. Hisham Nasr and Dr. A. Margarita Sáenz practice a full scope of periodontics with expertise in dental implants, cosmetic periodontal surgery, gum grafting, bone regeneration, and more. They are among an elite group of periodontists who, through additional examinations and clinical documentations, have achieved the highest level in the specialty by becoming board certified as diplomates of the prestigious American Board of Periodontology.   Fluent in English, Spanish, French, and Arabic, these doctors can communicate with many international patients. Flexible scheduling can accommodate same-day surgery and emergencies. Their highly skilled caring and compassionate staff is dedicated to providing the best possible patient experience. The Perioclinic has a special affinity for the complex exceptional cases. The Perioclinic is conveniently located in Old Metairie across from St. Francis Xavier Church & School. To schedule an appointment or for more information, call 831-0800 or visit Perioclinic.net. Just because you age doesn’t mean that your smile needs to fade. Feel better about your teeth in just a few hours with the various treatment options available at John J. Killeen, D.D.S. Cosmetic and Family Dentistry. Zoom in-office whitening will lighten your teeth by an average of eight shades and takes just 45 minutes. Save time and see the difference when you come in for just one session. If your teeth are worn, stained, or discolored, get a power lift for your smile with veneers. Veneers are a thin, porcelain shell that covers the front surface of your teeth to lengthen, lighten, and broaden your smile. The result is a conservative, long-lasting and very natural smile. Shifting and crowded teeth cause problems like chipping, recession, and bone loss. With clear aligners, you can straighten and perfect your smile in as little as a few months. Feel beautiful again and transform your smile. For a personal consultation with Dr. Killeen, call 985-643-7516.  Your smile isn’t only one of your most important features, it’s also unique to you. Everyone’s oral health, overall health, and financial position is different, so at DiMarco Dental, Doctors Damon DiMarco and Joanne Hoppe provide individualized care and solutions that fit your specific needs.


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From routine cleanings to custom mouth and snore guards to implants and whitening, DiMarco Dental provides a variety of oral health services that will keep you both healthy and happy. It’s never too early to visit DiMarco Dental. Patients start as early as two years old, as developing good habits early can lead to a lifetime of healthy smiles. Young patients often require sealants and other preventative measures to combat the temptations of the modern diet, especially sugar found in foods and beverages. To schedule an appointment or for more information on DiMarco Dental and the practice’s holistic approach to medicine, call 504-366-5611 or visit DimarcoDental.com. New patients are welcome at their Gretna-based of office at 309 Gretna Blvd. Dermatology Led by Erin Boh, MD, PhD, Tulane’s Department of Dermatology employs experts in psoriasis care, skin cancer care, and cosmetic dermatology. These doctors offer numerous surgical and nonsurgical treatments for skin cancer including state-of-the-art treatment in Mohs surgery for non-melanoma skin cancers and other specialized treatments. Coming in late summer, Tulane Dermatology will offer Mole Mapping as a new service. It is a painless, noninvasive tool in the early detection of melanoma by utilizing digital photography to track changes in moles. Tulane dermatologists treat all spectra of skin diseases in pediatric and adult populations and also provide

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cosmetic treatments and services such as neurotoxins for wrinkles, fillers for deep wrinkles, and chemical peels. The faculty are national leaders in dermatology who train the next generation of dermatologists while providing state of the art treatments. Tulane faculty serve as principal investigators in clinical trials and research and are able to offer new therapeutic modalities not yet offered by other dermatologists. To schedule an appointment, call 504-9881700 (Downtown) or 985-893-1291 (Covington). Eye Care Eyecare Associates physicians are excited about new cataract surgery technology now available for New Orleans area patients. The Catalys Precision Laser System is designed to make cataract surgery safer and more accurate, while new lens implant options, such as the latest in multifocal and extended focus intraocular lenses, provide patients with the best-corrected vision for both distance and near at the same time. The Ora System, used at the time of surgery, delivers the most accurate calculation for determining the power of the intraocular lens implanted. In addition to the new technology offered for cataract patients, Eyecare is excited to offer a non-dilated thorough retinal examination with the OPTOS ultra-wide retinal imaging system. This system allows physicians to detect diseases such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and even cancer much earlier than previous options have


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allowed. Optometrists at Eyecare Associates offer the latest options in daily wear contact lenses that are known for exceptional comfort and clear vision. Patients have access to comprehensive routine and medical examinations as well as refractive surgery, glaucoma treatment, and retina services and procedures. For more information, call 504-455-9825 or visit EyeCareNewOrleans.com. The physicians and staff of Retina Associates New Orleans are dedicated to diagnosing and treating all retinal conditions. With over four decades of clinical experience, commitment to research, passion for technological innovation, and unyielding compassion for the visually impaired, Retina Associates New Orleans is the premier Greater New Orleans institution for vitreoretinal care from Drs. Gerald Cohen, Gwen Cousins, Kathy Ta, Ronald Willson, and Stanislav Zhuk. The retina is a fragile tissue lining the back of the eye and is essential for vision. Medical treatment and surgical intervention is often required in order to heal the retina and preserve its visual function. The vitreoretinal specialists at Retina Associates New Orleans care for patients with a variety of conditions including macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, macular hole and pucker, ocular tumors, retinal tears and detachment, severe ocular trauma, uveitis and retinal vascular disease.

Retina Associates’ physicians are available for same-day referrals and around the clock for emergency care. The practice’s main offices are located in Metairie and Lacombe with convenient satellite offices located in Hammond, Amite, Thibodaux and Houma. For more information, please visit RetinaAssociates.com or call 504-456-9061. Fertility Since 1977, New Orleans has been home to one of the nation’s leading, state-of-the-art clinics specializing in new infertility treatment. The Fertility Institute has nearly 40 years of successful in vitro fertilization (IVF) and continues to be recognized for its excellence by peers and health insurance companies providing benefits for infertility and in vitro fertilization. Employing traditional treatments and the latest advances in reproductive technology, including IVF, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and cryopreservation of eggs, they offer hope for families who have trouble conceiving or who have genetic abnormalities that may cause a difficult quality of life for a child. The Fertility Institute is a pioneer in the Gulf South and the first to perform IVF in the region and achieve a pregnancy with its first IVF. With a team of five physicians and additional staff, the Fertility Institute has accomplished over 16,000 pregnancies from all forms of fertility treatment, including

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those who have suffered from recurrent miscarriages. Offices are located in Mandeville, Metairie, and New Orleans with the addition of a second state-of-the-art IVF laboratory in Baton Rouge. Schedule appointments at 1-800-375-0048. Visit FertilityInstitute.com.

advanced diagnostic tools such as ultrasound imaging, Bone Mineral Density, and Nerve Conduction Studies are being used to customize treatments. For information and scheduling, visit  HandCenterOfLouisiana.com.

Hand Surgery For over 40 years, the physicians and staff of The Hand Center of Louisiana have pursued a passion for patient-centered care. The Center and its staff are committed to creating an environment featuring cutting-edge technology and personalized services in a compassionate and caring setting—a one-stop shop for all medical and surgical services for patients with upper extremity conditions. Board Certified Hand Center surgeons are widely recognized for their expertise and successful outcomes. Using the most current approaches in surgical and nonsurgical treatments, they develop a plan of care suited to each individual patient. Omega Hospital is one of the premier facilities the surgeons use for surgical treatment of a wide range of conditions.   Certified Hand Therapists at The Hand Therapy Center are using advanced techniques and protocols for post-operative management of surgical patients. Therapists are often able to move patients into therapy more quickly, resulting in earlier clinical results and recovery. At The Center for Rheumatology and Neurological Testing,

HIV/ AIDS The Tulane T-Cell (HIV) Clinic offers comprehensive care for those who are living with HIV and AIDS. In addition to HIV testing for pediatrics, adolescents, and adults, the Tulane T-Cell Clinic offers complete primary care, including regular check-ups for people living with HIV.  The Tulane T-Cell Clinic also offers vaccinations and laboratory blood work testing, access to psychiatrists, assistance with Ryan White Foundation Form (ADAP) for uninsured patients needing medication, and on-site medical and non-medical case management. Additionally, referrals to subspecialty locations and legal support services are available. Physicians and staff are bilingual, and appointments may be scheduled online or by phone.   If you or someone you know is living with HIV and is outof-care, please schedule an appointment by calling 504-9883002 or by visiting Tulane.edu/som/t-cell-clinic. Please bring proof of residency, proof of income, proof of HIV status, a list of any current medications and questions you want answered, and a copy of your Medicaid, ADAP, or private insurance cards if you have them.

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Hospice Care Anyone looking for compassionate and dignified care for their terminally ill loved ones should take a look at the services offered by Canon Hospice. The caring team at Canon is dedicated to a hospice ministry that helps patients and families accept terminal illness positively and resourcefully. Their stated goal is to “allow our patients to live each day to the fullest and enjoy their time with family and friends.” With special expertise in pain management and symptom control, Canon Hospice designs individualized plans of care for each patient based on their unique needs. Home Based Services provide doctors, nurses, social workers, pastoral care and volunteers.  For patients with more intensive symptom management needs, Canon has an Inpatient Hospice Unit. This unit provides 24-hour care in a home-like environment where patients are permitted to receive visits at any hour. For more information, visit CanonHospice.com or call 504-818-2723. HOUSE CALL PHYSICIANS NOLA Doc offers a unique healthcare experience providing physician house calls to the greater New Orleans area. Visits take place in one’s home, hotel, office or other convenient location. Same day appointments, hour-long visits and afterhours availability allow for unparalleled access to care. Services include urgent and primary care, IV therapy, hospice and

palliative care, as well as personalized treatment for opioid dependence. Founded and directed by New Orleans native Dr. Mark Berenson, NOLA Doc physicians are board-certified with decades of experience in emergency medicine, hospital medicine and in-home care, and are dedicated to keeping patients safe and healthy at home. NOLA Doc offers convenience, privacy, and quality time with your doctor. To set up an appointment call 504-383-3828 or visit NolaDoc.com for more information. Infectious Disease If you are traveling to exotic parts of the world, consult first with the expert physicians at the Tulane Travel Clinic. According to Dr. Susan McLellan, Director, half of all travelers to developing countries will develop some health problem. Many travelers turn to their travel agents for advice, but McLellan says it is impossible for travel agents to stay abreast of all the latest information. Even most physicians are not upto-date on traveler’s health, which encompasses much more than immunizations. Consultations are individualized based on each traveler’s itinerary, medical history, and personal health considerations. “We need to consider if you’re working in a refugee camp, climbing at high altitude on the Inca trail, or going on a love boat-style cruise,” says Dr. McLellan.

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Dr. McLellan and the other Tulane Infectious Disease doctors also treat travelers who return ill at their regular Infectious Disease clinics. For more information about the Travel Clinic, call 504-988-1947 or visit TulaneTravel.com. Integrative Medicine Infinite Health Integrative Medicine Center is empowered medicine for the body, mind, and soul. Everyday, their comprehensive patient-centric approach to optimized health and longevity helps motivated people eradicate diabetes and overcome fibromyalgia, pain and inflammation, neuropathy, stress, anxiety, depression, hormone imbalances, ED, unwanted weight, and more. Infinite Health is happy to file claims for the insurance covered portion of their care to most private insurances, including Medicare (with the exception of Humana Medicare). There is an additional mind-body program investment required to cover the services that Infinite Health provides that insurance does not cover. Infinite Health is located at 3900 Veteran’s Memorial Parkway, Suite 204 in Metairie. To schedule an initial consultation, call 337-312-8234 or visit YourInfiniteHealth. com. Presently, consultations are available by appointment only. Internal Medicine The faculty of Tulane University’s Section of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics are dedicated to providing

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high quality patient health care and resident education through several clinical programs and locations across New Orleans, including Tulane Medical Center, University Medical Center, the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, and the Ruth U. Fertel/Tulane Community Health Center in Mid-City. Their Internal Medicine clinics provide excellent care in the areas of wellness, prevention, management of chronic illness, and acute care for adults. Faculty are trained in a variety of areas such as ambulatory medicine, geriatrics, hospital medicine, medicine-pediatrics, palliative care, and preventative health care. To find a clinic near you, visit www2.tulane.edu/som/ departments/medicine/gimger/patient-care/index.cfm and schedule an appointment by calling 504-988-1001 (Tulane Internal Medicine Practice), 504-609-3500 (Ruth U. Fertel/ Tulane Community Center), 504-988-8050 (Metairie-Lakeside Hospital) or 504-988-9000 (Tulane-Uptown Square). Multi-specialty Health Centers Stuck with long delays in getting care? High copays?  St. Thomas Community Health Center can help. With their affordable, income-based sliding scale, you can receive care with or without insurance. Since 1987, St. Thomas Community Health Center has continued its mission of providing comprehensive primary care to the community regardless of ability to pay. As a Federally Qualified Health Center and Patient-Centered


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Medical Home, their robust teams of dedicated providers work to address individual health needs and ensure delivery of the highest quality of care. Completing their 30th year of providing the community with primary care, pediatrics, OB-GYN, optometry, behavioral health, and mammography, St. Thomas now offers same-day and next-day cardiology appointments at the new St. Thomas Heart and Vascular Center.   All St. Thomas sites offer same-day and next-day appointment scheduling with office hours from 7:30am5:00pm, Monday-Friday. Call 504-529-5558 to schedule an appointment for basic services at any of their six convenient locations. For the St. Thomas Heart and Vascular Center, call 504-529-9115. CrescentCare provides whole-person health to anyone living in the greater New Orleans area, regardless of income, insurance, or any other circumstance. So often, all sorts of barriers to care stop New Orleanians from accessing vital health services—especially those who work in the service industry or who are in the LGBTQ community. That’s why as a Federally Qualified Health Center, CrescentCare is dedicated to serving the unique needs of those individuals. It doesn’t stop there—to anyone who needs services, CrescentCare offers primary care, dentistry, behavioral health, OB-GYN, trans*care, pediatrics, sexual health services, insurance/medicaid enrollment assistance, and so much more, all on a sliding scale. Building on over 30

years of history having been called the NO/AIDS Task Force, CresentCare is also a leader in HIV care in Southeast Louisiana. CrescentCare operates facilities across the city and continues to expand its reach to care for more New Orleanians. For more information, visit CrescentCare.org or call 504-207-CARE (2273). Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Tulane Orthopaedics doctors are elite, fellowship-trained surgeons who combine their expertise and sub-specialty areas into a single comprehensive program. Patients have access to some of the most capable surgical care in the nation as well as one of the finest rehabilitation programs. This ensures a faster and more effective recovery, regardless of whether you’re trying to get back on the sports field or back to daily life. Specialists offer care and prevention of sports medicine injuries, total joint replacements of hips, knees, shoulders, elbows, and ankles, treatment of pelvic and other bone fractures, and treatment of spine-related conditions ranging from scoliosis in children to adults with disc herniations and spinal stenosis. Other conditions treated include painful foot ailments such as bunions and painful nerve compressions. With multiple locations, including the Institute of Sports Medicine in uptown New Orleans, Tulane-Lakeside in Metairie, and downtown at Tulane Medical Center, their doctors and staff are able to serve the entire Greater New

