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november 2017 / VOLUME 52 / NUMBER 1 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Mary Lou Eichhorn, Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Brobson Lutz, M.D., Jason Berry, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton, Mirella Cameran Web Editor Kelly Massicot Staff Writers Kelly Massicot, Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Sales Manager Kate Sanders Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Jessica Marasco Account Executives Claire Cummings, Peyton Simms Director of Marketing and Events Cheryl Lemoine Event Coordinator Whitney Weathers Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Manager Jessica DeBold Production Designers Emily Andras, Demi Schaffer, Molly Tullier Traffic Coordinator Topher Balfer Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Subscriptions Manager Brittanie Bryant WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 Subscriptions: (504) 830-7231 MyNewOrleans.com

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2017 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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Contents features

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82

90

Oysters

Prospect.4

Top Lawyers

In search of the Best

Art Showcase in New Orleans

Best of 2017

By jyl benson

By John kemp

profiles By sarah ravits

on the cover Oyster on the half shell from our best of bivalves photo by eugenia uhl


Contents departments

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Local Color Chris Rose Pipe Dreams 46

Modine Gunch Green Hair Day 48

Joie d’Eve Ballet Battles 50

In Tune Music to Eat Boudin By 52

Book Reviews A review of the latest books 54

The Beat Marquee Entertainment calendar 26

Jazz Life Roderick on a Roll 56

Home House of Hues 58

Art GoodWood NOLA 28

Persona Jockey Florent Geroux 30

Biz Big-Money League 32

Education Scores are Improving 36

Health The Reign of Pain 38

Style A Feast for the Eyes 40

Chronicles Up in the Air 42

The Menu Table Talk Indian Fusion 118

Restaurant Insider

122

News From the Kitchens 120

Food Fine from the Vine 122

Last Call Spill the Wine 124

Dining Guide Plus restaurant spotlights 126

In Every Issue Inside On the Half Shell 14

Speaking Out Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 20

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Julia Street Questions and answers about our city 22

Try This Flying High 182

Streetcar 1826 North Broad 184

DIAL 12, D1 Actor John Goodman narrates WYES’ newest documentary, NEW ORLEANS: THE FIRST 300 YEARS, premiering on Wednesday, November 15 at 7pm & 9pm on WYES-TV/Channel 12. The 90-minute documentary tells some of the great stories from our city’s past. Produced by Peggy Scott Laborde.


inside

On The Half-Shell

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or the first time in recorded history this magazine has a cover story about oysters at the same time that the city faces a runoff in a mayoral election. Such a cosmic convergence suggests some sort of story about a New Orleans mayor and oysters. Fortunately there is one. In 1936 when the eloquent President Franklin Roosevelt was in town, he was escorted by the ineloquent mayor of New Orleans, Robert Maestri. The mayor, the President and their entourage, which included governor Richard Leche, toured the town to survey federally funded projects. That night the politicians relaxed. As the story goes, Maestri’s handlers urged the mayor, who was a roughhewn machine politician, to speak to the president as little as possible so that his street dialect patois would not clash with Roosevelt’s high society diction. The mayor contained himself dutifully throughout the day, but lost it when he gushed over the house classic Oysters Rockefeller. Turning to the president, he asked a question that has become a classic bit of local political lore: “How do ya’ like dem ersters?” We’ll get to the President’s response, but first we should note that that moment has been enshrined at Antoines. The dinner was in a long narrow room. If you are facing the Hermes bar it was through the door to the left. On the wall above the table is a photograph of the gathering, The President is sitting in the middle; the governor, mayor and whoever are standing to the sides. 14

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As for other presidential encounters with gulf oysters, Harry Truman was from Missouri where oysters are few, though as president he spent much time in Key West where he could have had oysters from the eastern end of the gulf. And given oysters rumored properties as an aphrodisiac, some presidents might have had sacks of oysters sneaked though the back door. My guess is that the presidentsto-be who had the most access to gulf oysters were the ones who spent the most time in Louisiana. Zachary Taylor lived on a plantation in Louisiana for a while, so he could have had oysters in his dressing, and when Andrew Jackson celebrated the battle of New Orleans, his victory meal reportedly included oyster gumbo. When President George W. Bush came to town in 2002, he dined in the Proteus room at Antoine’s where his meal included Oysters Rockefeller. Bush’s meal prompted a gleeful response from the Louisiana Oyster Task Force, a marketing group for the local mollusks which made a claim that might have otherwise escaped presidential biographers. According to the task force, Bush is a “longtime aficionado of Gulf oysters.” Did Vice-President Nelson Rockefeller ever have Oysters Rockefeller? That is lost to history. Also not known is Roosevelt’s reply to Maestri’s query. We would assume, however that he liked dem ersters real good.


on the web

2017 Press Club of new orleans AWARDS Ashton Phelps Memorial Award for Editorial Writing Errol Laborde Editoral Print “The T-P and The Advocate” Errol Laborde

Our Blogs Be the first to read our blogs, get the 411 on top events around the city and see the features and columns from all seven of our publications all in one place.

Follow us

Special Section “People to Watch” Tiffani Reding Amedeo, Morgan Packard, Sarah Ravits

Facebook: Facebook.com/ NewOrleansMagazine Twitter: @NewOrleansMag Instagram: @NewOrleansMag Pinterest: Pinterest.com/ NewOrleansMag

Our Newletters

Layout Design “50 things every New Orleanian Should Do” Tiffani Reding Amedeo Cartoon Mike Luckovich

Sign up at MyNewOrleans.com/Newsletter

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@NewOrleansMagazine

@NewOrleansMag


meet the sales staff

Kate Sanders Henry Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

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Jessica Marasco

Claire Cummings

Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7220 JessicaM@myneworleans.com

Account Executive (504) 830-7250 Claire@myneworleans.com

Peyton Simms

Colleen Monaghan

Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Peyton@myneworleans.com

Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com


speaking out

Pelicans’ Breakout Year Could this be the season?

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n December 4, 2015, the New Orleans Pelicans played the star-studded Cleveland Cavaliers in the arena. Except perhaps for the Golden State Warriors, just about any team that faces the Cavaliers is an underdog as was the case that night during a nationally televised game. It was not a role that the Pelicans were willing to accept as they led going well into the fourth quarter. In life there are many people who are designated as “super stars,” but only a small sub-group deserves the title. A super-star is best judged when the going gets though and by their ability to make a super effort. So it was that as the clock ticked down, the Cavaliers’ LeBron James took

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charge. In the closing moments no other player mattered. He championed an amazing comeback so spectacular that when the final buzzer sounded, the Cavaliers, only moments earlier down and out, had tied the game and pushed it into overtime. This indeed was a superstar moment. Fortunately the Pelicans, who by that moment had every reason to have lost confidence, had a superstar too, Anthony Davis. After the game Davis revealed a conversation with one of his teammates who implored, “This is the time where you’ve got to be great.” Those who were lucky enough to be watching that night saw a spectacular moment in sports; two stars each controlling a

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portion of the contest. Luckily the portion that Davis controlled was in overtime and the Pelicans won, 114-108. We suspect that somewhere there are still fans who are emotionally exhausted from what they saw. We are now at the beginning of a new season. Despite the stirrings from that December night, the last couple of years have been disappointing for the local guys, but this year there is that feeling, sort of like what we last felt about the Saints in 2009, that maybe, just maybe, there is something special here. Forward DeMarcus Cousins joined the team last season too late to have any real impact, but now he can make a great pairing with Davis. Then there is veteran Jrue Holliday, who was slowed

by injuries and personal issues last season but who is back in full form, and well-travelled, but star-powered, Point Guard Rajon Rondo has a one year contract to see what this team can do. All franchises try to improve during the off-season; it just may be that the Pelicans have done a little better than most. Despite their effort, the Pelicans will have to get past the league-dominating Golden State Warriors to win real gold of their own, but in sports, fortunes can change both up and down. We urge everyone to support the Pelicans. The NBA puts on a fast, well-paced show. Besides, with at least one bonafide star already in the house, on any given night something special can happen. •

AN ORIGINAL ©MIKE LUCKOVICH CARTOON FOR NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE


julia street

Dear Julia and Poydras, On the edge of the green space between Pontchartrain Boulevard and West End, facing Veterans in Lakeview is a square brick/ cement block that seems to have had a purpose at one time. I see it every day and wonder. - Peggy Serio (New Orleans, LA) The mysterious platform you photographed on your daily commute is in Lakeview but it is quite far away from the intersection you specified. It faces City Park Avenue and is located at the edge of the lake-side neutral ground separating Orleans Avenue and Marconi Drive.

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The brick veneered platform is a Sewerage and Water Board service hatch. ----------------------------------------------------------------Dear Julia and Poydras, I was reading the Question to Julia by Bob Pisani and he references the “sparkle houses.” I graduated from Jesuit in 1974 and during my latter years there, we would bring our dates by them on the way out to the lake from Valencia and maybe Fump’s bar. The three “sparkle houses” were on Pine Street behind Dominican and about two blocks past Walmsley on the way to

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with poydras the parrot

out. By 1981, all that glittered had been sold; the houses were gone and had been replaced by multi-story rental properties. Also, for the benefit of readers who may be wondering about Fump’s and Valencia, a little explanation is in order. Thanks for writing Ewell. According to Originally located at The brick 1900 Valence Street, your directions, the veneered platform the non-profit Valencia, houses in question is a Sewerage appear to have been Inc. started the Valencia and Water Board service hatch in the odd 3000 block Club in the summer of of Pine Street. It was 1948 as a social club a residential block with modest and recreation center for area homes but I have found no teens. Fump’s was the original specific explanation of why they F&M bar on Tchoupitoulas Street; glittered and why so many young co-owner John Flynn was nickpeople seem to have sought them named Fump. Washington Ave. They were on the river side. Always enjoyed seeing them, and my wife remembers them too as she was my date! - Ewell C. Potts III (New Orleans, LA)

cheryl gerber photo


Dear Julia, Back in 1971, Margaret, my New Orleans born and raised wife, agreed to leave New Orleans with this Yankee and move to New England. We have returned many times to visit friends, family and familiar haunts. Everyone in our area knows Margaret is from New Orleans proving once again you can take the girl out of New Orleans but you can’t take New Orleans out of the girl. Recently a friend gave Margaret a plate they found at an antique shop. The front of it shows a picture of Newcomb Hall, where her mom went to school, and the rear says “Scenes of Old New Orleans ... made ...for Coleman E. Adler and Sons”. Can you tell me when this series of plates was made and how many were in the series? - Thank You, E. Patrick Storey, Jr. (Tolland, MA) Crown Ducal was a trademark of the A. G. Richardson & Co., Ltd., an English earthenware and pottery firm. Richardson created for the Coleman E. Adler company at least two different series of souvenir plates depicting iconic New Orleans sights. One Crown Ducal series, which I have seen only in blue, featured a laurel design on the rim surrounding a broad cobalt band that encircled a central pictorial image showing a New Orleans view. The pattern you describe seems to have been introduced in the late 1930s and was actively pitched to the tourist market during the yearly Mardi Gras season. I have seen conflicting information about the number of scenes in the series, with a 1941 Adler’s advertisement claiming there were six views and three color schemes; neither the specific scenes nor the color options were listed. The plates originally sold for $1 each and continued in production into the 1950s. By 1952, the price had risen to $1.50 per plate in a

series consisting of eight different but unspecified views available in ether blue or mulberry. New Orleans attractions depicted on Crown Ducal souvenir dinnerware appear to have included St. Louis Cathedral, the intersection of St. Peter and Royal, Brulatour Courtyard, Madame John’s Legacy, Pirate’s Alley, Dueling Oaks, “Lacy Iron” wrought iron and Newcomb College.

Win a restaurant gift certificate Here is a chance to eat, drink and have your curiosity satiated all at once. Send Julia a question. If we use it, you’ll be eligible for a monthly drawing for a Jazz Brunch for two at The Court of Two Sisters. To take part, send your question to: Julia Street, c/o New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Errol@MyNewOrleans.com. This month’s winners are Ewell Potts, III, New Orleans and E. Patrick Storey, Jr., Tolland, MA.

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The Beat MARQUEE . ART . PERSONA . BIZ . EDUCATION . HEALTH . STYLE . CHRONICLES

greg miles photo

Jockey Florent Geroux returns to the Fairgrounds.


THE beat . marquee

November Our top picks for this month’s events By fritz esker

Boudin, Bourbon & Beer

Hell Yes Fest

As the name indicates, there will be tasty boudin and refreshing alcoholic beverages in Champions Square on Nov. 3. Attendees will also be able to sample some of America’s finest cigars in the Nat Sherman Cigar Tasting Tent. Last but not least, legendary chef Emeril Lagasse will be socializing with guests at the event. BoudinBourbonAndBeer.com.

If you’re looking for a laugh, celebrate New Orleans’ thriving comedy scene with Hell Yes Fest. It runs from Nov. 15-19 at various locations throughout New Orleans and features a mix of local and national comedians. There’s improv, sketch, stand-up, as well as surprise shows and different formats (film, podcasting, video games, etc.) along the way. HellYesFest.com.

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Treme Creole Gumbo Festival Local diners can find 12 different interpretations of gumbo in Armstrong Park from November 18-19. Aside from delicious gumbo, there will also be cooking demonstrations and panel discussions. The Trumpet Mafia will be one of many local bands providing music. TremeGumboFest.com.

Celebration in the Oaks Celebrating its 31st anniversary, Celebration in the Oaks once again brings holiday cheer to the young, and young at heart. City Park will be aglow with creative lighting displays spread out over 25 acres. Don’t miss the Mr. Bingle statue and be sure to take a ride on the carousel and the train through the park. NewOrleansCityPark.com/ celebration-in-the-oaks.

cheryl gerber photo


calendar Events, Exhibits & Performances

Sept. 30-Jan. 21

Nov. 13

Solidary and Solitary: The Joyner and Giuffrida Collection, Ogden Museum of Southern Art. OgdenMuseum.org.

Alt-J, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com.

Nov. 3 Jim Gaffigan: Noble Ape Tour, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Nov. 13 Primus, Civic Theatre. CivicNOLA.com.

Nov. 14 The Shins, Civic Theatre. CivicNOLA.com.

Nov. 3 & 5 Pops Specials: Star Wars and Beyond - The Music of John Williams, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com.

Nov. 14-19 The King & I, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Nov. 16 & 18 Nov. 4 Algiers Folk Art Festival, Algiers Folk Art Zone & Blues Museum. FolkArtZone.org/folk-art-fest.

Tchaikovsky’s “Pathetique”, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com.

Nov. 18 Nov. 4 Iron & Wine, Joy Theater. TheJoyTheater.com.

Colin Quinn, Civic Theatre. CivicNOLA.com.

Nov. 18 Nov. 4-5 PAW Patrol Live: The Great Pirate Adventure, Lakefront Arena. arena.uno.edu.

Nov. 5 So You Think You Can Dance Season 14 Tour, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Nov. 9 The Illusionists Present Adam Trent, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Nov. 9 Old Crow Medicine Show, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com.

Troyboi, Joy Theater. TheJoyTheater.com.

Nov. 20 Tyler, The Creator, Joy Theater. TheJoyTheater.com.

Nov. 24 2nd Annual Last Waltz New Orleans, Joy Theater. TheJoyTheater.com.

Nov. 25 Partners-N-Crime and DJ Jubilee 25th Anniversary Celebration, Joy Theater. TheJoyTheater.com.

Nov. 25 Bayou Classic, Superdome. MyBayouClassic.com.

Nov. 9 Jay-Z 4:44 Tour, Smoothie King Center. SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Nov. 27 John McLaughlin/Jimmy Herring, Joy Theater. TheJoyTheater.com.

Nov. 11 GRiZ, Orpheum Theater. OrpheumNOLA.com.

Nov. 28 Hip Hop Nutcracker, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Nov. 12 ZZ Top, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

Nov. 30 Michael Carbonaro Live, Saenger Theater. SaengerNOLA.com.

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THE beat . art

Art on display local exhibits

The Odyssey Ball November 4 7:00 - 11:55 p.m. New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA)

Crescent City Craftsmen GoodWood NOLA is planting deep roots By Alexa Harrison

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n a tiny garage off Freret Street during the fall of 2014, what started as an after-hours shelving unit for District Donuts quickly turned into a full design and build project. At the time, Michael Dalle-Molle and Jordan Gurren didn’t know where they wanted to take this project, or if they could even make something out of it, they just knew they loved to design and build furniture, and that was all that mattered. As such, GoodWood NOLA was a passion project that naturally turned into a business. The duo, who met working on The Road To Berlin exhibit in the WWII Museum, have backgrounds in prop making and scenic carpentry. Their now 11-person crew, however, have various backgrounds, ranging from jewelry design to sculpture and everything in between. Some of GoodWood’s masterpieces can be seen at the Catahoula Hotel, Daily Beet, and Dirty Coast. They’ve also built swings, meeting tables, desks, and chairs at the corporate office and headquarters for the Besh Restaurant Group, and Joy The Baker’s custom kitchen studio. GoodWood offers metalworking, upholstery, concrete, stone, and mixed-media services, in addition to and in combination with their 28

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(anything but) standard woodworking design and build projects. “Wood absolutely has a special meaning to all of us — it is the most commonly used material in our studio, and we care deeply about the types of wood we use and where it comes from,” says Dalle-Molle. The team recently started an initiative with SOUL (Sustaining Our Urban Landscape) called Building The Canopy — a network of local makers and builders working towards a greener New Orleans. The group will have annual gatherings focused on sustainable building resources and actively planting trees to offset consumption. So while neither Dalle-Molle, nor his co-founder, were born and raised here in New Orleans, they now call this place home and are deeply invested in preserving its lush landscape. “I went to Tulane University and fell in love with this city right away — I wasn’t ready to leave when I graduated, and decided to plant my roots in the big Easy,” Dalle-Molle says. Aside from the obvious issues a woodworker might encounter here in the swampy south (humidity, rain, and flooding) the Crescent City offers some things to Dalle-Molle and his team that no other city does quite as well: culture, community, creativity, and collaboration. Thus even as GoodWood plans to offer their services nationwide in the near future, their roots will stay firmly planted as a New Orleans-based company. •

Now in its 51st year, The Odyssey Ball raises money to support NOMA’s nationally-recognized exhibitions and educational programs with a night of what NOLA does best: dancing, dining, and drinking. Noma.org/event/ odyssey-2017.

New Orleans Book Festival November 11-12 New Orleans City Park

This two-day free festival is for readers of all ages and includes readings and panels by both national and local authors, as well as free books for kids, food, and activities. NolaBookFest.org

Prospect.4: The Lotus In Spite Of The Swamp Starts November 18 Various Locations

The fourth iteration of this citywide exhibition finds inspiration in the lotus plant, with work from 70+ artists in 17 locations across New Orleans. ProspectNew Orleans.org

Randy P. Schmidt photos


THE beat . persona

greg miles photo


Florent Geroux In the Winner’s Circle By Ashley McLellan

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lorent Geroux’s jockey career is truly off to the races. Track leader for the past two years, Geroux has made the Fairgrounds his winter home, when he’s not on a whirl-wind tour of international races. A native of France, Geroux moved to the U.S. in 2007 after continuing his family’s tradition of training and jockeying horses. Since then, he has competed in the Breeder’s Cup, the Kentucky Derby, and the Louisiana Derby, to name a few. Geroux completed his 1,000 race this past December at the Fairgrounds, marking a winning season. This fall and winter will mark Geroux’s fourth season riding in New Orleans, and while he hopes to stay on track with his victories, the chase is just as much fun as the win. You started training to be a jockey at a very young age. Did you grow up in a family tradition of working with horses? Yes. My father was a jockey. I went to jockey school when I turned 13. Before that, I wasn’t really into horse riding. I liked soccer. But I went to school and learned about both riding and taking care of horses. What is the most challenging part of your job? The hardest part is keeping fit mentally. If you lose too many days in a row, it can be hard. But you have to remember that sometimes it’s all about the horse. If the horse is slow, there’s nothing you can do. On the other side, the more you win, the more your confidence grows and the better you get. How do you develop a relationship with the horses you ride? I work with them in the morning,

with our daily exercise. I then ride them again in the afternoon. Some rides work out; sometimes it’s not a problem. But then again sometimes you can’t make them win. I try to get involved with them each morning. What is the most exciting part of the race? The most exciting part, of course, is the win. That’s all that counts, really, isn’t it? But truly, every race is different. With each race, it’s never a sure thing. Have you ever been injured? I have been injured; it’s part of the job. I’ve broken my back and my arm. It’s definitely a dangerous sport. The hardest part of being injured is trying to stay in shape and missing races. How has living and racing in New Orleans been for you? I’ve been in New Orleans for the past three winters. I find that people in the south are very friendly. It’s definitely a unique city, with lots of history. Some of it is French history. When we are here, we see a lot of music, and go to restaurants. We avoid the more tourist-driven areas for the most part. We like to hang out on Magazine Street or in Mid-City, where it’s a little more quiet.

