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november 2018 / VOLUME 52 / NUMBER 12 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Mary Lou Eichhorn, Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Jason Berry, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Social Media Assistant Becca Miller Staff Writers Topher Balfer, Kelly Massicot, Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Advertising Sales Manager Kate Sanders Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Claire Cummings Account Executives Meggie Schmidt, Rachel Webber Director of Marketing and Events Cheryl Lemoine Event Coordinator Abbie Dugruise Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Designers Emily Andras, Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney Special Projects Art Director Molly Tullier Traffic Coordinator Lane Brocato Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Subscriptions Manager Brittanie Bryant For subscription information call (504) 828-1380 WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 MyNewOrleans.com

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2018 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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Contents Local Color On the Cover: Tacos by Juan’s Flying Burrito, Photographed by Denny Culbert

Marquee Entertainment calendar 24

Persona Thomas Morstead 26

Education Stephen Goodly 30

Chris Rose Rediscovering Grand Isle 32

Modine Gunch Ways With Words 34

Joie d’Eve Growth Experiences 36

In Tune Music to Fest By 38

Jazz Life Sax Appeal 40

Home An Eye for Art 42

88

Taceaux All Hat, p. 46

Features

In Every Issue

Tacos

Inside

A tour of the city’s best 46 by Jyl Benson

Taco Talk 14

Lawyers

Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 18

Three Tough Cases 58 profiles by Sarah Ravits

Speaking Out

Julia Street Questions and Answers About Our City 20

Streetcar Season of the Boucherie 136

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DIAL 12, D1 WYES invites students, teachers, home educators and anyone interested in the story of the Mississippi River to register at wyes.org for a free Electronic Field Trip on Wednesday, November 14 at 9am & 1pm CST. Anyone can participate in this interactive lesson! Join us for the over 2,000-mile journey down the Mighty Mississippi — all you need is a computer. WYES will also broadcast the 55-minute event on Thursday, November 22 at 7pm.

The Menu Table Talk La Thai’s Style 82

Restaurant Insider News from the Kitchens 84

Food Thanksgiving Ambrosia 86

Last Call Black & Gold Martini 88

Dining Guide Listings by Neighborhood 90


inside

Taco Talk A taxi driver in Cancun, Mexico

was pointing out the various restaurants and bars along the way, including the American chains. Then he cautioned. “There is one chain that we do not have here,” he said. “Know what it is?” It did not take long. “Taco Bell?” He nodded. The same rule holds true in nearby Cozumel and probably most of gulf-side Mexico. What a horrid sight it would be to see tourists going back to their hotels and cruise ships carrying the chain’s to-go boxes. Much less offensive if they had just visited the Colonel. Stateside, however, there is an open market on the folded crunchy tortilla. Actually, more than a market, there is a fad. Tacos of various fillings are showing up on menus all around town. It used to be they were ladled with either beef or chicken to accompany the cheese and lettuce, now seafood is often on the menus. Picked random among local Mexican menus, the choices at the Lakeview El Gato Negro include lobster, crawfish and “fresh catch.” Add-ons include grilled mushroom and “Chihuahua cheese.” And yes there are gluten free versions made so, according to the menu, by specifying corn tortillas. Each November our cover story deals with one food item that we have selected. We take this seriously. Instead of asking readers to make the selections, we assign a food writer and give her almost a year to go out and eat. In the past, chosen topics have included burger, poor boys, fried chicken and pizza, among 1 4 november 2018 myneworleans.com

the usual suspects. This year the taco has risen in such status that it is our topic. From editing the copy, the choices are even greater and more imaginative than we had thought. There is a popular term that the French invented to describe ordering individual dishes rather than a set menu. So it is that the El Gato Negro menu has a section listed as “A La Carte Tacos.” They might taste good topped with marchland du vin sauce.

Number One New Orleans Magazine won the First Place award in the Best Magazine competition at the recent presentation of the New Orleans Press Club. The win was one of several by the magazine including first place finishes in the categories of Layout Design, Best Portrait, Special Section and Feature Reporting. We are proud of our entire staff.


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meet the sales staff

Kate Sanders Henry Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Claire Cummings Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7250 Claire@myneworleans.com

Rachel Webber Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Rachel@MyNewOrleans.com

Meggie Schmidt Account Executive (504) 830-7220 Meggie@myneworleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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speaking out

Night of the Saints Drew Brees Passes A Milestone

We recall one Fall Sunday in 2005, sitting

outside a store in Marksville, Louisiana, where we spent our Katrina exile. While others shopped, we listened to the Saints game on the car radio, though everything was wrong about the experience. The team was playing its home games in San Antonio whose mayor was eagerly courting the franchise to move there permanently. This particular game was held in Baton Rouge against former LSU coach Nick Saban’s Miami Dolphins. The team was not very good that year, finishing 3 and 13. Even the radio broadcast carried by a local station had a tinny sound. Worst of all, the game was not the big concern. At halftime, the announcers talked about what worried all of us the most, would the team return to New Orleans? We thought about that day on the evening of this past October 8. All the sports talk shows 1 8 november 2018 myneworleans.com

were buzzing about Drew Brees becoming the all-time passing leader. The go-ahead pass could not have been more dramatic, a 62-yard bomb for a touchdown delivered before a national audience on Monday Night Football. The Superdome, which in the days after Katrina seemed ruined forever, was dazzling with its lights show and graphics. Team members piled on Brees in celebration. Outside, blinking lights of yellow and gold raced around the dome’s circumference. How far we had come since that day when we listened to the Saints on the car radio. Booger McFarland, a former LSU standout who played eight years in the NFL, was working the sidelines for ESPN that night. (Yes, he answers to the name of “Booger.”) In a postgame show he gave a moving answer to what the evening meant to New Orleans. Going back to the post-Katrina recovery and the arrival of

Drew Brees, whose career with the San Diego Chargers had been sidetracked by a shoulder injury, McFarland recalled, “The city needed help. Brees needed a home. Throughout this long journey with Sean Payton, the city and Brees rehabbed together.” As spectacular as An original Brees’ record book pass ©Mike Luckovich completion was, one of his Cartoon for New Orleans Magazine most memorable plays did not involve a pass, nor did it achieve any yardage. That is when he took a knee and the clock wound down to victory in Superbowl XLIV in 2010. Sports serves us well when we can draw inspiration, and hope, from it. In this season, we can be thankful that the Saints have provided plenty of both.

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julia street with poydras the parrot

Roussel’s Menu, LaPlace 14 October 1969. Courtesy of the Historic New Orleans Collection. Gift of Richard and Rima Collin

Dear Julia and Poydras, Many of my childhood vacations were spent taking long road trips with my parents and little brother. Invariably, on our way into or out of town, our family would stop to eat at Roussel’s on Airline Highway in LaPlace. Sadly, that grand old eatery is long-gone. Do you happen to know when and why it closed? An Airline Highway landmark for more than half a century, the River Parishes mainstay was especially famous for its gumbo and seafood dishes such as crawfish etouffée. Founder Christophe Roussel died in 1939 at the age of 72, remembered not only as the progenitor of the Roussel family of restaurateurs, but as the ultimate authority on Perique tobacco. A slow local economy and the interstate took a heavy toll on Roussel’s as travelers bypassed LaPlace and there were not enough local patrons to pick up the slack. Roussel established the popular restau2 0 november 2018 myneworleans.com

rant as a roadside diner in 1927; his son subsequently moved the business to nearby Airline Highway to take advantage of the major travel corridor. By the time Roussel’s folded in 1984, several generations of the Christophe’s descendants had operated it – son Warren, granddaughter Elmire “Coo” Roussel Hachet and great-grandson Kenneth “Bubba” Hachet. Dear Julia, Every August, my mom would drag me to Canal Street to buy shoes and clothes for the next school year. I especially enjoyed looking for shoes because I could look through the machine to see how the shoes fit and what the insides of my feet looked like. I have not seen that type of machine since my childhood and was wondering if you or Poydras may know something about it. Sincerely yours, Joe Stephenson (Metairie)

have a question for julia? Send your question to: Julia Street, c/o New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Errol@ MyNewOrleans. com.

From 1921 to 1958, shoefitting fluoroscopes were a popular sales gimmick in use throughout the country. Generations of youngsters and their parents thought nothing of sticking their feet inside X-ray machines and peering through the attached viewers to see their foot bones revealed within their shoes. In 1921, the Imperial shoe store at the corner of Canal and Bourbon streets became the first local footware emporium to feature a shoe-fitting fluoroscope. Although competing brands were doubtless used in other local shoe stores over the next 37 years, the first such machine in New Orleans was a Foot-o-Scope from the Foot-o-Scope Company, Inc., of Boston, Massachusetts. Expressly made for the retail shoe store trade, the device then cost about $900, a little more than $12,500 in today’s currency. Housed in a mahogany cabinet, it was pretty. It was also pretty dangerous. The problem with the machines was that they leaked radiation and were operated by minimallytrained sales clerks. It was not until 1958 that the Louisiana Legislature passed Act 124, which banned the use of shoe fitting fluoroscopes outside a clinical setting under qualified medical supervision. At the time the bill passed, 42 such machines were in use in shoe stores throughout Louisiana.


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Local Color MARQUEE . PERSONA . EDUCATION . CHRIS ROSE . MODINE GUNCH . JOIE D’EVE . IN TUNE . JAZZ LIFE . HOME

greg miles photo

Saints Punter Thomas Morstead


marquee

November Our top picks for this month’s events by Fritz Esker

Boudin, Bourbon and Beer

Oak Street Po Boy Festival

On November 9 in Champions Square, Boudin, Bourbon, and Beer will have its biggest event yet with over 70 chefs participating. Abita is sponsoring this year’s event and will have their favorites, as well as seasonal brews and special cask selections. There will also be a cigar bar and dessert stations. Information, BoudinBourbonAndBeer.com

For an eclectic array of both traditional and exotic poor boys in one convenient location, visit the Oak Street Po-Boy Festival on November 11. When you’ve had your fill of tasting New Orleans’ signature sandwich, there will also be live music and the Where Y’Arts Market with quirky arts and crafts for sale. Information, PoBoyFest.com

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Treme Creole Gumbo Festival

On November 17-18, the Treme Creole Gumbo Festival brings delicious food and a music line-up consisting entirely of brass bands to Armstrong Park. Admission is free and there will also be a “gumbosium” where audiences can see gumbocooking demonstrations. Information, JazzAndHeritage. org/Treme-Gumbo

The Last Waltz: A Benefit for the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic

An all-star crew of New Orleans musicians and special guests will jam at the Joy Theater on November 23 to pay homage to The Band’s famous 1976 concert depicted in Martin Scorsese’s classic documentary The Last Waltz. Tickets range from $20-65. Information, TheJoyTheater.com


calendar October 30-November 4

November 17 & 24

School of Rock, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Dine & Dance with the Victory Swing Orchestra, BB’s Stage Door Canteen. NationalWW2Museum.org.

November 2

Keith Urban: Graffiti U World Tour, Smoothie King Center. SmoothieKingCenter.com.

November 17

Fête des Fromages, New Orleans Jazz Museum. FeteDesFromages.com.

November 2-4, 11

Dames at Sea, BB’s Stage Door Canteen. NationalWW2Museum.org.

November 20

August Greene, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

November 2-4

21st Annual Bucktown Seafood Festival, St. Louis King of France. BucktownSeafoodFest.com.

November 21

Ghost: A Pale Tour Named Death, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com.

November 3

November 23-25

The Music of Led Zeppelin, Mahalia Jackson Theater. MahaliaJacksonTheater.com.

Nine Inch Nails: Cold and Black and Infinite North America 2018, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

November 6

November 23-January 1

An Evening with Simple Minds: Walk Between Two Worlds Tour, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Celebration in the Oaks, City Park. NewOrleansCityPark.com.

November 9

Bayou Classic Battle of the Bands and Greek Show, Mercedes-Benz Superdome. MyBayouClassic.com.

November 23

Christina Aguilera: The Liberation Tour, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

November 24 November 14

The Price Is Right Live!, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Bayou Classic, Mercedes-Benz Superdome. MyBayouClassic.com. November 27-December 2

November 14-18

Hell Yes Fest, Various Locations. HellYesFest.com.

On Your Feet! Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com. November 28-December 23

November 15

LPO’s Tchiakovsky Symphony No. 4, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com.

Mandatory Merriment: An Untitled Holiday Musical, Southern Rep Theater. SouthernRep.com. November 29

November 15

Postmodern Jukebox: Back in Black and White, The Joy Theater. TheJoyTheater.com

Daughtry, Mahalia Jackson Theater. MahaliaJacksonTheater.com. November 29

November 17

Lil Yachty - The Disrespect Tour, Mahalia Jackson Theater. MahaliaJacksonTheater.com.

LPO’s Pictures at an Exhibition with Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com. November 30

November 17

So You Think You Can Dance? Live, Mahalia Jackson Theater. MahaliaJacksonTheater.com.

Christmas Belles Are Ringing, BB’s Stage Door Canteen. NationalWW2Museum.org.

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persona

attention for his “What you Give Will Grow” foundation, with the focus on tackling cancerrelated, specifically pediatric, fundraising events and initiatives. The foundation while active throughout the year, was also was recognized last winter by Minnesotans, who donated more than $200,000 to his New Orleans-based foundation in response to the player’s sportsmanlike conduct on the field during the division playoff game in January 2018. Morstead returned the gesture by donating that money, plus a $25,000 donation from Coach Sean Payton, to the Minnesota Children’s Hospital. Locally, Morstead also completed a “chin up challenge,” in which he completed 418 pull ups in 60 minutes, and raising more than $63,000 for a school fund for a former Saints sales account executive who lost his battle with cancer earlier this year. From the Vikings fans to the Who Dat Nation, Morstead, aka “The Leg,” will have plenty of fans backing him throughout this season, and with New Orleanians continuing to cheer him on, on and off the field.

Thomas Morstead Kicking the season into high gear by Ashley McLellan

A leader both on and off the field, New Orleans Saints

punter Thomas Morstead brings a commitment of positivity to his team and his adopted hometown. A Saint for the past nine years, Morstead has been a crucial part of the team, with a kicking average of 47 yards per punt average, and was named the team’s 2014 Man of the Year. Off the field, Morstead has gained local and national 2 6 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

Focus on the process and the results will take care of themselves.

Q: What is your favorite thing about your job? The camaraderie in the locker room. I have forged so many amazing relationships that will last a lifetime. Q: What do you do to prepare for a new season? One of the most important aspects to my game is starting from scratch every off-season. Obviously the common thought would be that you continue to build on previous years but I like to start over and relearn all the technical aspects of punting and kicking the football.    Q: What are your passions off the field? I know this may seem obvious, but I love my family more than anything. My wonderful wife Lauren is such a kind soul. Our three children, Maxwell, Beckett, and Maggie are all such blessings.  greg miles photo


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Q: What was the inspiration behind “What You Give You Grow?” My senior year of college I was very fortunate to be coached by Frank Gansz, Sr. He taught many lessons to me in the one year we had together. My favorite quote of his is, “What you give will grow and what you keep you lose.” That always resonated with me and I knew I wanted to honor him in someway once I made it in the NFL. Q: What did it mean to you have Minnesota Vikings fans contribute to your organization? You could never have planned for something like that to happen. It was just so pure and organic. It honestly helped me cope with the way the season ended. It gave me something positive to focus on after the loss.

Q: What was the response to you turning those Vikings donations back to benefit Minnesota’s Child Life program? I believe one of the reasons it went so viral was because of the decision to give the money back to the people of Minnesota, who were making all of the donations in the first place. Q: What does being a New Orleanian mean to you? I could never have imagined in my wildest dreams ever being so fulfilled in so many areas of my life. Most of the time I just had my head down trying to accomplish things that I set out to accomplish but every now and then it really is amazing to look up and see what all has transpired. I think gratitude sums up everything the best way. My family and I are so grateful to be living in New Orleans and making it our home. We have wonderful neighbors and couldn’t be any happier. Q: Is there a career goal, either on or off the field, that you aspire to achieve? I try not to sit too long term goals. Things can change very quickly in this NFL. As my career continues I continue to make year by year goals of what I’d like to accomplish. It’s honestly just about trying to get my highest level day in and day out. Focus on the process and the results will take care of themselves.

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at a glance

Age: 32 Born: 3/8/1986 Education: Southern Methodist University 2004-2008 Mechanical engineering w/ biomedical specialization, two classes shy of graduating Favorite Book: “Mind Gym” Favorite Movie: “Cinderella Man” Favorite TV show: I don’t watch TV, got three kids haha. Favorite Food: steak and potatoes Favorite restaurant: Irene’s Cuisine

True Confession: I eat brownies after every game.


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education

Stephen Goodly High School State Teacher of the Year by Dawn Ruth Wilson

Stephen Goodly, High School State

Teacher of the Year, recently recalled the very moment he decided to make teaching his life’s passion. At the time, he was a beginning college student full of plans for a career in computer science. That plan took a drastic turn one day after witnessing chaos in a New Orleans classroom. He recalled driving his mother 3 0 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

to a meeting at a middle school and sitting in the hall waiting. From his vantage point, he could see children in a nearby classroom swinging from the light fixtures despite the fact that a teacher was in the room. “The next day I went and changed my major from computer science to education,” Goodly said. When his mother asked why he’d made the change, he remembered

telling her: “Because they need me.” Now, after 24 years of teaching math, he basks in accolades that started last fall when he was selected teacher of the year at Warren Easton Charter High School. The principal at the time pushed him to apply for the Louisiana teacher of the year and for a New Orleans Excellence in Teaching Award. He won the New Orleans award along with six others and became a finalist for the state award. The 2018-2019 Louisiana Teacher of the Year award went to someone else, but he got the next best thing: Recognition as the best high school teacher. In fall 2017, when he was asked to apply for the award, he initially declined. “I don’t need to do it,” he remembered saying. “I just got my recognition today.” A girl that morning had said, “Mr. Goodly, you are my favorite teacher.” He didn’t know the girl because he’d never taught her. “That touched me,” he said. “Mr. Goodly is more than a teacher,” Kendall McManus, assistant principal at Warren Easton, said. “He is a mentor to me. He is a father figure to me, and he is that way with the children.” The “everyday quality instruction” that Goodly brings to the classroom is reflected in student test scores. In 2017-2018, 80 percent of his Algebra I students scored “good” or “excellent” on endof-course tests. Instruction is in Goodly’s DNA. Both parents were educators - his father is a high school history and French teacher, and his mother is an elementary school teacher. Teacher-talk even stretches deep into his evening hours because his wife Angela Goodly teaches math and science. Goodly’s teaching career took a winding path from grade school through college. When he graduated from Southern University of New Orleans in 1995, he couldn’t find a position teaching high school math, his chosen field, so he took one teaching elementary school. He taught at the elementary level for only one year before securing a position at the high school level, but he says it turned out to be a fortunate detour. The skills he learned working with younger students, help him deal with older students who struggle, he said. Hurricane Katrina sent him to Maryland, teaching for a while. Later, after completing a master’s degree in education technology, he took on teaching stints at the College of Southern Maryland. In 2008, he returned to teaching high school in New Orleans. Now a math coach for other teachers, he continues to apply a sacred motto: “There is no quitting.”