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Orleans community. For more information, call 877-Tortho-1 (877-867-8461), or 504-988-6032, or visit OrthoTulane.com. At Southern Orthopaedic Specialists, patients experience care that goes above and beyond normal expectations. A group of eight orthopaedic surgeons, six physical therapists, and two hand therapists, Southern Orthopaedic Specialists offers prompt, comprehensive orthopaedic care to Greater New Orleans with locations in Uptown (2731 Napoleon Ave.) and Metairie (1615 Metairie Road). Each Physician not only specializes in Orthopaedic Surgery but also has a sub-specialty as well. Their specialties and sub-specialties include: General Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine, Total Joint Replacements and Revisions, Upper Extremity, Hand, Shoulder, Foot and Ankle, and Back and Spine Care/Surgery. This level of advanced specialization allows Southern Orthopaedic Specialists to provide the absolute best treatment for patients. As a team, they can treat just about any orthopaedic problem. For more information, visit SOSNewOrleans.com. Both locations are easily accessible and provide complimentary parking. For all departments, as well as scheduling, call 504897-6351. They accept all major health insurance plans and worker’s compensation insurance plans. Serving the West Bank and Greater New Orleans region, Westside Orthopaedic Clinic provides superior general orthopaedic treatment with a specialty in spinal care. The clinic has been in operation since 1961, making it one of the longest standing orthopaedic clinics in the city. Dr. Ralph Katz is a board certified and fellowship trained orthopedic specialist who has performed over 500 minimally invasive procedures with consistently excellent outcomes. For the right patient who has failed conservative treatment (e.g. medication, physical therapy, injections), a minimally invasive microdiscectomy can be done in an outpatient setting with an incision that can be covered by a Band-Aid. The procedure typically takes less than an hour. Most patients can return to normal activities within three to six weeks. Additionally, Dr. Katz performs cervical and lumbar spinal fusions, utilizing small incisions with minimally invasive systems. He is one of few local surgeons who perform both cervical and lumbar disc replacements. Westside offers full-service, in-house x-rays, EMG/NCS, as well as physical therapy services with access to new rehabilitation equipment. Same day appointments can be accommodated. For more information, visit WestsideOrtho. com or call 504-347-0243.  One of the region’s top orthopaedic surgeons, Dr. Neil Maki practices in Thibodaux and is on staff at Thibodaux Regional Medical Center. Six staff members, including physician assistant Nicole Orgeron Bourgeois PA-C insure that patients’ individual needs are met by the most effective means. Dr. Maki specializes in the shoulder and has pioneered many shoulder arthroscopic procedures including obtaining patents on arthroscopic instrumentation. He also performs 148

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joint replacements and is one of few specialists in the region who performs endoscopic carpal tunnel (wrist) and endoscopic cubital tunnel (elbow) surgery. Board-certified in both orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, Dr. Maki is fellowship trained in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery. He has served on the medical staff of the New Orleans Saints and the Nicholls State University athletic programs.   Dr. Maki holds a distinction as a Clinical Professor in Orthopaedics and Honorary Alumnus at LSU Medical School.  He may be reached by calling 985-446-6284 or 800521-2647. At Pontchartrain Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, the goal is to achieve 100 percent patient satisfaction from any medical or non-medical service provided. Their physicians specialize in the care of the musculoskeletal system, which includes bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves and related structures of the body. All orthopedic problems from the neck down to the feet of both adults and children are treated from their full-service, advanced facility. Patient input is given the highest consideration during all courses of treatment, and conservative treatment is always considered before a decision for surgery is made. The comprehensive orthopedic management program at Pontchartrain Orthopedics & Sports Medicine includes procedures such as arthroscopic surgery, total joint replacement, carpal tunnel surgery, and fracture management as well as sports medicine and worker’s compensation cases. Pain management services include interventional spine, ultrasound-guided injections, and Botox injections. Pontchartrain Orthopedics maintains offices in Metairie and Boutte. For information and appointments, visit posm. org or call the office at 504-885-6464. At the Orthopedic Center for Sports Medicine (OCSM), Charles Murphy, MD, Thomas Lyons, MD, Luis M. Espinoza, MD, and William Sherman, MD, are all fellowship-trained, board-certified orthopedic surgeons who specialize in treatment of the shoulder, knee, and hip. Additionally the practice welcomes Chadwick Murphy, MD, a fellowshiptrained and board certified Pain Medicine/Interventional Spine specialist. “We are a general Orthopedic practice with subspecialty expertise in sports medicine, joint replacement, and arthroscopic surgery,” says Dr. Lyons. They deliver stateof-the-art care for local athletes and are the official team physicians of the Triple-A New Orleans Baby Cakes. Additionally, the practice specializes in evaluation and treatment of work-related injuries and conditions as well as in evaluation and management of legal cases. OCSM physicians can see patients the same day of injury and provide a plan to quickly return the patient to pre-injury form. To improve care, OCSM provides in-house MRI and physical therapy for close monitoring of patients and modification of treatment plans. For scheduling, call the Metairie (504-889-2663) or New Orleans offices (504 943-5777), or visit nolasportsmedicine.com. myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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Pain Management Southern Pain & Neurological is excited to introduce a revolutionary, minimally invasive needle treatment for herniated discs to their practice with the HydroDiscectomy, an outpatient alternative to traditional back surgery. The procedure uses a high-speed water-jet stream to remove herniated disc tissue, relieving the nerve pressure that causes back and leg pain. The advantages of using water include no hospitalization, fast recovery, no incision, less pain, no bone removal, no trauma to back muscles, and no general anesthesia. The entire procedure takes 20 minutes on average. Most patients will be able to return to work in about one to four weeks. Doctors Paul Hubbell, Barry Faust, Jr, and Donald Richardson know that chronic pain is a prison, keeping those who suffer from it trapped and unable to do the things they want to do. The stress from pain and lack of freedom can negatively affect personalities, too. If you are suffering from chronic pain, contact the Southern Pain clinic and find out if the HydroDiscectomy or another treatment is right for you. For information and scheduling at the Metairie, Marrero, and Covington offices, call 1-800-277-1265. Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Specialty Medicine Exercise is often the best prescription for your health, especially when mobility is compromised and pain appears. Functional exercise improves strength,

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balance, and most importantly, quality of life. At Baudry Therapy Center in Metairie, patients experience a safe, inspiring environment, where they can strengthen and heal their bodies to eliminate pain and restore active living. Baudry Therapy Center provides proactive healthcare using the body’s own healing mechanisms for a natural return to pain-free living. Their Doctors of Physical Therapy provide patients direct access to solutions for neck and lower back pain, as well as pain in the extremities, helping clients take control of arthritic, sciatic, and degenerative disc issues. Baudry Therapy Center’s skilled team supports patients by providing hands-on treatment, valuable education, a positive environment, and proven strategies for healing. Their experts show patients how to invest in their own health so that they can live a longer, stronger life. While Baudry Therapy Center works closely with physicians to coordinate and facilitate appropriate and timely care, patients can access care at Baudry without a doctor’s referral. For more information or scheduling, visit BaudryTherapy.com or call 504-841-0150.  For nearly two decades, Crane Rehab Center has helped New Orleanians lead better lives. Their team of therapists and techs have worked with thousands of patients in overcoming challenges, assisting them in achieving and returning to their highest level of function through individualized, innovative care. Offering physical, occupational, and speech therapy,


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ABA services, and wellness and enrichment programs, Crane Rehab is uniquely positioned to help you and your family get back on track after an illness, injury, or developmental disability. At Crane Rehab’s Adult Facility on River Road they treat lower back and spinal injuries, neurological disorders, arthritis, LSVT BIG Parkinson’s Treatment, orthopedic/ musculoskeletal injuries, post-surgical rehabilitation, and work-related and sports injuries. Crane’s Pediatric Facility on Earhardt Boulevard provides physical therapy, occupational therapy, Applied Behavior Analsysis (ABA), speech therapy, music therapy, and group therapy for children. Additionally, the Health + Wellness Center at Crane Rehab offers personal training, fitness memberships, massage therapy, yoga, Pilates, and nutrition counseling. Crane Rehab Center will be opening an additional Adult facility in the CBD in late summer/early fall 2017. Magnolia Physical Therapy (MPT) is the private physical therapy practice of local rehabilitation experts Beth Winkler and Lisa Taglauer. They focus on providing “Freedom From Pain” and returning patients to normal activity as soon as possible. All therapists are highly skilled in manual therapy. Patients benefit greatly from one-on-one sessions that include thirtyminutes of hands-on treatment. Eighty percent of Americans will suffer from back pain sometime in their lives, and MPT therapists specialize in treating not just the painful symptoms but also targeting what is causing the pain. Since 2005, MPT has provided comprehensive care for patients of all ages with many different musculoskeletal conditions. They offer free screens and pride themselves on getting patients scheduled the same week and on the road to “Freedom From Pain.” Offices are located in the Marigny, Uptown, Freret, and Harahan with a fifth location opening soon in the CBD. For a free pain relief assessment, call 733-0254 and mention this ad. For additional information, visit MagnoliaTherapyLA.com. Retirement Living & In-Home Care With spectacular views of the Mississippi River and Audubon Park, Lambeth House is New Orleans’ leading retirement community offering elegant living and amenities that focus on choice and flexibility. Active living is at the forefront at Lambeth House, where residents enjoy a robust events calendar, a variety of common spaces, and a Wellness Center that features a stunning indoor pool, fitness center, art studio, meditation room, and all one needs to maintain and ensure physical and spiritual wellness. Located Uptown where Broadway meets River Road, Lambeth House offers luxury retirement living at its best and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its recent expansion. Additionally, Lambeth House received top ranking in the Best Retirement Community category of City Business’s 2017 Reader Rankings. Non-residents are also welcome with Fitness Center memberships available to ages 55 and older, and Lambeth House’s Wild Azalea Café is open to the 152

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public for breakfast and lunch, Tuesday-Saturday. For more information, call 504-865-1960 or explore Lambeth House online at LambethHouse.com.  Providing better solutions for aging well in New Orleans since 1991, Home Care Solutions specializes in compassionate in-home care and Alzheimer’s care, in addition to Aging Life Care Management services to help elderly loved ones in the Greater New Orleans area extend their independence. Home Care Solutions’ team of reliable, experienced, caregivers provide older adults assistance with daily living and companionship services. Each caregiver is carefully matched to meet both client needs and personality. The company is committed to providing clients with the highest quality of care in their chosen environment, keeping loved ones safe and comfortable while giving families peace of mind. Care Managers simplify, coordinate, and proactively guide the care of a loved one with intelligence, expertise, and heart. They are experienced advocates capable of managing complex situations and finding intelligent and creative solutions for all care concerns. Home Care Solutions is a member of the Home Care Association of America and the Aging Life Care Association and is also a licensed Personal Care Attendant Agency. For more information call 504-828-00900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com. Urology Has someone you love been diagnosed with prostate cancer, kidney cancer or bladder cancer? The Department of Urology at Tulane University Medical Center, a national leader in providing minimally invasive surgical procedures for various urologic maladies, stands at the forefront of cancer treatment through state-of-the-art robotic procedures, breakthrough treatments, and research. Tulane Urology is proud to be recognized as the first and most experienced robotic urologic surgical center in the entire Gulf South. Using the daVinci high-definition robot, Tulane Urology’s expertly trained surgeons offer patients a highly advanced therapeutic option for cancer treatment. This cutting-edge, minimally invasive surgical technology, combined with the extensive experience of the Tulane Urology team, has made Tulane Urology the go-to center for the treatment of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancers. Visit MyProstateCancer.com and TulaneUrology.com for more information on the various treatments and procedures offered at Tulane Urology. Call 504-988-2536 to schedule an appointment or get a second opinion today. Patients of Urology & Urologic Surgery, the practice of Dr. Stephanie Hughes, enjoy friendly, caring staff and quickly accommodated appointments in a more personal office setting. As a general urologist, Dr. Hughes specializes in all urologic problems, including enlarged prostate, incontinence, erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, kidney stones, recurrent urinary tract infections, and cancers of the prostate, bladder, kidney, and other urologic organs.


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Board certified in Urology, Dr. Hughes focuses in large part on treating and preventing kidney stones as well as treating voiding dysfunction such as overactive bladder and enlarged prostates. Urology & Urologic Surgery treats patients on both sides of Lake Pontchartrain and offers same-day and next-day appointments. The practice offers in-office procedures for enlarged prostates (BPH) and overactive bladder. For Metairie appointments, call 504-887-5555, and for Covington appointments, call 985-892-8088. For more information, visit UrologyNOLA.com. Women’s Health The specialized healthcare team of Tulane Center for Women’s Health meets the unique healthcare needs of women by providing comprehensive care for the challenges faced in every phase of a woman’s life. Specializing in the areas of general obstetrics and gynecology, maternal fetal medicine, reproductive endocrinology and fertility, minimally invasive surgery, female pelvic and reconstructive surgery and gynecologic oncology, the center operates on the belief that every woman not only has the right to good obstetric and gynecologic care, but that she is a partner in her care.        Tulane gynecologists offer the latest treatments and therapies for a wide range of services including pelvic pain and infections, family planning, incontinence, menopause treatment, and more. They are skilled at employing minimally invasive surgery techniques and use of robotic surgery. Tulane obstetricians provide comprehensive prenatal evaluation and testing, prenatal office visits, fertility care and more. Patients deliver at Tulane Lakeside Hospital for women and children. Tulane offers clinic locations in Uptown and Downtown New Orleans as well as Metairie. Call 504-988-8070 today to meet your healthcare needs by scheduling an appointment. Selecting an OB/GYN is a very important choice, and Crescent City Physicians, Inc. hopes to make that choice a little easier. Whether you are becoming a mother for the first time, expanding your growing family, or looking for a doctor for annual wellness and pre- or post-menopausal health needs, Crescent City OB/GYNs offer unique, comprehensive care to women at every stage of life. The extensive OB/GYN services at Crescent City Physicians include comprehensive gynecology for adolescents and adults, family planning and contraceptive, peri/ postmenopausal care, preconception counseling, prenatal, birth, postpartum care, and STI testing and counseling. Additionally, the practice is pleased to offer midwifery services to patients. Their Certified-Nurse Midwives help care for women across their lifespan and assist expectant mothers with their individualized birth plan. Midwives are available to care for patients at Crescent City Physicians’ Uptown, MidCity, West Bank, and St. Claude locations. Crescent City Physicians offers eleven convenient locations throughout Greater New Orleans with delivery at Touro’s Family Birthing Center—“the place where babies come from.” Learn more at CrescentCityPhysicians.com or call 504-897-7197. • myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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All procedures are performed in a state-of-the-art private facility, conveniently located in Old Metairie Village. Patients avoid the delays and intimidation of big hospitals and benefit from the comprehensive team approach of expert clinicians, personalized service and customized follow-up care in a comfortable setting. Patrick Waring and his staff have helped thousands of satisfied patients get back to the business of living their lives. Visit PainInterventionCenter.com or call 504-455-2225 today. No referrals necessary. Most major medical insurance accepted.