At a Glance Age: 31 Resides: Winter in New Orleans; Louisville, Kentucky the rest of the year Born: Normandy, France Favorite Book: I don’t read a lot of books, I read mostly newspapers Favorite movie: Gladiator Favorite TV show: Game of Thrones Favorite Food: Anything French Favorite New Orleans restaurant: G.W. Fins myne w orleans . com

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THE beat . biz

Top 10 NFL teams valuation estimates

Dallas Cowboys $4.8 billion New England Patriots $3.7 B New York Giants $3.3 B Washington Redskins $3.1 B San Francisco 49ers $3.05 B Los Angeles Rams $3.0 B

Big-Money League How the NFL makes teams rich By Kathy Finn

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or football fans, November can be an intense month. With the National Football League’s 32 teams hitting the mid-point of their season, the scrutiny of each team’s performance grows harsher. It’s a time when fans can make their own judgment about whether the big money their teams spent on football talent is paying off. And as they puzzle over that, they might also wonder just how much all that spending affects their team’s bottom line. Rest assured, football fans. Whether or not you are impressed with your team’s performance on the field, there’s a good chance that its balance sheet is in great shape.

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Football revenue has climbed dramatically during the past few decades, thanks in large part to the NFL’s system of sharing league dollars among all its clubs, and the New Orleans Saints have enjoyed the rewards right along with everyone else. According to the latest report by Forbes.com, which annually analyzes the value of every NFL team, the Saints last year raked in $395 million, which is about $116 per resident of the metropolitan area. The team’s annual revenue has climbed 85 percent during the past decade, enabling owner Tom Benson Jr. to shell out increasingly high sums to pay players. Last year, the on-field talent, led by star

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Chicago Bears $2.85 B Houston Texans $2.8 B New York Jets $2.75 B

quarterback Drew Brees, cost Benson $205 million. But even after paying players, coaches, administrative staff and covering the host of other costs necessary to put the team on the field at least 16 times a year, the Saints enjoyed an operating profit – which is revenue minus expenses but excluding taxes and debt service – of $97 million. These figures reflect the heady financial environment in which the NFL and its clubs exist. Big Money is the name of this game, and of all the numbers that the team owners obsess over, the most important one may be team value. Estimates of what a team is

Philadelphia Eagles $2.65 B

New Orleans Saints latest financials

Value $2 billion Revenue $395 million Operating income $97 million Player expenses $205 million Gate receipts $65 million Source: Forbes.com


worth give owners an idea of the price they might be able to get should they decide to put their team up for sale, and Tom Benson is no doubt thrilled to see that Forbes this year valued his team at $2 billion. Benson, who bought the team in 1985 from then-owner John Mecom, paid $72 million for the franchise. Because the Saints and most other NFL teams are privately owned by either a single individual or small group of investors, information about their financial well-being is generally hard to come by. But thanks to the unique ownership structure of one NFL club, fans have a pretty good idea of how much money, at a minimum, is flowing in to all the teams. Since 1923, the venerable Green Bay Packers franchise has been owned by shareholders who paid varying amounts to own a tiny piece of their favorite team. Currently, more than 360,000 people, who paid sums ranging from $5 to $250 per share, own the team. Its public ownership structure subjects the team to Securities and Exchange Commission regulation, including rules that require key financial information to be made available to the public. As a result, the Packers release many details in quarterly and annual financial statements. It is through the Packers’ regular financial reports that payments from the NFL’s shared revenue pool to the league’s clubs have become known. That pool is fed, primarily, by television networks that pay huge sums to the league for the right to air more than 500 pro football games each season. The NFL’s most recent

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long-term deals with CBS, NBC, Fox, ESPN, DirecTV and the NFL Networks totaled more than $7 billion. Additional sponsorships and promotional deals with companies such as Microsoft, which provides the electronic tablets used on the sidelines by coaches and players, push the shared revenue pool still farther into the stratosphere. Once a year, the NFL carves this national pool into 32 equal chunks and sends checks to its franchises. The latest checks totaled nearly $244 million each, based on a report from the Packers. As if the national revenue doesn’t provide enough of a windfall, most NFL teams this year are also benefiting from payments made by the owners of three teams that chose to relocate. The moves by the St. Louis Rams and the San Diego Chargers to Los Angeles, and the impending move by the Oakland Raiders to Las Vegas, will send an additional $27 million to each of the nonrelocating teams. All these payments sent the Packers’ profit – the actual bottom line – to $73 million in the current year. With an estimated value of $2.55 billion, the Packers ranked at No. 13 on the Forbes. com list of NFL teams. While the Saints ranked farther down the list, at No. 27, owner Tom Benson nevertheless must be pleased. The Saints’ value jumped by 14 percent in just the past year. Kathy Finn’s biography of New Orleans Saints owner, “Tom Benson: A Billionaire’s Journey,” is available in most area bookstores and from major online book sellers. •


THE beat . education

Scores are Improving But there are still problems By Dawn Ruth Wilson

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our straight years of increases in college entrance test scores for Louisiana’s high school graduates indicate that education reform efforts are paying off, but the state’s Commissioner of Higher Education isn’t impressed. “It’s nice it’s going up,” Joseph C. Rallo said about increases on the college readiness ACT exam. “But 53 percent of high school graduates still need remediation.” Rallo, who heads the Board of Regents, the state’s coordinating board for higher education, also points out that a majority of the state’s graduates are unprepared to compete for jobs in science,

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technology, engineering and mathematics. “Over 50 percent will require some education in STEM fields,” Rallo said, “and only 10 percent (of students) are STEM ready.” The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Statistics Administration says that between 2000 and 2010, “growth in STEM jobs was three times as fast as growth in their non-STEM counterparts.” The report also says that STEM workers earn 26 percent more income. “We have to measure against the competition,” Rallo said. “Other people will come in and take the

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jobs, or industries will not come here.” Louisiana’s economy has long been stymied by an undereducated work force. Efforts to improve the state’s public schools for nearly two decades have resulted in higher test scores and graduation rates, but as other states also step up academic expectations, matching their performance remains a challenge. According to the state Department of Education, the 2016-2017 composite score for public school test takers climbed to 19.6 from last year’s 19.5. In 2012-2013, the score was 19.1, department’s figures show. A perfect score is 36. The DOE’s figures do not include private school test takers and they reflect students’ best scores. The ACT organization’s statistics differ slightly because it lumps together private and public students’ scores and uses the scores from students’ most recent attempts, according to state officials. Students often take the ACT more than once. Louisiana began requiring all public high school students to take the ACT in the 2012-2013 school year. That requirement means that thousands of students who have no interest in college and who don’t take college preparatory courses are reflected in the state’s composite score. Louisiana is one of 17 states that require all public students to take the ACT. When the DOE released the state’s composite ACT score

in August, it said a “record” 25,704 students scored 18 and above. In general, a score of 18 indicates a student has the minimum skills needed to take college-level courses. A composite score, however, doesn’t necessarily indicate college readiness

Over 50 percent will require some education in STEM fields and only 10 percent (of students) are STEM ready.”

for every subject.Individual scores can reflect weaknesses that must be corrected before a student can take a specific college credit course. Individual student scores are often out-of-balance. A student may score well in English, for example, and score low in math, hence the need to take a remedial course before taking the college credit course. The fact that more than half of Louisiana’s collegegoing graduates need some remediation indicates that many of them will struggle in college. Students also are not graduating from college on time, according to Rallo. Board of Regents statistics show that 31 percent of students attending college via Louisiana’s merit-based TOPs scholarship graduate in the usual four years. The report also shows that only 15 percent of non-TOPS students graduate on-time. •


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THE beat . HEALTH

The Reign of Pain Coping with chronic or acute pain By Kelly Massicot

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ain, no one wants to deal with it, but we all experience it at some point. The main objective is to learn how to manage your pain so you can continue having a full life. People suffer from pain in different ways. Some have chronic illnesses where pain is at the forefront, and others may only experience pain when there is a drop in barometric pressure as the weather changes. The key is knowing which type of pain you are experiencing and then deciding the best course of action from there. The two main types of pain are classified as chronic and acute. Though, on their website, Ochsner describes four main types of pain one can experience – chronic, acute, breakthrough, and pathologic. But there are many others Chronic pain is different than just a cut finger or pulled muscle.

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According to Merriam-Webster, the very definition of chronic is “continuing or occurring again and again for a long time.” This means that though the pain may go away at times, it will typically come back daily or sporadically throughout your life. It’s also more resistant to medicine. Examples of chronic pain include autoimmune diseases, fibromyalgia, cancer, nerve damage, and many more. Acute pain is the other main category of pain. It can involve damage to certain parts of the body like bones, muscles and organs. Ochsner defines acute pain as “the pain associated with the normal recovery process from surgery.” It’s not something that persists for long periods of time and should be easier to deal with. In all aspects of pain, the main thought is how to tackle it. Whenever I am asked about pain and my own chronic illness

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(rheumatoid arthritis), the first thing I tell people is to talk with their doctor. Whether it’s an ENT or a rheumatologist, they know your pain and all of your symptoms, and together you can find those medicines or other forms of treatment to aleviate pain. Since many forms of pain can be brought on by stress or anxiety, easy tactics can include meditation, yoga or simply stretching a few times a day - all of which can be done at home or your desk at work. Even just being consciously aware of where you tend to hold your stress in your body, for example I hold all of my stress in my neck, you can make a conscious change to loosen those tension areas when stressed. Luckily, we live in the digital age where apps and videos are just a fingertip away. This is true for these three outlets. Two meditation apps that have been my favorite

are Calm and The Mindfulness app. Both of these have their own individual qualities that make them great resources, but my favorite is that they are free. I have yet to find a yoga app I like, but there are a plethora of videos on YouTube and written tutorials you can find. Yoga incorporates a lot of meditation techniques, like focusing on your breathing, while still working your joints and stretching out your body. Some of the best stretches I’ve found are from my chiropractor, Dr. Ben of Allied Chiropractic. As a chiropractor, he knew exactly how to alleviate the pain I was experiencing. I would also include acupuncture and massage therapy into this list, because there is little you actually have to do to complete these tasks. Exercise is also a large component to some types of pain management. Many who experience pain can fall into a rut, where they stop moving and exercising. This happened to me and I had to find my new perfect rhythm. Exercising seems like the last thing you’d want to do if you’re feeling horrible, but it’s something that could really turn everything around once you nail down a routine that works for you. Medicine and a self-help plan for tackling pain should be guided by a medical professional. I do not allow anything to be done to me, like acupuncture or certain massages, unless my rheumatologist says it is okay. Make sure you trust your doctor and know your body. If those two things sync up you’re on the path to less pain and a happier lifestyle. •


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THE beat . style

A Feast for the Eyes Our holiday table setting selections By Mirella Cameran

Orange melamine salad plate, green synthetic crystal water glass both by Jade, 875-4420, Jadenola.com; Italian orange linen coated placemat, handmade ceramic oyster dish wear, in abalone and tortoise colors, feather quills and glass, all from Hazelnut New Orleans, 891-2424, Hazelnutneworleans.com; Custom velvet pumpkins with real stems available in a variety of colors and sizes exclusively at Perch, 899-2122, Perch-Home.com; Julia Knight Peony Salt & Pepper shakers in toffee, gold leafed carved wooden coasts, 22� square Festival hemstitched white linen dinner napkin, all from The Linen Registry, 831-8228, TheLinenRegistry.com.

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myne w orleans.com

eugenia uhl photo


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THE beat . chronicles

Up in the Air Ballooning in New Orleans by Carolyn Kolb

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In August of 1834, Baroness Micaela Pontalba was living in France and wrote to a New Orleans relative, mostly discussing her legal problems. In the letter, she wished she could come home to Louisiana in a balloon. Recently, there had been a planned Paris to London balloon flight, cancelled due to contrary winds. Since in two months’ time her father-in-law

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would shoot and badly injure her (and fatally wound himself), her instincts for a speedy departure were sound. Ballooning began in France with the Montgolfier brothers in the 1780s. It soon spread to America. The first possible balloon ride on record in New Orleans might have come in the 1820s. The New London Gazette in Connecticut

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published a report May 16, 1827 he reached Lake Pontchartrain and that “Eugene Robertson, accom- safely landed on the plantation of panied by a young lady, was to Louis Allard, near Bayou St. John, make an ascension in a balloon in today’s City Park. New Orleans on the 22d of April.” Besides providing props for Balloons were usually made of photo booths, balloons in New silk, and were attached to a basket Orleans have given culinary to hold passengers. Long cords, inspiration. Jules Alciatore at or tethers, dangled Antoine’s Restaurant from the basket aloft. was anxious to create a And, there were bags 1920s fake “balloon” dish to honor Brazilian of ballast on board. balloonist Alberto holds early jazz musicians: clarinetist As true today, there Santos-Dumont in Alcide Nunez, were two types of the early 1900s. His trombonist Tom Brown fuel: either hot air, mother recalled her and cornetist Frank then produced by a late husband’s recipe Christian. fire below the balloon, from France honoring or gas, with which the balloon pioneer balloonist Montgolfier. was inflated. So, Jules cut a heart shape out Cincinnati silversmith and of parchment paper, wrapped acclaimed balloonist Richard a fillet of pompano and sauce, Clayton would ascend above and voila! Pompano en Papillote New Orleans in 1839. Gas was ballooned up. Clayton’s fuel of choice. Beginning As in Pontalba’s day, not all at the Gas Works (burning coal balloon flights go as planned. to create gas for street lighting Orleanians Cyril Laan and Tommy and located on Gravier Street at Coleman, balloon hobbyists, the river), Clayton ascended. On launched a gas balloon from City March 8, 1839 in The Picayune, Park on May 30, 1986. The balloon ride aimed for the Atlantic Coast, he described his flight. “The populous city of New and was a fundraiser for Storyland Orleans was now wholly exposed in the park. Sponsors would pledge to my view, with its magnificent per mile of the completed voyage. buildings, its long line of ships, All did not go well. As reported by steamboats and other water craft. columnist Betty Guillaud in The Then my attention was drawn to Times Picayune June 13, when the surrounding woods, the lakes, “the air currents had them on a the Mississippi which I could trace a course for Cuba, they decided to number of miles in each direction… deflate and landed in a nearby Fifteen minutes after starting I swamp.” gained my greatest altitude, which “Not to worry,” Guillaud noted, was about a mile.” “all the sponsors who had pledged Clayton began to descend before big bucks paid off.” •

courtesy of the Hogan Jazz Archive, Tulane University


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Local Color

Chapman Baehler PHOTO

CHRIS ROSE . MODINE GUNCH . JOIE D’EVE . IN TUNE . BOOK REVIEWS . JAZZ LIFE . HOME

Primus returns to The Civic Nov. 13th


LOCAL COLOR . CHRIS ROSE

Pipe Dreams Can be a nightmare By Chris Rose

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ater, water, everywhere, nor any drop to drink. The famous phrase comes from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” a seaman lamenting the bounty of water that spread on all horizons from his ship but from which he was unable to relieve his thirst. Coleridge was an early19th century English poet and philosopher, but in many ways he fits the profile of a thoroughly modern man. A thoroughly modern New Orleans man at that: He was a poet and philosopher. He suffered from anxiety and depression. He was chronically physically unfit. He was in constant financial straights. He was a romantic. Literally; he was one of the founders of the British Romantic Movement. He was even dependent upon opiates, a pre-Victorian scourge enjoying a formidable comeback in these thoroughly modern times. 46

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But more than anything else, he is known for a line of verse decrying the lack of potable water while completely surrounded by it. And that secures his stature as an honorary New Orleanian. Not because the city is completely surrounded by water, which it is. But because you can’t drink it, even if it comes out of your kitchen faucet. Not unless you’re a fan of bacteria, e-coli, diarrhea and God knows what other risks and travails our water system delivers to our homes these days via the constant malfunctions and grandiose incompetence of our Sewerage and Water Board. As I write this story we are under a boil alert. Again. And again. And again. So many times in the past few years that sometimes it seems like the authorities over there are not clear that Sewerage and Water are supposed to be separate departments, not the same product.

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Despite substantial post-Katrina advances in education, urban renewal, entrepreneurship, environmental awareness, civic activism, counter-corruption and swelling city pride, nothing hews more firmly to our lingering reputation as a Banana Republic, a Third World sovereignty – a Confederacy of Dunces – more than our inability to provide consistently reliable safe and operative water works and drainage systems. It’s much like the trials of aging: Losing hair where you want it and sprouting it where you don’t. That’s New Orleans in reverse. We’ve got water where we don’t want it and, too often, none when we need it. The boil advisory of which I currently write – I don’t want to be too specific because who knows if or how many more there will be before this magazine goes to press – caught me unawares, as I’m sure it did many of my fellow citizens. There’s no more comforting feeling than taking a brisk shower, giving your teeth a good, thorough scrubbing, and drinking a refreshing iced coffee before turning on the TV and hearing a stern talking head direly warning that residents of the city should refrain from drinking tap water, taking showers and brushing their teeth without taking emergency precautions. Otherwise, well....we all know what the complications can be. Or do we? Why the hell can’t we have safe and steady drinking water like to rest of the country, Flint, Michigan excepted? (And at least they know every day when the wake up not to drink their water; here, it’s a crap shoot. Will we, won’t we? Do we, don’t we? Tune in to your local news for the latest updates.)

Updates. That’s what our water safety is subject to now, with extraordinarily increasing – and alarming – frequency. It’s not much of a sales pitch to lure the best and the brightest to our city, a new generation of kale-eating, Fitbit-wearing, hybrid car-driving, Lululemon-clad paddle boarders who prioritize health and longevity almost as much as they do money. It’s called Quality of Life. It’s called environmental awareness. It’s called health and safety. It’s called common sense. It’s also called the very essence of our existence: Water. It was another quotable bard, W.C. Fields who once complained that, during Prohibition, he was forced to live on nothing but food and water -- a lamentation I can relate to. He also said: “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There’s no point in being a damn fool about it.” It often seems like we’ve got a bunch of damn fools running our utilities and monopolies. But they’d better not quit. Because, after all this carping, I’ve worked up a powerful thirst. And outside my window as I write this, school busses are dropping kids off at my neighborhood school and that’s a sight that tends to diminish one’s appetite for fermented beverages. But what are the choices? The new head of the Sewerage and Water Board, the man charged with turning around the culture of associates at the utility, is named Paul Rainwater. I don’t know if that is serendipity or some kind of cruel joke. I suppose time, rain and water will tell. But for now, it’s water, water, nowhere. •

Jason Raish Illustration


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LOCAL COLOR . modine gunch

Green Hair Day Glowing when you don’t want to By Modine Gunch

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know it’s the style to dye your hair a color God never thought of, like hot pink or royal blue or K&B purple or whatever. I also know you got to be a certain age to carry it off. Whatever age that is, I am older. But here I am with green hair. Not olive green. Not even emerald green. NEON green. Glow-in-the-dark, scare-you-in-the-graveyard green. I got to explain. It ain’t like I did this to recapture my misspent youth or nothing. What happened was, my little grandson’s school

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needed a green-haired witch for their party on Halloween, and he volunteered me. I could have gotten a cheap wig, but my high-school daughter Gladiola found some neon dye at a costume shop that will be more dramatic, she says. Also, it washes right out, she says. She is right about the first part: it is dramatic. With that hair, plus some face paint and a few fake warts, I scare the bejesus out of them kindergarteners. I think I shook up the teacher, too.