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cheryl gerber photo


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chris rose

Rediscovering Grand Isle And changing his mind by Chris Rose This will come as a surprise to those who know me well – perhaps even a shock – but I love discovering I am wrong about some things. I relish being pleasantly enlightened by new discovery. So let’s talk Grand Isle. That far flung southern outpost of Jefferson Parish dipping its toe into the Gulf of Mexico; next stop Cuba. Truthfully, I had always taken a pretty dim view of the place. Many years ago – well, decades, actually – I made a few trips there for work, reporting for the Times-Picayune. They were usually in-and-out affairs. But one lost weekend, back in my younger and more vulnerable years, I made a weekend road trip down there with a bunch of friends, strictly for pleasure,

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to hang out, have fun, party, fish, eat, play. And the place left me desperately wanting. My strongest impression, all these years later, was of the color gray. Everything there seemed gray. The sky. The sand. The water. The road. The houses. The food. Even the mood. Even when the sun was shining, it just seemed....gray. And so years, decades, pass. Everything changes. Grand Isle. Me. Probably both. One night, in a conversation with my companion, she mentions that she’s never been to Grand Isle and wants to see it. I tell her I haven’t been there in a million years, but I’m always up for a road trip. But, I warn her: It ain’t pretty. It’s certainly

interesting, being located at the end of the world and all that, but it ain’t no Turks & Caicos. When she told friends about our plans, more than one asked her: Why are you going there! And so we agree to steel ourselves for any possibility and we head south to the Gulf as the horizon shifts from land to water, barns to barges, bayous to beaches. And then we are there. And then.... I didn’t recognize the place. Not even remotely. It was as if I had actually never been there before. Had I? What happens to memory? It was immediately enchanting. Quiet. Peaceful. And bursting with color. All the houses are raised 20 feet off the ground now and painted in bright tropical hues that greet you coming into town like pastel welcome flags waving in the breeze. I’m thinking: Haiti, maybe Puerto Rico, not Jefferson Parish. The beach is clean and expansive, the water a slow rolling twinkling blue(ish!) in the distance. In the morning, lolling trawlers quietly thrum for catch, silhouetted against the big ball of red rising in the east. They follow the gulls and pelicans, who follow the fish who follow the shrimp. The ecosystem at work. Lone fishermen wade out into the surf, casting hopefully. Shell collectors bend to inspect the day’s new deposits of treasure. Wild boys roar down the beach in their dads’ 4-wheelers and teenage girls huddle on the big beach rocks along the dunes, giggling into their iPhones and doing what teenage girls do. Schools of dolphin make their morning pass. The air smells of brine, hermit crabs are scruffing in

the sand and there are wildflowers everywhere. Tiny paintings on the berms. Everywhere. I was seduced, sedated, delighted. And best of all, totally relaxed. I forgot about everything. (Including my deadline for this story; sorry editors!) We stayed at the Wateredge Beach Resort, a clean and homey inn with a private beachfront deck from which to look out and just …. breathe. We didn’t want to leave it. Not just to explore the island, but to even come home. But we did explore and were greeted with famed Cajun Coast hospitality everywhere we went. The Lighthouse and Yum’s restaurants kept our bellies full with blackened soft shell crab and the best pizza on the island. Our favorite hangout was Pirate Island Daiquiri’s, where – between Jule, the bartender, and Pop’s, the ever-present barfly and raconteur filled us in on the news, history and gossip of the island. The existence of a Subway sandwich shop on the main (and only) drag – accepted by many locals with begrudging resignation – is the only anomaly in what is otherwise a distinct and proudly local community where everybody knows everybody. Literally. But they also put on a damn good show about wanting to know you, too. I am aware that – to long time locals, fishers, shrimpers and birders – this account all sounds so hopelessly naive and uninformed. Agreed. It appears I’ve been missing the boat (pun intended) on Grand Isle for a long time. But I get it now. Very much. We are already planning our next trip back.

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Jason Raish Illustration


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modine gunch

Ways With Words When the meaning is relative by Modine Gunch

Me and my daughter Gladiola are trying to figure out

how she did on her history test. “There was a question about President Abraham Lincoln — what happened to him at Ford Theatre,” she says. “And you said...?” “He was circumcised,” she tells me. Circumcised? “Nooo. He was shot in the head,” I say. “Also circumcised,” she says, and rolls her eyes like she can’t believe how dumb I am. I tell her I think maybe she got that wrong. She says, “Maaa, it’s right here in Wikipedia. She reads from her phone out loud, “‘He was ass-ass-a-nated.’’ And then she adds, “For your information, that means circumcised. ” “You meant ‘assassinated’ but you wrote down ‘circumcised’?” “I knew how to spell it. Ass-assinated is harder. All the ‘S’s’ ,” she says. Then I explain very gently what ‘circumcise’ means. “Ewww!” she says. “I don’t know if I believe THAT!” I can see that she ain’t in no mood to be impressed by facts. “Besides, that’s not what Gargoyle said,” she informs me. Aha. I put in a call to my son Gargoyle, who is working a couple jobs in Baton Rouge while he figures out what to do with his English degree. “Any idea why your sister thinks Abraham Lincoln was circumcised at Ford Theatre?” I ask. He says, “Say what?” We go back and forth like that for a while. And then, comes the dawn. He remembers. He says what happened was, back years ago, when she was seven or eight, Gladiola was looking at a newspaper, and she come across the word ‘circumcised.’ So she asked Gargoyle what it meant. “I panicked,” he tells me. “I didn’t know how to explain. So I picked a word out of the blue. I think I was reading a book about John F. Kennedy. So I said ‘assassinate.’” Years went by, and he forgot about it. I hand the phone over to Gladiola so he can explain it to her, and she listens, and frowns, and says, “Thanks a LOT!” in a way that don’t seem grateful, and hangs up and says to 3 4 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

me, “Great. Now I’ll get a bunch of points off my test and it’s all his fault.” I am trying real hard to not laugh. I can see why she’s mad. But I can also understand why Gargoyle said what he said. They say kids who are only children tend to turn out smarter than kids from big families. I can see why. I remember what my sisters had me believing. Once when I was five, Visine and Geraldine were babysitting me while mama went somewhere, and they told me I was leaking. They said I would die of Deflation Disease if I didn’t keep my finger in my belly button. They would take turns going “psssst” when I took my finger out. Now THAT was evil. Also, Visine once told me dogs never had to worry about having a cold, because they could breath through their ears. Years later, when I brought my own kids’ puppy in for his shots, I mentioned that to the vet. Well, he set me straight in a hurry. I was so embarrassed. When I got home

I called Visine to tell her off, but I couldn’t finish for her laughing and snorting and laughing some more. I still haven’t gotten even with her for that. Actually, there were all kinds of alternative facts I used to believe. My father told us that the ice cream truck only played music to show it was OUT of ice cream. So we never chased it down. And Mama said we couldn’t get never more than three presents from Santa, because that was how many Jesus got from the Wise Men. And when I said I knew kids who got way more presents than that, she said she guessed they weren’t Catholic like us. Gladiola listens to all this with a stone face. “But what’s there to show that Lincoln wasn’t circumcised at Ford Theatre?” she asks. “Can anybody actually prove I am wrong?” She narrows her eyes. “I’m taking it up with the school,” she says. So that’s how conspiracy theories get started.

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LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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JOIE D’EVE

Growth Experiences Watching from the sidelines By Eve Crawford Peyton

I’ve written before about

whether you can let your kids quit something. I still don’t have a firm stance on it, to be perfectly frank. I let Georgia quit both ballet and cheerleading – she wasn’t enjoying them – but made her stick it out as Tinker Bell No. 1 in Southern Rep Camp’s Peter Pan this summer despite her stage fright. (And she rocked it, obviously.) Georgia is my sweet tiny baby pumpkin face, though, and I probably let her get away with too much. I obviously make her do things she doesn’t want to do – all she ever really wants to do is watch weird kids’ shows on Netflix while eating Nutella by the spoonful – but in terms of extracurricular activities, I just couldn’t bring myself to force her to continue conscripted pliés. With Ruby, it’s been a different process and one that I, as a mom, find pretty exciting because it’s all part of watching her discover her talents and passions. Her first

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instinct was to rush headlong into everything: soccer, volleyball, softball, basketball, lacrosse, cheerleading, drama, choir, speech and debate. I’ve supported her in all of this, sat on uncomfortable bleachers in unfamiliar gyms trying to follow what was going on and clapping when everyone else clapped, bought costumes and uniforms and sports equipment that now clutters my attic, cried during her Shakespearian monologues, listen to her sing “The 12 Days of Christmas” until I thought my ears would bleed. But now, she begins the second phase of this process – discerning which of these activities she wants to pursue on a deeper level and which she is going to have to leave by the wayside because of time constraints. As she gets older, the commitment required is greater, and so she simply can’t do all of these things (and realistically, she is clearly better at some than others). She has already abandoned soccer and lacrosse

and is about to make the difficult anxious and risk-averse and choice to give up volleyball in nonconfrontational, we have to order to focus on cheerleading sleep with our feet uncovered. One and the school play and – the new of the things I love about Ruby arrival on her radar – roller derby. is how different from me she is. It’s hard for me to know whether She’s an extrovert who loves sports my role should be to encourage and public speaking and parades her to make her own choices or and parties and crowds. Another to guide her toward the major difference, and things I feel she’s better this is a very good at. Well, no, that’s not Excerpted from Eve thing, is that Ruby is true. I know my job as a Crawford Peyton’s far more comfortable blog, Joie d’Eve, which parent is to let her make appears each Friday on with failure than I her own decisions; it’s MyNewOrleans.com ever was or ever will just hard for me to stick be. She is a risk-taker to that. If she wants to commit who is willing to be bad at someherself to basketball, even if I thing until she gets good at it. feel like she’s better at speech I love watching her grow. I love and debate, that can’t be my call, watching them both grow. but it’s hard for me to watch her Seeing them unfold as the struggle instead of succeed. (And people they are is the greatest there is a point at which you have privilege; sitting on my hands to be as honest with your child as during that process is the greatest you can about his or her actual challenge. skillset.) Although Georgia really is an One of the things I love about expert at eating Nutella. Georgia is how much like me she is. We’re introverts who prefer to stay home, we love carbs, we’re

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jane sanders illustration


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in tune

must-see music november 1

All Them Witches rock One Eyed Jacks. november 2

The Snails surf Republic. november 6

Honey Island Swamp Band

Simple Minds pop into the Saenger. november 8

Phosphorescent brings indie folk to One Eyed Jacks. november 9

Christina Aguilera rocks the Saenger.

Music to Fest By

november 12

Wye Oak dreams at One Eyed Jacks.

Fall festivals that celebrate food and music by Mike Griffith

Just a couple of days later on heat has finally begun to dissipate November 11, the Oak Street Po-Boy and the fall festivals are getting Festival will be back to its home on close. Three of the best food and the riverside of Carrolton Ave. for music events of the year are this the 12th year. Despite its relative month. Things get underway on youth, this event is an institution. November 9 with The Emeril Some of the most inventive and Lagasse Foundation’s excellent delicious takes on our august Boudin, Bourbon and Beer party at sandwich can be found here. This Champion’s Square. If you haven’t year alone will feature over 50 been to this event before, I highly different poor boys. In addition recommend that you make it a to the great food, the festival has priority. Over 70 top chefs from always had a tradition of excellent around the country will be on hand local performers. This year the with their individual take on the headliners are the George Porter titular foods. One of the things Trio and The New Orleans Suspects I really like about this party is with Jennifer Hartswick. Also make that the chefs are there to talk sure to catch the outstanding about the inspira101 Runners while you’re tion behind their there. Jared Zeller—the dishes. Every year Playlist of mentioned founder and producer of they up the bar for bands available Bayou Boogaloo—has been at: http://bit.ly/ music and this year InTune11-18 brought in to produce the festival. I’m excited to see is no exception. The event will feature Railroad Earth, what the future holds for this event. Donavon Frankenreiter, Lillie Mae It has all the right ingredients to become one of the major events and Honey Island Swamp Band. November is finally here. The

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november 17

of the year. Finally, you can slip down to Armstrong Park the next weekend for the Treme Creole Gumbo Festival. This is one of the absolute best brass band showcases of the year and of course the food is outstanding. This year the food court is expanding out into Armstrong Plaza in order to accommodate everyone. As for the music, this year’s festival is headlined by Ashlin Parker’s Trumpet Mafia on Saturday, and by the incomparable Rebirth Brass Band on Sunday. You can also catch the Treme Brass Band, James Andrews, Corey Henry, Shamarr Allen, the LPO, the Free Agents Brass Band, the Pinettes Brass Band and the Hot 8 Brass Band over the course of the weekend. With talent like this, it is amazing that this event remains free (although donations are accepted). An afternoon of brass and gumbo is a great start to a fall evening in the Quarter.

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Jimmie Dale Gilmore tells stories at Chickie Wah Wah. november 17

Big Head Todd and the Monsters rock Tipitina’s. november 17

Low Cut Connie tickles the ivories at Gasa Gasa (don’t miss this one.) november 17

Ty Segall rocks One Eyed Jacks. november 23-25

Nine Inch Nails and The Jesus and Mary Chain come home to the Saenger.

Dates are subject to change; email Mike@ MyNewOrleans.com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.


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jazz life

Sax Appeal A Brother’s Chronicles by Jason Berry

The Lower Ninth Ward in the 1950s was a

semirural village of black people, Sicilians and Croatians, living close together. People raised cows and chickens in yards and small pastures. The clarinetist and saxophonist Don Suhor (1932-2003), a stellar jazz modernist memorialized in an eponymous dual CD on GHB records, grew up in the Lower Nine, inspiring his younger brother Charles, a drummer of repute to follow him at Loyola, studying music. Their parents approved. A few years out of college, Don Suhor like many jazzmen drawn to bebop, was cutting his chops at Bourbon Street strip clubs. “Jazz-forstrippers has some built in musical problems,” Charles Suhor drolly notes in his esteemed work, “Jazz in New Orleans: The Postwar Years through 1970” (2001). In “a classic strip show,” he reveals, “the drummer’s role is inherently invasive. The music, whatever the style, is pitted against rim shots, rolls, cymbal crashes, and tom-tom and bass drum thrusts that must be coordinated with the dancer’s gyrations, all without losing the beat.” Eyewitness Charlie notes that improvisational jazzmen “were not so much mentally blocking out the din of the performance as visualizing 4 0 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

it as an asymmetrical phenomenon that was part of the performance, like the Kafka tale in which the frequent disruption of a ceremony by a leopard was handled by making the leopard a part of the event.” He shifts to a thick list of early modernists who played hard, in a mode of asymmetrical visualization as women disrobed. Among them: Al Belletto, the alto saxist who would lead a big band of high Jazz Fest memories; Sam Butera, who wept on NPR’s American Routes in recalling his work with the late Louis Prima; Earl Palmer, who remembered jazz funerals in Tremé as “the plantings;” Mouse Bonati; Black Mike Lala; Pete Monteleone and twenty-one others, including Don Suhor. A longtime Downbeat Magazine contributor, Charles Suhor became a teacher in Montgomery, Alabama, continuing as a musician. His tenacity in chronicling the jazz avant-garde in an era of booming rhythm-and-blues (Fats Domino conquers Vegas but still lives in the Lower Nine!) and the mid-century New Orleansstyle jazz solidified at Preservation Hall, is a history fraught with insight, and gems, such as Coltrane’s fabled New Orleans gig in ’63 at Hayes Chicken Shack (later, Vernon’s.)

With dysfunctional families the consuming theme of American fiction and memoir, there is a beauty in Charlie’s devotion to Don, driving home to sit with the revered brother as he slowly died of lung cancer, leaving three siblings, a widow and several children. The many recordings on “Don Suhor: New Orleans Clarinet & Sax Virtuoso”, have graceful liner notes by Charles. On late hour 1950s jam sessions, Don found inspiration from “superb bebop alto saxist Joseph ‘Mouse’ Bonati, recently arrived from Buffalo, New York, [who] became his idol, along with, inevitably, Charlie Parker.” Don Suhor was one of many New Orleans musicians who chose to stay, for various reasons, rather than embark on the long treks holding promise of record deals and fuel for the publicity to secure a national career. A few of the locals who stayed – Al Hirt, Pete Fountain, Ellis Marsalis come immediately to mind – built national reputations. Don Suhor might have risen higher had he left; more important is the music he made, which with help from Charlie has been given lasting resonance.

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home

Unlike many art galleries that

present spare white walls as a backdrop for the work that’s exhibited, Beth Wheeler’s Uptown cottage stands up to the impressive collection of art it houses. The art is the star. But the house and décor, both thoughtfully curated like the art, meet it head on. Collecting came first for Wheeler, who was raised in Baton Rouge and is an attorney with Liskow and Lewis. She moved to New Orleans after college and began acquiring works by artists connected to the state or city in the late 1990s. Transforming her current home came soon after. She originally lived in the house (then a triplex with a main apartment, an efficiency and a rear townhouse) as a tenant. Several years later, she purchased the house and began turning it into the single-family residence it is today. “I got to live in it and know its quirks before I bought it,” she said. The first stage of the renovation married the original portion of the house, thought to be about 100 years old, with the small efficiency that had been connected later. Working with architect William Sonner, Wheeler used the added space to create a large centrally located kitchen and made structural changes for an improved master bedroom. The second renovation with architect Lee Ledbetter incorporated the

An Eye for Art An Uptown showcase cottage inspiration by Lee Cutrone photographed by Greg Miles

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Bright color and geometric forms in the office; vintage mid-century modern desk doubles as a bookshelf; the stained-glass piece in the window, inherited from Wheeler’s aunt, came from the First Presbyterian Church in Alexandria, La., which Wheeler’s father attended; the layered light fixture previously hung in the front of the house; totem by John Geldersma.


rear two-story townhouse (also added after the original cottage was built) into the floorplan and bumped out the footprint, allowing Wheeler to have a cozy study at the back of the house and an airy second-story master with a master bath and a walk-in closet. “Lee raised the ceiling in the bedroom. It now has a vaulted ceiling that makes it feel like a treehouse,” said Wheeler. Enlarging the house also enabled Wheeler to move art around and give it the importance it deserved without having the house look cluttered. In the formal front of the house, works hang one above the other salon-style. In the more casual living areas, pieces are displayed with a bit more space between them. Throughout the house, furniture from a range of periods, including 19th century, art deco and midcentury modern, complements the selection of art. Unusual lighting makes a bold statement as well. Wheeler even had a metal stair rail inspired by African Kuba cloth custom-made by artist Christian Hootsell for the stairs leading to the master suite. “I go to museums every chance I get,” said Wheeler. “The more you

Left: Contemporary art acquisitions displayed in the dining room have a pop art feel; the dining room table is by Danish designer Poul Kjaerholm, the chairs are antique, the sculpture on the table is by Susan Bowers. Left of window: top painting by Kathleen Ariatti Banton, below is a special commission by Scott Guion featuring some of Wheeler’s favorite New Orleans related things; On right: Pencil by Kyle Bravo, top David Sullivan, center Alan Gerson, bottom Kyle Bravo; the light fixture above the table is a Noguchi. Top, right: Beth Wheeler and her dog Jackson. Bottom, right: Beth Wheeler’s Uptown cottage.