Cutting-edge Health

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edicine is a fascinating subject. Mesmerizing for students, researchers, doctors, and lovers of science, the field is always expanding its reach with new technologies and breakthroughs for bettering health outcomes. Whether it’s life-saving, cancer-fighting technology or a life-improving pain procedure, the latest advancements in medicine are what doctors love to utilize and patients love to benefit from. If you’re interested in the latest and greatest, you can find physicians, private practices, and hospitals eager to share their news, their newest services, and their expertise. The following area healthcare providers are fans of the cutting edge. Find out if there’s a treatment or technology that could be right for you among the following professionals in pain management, cosmetic surgery, cancer treatment, prosthetics, brain and spine, psychiatry, hair restoration, and orthopedics and sports medicine. The Latest in Pain Management Too many suffer from chronic pain conditions that impact their personal lives and make working nearly impossible. Modern interventional pain techniques are effective alternatives to surgery and addictive opioid pain medicines. Dr. Patrick Waring, founder of the Pain Intervention Center, is a leader in the field of precision pain management and devoted to the diagnosis and innovative treatment of chronic pain and related disorders. As a board-certified anesthesiologist and pain management specialist, Waring targets and treats pain through non-narcotic, non-surgical, minimally invasive techniques performed under fluoroscopic X-ray guidance. 154

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Lonseth Interventional Pain Centers is a premier interventional pain management practice that helps adults with musculoskeletal or neuropathic conditions regain strength, mobility, and function while avoiding narcotics and without resorting to major surgery. Dr. Eric Lonseth is a specialist known across the United States for excellence in interventional pain management. He advises patients suffering pain to talk to a pain management physician before starting a prescription or planning surgery.  Specifically, Lonseth Interventional Pain Centers excel in nonsurgical treatments and minimally invasive procedures for neck and back pain, regenerative medicines for joint pain, and advanced solutions for other forms of chronic pain, such as radiculopathy, nerve pain, whiplash, and migraines. With a staff of compassionate professionals, they offer easily accessible locations in New Orleans, Metairie, and Baton Rouge. For more information on relieving pain and restoring life, visit LonsethPain.com or call Lonseth Interventional Pain Centers at 504-327-5857. Expertise in Eyelids Eyes are the most expressive feature of the face, and for those looking to enhance the appearance of their eyes, Dr. Kyle V. Acosta of the Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center offers numerous highly specialized procedures for recreating youth and beauty. An award-winning, highly trained, and experienced physician, Dr. Acosta is board-certified in Ophthalmology and fellowship trained in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery Center has a state-of-the-art, on-site, private surgical facility with experienced anesthesia care provided for your comfort. The highly qualified staff will make your surgical experience pleasant and effortless from the initial consultation to discharge from the surgical suite. In addition to cosmetic procedures for the eyes, Dr. Acosta also treats age-related changes to the eyelids, congenital abnormalities, and the repair of unsuccessful cosmetic eyelid procedures. For more information, call 985-898-2001.


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Cutting-edge Cancer Treatment At Slidell Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Center, physicians and staff are changing the way patients across the Gulf Coast experience and survive cancer. With innovative programs, cutting-edge treatments, and a robust support system for patients and their families, the Center takes a wellrounded approach to cancer care.  Radiation Oncologist Edward Mannina, Jr., MD, MPH, MS, is excited to introduce Stereotactic Radiation Therapy at Slidell Memorial Hospital for patients with cancer in difficult to access locations such as the lungs, liver, brain, and spine. Using 4D-CT technology, this treatment permits precisely targeted, high doses of radiation to tumors while sparing adjacent tissue. Dr. Mannina was the lead author of a promising clinical investigation of the treatment recently published in the prestigious International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics.  For more information on Stereotactic Radiation Therapy or the Slidell Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Center, call 985-280-6600 or visit SlidellMemorial.org/cancer-center.  New Technology in Prosthetics & Orthotics If you have lost a limb, know that you are not alone. As a company whose mission is to provide world-class prosthetic care, Prosthetic Solutions has been through this process with thousands of patients. With over 25 years of experience, Prosthetic Solutions wants to share its insights and help you turn this journey into a positive experience.

“Since 1989, I have dedicated my career to providing state-of-the-art prosthetic limbs in a caring and professional manner,” says J. Curt Patton, CEO. Since becoming board certified in Prosthetic and Orthotics, Patton has focused on developing cutting-edge technologies such as the SoftSocket™ system to enhance the health and quality of life for those who have lost limbs. Additionally, Prosthetic Solutions is proud to be the only authorized and licensed provider of the HiFi Interface™ in Greater New Orleans. This new technology offers a light, comfortable, and natural feel being praised by local users who have experienced its life-changing results. For more information, visit ProstheticSolutionsInc.com or call 504-500-1349. Prosthetic Solutions is located in Mid-City at 4000 Bienville Street, Suite D. News in Neuroscience & Neurosurgery Tulane University School of Medicine’s Center for Clinical Neurosciences is dedicated to providing the highest quality patient-centered care by combining cutting-edge technology with personalized attention. The center allows for faster consults between physicians who specialize in different neuroscience disciplines and provides an improved continuity of care for neuro patients. The center, in partnership with the world-class physicians at Tulane University School of Medicine’s Center for Neurosciences, offers the expertise and capabilities to effectively diagnose and treat spine, brain, and neurological

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conditions. To continue their tradition of excellence and expertise in providing the best quality care, education and research are integrated through the combined resources of Tulane University Hospital and Clinics and the Tulane School of Medicine. The Center for Clinical Neurosciences operates an outpatient clinic located in Tulane Hospital that can be reached at 504-988-5561. Visit online at TulaneNeurosciences.com. At Southern Brain & Spine, physicians focus on degenerative diseases of the spine and brain, specializing in brain microsurgery and cutting-edge, minimally invasive spinal procedures. The practice’s five neurosurgeons include Drs. Justin Haydel, Lucien Miranne, Jr., Everett Robert, Jr., Najeeb Thomas, and Rand Voorhies.  The doctors treat all spine and brain-related problems and are dedicated to providing personalized care to Greater New Orleans. At Southern Brain & Spine, minimally invasive decompressions and percutaneous fusions are performed after non-surgical options have been explored. Dr. Justin Lundgren specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation and non-operative treatments of the spine. Dr. Kevin Martinez, Interventional Pain Management specialist, offers precision diagnostic blocks and injection therapies. Combined with advanced imaging such as merged SPECT scans, these techniques allow physicians to avoid

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unnecessary surgeries and to best plan a surgery when it is required. Southern Brain & Spine has offices in New Orleans, LaPlace, Covington, and a main location in Metairie at 3798 Veterans Boulevard, Suite 200. The practice participates in all major insurance plans and can typically arrange same-day or next-day appointments. For information and scheduling, call 504-454-0141 or visit sbsdoc.net. Advancements in Psychiatry Dr. Nicholas Pejic has updated his transcranial magnetic stimlulation (TMS) program at Atlas Psychiatry to include MagVita TMS Therapy. TMS is a non-invasive outpatient procedure that reduces symptoms of depression in up to 70% of patients.  While the patient reclines in a chair, the state-of-theart TMS device sends magnetic pulses to parts of the brain associated with depression. The pulses force low functioning nerves to activate and form tighter synaptic connections. Restoring these connections causes an anti-depressant response, making TMS effective when medications have failed. Also, Dr. Pejic uses an advanced localizing technique and faster frequency called Theta Burst Stimulation, allowing for shorter and more cost-effective treatments. After a TMS treatment, patients can resume the day’s activities. TMS does not cause side effects commonly associated with antidepressants, such as weight gain,


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sedation, and sexual problems. Dr. Pejic is an experienced and distinguished psychiatrist with expertise in both TMS and traditional pharmacological treatment approaches. For more information, visit AtlasTMSCenter.com or call 504-899-1682. New Options in Hair Restoration “I thought it was magic,” says Dr. Nicole Rogers about the first time she observed hair transplant surgery. “The idea that you could take follicles from the back of the head, move them to the front, and observe them grow really excited me.” Following that significant day 20 years ago, Dr. Rogers became a board certified dermatologist and completed fellowship training in hair transplantation in Manhattan. Today, her Metairie-based practice, Hair Restoration of the South, is devoted exclusively to hair restoration.  Dr. Rogers offers her patients a choice between FUE (follicular unit extraction, where follicles are harvested individually with no linear scar), FUT (traditional donor strip surgery), and PRP (platelet rich plasma).  The growth factors that are released through PRP can serve as a great stand-alone treatment for hair loss or serve to enhance one’s surgical results. In every case, Dr. Rogers strives to make sure that her patients get outstanding results and feel great for a lifetime. Call 504-315-4247 or visit HairRestorationoftheSouth.com for more information.

Developments in Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Pontchartrain Orthopedics & Sports Medicine is not your typical orthopedics practice. With a full-service physical therapy department and on-site physical therapy center at their Metairie location, physicians are able to work closely with patients and physical therapists in taking a comprehensive approach to treatment and rehabilitation. With plans to open a physical therapy center at their Boutte location by the end of this year, Pontchartrain Orthopedics is displaying its commitment to providing the best possible care for patients experiencing an orthopedic problem or injury to the musculoskeletal system of bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves, and related structures. “The beauty of our on-site physical therapy clinic is that, with an integrated electronic health record, our physicians are always in sync with the therapists and have immediate contact in monitoring patient progress,” says Robert Marks, CEO. “Additionally, we offer a fitness program for patients to continue accessing our gym and PT staff after the insurancecovered portion of their treatment runs out, giving them an extra boost of attentive care.” For more information on Pontchartrain Orthopedics and their PT services, including dry needling, visit POSM.org or call 504-885-6464. •

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Resources

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e all get by with a little help from our friends, but sometimes our friends don’t have quite the expertise we need. When you’re in a situation where you need an expert, you probably don’t have time to do a lot of research. Fortunately, resources in a variety of subjects are available and ready to assuage your concerns and help find solutions to your needs. We’d all prefer to sail smoothly through life, and local legal, financial and health resources can assist you and your family with limiting risks and improving health and wealth. Home resources are available for making sure your home is not only perfect for you, but also perfect for your budget. Those working in healthcare can find additional resources, from help with billing to scrubs, uniforms and footwear. Peruse this month’s guide to resources and you may find just what you’ve been looking for. Retirement Living & In-Home Care Celebrating its Bicentennial Birthday this year, Poydras Home is a Life Plan Community offering independent living, assisted living and nursing care within its Uptown New Orleans campus. Poydras Home is known nationally for its quality of care and innovative programs that allow residents to enjoy life to the fullest. Poydras Home is the only Life Plan community in Greater New Orleans offering secure memory support care areas in both assisted living and nursing care as well as an adult day program. Poydras Home has recently partnered with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra to launch a music therapy program, designed to benefit people with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

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Soul Strings For Seniors: Musical Memories, the first program of its kind in our area, debuted to an enthusiastic group of Poydras participants, thanks to a generous donation by Whitney Bank. “Together the musicians and music therapist improve communication, memory, and attention in our residents, impacting wellness as they reach those who can find traditional modes of communication difficult,” says Erin Kolb, Interim CEO and Vice President of Resident Affairs. For more information, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-8970535. For more than 20 years, Azalea Estates Assisted Living & Retirement Community in Slidell has offered the gold standard in retirement living on the Northshore. Azalea Estates is dedicated to providing the care, services, and activities that keep older adults independent in a warm residential setting. They are committed to promoting freedom of choice, protecting residents’ privacy, ensuring their dignity, and providing safety. Most importantly, the philosophy at Azalea Estates is “Whole Person Oriented,” taking into consideration all physical, mental, social and spiritual needs. The community is comprised of warm, wonderful people just like you. Residents enjoy personalized care from a comprehensive team of compassionate caregivers in a homelike setting. Schedule a tour and enjoy a complimentary lunch by calling 985-641-2827. To learn more about Azalea Estates’ Slidell community, visit AzaleaEstates.com. 


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When you can’t be at home to care for your family member, you want peace of mind knowing that the person who is there will treat your loved one with the same level of care and concern that you would. At Personal Homecare Services, your family is their family. Providing 24/7, in-home companion care, Personal Homecare Services offers clients the ability to remain in the comfort of their own home with their personal memories and possessions while you regain the time and energy needed to experience being a real family again. Personal Homecare Services is one of the first nonmedical services specializing in live-in care and working in conjunction with doctors, healthcare providers, and hospices to provide continuous around-the-clock care without the worry and expense of hourly services. They’ve built a solid reputation with word-of-mouth referral, evidence of the trust their clients have in their caretakers and services. Services include meal preparation, help with personal hygiene, medicinal reminders, light housekeeping, transportation to/ from appointments and companionship. To learn more, visit PersonalHomecare.net or call 877-336-8045. Rentals & Resources for the Home 1st Lake Properties provides an unrivaled apartment experience throughout the Greater New Orleans area. With communities distinguished by leisurely walking paths

and glistening pools, residents can have it all at 1st Lake. Their Metairie, Kenner, River Ridge and Elmwood locations boast nearby restaurants, bakeries, entertainment venues, parks and more. Additionally, these communities include amenities like free off-street parking, granite countertops, access gates, fitness centers, washers/dryers, and flex space. Ready to be welcomed home? Move to a 1st Lake Properties community today. As the leader in multi-family developments, 1st Lake provides an unmatched living experience. With just a few clicks, residents can pay rent online, place service requests, and access resident reward discounts from surrounding businesses. For more information on their 70 communities, 9,500 apartments, corporate apartments, and applications, visit 1stLake.com. Proper spray foam applications help homeowners realize some of the quickest return on their initial investment of any energy efficiency upgrade available on the market today. Whether a new construction project or renovation, Diversified Energy insulation technicians take the time to understand the science of each structure while strictly adhering to best-practice standards. Homeowners can also save up to 25 percent on their energy bills by installing radiant barrier insulation. Diversified Energy’s radiant barriers reflect 97 percent of radiant heat and can be installed in residential attics, garages, and in an infinite

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number of commercial applications. As experts in the Gulf South’s hot, humid climate, Diversified Energy’s BPI certified professionals are the region’s most qualified home performance auditors and contractors, providing residential energy efficiency testing and home performance contracting and weatherization across Louisiana and the entire Mississippi Gulf Coast.  “Plug into comfort” by contacting Diversified Energy at 504-273-7779, or visit DiversifiedE.com today. Weight Loss & Fitness Based in the New Orleans area, Sensible Portions Meals is the largest meal prep program in the country. People across the U.S. are signing up for this simple and effective path towards fast weight-loss results, all by consuming flavorful, chef-prepared, fresh foods. Sensible Portions Meals boasts of the numerous health benefits including blood sugar regulation and overall heart health. This diet plan is changing lives. “After five days on the meal plan, the appetite shrinks, and when you eat restaurant or home-prepared food, the desire for smaller portions remains,” explains Ingrid Rinck, Owner and Founder of Sensible Portions Meals. Sensible Portions Meals ships nationally to thousands of clients with free local pickup in 10 cities. For videos, client testimonials—including exciting local “before and

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after” photos and success stories—visit Sensible Portions Meals’ Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter pages or head over to SensiblePortionsMeals.com.  Imagine working out, going home, and all the while knowing you’re still burning calories. You’ve eaten dinner and gone to bed, and you’re still burning calories. That is the incredible power of the sweat-inducing workouts found at OrangeTheory Fitness. The after-burn effect is a fitness revolution helping members get the most out of a workout and see amazing results in just a few weeks. Experience the hour-long workout with a balanced combination of cardio and strength training, all at high intensity intervals with a trainer who keeps the music pumping and you sweating. After your workout, your body continues to burn calories for up to 36 hours. OrangeTheory has two studios in New Orleans, Uptown at 5300 Tchoupitoulas Street and in Mid-City at 4141 Bienville Street. Visit the Northshore studio at 3555 Highway 190 in Mandeville. Learn more about about this revolutionary, science-backed approach to fitness at OrangeTheoryFitness.com. Try your first class free by igning up online. Nola Pilates & Xtend Barre is one of Lakeview’s premier pilates and barre studios. The studio’s extensive class schedule features over 65 group classes per week, including Pilates


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Reformer, Tower, Mat, yoga, TRX, spin and Xtend Barre. If you prefer a private setting, one-on-one sessions are available in the private equipment studio seven days per week. Classes range in focus and intensity from open-level pilates mat and yoga classes to muscle sculpting, calorie torching classes like Xtend Barre and spin. Whether you’re looking for a gentle transition back to exercise or a way to kick up your workout regimen, visit the studio online to schedule your first session.  “We are eternally grateful for the opportunity to help you meet your goals and restore your mind, body and spirit,” says owner Kim Munoz. For more information, visit NolaPilates.com or call 504-483-8880.  Health Resources Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive brain disease robbing the lives of more than 84,000 Louisiana seniors. Statewide, over 231,000 caregivers are affected by the burden of the disease. There is no prevention, no cure, or way to slow down Alzheimer’s, but there is hope. The Alzheimer’s Association provides care and support to families and those living with Alzheimer’s with a mission to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. The Community Resource Finder (alz.org/crf ) can help you find support groups,

educational programs, events, and community services in your community. Volunteer and learn more about the disease and how you can become a champion for the cause at ALZ.org/Louisiana. For additional help or guidance, call their 24/7 Helpline at 1-800-272-3900. You can also follow the association on Twitter (@ALZ_LA) and like them on Facebook (Alzheimer’s Association Louisiana Chapter). A medical alert pendant provides the fastest possible response to your medical emergency. Louisiana Alarm Watch, a locally owned company, installs medical alert systems in homes throughout Southeast Louisiana. The systems sold by Louisiana Alarm Watch include a wearable pendant with two-way communication and 24/7 monitoring. Pressing a single button connects you to a trained professional who can notify your doctor, an ambulance, your family or neighbors. If you have a known medical issue or are concerned about possible medical emergencies, a medical alert system allows you to live independently with peace of mind. The pendant is water resistant and comes with attachments to wear around your neck, on your belt, or on your wrist. The system also includes a base station that recharges the pendant’s batteries.  For a free consultation on a medical alert system, security cameras or any other security need, call 504-780-8775 or visit LaAlarmWatch.com.