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That evening, I scrub off the face paint and warts, and me and my gentleman friend Lust stroll around the Quarter. My hair glows, and the streetlights reflect off his bald head — very romantic. Gladiola is sleeping over at a friend’s, so we make quite a night of it. The next day is All Saints Day. I wake up late, jump in the shower, wash my hair, and rush to meet my mother-in-law at church, like I promised. “You got green hair, ” she hisses, when I kneel down. “It’s the light from the stained glass window,” I hiss. “They don’t allow that color in church,” she hisses back. Well, after church, my hair is still green, and there ain’t no stained glass around. Thank God I live in the Quarter, where there are plenty of people not acting their age, so I fit in with the scenery. The thing is, I got a temporary job next week. Uptown. I am filling in for my sister-inlaw Larva while she takes a cruise. Larva is a receptionist at very respectable insurance company, M.T. Promisses. She says I don’t have to do much —just sit behind the desk and look respectable. But her boss, Mr. Promisses, won’t consider neon hair respectable. Still, this is Wednesday and I start Monday. Four days to get the green out. Normally, I would call my friend Awlette, who owns Hairy Problems Beauty Salon, but she is in Texarkana, doing everybody’s coiffure for her niece’s wedding, and up to her neck in hysterical

bridesmaids. I got to handle this myself. I try everything I find on Google. I wash my hair in vinegar; Epsom Salts; lemon juice; baking soda. Nothing works. Saturday, Larva comes over and we try this procedure where I coat my head in ketchup; wrap a plastic bag around it while Larva bakes it with a hair dryer, and then peel off the plastic bag and submerge my head in ice water. When we are done, I smell pretty good, if you like McDonald’s. But my hair is still green. Ok. I could claim I am Muslim instead of Catholic and wear a hijab, but that would probably be a sin in TWO religions. A wig would have to be expensive enough to fool Mr. Promisses. He don’t approve of wigs, neither. Then Gladiola strolls into the room. It is noon, which is early for her to be up on a Saturday. She asks what’s going on. Evidently she hasn’t noticed I been washing my hair for three days. After I tell her, in a lot of loud words, she goes into the bathroom and comes back with the box the hair dye came in. She takes out a second bottle. “This is the clarifier, Ma,” she says. “The what?” “The antidote.” And would you believe, when I wash it with the clarifier, it ain’t green no more. How did Gladiola know? “I read the directions on the box,” she tells me. I guess you got to be a certain age to do that, too. •

LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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LOCAL COLOR . JOIE D’EVE

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here are some parenting issues on which my personal stance is clear, well-researched, and firm: I don’t believe in spanking or physical punishment. I don’t do Cry It Out. I don’t force my kids to clean their plates or eat any vegetables they despise (but I do encourage them to try everything). There are some parenting issues on which my personal stance is clear and well-researched but I lack the actual discipline to follow through: Kids should do chores, earn an allowance, go to bed by 8:30 p.m., have restricted screen time, and not eat in the car. I believe all of these things; I just suck at forcing my kids to follow these rules. And then there are the parenting issues on which I actually have no idea what I believe. Prime example: Should children be allowed to quit an activity? One argument is that once a child has committed to, say, ballet or karate or flute or gymnastics, he or she needs to follow through on that commitment. This will teach kids about responsibility and keeping your word. Also, from a practical viewpoint, it costs money to do all of these things. Children need to learn the value of a dollar, so they need to understand that you can’t just become a Ballet School Dropout after your parents have spent money on the class and the leotard and the shoes, etc. Furthermore, for team sports, it’s important to respect your team members by doing your part and not leaving them shorthanded. I believe every single one of 50

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although some things are nonnegotiable (like taking swim lessons, which is a safety issue), I’m still going back and forth on whether we should make her continue cheerleading, which she initially said she wanted to do and then decided she hated after we’d spent close to $200 on lessons and her uniform. I worry that if I force her to keep doing it, I’ll traumatize her in some way, and she won’t try any sports ever again and will also end up resenting me, just as a bonus. I worry that if I let her quit, I’ll teach her that it’s OK to be flakey and that commitments don’t matter and that money is meaningless and she’ll end up resenting me anyway because I When is it ok to let a kid quit? should have been stricter. My guideline thus far has been By Eve Crawford Peyton that if the kid wanted to do the activity in the first place, she has these things. at all, and even though I spent a lot to finish the season or the class session, but if I am the one pushing But then there’s the argument of money on pads and sticks and that children won’t try new things mouth guards, the one solid hit she it, I let them stop. This means, if they fear being forced to stick took scared me enough that I was technically, that Georgia should it out even if they hate it. That more than happy to tell her she be forced to finish cheerleading they should have the freedom to could stop (I did make her finish (her idea) but allowed to stop dabble and experiment until they the season, sort of, but ballet (my idea). (She find their true passions and gifts. we were definitely loves ballet, so that one That kids need more freedom and not all that diligent Excerpted from Eve actually isn’t an issue independence, not more structured about practices, and at all.) Crawford Peyton’s blog, Joie d’Eve, activities. That forcing them to she even missed a But even though which appears keep going to ballet class when game or two). Over a part of me says to each Friday on they hate it will just end up making the years, however, hold firm, another part MyNewOrleans.com it into a power struggle. Ruby has dropped out of me says that she’s of karate, decided piano was a barely five years old and should I believe those things, too. Last year, Ruby did cheer- no-go after one lesson, and gave be allowed some leeway. leading, volleyball, basketball, up ballet without so much as a And so the lessons continue lacrosse, and the school play. backward glance. - the parenting lessons for me, With the exception of lacrosse, at least. Those are the ones you Now that Georgia is in kindershe’s doing them all again this garten, I’m starting to confront just can’t quit. • year – lacrosse was not her scene these issues with her, too, and

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Ballet Battles

jane sanders illustration


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LOCAL COLOR . in tune

calendar must-see music

november 4 Iron & Wine at the Joy Theater

november 6 Saint Motel at Tipitina’s

november 10 Japandroids at Republic NOLA

Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats

november 11

Music to Eat Boudin By Bourbon and beer, too

GRiZ at the Orpheum

november 13 Alt-J at the Orpheum

By Mike Griffith

november 14

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his month the festivities kick off with the return studio record and first new album of original music of the Boudin Bourbon and Beer celebration. since 2011, The Desaturating Seven. These shows are Traditionally the kickoff party for Carnivale de always a visual feast as well as a blend of old and Vin, this event has come into its own over time. new with a generous side of jams. In many ways The event, which is located at Champions Square, Primus stand outside of genre definitions. They hosts a spectacular selection of food and beverage are often lumped in with the alt and funk metal as well as musical accompaniment. This year the scenes of the 90s but their overall catalog is way event is headlined by Nathaniel Rateliff and The more playful than those simple labels.In Primus Night Sweats. After thinking about it a bit, I honestly you have an entity that is completely dedicated to cannot come up with a better match for this party. creative invention by any means necessary. This Rateliff and company’s brand of Americana fit mission permeates every aspect of their live shows. perfectly in with the vibe of the evening. They will The very next night (14th) Tori Amos rolls into the Mahalia Jackson Theater on tour for be supported by Langhorne Slim and The Law as well as Kristin Diable and The City. her fifteenth studio record Native Invader. This is an outstanding night of music in the This record has been a revelation. These Playlist of mentioned midst of excellent fare and libations. Take tracks are meticulously arranged and bands available politically vital. One of Amos’ great skills the time to drop in on this one. at: http://bit.ly/ has always been a mediation between A bit later in the month we are lucky to InTune11-17 have back to back performances from two the personal and the public; between the performers with longstanding careers, deep catalogs intimate desire and collective need. On this record and passionate cult followings. On the 13th, Primus there is a mournful concern for the state of the returns to The Civic as part of their Ambushing The world and its impact on our fleeting humanity. Storm tour. The band has just released their ninth This show is not to be missed. •

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The Shins at the Civic

november 20 Tyler, The Creator at the Joy Theater

november 30 Esme Paterson at Gasa Gasa

Dates are subject to change; email Mike@ MyNewOrleans. com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.


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LOCAL COLOR . book reviews

The People’s Grocer by David Cappello Like K&B, Maison Blanche, and many of the other “‘Aint Dere No More” New Orleans favorites, Schwegmann’s grocery stores hold a special place in many people’s hearts, minds and those brown paper shopping bags. In The People’s Grocer, writer David Cappello not only investigates the man behind the grocery cart, but also explores Schwegmann’s role in the development of the modern grocery shopping experience. Schwegmann pioneered the idea of the “supercenter,” where shoppers could experience departments ranging from: produce, meat, drugs, liquor, lunch counter and even a bar, a feat that would definitely challenge the Wal-Marts and Costcos of today. Even those brown paper bags were a revelation, which were specially printed to promote the stores, as well as provide local color, catchy slogans, holiday wishes and political sentiments. Cappello provides a well rounded, amusing and surprising biography of the man behind Makin’ Groceries in New Orleans.

Angels in the Wilderness by William Barnwell

New Orleans, the First 300 Years edited by Errol Laborde and Peggy Scott Laborde

The art of storytelling allows experiences to be remembered, honored and taught so that others may learn from a personal perspective. Angels in the Wilderness by William Barnwell is a collection of essays, conversations and stories told by mostly young black men and women in New Orleans and their powerful experiences of growing up on the edge. Barnwell, an Episcopal minister and community leader, deftly gathers the voices of those that are most marginalized to shed light on the enduring spirit of New Orleanians. A powerful message of love and social justice, readers will be inspired and moved.

In honor of its 300th birthday, New Orleans journalists Errol Laborde and Peggy Scott Laborde have collected the perfect present in New Orleans, the First 300 Years. A fascinating compilation of essays by 21 authors, the book covers the rich history, rumors, scandals, stories, characters, politics, celebrations, literature and more of one of the most celebrated, haunted, elegant and downright quirky cities in America. A treasure trove of information, the book also includes a special collection of historic drawings, paintings and photographs that capture the spirit of the writing; and the writing chops here are real. (Errol Laborde is Editor-in-Chief for Renaissance Publishing, New Orleans Magazine’s parent company.) Noted authors include: Richard Campanella, Susan Larson, Angus Lind, Ian McNulty and Lolis Eric Elie, to name just a few.

By Ashley McLellan, Please send submissions for consideration, attention: Ashley McLellan, 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005

H = Did not finish

HH = Sort of ok, but kind of meh

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HHH = Enjoyable HHHH = Really, really liked it HHHHH = Loved it; a new favorite!


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LOCAL COLOR . jazz life

Roderick on a Roll Back to the music By Jason Berry

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oderick Paulin has been a heartbeat on tenor sax for a range of local bands, starting with ReBirth in the 1990s. Paulin, 48, saw the guys in ReBirth and Dirty Dozen playing 300 days on the road and wanted something else. He had traveled far from his teenage years, the youngest of six music-making brothers marching the streets in the brass band of their father, Doc Paulin, who paraded more than six decades, retired in his 90s and died at 100. Roderick made a detour in his thirties, to Denham Springs; he held down a day job for ATT and found himself gravitating into Southern University Law School in Baton Rouge. Lawyers can do anything. Roderick figured if they could do it, so could he. But his springboard to professional high cotton came

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down with a missing coil. Three courses shy of the diploma, he got tired and bored; he felt the old fire hitting the belly – he wanted jazz. Musicians move in such an existential world of changes in personnel and places that if you have a profile but dissolve for a dozen years or so (excepting a parade gig now and then) the attitude is not so much where you been? as who are you with these days? These days, Roderick Paulin, back in the city, is a music teacher in the Orleans Parish schools and a mainstay in Delfeayo Marsalis’s Uptown Jazz Orchestra. They play most Wednesdays at Snug Harbor. Roderick Paulin’s new release, Slow But Steady, is a 2-CD set with sterling arrangements of ensemble and big band jazz featuring 39 accompanists on the various tunes,

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among them David Torkanowsky and Larry Sieberth on keyboards; Shannon Powell, Jason Marsalis, Herlin Riley and Gerald French on drums; trumpeters Mark Braud, Jamil Sharif, Wendell Brunious among trumpeters, and at the risk of courting enemies we shall pass over other worthy names in a jump cut to vocalists Germaine Bazzle and Quiana Lynell. All good, all very good. Roderick roams the waterfront on songs as diverse as “Lil Liza Jane,” “Misty,” “Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans” and “Sleepy Time Down South.” The scope of twenty-two songs is a sign of Paulin’s artistic range; he has never been showcased like this, and moves with fluent ease between different styles and use of the tenor, alto and soprano saxophones. “It took fourteen years

to make this record,” he says by phone on a drive between gigs. “I paid for it a little bit at a time, didn’t get any loans, self financed it and I’m seriously happy about it.” He should be. Slow But Steady is a stunning achievement. My only quibble  -- conveyed to Paulin in the call in which he disclosed that his daughter is in final semester at Southern Law -- is the lead cut on each CD, an inspirational Roderick pep-talk on how to make life work, I thought, should have been deepsixed. He burst out laughing. “I hear you, but when they played those cuts on WWOZ, some guy in the Netherlands listening on the web contacted my website RoderickPaulin.com, ordered CDs and said those cuts really helped him out. Tell your readers they can order on Amazon, i-tunes, or CDBaby, too.” I told him I would. •

Calvin Evans photo


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LOCAL COLOR . home

House of Hues Palette pleasing in the Lower Garden District By Lee Cutrone

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yn and Harry Anderson have lived in multiple houses over the years. “Every time we needed to paint, we moved,” says Lyn, who inherited a penchant for moving and decorating from her late mother, and makes the claim only slightly in jest. The impetus for the latest move was a

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bit different. At the suggestion of their daughter, Elizabeth Rousell, the Andersons moved into a large double Victorian in the Lower Garden District - with Elizabeth, her husband John and their two children on the other side. The color palette was a departure as well. While

the Andersons’ previous homes were restrained in their use of color, usually against a neutral backdrop, this one takes color and pattern to another level. “We put color everywhere,” says Lyn. “Throughout the whole room.” For help decorating the house, Lyn called her friend of 50 years, decorator Mary Ferry Bigelow, who also worked on the Andersons’ last house. The two share a love of color and are both in creative businesses. Bigelow has been in the design business for four decades and makes elegant paper white arrangements for sale during the holidays. Anderson, whose creative path included her own catering business, now owns Pop Up Party Town Tents, which rents imaginative themed play tents for childrens’ parties. Because the house had been renovated seven years earlier, the framework was in place. Original architectural elements, including a carved wooden staircase, exterior gingerbread, floor to ceiling windows, wooden floors and fireplaces provide a warm, historic backdrop. Even the pale neutral color of the walls was a keeper. Since the house was a downsize for the couple who collected antiques and art over the years, and inherited others from Lyn’s parents, furnishing it was a no-brainer. That left room for decorator and client to play with color and motif. “I told Mary, ‘we’re going to do the whole place — this is our last stop,’” says Lyn, who relishes living next door to her grandchildren. Fabrics and wallpaper from Manuel Canovas, Kravet, Osborne

Greg Miles photographs Flowers by Mary Ferry Bigelow


Facing page: The color of the purple sitting room was inspired by a room decorated by Billy Baldwin; entertainment center components are from IKEA; the paint color by Benjamin Moore has a high gloss polyurethane finish; the fabric used for the Billy Baldwin slipper chairs and curtains is by Manuel Canovas. Left: Lyn and Harry Anderson with their dogs, Jack (l) and Taco (r). Top, right: The antique console and mirror in the foyer have travelled with the Andersons from home to home over the years; the chandelier was in the home when they purchased it. Bottom: Built in the 1880s, the large Victorian double is believed to have been built by a father for several generations of his family.


Facing page: Top, left: The Andersons refer to the canopy above the bed as “the float” because it reminds them of a Mardi Gras float; pink/green print fabric for bedspread and curtains by Duralee; green/ white lattice linen on dust ruffle and shams, green/ white dot on bench and fuzzy dot on chair, by Kravet; plaid for table skirt by Lilly Pulitzer for Lee Jofa. Top, right: In keeping with the rest of the house, the exterior is punched with color; zigzag patterned rug, from Lowe’s; fabric for cushions, pillows and curtains from Ballard Designs. Bottom, left: The Andersons eat at the kitchen counter or at a small dining table for two tucked away near the stairs. Bottom, right: Striped wallpaper by Osborne & Little was the starting point for the powder room; Bigelow suggested the circus tent ceiling design, the river rock surface on the vanity, and metallic vanity skirt; chandelier from New Orleans Auction, mirror from Crescent City Auction; the antique prints on the wall were a gift from Bigelow. This page: Turquoise and greens were the colors of choice for the living room; the settee in the foreground is covered with a turquoise chenille by Manuel Canovas; the curtains are a leaf pattern fabric by Kravet; giraffe print on chair and ottoman by Calvin Fabrics. Pillows on settee covered with fabrics by Manuel Canovas and Romo; all trims by Samuel & Sons; an abstract by Allison Stewart hangs above an antique chest handed down from Lyn’s parents.

& Little, Duralee, Harlequin and other well-known names became the springboards for most of the color selections inside. The exception is the upstairs sitting room (purple with a pale green ceiling), which was inspired by a room decorated by Billy Baldwin, Lyn’s favorite interior designer. In the Andersons’ version of the space, Bigelow used a Manuel Canovas fabric for the curtains and a pair of Billy Baldwin slipper chairs and created an entertainment center with IKEA components painted the same purple as the walls. Other ideas evolved spontaneously during the collaboration. When the friends chose a striped wallpaper for the powder room, Bigelow designed the ceiling to look like a whimsical circus tent and found an unusual metal chandelier at New Orleans Auction. Neither was fond of the rustic vanity that already existed in the room, so Bigelow suggested resurfacing it with river rocks, adding a glossy polyurethane finish and dressing it with a metallic skirt. The comfortable sitting room was

done with Harry in mind. His ham radio occupies a corner near the windows and the piano he plays daily is on the landing just outside the room. The master bedroom and adjoining bath are a more feminine retreat with traditional antiques and shades of pink and green. Works, by a variety of artists, including Alison Stewart, Stephanie Schoen, Lyn’s sister-in-law Gretchen Howard, her late uncles Wing Howard and Frank Howard, Jimmy Block and Luis Colmenares add a final layer of color and form. “Using a person’s art and objets is what makes a house a home and gives it character,” says Bigelow. “It reflects the way a person thinks and feels and lives.” The fact that the house has returned to the multifamily use for which it was originally built in the late 19th century makes it a happy haven for the Andersons as well. “We believe that this house and several others nearby were built by a father for several generations of his family,” says Lyn. “And now we are using it in the same way again.” •

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Oysters I n s e a r c h of t h e b e s t f r om t h e s h e l l s

To choose among New Orleans’ thousands of oyster dishes is a daunting, but delicious, task. In an effort to bring some kind of order to the challenge of determining which among them reign supreme in one of four categories - fried, char-grilled/char-broiled, specialty, and raw - I deliberately avoided poor-boys. Though the filling in an oyster poor boy is, indeed, fried, so many other elements of the sandwich can be subjective - the bread, the dressings, the ratio of mayonnaise to ketchup, yada yada. And then it fails to be about the oyster. And it had to be about the oyster. That’s the point. Other elements were welcome in supporting roles, even prominent ones, but if the oyster had sacrificed itself to the dish via a thick, heavy breading or an unctuous sauce that masked, rather than enhanced, the relatively assertive flavor and texture of the main attraction, it did not make the cut. Baked oyster dishes held under heating lamps until the content of the dish amalgamated into a singular mass? No. Char-grilled varieties blasted atop an inferno, resulting in a shriveled sticky mass coated in burned cheese necessitating a chisel for removal from its shell. No again. I set out to identify those who celebrate, rather than humiliate, this singular shellfish around which we will increasingly congregate as cooler temperatures usher in the height of oyster season. The following, in each category, are presented in no particular order.