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Top, left: The interior design in Wheeler’s home meets the art head-on with its combination of antique, vintage and contemporary pieces; the large painting over the sofa is by Nicole Charbonnet. Right: top Jeff Rinehart, bottom Brian Guidry, Left: top watercolor by Stephen Hoskins, bottom Charles Hossacher; brass candlestick chandelier, from Uptowner Antiques. Bottom, left: John Robshaw linens dress the bed in the airy master bedroom; the painting above the bed is by Dan Kelly; the airbrush drawing in the corner of the room is by Louisiana artist Brian Guidry. Top, right: Infinito Tiempo by Damian Aquiles.Bottom, right: The minimalist white bath designed by Lee Ledbetter combines penny tiles, subway tiles, marble counters and sleek cabinets.

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Left: African art, one of the first categories of art that Wheeler collected, is displayed in the den; the piece above the mantel by Anita Cook is made of money and maps all folded and built up into a textured canvas with a textile quality; Lee Ledbetter designed the den during the second renovation, which included the office and master suite; Wheeler’s friend, designer Linda Allen, helped with the furnishings and with pulling the décor and art together; the door on the right conceals the TV; metal sculpture by Irish artist James Luke Hayes. Bottom: Architect William Sonner enlarged and redesigned the kitchen; Beth and her mother found the painting while traveling in Provence; the table and chairs are Danish Modern.

learn, the more your eye develops. You start appreciating things that are not necessarily beautiful or conventional. I’m finding how much I love abstraction.” As her understanding of art has grown, so has her awareness of the way one piece relates to another, the way abstractionist paintings were often inspired by African art for example. Fittingly, she displays African sculpture in close proximity to large abstracts in several rooms. Over the years, Wheeler has worked with several interior designers to fine tune the contents of the house. After the first renovation, she worked with Washington, D.C.’s Nestor Santa-Cruz who spent several days shopping local resources with her and helped her with the arrangement of the furnishings. More recently, she worked with her friend, Linda Allen, who helped her find and integrate additional pieces and also place art. “I trusted her eye,” said Wheeler. “She helped me pull it all together.” To date, her collection contains more than 70 pieces, including African art, Angola prisoner art, ceramics, sculpture, photographs and paintings in a variety of media. Sources run the gamut from flea markets, bric-a-brac shops and auctions to traditional galleries, artists’ collectives and artists’ studios. There are works by Nicole Charbonnet, Fritz Bultman, Anita Cooke, Alan Gerson, Beatrice Hill, Dan Tague, Brian Guidry, Skyler Fein, Scott Andresen and others, as well as commissions by Stephen Hoskins, Gina Phillips and Scott Guion. “There is not a single piece that I want to trade out or replace,” said Wheeler, who was on collecting hiatus for a while after the second phase of the renovation but has started to add to her surroundings once again. “I love how they mix and I love living with them.”

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by Jyl Benson photographed by Denny Culbert

Tacos by Juan’s Flying Burrito. From left to right in alternating order are the Mardi Gras Indians tacos (roasted corn, pinto beans, grilled squash, cheese, and spicy slaw on corn tortillas) and Machaca Tacos (brisket with pickled red onion, jalapeùo, and sofrito).

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Non-Traditional

GW Fins 808 Bienville St., 581-3467, gwfins.com

Admit it. When you were a kid headed home from school and you knew it was taco night, there was a bit of extra zippity-dodah in your step. Despite the oft- stale crunchy corn shells that were frequently disappointingly shattered in the bottom of the box (necessitating building a pile as opposed to stuffing a shell), the lackluster seasoning used to enhance ground beef chuck (resulting in orange-hued grease), and the “salsa” that tasted like the inside of a tin can you thrilled to the site of the bright yellow box from Old El Paso. The taco kit and the accompanying garnishes your mother laid out put your childhood self in control. And you loved it. We all did. It was the original dinner kit, predating modern at-home meal assembly incarnations by generations. The Mexican and Central American immigrants who came to our aid in rebuilding our shattered region after the Big Bath in 2005 brought their culinary traditions and, in some cases, their taco trucks with them. In doing so they radically elevated the standards by which we regard tacos, and our demand for the fresh little hand-held meals just seems to grow and grow. Old El Paso simply doesn’t cut it anymore. We have been enlightened. Choosing the New Orleans area tacos that stand out in a field of what must be thousands was a daunting, but delicious, task. In an effort to bring some kind of order to determining which among them reign supreme I broke them down into three categories—Traditional, Non-Traditional, and Vegan/Vegetarian.

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Rumor has it that regular attendees of swank charity events thrill to the site of GW Fins’ miniature Firecracker Tuna Tacos. “I initially came up with this dish for an off-premise event because it was a great representation of GW Fins,” said Executive Chef Michael Nelson, “and didn’t require us to use an oven or stove to prepare it.” This makes sense. The little two-bite morsels are vibrantly colored and lovely to behold; tidy and self contained, cutting down on the incidence of wearing them on one’s gala finery; and packed with intensely flavorful tidbits of raw, sashimi-grade fresh tuna, so you can psych yourself into believing they are guilt free. All of this comes together to allow for the quick consumption of several without a second thought. “It was so popular that we introduced it on the menu as an appetizer,” Nelson said, “and since then, it’s become one of our biggest sellers.” Those of us unaccustomed to attending charitable soirees can fork over $12 for an order of three. GW Fins prints a new menu each day and the little tacos are on it when tuna is fresh, which is, thankfully, often. “I think the dish works really well because there are so many flavors and textures in every bite, blending the richness of the tuna, creaminess of avocado, refreshing pickled ginger, and finally the crunchy wasabi caviar,” Nelson said. “To top it off we use locally made tortillas from Hola Nola and make the taco shells fresh every night. “


GW Fin’s Firecracker Tuna Taco with ginger slaw, avocado aioli, and wasabi infused caviar.

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Traditional

El Pavo Real 4401 S Broad St. (corner of Fountainebleau Dr.) 266-2022, elpavorealnola.com

Chef Lindsay McLellan departed the long-beloved Mid-City Spanish restaurant, Lola’s, in 2016 to open El Pavo Real, a traditional Mexican cafe housed in a former Time Saver convenience store in Broadmoor. Prior to taking up

the top spot in the kitchen at Lola’s, she cooked in Mexican restaurants in New York using recipes passed down through her husband’s Mexican family. El Pavo Real is bright, cheery and family (and wallet) friendly. Black and white checkerboard

floors contrast tables covered in oilcloths of brilliant colors and various patterns. All of the tacos are outstanding - Chicken Tinga, Al Pastor, Pescado Frito— but the Hanger Steak Tacos take the top prize. The toothsome cut


Traditional

he first culinary references to the “taco” appeared in the early 19th century when the word was used to describe a casual, hand-held Mexican food consisting of a corn or wheat tortilla folded or rolled around a filling of meat, seafood, vegetables, and/or cheese. Traditional garnishes include pico de gallo, salsa, minced chilies, sweet onion, tomatoes, lime juice, sliced radishes, avocado, guacamole, cilantro and shredded lettuce.

El Patron Mexican Grill & Cantina 101 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 301-3161 El Patron Mexican Grill & Cantina in Gretna is a bright, festive, place enlivened with Mariachi music, traditional piñatas and hoards of happy Hispanic families who pack the place on weekends. It’s usually a good sign when I am one of the only gringos in such a place. The Baja Shrimp tacos are overflowing with perfectly grilled, plump Gulf shrimp, garnished with shredded cabbage, a bright pico de gallo, a drizzle of chipotle salsa and slices of creamy avocado in a soft, warm white corn tortilla. This will set you back $2.89, unless you show up on a Tuesday—be ready to brave extreme crowds and a parking nightmare— when these gems can be had for $1. Other noteworthy things on the menu include the Chili Rellenos El Poblano and the eye-popping Molcajete Fajitas. Order this and a sizzling Molcajete, the traditional Mexican version of the mortar and pestle fashioned of volcanic rock will arrive draped with chicken, steak, jumbo shrimp, and chorizo sausage, that cook via the heat given off by the vessel, the bowl of which is layered with queso fresco, grilled onions, Monterey Jack cheese, jalapeño chile toreados and salsa verde. An order for one easily serves two. Order one that is supposed to feed three and you can pretty much stuff an entire family to the gills.

El Mesquite Grill 516 Gretna Blvd., Gretna, 367-1022, elmesquitela.com Another sprawling spot in Gretna, El Mesquite Grill is a hodgepodge of different buildings that have been strung together over the years to accommodate demand. The result looks and feels a bit like a frat house. Operated by the Ortiz family, natives of Guanajuato,

of beef is rubbed with smoky ground chipotle, grilled, thinly sliced and served with a bright tomatillo and avocado salsa, a squeeze of lime, chopped cilantro, queso fresco, and a light scatter of minced jalapeño on a soft, warm corn

tortilla. The menu, everything screamingly fresh, includes mole poblano with fresh tortillas, carnitas with beans and red rice, and glorious Gulf shrimp simmered in a sauce of chipotle and coconut milk over cilantro rice with plantains.

El Pavo Real’s chipotle rubbed hanger steak tacos with tomatillo salsa, lime, cilantro, queso fresco, and jalapeño.


Mexico, the kitchen turns out vats of salsa, boiling cauldrons of chilies, and slow roasting meats. The tacos El Pastor are a standout on a menu that is generally good all around. Thick ribbons of tender pulled pork are heaped into soft corn tortillas and topped with grilled onions, pineapple bits, a drizzle of chipotle salsa, minced sweet white onion and cilantro. A platter of three with a side of refried beans will set you back $13.99.

Juan’s Flying Burrito Four locations across New Orleans, juansflyingburrito.com According to Warren Chapoton, founder and president of Juan’s Flying Burrito, the joint first “lit up” on a funky stretch of lower Magazine Street on Feb. 7, 1997, just before Mardi Gras. If the trippy menu and fun-house-meets-punk-music-club environment are any indication, they’ve been lightin’ up ever since. Loosely based on the San Francisco Mission style burrito joints that were hot in the 80’s and early 90’s, Juan’s differentiated itself with Creolelaced, kinda-sorta Tex-Mex-ish food to order and finished a la minute on the grill. A truly wacky New Orleans style Mexican joint with creative interpretations of traditional dishes from both cultures, Juan’s makes the list with the Machaca taco, a new menu addition featuring hunks of slow cooked beef simmered with clove, cinnamon and cumin served on a white corn tortilla with sofrito, lime crèma, and crumbled Cotija cheese. Enjoy three for $8.75.

Adelitas’ Mexican Restaurant 7007 St. Claude Ave. Arabi, 309-9962. We were tooling along on a Saturday afternoon hunting in junk shops on St. Claude Avenue in Old Arabi when hunger struck. Located in a short, tired-looking strip mall, Adelitas’ does not beckon with curb appeal. We were the only people in the place in the middle of the afternoon. Starving, we ordered half of the menu.

The food was worth every moment of that seemingly endless wait. It turns out Lilly Jones, the cook and our waitperson’s cousin, had recently moved to the area from Houston to take over the kitchen from her aunt, who was ailing. Lilly’s refried beans are peerless. The Chili Rellenos are fried with a light, thin batter that crackles to the bite, and the Carne Asada tacos are a revelation, the beef skirt steak grilled with just a faint touch of cinnamon that is really more of a suggestion than an outright flavoring. The meat is thinly sliced, served on a soft, griddled flour tortilla and finished with chopped cilantro and wedges of lime. It needs nothing more. This taco was the best $2 I have ever spent. This is seriously good grub.

Taqueria D.F. Parking lot at Claiborne Ave & Eagle St. Taqueria D.F. (“Districto Federal” a.k.a. Mexico City) is a 10 x 15 trailer with a permanent place in the parking lot of a laundromat (the “kitchen” is powered by a yellow extension cord from said laundromat and a couple of propane tanks). Three ladies bustle feverishly about in the tight space turning out a constant stream of delicious food from tabletop griddles and patrons stand in line, wait to order at the window then sit on the curb or in their cars until their orders come up. Tacos arrive double-wrapped in corn tortillas of an irregular thickness that signals they were crafted by hand, and are simply adorned with sofrito, and lime wedges with small containers of a thin, potent salsa verde on the side. The winner here is the chewy Leguna (beef tongue) taco. The slow cooked meat is incredibly flavorful and as tender as pot roast. The Carne Asada Gorditas are another incredible bet: two warm tortillas sandwich layers of grilled skirt steak, refried beans, lettuce, cheese, and onion. Take one of the tortillas, fill it with goodness and eat. Repeat. Nothing on the menu rings in over $2.

In the 18th century, men toiling in the silver mines of Mexico used “tacos,” small charges they fashioned of gunpowder wrapped in paper, to excavate silver ore from the mines. They tucked the powerful little parcels into pockets carved in the caves’ rock walls then jumped back to avoid the blast.

Traditional

Casa Borrega 1719 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 427-0654, casaborrega.com Located in a beautifully restored Greek Revival mansion in Central City, Casa Borrego is awash in color, music, and art inside, and more of the same with the addition of a beautiful flower garden surrounding the expansive back patio that always feels like a secret. The winner here is the traditional lamb shoulder taco for which the joint takes its name, the Borrego. The succulent meat is seasoned with chili rub before it is slow cooked, chopped, and double-wrapped in a warm griddled corn tortilla. That’s it. No further adornment is needed. Check in for lunch and pay $10 for three.


Casa Borrega’s namesake taco the borrego (lamb shoulder) taco.


non-Traditional

Taceaux Loceaux 304-4714, facebook/taceauxloceaux, twitter.com/TLNola

Belly up to the food truck. Get the optional kimchee on top and the Seoul Man tacos from Taceaux Loceaux land like a bomb on the taste buds. Bulgogi chicken, shredded cabbage, chopped cilantro, ribbons of pickled red onion, and Sriracha aioli, come together on a flour tortilla in an explosion

of sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami. The truck is regularly parked outside of Dos Jeffes Cigar Bar or the Kingpin lounge, both Uptown, but you will need to stalk them on Facebook or Twitter to know just where to find it.


Non-Traditional

his category is anything goes. From Asian inspired (think kimchee slaw and Sriracha sauce) to hogshead cheese and jalapenos, these tacos pack a flavor punch. Grab some napkins and a cold one, and be transported on a tasty adventure.

Juan’s Flying Burrito Four locations throughout New Orleans, juansflyingburrito.com The Taco Hennicano at Juan’s Flying Burrito (which makes both our traditional and non-traditional lists) literally inspired me to write a contemporary New Orleans cookbook (Fun, Funky & Fabulous, Pelican Publishing, 2015). Back in 2013 or so, my then teenage daughter and I wandered into Juan’s Mid City location and these tacos were on offer on the special board: Gulf shrimp and hunks of smoky tasso sautéed and finished with salsa fresca, shredded red and green cabbage, spears of pickled okra, a finishing drizzle of pepper jelly and a scattering of razor -thin slices of green scallions on a warm, griddled flour tortilla. These ridiculously disparate flavors really worked together, the colors made for a visual feast, and the whole thing tugged at something for each of us...jointly we realized this was a riff on the Shrimp Hennican appetizer at Commander’s Palace. Brilliant! Juan’s was, and still is, making luxury dining available to us members of the unwashed masses via a taco. Many of the cooks in the kitchen at Juan’s four restaurants joined the crew after stints on the lines at the city’s luxury eateries and they bring their ideas with them. This is one such example. Its shows up from time to time as a special so you might want to call ahead if you have an envie for it. That’s what I do.

Turkey & the Wolf 739 Jackson Ave, 218-7428, turkeyandthewolf.com The Tacos Inauthenticos at Turkey & the Wolf are exactly what they claim to be. They are also a mess. First daters beware: there is simply no way to tackle this pile of sloppy deliciousness with anything approaching grace or decorum—unless your goal is to let the person opposite you see into your gluttonous soul right from the get go Tuck in for a gooey pile of house-made hog’s headcheese, jalapenos, shredded lettuce, sour cream, Valentina and American cheeses all heaped on a warm corn tortilla. You have to pick it up and eat it like an open- faced sandwich, there’s simply too much piled on to fold in half. Plan to part with $4 for one or $7 for two.

The Rum House 3128 Magazine St. 941-7560, the rumhouse.com

Taceaux Loceaux’s All Hat No Cattle (black bean taco) with avocado fries and a complimentary Tecate (when you spend $11 or more) in the background.

An improbable mash-up of a taco from an improbable mash-up of a restaurant that marries Latin America and the Caribbean cuisines, the Rum House’s Lambsbread taco successfully combines chunks of tender lamb in a tangy red curry on a white corn tortilla dressed with mint yogurt chutney and sliced, caramelized plantains for $5.25. Wash it down with one of the creative, potent rum drinks The Rum House is known for.


Vegan/Vegetarian

lobal Data recently released a study citing that 70 percent of the world’s human population is either reducing meat consumption or leaving meat off the table altogether. This trend is most evident in Millennials and Generation Z, those most likely to consume the greatest number of quick, easy, tasty tacos. Naturally, New Orleans taco purveyors have taken notice and have acted accordingly.

Taceaux Loceaux 304-4714, facebook/taceauxloceaux, twitter.com/TLNola As the founders of Taceaux Loceaux, Alex and Mairbeth del Castillo have been dialed into New Orleanians’ alternative taco cravings since Mardi Gras 2010. Their vegetarian options, which are easily adapted to suit vegan diets, include All Hat, No Cattle with seasoned beans and rice, shredded cabbage, radish, cilantro, crema and salsa picante on a griddled flour tortilla ($5 for two), and Jane Deaux with seasoned braised greens, roasted potatoes, Cotija cheese, crema, salsa picante, cilantro and toasted pepitas on a hot corn tortillas ($6 for 2). Add an order of the Avocado Fries (wedges of perfectly ripe avocado battered in some light, magical tempura-like coating, quickly fried to a greaseless perfection and served with a magic potion/sauce) for $5.

Vegan/Vegetarian

Juan’s Flying Burrito Four locations throughout New Orleans, juansflyingburrito.com Juan’s Mardi Gras Indian tacos combine roasted corn, pinto beans, grilled squash, cheese, and spicy red cabbage slaw on white corn tortillas. $7 for an order of three.