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Dale Gedert has focused on foot care for more than 45 years. He brings his expertise to Greater New Orleans with Therapeutic Shoes, a shopping resource for those suffering from a wide variety of conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, flat feet, heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, bunions, calluses, edema and leg length discrepancies, as well as knee, hip, back pain and more. “We specialize in custom accommodative foot orthotics, stylish extra depth shoes, diabetic shoes, custom shoes, shoe modifications, compression wear and diabetic socks,” says Gedert. “We’ve got over 500 styles and color of men’s and women’s shoes.” Therapeutic Shoes features an in-house orthotic lab with certified personnel who handle all custom orthotics and shoe modifications. They offer a large selection of compression wear as well as socks shaped to fit the foot for reducing fatigue and preventing circulation problems. They offer UV Total Recovery Shoe Sanitizer for those who’ve been treated for toenail fungus by a podiatrist or medical professional to prevent reinfection.  Therapeutic Shoes is located at 5017 River Road in Harahan, Louisiana. For more information and hours, call 504-731-0013. PHARMACY Regular pharmacies are great for some things, but complex health conditions require more care and expertise than they

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provide. As a specialty pharmacy, Avita Pharmacy does more than just fill prescriptions; it is part of the patient’s healthcare team.  For over 13 years, Avita Pharmacy’s team has provided clinical expertise, compassionate guidance and support, and specialized services to patients, healthcare providers, payers, and service organization partners. Avita’s commitment to excellence isn’t just something the pharmacy values—it’s been validated by patients, who recently reported 99.1 percent satisfaction with their overall Avita experience, and through national accreditations by respected institutions. Avita is proudly accredited by URAC and Accreditation Commission for Health Care (ACHC). Avita believes that true excellence goes beyond the walls of its pharmacies. The company wants to see its communities prosper and improve every day, and that’s why Avita Pharmacy gives back to the communities it serves. For more information, please visit AvitaPharmacy.com.  Patrick Douglass and Ross Morel, former employees of C’s Pharmacy, opened NOLA Discount Pharmacy to continue the tradition of a local, family-owned drugstore with superior customer service and discount prices. In addition to filling your prescriptions, they offer immunizations, compounding, and unique over-the-counter items. The stores feature an extensive retail selection with your favorite local and national brands, and if they don’t have it, you can ask Patrick to order it for you!


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They accept all insurance plans and offer affordable cash prices on prescriptions. Transferring your prescriptions is quick and easy—just speak with a friendly staff member by calling one of their two convenient Metairie locations: 504-888-9411 (4305 Clearview Parkway) or 504-835-6060 (1107 Veterans Memorial Blvd.). NOLA Discount Pharmacy is open Monday through Friday, 9:00am-7:00pm, and Saturdays from 9:00am-3:00pm. More information and prescription refill services available at NolaPharmacy.com. Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy and the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long- term care and infusion needs as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Long Term Care and Home

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Infusion Pharmacy and Consultant Pharmacy Services. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Blvd. in Metairie. For more information, call 504-889- 7070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.” Scrubs & Uniforms Scrub Stop is your locally owned, one-stop shop for the latest styles and fabrics of the uniform industry. The properties of today’s fabrics offer anti-microbial features, are stain resistant and moisture wicking, allow spandex movement, and have colorfast qualities. Even Scrub Stop’s professional-wear shoes offer fashion and comfort for your feet with lively prints and solids to add variety to your uniform. The Scrub Stop team believes that looking good and loving what you wear will uplift not only your appearance but also your spirit! Other products offered at Scrub Stop include chef wear, medical accessories, slip-resistant shoes, hosiery, nursing school uniforms, medical and black-and-gold-themed jewelry, embroidery, and logo services. They are competitively priced with a slogan that states “Everyday Discounted Prices.” Open 10:00am-6:00pm Tuesday through Friday and 10:00am-3:00pm on Saturdays, Scrub Stop is located at 1213 Eastridge Drive in Slidell. Though located in Slidell, Scrub Stop has serviced Greater New Orleans, St. Tammany and Tangipahoa Parishes, and parts of Mississippi since


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2004. Call 985-661-8998 and email scrubstop@bellsouth. net for more info. “Like” Scrub Stop on Facebook for monthly specials. Online shopping coming soon! Uniforms by Bayou is a family-owned business celebrating over 40 years of serving the uniform needs of regional healthcare professionals. Uniforms by Bayou offers a complete line of nursing uniforms, shoes and accessories, as well as chef wear, corporate apparel, and monograming. They offer the largest selection of styles, colors, and fabrics in the south. With locations in Covington, Baton Rouge, Mobile, Marrero, and their newest state-of-the-art uniform outlet in Metairie, they offer easy access for all of Greater New Orleans. Visit the new location at 3624 West Esplanade (at Hessmer) in Metairie and experience superior customer service delivered by highly trained sales consultants, the same kind of service for which Uniforms by Bayou has been known for years. Contact Uniforms by Bayou at 1-800-222-8164 to have one of their professional sales staff visit your group for an on-site visit, or stop by one of the five retail outlets for a truly pleasant shopping experience. Financial Help: Banking & Billing Experience the IBERIABANK difference today. Headquartered in Louisiana for over 130 years, IBERIABANK has strength, stability, and security that you can count on for your financial wellness. Visit any of their

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convenient locations in New Orleans or on the Northshore to experience their tradition of excellence firsthand. Their relationship-based approach to banking focuses on local decision-making so that you can enjoy the things in life that matter most.  For more information, visit IberiaBank.com or call  800-682-3231. No one likes to work for free, and physicians, when claims go unpaid, that’s exactly what you’re doing. Even a small percentage of unpaid claims can amount to a lot of money. Increase your profitability and hire expert billers—the money you save by hiring Greenwood Medical Billing can greatly exceed the fees paid for their services, which allows for smoother operations and more time devoted to your patients. Greenwood Medical Billing offers the perfect combination of outstanding costumer service and a notably high collection rate. Their experts get your claims paid fast and are available to discuss any issues or answer any questions. They also offer flexibility—all reports are available 24/7, and all information is secure, encrypted, and fully HIPAA compliant with a range of methods for exchanging data. They offer free electronic health record options and a free scheduler complete with support services. For most medical and mental health practices, Greenwood Medical Billing can provide customized billing services for five percent-seven percent of the amount received. Learn more at


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GreenwoodMedicalBilling.com or by calling 504-655-0800. Lawyers and Legal Firms Stop injustice, and don’t be a victim. Today’s world is filled with dishonest businessmen, con artists, and deliberate fraud, but don’t fear—there is a solution. After 22 years of active and aggressive courtroom experience, Robert Evans of Evans Law has distinguished himself from other attorneys. He holds the highest rating a lawyer can obtain, AV Rated, and has been recognized as a top lawyer in the city, state, and country. His success is the result of hard work, the development of close relationships with clients, and the extensive research he will do on your behalf. Whether your case involves a business transaction gone bad or a serious accident that has altered your life, Robert Evans is a best bet for representation in every matter. A member of numerous professional associations, including local, regional, and national bar associations, Mr. Evans is AV Top Rated, a Martindale Top Lawyer in Louisiana, and among the one percent of attorneys in the nation recognized by The National Institute of Trial Advocacy as a Designated Trial Advocate. For more information, visit RobertEvansLaw.com.

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Pre-planning, Arrangements, & Events A community landmark for generations, Jacob Schoen & Son has a long, storied history dating back to 1874. In its current Mid-City, Canal Street location since 1936, Jacob Schoen & Son offers more than a beautiful, architecturally stunning funeral home. The Schoen family now extends their home to your family as a private event space in addition to its services as a funeral home. They invite you to gather together with loved ones whether in remembrance of a life well lived or in celebration of one of life’s milestone moments. In 2014, the building underwent a vast expansion and renovation by Lachin Oubré & Associates. With a new 5,000-squarefoot chapel and improvements to the original home, Jacob Schoen & Sons is able to offer exceptional services in an exquisite location. Their experienced staff is committed to your vision and passionate about making your funeral or event as memorable and uplifting as possible. They bring decades of experience caring for families of all cultural backgrounds and diverse walks of life. For information, visit SchoenFH.com, call 504-482-1111, or email wecare@schoenfh.com. •


The Menu TABLE TALK | RESTAURANT INSIDER | FOOD | LAST CALL | DINING LISTINGS

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TABLE TALK, PG. 172

The Daily Beet in South Market serves up healthy food, with a twist.

jeffery johnston PHOTOGRAPH


THE MENU | TABLE TALK

tGood

Karma at Carmo

While the places in this column are newcomers, stalwarts like Carmo in the Warehouse District helped pave the way for this new wave of juice bars and poke joints. Since 2010 Carmo has helped to blaze a trail for creative, healthy eating here in New Orleans. With a kaleidoscopic menu that draws everywhere from the Caribbean to Asia to West Africa, here you will find an array of dishes like nowhere else in the city. As a bonus, the juice bar helps to fortify the cocktail menu. Orbit bowl at Daily Beet

Clean Eats

A new wave transforms health food from bland to bold By Jay Forman

It is safe to say that people don’t move to New Orleans in pursuit of a healthy diet. To the contrary, we have a proud history of thumbing our nose at the “Food Police” when it comes to sitting down at the table. This is the city that concocted “Breakfast at Brennan’s,” a caloric lollapalooza bookended with brandy milk punch and dessert flamed tableside. And when naysayers chide us for our wanton ways, we are adept at wrapping our indulgent choices within a rationalized cocoon of cultural heritage, French technique and Hollandaise sauce. Yet the times they are a changin’. Healthy dining, once dismissed as the culinary equivalent of Scientology but worse-tasting, has finally arrived and is putting such preconceived notions to rest with its emphasis on freshness and bold compositions. Here is a look at a few new spots. The Daily Beet perches on a South Market corner in bold opposition to lurid temptation

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of The Company Burger just across the street. The light-filled interior is spacious and contemporary, softened with comfortable nooks for thumbing through art-filled books. Owner Dylan Maisel might be young but knows a thing or two about healthy habits thanks to his upbringing in Upstate New York. “I never really had a babysitter,” Maisel says. “I just grew up in my family’s vegetarian restaurant. Doing this kind of food comes naturally to me.” Maisel moved to New Orleans six years ago and got his start at the St. Roch Market, where he operated Juice NOLA. Encouraged by the feedback and motivated by a desire to open his own place, he decided to stake a claim in the new Beacon Building. Since opening back in the spring, Maisel has found that the grain bowls, built on a foundation of either wild rice or quinoa, have proven popular. A breakout hit is the Orbit, an

Asian-inspired combo of warm wild rice, avocado, pastured egg, edamame, kimchi, and nori garnished with scallions and a sesame ginger dressing. “We make the kimchi in-house,” Maisel adds. Salads shine as well. The Summer Kale, accented with sharp pecorino cheese, nutty sunflower seeds and sweet pops of currant, adds a panoply of flavors and contrasts to its leafy base. Smoothies are nondairy and start with either almond or rice milk. Try the Berry Bucha, made with local Big Easy Kombucha blended with strawberries, mango and goji berries. If you have a sweet tooth, the Chocoheaven makes use of raw cacao for its chocolate punch – a notable twist. And while the smoothies are blended to order, the

jeffery johnston PHOTOGRAPH


juices in the cold case are made with a hydraulic press, adding zero heat to the extraction process. “When you add heat it can kill off some of the enzymes and nutrients. With this cold press technique we preserve the nutrients for a lot longer,” Maisel says. More than anything else, The Daily Beet gives the business lunch crowd a healthy alternative to the other options in the surrounding area. “I think there was just a need in this area for fast, casual and clean,” he says. “I wanted guests to go back to work feeling energized rather than wanting to take a nap.” Pressed NOLA is nestled in the ground floor of the Greater New Orleans Foundation’s new headquarters on Lee Circle. Like The Daily Beet, it boasts a clean, contemporary look with tall windows that allow for a lot of natural light. Also like Maisel, owners Artis and Leslie Turner got their start at St. Roch Market with Dirty Dishes, as well as the food truck by the same name. Their friendly, positive vibe exudes through the space. Here the menu has a healthier focus than Dirty Dishes and they serve mostly pressed panini-style sandwiches as well as fresh salads. Try the Blake, composed of turkey, Havarti, apples and pecan-pepper jelly for sweetness. Also, the Creole Caprese, made with tomatoes, basil and mozzarella, makes for a nice summer nosh. Additional offerings are by and large collected from other small businesses around town. In fact Pressed NOLA functions a little bit as a small collective, an analog to the philanthropic mores of their landlord GNOF. Juices come from Major Joose and baked goods from Girls Gone

Vegan, just to name a few. Bearcat, on Jena Street just a short hop off Freret, puts the focus on brunch and hedges its bets on the menu. Here, one half features healthy fare, whereas the other is indulgent. The buildout is striking, with a gorgeously composed interior whose aesthetic trickles down into the very stoneware plates and flatware used at the tables. From the Good Cat (viz. healthy) side, a dish of housemade yogurt came beautifully garnished with cut fruit and a drizzle of honey, although the portion was miserly given the cost. There was perhaps four ounces of yogurt in the bowl. A side of House-Made Ricotta and Lavash, also drizzled with honey, was tasty although the lavash were actually wafer-thin crackers and not the expected flatbread. Better luck was had on the Bad Cat portion of the menu, where the Banana’s Foster with a paleo pancake upcharge satisfied. Bearcat has friendly, if not overly attentive service, and offers a kids menu to boot. n t

Caribbean Style

The Daily Beet, 1000 Girod St., South Market, (504) 605-4413. B, L, D Daily. TheDailyBeetNOLA.com HEALTH FOOD $

Pressed NOLA, 919 St. Charles Ave., Lee Circle, (504) 900-5466, B, L Mon.-Fri. Closed Sat & Sun. SANDWICHES / HEALTH FOOD $

Bearcat Café, 2521 Jena St., Uptown, (504) 309-9011. B, L Tues.-Sun. Closed Mon. BearcatCafe.com HEALTH FOOD/ BRUNCH $$ myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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News From the Kitchens

Public Service, Piece of Meat Butcher & Restaurant, Sprout and Press By Robert Peyton

Public Service New Orleans has seen several high-profile hotels open in the CBD in recent years, and that means we’ve also seen several highprofile hotel restaurants arrive. The latest is Public Service, which opened in July in the NOPSI Hotel, 317 Baronne Street. As you likely guessed, the hotel and restaurant are named for the building’s original owner, New Orleans Public Service, Inc., (which once operated the city’s utilities and public transit) and the restaurant’s décor is consistent with that theme. Chef Dustin Brien, formerly in charge of the kitchen at Salú, is serving a menu of eclectic, upscale, comfort food, with items such as crab gnocchi with orange, green onion, peas and sheep milk cheese; chicken-fried softshell crab with watermelon, blistered serrano, arugula and watermelon ranch dressing; and a shrimp roll with lemon mayonnaise and lettuce on a buttered brioche. The last item reflects the chef’s former home in Massachusetts, but there’s no real regional focus – there’s a raw bar, multiple rotisserie items, and I’m told sushi is on the way. Public Service, 311 Baronne St., open 7 days for breakfast, 6:30 - 11, lunch 11 - 3, dinner 5:3010 Sun. - Thurs., and until 11 on Fri. and Sat; 962-6527.