By Jyl Benson

Photographed by Eugenia Uhl


Bourbon House raw oysters


Shuck and Jive How to Shuck an Oyster

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Find the hinge (muscle) that connects the top and bottom shells at the pointy end of the oyster. Hold the shell top (flat) side up with the hinge facing toward you. Insert the oyster knife into the hinge and point it down into the bottom (cup) of the oyster. Twist the knife to separate the top and bottom shells. You will feel the hinge pop.

Run the blade along the top of the shell keeping it close to the top. Now run it from the hinge around to the other side of the oyster, twisting to separate the top and bottom shells. Take care not to tip the shell from side to side or turn it over or the oyster’s liquor will pour out. You want the liquor.

When the oyster is open run the knife along the top shell to separate any remaining meat. TIP: You will need an oyster knife and a heavy rubber or canvas glove. (If you are not a professional, wear a glove.)


Raw Bourbon House 144 Bourbon St. 522-0111 bourbonhouse.com

NOSH 752 Tchoupitoulas St. 581-1103 noshneworleans.com

Seaworthy 630 Carondelet St. 930-3071 seaworthynola.com

Raw, wild Gulf oysters have long been offered with Champagne Mignonette and Ghost Pepper Cajun Caviar but recently on Thursdays, Bourbon House has been offering a changing selection of three different farm-raised Gulf oysters until they run out. The rotating varieties allow connoisseurs to experience different flavors from different regions in Gulf waters

NOSH (New Orleans Social House), a new warehouse district hot spot features wild Louisiana Gulf oysters at the raw bar

At Sac a Lait, raw, wild Gulf oysters are served with wild pepper mignonette, cocktail sauce and horseradish.

Seaworthy offers an array of both wild and farm-raised oysters from near and far. Farm-raised species include Louisiana Caminada Bay area 3, Alabama Massacre Island area 3, Alabama Point aux Pins area 3, Massachusettes Bass Masters from area 3, and West Coast Fanny Bay area 3. Louisiana area 1.5 wild Gulf East Coast oysters and wild Florida Apalachicola area 2.5,are also available.

Station 6 105 Metairie Hammond Hwy. Bucktown 345-2936 station6nola.com

Trinity 1117 Decatur St. 325-5789 trinityrestaurantneworleans. com

On Tuesdays -Thursdays from 3-6 p.m., Station 6, a new Bucktown favorite, offers a half dozen raw, wild Gulf oysters are offered with Cajun Caviar and a glass of Champagne Lallier Grand Reserve Brut for $15.

The raw bar at Trinity is a flowing expanse of flawless super white marble and a rotating variety of both wild and farm raised varieties are offered. Try them topped with lemon, Herbsaint mignonette, and radish sprouts.

Peche Seafood Grill 800 Magazine St. 522-1744 pecherestaurant.com Pêche Seafood Grill offers both wild and farm-raised East, West, and Gulf oyster comparisons.

Sac a Lait 1051 Annunciation St. 324-3658 sac-a-laitrestaurant.com

Sauce it Up

Eating raw Oysters Serve up safely

1 Fresh is Best Choose fresh oysters with closed shells. If an oyster’s shell is open, it’s likely that it’s already dead. Lightly tap the shell, just in case; if it immediately shuts, the oyster is still alive and safe to eat. If it’s dead it could kill you, too. Not cool. Pitch it.

2 Ship Shape Oysters should smell sweet, briny, and fresh, not “fishy.” The shells should feel weighty in your hand. A heavy feel indicates the shells are still desirably full of seawater and, therefore, fresh. If the shell feels light the seawater has probably dried up and the oyster has shriveled. Skip it.

3 Cold as Ice

Classic Tarragon Mignonette Makes 1/2 cup 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh tarragon leaves 1/2 cup champagne vinegar 2 teaspoons very finely chopped French shallots 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice Dash of salt Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Chill for at least one hour to allow flavors to marry. Serve as a dipping sauce with oysters

Keep the oysters on ice until ready to shuck. If the oysters are dirty, wash them in ice water and use a stiff brush to scrub the shells clean.


Peche Seafood Grill

If serving on the half shell place the oyster back in the cupped bottom shell set over crushed ice. Serve with desired condiments or au naturel.


Goodenough at Carrolton Market


Crispy Fried P&J Oysters at maypop

Crunch Time coatings for the crunchiest fried oysters

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Panko

Corn Meal

Crackers

Panko, Japanese-style breadcrumbs, create a super light and crunchy coating for fried oysters. To use, dredge freshly shucked oysters in flour, then dip in an egg and milk wash and coat liberally with Panko. Fry in small batches, drain and serve immediately.

Many cooks use a traditional coating of equal parts flour and southern white cornmeal for a quick fry. The result: a crisp crust with a soft plump oyster inside. For best results, soak the oysters in buttermilk prior to coating in the flour-cornmeal mix.

Use leftover sleeves of saltines from the raw bar for an easy oyster coating. Place crackers from two whole sleeves in a food processor, and pulse into a fine crumb. Coat freshly chilled and drained oysters in an egg wash and then roll in cracker crumbs. Refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours prior to frying.


Fried Maypop 611 O’Keefe Ave. 518-6345 maypoprestaurant.com

Carrollton Market 8132 Hampson St. 252-9928 carrolltonmarket.com

Chef Michael Gulotta has the stones and the skill to put the most eccentric combinations out there and make them work. Nowhere is this more screamingly apparent than in his Crispy Fried P&J Oysters at Maypop. What sounds pretty benign turns out to be anything but. He dredges plump oysters in a blend of cornmeal, corn flour, all-purpose flour, rice flour, and ground panko seasoned with cayenne pepper, garlic powder and onion powder. He quickly flash fries them for a crisp exterior and silken interior then sets them atop left over soy mash he gets from his friend, Matt Jamie, who ages soy sauce in old Jim Beam barrels. The oysters are then topped with a vinaigrette made with Tabasco mash powder that kicks in as spicy and acidic and instantly imparts a kimchi-like flavor. Additional crunch comes from marinated cucumbers and shaved radish that he tops with shavings of Manchego cheese for additional richness and umami. The last layer is a sprinkle of cilantro leaves. To get the full, kind of mind-blowing experience you will need a big fork to assemble all of those elements into the Right Bite.

Chef Jason Goodenough lent his name to the oyster creation that is certain to be widely imitated and is already destined to become a classic. He serves his Oysters Goodenough at his cozy Riverbend bistro, Carrollton Market. The oysters are flash fried then placed back on their half shells atop a base of creamed leeks studded with bits of Benton’s bacon. They oysters are then topped with a bright Béarnaise crafted with enough tarragon to cut through the fat. Rich is the word and these oysters scream for a glass of cold, crisp, bright champagne.

Galatoire’s 209 Bourbon St. 525-2021 galatoires.com To make Oysters en Brochette, Galatoire’s threads plump specimens onto wooden skewers next to curls of poached bacon then the deal is sealed with a sturdy egg-rich batter before the skewers are deep fried. They arrive at table atop a pool of tangy Meuniere sauce and toast points with lemon wedges. A small quirt of the juice enlivens the rich bite.

Clancy’s 6100 Annunciation St. 895-1111 clancysneworleans.com Since Clancy’s opened on a quiet Uptown street in the 1980s the restaurant’s signature dish of fried oysters set atop sautéed spinach under a lush, chunky blanket of melted Brie has been a menu staple. Though it came to be in an era when nibbling Brie with Chardonnay was all the rage the now iconic dish survived the era of big hair and remains as brilliant an innovation as the day it was first composed.

Irene’s Cuisine 539 St. Philip St. 529-8811 The Paneed Oysters at Irene’s Cuisine are coated with Italian bread crumbs and quickly pan-fried to render a crisp exterior, then served with beurre blanc, plump grilled shrimp, and a spinach salad dressed with a raspberry and balsamic vinaigrette. I will admit to less-than-high hopes for this unorthodox combination, but it really works. The colors and textures on the plate make for a beautiful presentation and the perfect bite merges all of these rather disparate ingredients together for a perfect balance of crunch, fat, acid, astringency, sweetness, and salty brine. It’s simply brilliant.


Oysters en Brochette at Galatoire’s

Fried oysters pair well with an acidic garnish such as fresh salsa, tangy tartar sauce or a simple squeeze from a lemon wedge.


Belly Up to the Bar Beer Dives & Raw Oysters Beer dives like Cooter Brown's (509 S Carrollton Ave., 866-9104 cooterbrowns.com) and poor-boy/ oyster bar hybrids like Acme Oyster House (Acme Oyster House, 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, acmeoyster. com), and Felix's (739 Iberville St., 522-4440, felixs.com) will always be beloved places to slurp down a dozen. The ice-cold oysters that arrive on trays, usually propped up on beds of crushed ice, are irregularly-sized, wild muscular specimens that were dredged from beneath the Gulf's muddy waters. They are typically either slurped up straight from the shell or dunked in sauce of catsup and horseradish with a squirt of lemon then plunked on a saltine cracker and washed down with a beer.


char-grilled oysters at drago’s


char-grilled oysters at sac a lait


Char-grilled Drago’s 3232 N. Arnoult Rd. Metairie 888-9254 Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel 584-3911 dragosrestaurant.com

Oyster Loaves the best bread for dipping Warm French bread remains the ultimate partner for chargilled oysters; serve whole loaves or chunky slices for dipping in the rich garlic butter, cheese and oyster liquor. Yet, not any loaf will do; New Orleans French bread is unique, with a crisp crust, soft pillowy inside and a toothsome tear. Some of our favorites: Leidenheimer Baking Co. has been in the bread business for more than 100 years, and was named a “Guardian of Tradition” by the Southern Foodways Alliance in 2005. Loaves, sold in their distinctive paper wrappers, are available in grocery stores across New Orleans. Alois J. Binder Bakery has been in the baking business since 1914, and remains a favorite in the kitchens of New Orleanians and restaurants alike. Stop by their Frenchman Street bakery for a loaf or two. LeJeune’s in Jeanerette, Louisiana may be a bit off the beaten track, but the 133-year-old bakery ships loaves of French bread three days a week. Fifth generation bakers use traditional methods and recipes. Locals know to stop and grab a loaf when the bakery pulls them fresh from their ovens.

What is probably the most knocked-off oyster dish in history was conceived not by a chef but a second generation restaurant manager. Legend has it that Tommy Cvitanovich, was messing around in Drago’s Fat City kitchen in 1993, when he cobbled together a sauce of garlic, butter and herbs, ladled it over oysters on the half shell, hit them with a pop of Parmesan and Romano cheeses, placed them on the grill, and forever put to rest the question of whether or not seafood and cheese belong together. Drago’s, founded in 1969 by Croatian immigrants Drago and Klara Cvitanovich now turns out as many as 900 dozen charbroiled oysters a day from three locations in two states. The Drago’s Charbroiling Engine Co. fire truck or the a Drago’s-themed EMS vehicles will show up on site to cook what Tom Fitzmorris called “the single best bite of food in New Orleans” for charity events and private parties. If you need your fix but don’t want to leave home Drago’s charbroiling kits are available locally at Rouse’s markets and online. For $69.95 you get three dozen raw, chilled Gulf oysters accompanied by a frozen gel pack, a pint of sauce, a pint of cheese blend, three dozen aluminum cooking shells, and some French bread for mopping up the sauce.

Katie’s Restaurant 3701 Iberville St. 488-6582 katiesinmidcity.com Katie’s Chef/Owner Scot Craig likes to involve margarine

rather than butter in the garlic sauce he uses to top the char-grilled oysters he started serving in his popular Mid-City neighborhood eatery in 2010. “It allows us to cook the oysters at a higher temperature without them burning or drying out. For his Oysters Slessinger, which are also char-grilled he really guilds the lily with a rich topping of minced shrimp, crisp bacon, spinach and— Scot’s go-to weapon—smoky Provel cheese he has his mother in law overnight him from St. Louis—swirled in with the garlic sauce.

Sac a Lait 1051 Annunciation St. 324-3658 sac-a-laitrestaurant.com At Sac a Lait, the chic, deeply personal Warehouse District eatery chefs Samantha and Cody Carrol designed and built with their families in an 1892 cotton mill, the chargrilled oysters arrive not on a predictable try lined with a bed of rock salt but, rather, in the kind of terra cotta dish you expect to find under a houseplant. Assorted small rocks and pebbles form a heatconducting bed while keeping the oysters aloft. It’s the kind of presentation you would expect to find at a camp, which is the intention. The rusticity ends there as the Gulf specimens are bathed in a flavorful jalapeño and bacon laced garlic butter and cooked under a blanket of rich, salty Pecorino Romano cheese. The oysters are accompanied by house-made French bread that’s brushed with garlic butter before it, too, hits the grill.

Casamento’s 4330 Magazine St. 895-9761 cassamentosrestaurant.com Change comes neither easily nor often at Casamento’s, the pristine white-tiled oyster

house on Magazine Street that probably looks today pretty much the way it did when Joe Casamento opened it in 1919. Though oysters were long-ago deemed safe to eat and of high quality even during the hottest months, proprietor CJ Gerdes, the founder’s nephew, still closes June-August. More throwbacks to the past: No separate checks and no credits cards. It’s cash only and your crew can figure out how to divvy up the bill on your own. With a clear aversion to change Gerdes set the city abuzz when, in 2014, he started offering char-grilled oysters on the menu. The style here is a straight-up “imitation is the most sincere form of flattery” ode to Drago’s but the restaurant had to hire a second full-time shucker to keep up with the demand for the garlicky beauties, which are grilled outside behind the restaurant. You can also get the fragrant garlic butter ladled over French fries.

Acme Oyster House 724 Iberville St. 522-5973 acmeoyster.com The original Acme Oyster House, at Bourbon and Iberville streets, is ground zero for tourists trying to fulfill a lust awakened in them via their televisions. Crews from shows on The Travel Channel and The Food Network have found their money shots in Acme’s oysters sizzling and popping on the grill under the restaurant’s kaleidoscope of neon signs. Long lines can stretch down the sidewalk, even in the dead of summer. It’s worth the wait to score a seat at the raw bar where vacationing celebrants create a festive air. Char-broiled oysters arrive sizzling in their own juices married with butter, herbs and garlic under a crust of Romano cheese.


2 cups Champagne or other sparkling wine (you could also use vodka)

1/4 cup Cajun Caviar, either original or ghost pepper variety

1/2 cup minced chives

48 freshly shucked oysters, preferably small ones, with their liquor

Combine the oysters, their liquor, Champagne or vodka and chives. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour. To each of 24 small, clear shot glasses add two oysters. Divide the liquid and chives evenly among the glasses. Top each shot with Cajun Caviar. Serve.

Down the Hatch char-grilled oysters at katie’s restaurant

Oyster Shooters with Champagne & Cajun Caviar Makes 24 shots


Specialty DTB 8201 Oak St. 518-6899 dtbnola.com Since it opened on Oak Street in March, DTB (Down the Bayou) has become a hotspot for reinterpreted coastal Cajun cuisine, craft cocktails, and an atmosphere that successfully captures elements of the swamp and ‘da camp in a refreshing, contemporary way. Co-Owners Jacob Naquin and Chef Carl Schaubhut both have roots in bayou towns, lending authenticity to the way they gently evolved what they know. Schaubhut worked with Chef de Cuisine Jacob Hammel in creating the excellent Oyster Gratin that arrives sizzling in a small cast iron casserole dish. The surprise of smoked oysters was a welcome one, the smoke suffusing with the plump oysters’ brine to cut through a rich Parmesanand-charred-onion-laced Béchamel sauce under the crackle of herb-rich gremolata crust. Spread it on rounds of toasted French bread for the perfect bite.

Irene’s Cuisine 539 St. Philip St. 529-8811 Since it opened on the then relatively quiet corner of Chartres and St. Philip streets in the early 1990s, the dining rooms at Irene’s Cuisine have been consistently packed with enthusiasts seeking

the restaurant’s signature interpretations of CreoleItalian food. The namesake Oysters Irene has been a staple from the beginning, one of the building blocks upon which the cozy, romantic spot built its reputation. Oysters are baked in their shells under minced roasted red peppers, crisp smoky pancetta, bright lemon, and Romano cheese. They arrive golden and crusty, the oysters still plump and briny.

Trinity 1117 Decatur St. 325-5789 trinityrestaurantneworleans. com Oysters are the house specialty at Trinity with the menu offering them in six preparations, but Chef Michael Isolani’s creativity and daring in topping simple, creamy deviled eggs, the filling enlivened with horseradish, with delicately smoked oysters under scant teaspoon of ghost pepper-kissed Cajun caviar won the day. A serving of three of the bite-sized morsels makes an ideal snack especially with a chilled glass of robust champagne

Aranud’s Restaurant 813 Bienville St. 523-5433 arnaudsrestaursant.com Named for Jean de Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, who founded New Orleans in 1718, Arnaud’s Oysters Bienville became popular under the restaurant’s founder

Arnaud Cazanave in the1920s. Served baked on the half shell under a creamy dressing featuring shrimp, mushrooms and Romano cheese bound with breadcrumbs, the elegant dish feels just right for an occasion in the grand French Quarter restaurant. Arnaud’s features five baked oyster dishes and the signature Oysters Arnaud offers samples of all five Bienville, Rockefeller, Oysters Kathryn, Oysters Ohan, and Oysters Suzette.

Commander’s Palace 1403 Washington Ave. 899-8221 commanderspalace.com When I checked in to Commander’s Palace for brunch last spring to discover the Oyster and Absinthe Dome absent from the menu I was compelled to call Chef Tory McPhail to protest. He assured the dish would return seasonally with the return of cool weather and I could have wept with relief. Upon my death an embalming in the concoction (oysters, artichoke, bacon, absinthe, cream, garlic, shallot, tarragon) that awaits my spoon under the lofty, golden puff of pastry would suit me just fine.