La Castita Taqueria 8400 Oak St., 826-9913, eatlacasita.com La Casita offers a variety of produce-forward margaritas to enjoy while sitting on the deep front porch overlooking the bustle of Oak Street. Refreshing varieties like ginger mint, pineapple cilantro, pomegranate, and jalapeno are sold by the glass or the pitcher. Keep the garden theme going with an order of three Papas Guapas ($8). The unique rolled tacos start with flour tortillas that are stuffed with roasted potatoes then deep fried and topped with avocado salsa, shredded lettuce, fresh pico de gallo; or and order of two Calabacitas ($8) grilled zucchini, yellow squash, radish, cilantro, roasted corn, and arbol in soft flour tortillas.

The Rum House 3128 Magazine St. 941-7560, the rumhouse.com The vegan Curried Tempura Cauliflower tacos at The Rum House combine cauliflower coated and fried in a light, puffy tempura battered, with tamarind sauce, and curried coleslaw.

If an ice cold beer isn’t your thing, wash down your taco with a Jarritos soda, one of the most popular Mexican sodas in flavors such as Lime, Tamarind, Guava, and Jamaican (hisbiscus).

Juan’s Flying Burrito Taco Hennicano featuring the best of Louisiana products: Gulf shrimp, hunks of smoky tasso, spears of pickled okra, and a finishing drizzle of pepper jelly.


myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 5 7


TOP LAWYERS Profiles by sarah ravits Photographed by Craig Mulcahy

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ost people hope not to need them, but when they do, they want the good ones on their side. To help with that we present our annual list of Top Lawyers. The list was prepared by Detroit-based Professional Research Services. PRS provided this explanation of its methodology: The voting was open to all licensed attorneys in New Orleans. They were asked which attorney, other than themselves, they would recommend in the New Orleans area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each specialty are reflected in the following list. As always when making professional services choices, second opinions are encouraged. In the end, you’re the judge.

5 8 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com


Administrative/ Regulatory Law Metairie George A. Mueller III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans John C. Saunders Jr. Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7516 Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0816 New Orleans Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0818 Admiralty & Maritime Law New Orleans Donald R. “Don” Abaunza Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4110 Francis J. Barry Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0642 Richard D. Bertram Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8334 Wilton E. Bland III Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8470 Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250

504-648-8450 Philip S. Brooks Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 Saint Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-585-7648

650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-586-1555

Suite 2550 504-336-2432

New Orleans Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0822

S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4122

Gregory J. McDonald Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 504-322-1375

Delos E. Flint Jr. Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Andre J. Mouledoux Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8480

Bert M. Cass Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0643

Thomas D. Forbes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7041

Kelly T. Scalise Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6110

Richard A. Chopin Chopin Law Firm, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-475-2429

Glenn G. Goodier Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8174

Benjamin O. Schupp McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-0349

Antitrust Law New Orleans Mark R. Beebe Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0436

Robert C. Clotworthy Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8676

Paul D. Hale Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0715

David B. Sharpe Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Craig L. Caesar Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8616

Daniel A. Tadros Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7054

Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8536

Miles C. Thomas Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5222

Raymond T. Waid Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4042

Alexander M. McIntyre Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5215

David L. Carrigee Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900

Stanley J. Cohn Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Katharine R. Colletta Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7708 Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5251 Lawrence R. DeMarcay III Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Michael J. Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Gregory L. Ernst Ernst Law Firm, PLC

Christopher M. Hannan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8612 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8224 R. Keith Jarrett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4133 Charles E. Leche Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0790 Georges M. Legrand Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8490 Walter P. Maestri Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0757 Kevin A. Marks Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave.

Alternate Dispute Resolution Metairie Daniel E. Buras Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

R. Christopher Martin Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7534 Corinne A. Morrison Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7228

David G. Radlauer Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8210 Perry R. Staub Jr. Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8513 Appellate Practice Mandeville Mary S. Johnson Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC

myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 5 9


21357 Marion Ln. Suite 300 985-246-6544 Metairie Daniel E. Buras Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Barry W. Ashe Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0843 Kelly Brechtel Becker Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4067 Bruce C. Dean Bruce C. Dean, L.L.C. 6 Cromwell Pl. 504-202-7272 Jennifer C. Deasy Jennifer C. Deasy, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300 Andy Dupre Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 504-569-0066 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 504-569-0064 Michael R. Fontham Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0810

Catherine Fornias Giarrusso Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9767 Kathryn Gonski Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4029 Douglas L. Grundmeyer Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7028 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4148 Louis C. LaCour Jr. Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0328 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0606 Donald J. Miester Jr. Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8510 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4143 Katie Seegers Roth Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4167 Martin A. Stern Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0289

Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9351

Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5204

William “Blake” Bennett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4113

Brent B. Barriere Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-556-5525

G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7289

Alicia M. Bendana Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Lauren E. Campisi McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2761 Ryan T. Christiansen Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4136 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7212 Leon J. Reymond Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4150 James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9239 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0828 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8298

John W. Waters Jr. Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 504-310-1560

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights/Insolvency and Reorganization Law Covington Rachel Thyre Anderson Attorney at Law 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-377-9271

Banking and Finance Law New Orleans Lee R. Adler

New Orleans Edward Arnold Baker, Donelson, Bearman,

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Christopher T. Caplinger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Robin B. Cheatham Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0411 Jonathan R. DeTrinis DeT Law Firm, LLC 4000 Bienville St. Suite C 504-722-9711 Douglas S. Draper Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3333 John M. Duck Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0226 J. David Forsyth Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1521 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5465 Jan M. Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8645 Philip K. “Kirk” Jones Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC

701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4132 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Omer F. “Rick” Kuebel III Locke Lord, LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2660 504-558-5155 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0819 Fernand L. Laudumiey IV Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7052 Tristan E. Manthey Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3314 Richard W. Martinez Richard W. Martinez APLC 228 St. Charles Ave. Suite 1311 504-525-3343 Carey L. Menasco Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4171 David J. Messina Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7055 Cherie Dessauer Nobles Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3318 William H. Patrick III Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3345 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St.


Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hayer Family & Domestic Litigation Law School: Loyola University of New Orleans, College of Law Hometown: Born in New Orleans, raised in Bourg

Kim Ngan Nguyen Most Difficult Case: International Custody

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hen she was just in fourth grade, Kim Ngan Nguyen found her calling at Career Day during a mock trial. “I came home that day and announced that ‘I’m going to be a lawyer,’” she recalled. Outside family members didn’t approve; they told her “lawyer’s aren’t moral” and “you’re an Asian female — it’s not possible.” Determined to prove a point and show the

world, “I can be and do anything I put my mind to.” After graduating from the University of New Orleans, she went on to attend Loyola University of New Orleans, College of Law, earning her juris doctorate degree in 2003. Now an attorney at Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hayer, Nguyen works primarily in family and domestic litigation, occasionally taking on general litigation cases, as well. As

of press time, she is working on her most challenging case yet: an international child custody dispute that is still ongoing. “I’ve been very blessed to have encountered amazing people in the New Orleans legal community, [who] took me under their wings and continue to provide me with unfettered access to their wisdom and knowledge. She says the challenges involve “the interplay between Louisiana law, federal law and international law.” The case is still pending, but she is optimistic. “Attorneys can make a difference; I can make a difference,” she said. “The law is not all about greed and money — justice is not just a term; justice exists.” She also is proud of overcoming the odds as an Asian American. “For a small town, first-generation minority girl with no connections to anyone or anything in the legal arena, I’ve been blessed to have encountered amazing people in the New Orleans legal community.” myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 6 1


Suite 2775 504-568-1990 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8194 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0827 Bet-the-Company Litigations New Orleans Barry W. Ashe Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0843 Bernard J. Bagert Jr. The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-523-1117 Judy Barrasso Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9720 Edward Hart Bergin Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8222 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4116 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5266 Ewell E. Eagan Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 Saint Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-582-1115 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150

504-593-0814 James R. Swanson Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5267 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9721 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0804 Biotechnology Law New Orleans David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0920 Commercial Litigation Metairie Frank J. DiVittorio Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Jesse P. Lagarde Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 985-269-7220 New Orleans Jack M. Alltmont Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1507 Drew Ballina Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3301 Judy Barrasso Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9720

6 2 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

Edward Hart Bergin Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8222 Sean P. Brady Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 504-569-0078 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4116 Peter J. Butler Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5427 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5266 Thomas J. Cortazzo Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8536 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5249 George Denegre Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4119 S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4122 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 504-569-0064 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis, APLC

701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4148

Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0789

Kent Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5252

Michael E. Botnick Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-679-9814

Martin E. Landrieu Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-569-1832 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0882 Donald J. Miester Jr. Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8510 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0842 Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5440 Kyle Schonekas Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-680-6052 Communications Law New Orleans Lesli D. Harris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0938 Construction Law Mandeville Danny G. Shaw Attorney at Law 3 Sanctuary Blvd. Suite 201 985-789-0701 New Orleans Keith J. Bergeron

Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0605 Jimmy A. Castex Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0607 Adrian A. D’Arcy Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445 Mark W. Frilot Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 985-819-8417 Elizabeth L. Gordon Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4148 Richard E. King Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2435 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0819 Daniel Lund III Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9325 Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2970


Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC Tax Law Tulane University, juris doctor; New York University, master of law (in taxation) Hometown: New Orleans

John A. Rouchell Most Difficult Case: The Vietnamese Misunderstanding

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wenty-five years ago, tax attorney John A. Rouchell encountered his most memorable and toughest case of his career. The IRS had audited a local Vietnamese fisherman, believing that the man was a drug smuggler. The position, Rouchell said, was understandable — the taxpayer had a large number of cash deposits into his checking account. Neither the fisherman nor his wife spoke English; however,

their college-aged daughter was fluent. “A visit to the client’s home showed an extended family living in a modest residence, driving an automobile that looked like it was about to fall apart,” Rouchell said. “Something didn’t make sense.” Rouchell learned that the fisherman was a leader of his clan in South Vietnam, in an area where fishing had been the primary economic

activity. He and his family had escaped as “boat people” leaving Saigon at the time of the fall of the U.S. embassy. He soon earned American citizenship in Michigan before relocating to south Louisiana. As the first member of his clan to obtain a social security number, he opened a bank account and held money for his clan while they awaited their own citizenship status. “As was the custom of South Vietnam, he served as the ‘bank’” Rouchell said, who then requested a conference including the IRS examiner and the chief of the income tax division. “The chief was an African American man 10 to 15 years my senior,” Rouchell recalled. “At the conference, I told the story and then entered into an unrehearsed lecture about unconscious bias in America, when we are unaware of cultural differences.” He ultimately presented around 35 affidavits to the local IRS chief and requested that he “not force my clients to the back of the bus.” One of the most powerful lessons he learned was that combatting the IRS requires four things: favorable facts, demonstrative evidence, a courageous client and a stubborn lawyer. myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 6 3


Mark W. Mercante Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 985-819-8410 H. Minor Pipes III Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9726 Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 Lloyd N. Shields Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445 Kelly E. Theard Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0667 Richard J. Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8266 John W. Waters Jr. Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 504-310-1560 Corporate Governance and Complaints Law New Orleans Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0852 Corporate Law Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Stephen K. Conroy Conroy Law Firm 3838 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 3130 504-830-3450

Jennifer A. Lee Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

New Orleans Ashley L. Belleau Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0845 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7212 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5255 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9324 Edward N. George III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7253 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8308 Abid Hussain Hussain Law LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 888-789-7250 Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0852 William H. Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7037

Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8386 J. Marshall Page III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8248

Billy Gibbens Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-680-6065

Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Samantha P. Griffin Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0808

Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900

Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0811

Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2101

Criminal Defense White Collar Gretna Patrick J. Fanning Attorney at Law 238 Huey P Long Ave. 504-368-7888

Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 Criminal Defense Non White-Collar Covington Stephanie Griffith Beard Stephanie Griffith Beard, Attorney at Law 607 E. Boston St. Suite 207 985-809-1442 Gretna Robert S. Toale The Law Office of Robert S. Toale 505 Weyer St. 504-368-8440 Mandeville Kevin S. Vogeltanz The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, LLC 823 Carroll St. Suite A 985-377-9033 New Orleans Bernard J. Bagert Jr. The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-523-1117 Walter F. Becker Jr.

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Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7046

Metairie Richard T. Simmons Jr. Hailey McNamara Hall Larmann & Papale LLP One Galleria Blvd. Suite 1400 504-836-6516 New Orleans Bernard J. Bagert Jr. The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-523-1117 Walter F. Becker Jr. Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7046 Brian J. Capitelli Capitelli and Wicker Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-582-2425 Ralph Capitelli Capitelli and Wicker Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-582-2425 Edward J. Castaing Jr. Crull, Castaing & Lilly 601 Poydras St. Suite 2323

504-581-7700 Billy Gibbens Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-680-6065 Samantha P. Griffin Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0808 Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8110 Michael W. Magner Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8316 Avery B. Pardee Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8358 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9219 Kyle Schonekas Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-680-6052 Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0811 Sean Toomey Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4118 Ralph S. Whalen Jr. Ralph S. Whalen Jr., Attorney at Law 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-525-1600 Elder Law Metairie Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP


Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, LLC Products liability defense Tulane University School of Law Hometown: Marksville, Louisiana

Celeste Coco-Ewing Most Difficult Case: Big Pharma

C

eleste Coco-Ewing’s career has taken a few twists, bringing her to Washington, D.C’s Capitol Hill after obtaining a law degree from Tulane University. She recalled that after four years on the Beltway, she was ready to return to New Orleans, to “live in a community that I love while maintaining a mostly national practice.”

Her grandfather, Edgar Coco, traveled the state with the late Huey P. Long, playing the harmonica on political stops, and he later ran on Earl Long’s ticket. So an interest in politics and policy — particularly in how decisions are made for the benefit of a broader community — is in her blood. At her firm, she primarily focuses

on complex litigation, with an emphasis on product liability and toxic tort cases. As an attorney, she has defended large manufacturers in multiweek trials in state and federal courts. Her clients come from a variety of industries, including medical device, pharmaceuticals, industrials, manufacturing, oil and gas, insurance and more. The biggest challenges for her, she said, are the issues stemming from pharmaceutical and medical device litigation. It requires extra research, as part of the defense “involves learning the science” behind these medications and contraptions. And as a perfectionist, an important life lesson came early in her career. “I had to put aside perfectionism and self-doubt,” she recalled. “I repeat this by saying, ‘Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.’”

myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 6 5


1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1519 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law Metairie Barry W. Sartin Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4156 Matthew D. Simone Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4191 Randall A. Smith Smith & Fawer, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3702 504-525-2205 John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4160 Employee Benefits Law New Orleans Jane E. Armstrong

Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9244 Timothy P. Brechtel Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8236 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7271 Susan K. Chambers Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8394 Lindsey H. Chopin Proskauer Rose, LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-310-2018 Katherine Conklin McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2876 Sandra Mills Feingerts Fisher & Phillips LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 504-529-3836 Charles F. Seemann III Jackson Lewis P.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 504-208-5843 Howard Shapiro Proskauer Rose, LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-310-4085 G. Phillip Shuler III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7011 Randye C. Snyder Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4033 Michael S. Williams Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-581-7979 Energy Law Kenner

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Lisa Africk Crescent Drilling & Production, Inc. 2400 Veterans Blvd. Suite 110 504-467-5100 New Orleans Kelly Brechtel Becker Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4067 Miles P. Clements Frilot LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3700 504-599-8004 Katharine R. Colletta Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7708 Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0831 Ewell E. Eagan Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 Saint Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-582-1115 Joelle Flannigan Evans Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 504-680-6053 Aimee W. Hebert Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St. Suite 1812 504-522-1812 Harry R. Holladay Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7518 Jonathan A. Hunter Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8279 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8224

R. Keith Jarrett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4133 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4135 Charles D. Marshall Jr. Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000 Marjorie A. McKeithen Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8420 Mark L. McNamara Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4166 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4052 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4143 Edward B. Poitevent II Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0889 Carl D. Rosenblum Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8296 Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0816 Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0818 Environmental Law New Orleans Louis E. Buatt

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4082 Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0858 Greg L. Johnson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4115 David N. Luder Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9798 Elizabeth Haecker Ryan Coats Rose A Professional Corporation 365 Canal St. Suite 800 504-299-3085 Stephen P. Schott Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Stephen W. Wiegand Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4192 Equipment Finance Law New Orleans Edward Arnold Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5204 James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9239 Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3810 Family Law Covington Peggy Vallejo Vallejo & Karr Law Firm


428 W. 21st Ave. 985-892-6855 Gretna Sarah Pfeiffer Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer 920 5th St. 504-366-4025 Metairie Meghan E. Ruckman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Suzanne Ecuyer Bayle Morris, Lee & Bayle, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1420 504-524-3781

Meneray Family Law, L.L.C. 710 Carondelet St. 504-581-4334 Edith H. Morris Morris, Lee & Bayle, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1420 504-524-3781 Kim Ngan Nguyen Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Jon G. Bethune The Law Offices of Jon G. Bethune, L.L.C. 4701 Tchoupitoulas St. 504-218-8570

Lacy M. Smith The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith, LLC 1820 St. Charles Ave. Suite 203 504-249-8242

Shawn M. BridgewaterNormand Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7281

Brooke C. Tigchelaar Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0862

Jennifer J. Greene Scott, Vicknair, Hair and Checki, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1100 504-684-5200

Marc D. Winsberg Winsberg and Arnold, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2050 504-229-4949

Jeffrey M. Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Mitchell J. Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Steven Lane Herman Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 Robert C. Lowe Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Elizabeth S. Meneray

Barbara J. Ziv Barbara J. Ziv, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 4100 504-525-4361 First Amendment Law New Orleans Scott L. Sternberg Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 643 Magazine St. Suite 402 504-324-1887 Gaming Law New Orleans Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5464 William “Blake” Bennett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4113

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504-593-0803 J. Kelly Duncan Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8218 Abigayle C. Farris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0948 Deborah Duplechin Harkins Roedel Parsons Koch Blache Balhoff & McCollister 1515 Poydras St. Suite 2330 504-566-1801 Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0915 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0842 Brian D. Wallace Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9204 General Service Law Metairie Anya Jones Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Government Relations Practice New Orleans Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5201 E Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0420 Bryant S. York Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150

Health Care Law Metairie Sarah J.L. Christakis Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Adrienne L. Ellis Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4141 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Anthony M. DiLeo Anthony M DiLeo, APC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2350 504-274-0087 Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5201 Monica A. Frois Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8615 Joseph J. Lowenthal Jr. Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8240 Margaret M. Silverstein Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5226 Jack M. Stolier Sullivan Stolier Schulze and Grubb, LLC

909 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-561-1044 Danielle Trostorff Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5224 Immigration Law New Orleans Malvern Burnett Law Offices of Malvern C. Burnett, APLC 1523 Polymnia St. 504-586-1922 Brandon Davis Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9312 Kathleen Gasparian Gasparian Spivey Immigration 829 Baronne St. 504-262-9878 James Gonczi Ricci Partners, LLC 101 W. Robert E. Lee Blvd. Suite 400 504-304-7115 Insurance Law New Orleans Drew Ballina Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3301 Judy Barrasso Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9720 Thomas J. Cortazzo Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Insurance Law Metairie Zachary Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Mary L. Dumestre


myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 6 9


Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0856 Céleste D. Elliott Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Leah Nunn Engelhardt Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7081 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 504-569-0062 Joseph P. Guichet Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7263 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3340 Edward F. LeBreton III Fowler Rodriguez 400 Poydras St. 30th Floor 504-595-5142 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0814 Gregory J. McDonald Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 504-322-1375 H. Minor Pipes III Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9726

Seth A. Schmeeckle Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Jay Russell Sever Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9271 Robert I. Siegel Gieger, Laborde & Laperouse, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 4800 504-654-1307 William D. Treeby Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0807 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9721 John W. Waters Jr. Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 504-310-1560 Kristopher T. Wilson Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Matthew A. Woolf Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5262 Intellectual Property Law Metairie Taylor Montgomery Norton Norton IP Law Firm 345 Metairie Rd. 504-858-0198 New Orleans Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0822 Susan J. Burkenstock

7 0 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4400 504-529-3600 Lesli D. Harris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0938 David L. Patrón Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9295 Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9254 Michael Q. Walshe Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0881

New Orleans M. Nan Alessandra Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9297

Thomas P. Hubert Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8384

Stephen P. Beiser McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2756

Rachael Jeanfreau Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5467

Magdalen Blessey Bickford McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2726

Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0915

Kim M. Boyle Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-679-5790

Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5222

Andrew P. Burnside Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3500 504-648-2609

Leslie A. Lanusse Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0298

H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7271

Sidney F. Lewis V Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8352

Peter G. Strasser Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7231

Laura L. Catlett Attorney at Law 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-521-7958

Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7007

International Trade and Finance New Orleans William H. Hines Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8272

Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-569-1862

Eve B. Masinter Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5468

Labor and Employment Law Mandeville Kevin S. Vogeltanz The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, LLC 823 Carroll St. Suite A 985-377-9033

Susan Fahey Desmond Jackson Lewis P.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 504-208-1755

International Arbitration New Orleans Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2101

Metairie George B. Recile Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Brooke Duncan III Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0220 Steven F. Griffith Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5225

Thomas J. “Tommy” McGoey II Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6101 Ellis B. Murov Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0655 Sarah Voorhies Myers Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7009 E. Fredrick Preis Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson,


L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5470 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0911 Land Use and Zoning Law Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans James T. Dunne Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC

909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0824 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0835 Legal Malpractice Law New Orleans James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4116 Gus A. Fritchie III Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2106 Melissa M. Lessell Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0689 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St.