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Piece of Meat Butcher & Restaurant

Sprout and Press

First it was Bayou Beer Garden, then Bayou Wine Garden. Now the folks behind those two successful ventures are opening Piece of Meat Butcher & Restaurant in the same Mid-City neighborhood. The full-service restaurant will also offer retail sales of meat and poultry, charcuterie, cheese and accompaniments. It feels like the culmination of a process started when Virginia and David Demarest opened Bayou Beer Garden at 326 North Jeff Davis, and continued with the opening of Bayou Wine Garden at 315 N. Rendon Street, properties that are connected by rear patios. The Wine half of that equation featured a greater emphasis on food, and particularly housemade charcuterie and cheese plates. That’s getting an even bigger emphasis at Piece of Meat, where the day to day operations will be handled by Leighann Smith and Daniel Jackson, both of whom gained experience at Cochon Butcher. Piece of Meat Butcher & Restaurant, 3301 Bienville St., plans to open for lunch, brunch on the weekends, and an early dinner, but at this time it’s not going to be a late-night haunt. Call 259-5970 to confirm hours and see what they’ve got on offer.

Sprout and Press joins a number of local restaurants serving freshly-pressed juice and light fare. It’s also yet another addition to the Freret street dining scene, located in the same block as Piccola Gelateria and Bar Frances. The juices are cold-pressed, which purportedly retains more of the vitamins, minerals and nutritional content, but also keeps the flavors fresh. Options include the Citrus Green, with spinach, celery, cucumber, kiwi, green apple, lemon, banana and mint; the Berry Cooler, which combines strawberry, blueberry, mango, papaya, banana, red apple, pomegranate, honey and basil; and the Choco-latte: cacao, banana, almond milk, raw honey, date, cinnamon and espresso. Sprout and Press is owned by Kim Nguyen, who also runs Magasin and Magasin Kitchen, two excellent (and popular) Vietnamese restaurants. That explains the presence of fresh spring rolls on the menu, which fit right in with the salads, wraps and “bowls” that make up the remainder of the fresh menu. Both sweet and savory pastries are also available. Sprout and Press, 4525 Freret St., open from 9 -6 , Mon. - Fri., and 11- 4 on Sat., 3249685.

jeffery johnston PHOTOGRAPHs


THE MENU | FOOD

Net Gain

Season For Crabs By Dale Curry

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PHOTOGRAPHed and styled EUGENIA UHL


t Crab Saladstuffed Avocados

1 pound crabmeat, preferably lump or jumbo lump 1 Tablespoon capers 3 green onions, chopped 1 Tablespoon fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped Juice of 1 lemon, divided ½ cup good-quality mayonnaise 1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 4 Hass avocados, slightly soft Shredded lettuce Vinaigrette* Gently pick through crabmeat, removing any shell. Add capers, green onions, parsley, ½ of lemon juice, mayonnaise, olive oil, salt and pepper, and mix gently, keeping crab from breaking up. Cut avocados in half, remove seeds and, using a serving spoon, scoop out the avocado as close to the peel as possible and all in one piece. Rub all over with remaining lemon juice to keep from turning brown. Fill each half with crab salad. Cover a platter or individual plates with shredded lettuce. Place avocados on lettuce and drizzle all with vinaigrette. Serves 8 as side or 4 as entrée. *To make vinaigrette, place ¼ cup salad or wine vinegar in a bowl. Add 1 clove crushed garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Drizzle in ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil, whisking rapidly, until smooth.

Earlier this summer, we took some crab nets along on a fishing trip, tossed them off a pier and waited for prey to grab our chicken necks. We waited - and waited - and finally gave up with only a couple of three-inch babies we threw back into the water. This year’s crab season came a little late with new restrictions that closed crabbing for a month to increase production. These crustaceans are available year-round but are best in warm months. So now is our chance to stock up, whether it’s hauling them in with nets or buying them already cooked or even picked. Once in a while, I splurge and buy a pound of jumbo lump crabmeat for one of the many delicious dishes our abundance of fresh shellfish affords us. Crab cakes are an easy fix for a fancy dinner, and certain old-line recipes are fun to make at home for special occasions. Some of the fish I froze from a recent fishing trip is bound to get blanketed in buttery jumbo lump crabmeat,

perhaps with a little Hollandaise. Such pleasures we have on our seafood-rich coast. Crabmeat also makes great summer salads. My favorite is avocado stuffed with crab salad and served on shredded lettuce with a splash of vinaigrette. Serve one as a side or two for a luncheon entrée. Call it a salad, appetizer or entrée, marinated crabs, as once served by Mosca’s Restaurant, is as unique as its creator. My version is simple to make, especially from spicy crabs left over from a crab boil. Get a few extra hands to help you peel, and marinate them overnight. You’ll be happy you did. Equally tempting for a summer supper is crab and corn bisque, paired with a chunk of crunchy French bread. This, too, can be made from crab-boil leftovers, but if you don’t mind splurging for a pound of jumbo lump, just remember you’d be paying twice as much if you lived anywhere else.

Crab and Corn Bisque

Marinated Crabs

1 1-pound package frozen gumbo crabs

8 to 10 boiled, well-seasoned large crabs

5 ears corn

1 large onion, chopped

1 stick butter

3 ribs celery, chopped

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

10 cloves garlic, mashed with the back of a knife

1 small onion, chopped

¾ to 1 cup good-quality extra-virgin olive oil, depending on number of crabs

4 green onions, green and white part divided, chopped

½ cup white wine vinegar

2 stalks celery, chopped

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 Tablespoon Italian seasoning

Salt, freshly ground pepper and Creole seasoning to taste

Juice of ½ to 1 lemon, depending on number of crabs

5 cups water

1 cup olive salad or Italian pickled giardiniera

1 cup heavy cream

Use leftover crabs from a crab boil, or purchase boiled crabs from a seafood store or restaurant. Remove and discard back of the crab. Scrape out any contents in the center of the crab except yellow fat. Remove dead man’s fingers (lungs) from shells. Crack crab in half and cut off claws with scissors, leaving small legs attached. Remove the piece of shell at the large edge of each body half to reveal the lump. Break claws in half and crack each segment with a nutcracker. Peel off pinchers and some shell on the small segment and discard to allow for marinating. Repeat gently with each crab and place in a large bowl. In a medium bowl, mix all other ingredients and pour over crabs. Toss gently. Cover and refrigerate overnight or for at least 8 hours. Stir once or twice during marinating. When ready to serve, toss again gently and place in individual bowls with some of the liquid. Serve with French bread for dipping. Serves 4 as entrée or up to 8 as an appetizer or salad.

1 pound jumbo lump crabmeat 2 Tablespoons fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped Thaw crabs, clean off any debris and rinse. Shuck corn and remove silk. Place corn, one ear at a time, in a large bowl, and, using a sharp knife, slice off the kernels and juice. Set aside. Make a light roux, melting butter in a large pot, stirring in flour and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until just beginning to turn brown. Add chopped white onion and celery and simmer for a few minutes, stirring occasionally. Add garlic and simmer another minute. Add seasonings, water and thawed crabs, and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Remove crabs and discard, add corn and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for one minute. When ready to serve, stir lump crabmeat into bisque. Simmer for a minute or two, taste and adjust seasonings. Stir in cream and heat until hot. Add parsley and green onion tops. Serves 6 to 8.

2 Tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley

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THE MENU | Last Call

Shake, Pour and Chill Out The Saltwater By Tim McNally

When the heat and humidity of August settle in, we are all looking for an escape. For some, the lure of the mountains takes over. For others, there’s never leaving an air-conditioned space. And for the rest of us, there’s the beach and the cool breezes coming off of the salt waters of the Gulf. Oak Street’s DTB (Down the Bayou) has another great suggestion: the Saltwater, served at their bar with fine indigenous dishes from the menu. Chef Carl Schaubhut and Mixologist Lu Brow furnished this recipe, which should cool matters off at your place or theirs. DTB is air conditioned, has a terrific menu, and plays some very cool Louisiana music. t

SALTWATER

2 ounces vodka 1 ounce Pamplemousse liqueur ¾ ounce Basil & pink peppercorn syrup* ¾ ounce fresh grapefruit juice ½ ounce fresh lime Grapefruit & Pink Himalayan salt rim Basil garnish All ingredients into shaker with ice. Shake, then pour contents in a rocks glass rimmed with grapefruit peel and salt.  Garnish with basil.   *Basil & pink peppercorn syrup  1 plastic ½ gallon container granulated sugar (half container) 1 ounce pink peppercorn 1 cup fresh basil Fill plastic container halfway with sugar. Fill 2/3 of the remainder with very hot Water. Stir. Add basil, peppercorns. Stir again till well mixed.  Add cool water to top. Allow to steep for 2 hours. Remove basil & peppercorns, allow to cool.   DTB, 8201 Oak Street, 518-6889, DTBNola.com 178

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THE MENU | DINING GUIDE

H= New Orleans Magazine award winner | $ = Average entrée price | $ = $5-10

American

Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill Multiple Locations, ZeaRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular restaurant serves a variety of grilled items as well as appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Also offers catering services. $$$

Bywater Elizabeth’s 601 Gallier St., 944-9272, ElizabethsRestaurantNola.com. B, L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sat-Sun. This eclectic local restaurant draws rave reviews for its praline bacon and distinctive Southern-inspired brunch specials. $$$ Satsuma Café 3218 Dauphine St., 3045962, SatsumaCafe.com. B, L daily (until 5 p.m.). Offers healthy, inspired breakfast and lunch fare, along with freshly squeezed juices. $

carrollton Bourré 1510 S. Carrollton Ave., 510-4040. L, D Tue-Sun. “Elevated” street food along with quality daiquiris and reconsidered wings are the draw at this newcomer from the team behind Boucherie. $$

Manning’s 519 Fulton St., 593-8118. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Born of a partnership between New Orleans’ First Family of Football and Harrah’s Casino, Manning’s offers sports bar fans a step up in terms of comfort and quality. With a menu that draws on both New Orleans and the Deep South, traditional dishes get punched up with inspired but accessible twists in surroundings accented by both memorabilia and local art. $$$

Wolfe’s in the Warehouse 859 Convention Center Blvd., 613-2882. B, L, D daily. Chef Tom Wolfe brings his refined cuisine to the booming Fulton Street corridor. $$$

Downtown The Grill 540 Chartres St., 522-1800. B, L, D daily. A diner with local character staffed by local characters. $

Faubourg Marigny

Pete’s Pub Intercontinental Hotel, 444 St. Charles Ave., 525-5566, IcNewOrleans.com/ dining/petes_pub. D Mon-Fri. Casual fare and adult beverages are served in this pub on the ground floor. $$ Q&C Hotel/Bar 344 Camp St., 587-9700, QandC.com. B, D daily, L Fri-Sun. Newly renovated boutique hotel offering a small plates menu with tempting choices such as a Short Rib Poor Boy and Lobster Mac and Cheese to complement their sophisticated craft cocktails. $$

H Root 21800 Magazine St., 309-7800, RootNola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Chef Philip Lopez opened Root in November 2011 and has garnered a loyal following for his modernist, eclectic cuisine. $$$$

CITY PARK

H Restaurant August 301 Tchoupitoulas

CBD/Warehouse District The Grill Room Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Featuring modern American cuisine with a distinctive

$$$ = $16-20

Warehouse Grille, 869 Magazine St., 3222188, WarehouseGrille.com. L, D daily, Br Fri-Sat. Creative fare served in an art-filled environment. Try the lamb spring rolls. $$

New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$

Satsuma Maple 7901 Maple St., 309-5557, SatsumaCafe.com. B, L daily (until 5 p.m.). Offers healthy, inspired breakfast and lunch fare, along with freshly squeezed juices. $ Café NOMA 1 Collins Diboll Circle, NO Museum of Art, City Park, 482-1264, CafeNoma.com. L, (snacks) Tue-Sun. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $$

$$ = $11-15

St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. L Fri, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef John Besh’s menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Walk-On’s Bistreaux & Bar 1009 Poydras St., 309-6530, Walk-Ons.com. L, D, daily. Burger, sandwiches, wraps and more made distinctive with a Louisiana twist are served at this sports bar near the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. $$

t

Langlois 1710 Pauger St., 934-1010, LangloisNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D Wed-Sun. *Reservations only Supper club and boutique cooking school in the Marigny serves up culturally informed, farm-to-table fare with the added bonus of instruction. Open kitchen and convivial atmosphere add up to a good time. $$$ The Marigny Brasserie 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472, MarignyBrasserie.com. L, D daily. Chic neighborhood bistro with traditional dishes like the fried green tomatoes and innovative cocktails such as the cucumber Collins. $$$ Snug Harbor 626 Frenchman St., 9490696, SnugJazz.com. D daily. This jazz club serves cocktails and a dining menu loaded with steaks, seafood and meaty burgers served with loaded baked potatoes. $$$$

French Quarter

Angeline 1032 Chartres St., 308-3106, AngelineNola.com. B Mon-Thu, D daily, Br Sat-Sun,. Modern southern with a fine dining focus is the hallmark of this bistro tucked away in a quiet end of the French Quarter. Southern Fried Quail and Duck Confit Ravoli represent the style. $$$ Continental Provisions 110 N Peters St., Stall 23, 407-3437. Open daily. Artisan purveyors including Bellegarde Bakery,

$$$$ = $21-25

$$$$$ = $25 and up

St. James Cheese Co. and Cleaver & Company team up to reclaim a foothold for quality food in the tourist Ground Zero of the French Market. Sandwiches, breads, cheeses and more. $$ Hard Rock Café 125 Bourbon St., 5295617, HardRock.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Local outpost of this global brand serves burgers, café fare and drinks in their rock memorabilia-themed environs. $$ The Pelican Club 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. D daily. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$ Rib Room Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. B, D daily, L Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Old World elegance and high ceilings, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$