Oysters Irene at Irene’s Cuisine


Oyster Gratin at DTB


A New Wave Farm-raising Oysters In recent years a greater variety of raw bars have opened. Change was ushered in by the introduction of farm-raised Gulf oysters labeled with their specific place of origin and a greater availability of elegant East Coast specimens like Blue Points and Malpeques, all of which are sold individually, rather the by the pound, as opposed to their wild brethren which commercial fishermen sell based on shell weight. Though oyster farming has been common in the northeast for years, the volume of southern farmed oysters is expected to quickly surpass the North due to the high nutrient content in the Gulf. Northern oysters are ready for harvest in two years, here they are ready in 14-to-16 months. In an oyster farming operation, seed oysters grow in hatchery baskets suspended just over the water, each filled with 80 to 100 growing oysters, allowing the swells to gently wash and polish the specimens within the baskets with the slow roll of the tide. Like their northern counterparts, the southern oysters benefit from the safety of the caging system that makes them inaccessible to predators. As the waves wash over them, the oysters ingest only the Gulf’s rich nutrients, not the mud mixture the bottom feeders subsist on. Once a week, they are lifted out of the water to dry out and bask in the sun, ensuring clean, luminous shells. They are graded and sorted by size and run through a tumbler to break down the ragged edges of their shells. This makes the oyster shells shorter, tougher, and easier to open up without the shell breaking. Tumbling also causes the oysters to clamp down and makes their muscles stronger. The result is a small, plump oyster in a deeply cupped shell. Farm-raised oysters are usually offered raw on the half shell, either unadorned, with a bright Mignonette sauce, or a simple squeeze of fresh lemon. To mask their flavor and lush texture under a blanket of ketchup just seems terribly wrong.

oyster Deviled Eggs at Trinity


Prospect

“The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp” International contemporary art comes to New Orleans By John R. Kemp


“Photo Bloke,” 2016, by Barkley Hendricks of New London, CT


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ew Orleans is a city that celebrates creative souls and its place in the American psyche. It revels in its own history, real and imagined, and thinks of itself as a place like none other in North America. The existentialist novelist Walker Percy once described the city, his adopted hometown, as an island “cut adrift not only from the South but from the rest of Louisiana, somewhat like Mont Saint-Michel awash at high tide.” Percy’s New Orleans, with its graceful patina of age, cultural history, architecture and almost smothering humid floral landscape, is a natural open-air art gallery. With that in mind, Prospect New Orleans has launched this year’s international contemporary art triennial “Prospect.4: The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp.” The citywide art show, which runs November 18 to February 25 and is free to the public, explores the city’s creative spirit in the visual and performing arts and its historical connections to Africa, the Caribbean and Europe. Billed as one the nation’s largest triennial art exhibitions, Prospect.4 features artwork by 73 local, national and international artists from 25 countries in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and Europe. New Orleans-area artists included in the Prospect.4 line up are Wayne Gonzales, Darryl Montana, Jennifer Odem, Quintron and Miss Pussycat, John T. Scott, Michel Varisco, Monique Verdin, and jazz legend Louis Armstrong. Yes, in addition to blowing a mean horn, Armstrong was also a talented visual artist. The guiding intellectual force and artistic director behind P.4, as it is generally called, is Trevor Schoonmaker, chief curator of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and a member of the board of directors for the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts in New York. Schoonmaker’s credentials in contemporary art in the South are solid. In 2016, he co-curated an exhibition called “Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art” at Duke University with Miranda Lash, the contemporary art curator at the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, and former curator of contemporary and modern art at the New Orleans Museum of Art. Lash along with six other international artists and curators served on Schoonmaker’s council that helped recommend artists for P.4. Schoonmaker could not have chosen a more appropriate concept for an art show in a city surrounded by swamps and still recovering from Hurricane Katrina. Despite the obvious implications and imagery of the lotus and the swamp, he says the underlying theme is more complex.

Lotus as a Symbol “The lotus in spite of the swamp is evocative of the natural landscape of New Orleans, but it isn’t intended to be a direct metaphor for the city,” he says. “Rather, it speaks more broadly to the tumultuous state of the world today, rife with cultural, social and political tensions. The lotus is viewed as a symbol of spiritual enlightenment in Buddhism and Hinduism. As its beautiful bloom flourishes above the nutrient-rich, but fetid, muddy water, the lotus flower suggests the possibility of rising above trying circumstances, both as individuals and as a society.” The “lotus” subtitle is based on a 1970 quote from famed jazz saxophonist and composer Archie Shepp who described jazz as “a symbol of the triumph of the human spirit, not its degradation. It is a lily in spite of the swamp.” That brought the metaphor home. “The triennial’s title provides the primary connective tissue for Prospect.4,” says Schoonmaker.


“Act of Recovery (Part 1), Nouakchott, Mauritania,” 2016, by Dewitt Petros of New York


“Cathedral,” 2003, Woodcut Print by John Scott, Courtesy of Arthur Roger Gallery


“Some specific themes and subjects that individual artists investigate are the environment, specifically marine or river ecology, social justice, cultural hybridity, identity, displacement, colonialism and music.” Understanding New Orleans, Schoonmaker says, is like peeling away the layers of an onion. “I am referring to the cultural complexity of the city of New Orleans itself,” he says. “It has such a diverse and complicated history, with rich, esoteric cultural traditions that only insiders specific to those social groups know the details of. That makes for very “1001st Island-The Most fertile soil for artists to mine.” He Sustainable Island in goes on to say that the “tropical, Archipelago,” 2015, by Tita wetlands ecology, colonial history Salina of Indonesia and racial and economic inequity are realities of New Orleans that connect it to the Global South.” That layered, cultural complexity has inspired a triennial unlike any other. “In most biennials and triennials,” the North Carolina curator says, “the connection between the

14-week triennial. Grouped under the title of “P.S. Satellites,” 50-plus local photographers, painters, sculptors and others have signed up to show their work in locations that run the gamut from traditional art galleries and art collectives to almost every conceivable alternative space. The same was done in all three previous Prospect New Orleans biennials and to great success. Gallery-goers got to see some of the best contemporary art being created in the region. P.4 and P.S. Satellites are great opportunities for local artists to show their work to an international audience, says New Orleans photographer Michel Varisco, whose work is included in P.4. “It’s an honor to be included in this international triennial,” she says. “It not only heightens the visibility of the work with curators and institutions from around the globe, but more importantly it allows our stories of place to be taken further – stories about an endangered land and culture that are vital stories in these times. I think what’s resonating with Schoonmaker are works that touch on social and environmental consequence, and this makes for an interesting and compelling show, and perhaps even

exhibition and the city is far more tenuous and the artistic director spends much less time on the ground. But New Orleans is a special place and Prospect was conceived and created differently than most triennials. In this particular case, I have been coming to New Orleans since 1994, so I have some prior familiarity that is helpful. Perhaps even more importantly, my professional and personal interests and experience happen to be well aligned with the city. I have lived in West Africa and Europe and I am also a southerner.”

more if it moves viewers deeply enough.” Prospect New Orleans is all about showcasing New Orleans to the world as an important center for contemporary art. The concept began back in 2006 when the internationally acclaimed art curator Dan Cameron, a veteran of international biennials in Taipei and Istanbul and later a member of the New Orleans Contemporary Art Center’s staff, made one of his many visits to New Orleans and saw that a citywide contemporary art biennial was just the morale booster the city needed to help recover from Hurricane Katrina. With financial backing from philanthropist Toby Devan Lewis, Cameron launched Prospect New Orleans in 2007. Prospect.1 opened the following year to rave national reviews. According to Prospect New Orleans reports, Prospect.1

Special Exhibits In addition to the 73 artists featured in this year’s triennial, P.4 is also working with the local art community to organize special exhibitions and events to run concurrently with the


attracted approximately 88,000 visitors to the city and infused over $23 million into the local economy. It also gave New Orleans much needed positive international press coverage. With that success under its belt, Prospect New Orleans opened offices in New York and New Orleans. At the end of P.3 in early 2015, however, Prospect officials closed the New York location and consolidated all operations in New Orleans. They also changed the biennial to a triennial to give organizers more time to plan. P.4 officials now hope the turnout for this year’s event will exceed P.1 numbers as well as the estimated 72,000 local and international visitors for P.2 in 2011 and the 100,000 for P.3 in 2014. Numbers aside, stalwart visitors to P.4 will see not only remarkable intellectually charged and often challenging contemporary art from around the globe but also visually rich and often surreal venues in the city’s earliest neighborhoods. Unlike earlier Prospect biennial sites that were spread across the city from the Lower 9th Ward to Audubon Park, P.4 has concentrated locations to make them more convenient and easier to find. The 17 sites are located mainly in the French Quarter, Central City, Algiers Point, and in the Marigny and Bywater neighborhoods. Prayer Wheels Examples of works along the P.4 trail are Varisco’s Tibetaninspired “Prayer Wheels for the Mississippi River” located on the Lafitte Greenway, and the late New Orleans artist John Scott’s remarkable woodcut print “Cathedral” at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art on Camp St. Others include Brooklyn-artist Derrick Adams’s multi-media installation on the Riverfront Streetcar and the Nigeria-born Philadelphia artist Odili Donald Odita’s installation on the Algiers Ferry. According to P.4 organizers, Odita’s work is part of a citywide project that includes custom flags that work “the theme of stars and stripes, while using his trademark sense of form, color, and space to investigate cultural differences and ideas of exclusion and inclusivity within America.” Located at Algiers Point is New York artist Mark Dion’s “Field Station for a Melancholy Marine Biologist,” an art installation that explores the ecology of the Mississippi River and delta. Others not to miss are Louis Armstrong’s collages along with artworks by artist and jazz musician Satch Hoyt, and Big Chief Darryl Montana. All three are located at the New Orleans Jazz Museum in the Old U.S. Mint on Esplanade Avenue. When the show ends in February, all of the art will be returned to the artists, galleries and owners. Prospect New Orleans biennials and triennials also give locals an opportunity to see what social, cultural and environmental issues are driving contemporary artists in New Orleans and in other parts of the world. P.4 media-relations coordinator Andrew Freeman says almost half of the art was created specifically for the triennial. Thirty-two of the 73 artists came to New Orleans to examine the sites where their artworks will be shown. Other artists in the triennial were already creating work that complemented the subtitle of this year’s theme – “The Lotus in spite of the Swamp.” Though much of the artwork was created specifically for the triennial and some inspired by New Orleans, not all are about the city. “Neither I nor the artists of P.4 desire or intend to speak for the city and people of New Orleans,”

Schoonmaker says. “The artists draw on their own experiences to enhance connections and parallels between New Orleans and the rest of the world. These may be visual, conceptual, social, historical or cultural. To that extent, I have selected artists from around the world whose work I feel will resonate within the city of New Orleans by way of their artistic process, subject matter or materials. New Orleans has such a unique cultural hybridity that is evidenced in its customs, food, music, architecture, language, and spirituality. I want artists’ work to feel at home in that context, regardless of its origin. The artists I have selected possess a sensibility and sensitivity that hopefully lends itself to that. Their connections to other regions and cultures around the world may enable people to see themselves in someone or someplace else.” Prospect.4 is also Schoonmaker’s nod to the city’s upcoming Tricentennial celebrations, marking the founding of New Orleans in 1718 by the French. He also kept that in mind while selecting artists. “To help enhance historical and cultural connections to New Orleans and the Tricentennial,” he says, “I’ve invited artists primarily from the Americas, Africa and Europe. Some of them are mining New Orleans culture specifically, but more are drawing parallels to other cultures around the world.” In preparing himself for Prospect.4, Schoonmaker spent months immersing himself in everything New Orleans. He read books and articles, listened to music, watched documentaries and visited the city’s various neighborhoods, talking with residents and soaking up New Orleans’ rich cultural traditions. “Curating Prospect.4,” he says, “has given me the opportunity to explore New Orleans and the surrounding area in remarkable ways that I probably could or would not have otherwise. For instance, I spent Fat Tuesday with the Yellow Pocahontas Mardi Gras Indians and the Skull and Bones Gang. And top, left: “The Sweet I took an all-day tour and Salty Sea,” 2015, of the wetlands down by Gauri Gill and around Venice with a Rajesh Vangad local fisherman turned top, right: “The environmentalist. That Beautyful Ones,” is just two examples, of 2014, by Njideka which there are many.” Akunyili Crosby of Los Angeles As a result, two other New Orleans traditions bottom: “Ayum– music and food – ee-aawach play into Prospect.4’s Oomamamowan,” 1991, by Rebecca overall theme. “Music Belmore of Canada and food are such visceral and frequently communal experiences,” Schoonmaker says. “They really get right to the heart of a culture, revealing its temperament and influences. Perhaps nothing defines New Orleans more than its food and music, so I invited several artists who have worked with music and food in their prior work.” As Schoonmaker learned while organizing P.4, New Orleans is indeed culturally and spiritually very much like Archie Shepp’s description of jazz. New Orleans is “a symbol of the triumph of the human spirit” and a “a lily in spite of the swamp.” It is Percy’s “Mont Saint-Michel.” For more information visit ProspectNewOrleans.org.


2017

TOP LAWYERS In search of the best from among 58 specialities Profiles by sarah ravits Photographed by Danley c. romero

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ost people hope not to need them, but when they do, they want  the good ones on  their side. To help with that we present our annual list of Top Lawyers. The list was prepared by Detroit-based Professional Research Services. PRS provided this explanation of its methodology:  The voting was open to all licensed attorneys in New Orleans. They were asked which attorney, other than themselves, they would recommend in the New Orleans area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each specialty are reflected in the following list.  As always when making professional services choices, second opinions are encouraged. In the end, you’re the judge.

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Administrative/ Regulatory Law Metairie David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4110 Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4280

David L. Carrigee Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900

556-4128

Richard A. Chopin The Chopin Law Firm LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 1550 475-2429

R. Keith Jarrett Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4133

Robert C. Clotworthy Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8676

David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4137

Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8224

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7044

Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8616

Alternative Dispute Resolution Metairie Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4281

Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8536

Michael J. Moran MAPS 3850 N Causeway Blvd. Suite 400 831-7351

Katharine R. Colletta Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7708

Georges M. Legrand Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000

John C. Saunders Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7516

Tiffany L. Delery Davis Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4161

Kevin A. Marks Melchiode, Marks, King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 336-2432

Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0816

Gregory L. Ernst Ernst Law Firm, PLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 586-1555

Gregory J. McDonald Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

New Orleans Jacqueline M. Brettner Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3841

Andre J. Mouledoux Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000

Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0822

James H. Roussel Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5278

Robert R. Johnston Pusateri, Johnston, Guillot & Greenbaum, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2250 620-2013

William B. Schwartz Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900

Corinne A. Morrison Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7228

New Orleans Jonathan A. Hunter Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4108

Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0818 Admiralty & Maritime Law New Orleans Donald R. Abaunza Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4110 Francis J. Barry Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0642 Richard D. Bertram Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8334 Wilton E. Bland Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000

S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4122 Adelaida J. Ferchmin Preis PLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1700 581-6062 Thomas D. Forbes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7041 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2130 Joseph I. Giarrusso Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4056 Christopher M. Hannan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8612 Don K. Haycraft Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000

David B. Sharpe Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Daniel A. Tadros Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7054 Raymond T. Waid Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4042 Derek A. Walker

Glenn S. Newbauer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4295

Ronald J. Sholes Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0479 David R.M. Williams Attorney at Law 1100 Poydras St. 838-6100 Antitrust Law New Orleans Mark R. Beebe Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0436 Craig L. Caesar Baker, Donelson, Bearman,

Alexander M. Mcintyre Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5215 Appellate Practice Metairie Glenn S. Newbauer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4295 Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4291 Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4130 New Orleans Harry S. Hardin Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8170 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4135 Barry W. Ashe Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0843 Kelly B. Becker Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4067 Bruce C. Dean Bruce C. Dean, L.L.C. 6 Cromwell Place 202-7272 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 2405 569-0064 Michael R. Fontham

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Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0810 Kathryn Z. Gonski Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4029 Douglas L. Grundmeyer Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7028 Shannon S. Holtzman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4148 Louis C. LaCour Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0328 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0606 Donald J. Miester Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8510 David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 Katherine S. Roth Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4167 Martin A. Stern Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0289 Raymond P. Ward Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0339 Jack M. Weiss Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 581-7979 Banking and Finance Law New Orleans Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 92

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Alicia M. Bendana Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450

Michael S. Ricci Ricci Partners, LLC 101 W. Robert E Lee Blvd. Suite 400 304-7115

Wm. Blake Bennett Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4113 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7289 Joseph P. Briggett Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Lauren E. Campisi McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2761

James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9239 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0828 Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3810 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8298

Philip D. Claverie Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9368

Sterling S. Willis Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5264

E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights/Insolvency and Reorganization Law Covington Rachel T. Anderson The Law Office of Rachel Thyre Anderson LLC 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-377-9271

Edward N. George Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7253 Barry H. Grodsky Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8535 Neal J. Kling Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2112 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7037 J. Marshall Page Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8248 Leon J. Reymond Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000

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New Orleans Edward H. Arnold Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 556-5204 Brent B. Barriere Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 4600 556-5525 Ashley L. Belleau Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Alicia M. Bendana Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 Joseph P. Briggett

Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Christopher T. Caplinger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Robin B. Cheatham Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0411 Jonathan R. DeTrinis DeT Law Firm, LLC 4000 Bienville St. Suite C 722-9711 Douglas S. Draper Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3333 John M. Duck Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0226 Elizabeth J. Futrell Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8260 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5465 Barry H. Grodsky Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8535 Jan M. Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8645 P. Kirk Jones Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4132 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St.

Suite 3150 593-0819 Fernand L. Laudumiey Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7052 Tristan E. Manthey Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3332 David J. Messina Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7055 William H. Patrick Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3345 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8194 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0827 Bet-the-Company Litigations Metairie James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4287 New Orleans Barry W. Ashe Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0843 Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9720 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4116


Elizabeth Haecker Ryan Firm: Coats Rose

My Toughest Case: Helping A Permanently Disabled Longshoreman

After considering a couple of other career options, Elizabeth

small amount of affection mixed with awe from both sides of the Haecker Ryan decided to pursue law, as she recognized her strengths bar and from the bench. in reading, writing and verbal “jousting” as she fondly calls it. One of her toughest in her 37-year-career was representing a A native of San Antonio, Texas, she graduated from the Tulane longshoreman who was permanently disabled. It was one of just School of Law, and initially went into maritime law two cases she has ever handled on the plaintiff’s side. before expanded her practice to include product liability, Undergraduate degree: “I was asked by a firm staff member to represent BA, Newcomb College toxic tort, pharmaceuticals, construction action and her injured father,” she said. “He was a longshoreman, (Tulane University) employment. Law School: Tulane Uni- which means the legal standard for winning a jury verdict was quite difficult.” Additionally, his limited “I am fortunate to have been able to enjoy each area versity School of Law education presented further challenges in the case. while avoiding being tied to only one,” she said. Part of her success as an attorney can be attributed to her “The case was tried for at least a week, and thankfully the jury mentor, the late Wood Brown, III, who once served as president came back in our favor with a large damages award,” she said. of the Louisiana State Bar Association. The weight of responsibility which she felt toward this man — “The work ethic, intellect and generosity of spirit which he who was a colleague’s father — was “palpable,” she says. The modeled through his career inspired me both as a very young outcome of the case, she says taught her that “even weighty odds lawyer and to this day,” she said. “He instilled respect and no can be overcome by a message that speaks truth to its hearers.” my n e w or l e a n s . com

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Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5266 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8536 Kent A. Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5252 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0814 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0804 Biotechnology Law Metairie Taylor M. Norton Taylor M. Norton, Registered Patent Attorney 341 Metairie Rd. 858-0198 New Orleans David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0920 Commercial Litigation Metairie Robert B. Evans Evans Law, APLC 3445 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 707 662-1195 Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4130 James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4287 New Orleans Drew R. Ballina Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3301 94

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Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9720 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4116

Ricci Partners, LLC 101 W. Robert E Lee Blvd. Suite 400 304-7115 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9721

Thomas J. Cortazzo Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900

Commercial Transactions/LLS Law New Orleans E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212

Nancy S. Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5249

Robert L. Wollfarth Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8623

George Denegre Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4119

Communications Law Metairie Scott W. Mcquaig McQuaig & Associates, LLC 100 Lilac St. 836-5070

Shannon S. Holtzman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4148 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3340 Joseph J. Lowenthal Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8240 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0882 Carey L. Menasco Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4171 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0842 Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5440 Michael S. Ricci

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New Orleans Martin E. Landrieu Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Floor 40 569-1832 Constance C. Willems McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2724 Lesli D. Harris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0938 Construction Law Metairie Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4284 New Orleans Charles P. Blanchard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7216 Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0605

Adrian A. D’Arcy Shields | Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 581-4445 Philip A. Franco Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0291 Shannon S. Holtzman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4148 Richard E. King Melchiode, Marks, King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2250 336-2435 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0819 Daniel Lund Coats Rose 365 Canal St. Suite 800 299-3089 Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode, Marks, King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2250 336-2970 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7241 H Minor Pipes Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9726

593-0667 John W. Waters Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 Corporate Governance and Complaints Law New Orleans Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0852 Corporate Law Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4294 George A. Mueller Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4282 New Orleans Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0845 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9324 William H. Hines Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8272

Charles F. Seemann Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0608

Abid Hussain Hussain Law LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 888-789-7250

Lloyd N. Shields Shields | Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 581-4445

Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0852

John A. Stewart Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 Kelly E. Theard Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St.