909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0898

504-593-0602 Lisa A. Montgomery The Montgomery Law Firm 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-267-9401 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0842 Thomas P. Owen Jr. Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7226 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580

William E. Wright Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0623 Mass Tort Litigation/ Class Actions Metairie Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Lauren R. Bridges Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4096 Abigayle C. Farris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0948

New Orleans Charles H. Abbott Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4350 504-565-7555

Jennifer J. Greene Scott, Vicknair, Hair and Checki, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1100 504-684-5200

Dawn M. Barrios Barrios, Kingsdorf & Casteix, L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3650 504-524-3300

James C Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0817

Carmelite M. Bertaut Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC

Russ Herman Herman Herman & Katz, L.L.C.

myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 7 1


820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892

4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272

Stephen Herman Herman Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892

Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4141

Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3340 Craig Isenberg Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9753 Gerald E. Meunier Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5440 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9733 Charles B. Wilmore Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6113 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0911 Medical Malpractice Law Metairie Rebecca J. Beck Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Louis A. DiRosa Jr. The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC

Jeffrey A. Mitchell The Cochran Firm 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 1500 504-309-5000 New Orleans Michael R. Allweiss Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 C. Wm. Bradley Jr. Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6302 Tracey Rannals Bryan Rannals Law Firm 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-500-0517 Richard S. Crisler Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6308 Robert J. David Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Michael J. Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Monica A. Frois Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8615 James Klick Herman Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892

7 2 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

Lawrence S. Kullman Lewis, Kullman, Sterbcow & Abramson LLC 2615 Pan American Life Center 601 Poydras St. 504-588-1500 Michael C. Luquet Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5441 Peter E. Sperling Frilot LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3700 504-599-8015 Mergers and Acquisitions Law Metairie Ryan P. Monsour Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0845 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5255 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9324 Edward N. George III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7253 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8308 Leon J. Reymond Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4150 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther

Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law New Orleans J. Dalton Courson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0812 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0819 Richard W. Martinez Richard W. Martinez APLC 228 St. Charles Ave. Suite 1311 504-525-3343 Municipal Law New Orleans Terry Q. Alarcon Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7026 Mark E. Hanna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-595-3000 Natural Resources Law New Orleans Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0858 John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0855 Charles D. Marshall Jr. Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000

John Y. Pearce Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-585-7674 Non-Profit/Charities Law New Orleans Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0975 Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7007 Oil and Gas Law New Orleans Scott R. Bickford Martzell, Bickford & Centola 338 Lafayette St. 877-717-4551 John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0855 C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 Saint Charles Ave. 40th Floor 504-569-1858 Colleen C. Jarrott Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8664 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4135 Justin P. Lemaire Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0942 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4052


Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4143 Edward B. Poitevent II Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0889 Adam Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5210 On air Media Legal Analyst New Orleans Dane S. Ciolino Loyola University College of Law 526 Pine St. 504-975-3263 Personal Injury Litigation Covington Peggy Vallejo Vallejo & Karr Law Firm 428 W. 21st Ave.

985-892-6855 Kenner Stephen R. Rue Stephen Rue & Associates 3309 Williams Blvd. 504-517-8395 Metairie Tommy J. Badeaux The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC 4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272 Scott W. McQuaig McQuaig & Stelly 100 Lilac St. 504-836-5070 James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Morris Bart III Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 800-205-7284

John Jerry Glas Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0627 Brian Katz Herman Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 Terry Loup Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-525-8000 Vincent P. Scallan Vincent P. Scallan Law, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1825 504-272-0444 David E. Walle Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 504-322-1375 Product Liability Litigation New Orleans

Carmelite M. Bertaut Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0898

504-322-1375

Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9762 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2203

Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2163 Kim E. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2108 David W. O’Quinn Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2111

James C Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0817

John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7241

Gregory J. McDonald Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22

Peter J. Rotolo III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7022

myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 7 3


Richard E. Sarver Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9733 Mark C. Surprenant Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0213 John W. Waters Jr. Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 504-310-1560 Railroad Law Mandeville Benjamin B. Saunders Davis, Saunders, Miller & Oden, PLC 400 Mariners Plaza Dr. Suite 401 985-612-3070 New Orleans Alissa J. Allison Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5233 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2203 Loretta O. Hoskins Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7264 William Howard III Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5275 C. Perrin Rome III Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2017 504-521-7946

Metairie Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 George A. Mueller III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Elsbet C. Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 985-269-7220 New Orleans Marguerite L. “Peggy” Adams Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4142 R. Keith Colvin Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8524 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7212 James T. Dunne Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0824 Paul C. Kitziger Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4126 Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7059

Jon F. Leyens Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8628

Real Estate Law

Richard B. Montgomery III

7 4 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0663

701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6106

Marie A. Moore Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2108

George C. Freeman III Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9732

James R. Morton Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8507 Randy Opotowsky Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3201 504-582-1199 Michael S. Ricci Ricci Partners, LLC 101 W. Robert E. Lee Blvd. Suite 400 504-304-7115 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0835 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3201 504-582-1199 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0828 Peter S. Title Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1542 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 Sterling Scott Willis Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5264 Securities Regulation New Orleans John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis, APLC

Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9324 Stephen H. Kupperman Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. 24th Floor 504-589-9728 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0882 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8386 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7226 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2101 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0827 Securities/Capital Markets Law New Orleans John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4177 Noah Kressler Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600

504-566-5207 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0882 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7226 James R. Swanson Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5267 Jessica M. Vasquez Vasquez Law 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-571-9582 Tax Law Metairie David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0809 Jesse R. Adams III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8364 A. Albert Ajubita Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300 Robert S. “Bob” Angelico Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4112 William M. Backstrom Jr. Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8228 Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward, LLP


909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000 John W. Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0832 Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0247 James C. “Jim” Exnicios Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4034 Edward N. George III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7253 Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4156 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0838 Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8206 Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Leon H. Rittenberg III Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Mark S. Stein Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 701 Poydras St.

Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Daniel J. Walter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0826 Christian N. Weiler Weiler & Rees, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1250 504-524-2944 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Transportation Law New Orleans Kaye N. Courington Courington, Kiefer & Sommers, L.L.C. 616 Girod St. 504-524-5510 Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5251 Gerard J. Dragna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-595-3000

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8487 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7059 Olivia Yen Truong Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2495 Quentin F. Urquhart Jr. Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2107 Trusts and Estates Metairie Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Suite 3150 504-593-0845

701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0247

Mandy Mendoza Gagliardi Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7018

Miriam Wogan Henry Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8436

William H. Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7037

Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0975 Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900 Stacey LaGraize Meyaski Wallace Meyaski, LLC 5190 Canal Blvd. Suite 102 504-644-2058 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1519 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0838

New Orleans Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0809

Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. 36th Floor 504-569-2900

Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7263

Marguerite L. “Peggy” Adams Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4142

Eric M. Schorr Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1540

Kenneth Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5258

Ashley L. Belleau Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Andre J. Mouledoux Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8480

David F. Edwards Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 5100 504-582-8184

Venture Capital Law Metairie P. J. Stakelum III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Delos E. Flint Jr. Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

C. Michael Parks

Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese, LLP

Leon J. “Trey” Reymond III Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4028 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 Workers Compensation Law Covington Stephanie Griffith Beard Stephanie Griffith Beard, Attorney at Law 607 E. Boston St. Suite 207 985-809-1442 Metairie Meghan E. Ruckman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8450 Kevin A. Marks Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2432

New Orleans Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 7 5


PROMOTIONAL

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K

nowing who to call when a legal issue arises isn’t easy for everyone. While personal injury attorneys may enjoy daytime TV fame, other attorneys work under the radar and out of the spotlight. You don’t see as many billboards or television commercials for attorneys in construction law, healthcare law, or white collar criminal defense. So if you’re looking to defend your business decision or seek reparations for someone else’s bad decision, it might require a little research to find the right representation for your case. Fortunately, New Orleans is home to some of the best and brightest, some of the biggest, and some of the more boutique firms that all offer their own approach to solving a legal dilemma. Whether you’re facing a legal battle or just need eyes on a contract, attention to detail and personal service will be high priority. Find out more about what New Orleans offers with news from the following local firms and attorneys. Established in 1928, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP (BSW) is one of the oldest law firms in the state of Louisiana. The firm takes great pride in its long history of client service. With more than 70 attorneys, the firm is among the largest firms in the state and one of the larger law firms in the South. BSW’s clients range from individuals and start-up companies, to Fortune 500 corporations, governmental entities, and not-for-profit institutions. Since the firm was established, two standards have remained constant: to strive for legal excellence and to be involved in local communities. Members of the firm have served as presidents, directors, and officers of community and business organizations. BSW’s primary focus is growing and protecting each client’s business. Whether it is in litigation, negotiating contracts, advising on management restructures, or assisting in the purchase or sale of a business, BSW attorneys possess the skill set to help their clients achieve their goals. For more information, visit bswllp.com. Jones Walker LLP is among the 120 largest law firms in the United States serving local, regional, national, and international business interests with offices in Alabama, Arizona, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New York, and Texas. The firm is committed to providing a comprehensive range of legal services to major multinational, public and private corporations, Fortune® 500 companies, money center banks, worldwide insurers, and emerging companies doing business in the United States and abroad. Clients have recognized the firm for consistent excellence in areas such as client focus, anticipating client’s needs, and understanding the client’s business. Jones Walker has been named to the 2018 Client Service A-Team by The BTI Consulting Group, which conducts hundreds of in-house counsel interviews to identify law firms providing top client service. For more information, visit JonesWalker.com. Since 1989, Chehardy Sherman Williams has served individuals and businesses in Greater New Orleans with integrity, professionalism, and experience. The firm’s attorneys understand the importance of attention to detail and provide candid and thoughtful consultation in a variety of practice areas, ranging from Business & Corporate Law to Healthcare Law, Personal Injury to Estate Planning, and all types of Litigation. Chehardy Sherman Williams attorneys are also dedicated to their community, and many of them serve with philanthropic and civic organizations, educational institutions and as leaders of various councils. Chehardy Sherman Williams Law Firm strongly believes in this community and chooses to give back by going beyond providing legal representation for local businesses and individuals; the firm prides itself on being leaders in the courtroom, the boardroom, and all places in between. For more information on Chehardy Sherman Williams’ practice areas, attorneys, and legal approach, visit Chehardy.com or call 504-833-5600. 7 6 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP is a national law firm with offices in New Orleans, Houston, Jackson, Detroit, and New Jersey. Led by well-respected and experienced litigators Tim Gray and Charles Abbott, the New Orleans office represents a number of corporate clients, including several Fortune 500 companies, in litigation in Louisiana and throughout the country. Since its inception over 30 years ago, Forman Watkins has always embraced non-traditional approaches to clients’ problems. The firm accomplishes this by truly learning its client’s businesses and committing to a true partnership with them. When favorable early case resolution is not an option, Forman Watkins’ attorneys are trial ready. The firm has tried cases from the North to the South and coast to coast with a winning rate of over 83 percent. Most recently, in April 2018, Tim Gray obtained a complete defense verdict in a jury trial in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For more information, visit FormanWatkins.com. For nearly a century, Deutsch Kerrigan LLP has provided high quality, effective legal services that exceed client expectations. From its offices in New Orleans, LA, and Gulfport, MS, Deutsch Kerrigan represents local, national, and international businesses ranging in size from Fortune 500 companies to small, emerging businesses, organizations and individuals. Practicing in the areas of Civil Litigation, Commercial Litigation, Commercial Transactions, Construction Law, Labor & Employment Law, Marine & Energy Law, Professional Liability Law, and Toxic Tort & Environmental Law, the firm is equipped with up-to-date technologies and information that enable its team to inform clients of the latest legal news and emerging industry trends. As effective problem solvers, Deutsch Kerrigan’s 70+ legal counselors and trial attorneys view each client’s legal issue as their own, taking on a true partnership and working closely with the client or outside counsel to identify and achieve the best solution. Using a sensible approach to litigation, the firm helps clients resolve disputes by balancing desired business outcomes with what is smart economically. For more information, visit DeutschKerrigan.com. The firm of Melchiode Marks King LLC (MMK) may only be in its fourth year of existence, but its attorneys have practiced together for decades, and recent accolades are a testament to both their talents and the breadth of services they provide to clients. This year, four MMK attorneys were recognized as New Orleans Magazine’s Top Lawyers: Jerry Melchiode (Construction Law), Kevin Marks (Admiralty & Maritime Law and Workers Compensation), Rich King (Construction Law) and Olivia Truong (Transportation Law). While awards are gratifying, the best endorsement is the loyalty of MMK’s clients who have enthusiastically supported the firm. It is this trust and commitment that inspires MMK to achieve successful outcomes while controlling costs. Through increased efficiency and advances in technology, MMK delivers big firm capabilities with small firm efficiency, agility, and attentiveness. MMK’s attorneys’ practice areas include, among others, maritime, construction, insurance, environmental, employer’s liability, professional liability, and transportation. For more information, visit MMKfirm.com. Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. is a nationally recognized litigation firm known for trying high-stakes, complex, and challenging cases throughout the country. The firm has served as lead trial counsel in national multidistrict products liability cases and has handled mass actions for corporations and insurers hit with thousands of claims after chemical releases and natural disasters. The firm’s lawyers have tried dozens of cases nationwide for financial services companies after downturns in the bond and equity markets sparked a multitude of lawsuits. And this represents only a small part of what the firm does. Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver is, first and foremost, a firm of trial lawyers. The proof is in its track record of success. Benchmark Litigation has recognized this record by naming the firm the Louisiana Litigation Firm of the Year for five of the past six years. For more information, visit BarrassoUsdin.com.


PROMOTIONAL Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP, was formed in 1987 by attorneys who had previously worked at two of the largest law firms in the city of New Orleans. They brought with them the practices and high standards of the larger law firms and integrated that with a small-firm atmosphere, making them one of the most select boutique law firms in the city. The firm’s practice areas are diverse and include family law, tax and estate planning, insurance defense, employment law, civil rights litigation, workers’ compensation, and commercial litigation. The firm is AV Pre-eminent rated by Martindale Hubbell, and many of its attorneys have been recognized as Top Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and Best Lawyers in America among other various honors. The firm is dedicated to personal service and to meeting its clients’ needs as expediently and as inexpensively as possible. To find out more or schedule a consultation, call the firm at 504-581-2450 or visit LoweStein.com. Taggart Morton is a New Orleans-based law firm that provides a complete array of legal services to individuals and the business community. Traditionally, the firm’s primary practice involved representing companies engaged in regulated industries (including the healthcare, public utilities, insurance, transportation, media, communications, and technology fields). Taggart Morton’s attorneys now represent clients in business transactions, commercial litigation, and appellate practice, and even handle referred commercial cases and appeals from other firms. Taggart Morton’s attorneys are skilled in such specialized areas as business disputes, healthcare, insurance regulatory services, bankruptcy, employment, ERISA, antitrust and trade regulation, intellectual property, media/technology, workers’ compensation, real estate, and managed care law. Taggart Morton is small enough to provide a high level of personal attention to each of its clients, yet large enough to address almost any legal need its clients may have. The firm is also active in the community, and takes great pride in Barry H. Grodsky, who was recently installed as

the 78th President of the Louisiana State Bar Association. For more information, visit TaggartMortonLaw.com. In 1980, Morris Bart ran a simple ad on television.  Since that time, his advertising and his law firm have grown to the extent where he has become a household name throughout Louisiana. However, Morris Bart, LLC is much more than just a name. For over 35 years, Morris Bart and his team of over one hundred attorneys fight hard to get the injured the compensation they deserve. With offices statewide and throughout Mississippi and Alabama, Morris Bart, LLC is proud to be the largest personal injury firm in Louisiana and one of the largest in the United States.   If you or someone you know has been injured, call 855-GET-BART or go to MorrisBart.com for 24-hour access. You know what to do: “One Call, That’s All!” The shifts in family dynamics that accompany divorce can be difficult and sometimes painful for the parties involved. To avoid the common problems largely responsible for the fear and suffering related to divorce, individuals going through the process need to understand the system and know what to expect. Counsel from an experienced family law attorney can be invaluable when making tough decisions and planning for the future. With more than 40 years of experience in domestic relations, Barbara J. Ziv, LLC is a small firm committed to helping people seeking advice about divorce and family law matters, including child custody, child and spousal support, and property divisions. During your initial consultation, Barbara J. Ziv and Esther L. Greenbaum will explain what they need to know about you, why they need to know it, and what you should expect from both the process and your attorney. Their clients can expect competence in family law and matters related to it, clear-cut billing, and trouble-free accessibility. For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit NewOrleansDivorces.com or call 504-525-4361.