GARDEN DISTRICT Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s, 2001 St. Charles Ave., 593-9955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sun. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$ District Donuts Sliders Brew, 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders. com. B, L, D daily. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $

Metairie Boulevard American Bistro 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. L, D daily. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$

Briquette to Open in Warehouse District

Briquette, 701 S. Peters St., 985-257-0707 Award-winning chef Robert Vasquez is set to take the helm at new Warehouse District restaurant, Briquette. Vasquez was the 2015 Seafood Competition winner at the Louisiana Seafood Expo and Silver Medal winner at the 2016 New Orleans Wine and Food Expo. He brings experience from restaurants throughout the world: including Arizona, California, Bermuda, Beijing and Singapore. Vasquez was also the former owner and chef at Opal Basil in Mandeville. At Briquette, Vasquez will create a coastal contemporary menu and will utilize a large charcoal grill to highlight fresh fish and seafood. Small plates for sharing will also be featured alongside a well curated wine list and handcrafted cocktails. – Mirella Cameran 180

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cheryl gerber photograph


café B 2700 Metairie Road, 934-4700, cafeB.com. D daily, L Mon-Fri. Br Sun. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this family-friendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. B, L Mon-Sat. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. B, L daily; D Mon-Sat. CaffeCaffe. com Healthy, refreshing meal options combine with gourmet coffee and espresso drinks to create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. Try the egg white spinach wrap. $ Heritage Grill 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 934-4900, HeritageGrillMetairie.com. L Mon-Fri. This lunch-only destination caters to the office crowd and offers a freshly squeezed juice menu to go along with its regular menu and express two-course lunch. $$ Martin Wine Cellar 714 Elmeer Ave., 8967300, MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, towering burgers, hearty soups and salads and giant, deli-style sandwiches. $ Vega Tapas Café 2051 Metairie Road, 836-2007, VegaTapasCafe.com. D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Innovative establishment offers fresh seafood, grilled meats and vegetarian dishes in a chic environment. Daily chef specials showcase unique ingredients and make this place a popular destination for dates as well as groups of friends. $$

Mid-City Parkway Bakery and Tavern 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $

NORTHSHORE Dakota 629 N. Highway 190, (985) 8923712, TheDakotaRestaurant.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. A sophisticated dining experience with generous portions. $$$$$

Riverbend Carrollton Market 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket.com. L SatSun, D Tue-Sat. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$

Uptown Audubon Clubhouse 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute.org. B, L TueSat, Br Sun. A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Camellia Grill 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 3092679. B, L, D daily. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $ GG’s Dine-O-Rama 3100 Magazine St., 373-6579, GGsNewOrleans.com. B, L Tue-

Sun. Upscale-casual restaurant serves a variety of specialty sandwiches, salads and wraps, like the Chicago-style hot dog and the St. Paddy’s Day Massacre, chef Gotter’s take on the Rueben. $$ Martin Wine Cellar 3827 Baronne St., 8997411, MartinWine.com. Wine by the glass or bottle with cheeses, salads, sandwiches and snacks. $ Slim Goodies 3322 Magazine St., 891 EGGS (3447), SlimGoodiesDiner.com. B, L daily. This diner offers an exhaustive menu heavily influenced by local cuisine. Try the Creole Slammer, a breakfast platter rounded out by crawfish étouffée. The laid-back vibe is best enjoyed on the patio out back. $ Stein’s Market and Deli 2207 Magazine St., 527-0771, SteinsDeli.net. B, L Tue-Sun. New York City meets New Orleans. The Reuben and Rachel sandwiches are the real deal and the half-sours and pickled tomatoes complete the deli experience. $ Surrey’s Café and Juice Bar 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; 4807 Magazine St., 895-5757, SurreysCafeAndJuiceBar.com. B, L daily. Laid-back café focuses on breakfast and brunch dishes to accompany freshly squeezed juice offerings. Health-food lovers will like it here, along with fans of favorites such as peanut butter and banana pancakes. $$

Tracey’s Irish Restaurant & Bar 2604 Magazine St., 897-5413, TraceysNola.com. L, D daily. A neighborhood bar with one of the best messy roast beef poor boys in town. The gumbo, cheeseburger poor boy and other sandwiches are also winners. Grab a local Abita beer to wash it all down. Also a great location to watch the game. $

H Upperline 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. D Wed-Sun. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger and talented chef Dave Bridges make for a winning combination at this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$

H Wayfare 4510 Freret St., 309-0069, WayfareNola.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Creative sandwiches and southern-inspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933.com. D TueSat. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$

Asian Fusion/Pan Asian

Little Tokyo Multiple locations, LittleTokyoNola.com. L, D daily. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$

Bywater Red’s Chinese 3048 St. Claude Ave.,

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DINING GUIDE

304-6030, RedsChinese.com. L, D daily. Assertive, in-your-face Chinese fare by chef Tobias Womack, an alum of Danny Bowien’s Mission Chinese. The Kung Pao Pastrami and General’s Chicken are good options. $$

Thailand and Malaysia. Five-pepper calamari is a tasty way to begin the meal, and their creative sushi rolls are good. Private dining rooms available. $$

CBD/Warehouse District

B, L, D daily. Roasted quail and the beef pho rule at this Vietnamese outpost. $$

Rock-N-Sake 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake.com. L Fri, D Tue-Sun, late night Fri-Sat. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$

Faubourg Marigny Bao and Noodle 2700 Charters St., 2720004, BaoAndNoodle.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Housemade noodles and a more authentic take on Chinese fare sets this neighborhood startup apart. Try the soup dumplings if available $$

French Quarter V Sushi 821 Iberville St., 609-2291, VSushiMartini.com. D daily, late-night. Creative rolls and a huge list of fusion dishes keep party-lovers going late into the night at this combination sushi and martini bar. $$$

Garden District Hoshun Restaurant 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Offers a wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from China, Japan,

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Gretna H Tan Dinh 1705 Lafayette St., 361-8008.

Kenner Little Chinatown 3800 Williams Blvd., 305-0580, LittleChinatown.net. L, D daily. One of the city’s best Chinese restaurants is secreted away on William’s Boulevard in Kenner. Try the roast duck or roast pork, either one is terrific, as well as their short menu of authentic dishes that (for the most part) avoid Americanized Chinese fare. $$

Lakeview Lakeview Pearl 6300 Canal St., 309-5711, LakeviewPearl.com. L, D Mon-Sat. A long list of specialty rolls rounds out the offerings of this Asian-Fusion restaurant. $$

Metairie CoNola Grill & Sushi 619 Pink St., 8370055, CoNolaGrillSushi.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Eclectic cafe with DNA from both Sun Ray Grill and Aloha Sushi Bar puts out southerninspired fare backed by an Americanized sushi menu, a kids menu and more. Along with a Sunday brunch, there’s something

for everyone at this independent restaurant. $$$

interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$

H Royal China 600 Veterans Blvd.,

Riverbend H Ba Chi Canteen 7900 Maple St., 373-

831-9633. L daily, D Tue-Sun. Popular and family-friendly Chinese restaurant is one of the few places around that serves dim sum. $$

MARRERO

5628. L, D Mon-Sat. The kitchen plays fast and loose with Vietnamese fare at this eclectic outpost on Maple Street. Try the caramelized pork “Baco”. $

Daiwa, 5033 Lapalco Blvd., 875-4203, DaiwaSushi.com. L, D daily. Japanese destination on the Westbank serves an impressive and far-ranging array of creative fusion fare. $$$

H Chill Out Café 729 Burdette St.,

Mid-City H Café Minh 4139 Canal St., 482-6266,

Uptown

CafeMinh.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Chef Minh Bui and Cynthia Vutran bring a fusion touch to Vietnamese cuisine with French accents and a contemporary flair. $$ Five Happiness 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. L, D daily. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and house-baked duck. $$

H MoPho 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-and-match pho and an

872-9628. B, L daily, D Mon-Sat. Thai food and breakfast favorites like waffles and pancakes can both be had at this affordable college-friendly hangout. $ Chiba 8312 Oak St., 826-9119, Chiba-Nola. com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Contemporary restaurant features fresh, exotic fish from all over the world and fusion fare to go along with typical Japanese options. Extensive sake list and late night happy hours are a plus. $$$

H Jung’s Golden Dragon 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280, JungsChinese.com. L, D daily. This Chinese destination is a real find. Along with the usual, you’ll find spicy cold noodle dishes and dumplings. One of the few local Chinese places that breaks the Americanized mold. $

H Magasin 4201 Magazine St., 896-7611,


MagasinCafe.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $

WEST BANK Nine Roses 1100 Stephen St., 366-7665, NineRosesResturant.com. L, D Sun-Tue, Thu-Sat. The extensive Vietnamese menu specializes in hot pots, noodles and dishes big enough for everyone to share. $$

Bakery/Breakfast

Café du Monde Multiple Locations, CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Multiple locations in New Orleans, Metairie and Northshore, CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $

BROADMOOR Gracious to Go 7220 Earhart Blvd., 3013709, GraciousBakery.com. B Mon-Fri. Quick-service outpost of Gracious Bakery + Café serves artisan pastries, locally roasted coffee and grab-and-go sandwiches to meet the needs of commuters. Onsite park-

ing a plus. $

CBD/Warehouse District H Merchant 800 Common St., 571-9580, MerchantNewOrleans.com. B, L daily. Illy coffee and creative crêpes, sandwiches and more are served at this sleek and contemporary café on the ground floor of the Merchant Building. $ Red Gravy 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. B, Br, L, Wed-Mon. Farmto-table Italian restaurant offers a creative array of breakfast items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more for lunch. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café 200 Magazine St., 525-9355; 1005 Canal St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

CARROLLTON Breads on Oak, 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. B, L Wed-Sun. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak Street serves breads, sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan-friendly options. $

City Park Morning Call 56 Dreyfous Drive, City Park, 885-4068, NewOrleansCityPark.com/ in-the-park/morning-call. 24 hours a day; cash-only. Chicory coffee and beignets coated with powdered sugar make this the quintessential New Orleans coffee shop. $

Faubourg Marigny H Ruby Slipper Café 2001 Burgundy St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

Mid-City Gracious Bakery + Café 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B, L daily. Boutique bakery on the ground floor of the Woodward Building offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $

H Ruby Slipper Café 139 S. Cortez St., 5259355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

Barbecue Bywater

The Joint 701 Mazant St., 949-3232, AlwaysSmokin.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Some of the city’s best barbecue can be had at this locally owned and operated favorite. $

French Quarter BB King’s Blues Club 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/new-orleans. L, D daily. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician features a menu loaded with BBQ and southern-inspired specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$

Lower Garden District Voodoo BBQ 1501 St. Charles Ave., 522-4647, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

Metairie Voodoo BBQ 2740 Severn Ave., 353-4227, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

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DINING GUIDE Burgers

French Quarter Bayou Burger, 503 Bourbon St., 529-4256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$ Port of Call 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. L, D daily. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

Lakeview Lakeview Harbor 911 Harrison Ave., 4864887. L, D daily. Burgers are the name of the game at this restaurant. Daily specials, pizza and steaks are offered as well. $

Riverbend H Cowbell 8801 Oak St., 298-8689, Cowbell-Nola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Burgers and homemade sauces on potato rolls are the specialty here, along with other favorites like skirt steak. $$

Uptown H The Company Burger 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger.com. L, D daily. Custom-baked butter-brushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $

French

Faubourg St. John H Café Degas 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. L, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

French Quarter Broussard’s, 819 Conti St., 581-3866, Broussards.com. D daily, Br Sun. CreoleFrench institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Marti’s 1041 Dumaine St., 522-5478, MartisNola.com. L Fri, D daily. Classic French cuisine, small plates and chilled

seafood platters like Grand Plateau Fruits De Mer are the calling cards for this restaurant with an elegant “Old World” feel. $$$

Lacombe H La Provence 25020 Highway 190, (985) 626-7662, LaProvenceRestaurant. com. D Wed-Sun, Br Sun. Chef John Besh upholds time-honored Provençal cuisine and rewards his guests with a true farm-life experience, from house-made preserves, charcuterie, herbs, kitchen gardens and eggs cultivated on the property. $$$$$

Uptown Bistro Daisy 5831 Magazine St., 899-6987, BistroDaisy.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Anton Schulte and his wife Diane’s bistro serves creative and contemporary bistro fare in a romantic setting. The signature Daisy Salad is a favorite. $$$$

H Coquette 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from chef Michael and his partner Lillian Hubbard. $$$

H La Crêpe Nanou 1410 Robert St., 8992670, LaCrepeNanou.com. D daily, Br Sun. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. L Tue-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette 3637 Magazine St., 895-1636, LiletteRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

Gastropub

namesake eatery. “Tasteful” tours available for visitors. $$

CBD/Warehouse District Gordon Biersch 200 Poydras St., 5522739, GordonBiersch.com. L, D daily. Local outpost of this popular chain serves specialty brews made on-site and crowdpleasing lunch and dinner fare. $$ Victory 339 Baronne St., 522-8664, VictoryNola.com. D daily. Craft cocktails served by owner and acclaimed bartender Daniel Victory, as well as refined small plates and gourmet pizza. $$

French Quarter H Cane & Table 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Open late, this chefdriven rustic colonial cuisine and rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. D daily. Wine is the muse at this beautifully renovated bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. D daily. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$

Lower Garden District The Tasting Room 1906 Magazine St., 581-3880, TTRNewOrleans.com. D Tue-Sun. Flights of wine and sophisticated small plates are the calling cards for this wine bar near Coliseum Square. $$

Mid-City Trèo 3835 Tulane Ave., 304-4878, TreoNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D daily. Craft cocktail bar also serves a short but excellent small plates menu to accompany its artfully composed libations. $$

Abita Springs

Uptown

Abita Brew Pub 72011 Holly St., (985) 892-5837, AbitaBrewPub.com. L, D TueSun. Better-than-expected pub food in its

The Avenue Pub 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243, TheAvenuePub.com. Kitchen open 24/7. With more than 43 rotating draft

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beers, this pub also offers food, including a cheese plate from St. James Cheese Co. and the “Pub Burger.” Counter service only. $ Bouligny Tavern 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern.com. D Mon-Sat. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$ The Delachaise 3442 St. Charles Ave., 8950858, TheDelaichaise.com. D daily. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$

Italian

Avondale H Mosca’s 4137 Highway 90 West, 4368950, MoscasRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sat. Italian institution dishes out massive portions of great food, family-style. Good bets are the shrimp Mosca and chicken à la grande. Cash only. $$$

Bywater H Mariza 2900 Charters St., 598-5700, MarizaNewOrleans.com. D Tue-Sat. An Italian-inspired restaurant by chef Ian Schnoebelen features a terrific raw bar, house-cured charcuterie and an array of refined adult beverages served in the industrial/contemporary setting on the ground floor of the Rice Mills lofts. $$$

CBD/Warehouse District H Domenica The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Chef Alon Shaya serves authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products, some from chef John Besh’s Northshore farm. $$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. D daily. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery.