William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7037 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8386


Elizabeth S. Meneray Meneray Family L aw

My Toughest Case: The Opposition’s Contempt Of Court “I can’t abide a bully,” Elizabeth Meneray said firmly.

her for the visit.” The child was entitled to the time with her mother, Her work in family law is rarely uplifting — it often involves custody and he had deprived her of it. battles, divorce, alimony, property division and other related issues. In a draining battle, the man was ultimately found in contempt of But it is important and necessary. court and owed Meneray a large amount of attorney’s fees. His anger Her toughest case involved a bitter custody battle over a young girl toward the child’s mother was then turned to Meneray herself. whose mother (Meneray’s client) lived out of state while working a “I have received threatening mail and been stalked on social media by this man. But what really upset me was not the low-paying job. One afternoon Meneray received a frantic phone call cowardly manner in which he behaved, but how his Undergraduate: BA, Political Science with a Certificate in from the airport as her client was “crying her heart lawyer reacted when I told him what he had done.” Paralegal Studies, UNO out.” The child’s father had refused to drop her off at The man’s attorney tried to shift the blame to her, Law School: Loyola University telling her, “You shouldn’t have pursued that judgment the scheduled time at the airport, and sent the mother New Orleans School of Law a series of cruel text messages: “Good luck finding her” against him. You made him mad; what do you expect?” and “Have fun in New Orleans. She’s not going with you.” The issue rendered Meneray even more determined to find a way A mother herself, Meneray was sickened by this clear violation of to prevail in similar circumstances. “When there is an imbalance of power in a relationship, the law a court order. “She only had about an hour layover and then had to take the return flight home, without the long-awaited mother-daughter is there to ensure a fair result,” she said. “As long as I am committed visit both of them had anticipated in months.” to using the power of the law for the purpose of equity and fairness The man knew that Meneray’s client lacked funds, and “it was all … I have no fear that my clients will see their legal rights protected.” she could do to afford the ticket to bring her daughter home with my n e w or l e a n s . com

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Leon J. Reymond Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4028

George M. McGregor Burgos Law Firm 3535 Canal St. Suite 100 488-3722

Leon H. Rittenberg Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7845

John W. Reed Glass & Reed 3015 Magazine St. 581-9083

Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0836 Criminal Defense Non White-Collar Gretna Michael P. Ciaccio Attorney at Law 320 Huey P Long Ave. 364-1892 F. Gerald Desalvo F. Gerald DeSalvo, LLC 235 Derbigny St. Suite 200D 309-5522 Mandeville Kevin Shockley Vogeltanz Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, LLC 823 Carroll St. Suite A 275-5149 New Orleans Walter F. Becker Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7046 Brian J. Capitelli Capitelli and Wicker Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 582-2425 Elizabeth B. Carpenter Elizabeth B. Carpenter, Esq. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2500 599-5955 Robert S. Glass Glass & Reed 3015 Magazine St. 581-9083 Samantha P. Griffin Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0808 Stephen D. Hebert Stephen D. Hebert, LLC 700 Camp St. Suite 216 250-6020 96

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Thomas W. Shlosman Shlosman Law Firm 3919 Baronne St. 826-9427

601 Poydras St. Suite 2323 581-7700 Matthew S. Chester Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5231 Frank G. Desalvo Frank G DeSalvo, APLC 739 Baronne St. 524-4191

Peter G. Strasser Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7231

William P. Gibbens Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 680-6065

Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0811

Samantha P. Griffin Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0808

Ralph S. Whalen Ralph S. Whalen Jr. Law Office 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 525-1600

Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8110

Walter F. Becker Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7046 Criminal Defense White Collar Gretna Michael P. Ciaccio Attorney at Law 320 Huey P Long Ave. 364-1892 F. Gerald Desalvo F. Gerald DeSalvo, LLC 235 Derbigny St. Suite 200D 309-5522 New Orleans Seth J. Bloom Bloom Legal, LLC 700 Camp St. Suite 210 636-6729 Brian J. Capitelli Capitelli and Wicker Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 582-2425 Ralph Capitelli Capitelli and Wicker Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 582-2425 Edward J. Castaing Crull, Castaing & Lilly

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Eric J. Hessler Attorney at Law 2802 Tulane Ave. Suite 102 301-9913 Michael W. Magner Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8316 Charles D. Marshall Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7242

Law, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2900 585-7942 Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7885 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7854 Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law Metairie Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4282 Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4105 New Orleans Marshall A. Hevron Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0242 Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4156

John W. Reed Glass & Reed 3015 Magazine St. 581-9083

Matthew D. Simone Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4191

Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9219

John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4160

Peter G. Strasser Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7231

Adam B. Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5210

Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0811 Elder Law New Orleans Steven E. Bain Steven E. Bain Attorney at

Employee Benefits Law New Orleans Timothy P. Brechtel Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8236 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St.

Suite 2300 585-7271 Lindsey H. Chopin Proskauer Rose, LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 1800 310-2018 Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7007 Sarah V. Myers Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7009 Howard Shapiro Proskauer Rose, LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 1800 310-4085 Randye C. Snyder Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4033 Michael S. Williams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 581-7979 Energy Law New Orleans Kelly B. Becker Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4067 Laura Springer Brown Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4021 Katharine R. Colletta Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-585-7708 Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0831 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 2405 569-0062 Harry R. Holladay Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7518 Jonathan A. Hunter Liskow & Lewis


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701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4108 Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5258 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4143 Edward B. Poitevent Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0889 Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0816 Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0818 Environmental Law New Orleans Louis E. Buatt Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4082 Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0858 Robert E. Holden Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8139 Greg L. Johnson Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4115 Elizabeth H. Ryan Coats Rose 365 Canal St. Suite 800 299-3085 Stephen W. Wiegand Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4192 Equipment Finance Law New Orleans Nathan P. Horner 98

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Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Kathleen S. Plemer Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7222 Family Law Covington Peggy Gonsoulin Vallejo The Vallejo Law Firm, LLC 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-892-6855 Metairie Meghan E. Ruckman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 217-2006 Jane C. Scheuermann Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4206 Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4277 New Orleans Robin Penzato Arnold Winsberg & Arnold, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2050 648-2713 Jeffrey Mitchell Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 Mitchell J. Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 Steven J. Lane Herman, Herman & Katz, LLC 820 O Keefe Ave. 581-4892 Robert C. Lowe Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 Elizabeth S. Meneray Meneray Family Law, L.L.C.

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710 Carondelet St. 581-4334 Edith H. Morris Morris, Lee & Bayle, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1420 524-3781 Kim Ngan Nguyen Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 Lacy M. Smith The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith, LLC 1820 St. Charles Ave. Suite 203 249-8242 Brooke C. Tigchelaar Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0862 Marc D. Winsberg Winsberg & Arnold, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2050 648-2716 Barbara J. Ziv Barbara J. Ziv, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 4100 525-4361 First Amendment Law New Orleans Mary E. Roy Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9254 Scott L. Sternberg Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC. 643 Magazine St. Suite 402 324-1887 Gaming Law New Orleans Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5464 Wm. Blake Bennett Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4113 J. Kelly Duncan

Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8218 Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0915 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0842 General Service Law Firm New Orleans John W. Waters Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 Government Relations Practice Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4294 New Orleans Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5440 John C. Saunders Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7516 Bryant S. York Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0803 Health Care Law Metairie Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4141 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4110 New Orleans Peter J. Butler

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5427 Adrienne L. Ellis Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 833-5600 Karen M. Fontana Kean Miller LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 3600 585-3191 Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5201 A. J. Herbert Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8514 John C. Saunders Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7516 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0420 Perry R. Staub Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8513 Danielle L. Trostorff Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5224 Immigration Law New Orleans Brandon E. Davis Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9312 Brenda J. DeArmas-Ricci Law Offices of Brenda J. DeArmas Ricci 400 Poydras St. Suite 2525 522-4217 Kathleen C. Gasparian Gasparian Immigration 829 Baronne St. 262-9878 Insurance Law New Orleans


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Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0807

Drew R. Ballina Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3301

Steven W. Usdin Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9721

Mary L. Dumestre Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0856

John W. Waters Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 2405 569-0062 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2130 A. Kirk Gasperecz Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0408

New Orleans Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3803

Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7263

Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0822

Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3340

Paula Estrada de Martin Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8669

Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0814 Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode, Marks, King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2250 336-2970 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7241 H. Minor Pipes Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9726 Robert I. Siegel Gieger, Laborde, & Laperouse, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 4800 654-1307 William D. Treeby 100

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Intellectual Property Law Metairie Taylor M. Norton Taylor M. Norton, Registered Patent Attorney 341 Metairie Rd. 858-0198

Lesli D. Harris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0938 Benjamin W. Janke Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8607 David L. Patron Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9295 Mary E. Roy Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9254 Michael Q. Walshe Stone Pigman Walther

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Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0881 International Arbitration New Orleans Andrew T. Lilly Andrew T. Lilly 317 Exchange Alley 249-8670 Daniel A. Tadros Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7054 Derek A. Walker Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7044 Labor and Employment Law Metairie Glenn S. Newbauer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4295 Patricia E. Pannell Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4126 New Orleans M. Nan Alessandra Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9297 Kim M. Boyle Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 679-5790 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7271 Walter W. Christy Coats Rose 365 Canal St. Suite 800 299-3073 Brooke Duncan Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0220 Steven F. Griffith Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600

566-5225 Clyde H. Jacob Coats Rose 365 Canal St. Suite 800 299-3072 Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0915 Leslie A. Lanusse Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0298 Sidney F. Lewis Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8352 Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7007 Eve B. Masinter Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5468 Thomas J. McGoey Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 299-6101 Sarah V. Myers Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7009 E. Fredrick Preis Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5470 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0911 Land Use and Zoning Law Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4294 Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4105 New Orleans James T. Dunne Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0824 Richard P Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2104 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0835 Legal Malpractice Law New Orleans James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4116 Gus A. Fritchie Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2106 Corinne A. Morrison Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7228 Ernest L. O’Bannon Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0842 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 523-1580 William E. Wright Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0623 Mass Tort Litigation/ Class Actions Metairie Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile,


Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4284 New Orleans Charles H. Abbott Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4350 565-7555 Betsy J. Barnes Morris Bart LLC 601 Poydras St. 599-3234 Dawn M. Barrios Barrios Kingsdorf & Casteix, L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3650 524-3300 Carmelite M. Bertaut Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0898 Gregory P. Dileo Law Offices of Gregory P DiLeo, APLC 300 Lafayette St. Suite 101 522-3456 Abigayle C. Farris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0948 James C. Gulotta Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0817 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Dabney, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3340 Anthony D. Irpino Irpino Law Firm 2216 Magazine St. 525-1500 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9733 Charles B. Wilmore Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 299-6113 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC my n e w or l e a n s . com

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909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0911 Medical Malpractice Law Metairie Rebecca J. Beck Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4274 Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4141 Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4277 New Orleans C. Wm. Bradley Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6302

Robert J. David Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. 522-2304 Michael J. Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 522-2304 Monica A. Frois Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8615 Michael C. Luquet Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5441

Associates, L.L.C. 4004 Canal St. 662-1747 Peter E. Sperling Frilot L.L.C 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3700 599-8015 Lydia H. Toso Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5461 Mergers and Acquisitions Law Metairie Ryan P. Monsour Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4230

R. Christopher Martin Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7534

New Orleans William R. Bishop Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0962

Kara Hadican Samuels Kara Hadican Samuels and

Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther

Floor 36 569-2900

Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0845 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5255

Mining Law New Orleans Harry R. Holladay Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7518

Edward N. George Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7253

John Y. Pearce Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. 585-7674

Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8308

Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law Metairie Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4105

J. Marshall Page Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8248 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0836 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St.

Jeannie Morris Law Offices of Jeannie Morris LLC 1000 Veterans Blvd. Suite 206 261-9157 Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile,

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Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4280

John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0855

New Orleans J. Dalton Courson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0812

Non-Profit/ Charities Law Metairie Ryan P. Monsour Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4230

E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212

Suite 5000 556-4143 Edward B. Poitevent Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0889 On Air Media Legal Analyst Metairie Dane S. Ciolino Dane S. Ciolino, LLC 18 Farnham Place 575-3263

New Orleans Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7007

Donald L. Foret Donald L. Foret, Attorney at Law LLC 3500 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 185 669-7585

Oil and Gas Law Kenner Lisa M. Africk Crescent Drilling and Production Inc. 2400 Veterans Blvd. Suite 110 655-4600

Personal Injury Litigation Gretna Leo J. Palazzo Palazzo Law Firm 732 Behrman Hwy. Suites F & G 433-1442

Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4291

New Orleans John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0855

Metairie Scott W. Mcquaig McQuaig & Associates, LLC 100 Lilac St 836-5070

James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4287

C. Peck Hayne Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Floor 40 569-1858

V. M. Wheeler Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7586 Municipal Law Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4294

New Orleans Mark E. Hanna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Nolan P. Lambert Sewerage & Water Board 625 Saint Joseph St. Room 201 585-2236 Natural Resources Law New Orleans Tiffany L. Delery Davis Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4161 Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0858 104

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Jonathan A. Hunter Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4108

New Orleans Morris Bart Morris Bart LLC 601 Poydras St. 844-765-5440 Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates, P.L.C. 4173 Canal St. 526-2222 Vincent L. Bowers Morris Bart LLC 601 Poydras St. 599-3212

Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4135

Justin M. Chopin The Chopin Law Firm LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 1550 475-2429

Justin P. Lemaire Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0942

Charles F. Gay Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0295

Robert B. Mcneal Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4052 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St.

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556-4180 David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4137 Terry B. Loup Morris Bart LLC 601 Poydras St. 525-8000 Gregory J. Mcdonald Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 Vincent P. Scallan Vincent P. Scallan Law, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1825 272-0444 Scott E. Silbert Silbert, Garon, Pitre & Friedman 909 Poydras St. Suite 2130 581-6200 John W. Waters Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 Product Liability Litigation New Orleans Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates, P.L.C. 4173 Canal St. 504-526-2222 Carmelite M. Bertaut Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0898

Suite 2700 310-2150 David M. Melancon Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2117 Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2163 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7241 Peter J. Rotolo Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7022 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9733 Quentin F. Urquhart Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2107 Project Finance Law New Orleans Anthony P. Dunbar Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7029 William H. Hines Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8272

Celeste R. Coco-Ewing Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9762

Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0828

Charles F. Gay Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0295

Railroad Law Mandeville Benjamin B. Saunders Davis, Saunders, Miller & Oden, PLC 400 Mariner’s Plaza Dr. Suite 401 985-612-3070

Mark P. Glago Glago Law Firm, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 29 599-8666

James C. Gulotta Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0817

Mark D. Latham Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000

James B. Irwin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC 400 Poydras St.

New Orleans Alissa J. Allison Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5233


Thomas L. Colletta Akerman LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2200 586-1241 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2203 Dow M. Edwards Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2205 William H. Howard Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5275 Benjamin R. Slater Akerman LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2200 586-1241 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7059

Real Estate Law Metairie Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4105

Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2103

Malcolm D. Meyer Hand, Holmes, Pilie, and Matthews 110 Veterans Blvd. Suite 525 309-1030

E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212

Malcolm A. Meyer Stewart Title Guaranty Company, Louisiana State Counsel 113 Rosa Ave. 259-5364 New Orleans Marguerite L. Adams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4142 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7289 Elwood F. Cahill Sher Garner Cahill Richter

R. Keith Colvin Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave 582-8524

James T. Dunne Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0824 Brian R. Johnson Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7819

Suite 400 304-7115

909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2112 Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Jon F. Leyens Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8628 Richard B. Montgomery Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0663 James R. Morton Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8507

Paul C. Kitziger Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4126

Leon J. Reymond Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4150

Neal J. Kling Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C.

Michael S. Ricci Ricci Partners, LLC 101 W. Robert E Lee Blvd.

Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2104 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0835 Stephen P. Schott Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2101 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 3201 582-1199 Marx D. Sterbcow The Sterbcow Law Group,

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Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5264

LLC 1734 Prytania St 523-4930 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0828 Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3810

Securities Regulation New Orleans John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4177 George Denegre Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4119

Peter S. Title Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. 582-1542

Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 Saint Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5255

Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8298

George C. Freeman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9732

Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0836 Sterling S. Willis

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Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9324

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Stephen H. Kupperman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9728 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0882 Kirk Reasonover Reasonover & Berg, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 1980 526-2921 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7226 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0827 Securities/Capital Markets Law New Orleans John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis

701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4177 George C. Freeman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9732 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8308 Noah B. Kressler Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5207 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8386 David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0920 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St.

Suite 2300 585-7226 Tax Law Metairie Ryan P. Monsour Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4230 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4110 New Orleans Hirschel T. Abbott Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0809 A. Albert Ajubita Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, L.L.C 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 582-2300 Robert S. Angelico Liskow & Lewis


569-2899

593-0826

William M. Backstrom Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8228

Edward N. George Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7253

John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7854

Christian N. Weiler Weiler & Rees, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1250 524-2944

Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 569-7000

Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2105

Mark S. Stein Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450

John W. Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0832

William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7037

Andrew T. Sullivan Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7734

701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4112

Tyler J. Douglas Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 581-2450 Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0247 James C. Exnicios Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St.