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PROMOTIONAL

The Law Office of Jon G. Bethune, LLC is a Family Law, Personal Injury, and Civil Litigation law practice in New Orleans, Louisiana. An award-winning attorney, Jon Bethune offers years of experience and a meticulous, steadfast style of litigation. Jon Bethune is well versed in issues related to divorce, custody, child support, and interim and final spousal support. His personal injury cases involve truck, auto, slip-and-fall accidents, and other premises liability matters. Bethune believes that your personal injury or family law attorney in New Orleans should be the same one you hire. You should actually see and receive the help and guidance you need directly. “Professional accolades and personal attention are not mutually exclusive when it comes to receiving legal help. We believe that no client should have to choose between the two,” says Bethune, who sees all clients personally. For more information, visit Bethune-Law.com, call 504-218-8570, or e-mail jbethune@bethune-law.com. Although ours is a government of “laws, and not men,” it is men and women—judges, jurors, and regulators—who we entrust to reach fair decisions. The Bagert Law Firm has earned the credibility of such key decision-makers by blending years of excellence in the practice of law with participation at the very heart of the process by which laws and regulations are enacted and repealed. The Firm congratulates Ben Bagert who, over the years, has been voted by his peers as a New Orleans Magazine Top Lawyer in such varied fields as Commercial Litigation, White Collar Criminal Defense, Administrative and Regulatory Law, Trust and Estates, Insurance Law, and Real Estate Law. Bagert’s peers also awarded him the title of “Bet the Company Litigator.”

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The Bagert Law Firm takes pride in its ability to connect with clients and to understand their objectives. Every client’s case is treated as a “big case” whether the client is a large corporation or a person of modest means. For more information visit BagertLaw.com or call 504-532-1117. Voted “Best Lawyer” in The Gambit Weekly Best of New Orleans poll and voted a “Top Lawyer” in New Orleans Magazine, Stephen Rue has a reputation for working tirelessly on behalf of his clients. At Stephen Rue & Associates, Stephen and his team of highly rated and experienced attorneys focus on matters of personal injury, family law, and criminal defense. Named a Super Lawyer for 2019, 2018, and 2017, Stephen Rue has also received a “Superb” 10.0 AVVO attorney rating in addition to receiving the AVVO Client Satisfaction Award. The practice has received numerous five-star Google and Yelp reviews, and Stephen is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum. Stephen is focused on delivering results for his clients while also prioritizing education for the next generation of exceptional attorneys as a law school lecturer and continuing legal education lecturer. The author of numerous bestselling Louisiana law books, Stephen is widely respected and sought for his legal expertise and prowess. To schedule a consultation, call 504-529-5000 or visit StephenRue.com. The firm offers five convenient locations across the metro area. •


myneworleans.com NOVEMBER 2018 7 9


The Menu TABLE TALK . RESTAURANT INSIDER . FOOD . LAST CALL . DINING LISTINGS

jeffery johnston photo

Pan Seared Salmon at la thai


table talk

meet the chef

Nit Noi menu: Som Tam, Laap Gai, Thai BBQ Shrimp, Nua Dad Diew

La Thai’s Style Asian with a Touch of Local

Diana Chauvin Galle grew up in the restaurant business. “I was a restaurant baby – as soon as I could pick up a spoon they put me to work,” she says. “My family owned Mai Tai which was the first authentic Thai restaurant in the city.” Growing up she mostly worked in frontof-house capacities as her family owned a series of restaurants including Bangkok Cuisine and another La Thai on Metairie Road. But after some years spent in Los Angeles taking in the restaurant scene and working there she returned home inspired to tackle the expanded roles of being both an owner and a chef. “When I came back I opened Sweet Ginger with my mom and immersed myself in cooking. I wanted to learn everything. Later on in 2008 we opened this La Thai on Prytania.” Eleven years later her restaurant still going strong.

by Jay Forman

The sharp anise-like notes of basil and the

aromatic hook of cilantro. A squeeze of lime and the umami of Golden Mountain sauce, a uniquely Thai variant of soy. Add the firepower of raw chilis and the crunch of peanuts and you 8 2 november 2018 myneworleans.com

have a tool kit for building some serious flavor combinations. Now to this potent mix toss in the bounty of Louisiana seafood and some Cajun riffs on the same and you can begin to put together a menu like the one you’ll find jeffery johnston photo


at La Thai. and curry dishes. The expected This Prytania Street stalwart Phat Thai is there, with its effortlessly melds Thai cuisine crushed peanuts and sweetly sour with a smattering of Cajun influ- punch of tamarind. The Drunken ence, serving it up in a sleekly Noodles are also a popular choice. contemporary dining room that Dishes that bring in more of the is equal part bar and lounge with aforementioned Cajun influence event space to boot. Executive include the Pecan-Crusted Gulf Chef Diana Chauvin Gallé owns Fish, served over a bed of wilted the restaurant along with her spinach and brown rice with a husband Jay Gallé. Diana’s family garlic-butter sauce punched up has a long history in the restaurant with lemon and basil. “Butter is business here in New Orleans, not a part of Thai cuisine,” Gallé having owned a string of Thai said, “but we use it here.” restaurants dating back to the La Thai has carved out a niche 1970s. “My father as a local neighborhood spot is Cajun French and helps to round out a and my mother La Thai, 4938 remarkably broad array is Thai,” she said. Prytania St., Uptown; of restaurants within this “So we’ve got two 899-8886; L Th & Fri, D short strip of Uptown real Tues.-Sun. Closed Mon. estate. On weekend nights very different LaThaiUptown.com cultural backthe bar gets lively, whereas grounds but also some comple- during the day regulars pop in mentary aspects when it comes for the array of lunch specials. to spices and cuisine.” Going forward Gallé is toying Thai aficionados or those in with the idea of expanding the search of authenticity are best Nit Noi menu. “That menu really directed to her Nit Noi menu, inspires me,” she said, “and I’ve a collection of sharable plates got some fun things coming onto featuring Northern Thai and it in the future.” Laotian influences. “In Thailand the northern part is more of a country style of cooking. It is pastes, dips, sticky rice – lots of finger foods where you use your hands,” Chauvin says. Every dish is worth exploring, but standouts include the eminently snackable Nua Dad Diew, strips of beef jerky you dip into a fiery roasted chili sauce alongside a bowl of sticky rice. The Laap Gai is a cold chopped chicken salad punctuated with lime, chili, mint and cilantro that you wrap into packets with crisp lettuce leaves. The Thai BBQ Shrimp is served over a remarkable red curry sauce, whose heat West Bank Thai Banana Blossom has long been is mellowed with lemongrass and a local Thai favorite, and the kaffir lime. The accompanying roti restaurant expanded into a larger bread is a perfect foil for sopping space earlier this year in Old up the leftovers. And the hottest Gretna. While the cuisine is dish was the arguably the most predominately Thai, Banana innocuous – the Som Tam, a chilled Blossom rolls other influences into shredded papaya salad. The main menu, grounded in its menu. Recommended dishes the cuisine of central Thailand, include another take on BBQ offers an array of specials, noodles Shrimp and Spicy Beef Salad.

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restaurant insider

News From the Kitchen Picnic Provisions & Whiskey, Copper Vine, Poydras and Peters by Robert Peyton

Fried Chicken Steamed Bun: Asian Slaw, Cilantro-Yuzu Aioli, Vegetable Chips

Picnic Provisions & Whiskey

Copper Vine

Poydras and Peters

Picnic Provisions & Whiskey opened recently in the space previously occupied by Noodle & Pie. It’s a joint effort from chef Tory McPhail and Ti Martin of Commander’s Palace and Darryl Reginelli, one of whose eponymous pizza restaurants is across Magazine street. As befits the name most of the food is of the “comfort” variety – think crab boil fried chicken, “tumbled” pimento cheese and jumbo lump crab roll – and there is an emphasis on take-out orders. Picnic Provisions & Whiskey; 741 State St., 266-2810; daily from 11 to 11; NolaPicnic.com.

Copper Vine, a new wine bar, has opened in the spot many locals remember as Maylie’s. There are 30 wines on tap and a fairly extensive menu of upscale “gastropub” fare, including duck fat fries, fig and goat cheese flatbread and pork belly with braised collard greens, cornbread pudding and a mushroom demiglace. Copper Vine; 1001 Poydras St.; 208-9535; Monday – Thursday 3 to 11, Friday until midnight, Saturday 10:30 a.m. until midnight, Sunday 10:30 a.m. until 11 p.m.; CopperVineWine.com

Poydras and Peters has taken over for Café Adelaide in the downtown Loews Hotel. Chef Thomas Hines, a New Orleans native, heads the kitchen. His menu is grounded in the American south, with influences from Vietnam and Mexico here and there. Poydras and Peters; 300 Poydras St.; 595-3305; Monday – Thursday from 6:30 a.m. to 9:00; until 10 on Friday and Saturday, and for brunch on Saturday and Sunday from 10:00 to 1:30.

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jeffery johnston photo


food

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styled by photographed by eugenia uhl


Thanksgiving Ambrosia

RECIPEs AMBROSIA

4 cups Louisiana satsuma segments, about 6 satsumas

And Black Friday turkey salad

1 cup pecans, chopped

by Dale Curry

1 20-ounce can pineapple chunks, drained, or 2 cups fresh, cut into chunks 1 ½ cups flaked coconut, fresh or packaged

Growing up in Memphis, I always feasted on

ambrosia at holiday time. The day before Thanksgiving or Christmas, my mother would crack fresh coconuts with a hammer out on the driveway and peel and chop the oranges. It took hours of shredding and mixing, but eventually the vintage blue crock bowl was filled to capacity and placed in the fridge overnight. Later, during my first newspaper job in Jackson, Tennessee, I worked across the hall from the brotherin-law of Al Gore, Sr. He and his lovely wife Pauline, sister of the U.S. senator and aunt to the later vice president, invited me and my roommate over for dinner. I don’t remember what else we ate, but I especially enjoyed an updated version of ambrosia using canned oranges and pineapple. I still occasionally haul out the tattered recipe card she gave me in preparation of holiday dinners. The oranges called for in Pauline Gore’s recipe are mandarin oranges. Ding! Satsumas are mandarin oranges and the pride of Louisiana’s citrus crop. We’re famous for them, and their season is November through January. I had to try it, so I combined both recipes, some ingredients fresh, some canned, and came up with my own new version. The star, of course, is Louisiana satsumas. The key to ambrosia is juiciness, so I cut the segments in half so that juice can run out. It was a hit. Ambrosia has been labeled “the food of Greek gods,” by whom I do not know, but I’ve seen it referenced several times. I call it a fruit salad, but it can be a grand dessert for the dieting among us. Whatever you call it, ambrosia is a pretty addition to the holiday table. And, it goes well with the leftovers. Speaking of leftovers, another delicious salad can help you use up that leftover turkey. I know because we usually deep-fry three of them, and there is plenty left for a turkey salad or gumbo the next day. I’m not a Black Friday shopper, but for those who have stood in lines all day, a tasty dish ready and waiting means you can prop your feet up a little sooner. I’m for that, shopping or not.

1/2 cup maraschino cherries, drained and halved 1 cup green seedless grapes, halved 2 cups mini marshmallows 1 cup sour cream or more if needed

1. Peel satsumas and pull off any excess white pith. Slice in two, and place in a large serving bowl. 2. Roast pecans on a cookie sheet in a 350-degree oven until lightly browned, about 6 to 8 minutes. Cool. 3. Add pineapple chunks to satsumas in bowl, then coconut, cherries, grapes and marshmallows, and toss. Add nuts and sour cream and mix well. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight. Serves 10 to 12.

BLACK FRIDAY TURKEY SALAD

1 pound leftover turkey, shredded or chopped 2 celery stalks, chopped 1 bunch green onions, white and green parts thinly sliced 1 cup pecans, roasted ½ cup mayonnaise Gumbo Goodness Don’t forget to boil your turkey carcass and all bones salvageable for a great turkey gumbo. Cover bones with water in a large pot, bring to a boil, cover and simmer for two hours. Strain and use as broth for the gumbo. Make a roux and sauté onions and celery in the roux. Add broth and leftover chopped turkey and sliced andouille sausage. Simmer and serve over rice. Add some raw oysters in the last few minutes of cooking, if you like.

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard Salt, freshly ground black pepper, garlic powder and Creole seasoning to taste ¼ cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped Lettuce leaves, if serving as salad

1. If shredding turkey, pull pieces or slices apart with your hands. Then chop roughly. This gives a good consistency when mixing with other ingredients. Chop in small pieces if you prefer. 2. Place turkey in a large bowl and add celery and green onions. 3. Place pecans on a baking pan in a 350-degree oven until fragrant and turning slightly brown, about 6 to 8 minutes. Let pecans cool and add to bowl. 4. Add mayonnaise and Dijon and mix well. Stir in parsley. 5. If using for salad, serve on lettuce leaves. Makes about 6 salads or 8 sandwiches.


last call

The Cart Before the Course Black and Gold Martini by Tim McNally If you don’t believe that life is a circle,

just stick around long enough and see dated clothing styles come back into fashion. Inevitably you are going to wish you had held on to most of those clothes you discarded. Along those lines, but not quite as stylish as padded shoulders, bell-bottoms and doubleknit fabric, the cocktail cart was a standard fixture at most fine dining restaurants. These rolling serving conveniences allowed the preparer to make you a fine adult cocktail without ever leaving your sight or your table. Your specific instructions were followed to the “T” because you were eyewitness to the process of making your perfect martini. That hallmark of elegant service is back at Dickie Brennan’s Steak House. Hendrick’s Gin has constructed the only tableside cocktail cart in America, at least for now. More carts are sure to follow. The whole concept of crafting a great martini in front of you is the best approach to your drinking satisfaction and is better than just about any floor show.

Black & Gold Martini

2 oz. Hendrick’s Gin ½ oz. Lillet Blanc  ½ oz. Dolin Dry Vermouth Garnish with two black Cerignola olives stuffed with Cajun caviar (and rolled in 24k edible gold if you want to be extra fancy.) As served from the tableside cocktail cart at Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse, 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, Dickiebrennanssteakhouse.com.

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eugenia uhl photo


myneworleans.com november 2018 8 9


dining listings H= New Orleans Magazine award winner

Bywater

H Pizza Delicious pizza 617 Piety St., 676-8482, PizzaDelicious.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant , that also offers excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes. Outdoor seating a plus. $ Carrollton Bourré AMERICAN 1510 S. Carrollton Ave., 510-4040. L, D Tue-Sun. “Elevated” street food along with quality daiquiris and wings are the draw at this newcomer from the team behind Boucherie. $$ Breads on Oak Bakery/Breakfast 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. B, L WedSun. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak St. serves breads, sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan-friendly options. $ City Park Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Cir., NO Museum of Art, 482-1264, CafeNoma. com. L, (snacks) Tue-Sun. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $$ CBD/Warehouse District Balise Louisianian Fare 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. L Tue-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Carefully crafted fare fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

H BH Steak Steakhouse Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. D daily. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne Seafood 601 Loyola Ave.,

$ = Average entrée price

$ = $5-10 $$ = $11-15 $$$ = $16-20 $$$$ = $21-25 $$$$$ = $25 & up

appeal. $$$

burning oven, and an excellent raw bar. $$$

Drago’s Louisianian Fare Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D daily. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

Q&C Hotel/Bar AMERICAN 344 Camp St., 587-9700, QandC.com. B, D daily, L Fri-Sun. Boutique hotel bar offering a small plates menu with tempting choices such as a Short Rib Poor Boy and Lobster Mac and Cheese to complement their sophisticated craft cocktails. $$

H Domenica Italian The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products. $$$$ Emeril’s Louisianian Fare 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from all over the world. $$$$$

H Herbsaint Louisianian Fare 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$ H La Boca Steakhouse 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. D Mon-Sat. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Lüke World 333 St. Charles Ave., 378-2840, LukeNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, house-made pâtés and plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$

613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Coastal Louisiana with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$

Morton’s The Steakhouse Steakhouse 365 Canal St., One Canal Place, 566-0221, Mortons.com/NewOrleans. D daily. Private elevator leads to the plush, wood-paneled environs of this local outpost of the famed Chicago steakhouse popular with politicians and celebrities. $$$$

Calcasieu Specialty Foods 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2188, CalcasieuRooms.com. For large and small gatherings, the catering menus feature modern Louisiana cooking and the Cajun cuisine for which chef Donald Link is justifiably famous.