Don’s Seafood Non-Stop Happy Hour

DonsSeafoodOnline.com When 24-year-old, Don Landry borrowed $400 in 1934 to open a restaurant and bar in downtown Lafayette, he probably could never have imagined that 80 years later, his venture would have turned into a group of restaurants throughout Louisiana. The decades long success of Don’s, which is still owned by the Landry family, probably comes from the fresh gulf seafood they serve and the original South Louisiana Cajun family recipes they use. Don’s also offers great daily specials such as half off oysters on Mondays or a Ribeye with Shrimp Saute for $17.00. It’s 2– for-1 Happy Hour, featuring Margaritas, Bloody Marys and beer is the best one around, and it is offered all day every day! – M.C. 184

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Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$

local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-be-haunted establishment. $$$$

French Quarter

Napoleon House 500 Chartres St., 5249752, NapoleonHouse.com. L Mon-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned Europeanstyle café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas, and for sipping, a Sazerac or lemony Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $$

Café Giovanni 117 Decatur St., 529-2154, CafeGiovanni.com. D daily. Live opera singers three nights a week. A selection of Italian specialties tweaked with a Creole influence and their Belli Baci happy hour adds to the atmosphere. $$$$ Chartres House, 601 Chartres St., 5868383, ChartresHouse.com. L, D daily. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Irene’s Cuisine 539 St. Philip St., 5298881. D Mon-Sat. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$

H Italian Barrel 430 Barracks St., 5690198, ItalianBarrel.com. L, D daily. Northern Italian dishes like Braciola di Maiale as well as an exhaustive pasta menu tempt here at this local favorite that also offers al fresco seating. $$$ Muriel’s Jackson Square 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. L, D daily, Br SatSun. Enjoy pecan-crusted drum and other

Ralph Brennan’s Red Fish Grill 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. L, D daily. Chef Austin Kirzner cooks up a broad menu peppered with local favorites such as barbecue oysters, blackened redfish and double-chocolate bread pudding. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. L, D daily. Granite-topped tables and an antique mahogany bar are home to the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thincrust pizza. $$

H R’evolution 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the more cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Chris Lusk and executive sous chef Erik Veney are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include

house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$

chuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

harahan

Ralph’s On The Park 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. Br Sun, L Tue-Fri, D daily. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$$

Oak Oven 6625 Jefferson Highway, Harahan, 305-4039, OakOvenRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Wood-fired pizza and seasonal Italian cuisine with a locavore philosophy brings respite to the burbs. Family friendly with patio seating to boot. $$

Metairie H Andrea’s Restaurant 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.com. L MonSat, D daily, Br Sun. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$ Semolina 4436 Veterans Blvd., Suite 37, 454-7930, Semolina.com. L, D daily. This casual, contemporary pasta restaurant takes a bold approach to cooking Italian food, emphasizing flavors, texture and color. Many of the dishes feature a signature Louisiana twist, such as the muffuletta pasta and pasta jambalaya. $$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

Mid-City H Liuzza’s 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120, Liuzzas.com. L, D daily. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Fren-

NORTHSHORE H Del Porto Ristorante 501 E. Boston St., (985) 875-1006, DelPortoRistorante.com. L, D Tue-Sat. One of the Northshore’s premier fine dining destinations serving Italian food that makes use of locally sourced meats and produce. $$$

Uptown Amici 3218 Magazine St., 300-1250, AmiciNola.com. L, D daily. Coal-fired pizza is the calling card for this destination, but the menu offers an impressive list of authentic and Creole Italian specialties as well. $$ Pascal’s Manale 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Vintage neighborhood restaurant since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves icy cold, freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine. com. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sun. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain

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Louisianian Fare

CBD/Warehouse District H Annunciation 1016 Annunciation St., 568-0245, AnnunciationRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Steven Manning brings a refined sensibility to this refined Warehouse District oasis along with his famous fried oysters with melted brie. $$$ Balise 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. L Tue-Fri, D daily, Br SatSun. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Decidedly masculine fare – think beef tartare with horseradish and pumpernickel – is carefully crafted and fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$ Bon Ton Cafe 401 Magazine St., 524-3386, TheBonTonCafe.com. L, D Mon-Fri. A local favorite for the old-school business lunch crowd specializing in local seafood and Cajun dishes. $$$$ Café Adelaide Loews New Orleans Hotel, 300 Poydras St., 595-3305, CafeAdelaide. com. B, L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. This offering from the Commander’s Palace family of restaurants has become a power-

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lunch favorite for business-people and politicos. Also features the Swizzle Stick Bar. $$$$

H Cochon 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. L, D, Mon-Sat. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski showcase Cajun and Southern cuisine at this hot spot. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme here, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine from the bar. Reservations strongly recommended. $$ Drago’s Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D daily. This famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$ Emeril’s 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from all over the world. $$$$$

H Herbsaint 701 St. Charles Ave., 5244114, Herbsaint.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$

Mother’s 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net. B, L, D daily. Locals and tourists alike endure long queues and a confounding ordering system to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$ Mulate’s 201 Julia St., 522-1492, Mulates. com. L, D daily. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$

Central City Café Reconcile 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile.org. L Mon-Fri. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$

Darrow Café Burnside Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. L daily, Br Sun. Historic plantation’s casual dining option features dishes such as seafood pasta, fried catfish, crawfish and shrimp, gumbo and red beans and rice. $$ Latil’s Landing Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. D Wed-Sun. Nouvelle Louisiane, plantation-style cooking served in an opulent setting features dishes like

rack of lamb and plume de veau. $$$$$

Faubourg Marigny Feelings Cafe, Bar and Courtyard Lounge 535 Franklin Ave, 446-0040, FeelingsCafeBar.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri. The All New Feelings Marigny is a complete relaunch of the much beloved “Feelings Cafe”. Under the guidance of new ownership and Executive Chef Scott Maki, everything has been completely transformed into one of the most absolutely charming neighborhood restaurants in the area. Chef Maki’s emphasis on contemporary Creole-Louisiana fare is winning diners over from near and far.$$$$ Horn’s 1940 Dauphine St., Marigny, 4594676, HornsNola.com. B, L daily, D Thu-Sun. This casual, eclectic watering hole offers offbeat twists on classics (the Jewish Coonass features latkes to go with the crawfish etouffée) as well as the usual breakfast and lunch diner fare. $ Praline Connection 542 Frenchmen St., 943-3934, PralineConnection.com. L, D daily. Down-home dishes of smothered pork chops, greens, beans and cornbread are on the menu at this Creole soul restaurant. $$

French Quarter Acme Oyster House 724 Iberville St., 5225973, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as


one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. D daily, Br Sun. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Antoine’s 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$

H The Bistreaux New Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy.com/dining.html. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$ The Bombay Club Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. D daily. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ Café Maspero 601 Decatur St., 523-6250, CafeMaspero.com. L, D daily. Tourists line up for their generous portions of seafood and large deli sandwiches. $ Court of Two Sisters 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters.com. Br,

D daily. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. B, L, D daily. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various cultures reflected in Louisiana cooking and cuisine, often with a slight contemporary twist. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse. com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar with chargrilled and raw oysters. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$

KillerPoboys.blogspot.com. L, D Wed-Mon. This quasi-popup operating out of the Erin Rose Bar serves some of the city’s best poor boys, including one featuring glazed pork belly. $ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul.com/KPaul. L ThuSat, D Mon-Sat. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to a grateful nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$ NOLA 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/Nola-Restaurant. L Thu-Mon, D daily. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedar-plank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$

Galatoire’s 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$

Palace Cafe 605 Canal St., 523-1661, PalaceCafe.com B, L Mon-Sun, Br Sat-Sun, D daily. A classic New Orleans restaurant, serves contemporary Creole food in an upbeat, lively cafe at the foot of the French Quarter. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates at the Black Duck Bar on the second floor. $$$

House of Blues 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues.com/NewOrleans. L, D daily. Surprisingly good menu complements music in the main room. World-famous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$

Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant, 301 Dauphine St., 586-0972, RichardFiskes.com. B, Bar Lunch daily. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street you can find this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-andBacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$

Killer Poboys 811 Conti St., 252-6745,

Royal House, 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. L, D daily. B Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$ SoBou 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. B, L, D daily. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tableau 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. B Mon-Fri, L Mon-Sat, D daily, Brunch Sat-Sun. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre on the corner of Jackson Square. A brass brunch is featured on weekends. $$$

H Tujague’s 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. L, D daily, Br SatSun. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$

Kenner Copeland’s 1319 W. Esplanade Ave., 6179146, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D

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daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$

Lakeview H Cava 789 Harrison Ave., 304-9034. D daily. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$

Metairie/Jefferson Acme Oyster House 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Austin’s 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 8885533, AustinsNo.com. D Mon-Sat. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$ Copeland’s 1001 S. Clearview Parkway, 620-7800; 701 Veterans Blvd., 831-3437, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$ Crabby Jack’s 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. L Mon-Sat. Lunch outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Drago’s 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. This famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

Mid-City H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$ Lil’ Dizzy’s Café 1500 Esplanade Ave., 5698997, LilDizzysCafe.com. B, L daily, Br Sun. Spot local and national politicos dining at this favored Creole soul restaurant known for homey classics like fried chicken and trout Baquet. $

fried quail with corn waffle. $$$

H Mandina’s 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$

H Toups’ Meatery 845 N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$

Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket.com. B, L, D daily. Beautiful restoration of historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$

NORTHSHORE Acme Oyster House 1202 N. Highway 190, Covington, (985) 246-6155, AcmeOyster. com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Gallagher’s Grill 509 S. Tyler St., (985) 892-9992, GallaghersGrill.com. L, D TueSat. Chef Pat Gallagher’s destination restaurant offers al fresco seating to accompany classically inspired New Orleans fare. Event catering offered. $$$

Riverbend H Boucherie 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$ Brigtsen’s 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

Uptown H Apolline 4729 Magazine St., 894-8881, ApollineRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sun, Br Sat-Sun. Cozy gem serves a refined menu of French and Creole classics peppered with Southern influences such as buttermilk

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Casamento’s 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. L Thu-Sat, D Thu-Sun. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and for all major holidays. $$ Clancy’s 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. L Thu-Fri, D MonSat. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$ Commander’s Palace 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Award-winner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$ Dick and Jenny’s 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys.com. D Mon-Sat. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$ Domilise’s 5240 Annunciation St., 899912. L, D Mon-Sat. Local institution and riteof-passage for those wanting an initiation to the real New Orleans. Wonderful poor boys and a unique atmosphere make this a one-of-a-kind place. $

H Gautreau’s 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along with contemporary creations. $$$$$ Jacques-Imo’s Cafe 8324 Oak St., 8610886, Jacques-Imos.com. D Mon-Sat. Reinvented New Orleans cuisine served in a party atmosphere. The deep-fried roast beef poor boy is delicious. The lively bar scene offsets the long wait on weekends. $$$$ Joey K’s 3001 Magazine St., 891-0997, JoeyKsRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. A true neighborhood restaurant with daily lunch plates; red beans and rice are classic. $ Mahony’s 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374, MahonysPoBoys.com. L, D daily. Along with the usual poor boys, this sandwich shop

serves up a grilled shrimp and fried green tomato version dressed with remoulade sauce. Sandwich offerings are augmented by a full bar. $ Mat & Naddie’s 937 Leonidas St., 8619600, MatAndNaddies.com. D Mon-Tue, Thu-Sat. Cozy converted house serves up creative and eclectic regionally inspired fare. Shrimp and crawfish croquettes make for a good appetizer and when the weather is right the romantic patio is the place to sit. $$$$

WEST BANK Copeland’s 2333 Manhattan Blvd., 3641575, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$

Pizza

Reginelli’s Pizzeria Multiple Locations, Reginellis.com. L, D daily. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$ Theo’s Pizza Multiple Locations, TheosPizza.com. L, D daily. The crackercrisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with a lot of local ingredients at cheap prices. $$

Bywater H Pizza Delicious 617 Piety St., 676-8482, PizzaDelicious.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant that began as a pop-up, but they also offer excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes as well. Outdoor seating a plus. $

Uptown H Ancora 4508 Freret St., 324-1636, AncoraPizza.com. D daily. Authentic Neapolitan-style pizza fired in an oven imported from Naples. The housemade charcuterie makes it a double-winner. $$ Pizza Domenica 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. James Beard Award Winning Chef

Brunch with a Serving of History

613 Royal Street, 522-7261, CourtofTwoSisters.com 613 Royal Street has been a cultural landmark since 1726. Over the centuries, 613 transitioned from royal residence to shop, to restaurant, and with each incarnation came a new set of stories of historic moments. Legend has it that voodoo queen Marie Laveau practiced her rites in the torch-lit courtyard and that Jean Lafitte killed three men in three separate duels in one night in that spot. All of this history would be enough to visit The Court of Two Sisters restaurant, but then again so is the brunch. Time and again, the copious hot and cold buffet wins awards for best brunch and best outdoor dining. All the classics from “Shrimp Etouffee” to “Bananas Foster” can be enjoyed in that same courtyard to the sounds of a live jazz band. – M.C. 188

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Alon Shaya’s pizza centric spinoff of his popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitan-style pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$ Slice 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-PIES (7437); 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800; SlicePizzeria.com. L, D daily. Order up slices or whole pizza pies done in several styles (thin- and thick-crust) as well as pastas, seafood, panini and salads. $

Seafood Akers

Middendorf’s Interstate 55, Exit 15, 30160 Highway 51 South, (985) 386-6666, MiddendorfsRestaurant.com. L, D Wed-Sun. Historic seafood destination along the shores of Lake Maurepas is world-famous for its thin-fried catfish fillets. Open since 1934, it’s more than a restaurant, it’s a Sun. drive tradition. $$

CBD/Warehouse District H Borgne 601 Loyola Ave., 613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Coastal Louisiana seafood with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$

H Pêche 800 Magazine St., 522-1744, PecheRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood

destination by chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven. An excellent raw bar is offered as well. $$$ Sac-A-Lait 1051 Annunciation St., 3243658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. D TueSat, L Fri. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. The striking buildout in the Cotton Mill lofts adds to the appeal. $$$$

French Quarter Crazy Lobster 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. L, D daily. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. L, D daily. Crowd-pleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood 841 Iberville St., 5811316, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse. com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar with chargrilled and raw oysters. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$

H GW Fins 808 Bienville St., 581-FINS (3467), GWFins.com. D daily. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$

H Kingfish 337 Charters St., 598-5005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chefdriven French Quarter establishment. $$$

Oceana Grill 739 Conti St., 525-6002, OceanaGrill.com. B, L, D daily. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Pier 424, 424 Bourbon St., 309-1574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. L, D daily. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “CajunBoiled” Lobster prepared crawfish-style in spicy crab boil. $$$

Kenner Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant 910 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite A, 463-3030, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

Le Bayou 208 Bourbon St., 525-4755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafood-centric destination on Bourbon Street. Fried alligator is available for the more daring diner. $$$

Metairie

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 512 Bienville St., 309-4848, MrEdsRestaurants. com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. A seafood lover’s paradise offering an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. An elaborate raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw is part of the draw. $$$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 3117 21st St., 833-6310, MrEdsRestaurants.com/ oyster-bar. L, D Mon-Sat. Seafood-centric eatery specializes in favorites like whole flounder, crabmeat au gratin and more. An oyster bar offering an array of raw and broiled bivalves adds to the appeal. $$$

Deanie’s Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 8314141, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant

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DINING GUIDE 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo. com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

Mid-City

Morton’s The Steakhouse 365 Canal St., One Canal Place, 566-0221, Mortons. com/NewOrleans. D daily. Private elevator leads to the plush, wood-paneled environs of this local outpost of the famed Chicago steakhouse popular with politicians and celebrities. $$$$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 301. N. Carrollton Ave., 872-9975, MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. Latest outpost of local seafood chain features char-broiled oysters, seafood poor boys and other favorites such fried chicken and red beans and rice in a casual setting in Mid-City Market. $$

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris. com. D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

Uptown

Garden District H Mr. John’s Steakhouse 2111 St.