Suite 5000 556-4034

Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0838

Ryan C. Toups Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7036

Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8206

Alexander P. Trostorff Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8232

Jerome J. Reso Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36

Daniel J. Walter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150

Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 Transportation Law New Orleans Daryl J. Daigle Preis PLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1700 581-6062 Gerard J. Dragna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7263 C. Michael Parks Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett

701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Eric Winder Sella Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7059 Trusts and Estates Metairie Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4107 Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4203 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP

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1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4110

701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0247

New Orleans Hirschel T. Abbott Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0809

Miriam W. Henry Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8436 Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0975

Marguerite L. Adams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4142 Steven E. Bain Steven E. Bain Attorney at Law, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2900 585-7942 David F. Edwards Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8184 Mervatt F. Eljaouhari Wealth Planning Law Group 101 W. Robert E. Lee Blvd. Suite 404 212-3440 Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese LLP

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Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0838 Jerome J. Reso Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 Leon H. Rittenberg Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7845 John A. Rouchell

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Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7854 Venture Capital Law New Orleans Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0845 Curtis R Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 Saint Charles Ave. 582-8308 Mandy D. Mendoza Gagliardi Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7018 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 593-0836 Workers Compensation Law Metairie Meghan E. Ruckman

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 217-2006 Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4280 Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4277 New Orleans Beth Song Bernstein Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000

Mark D. Latham Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4180 Kevin A. Marks Melchiode, Marks, King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 336-2432 Gregory J. Mcdonald Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon LLC 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 Renee S. Melchiode Melchiode, Marks, King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 336-2544 Daniel P. Sullivan Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Simone H. Yoder Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 •


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ADVERTISING SECTION

Legal Services

T

o many people, legal matters are often intimidating. Every day, people across America are asked to sign papers too long to read or click that they agree to Terms of Service that would take days to scroll. Fortunately, there are professionals who do have the time and ability to interpret such matters and who can offer counsel when needed. From translating the fine print to knowing one’s rights and protections, attorneys offer an invaluable service

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to individuals, businesses, and other entities that need help navigating the law. If you’re seeking compensation to cover medical expenses resulting from another’s negligence, or if your business needs defending against a predatory claim, there are firms all across Greater New Orleans that offer expertise in the area of your concern. Local representation comes in all shapes and sizes, from small, one-attorney law practices to large firms with the manpower to represent giant corporations.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Established in 1928, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP (BSW) is one of the oldest law firms in the state of Louisiana. The firm takes great pride in its long history of client service. With almost 70 attorneys, the firm is among the largest firms in the state and one of the larger law firms in the South. BSW’s clients range from individuals and start-up companies, to Fortune 500 corporations, governmental entities, and not-for-profit institutions. Since the firm was established, two standards have remained constant: to strive for legal excellence and to be involved in local communities. Members of our firm have served as presidents, directors, and officers of community and business organizations. BSW’s primary focus is growing and protecting each client’s business. Whether it is in litigation, negotiating contracts, advising on management restructures, or assisting in the purchase or sale of a business, BSW attorneys possess the skill set to help their clients achieve their goals. For more information, visit www.bswllp.com. Taggart Morton is a New Orleans-based law firm that provides full service legal representation to the business community. The firm’s primary practice involves the representation of regulated and formerly regulated industries of all types, including healthcare, public utilities, insurance, transportation, media and communications, technology, and oil & gas in corporate, transactional, regulatory, bankruptcy, tax and litigation matters. Representing these clients as well as small businesses and property owners, Taggart Morton embraces virtually every type of dispute, including commercial and business disputes, healthcare, insurance regulatory services,

bankruptcy employment law, ERISA, antitrust and trade regulation, intellectual property, media/technology law, environmental and toxic tort, bankruptcy, workers’ compensation, real estate, managed care, and construction. Taggart Morton provides its attorneys with the latest in resources and technologies to put its quality of work on par with the largest firms. Its goal is always to offer clients effective and comprehensive representation at a reasonable cost. Taggart Morton is pleased to congratulate its 2017 New Orleans Magazine Top Lawyers: Barry Grodsky, A.J. Herbert, Donald Miester, James Morton, and Perry Staub. For more information about Taggart Morton, please contact the firm at 504-599-8500.   In 1980, Morris Bart ran a simple ad on television.  Since that time, his advertising and his law firm have grown to the extent where he has become a household name throughout Louisiana. However, Morris Bart, LLC is much more than just a name. For over 35 years, Morris Bart and his team of over one hundred attorneys fight hard to get the injured the compensation they deserve. With offices statewide and throughout Mississippi and Alabama, Morris Bart, LLC is proud to be the largest personal injury firm in Louisiana and one of the largest in the United States.   If you or someone you know has been injured, call 855-GET-BART or go to MorrisBart.com for 24-hour access. You know what to do: “One Call, That’s All!” Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP is a national law firm with offices in Jackson, Detroit, Houston, New Jersey, and New Orleans. Led by well-respected and experienced litigators Tim

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Gray and Charles Abbott, the New Orleans office represents a number of corporate clients, including several Fortune 500 companies, in litigation throughout Louisiana. Since its inception over 30 years ago, Forman Watkins has always placed an emphasis on non-traditional approaches to problems presented by clients. There are no “cookie-cutter” solutions, as each case requires individual attention to ensure that the best approach is taken both economically and strategically. The firm has tried cases from North to South and coast to coast with a winning percentage of over 83%. In the end, there is no substitute for hard work, intelligence, curiosity, innovation, and a refusal to lose. While trial should always be a viable solution in a case, settlement must be a viable alternative. Through the years Forman Watkins has secured settlements totaling over $1B. For more information, visit formanwatkins.com or email info@formanwatkins.com.  Since 1989, Chehardy Sherman Williams has served individuals and businesses in Greater New Orleans with integrity, professionalism, and experience. The firm’s attorneys understand the importance of attention to detail and provide candid and thoughtful consultation in a variety of practice areas, ranging from Business & Corporate Law to Healthcare Law, Personal Injury to Estate Planning, and all types of Litigation. Chehardy Sherman Williams attorneys are also dedicated to their community, and many of them serve with philanthropic and civic organizations, educational institutions and as leaders of various councils. Chehardy Sherman Williams Law Firm strongly believes in this community and chooses to give back by going beyond providing legal representation for local businesses and individuals; the firm prides itself on being leaders in the courtroom, the boardroom, and all places in between. For more information on Chehardy Sherman Williams’ practice areas, attorneys, and legal approach, visit  Chehardy.com or call 504-833-5600.  The firm of Melchiode Marks King LLC (MMK) may only be in its third year of existence, but its attorneys have practiced together for decades, and recent accolades are a testament to both their talents and the breadth of services they provide to clients. This year, four MMK attorneys were recognized as New Orleans Magazine’s Top Lawyers: Jerry Melchiode (Construction Law), Kevin Marks (Workers’ Compensation), Rich King (Construction Law) and Renée Melchiode (Workers’ Compensation). While awards are gratifying, the best endorsement is the loyalty of MMK’s clients who have enthusiastically supported the firm. It is this trust and commitment that inspires MMK to achieve successful outcomes while controlling costs. Through increased efficiency and advances in technology, MMK delivers big firm capabilities with small firm efficiency, agility, and attentiveness. MMK’s attorneys’ practice areas include, among others, maritime, construction, insurance, environmental, employer’s liability, professional liability, and transportation. For more information, visit MMKfirm.com. Mouldedoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett (MBLB) is a fullservice defense firm with decades of experience handling claims in Admiralty & Maritime Law, General Casualty & Insurance Defense, Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act, Defense Base Act and War Hazards Compensation Act, Municipal Law, Transportation & 112

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Automobile Liability Defense, and Workers’ Compensation Defense. Their attorneys have established their reputations for delivering favorable results far beyond the Gulf South, representing clients ranging from international corporations to national insurance carriers to local businesses. Whether you’ve worked with MBLB for years or are doing so for the first time, you’ll feel like their only client. They make it a point to understand your business and its risk and are available 24/7 to respond to catastrophic accidents and other legal needs. MBLB’s attorneys are experienced in crafting a defense plan in each case, including on-site casualty investigations, gathering evidence, deposing witnesses, and directing medical care, which is crucial to proactively pushing the claim toward a favorable resolution. They possess a high level of expertise in litigation and trial experience in a variety of jurisdictions and states. For more information, visit MBLB.com. Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC serves as local, regional, and national counsel for public companies, privately owned businesses, governmental entities, non-profit organizations, individuals, professionals, and insurers with civil litigation needs. Irwin Fritchie has consciously focused its practice in areas where it can offer clients superior service and results. Within its specialized practice areas, the firm offers a full spectrum of services ranging from the representation of local business entities to serving as national coordinating counsel for Fortune 500 companies. Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore LLC’s “ClientCentric” philosophy is focused on thoroughly understanding and supporting the business objectives of clients. The firm achieves superior results by seizing the initiative in litigation and finding cost-effective solutions before significant transactional costs are incurred. Where early resolution of litigation is not obtainable, their attorneys use experience, knowledge, and creativity to achieve the best results for clients at trial.  For more information, visit www.irwinllc.com. Stop injustice, and don’t be a victim. Today’s world is filled with dishonest businessmen, con artists, and deliberate fraud, but don’t fear—there is a solution. After 22 years of active and aggressive courtroom experience, Robert Evans of Evans Law has distinguished himself from other attorneys. He holds the highest rating a lawyer can obtain, AV Rated, and has been named recognized as a top lawyer in the city, state, and country. His success is the result of hard work, the development of close relationships with clients, and the extensive research he will do on your behalf. Whether your case involves a business transaction gone bad or a serious accident that has altered your life, Robert Evans is a best bet for representation in every matter.  A member of numerous professional associations, including local, regional, and national bar associations, Mr. Evans is AV Top Rated, a Martindale Top Lawyer in Louisiana, and among the 1% of attorneys in the nation recognized by The National Institute of Trial Advocacy as a Designated Trial Advocate. For more information, visit robertevanslaw.com. While accidents are always unintentional, they’re not always innocent. Accidents often occur because of someone’s negligence. With nearly 20 years of experience handling personal injury cases in Louisiana, Tim Fields is committed to fighting for the rights of those who were injured due to the negligence of others. At the Law Offices of Tim L. Fields, attorneys serve as strong advocates for your claims and are present with you at every stage of your case. Attorneys Tim Fields, Jonathan Wasielewski, and Angel


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Adrian understand the profound effect accidents can have on the lives of victims, including lasting medical conditions, loss of mobility, loss of earning capacity, and damage to the individual’s quality of life and relationships with others. The firm is committed to holding responsible parties accountable and seeking full compensation for pain and suffering. Examples of cases include medical negligence, automobile accidents, premises liability issues, offshore injuries and Jones Act cases, traumatic brain injuries, and more. For more information, visit TimFieldsLaw.com or call 800-653-4033. The shifts in family dynamics that accompany divorce can be difficult, painful, and sometimes traumatic for the parties involved. To avoid the common problems largely responsible for the fear and suffering related to divorce, couples need to understand the system and know what to expect. Counsel from an experienced family law attorney can be invaluable when making tough decisions and planning for the future. With more than 40 years of experience in domestic relations, Barbara J. Ziv, LLC is a small firm committed to helping individuals seeking advice about divorce and family law matters, including child custody, child and spousal support, and property partitions. During your initial consultation, Barbara J. Ziv and Esther L. Greenbaum will explain what they need to know about you, why they need to know it, and what you should expect from both the process and your attorney. Their clients can expect competence in divorce law and matters related to it, clear-cut billing, and trouble-free accessibility. For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit neworleansdivorces.com or call 504-525-4361. Burgos & Associates, LLC, is a full service law firm dedicated to representing the people of New Orleans as well as her surrounding parishes and is made up of Cesar Burgos, George McGregor, Robert Daigre, Gabriel Mondino, Paul Grego, and Matthew Lofaso. The main focus of Burgos & Associates, LLC, is representing New Orleanians that are suffering from any and all types of personal injuries, whether those injuries were sustained in 18 Wheeler or car wrecks, maritime/offshore accidents, or workplace accidents. They also focus on representing individuals facing criminal charges and handle everything from drug crimes and violent crimes to DWIs. Additionally, they regularly represent individuals who are in removal proceeding before immigration court and also handle adjustment USCIS matters including family base adjustment status, U-visas application, SIG applications and other forms of adjustments. The firm also represents local businesses involved in civil litigation. While headquartered in New Orleans, Burgos & Associates handle legal matters across Southeast Louisiana with additional offices in Kenner and Baton Rouge. For more information, call 504 488-3722 or visit BurgosLawFirm.com. The firm offers consultations in English and Spanish. Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP, was formed in 1987 by attorneys who had previously worked at two of the largest law firms in the city of New Orleans. They brought with them the practices and high standards of the larger law firms and integrated that with a small-firm atmosphere, making them one of the most select boutique law firms in the city. The firm’s practice areas are diverse and include family law, tax and estate planning, insurance defense, employment law, civil rights litigation, workers’ compensation, and commercial

litigation.   The firm is AV Pre-eminent rated by Martindale Hubbell, and many of its attorneys have been recognized as Top Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and Best Lawyers in America among other various honors. The firm is dedicated to personal service and to meeting its clients’ needs as expediently and as inexpensively as possible. To find out more or schedule a consultation, call the firm at 504-581-2450 or visit LoweStein.com. Ricci Partners, LLC is a full-service litigation and general business law firm that combines years of business counseling and courtroom experience with small, boutique-firm attention to clients. The firm provides practical and professional representation, aggressive yet financially prudent, and assures clients receive the utmost care and attention whether a case requires only a single letter or necessitates years of ongoing litigation. Ricci Partners, LLC was founded with those ideals, and continues to practice them to this day. With offices in New Orleans, the firm’s practice areas include commercial, financial, real estate, and construction litigation as well as employment, insurance coverage, professional liability, mediation and arbitration, successions, and injury. The firm builds personal relationships with clients, advocating with a strong commitment to their individual needs.  For more information, visit RicciPartnersLLC.com or call 504-304-7115.  Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux, LLC congratulates Ray Areaux, one of its founding partners, on being named a Top Lawyer by New Orleans Magazine. Since the firm’s founding 23 years ago, Ray has lead the Intellectual Property Practice Group and grown its size and reputation. Today, the firm’s IP practice is one of the premier IP practices in the Southeast. Continually sought after for his innovative solutions and practical advice, Ray is as comfortable litigating a patent, trademark, or brand infringement case as he is in counseling clients on their transactions to license, acquire, or transfer their IP assets or in filing their patent or trademark applications. Ray’s client mix varies from individuals and startups to high growth or Fortune 500 companies. The firm’s IP clients are found in many industries, including software, beverages, consumer products, publishing, education, insurance, banking, and oil and gas. For more information, please call Ray at 504-585-3803, or visit CarverDarden.com and navigate to “Intellectual Property” under Areas of Practice. When you turn to the Glago Law Firm for help after an accident or when you are in the midst of an insurance dispute, you will benefit from experience gained in over 2,500 cases and more than 160 trials. Lead attorney Mark Glago has focused on civil litigation his entire career, representing many people who have been seriously injured, endured the wrongful death of a loved one, suffered a major property loss, or become involved in a high-stakes business dispute. The firm is well prepared to handle complex class actions as well as representation of individual clients. Glago Law Firm’s notable trials and settlements demonstrate a willingness to go the distance when the evidence and legal precedent justify a recovery greater than the defense is willing to offer. Their dedicated, energetic staff prioritizes the problems and concerns of people who have suffered life-changing injuries and losses and collaborates actively and efficiently with other attorneys, qualified medical my n e w or l e a n s . com

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experts, and other professionals as necessary to build the best possible case. For more information, call 504-599-8666 or visit GlagoLawFirm.com. After Metairie-native Vincent P. Scallan graduated from LSU Law in 2009, he dove right into his solo practice. Working initially from an office in his parent’s local home, Scallan has come a long way in a short period of time. In the years from home office to Poydras Street high-rise, Scallan has garnered a number of accolades including being named a 2017 Top Lawyer in the field of Personal Injury by New Orleans Magazine. His passion for helping people with personal matters, from injury to family law, DWI, and criminal defense, is evident also in his three-time designation as a Super Lawyer’s “Rising Star” and a “Top 40 Under 40” Lawyer from The National Trial Lawyers. While his primary focus is on personal injury, workers’ compensation, criminal defense, and DWI, Vincent believes in developing life-long relationships with clients and strives to assist them with all of their legal matters. Scallan works personally with each client, and he invites you to call 504-272-0444 for a free initial consultation to discuss your legal matter. For more information, visit VPScallanLaw.com. Celebrating a quarter-century, the Palazzo Law Firm specializes in aggressive representation in personal injury and criminal defense cases. The team of skilled lawyers and dedicated paralegals are proud of their record of saying “no.” At The Palazzo Law Firm, there’s “no quitting” — no

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one works harder to secure the best possible outcome for every client in every case. There is “no doubt” —the firm stands up for those who have made a mistake and works hard to get them back on the right path. There is “no fear” —insurance companies do not scare them, and trials do not rile them. Their successes before judges and juries speak for themselves. As one of the most aggressive trial attorneys in the country, Leo Palazzo is committed to getting the best results for his clients. His skill and competence as a lawyer is demonstrated by the fact that many of his clients are referrals from other law firms. Contact the firm at 504-433-1442 or visit PalazzoLaw.com.  Jones Walker LLP is among the 120 largest law firms in the United States serving local, regional, national, and international business interests with offices in Alabama, Arizona, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New York, and Texas. The firm is committed to providing a comprehensive range of legal services to major multinational, public and private corporations, Fortune® 500 companies, money center banks, worldwide insurers, and emerging companies doing business in the United States and abroad.  Clients have recognized the firm for consistent excellence in areas such as client focus, anticipating client’s needs, and understanding the client’s business. Jones Walker has been named to the 2017 Client Service A-Team by The BTI Consulting Group, which conducts hundreds of in-house counsel interviews to identify law firms providing top client service. For more information, visit joneswalker.com.


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The Menu TABLE TALK . RESTAURANT INSIDER . FOOD . LAST CALL . DINING LISTINGS

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Tamarind Shrimp at Saffron NOLA


THE MENU . TABLE TALK

meet the chefs Arvinder Vilkhu

Indian Fusion Combining creativity and spices By Jay Forman

F

or Indian food lovers in the know, the best-kept secret in town was for years Chef Arvinder Vilkhu’s Friday-only popup on the West Bank. With a decidedly festive, club-like atmosphere, dinner felt special not just because

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Saffron NOLA might be the new kid on the block, but chef/owner Arvinder Vilkhu has deep culinary roots in New Orleans. He came to New Orleans in 1984 to work at the Intercontinental Hotel and decided to make the city his new home after experiencing his first bowl of gumbo. The longtime manager of the Pickwick Club, Vilkhu has also operated his own successful catering company for the past 25 years. His business is a family affair, with his wife Pardeep, his daughter Pranita and his son Ashwin, who oversees the excellent cocktail and beverage program at Saffron.

of the terrific food but also because of the sense of occasion and the hospitality of Vilkhu and his family, who play an integral role in its operation. Over the past six years this Friday-only restaurant generated a pent-up demand for access to his

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cuisine on a more accommodating Bread is an indispensable part schedule. This has now come to of the Indian dining experience pass with the opening of Saffron and Saffron offers two versions. The Naan, with its dough made NOLA on Magazine Street. “The response has been terrific,” with milk and yogurt, is cooked says Vilkhu of his new location. directly on the clay walls of the “Both from people who have never tandoor oven, drawing flavor from eaten with us before and people the clay and wood smoke. Roti, a who have supported us over the whole wheat flatbread made with unleavened dough, is also made years.” The build-out, which took the in-house on specialty equipment better part of 2017, coalesced into brought in from San Antonio. an elegant, muted space divided The roti can be enjoyed with an between tables and sumptuously assemblage of accompaniments upholstered booths that help including the southern Indianswallow the bustle and flow of inspired Eggplant Hyderabad as this new hotspot. A plate-glass well as the richly flavored Royal window presents a Paneer, daily Daal view down the line and more. of the gleaming Interestingly, new kitchen. The cuisine in India Saffron NOLA, 4128 Magazine St., Uptown, menu is a mélange is entwined with 323-2626. Dinner Tues.,of dishes both health. Spices Sat., Brunch Sun., Closed time-tested at the are not just for Mon., SaffronNola.com. Friday popup as flavor, they also well as ones new impart medicinal to this location. Vilkhu draws in properties. “All medicine in India part on his long years of catering originally derived from these experience to tailor the taste spices,” Vilkhu says, pointing to visitors unfamiliar with the out the anti-inflammatory properspices particular to Indian cuisine. ties of turmeric as an example. Notable too are the dishes drawing Perhaps the Western world is on New Orleans influences and finally catching up; turmeric seems ingredients, such as the Curried to be popping up everywhere. For Seafood Gumbo which takes a those of us who prefer to drink familiar dish in an unfamiliar our medicine, Saffron’s exceldirections thanks to the inclusion lent beverage program, overseen of fresh curry leaves, fenugreek, by Vilkhu’s son Ashwin, makes chili pepper from Kashmir and copious use of spices and infusions more. “The fusion component of in its creative cocktail menu. • our menu allows us to make use of local ingredients, like oysters, and have our own charcuterie and sausages that use Indian spices and flavors,” Vilkhu points out. A case in point is his Oyster Bed Spice Trade Roast, which swaps Indian spices, Interested in trying to cook Indian garlic and ginger for the butter, food on your own? Then check Parmesan and bread crumbs out International Market at 3940 typical to the dish. Another is Barron Street in Metairie, which the Tamarind Shrimp, inspired puts a focus on Indian food, spices by the BBQ Shrimp cooked up and ingredients. Alternatively if by Paul Prudhomme back in his you love Indian food but don’t Commander’s days. Vilkhu’s feel like cooking it, they have a version switches out tamarind for huge collection of prepared and lemon and cracked black pepper frozen foods as well as a robust to contribute the spiky heat. vegetarian selection.