Mother’s Louisianian Fare 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net. B, L, D daily. Locals and tourists alike endure long lines to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$

H Cochon Louisianian Fare 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. L, D, Mon-Sat. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski feature Cajun and Southern cuisine. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine Reservations recommended. $$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. L Mon-Fri, D Tue-Sat. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this menu, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the

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Mulate’s Louisianian Fare 201 Julia St., 5221492, Mulates.com. L, D daily. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$ Palace Café World 605 Canal St., 523-1661, PalaceCafe.com. B, L, D daily. Cassic New Orleans restaurant, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates at the Black Duck Bar. $$$

H Pêche Seafood 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by Chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-

HRed Gravy Bakery/Breakfast 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. B, Br, L, Wed-Mon. Farm-to-table brunch restaurant offers a creative array of items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$ H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. L Fri, D daily. James Beard Award-winning menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Rock-N-Sake Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake.com. L Fri, D Tue-Sun, late night Fri-Sat. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution. There are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sac-A-Lait Seafood 1051 Annunciation St., 324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. D TueSat, L Fri. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. $$$$ The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine Italian 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. D daily. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$ Central City Café Reconcile Louisiana fare 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile. org. L Mon-Fri. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$ Covington Don’s Seafood seafood 126 Lake Dr., (985) 327-7111, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Popular neighborhood seafood joint offers an array of crowd-pleasing south

Louisiana dishes, including char-broiled oysters and Zydeco shrimp. Kid’s Menu makes it a good choice for families. $$$ Faubourg Marigny The Marigny Brasserie AMERICAN 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472, MarignyBrasserie. com. L, D daily. Chic neighborhood bistro with traditional dishes like fried green tomatoes and innovative cocktails such as the cucumber Collins. $$$ Faubourg St. John

H Café Degas French 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. L, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

H 1000 Figs World 3141 Ponce De Leon St., 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-to-table alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$ French Quarter Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s Louisianian Fare 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. D daily, Br Sun. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade Italian 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. L, D daily. Home of the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$ Antoine’s Louisianian Fare 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$ Antoine’s Annex Specialty Foods 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/Antoines-Annex. Open daily. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available. BB King’s Blues Club Barbecue 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/ new-orleans. L, D daily. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician with a menu loaded with BBQ and southern specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$ Bayou Burger Burgers 503 Bourbon St., 529-4256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$ Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes,


bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Bayona World 430 Dauphine St., 5254455, Bayona.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ Broussard’s French 819 Conti St., 5813866, Broussards.com. D daily, Br Sun. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table Gastropub 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Open late, this chefdriven rustic colonial cuisine with rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House Italian 601 Chartres St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. L, D daily. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters Louisianian Fare 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters.com. Br, D daily. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Louisianian Fare Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. B, L, D daily. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various

Louisiana cultures, with a contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster Seafood 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. L, D daily. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery Seafood 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. L, D daily. Crowd-pleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. L Fri, D daily. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan Steakhouse 620 Chartres St., 267-3500,

DorisMetropolitan.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. Innovative steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro World 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. L, D daily. Central Mexican cuisine along with hand-muddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s Louisianian Fare 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak Steakhouse 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. L Fri, D SunThu. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails and classic steakhouse fare and inspired dishes. Reservations accepted. $$$

H GW Fins Seafood 808 Bienville St., 581FINS (3467), GWFins.com. D daily. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$ Hard Rock Café AMERICAN 125 Bourbon St., 529-5617, HardRock.com. L, D daily, Br SatSun. Local outpost of this global brand serves burgers, café fare and drinks in their rock

memorabilia-themed environs. $$ House of Blues Louisianian Fare 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues. com/NewOrleans. L, D daily. Good menu complements music in the main room. Worldfamous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Irene’s Cuisine Italian 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. D Mon-Sat. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen Louisianian Fare 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul. com/KPaul. L Thu-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to the nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish Seafood 337 Charters St., 598-5005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chefdriven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou Seafood 208 Bourbon St., 5254755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafood-centric destination on Bourbon Street. $$$ Muriel’s Jackson Square Italian 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Enjoy local classics while

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dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-be-haunted establishment. $$$$ Napoleon House Italian 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. L Mon-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas. A Sazerac or Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $$ NOLA Louisianian Fare 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. L Thu-Mon, D daily. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedar-plankroasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill Seafood 739 Conti St., 5256002, OceanaGrill.com. B, L, D daily. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro Gastropub 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. D daily. Wine is the muse at this bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin Gastropub 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. D daily. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 Seafood 424 Bourbon St., 3091574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. L, D daily. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by

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unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster. $$$ Port of Call Burgers 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. L, D daily. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

H Restaurant R’evolution Italian 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola. com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Jana Billiot and executive sous chef Gabriel Beard are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Ralph Brennan’s Red Fish Grill Italian 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. L, D daily. Chef Austin Kirzner cooks up a broad menu peppered with local favorites such as barbecue oysters, blackened redfish and double-chocolate bread pudding. $$$$$ Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. B, D daily, L MonSat, Br Sun. Old World elegance, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$ Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant Louisianian Fare 301 Dauphine St., 5860972, RichardFiskes.com. B, Bar Lunch daily. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street is this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with

dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$ Royal House Louisianian Fare 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. L, D daily. B Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$

bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. D daily. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

SoBou Louisianian Fare 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. B, L, D daily. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on an accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tujague’s Louisianian Fare 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$

H Tableau Louisianian Fare 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. B Mon-Fri, L Mon-Sat, D daily, Brunch Sat-Sun. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre. $$$

Garden District Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s AMERICAN 2001 St. Charles Ave., 593-9955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sun. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$

H The Bistreaux Louisianian Fare New Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy.com/dining. html. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$

District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders.com. B, L, D daily. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $

The Bombay Club Louisianian Fare Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. D daily. Popular martini

Hoshun Restaurant Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. L, D daily. A wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes


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culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Private dining rooms available. $$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri-Sat. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$ Lakeview H Cava Louisianian Fare 789 Harrison Ave., 304-9034. D daily. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$

H Mondo World 900 Harrison Ave., 2242633, MondoNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. This place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$ Lower Garden District The Tasting Room Gastropub 1906 Magazine St., 581-3880, TTRNewOrleans. com. D Tue-Sun. Flights of wine and sophisticated small plates are the calling cards for this wine bar. $$ Metairie H Andrea’s Restaurant Italian 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.com. L Mon-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$ Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to

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eat oysters. $$

towering seafood platters. $$$

available.

Austin’s Louisianian Fare 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. D Mon-Sat. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$

Don’s Seafood seafood 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials. $$$

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D MonSat. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

Drago’s Louisianian Fare 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. L Tue-Fri & Sun, D Tue-Sun. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$

Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Seafood 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

Five Happiness Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. L, D daily. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and housebaked duck. $$

Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. L, D daily. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. D daily, L Mon-Fri. Br Sun. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this family-friendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. B, L Mon-Sat. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. B, L daily; D Mon-Sat. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options, and gourmet coffee and espresso drinks create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. $ Crabby Jack’s Louisianian Fare 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. L Mon-Sat. Lunch outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris. com. L Fri, D daily. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution, and great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sucré Specialty Foods 3301 Veterans Blvd., 834-2277, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering

Mid-City

H Crescent City Steaks Steakhouse

Gracious Bakery + Café Bakery/Breakfast 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B, L daily. Boutique bakery offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Louisianian Fare 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

H Liuzza’s Italian 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120, Liuzzas.com. L, D daily. Classic


neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

H Mandina’s Louisianian Fare 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$

H Mona’s Café World 3901 Banks St., 4827743. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros. The lentil soup and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H MoPho Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-and-match pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$ Parkway Bakery and Tavern AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys. com. L, D Wed-Mon. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $ Ralph’s On The Park Italian 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. Br Sun, L Tue-Fri, D daily. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and

good cocktails. $$$$

H Toups’ Meatery Louisianian Fare 845 N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. L, D Tue-Sat. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$ Multiple Locations Café du Monde Bakery/Breakfast CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Bakery/Breakfast CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $ Copeland’s Louisianian Fare CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$ Little Tokyo Asian Fusion/Pan Asian LittleTokyoNola.com. L, D daily. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, burgers, soups, salads and deli-style sandwiches. $ Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Seafood MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. A seafood lover’s paradise offers an

array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. A raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw. $$$

861-7610, Brigtsens.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

Reginelli’s Pizzeria pizza Reginellis.com. L, D daily. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$

HCarrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. L Sat-Sun, D Tue-Sat. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$ Theo’s Pizza TheosPizza.com. L, D daily. The cracker-crisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with local ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN ZeaRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular spot serves a variety of grilled items, appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Catering services available. $$$ Riverbend

H Boucherie Louisianian Fare 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, BoucherieNola.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$ Brigtsen’s Louisianian Fare 723 Dante St.,

Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market Louisianian Fare 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket.com. B, L, D daily. Historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ Uptown Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute. org. B, L Tue-Sat, Br Sun. A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Bouligny Tavern Gastropub 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern.com. D MonSat. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$ Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. B, L, D daily. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $ Casamento’s Louisianian Fare

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4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. L Thu-Sat, D Thu-Sun. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and for all major holidays. $$ Clancy’s Louisianian Fare 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. L Thu-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$ Commander’s Palace Louisianian Fare 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Awardwinner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$

H Coquette French 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from the chefs. $$$ Dick and Jenny’s Louisianian Fare 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys. com. D Mon-Sat. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$

H Gautreau’s Louisianian Fare 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant. com. D Mon-Sat. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along H La Crêpe Nanou French 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. D daily,

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Br Sun. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery French 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. L Tue-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette French 3637 Magazine St., 8951636, LiletteRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

H Magasin Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4201 Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $ Pascal’s Manale Italian 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. A neighborhood favorite since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$

Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$ Pizza Domenica pizza 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. A pizza centric spinoff of the popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitanstyle pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

H Shaya World 4213 Magazine St., 8914213, ShayaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. James Beard Award-winning menu pays homage to Israel at this contemporary Israeli hotspot. $$$

presents this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$ H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 309-0069, WayfareNola.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Creative sandwiches and southerninspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. D Tue-Sat. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$

Sucré Specialty Foods 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily & nightly. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available.

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sun. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

H The Company Burger Burgers 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger. com. L, D daily. Custom-baked butter-brushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $

Warehouse District Lucy’s World 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 5238995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. L, D daily. Island-themed oasis with a menu that cherrypicks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay into the wee hours. $

H Patois World 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441,

The Delachaise Gastropub 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise.com. D daily. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$

PatoisNola.com. L Fri, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. French food, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron

H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. D Wed-Sun. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com


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Dining & Entertainment

ADVERTISING SECTION

Arnaud's

Balise

Briquette

813 Bienville St., New Orleans 504-523-5433 ArnaudsRestaurant.com

640 Carondelet St., New Orleans 504-459-4449 BaliseNola.com

701 South Peters, New Orleans 504–302-7496 Briquette-Nola.com

In 2018, Arnaud’s Restaurant will celebrate one hundred years of delivering a quintessential New Orleans dining experience, from its original, historic location in the city’s most prized gem, the French Quarter. Arnaud’s offers an unmatched New Orleans experience that celebrates the city’s culture with every sip and every bite.

Balise is a New Orleans-style tavern by husband-and-wife team Justin and Mia Devillier of La Petite Grocery. Set in a 19th century Creole townhouse, Balise features an approachable menu and world-class beverage program inspired by the traditions of Louisiana and New Orleans as a port city.

Award-winning chef Robert Vasquez will create a coastal contemporary menu and will utilize a large charcoal grill to highlight fresh fish and seafood. There will also be handcrafted cocktails and well curated wine list as well as small plates perfect for sharing.

Cajun Cookery

Chef Charles House

Compere Lapin

719 S. Peters, New Orleans 504-302-7496

225-803-2138 ChefCharlesHouse.com

The newest addition to The Warehouse District, Cajun Cookery is the home of the perfect Cajun and Creole combination. From po-boys to étouffée, Cajun Cookery is the place for New Orleans Cuisine. Check out happy hour from 2-4 p.m. or Weekend Brunch 7 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Bringing the restaurant to you. Romantic settings for 2-30 guests and offering 3 or even 4 course meals prepared at your home. Unique creations. Fresh desserts. Creative table settings all to highlight the experience!

535 Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans 504-599-2119 CompereLapin.com

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Compère Lapin (kom-pare la-pan) n. 1. French for "brother rabbit" 2. traditional Caribbean and Creole folktales featuring a mischievous rabbit named Compere Lapin 3. Ground-breaking restaurant helmed by renowned Chef Nina Compton in the heart of the Warehouse Arts District in New Orleans.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Creole Cookery

613 Royal St., New Orleans 504-522-7261 CourtOfTwoSisters.com

510 Toulouse St., New Orleans 504-524-9632 NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com

The Court of Two Sisters, known for its large dining courtyard, serves a lavish daily Jazz Brunch buffet, and now serves appetizers at the Carriageway Bar. Enjoy Blackened Alligator or BBQ Shrimp while sipping cocktails at the bar. At night, order la carte or the four-course dinner menu. Reservations recommended.

Savor authentic Creole dishes prepared by chef John Trinh, formerly of Eleven 79. Delight in traditional dishes such as gumbo, shrimp Creole and crawfish etouffĂŠe, as well as an oyster happy hour Monday-Friday, 3 p.m. - 6 p.m. Enjoy handcrafted cocktails and signature drinks in the historic French Quarter.

Five Happiness

Galatoire's 33 Bar & Steak

Gautreau's Restaurant

3605 S. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans 504-482-3935 FiveHappiness.com

215 Bourbon St., New Orleans 504-335-3932 Galatoires33BarandSteak.com

1728 Soniat St., New Orleans 504-899-7397 GautreausRestaurant.com

At Five Happiness, the ambience and friendly staff will take you to a new level of dining experience. This award-winning restaurant always strives to achieve its best. Private party and banquet rooms are available.

Whether stopping in for a short visit or a comfortable stay, Galatoire's "33" Bar & Steak offers classic, hand-crafted cocktails and the finest wines and spirits, alongside USDA prime steaks from the dinner menu and lighter fare at Bar "33".

Nestled in a lush garden spot in an Uptown New Orleans neighborhood, Gautreau's courts its guests with distinctively elegant, yet approachable surroundings and a menu that is both inventive and down to earth.

Edward A. Dufresne Community Center 274 Judge Edward Dufresne Pkwy., Luling 985-331-3795 EdwardDufresneCommunityCenter.com St. Charles Parish’s multi-functional facility is designed to host numerous functions from meetings to formal banquets and receptions. Their full-service, on-site caterer is available to meet all your food and beverage needs from ten guests to a formal dinner for 500.

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Court of Two Sisters


Dining & Entertainment

ADVERTISING SECTION

Hoshun

Katie's

Mandina's

1601 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504-302-9171 HoshunRestaurant.com

3701 Iberville St., New Orleans 504-488-6582 KatiesInMidCity.com

3800 Canal St., New Orleans 504-482-9179 MandinasRestaurant.com

Chinese or Japanese? Can't decide? Hoshun is your answer, offering an extensive menu from classic Chinese dishes to Japanese sushi and everything in between (like Vietnamese pho or pad Thai). Stick with one cuisine, or mix and match. Open daily until 2 a.m.

Fresh and delicious, “The Legend” features BBQ Shrimp with cochon de lait stuffed into New Orleans French bread. Call to ask about daily special. Open for lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday and don’t miss the bottomless mimosa Sunday brunch.

Mandina's is the quintessential neighborhood restaurant. "There are some items that have been on the menu for 75 years," says Cindy Mandina. "My grandmother always said, 'Take care of the neighborhood people and locals that come here… cater to their needs and desires’. That's what we're all about." Mandina's is open for lunch and dinner daily.

Mr. Ed's Oyster Bar and Fish House

Mr. Ed's Seafood and Italian

Orleans Grapevine

1001 Live Oak, Metairie 504-838-0022 910 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner 504-463-3030 MrEdsRestaurants.com

720 Orleans Ave., New Orleans 504-523-1930 OrleansGrapevine.com

Mid-City, Metairie, French Quarter & St. Charles MrEdsRestaurants.com Now open in Mid-City at the corner of Carrollton and Bienville, Mr. Ed's Oyster Bar serves your choice of chargrilled, fried or raw oysters, as well as long time favorites such as Oyster Rockefeller and Bienville. Offering both a stand up oyster bar and cocktail bar, it's the perfect place to relax and enjoy. Four unique locations; one great menu. NEW! 2nd French Quarter location Opening Soon.

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Mr. Ed's has been a local favorite since 1989, offering home-style cooking, Italian cuisine, seafood favorites, and Mr. Ed's Famous Fried Chicken. Open MondaySaturday for lunch and dinner. Daily lunch specials and catering are available as well.

Enjoy true New Orleans atmosphere in a beautiful, tropical courtyard. Orleans Grapevine serves high quality cuisine and one of the largest selections of wine by the bottle or by the glass. Don't miss the popular Bacon Happy Hour, where you'll enjoy free bacon with your cocktails and wine. 4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m. to midnight daily.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Peppermill

Poppy's Time Out Grill

1838 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans 504-895-4877 PascalsManale.com

504-455-2266 RiccobonosPeppermill.com

Spanish Plaza across from Harrah's Casino 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 80 504-247-9265 PoppysTimeOutSportsBar.com

This famous restaurant has been family owned and operated since 1913. Pascal’s Manale is the origin of the well known Original Pascal’s Barbeque Shrimp. The old-time oyster and cocktail bars offer raw oysters on the half shell and all types of cocktails, as well as a great selection of fine wines. Fresh seafood, Italian dishes and delicious steaks are featured.

The concept of the Peppermill was to bring classic New Orleans dishes as well as Riccobono family Italian recipes to the city in a comfortable, casual atmosphere. Now, three generations later, that tradition continues to live on.

Poppy's Time Out is the place with the hottest sports action. They have all the DirecTV packages on 21 huge screens, great food and 20 beers on tap. They are open seven days a week, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Catch the game with them.

Ralph Brennan Catering

Red Gravy

Restaurant R'evolution

504-539-5510 RalphBrennanCatering.com

125 Camp St., New Orleans 504-561-8844 RedGravyCafe.com

777 Bienville St., New Orleans 504-553-2277 RevolutionNola.com

Can’t decide between brunch and lunch? Why not both! Chef de Cuisine Roseann is serving her handmade pasta with a sweet sausage sugo, fresh ricotta and a sunny up yard egg. Naturally named Breakfast Spaghetti, this dish is a must-try. Voted #1 Brunch and #1 Italian in New Orleans Magazine and on Open Table. Open Wednesday through Monday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Chefs John Folse and Rick Tramonto present their imaginative reinterpretations of classic Creole cuisine in a spectacular setting that blends antique architectural details of grand French Quarter homes with contemporary accents. Serving Lunch Fridays, Dinner nightly, and Sunday Jazz Brunch.

Ralph Brennan Catering is known as New Orleans' premier caterer for groups from 100 to 1,200 people. With the ability to match your palate, theme and budget in your home, restaurant, or venue of your choice, they are dedicated to providing a seamless, professional and, above all, memorable experience.

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Pascal's Manale


Dining & Entertainment

ADVERTISING SECTION

Royal House

SALA

SoBou

441 Royal St., New Orleans 504-528-2601 RoyalHouseRestaurant.com

124 Lake Marina Ave., New Orleans 504-513-2670 SalaNola.com

310 Chartres St., New Orleans 504-552-4095 SobouNola.com

Royal House is a classic New Orleans restaurant and oyster bar in the French Quarter. From fresh-shucked to charbroiled, and Rockefeller to Royale, this is your destination for everything oyster! Whether you’re a traveler to our great city or a New Orleans native, we’ve got the perfect place for you!

Enjoy breakfast with homemade Bloody Marys and Mimosas by the carafe on Saturdays and Sundays starting at 8 a.m. Try Traditional or Crab Cakes Benedict, Eggs Sardou, Omelets, or something sweet like Zeppole or French Toast. Weekdays open for lunch at 11 a.m., with happy hour 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Dinner nightly with great seafood, steaks, and burgers, and late-night hours until midnight Thursday through Saturday. Closed Monday.

A modern Creole Saloon south of Bourbon Street in the French Quarter. Chef Juan Carlos Gonzalez brings you Louisiana Street Food-Inspired small plates to pair with cocktails lovingly prepared by our knowledgeable and friendly bar team. Burlesque Brunch every Sunday.

Tableau

The Pearl Room

Tommy's

616 St. Peter St., New Orleans 504-934-3463 TableauFrenchQuarter.com

2310 Hickory Ave, River Ridge 504-737-0604 MrEdsRestaurants.com

746 Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans 504-581-1103 TommysNewOrleans.com

Tableau is now serving premium Gulf oysters. The Oyster Bar features the increasingly popular aqua-culture oysters that are hand harvested in the Gulf region. Oysters in regular rotation include Southern Belle, Independence Island, Champagne Bay (from Louisiana), Massacre Island, Turtleback and Point aux Pins (from Alabama).

The Pearl Room at The Grotto is NOW OPEN in River Ridge, offering modern elegance and the delicious cuisine of Mr. Ed's Restaurant Group. Available for Receptions, Rehearsal Dinners, Luncheons, Corporate Parties and all of your Holiday Events from 50-250 guests.