Frankie & Johnny’s 321 Arabella St., 243-1234, FrankieAndJohnnys.net. L, D daily. Serves fried and boiled seafood along with poor boys and daily lunch specials. Kid-friendly with a game room to boot. $$ Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 1327 St. Charles Ave., 267-0169, MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. Outpost of local seafood chain serves Cajun and Creole classics in the Maison St. Charles Hotel. Favorites include Redfish Maison St. Charles, which features blackened redfish topped with crawfish etouffée. $$$

Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri-Sat. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$

French Quarter Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. L Fri, D daily. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

West End

H Doris Metropolitan 620 Chartres

Landry’s Seafood 8000 Lakeshore Drive, West End, 283-1010, LandrysSeafood. com. L, D daily. Kid-friendly and popular seafood spot serves of heaping platters of fried shrimp, Gulf oysters, catfish and more. $$

St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. Innovative, genre-busting steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$

Steakhouse

CBD/Warehouse District H Besh Steak Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. D daily. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$ Chophouse New Orleans 322 Magazine St., 522-7902, ChophouseNola.com. D daily. In addition to USDA prime grade aged steaks prepared under a broiler that reaches 1,700 degrees, Chophouse offers lobster, redfish and classic steakhouse sides. $$$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks. com. L Mon-Fri, D Tue-Sat. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this Mr. John’s offshoot overlooking Lafayette Square, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$

H La Boca 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 5258205, LaBocaSteaks.com. D Mon-Sat. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

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Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak. com. L Fri, D Sun-Thu. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails to accompany classic steakhouse fare as well as inspired dishes like the Gouté 33: horseradish-crusted bone marrow and deviled eggs with crab ravigote and smoked trout. Reservations accepted. $$$

Metairie Ruth’s Chris Steak House 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris.com. L Fri, D daily. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

Mid-City H Crescent City Steaks 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. L Tue-Fri & Sun, D Tue-Sun. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$

Uptown Charlie’s Steak House 4510 Dryades St., 895-9323, CharliesSteakHouseNola. com. D Tue-Sat. This quintessential New Orleans neighborhood steak house serves up carnivorous delights including its 32-ounce T-Bone in a relaxed and

unpretentious atmosphere. An upstairs dining room accommodates larger parties with ease. $$$

Vegan/Vegetarian

Lower Garden District H The Green Fork 1400 Prytania St., 267-7672, GreenForkNola.com. B, L Mon-Sat. Fresh juices, smoothies and vegetarian-friendly fare make The Green Fork a favorite for lovers of healthy food. Catering is offered as well. $$

World

Byblos Multiple Locations, ByblosRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Upscale Middle Eastern cuisine featuring traditional seafood, lamb and vegetarian options. $$

Bywater The Green Goddess 307 Exchange Place, 301-3347, GreenGoddessRestaurant. com. L, D Wed-Sun. One of the most imaginative local restaurants. The menu is constantly changing, and chef Paul Artigues always has ample vegetarian options. Combine all of that with a fantastic selection of drinks, wine and beer, and it’s the total (albeit small) package. $$

CBD/Warehouse District Johnny Sanchez 930 Poydras St., 304-6615, JohnnySanchezRestaurant. com. L, D daily. Contemporary Mexican mecca offering celebrity chef cachet to go along with the locally sourced produce accompanying the Bistec a la Parilla. Popular happy hour and downtown locale next to South Market District add to the appeal. $$$

H Lüke 333 St. Charles Ave., 378-2840, LukeNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef John Besh and executive chef Matt Regan serve Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, housemade pâtés and abundant plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$ Palace Café 605 Canal St., 523-1661, PalaceCafe.com. B, L, D daily. A classic New Orleans restaurant, located at the foot of the French Quarter, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team constantly evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates athe Black Duck Bar on the second floor. $$$

Faubourg Marigny H Mona’s Café 504 Frenchmen St., 9494115. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tender-tangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

Faubourg St. John H 1000 Figs 3141 Ponce De Leon St., 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-to-table alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$

French Quarter Bayona 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455, Bayona.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ El Gato Negro 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. L, D daily. Central Mexican cuisine along with hand-muddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$

Kenner H Fiesta Latina 1924 Airline Drive, 4695792, FiestaLatinaRestaurant.com. B, L, D daily. A big-screen TV normally shows a soccer match or MTV Latino at this home for authentic Central American food. Tacos include a charred carne asada. $$

Lakeview H Mondo 900 Harrison Ave., 224-2633, MondoNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. Make sure to call ahead because the place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$

METAIRIE Vega Tapas Café 2051 Metairie Road, 836-2007, VegaTapasCafe.com. D MonSat, Br Sun. Fun, eclectic small plates destination offers creative fare keeps guests coming back with frequent regionally inspired specialty menus served with humor and whimsy. $$

Mid-City Juan’s Flying Burrito 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 486-9950, JuansFlyingBurrito. com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $ Lola’s 3312 Esplanade Ave., 488-6946, LolasNewOrleans.com. D daily. Garlicky Spanish dishes and great paella make this artsy boîte a hipster destination. $$$

H Mona’s Café 3901 Banks St., 4827743. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tender-tangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H Taqueria Guerrero 208 N. Carrollton Ave., 484-6959. B, L, D, Tue-Sat. Friendly staff and authentic Mexican cuisine make this affordable neighborhood restaurant a neighborhood favorite. BYOB $

Upper 9th Ward Kebab , 2315 Saint Claude Ave., 3834328, KebabNola.com. L, D Wed-Mon. The menu is short and tasty at this kebab outpost along the revitalized St. Claude Avenue corridor. $

Uptown H Café Abyssinia 3511 Magazine St.,


894-6238. L, D daily. One of a just few authentic Ethiopian restaurants in the city, excellent injera and spicy vegetarian fare make this a local favorite. $$

influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$

H Irish House 1432 St. Charles Ave.,

H Shaya 4213 Magazine St., 891-4213,

595-6755, TheIrishHouseNewOrleans. com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Irish pub dishes such as shepherd’s pie and fish and chips are featured here, as well as creative cocktails like Irish iced coffee. Check the schedule of events for live music. $$

ShayaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef Alon Shaya pays homage to his native Israel with this contemporary Israeli hotspot. Cauliflower Hummus and Matzo Ball Soup made with slow-cooked duck are dishes to try. $$$

Jamila’s Mediterranean Tunisian Cuisine 7808 Maple St., 866-4366. D TueSun. Intimate and exotic bistro serving Mediterranean and Tunisian cuisine. The Grilled Merguez is a Jazz Fest favorite and vegetarian options are offered. $$ Juan’s Flying Burrito 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000, JuansFlyingBurrito.com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Panchita’s 1434 S. Carrollton Ave., 281-4127. L, D daily. Authentic, budgetfriendly Mexican restaurant serves tamales, mole and offers free chips and salsa as well as sangria. $

H Patois 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441, PatoisNola.com. L Fri, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. The food is French in technique, with

Warehouse District Lucy’s 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 523-8995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. L, D daily. The focus is on fun at this island-themed oasis with a menu that cherry-picks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the afterwork crowds stay well into the wee hours at this late-night hangout. $

Specialty Foods

CBD/Warehouse District Calcasieu 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 5882188, CalcasieuRooms.com. For gatherings both large and small, the catering menus feature modern Louisiana cooking and the Cajun cuisine for which chef Donald Link is justifiably famous.

French Quarter

Antoine’s Annex 513 Royal St., 5258045, Antoines.com/Antoines-Annex. Open daily. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available.

Metairie Sucré 3301 Veterans Blvd., 834-2277, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available.

a selection of fine cheeses, wines, beers and related accouterments. Look for wine and cheese specials every Friday.

Sucré 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily & nightly. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available. n

Mid-City H Blue Dot Donuts 4301 Canal St., 2184866, BlueDotDonuts.com. B, L Tue-Sun. The Bacon Maple Long John gets all the press, but returning customers are happy with the classics as well as twists like peanut butter and jelly.

Uptown Blue Frog Chocolates 5707 Magazine St., 269-5707, BlueFrogChocolates.com. Open daily, closed Sundays in summer. French and Belgian chocolate truffles and Italian candy flowers make this a great place for gifts. St. James Cheese Company 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737, StJamesCheese. com. Open daily. Specialty shop offers

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contact

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@ MyNewOrleans.com.

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try this

Playing with Fire Glass blowing at YAYA Studios By Kelly Massicot

You’ve seen these works of art in museums, hotel lobbies, and even on your Christmas tree each holiday season. But have you ever wondered how glass sculptures and pieces are made? We did and decided to contact YAYA (Young Aspirations, Young Artists) to see if we could visit their glass blowing studio. One hot day in July we arrived at the Lasalle Street YAYA building, which serves as an art gallery, offices, art studio and more for the youth of New Orleans. Glass studio manager James Vella greeted us at the door and brought us to the massive studio attached to the back of the building. As we walked through the gallery, we were met by an exceptional playlist, blasting from the speakers in a corner of the room, and a wall of heat coming from the furnaces. The temperature was so pronounced that Vella actually had us stand outside while he gave the 411 on the studio safety because, if you can imagine, it was cooler outside in the New Orleans weather than it was inside. Vella is an expert in the glass blowing community, and an exceptional addition to

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the YAYA team. His knowledge is vast and his ability to teach each step of the process in such a manner that even the most ignorant novice could understand is much appreciated. First, Vella talked us through the process, then he gave us a demonstration. And after that we were next. Terrified of the heat and having to manipulate molten glass, my turn came first. I quickly learned that the upper body strength needed for this task far surpassed my abilities, as I unsuccessfully lifted the melted glass from the furnace. Vella, luckily, was right there with me helping me through every step, and picking up the slack as I attempted to pull the glass out of the furnace and spin the glass-blowing pole at the same time – a necessary movement to ensure the liquid glass does not slip off of the end as you remove it from the heat. All in all, the process comprises about seven to 10 steps. But the most interesting part is the step that lends itself to the naming, actually blowing into the glass. The pole that is used is hollow throughout. This allows for the artist to blow an air bubble

into the glass. Since the practice’s inception in the middle of the 1st century B.C., though they did not know why at the time, an initial small puff of air is blown into the molten glass through the rod and capped in order for it to expand. Next, there is the need for constant air blowing into the pipe, either by the glass sculptor or an assistant’s help, after you have finished molding your shape and as you are preparing to score the glass away from the pole. There were a lot of technical steps to glass blowing, and it is not an activity for those wanting to stay clean and dry – prepare for down and dirty, and if you go during the summer you are sure to sweat. They invite kids of all ages (7 or 8-years-old and up) to come experience their studio for a party or private class. They even offer “blow your owns,” which typically happen on Saturdays and involve guests coming and creating whatever is on the menu that day. A master class is also offered once you’ve taken a lesson, a few other classes, and are ready to learn from professionals from around the world. Other than the heat I loved the whole experience. It was an unexpected feeling seeing how these beautiful works of art are created and the meticulous planning and process that goes into each piece of glass. It’s a messy job that yields a beautiful result. n cheryl gerber PHOTOGRAPH


etc.

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More Fun in the Sun at Gulf Shores

GulfShores.com

cheryl gerber PHOTO

32 miles of white-sand beaches and clear blue water make Alabama Gulf Shores and Orange Beach a wonderful vacation spot for all tourists, both grown and small. There’s plenty to do from deep-sea fishing, and water sports to golf and historic attractions. This fall, there are fun events almost every weekend. In early September, Green Day will kick off a Concert Series and later on, you’ll find the 46th Annual National Shrimp Festival, The Wharf Uncorked Food & Wine Festival 10th Annual Oyster Cook-Off and Craft Beer Weekend, along with other food, sporting and arts events.

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New Offerings at Perlis

Perlis.com Perlis, the store famous for Southern attire and its own ‘crawfish’ logo may have been around since 1939, but it remains a prized success story in keeping up with the retail giants of today. Started by Roger Perlis, it is still family run and boasts four stores and an online presence. This fall, the ladies’ department will start selling evening gowns, and new brands are coming on-board in the men’s department too. Perlis always sees a rush at the start of football season and will be fully stocked, whether you are supporting the Black & Gold, Green & Blue or Purple & Gold. By Mirella Cameran myneworleans.com AUGUST 2017

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D.J. prompted the town to start singing:

When I get older, losing my hair, Many years from now. Will you still be sending me a Valentine Birthday greetings bottle of wine…

Election Day in Liverpool Victory for The Fab Four Party By Errol Laborde

We just happened to be in Liverpool on the same day that the British were holding a national election. I thought it would be interesting to observe how one of the world’s other great democracies performs on voting day. I had expected to see trucks with loudspeakers and campaign workers handing out leaflets from key intersections, but there was none of that. British elections are different from ours in several ways, including: • By law there can be no public electioneering on Election Day. • Voting is on a Thursday with the polling hours spread from 7am to 10pm. • Emphasis is on the party, rather than the candidates, and there are more political parties to vote for. Other than one sign pointing to a voting poll there was no indication that anything special was happening that day, but oh, something else was: by around

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9:30 that morning, we noticed clusters of people gathered around a couple of microphones located downtown. Our tour guide explained that they were not there for demonstrations or politics, but, far more importantly, especially in Liverpool—to sing. Even more significant than having been in Liverpool on national Election Day was to have been there during the week of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Beatle’s recording of the brilliant Sergeant Pepper album. Each day that week a different song from the album, with the help of a local radio station, was featured at 10:30 a.m. There would be a city-wide sing-along. To the rest of Great Britain it was Election Day; to the people of Liverpool it was When I‘m 64 Day. Right on the hour, the bus driver parked his vehicle and turned the radio loud. A fast-talking, cockney-accented

At intervals, the broadcast would switch to one of the street groups, though we could barely hear them because of our singing in the bus. No stonefaced king or gallant warrior staring down from a pedestal was as important to the town’s history as the four native boys whose music spread across the world as no empire could. If I’d been out ‘til quarter to three Would you lock the door, Will you still need me, will you still feed me, When I’m sixty-four? Statues of John, Paul, George and Ringo walking together, in the direction of America, embellish the Mersey river waterfront, where the ferry that crosses the river is painted psychedelic. Around 5:00 that afternoon, the tour guide noticed a traffic buildup and suggested that the night might be especially busy, as folks gathered in pubs for the election returns. So that was the answer. To see Election Day politics in Great Britain, go to the pubs (although there is little action until after 10 when the votes are counted.) That night, British politics was atwitter as the ruling Conservative party did far worse than expected, creating a badly divided government. The big issues of the day would be even more contentious. Of course, as the folks in Liverpool know, politics would not be necessary if only everyone lived in a yellow submarine. n

ARTHUR NEAD ILLUSTRATION


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine August 2017  

New Orleans Magazine August 2017