True Italian Cuisine with touches of French Creole influence served proudly in the heart of the Warehouse District. Tommy’s Cuisine combines a quintessential New Orleans reverence for fine ingredients with artfully concocted combinations to create a worldclass dining experience.

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ADVERTISING SECTION

Holiday GIFT GUIDE 1. A. Renee 824 Chartres St., New Orleans 504-418-1448 AReneeBoutique.com A. Renee Boutique at 824 Chartres has the perfect gift for Christmas or any day when you want a unique gift for that special someone in your life. The gift of their pet in these beautiful clutches, handmade by Kent Stetson. The collection includes 17 breeds of dogs and 2 cats. Call April Renee at (504) 418-1448 or come in. If not in stock, can be special ordered an arrives in 3 days.

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2. Aucoin Hart 1525 Metairie Rd., Metairie 504-834-9999 AucoinHart.com Classic ruby, sapphire, emerald and diamond stack rings set in 18k white gold, starting at $1,475. Available exclusively at Aucoin Hart Jewelers on Metairie Road. 3. Aunt Sally's 750 St. Charles, New Orleans 810 Decatur, New Orleans 504-944-6090 AuntSallys.com Gumbo Gift Basket — New Orleans is a gumbo of culture, and now you can send those flavors anywhere with our Gumbo Gift Basket! One of the most popular dishes in New Orleans cuisine, this basket is perfect for the foodies in your life. 4. Auraluz 4408 Shores Dr., Metairie 504-888-3313 ShopAuraluz.com Paparté personalized items make the perfect holiday gift. Easily create your item through our fun interactive kiosk or from the comfort of home. Personalize with names, initials, monograms, designs and even photos. Last minute gift? No problem. They're all printed in-store at AURALUZ! 5. Chronos 3200 N Arnoult Rd, Metairie 504-267-4549 ChronosBHW.com Holiday shopping that easily fits between your morning coffee and your evening champagne! Purchase a Chronos gift card for all our services – from CoolSculpting to laser treatments and dermal fillers to hydrafacials along with day spa services and a fitness center, we have you covered. 6. Cristy Cali 504-407-5041 CristyCali.com Banana Leaf Necklace: Eye-catching and elegant, this genuine Sterling Silver choker symbolizes joy and happiness, and a feeling of safety wherever you may be. It is also a stunning accent to your Fall or Winter wardrobe. 1 0 4 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

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ADVERTISING SECTION

7. HGM Fine Jewelry 3617 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-957-3409 HGMJewelry.com Fabulous Emerald and diamond ring in platinum. Late 1940’s early 1950’s, Art Deco on the cusp of Retro. $7800. 8. Home Malone 629 N Carrollton Ave. 504-324-8352 HomeMaloneNola.com Locally designed and printed, this New Orleans tea towel is one of many designs in the Local Life Linens line that was released this year. $16.

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9. Jaci Blue 2111 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-603-2929 JaciBlue.com At Jaci Blue, you’ll find gorgeous clothing hand picked to flatter women sizes 12 and up. The cranberry dress is the perfect dancing dress for any holiday party. $149. 10. Konnie's Gift Depot 859 Brownswitch Road, Slidell In the Country Club Plaza 985-643-8000 Pelican Lamp at Konnie’s. Perfect to put into a tropical, coastal or nautical themed room or area. Created from hand painted, embossed metal and tinted glass and lit from within. Other styles are available. Konnie’s is open Monday thru Saturday and most Sundays. 11. Le Petit Theatre 616 St Peter, New Orleans 504-522-2081 LePetitTheatre.com Le Petit Theatre’s 1st-annual production of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, featuring 20 young artists from a newly-launched Young Conservatory Program opens on 12/7. A Family Matinee performance is scheduled for 12/8 with pre-show games, ornament making, treats and holiday gift opportunities. Tickets: LePetitTheatre.com. 12. Lousisana Children's Museum 420 Julia St., New Orleans 504-523-1357 lcm.org “Puzzled” for gifts this holiday season? Bring home some brain-building, locally made fun! Topple Rocks are made from African Mahogany recycled from construction projects in Covington, LA. Each piece has the same geometric shapes. Try to match them to see how high you can build. They come in a jute bag which is great for travel. Available at the Museum Store at the Louisiana Children’s Museum.

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ADVERTISING SECTION

13. Luna Press LunaPress.com 13 "Dalt Wonk captures the eccentric heart of New Orleans. Spiritual Gifts is peopled with the quirky, the disillusioned, the good-hearted of our world. He brilliantly weaves each story into an unforgettable human tapestry." – Jim Amoss, Former Pulitzer Prize board member

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14. Pascal's Manale Poppy Tooker takes on the Italian Creoles in her new book, the Pascal’s Manale Cookbook. A colorful five-generation family history begins this delicious book focusing on the second oldest family-owned restaurant in a city known for great food. Visit PoppyTooker.com to order yours today! 15. Perlis New Orleans 504-895-8661, French Quarter 504-523-6681, Mandeville 985-674-1711, Baton Rouge 225926-5909 Perlis.com Perfect gift for any Who Dat! 100% hand-stitched needlepoint full grain leather coozie with neoprene liner. Exclusively at Perlis. 16. Queork 838 Chartres St., New Orleans 504-481-4910 3005 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-388-6803 Queork.com Queork Men's Wallets ($49) are made with extremely durable cork fabric, which is a eco-friendly vegan alternative to leather. Cork is water and stain resistant, antimicrobial and takes minimal care. Made in New Orleans.

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17. Stella Plantation 4881 Hwy 39, Braithwaite 504-919-7474 StellaPlantation.com/glamping Glamping in Louisiana just got a lot better! Stella Plantation offers glam camping experiences on Paloma Lake. Book before December 25th and receive 10% off your stay. 18. Trashy Diva 2050 Magazine St, 712 Royal St. 504-299-3939 TrashyDiva.com Give the gift of glam with Trashy Diva Lingerie’s Forties Follies Collection. This luxe selection of vintage-inspired gowns, slips, and robes features elegant satin and sheer georgette. Shop in-store or online for the season’s must-have accessories and classic style. Featured item: Glamour Robe with Ostrich, $253. 1 0 8 NOVEMBER 2018 myneworleans.com

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ADVERTISING SECTION Vista Shores is a luxury senior living and memory care community located on Bayou St. John. Vista Shores residents enjoy chef-prepared meals in the bistro, socialize over coffee or cocktails in the lounge, and take in beautiful sunsets on the wrap-around porch. Vista Shores' diverse social and cultural activities and fitness programs keep residents active and engaged, while weekly housekeeping, laundry and transportation services ensure that residents are able to relax and focus on living their best lives. All residents are provided with 24-hour personal care and individualized assistance plans. Vista Shores offers a specialized Memory Care program— each staff member has been vigorously trained in Alzheimer's/dementia care to enrich the lives of memory care residents. If you have a loved one living with Alzheimer's or Dementia, find support at Vista Shores’ free Alzheimer's Association Caregivers Monthly Support Group on the second Saturday of every month at 11 a.m. For more information, visit VistaShores.com or call 504-288-3737.

In-Home Assistance

Senior Living

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iving and aging well take effort, time, and attention to one’s needs and desires. Maintaining health and happiness throughout our older years is attainable with the right care from both others and ourselves. As challenges rise, so do solutions. Whether a person chooses to downsize and move into a vibrant retirement community or remain at home and call in a few reinforcements, maintaining your lifestyle is easy in a city like New Orleans, which is full of resources for older adults and their families. From retirement communities and home care aids to health resources such as drug stores and specialists, professionals knowledgeable in the needs of older adults are expanding their knowledge and services to better meet the needs of the aging in the community. Take advantage of the services available and enjoy the peace of mind that comes with knowing your loved ones are living their best lives, active and safe.

Retirement Living Poydras Home is reaching deeper into the Greater New Orleans area to fulfill the diverse care needs of even more seniors with the acquisition of an independent, in-home, personal care attendant company, Home Care Solutions. Continuing Care Retirement Communities such as Poydras Home recognize that community living is not the only option available to the region’s aging population. With Poydras Home’s new home support, seniors and their families can choose their optimum environment. For the first time in its 201-year history, Poydras Home will now be able to offer non-medical sitter/companion services to those who elect to remain at home. Through Home Care Solutions, Poydras Home can also deliver care management services, personally advising seniors and their families as they face a wide variety of healthcare choices. This new venture and expansion of services will allow greater flexibility to meet the growing needs of more New Orleanians. For more information about Poydras Home, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-897-0535. As an award-winning and full-service retirement center and community, Lambeth House offers the best of all worlds—independent living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care, and Memory Care in the event it’s ever needed. With an exceptional approach to living and aging well, Lambeth House recently received top ranking in the Best Retirement Community category of City Business’s 2018 Reader Rankings. With a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities including the fitness center with a stunning indoor, salt-water swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options, and engaging activities and social events. Nonresidents (55+) can access Fitness Center memberships, and Lambeth House’s Wild Azalea Café is open to the public for breakfast and lunch, Tuesday-Saturday. Nestled in the heart of Uptown and overlooking the Mississippi River, Lambeth House offers luxurious accommodations and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its last expansion. For more information, call 504-865-1960 or visit LambethHouse.com.

Home Care Solutions, newly acquired by Poydras Home, specializes in compassionate in-home care, Alzheimer’s care, and Aging Life Care Management™ services to help your elderly loved ones extend their independence at home. They are committed to providing the highest quality of care, keeping loved ones safe and comfortable while giving families peace of mind. Caregiver’s are carefully matched to meet both your loved one’s needs and personality. Home Care Solutions Care Managers navigate the care of your loved ones with expertise and heart and are experienced advocates with creative solutions for complex situations and all care concerns. Care Managers’ familiarity with local resources saves you time and often saves you money while their compassionate understanding of the aging process saves you unnecessary distress. Home Care Solutions, a licensed Personal Care Attendant Agency, is a member of Home Care Association of America and Aging Life Care Association™. Call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com Home Care Solutions would be honored to assist your family in navigating elder care. When you can’t be at home to care for your family member, you want peace of mind knowing that the person who is there will treat your loved one with the same level of care and concern that you would. At Personal Homecare Services, your family is their family. Providing 24/7, in-home companion care, Personal Homecare Services offers clients the ability to remain in the comfort of their own home with their personal memories and possessions while you regain the time and energy needed to experience being a real family again. Personal Homecare Services is one of the first non-medical services specializing in live-in care and working in conjunction with doctors, healthcare providers, and hospices to provide continuous around-the-clock care without the worry and expense of hourly services. They’ve built a solid reputation with word-of-mouth referral, evidence of the trust their clients have in their caretakers and services. Services include meal preparation, help with personal hygiene, medicinal reminders, light housekeeping, transportation to/from appointments, and companionship. To learn more, visit PersonalHomecare.net or call 877-336-8045. Home Instead offers peace of mind for families of aging adults who wish to remain in the home. As a local franchise, Home Instead offers the added benefit of staff who understand New Orleans’ culture and hospitality. Home Instead New Orleans has a large team of fully trained CAREGiversSM who provide the care and companionship your loved one deserves. CAREGivers provide support through non-medical services like meal preparation, transportation, personal care, medication reminders, and more, while working in tandem when needed with healthcare providers, home health, and hospice. “Most older adults want to stay home, the place they know and love,” says Owner Lisa Rabito. “Our focus is to build relationships first.” Available from as little as eight hours a week to 24 hours a day, CAREGivers can take your loved one to church, the salon, and their weekly bridge game, or care for bed-bound clients who need full personal care, all while providing safety and companionship. Aging adults no longer in the home can also request Home Instead services at the retirement community or nursing facility where they reside. For more information, visit HomeInstead.com/339 or call 504-455-4911.

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ADVERTISING SECTION

Health Resources Your CBD Store New Orleans and Your CBD Store Metairie specialize in all things CBD. Cannabidiol, or CBD, has been a big topic of conversation due to its medical qualities. Customers of Your CBD Store are using their products for inflammation, chronic pain, anxiety, depression, migraines, Crohn’s, fibromyalgia, arthritis, and even addiction and sleep aid. According to Dr. David Allen, retired cardiac surgeon and member of the ICRS, "The discovery of the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) is the single most important medical scientific discovery ever, and the manipulation of the ECS will save more lives than are currently saved by surgery." When you’re ready for an all-natural alternative, visit Your CBD Store to get the help without the high. Your CBD store has two convenient locations at 3613 Magazine Street in New Orleans and, now open, 6824 Veterans Memorial Blvd. in Metairie across from Office Depot and Pet-Smart. For more information, call 504-702-8989 or visit CBDRX4U.com. Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy and the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long-term care as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Long Term Care, and Consultant Pharmacy Services. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Boulevard in Metairie. For more information, call 504-889-7070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.”

For most people, the annual election period for choosing a 2019 Medicare Advantage or Prescription Drug plan ends on December 7. If you haven’t already, now is the time to research your options to find a plan that best suits your health care needs and budget. Locally, Humana offers a number of ways to explore your options. The Humana Neighborhood Metairie location at 747 Veterans Memorial Boulevard offers sales seminars for plans being offered in addition to free health and wellness activities and programs. Open Monday through Friday (9 a.m. to 4 p.m.), the Neighborhood center offers community members a place to connect, share common interests, and participate in fitness and education classes at no cost. Additionally, you can sit down with a licensed Humana insurance agent to go over your plan options. To find out about Humana’s Medicare Advantage plans, call 504-840-0906. You can also visit Humana.com/Medicare to view plan options. Many women suffer from incontinence or overactive bladder in silence. Often these conditions occur from childbirth, aging, and at times medical problems. But according to Margie Kahn, MD, associate professor and Board Certified Section Head of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery in the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology at Tulane’s School of Medicine, “Urinary incontinence is not a normal part of aging! We address all pelvic floor disorders, including accidental bowel leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, at the same time. We have an experienced and sensitive team that understands most women are embarrassed to bring up these problems and may have had them ignored if they did so. We offer a multidisciplinary approach comprising behavioral interventions, physical therapy, simple office procedures, and more complex, minimally invasive surgery in the operating room.” Dr. Kahn’s patients are given every option for treatment, and every woman chooses what options are right for her. To schedule an appointment at Tulane’s downtown or Metairie offices, or for more information on Tulane’s OB/GYN department, call 504-988-8070. •

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Orthopedic Care

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njury and illness don’t often strike during the convenience of business hours. When a child is hurt or sick but doesn’t need emergency room care, families don’t want to wait for the next business day or available appointment to try and resolve their concern. To assist in these situations, Children’s Hospital launched Virtual After Hours, a phone- and tablet-based app that allows parents to speak with a provider during off hours, such as in the evenings or on weekends. The hospital’s provider will contact you over live video to discuss your child’s minor issues and conditions, or let you know whether you should seek emergency care. This allows parents to have peace of mind when issues arise at inconvenient hours. To download the app, visit chnola.org/virtual-care. To reach Children’s Hospital’s After Hours walk-in clinics in Metairie and River Ridge, visit chnola.org/Pediatrics/AfterHours. For more information on Children’s Hospital, visit chnola.org. Orthopedic care at East Jefferson General Hospital is best described as personalized. EJGH orthopedists take the approach that not every patient, knee, hip, shoulder, or injury is the same. The hospital takes great pride in providing the surgical and non-surgical solutions needed to provide each patient the best outcomes possible.

Recognized as a Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Distinction Orthopedic Center and recognized as Best in Region by US News and World Report for both Hip Replacement and Knee Replacement, EJGH is the leader in providing minimally invasive solutions that get you back to work, play, and life as quickly and safely as possible. Visit ejgh.org for more information and orthopedic solutions at East Jefferson General Hospital. Serving the West Bank and Greater New Orleans region, Westside Orthopaedic Clinic provides superior general orthopedic treatment with a specialty in spinal care. The clinic has been in operation since 1961, making it one of the longest standing orthopedic clinics in the city. Dr. Ralph. Katz is a board certified and fellowship trained orthopedic specialist who has performed over 500 minimally invasive procedures with consistently excellent outcomes. For the right patient who has failed conservative treatment (e.g. medication, physical therapy, injections), a minimally invasive microdiscectomy can be done in an outpatient setting with an incision that can be covered by a Band-Aid. The procedure typically takes less than an hour. Most patients can return to normal activities within three to six weeks. Additionally, Dr. Katz performs cervical and lumbar spinal fusions, utilizing small incisions with minimally invasive systems. He is one of few local surgeons who perform both cervical and lumbar disc replacements. Westside offers full-service, in-house x-rays, EMG/NCS, as well as physical therapy services with access to new rehabilitation equipment. Same day appointments can be accommodated. For more information, visit WestsideOrtho.com or call 504-347-0243. •

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streetcar by errol laborde

Season of the Boucherie An aunt in Avoyelles parish

traditionally would give me a pack of boudin for Christmas. It was a wonderful gift, except for the Christmas after Katrina when the car trunk tended to be loaded down with paraphernalia for survival in addition to holiday gifts. That following October I traced down the gamey, but still savory, smell that wafted from the back of my car to the Christmas boudin that had shifted into a space at the bottom of the truck. Guard your boudin well. To most of the rest of the world pigskin is that object tossed and kicked about during football games. That’s true in Louisiana too, but the term has another meaning, also associated with 1 3 6 november 2018

the fall and winter, for that is the season of the boucherie. Many churches and schools in French Louisiana are endowed by money from their fairs. On Sunday mornings, lines form to purchase the roast pig dinners made from the carcasses that glowed on vertical pits the night before. Among the specialty items made from the hogs, the two most popular seem to be cracklins and boudin. On paper, a cracklin does not seem like something one would want to take to a spa. It consists of deep-fried pork fat, with a hint of meat that is salted. When done right, though, there is a sweetness and crunchiness that cannot be denied. There are two types of boudin;

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the red and the white. The former is the so-called blood sausage, and that is a discussion in itself. There are blood dishes throughout the world, including the English’s blood pudding, but they are not for the squeamish. White boudin is another matter. Pork, spices and rice are mixed together and stuffed into a sausage case. Though it is an ancient food, boudin is thoroughly modern in that in can be frozen and then microwaved. Service hint: Be sure to prick holes into the casing before heating otherwise you might have a boudin bomb in your oven. (Most daring of the variations are the boudin balls served from beneath hot lights at gas stations.

That experience offers the extra advantage of being able to buy a lottery ticket while dining.) Boudin and “kush-kush,” a Cajun cereal made with cornmeal, are the subject of an only- in- Louisiana football cheer used at several universities: “Hot boudin, cold kush kush, come on (name team), push, push, push.” In modern times boudin has gained popularity in the city. Once unheard of in New Orleans, it is now on the menu at some white tablecloth restaurants. At the Jazz Fest, boudin in various forms, including crawfish, is sold. Crawfish, of course, is not really a traditional boudin ingredient, but if the trend continues, that is perhaps good news for the pigs.

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ARTHUR NEAD Illustration


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine November 2018  

New Orleans Magazine November 2018