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THE MENU . restaurant insider

News From the Kitchen Gabrielle, Curio, St. Cecilia By Robert Peyton

Ponce de Lapin

Gabrielle

Curio

St. Cecilia

Chef Greg Sonnier, his wife Mary and daughter Gabie have reopened Gabrielle in a newly-renovated space on Orleans Ave. Chef Sonnier describes his cooking as Cajun, and the menu returns modern classics such as the slow-roasted duck, braised rabbit and oysters Gabie to the New Orleans dining scene. The dining room seats 45-50 comfortably, with additional space at the bar; large format photographs and paintings by Ted Bertrand, of Opelousas, adorn the walls. Gabrielle, 2441 Orleans Ave., dinner Tuesday-Saturday 5:30-10, weeknights, and 5:30-11, Friday - Saturday, 603-2344.

Creole Cuisine Restaurant Concepts continues adding restaurants with the opening of Curio. The restaurant, helmed by Chef Hayley Vanvleet, features an eclectic menu with influences from southern Cajun, Creole, Italian, French, Japanese and Indian cuisines. Vanvleet has worked at Meauxbar, Peche, Cochon Butcher and Kingfish. Curio features two floors of dining rooms and a wrap-around porch on the second. Curio, 301 Royal St., open 7 days, 11-11 MondayThursday, 11-midnight on Saturday, 9- midnight on Saturday, and 9 -11 on Sunday, 717-4198, CurioNOLA.com.

St. Cecilia is the patron saint of musicians and artists, and also the name of a restaurant that opened in February facing the French Market in the Quarter. It’s owned by the same folks behind St. Lawrence, the gastropub on S. Peters street on the Uptown side of the French Quarter. Both restaurants feature craft beers, but there’s more of an emphasis on cocktails at St. Cecelia, and the menu is a bit more “upscale.” St. Cecilia, 91 French Market Place, open Monday and Thursday from 10-11, and Friday and Saturday from 9- 11; closed Tuesday and Wednesday, 522-5851, StCeciliaNOLA.com.

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THE MENU . food

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styled by photographed by eugenia uhl


Fine From the Vine Homecooking with mirlitons BY Dale Curry

RECIPE Shrimp And Andouille-Stuffed Mirlitons

Ingredients 5 mirlitons

T

he first house we owned was in the Broadmoor section of Uptown and came with a mirliton vine that draped our entire garage, hung over the edges and ran down two fences like grapevines. Pear-shaped vegetables dangled like holiday decorations. It was then that I learned to stuff mirlitons, make casseroles out of them and even pickle them. The vines were selfsufficient and provided free food for the taking. I gave them away by the bags-full. It is no secret that mirlitons are as mandatory as the turkey for the Thanksgiving dinner in New Orleans, and no less expendable than the oyster dressing. What I really like about both the stuffed variety and the casserole is that they can be made ahead and frozen, easing the work for cooks of the labor-intensive meal. At Thanksgiving, we have out-of-town friends who marvel at our “unique” traditions such as mirlitons, turduckens, oyster and dirty rice dressings, and deep-fried turkey. In their hometowns, the food is “regular” American with blander fare. I think they like ours better because they come back every year. Their hometowns also don’t have horse racing, a Thanksgiving Day parade or turkey gumbo the next day. And, great weather usually ices the cake. Like cucumbers and squash, the pale green mirliton is a member of the gourd family and is much like a squash. Also called chayote in Latin America and the American Southwest, it has a delicate sweetness that pairs well with shrimp, which are also slightly sweet. Ham goes well, too, as does andouille, if you don’t use too much, or crabmeat for a lighter but succulent touch. Ground sausage also combines well with shrimp. The delicacy of the mirliton can be overpowered by stronger ingredients if you’re not careful, but a couple of pinches of cayenne are just right. This year I’m adding a little minced

1 ½ pounds shrimp with heads on andouille to my shrimp-stuffed mirlitons to spring yet another local ingredient on my guests. When they go home to Colorado and California, they can return to lamb chops and seaweed. But while I’ve got them here, they’ll dine on Gulf seafood and spicy foods with funny names.

1 stick butter plus 2 tablespoons 1 medium onion, chopped 1 bunch green onions, chopped, white and green parts separated ½ green bell pepper, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 3 garlic cloves, minced Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste ¼ pound andouille sausage, chopped fine

TIPS Beyond the stuffing 1

To make a casserole rather than stuffing, scoop all of the mirliton meat out, discarding the peeling, or peel with a knife. Follow instructions above, and place mixture in a large casserole baking dish, sprinkle with bread crumbs and dot with butter. Baking instructions are the same. 2

To make ahead and freeze, place stuffed mirlitons in individual freezer bags with air removed and leave off the toppings of breadcrumbs and butter dots until ready to bake. For casserole, place in an aluminum baking pan and cover air-tight for freezing. Toppings can be added then or before baking. 3

Mirlitons are not the only things growing around us now. Late fall is a wonderful time for deeply colored vegetables loaded with nutrients. Our seasonal best from Louisiana farms includes all kinds of greens including turnip, mustard, collard, and kale, along with sweet potatoes, rutabagas, shelling beans, winter squash and pumpkins. Trees are heavy with mandarins, oranges, tangerines and persimmons, all at peak season and in time for Thanksgiving.

2 pinches cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon Creole seasoning 1 ½ cups French bread crumbs plus some for topping ¼ cup chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley, chopped Directions 1. In a large pot, cover mirlitons with water, bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer until very tender when tested with a fork, about 45 minutes. Set aside to cool. 2. Peel and devein shrimp and roughly chop. 3. In a large skillet, melt butter and saute white onions, bell pepper and celery until wilted, add garlic and saute another minute. Add shrimp and andouille and cook over medium heat, stirring often, until shrimp are pink. Add seasonings and cook another minute. Mix in bread crumbs, 1/3 cup green onion tops and parsley. 4. Slice mirlitons in half length-wise and discard seeds. With a serving spoon, scoop out mirlilton meat, leaving ¼-inch shells for stuffing. Mash mirliton meat with a fork and stir into shrimp mixture. Taste and adjust seasonings. Place shells on a lightly greased baking pan, and divide shrimp mixture evenly among them. Sprinkle lightly with more bread crumbs. Cut the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter into small pieces, and dot the mirlitons with it. 5. One hour before serving, place mirlitons in a 350-degree oven and bake for 30 minutes or until lightly browned on top. Serves 10.


THE MENU . last call

New with Nouveau Spill the Wine By Tim McNally

W

e ask a lot of language, and very few words have as strong a connotation as the one in the headline. We all love “new” and we strive to be among the first to have the knowledge, or better yet, to enjoy the experience. On the third Thursday of every November, French winemakers in the Beaujolais region release their latest wines. These are wines of the Gamay grape that no more than 90 days prior were still on vines in fields. By French law, the wines cannot be released before the assigned date. This year, in a most interesting meeting of circumstances, the just-opened bistro, Curio, has created a cocktail to celebrate the new wine. New meets New. The results are delightful in a New Orleans symmetry sort of way. If you arrive at Curio before the third Thursday of this month, they won’t be able to make Spill the Wine with Beaujolais Nouveau but this being New Orleans, there is always a most acceptable and happy substitute until the main ingredient is available on November 16.

RECIPE Spill the Wine

2 oz. Beaujolais Nouveau, or Beaujolais, or light Burgundy 1 oz. Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao .75 oz. Sage-Black Pepper Syrup 2 Dashes Orange Bitters Orange slice garnish

Add all Ingredients in to a mixing glass with ice. Stir until cold. Strain into bar glass.

Curio, a French Quarter bistro, 301 Royal Street, 717-4198. As created by Curio Bar Manager Hayden Winklar

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THE MENU . dining listings

H= New Orleans Magazine award winner

Abita Springs Abita Brew Pub Gastropub 72011 Holly St., (985) 892-5837, AbitaBrewPub.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Better-than-expected pub food in its namesake eatery. “Tasteful” tours available for visitors. $$ Akers Middendorf’s Seafood Interstate 55, Exit 15, 30160 Highway 51 South, (985) 386-6666, MiddendorfsRestaurant.com. L, D Wed-Sun. Historic seafood destination along the shores of Lake Maurepas is worldfamous for its thin-fried catfish fillets. Open since 1934, it’s more than a restaurant, it’s a Sun. drive tradition. $$ Avondale H Mosca’s Italian 4137 Highway 90 West, 436-8950, MoscasRestaurant.com. D TueSat. Italian institution dishes out massive portions of great food, family-style. Good bets are the shrimp Mosca and chicken à la grande. Cash only. $$$ Bywater H Pizza Delicious pizza 617 Piety St., 676-8482, PizzaDelicious.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable

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$ = Average entrée price

$ = $5-10

restaurant that began as a pop-up, but they also offer excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes as well. Outdoor seating a plus. $

H Mariza Italian 2900 Charters St., 598-5700, MarizaNewOrleans.com. D Tue-Sat. An Italian-inspired restaurant by chef Ian Schnoebelen features a terrific raw bar, house-cured charcuterie and an array of refined adult beverages served in the industrial/contemporary setting on the ground floor of the Rice Mills lofts. $$$ Carrollton Bourré AMERICAN 1510 S. Carrollton Ave., 510-4040. L, D Tue-Sun. “Elevated” street food along with quality daiquiris and reconsidered wings are the draw at this newcomer from the team behind Boucherie. $$ Breads on Oak Bakery/Breakfast 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. B, L Wed-Sun. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak Street serves breads, sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan-friendly options. $ City Park

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$$ = $11-15

$$$ = $16-20

$$$$ = $21-25

Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Circle, NO Museum of Art, City Park, 4821264, CafeNoma.com. L, (snacks) Tue-Sun. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $$ Morning Call Bakery/Breakfast 56 Dreyfous Drive, City Park, 885-4068, NewOrleansCityPark.com/in-the-park/ morning-call. 24 hours a day; cash-only. Chicory coffee and beignets coated with powdered sugar make this the quintessential New Orleans coffee shop. $ CBD/Warehouse District H Annunciation Louisianian Fare 1016 Annunciation St., 568-0245, AnnunciationRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Steven Manning brings a refined sensibility to this refined Warehouse District oasis along with his famous fried oysters with melted brie. $$$ Balise Louisianian Fare 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. L Tue-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Decidedly

$$$$$ = $25 & up

masculine fare – think beef tartare with horseradish and pumpernickel – is carefully crafted and fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

H Besh Steak Steakhouse Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. D daily. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne Seafood 601 Loyola Ave., 6133860, BorgneRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Coastal Louisiana seafood with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$ Café Adelaide Louisianian Fare Loews New Orleans Hotel, 300 Poydras St., 595-3305, CafeAdelaide.com. B, L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. This offering from the Commander’s Palace family of restaurants has become a power-lunch favorite for business-people and politicos. Also features the Swizzle Stick Bar. $$$$ Calcasieu Specialty Foods 930


Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2188, CalcasieuRooms.com. For gatherings both large and small, the catering menus feature modern Louisiana cooking and the Cajun cuisine for which chef Donald Link is justifiably famous. Chophouse New Orleans Steakhouse 322 Magazine St., 522-7902, ChophouseNola.com. D daily. In addition to USDA prime grade aged steaks prepared under a broiler that reaches 1,700 degrees, Chophouse offers lobster, redfish and classic steakhouse sides. $$$

famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

H Domenica Italian The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Chef Alon Shaya serves authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta

H La Boca Steakhouse

some from chef John Besh’s Northshore

870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. D Mon-Sat. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Cochon Louisianian Fare 930

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. L Mon-Fri, D Tue-Sat. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this Mr. John’s offshoot overlooking Lafayette Square, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$ Drago’s Louisianian Fare Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D daily. This

Johnny Sanchez World 930 Poydras St., 304-6615, JohnnySanchezRestaurant. com. L, D daily. Contemporary Mexican mecca offering celebrity chef cachet to go along with the locally sourced produce accompanying the Bistec a la Parilla. Popular happy hour and downtown locale next to South Market District add to the appeal. $$$

and entrées features locally raised products, farm. $$$$

Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. L, D, Mon-Sat. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski showcase Cajun and Southern cuisine at this hot spot. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme here, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine from the bar. Reservations strongly recommended. $$

brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$

Emeril’s Louisianian Fare 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from all over the world. $$$$$ Gordon Biersch Gastropub 200 Poydras St., 552-2739, GordonBiersch.com. L, D daily. Local outpost of this popular chain serves specialty brews made on-site and crowdpleasing lunch and dinner fare. $$

H Herbsaint Louisianian Fare 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana

H Lüke World 333 St. Charles Ave., 3782840, LukeNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef John Besh and executive chef Matt Regan serve Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, house-made pâtés and abundant plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$ Manning’s AMERICAN 519 Fulton St., 593-8118. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Born of a partnership between New Orleans’ First Family of Football and Harrah’s Casino, Manning’s offers sports bar fans a step up in terms of comfort and quality. With a menu that draws on both New Orleans and the Deep South, traditional dishes get punched up with inspired but accessible

twists in surroundings accented by both memorabilia and local art. $$$

H Merchant Bakery/Breakfast 800 Common St., 571-9580, MerchantNewOrleans.com. B, L daily. Illy coffee and creative crêpes, sandwiches and more are served at this sleek and contemporary café on the ground floor of the Merchant Building. $ Morton’s The Steakhouse Steakhouse 365 Canal St., One Canal Place, 566-0221, Mortons.com/NewOrleans. D daily. Private elevator leads to the plush, wood-paneled environs of this local outpost of the famed Chicago steakhouse popular with politicians and celebrities. $$$$ Mother’s Louisianian Fare 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net. B, L, D daily. Locals and tourists alike endure long queues and a confounding ordering system to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$ Mulate’s Louisianian Fare 201 Julia St., 522-1492, Mulates.com. L, D daily. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$ Palace Café World 605 Canal St., 5231661, PalaceCafe.com. B, L, D daily. A classic New Orleans restaurant, located at the foot of the French Quarter, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team constantly evolve

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traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates athe Black Duck Bar on the second floor. $$$

H Pêche Seafood 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven. An excellent raw bar is offered as well. $$$ Q&C Hotel/Bar AMERICAN 344 Camp St., 587-9700, QandC.com. B, D daily, L Fri-Sun. Newly renovated boutique hotel offering a small plates menu with tempting choices such as a Short Rib Poor Boy and Lobster Mac and Cheese to complement their sophisticated craft cocktails. $$ Red Gravy Bakery/Breakfast 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. B, Br, L, Wed-Mon. Farm-to-table Italian restaurant offers a creative array of breakfast items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more for lunch. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$ H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. L Fri, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef John Besh’s menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Rock-N-Sake Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake. com. L Fri, D Tue-Sun, late night Fri-Sat. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$ H Root AMERICAN 21800 Magazine St., 309-7800, RootNola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Chef Philip Lopez opened Root in November 2011 and has garnered a loyal following for his modernist, eclectic cuisine. $$$$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sac-A-Lait Seafood 1051 Annunciation St., 324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. The striking buildout in the Cotton Mill lofts adds to the appeal. $$$$ The Grill AMERICAN 540 Chartres St., 522-1800. B, L, D daily. A diner with local character staffed by local characters. $ The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor 128

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Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Featuring modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$

restaurant spotlight Ralph Brennan Group’s White Christmas By Mirella Cameran

Tommy’s Cuisine Italian 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. D daily. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$ Walk-On’s Bistreaux & Bar AMERICAN 1009 Poydras St., 309-6530, Walk-Ons. com. L, D, daily. Burger, sandwiches, wraps and more made distinctive with a Louisiana twist are served at this sports bar near the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. $$ Warehouse Grille AMERICAN 869 Magazine St., 322-2188, WarehouseGrille. com. L, D daily, Br Fri-Sat. Creative fare served in an art-filled environment. Try the lamb spring rolls. $$ Victory Gastropub 339 Baronne St., 522-8664, VictoryNola.com. D daily. Craft cocktails served by owner and acclaimed bartender Daniel Victory, as well as refined small plates and gourmet pizza. $$ Central City Café Reconcile Louisiana fare 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile.org. L Mon-Fri. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train atrisk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$ Covington Don’s Seafood seafood 126 Lake Dr., (985) 327-7111, DonsSeafoodOnline. com. L, D Daily. Popular neighborhood seafood joint offers an array of crowdpleasing south Louisiana dishes, including char-broiled oysters and Zydeco shrimp. Kid’s Menu makes it a good choice for families. $$$ Darrow Café Burnside Louisianian Fare Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. L daily, Br Sun. Historic plantation’s casual dining option features dishes such as seafood pasta, fried catfish, crawfish and shrimp, gumbo and red beans and rice. $$ Latil’s Landing Louisianian Fare Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. D Wed-Sun. Nouvelle Louisiane, plantationstyle cooking served in an opulent setting features dishes like rack of lamb and plume de veau. $$$$$ Faubourg Marigny Feelings Cafe, Bar and Courtyard Lounge Louisianian Fare 535 Franklin Ave, 446-0040, FeelingsCafeBar.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri. The All New Feelings Marigny is a complete relaunch of the

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If you’re dreaming of a white Christmas then head to Brennan’s “Snow” event on Monday, December 18. The courtyard will be turned into a winter wonderland. For those who enjoy home-baked gingerbread, there’s the annual Red Fish Grill Gingerbread House Workshop on December 2nd and 9th. Guests of all ages will enjoy putting together Executive Chef Brett Gauthier’s perfectly crispy and spicy houses and decorating them with an abundance of Holiday candy. Brennan’s, 417 Royal Street, 525-9711, BrennansNewOrleans.com. Red Fish Grill, 115 Bourbon Street, 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com.

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much beloved “Feelings Cafe”. Under the guidance of new ownership and Executive Chef Scott Maki, everything has been completely transformed into one of the most absolutely charming neighborhood restaurants in the area. Chef Maki’s emphasis on contemporary CreoleLouisiana fare is winning diners over from near and far.$$$$ Langlois AMERICAN 1710 Pauger St., 9341010, LangloisNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D WedSun. *Reservations only Supper club and boutique cooking school in the Marigny serves up culturally informed, farm-to-table fare with the added bonus of instruction. Open kitchen and convivial atmosphere add up to a good time. $$$

H Mona’s Café World 504 Frenchmen St., 949-4115. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tender-tangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/ Breakfast 2001 Burgundy St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$ The Marigny Brasserie AMERICAN

640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472, MarignyBrasserie.com. L, D daily. Chic neighborhood bistro with traditional dishes like the fried green tomatoes and innovative cocktails such as the cucumber Collins. $$$ Faubourg St. John H Café Degas French 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. L, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

H 1000 Figs World 3141 Ponce De Leon St., 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-totable alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$ French Quarter Angeline AMERICAN 1032 Chartres St., 308-3106, AngelineNola.com. B Mon-Thu, D daily, Br Sat-Sun,. Modern southern with a fine dining focus is the hallmark of this bistro tucked away in a quiet end of the French Quarter. Southern Fried Quail and Duck Confit Ravoli represent the style. $$$ Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s Louisianian Fare 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. D

daily, Br Sun. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade Italian 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. L, D daily. Granite-topped tables and an antique mahogany bar are home to the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thincrust pizza. $$ Antoine’s Louisianian Fare 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$ Antoine’s Annex Specialty Foods 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/AntoinesAnnex. Open daily. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available. BB King’s Blues Club Barbecue 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/neworleans. L, D daily. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician features a menu loaded with BBQ and southern-inspired specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the

fun. $$$ Bayou Burger Burgers 503 Bourbon St., 529-4256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$ Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes, bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Bayona World 430 Dauphine St., 5254455, Bayona.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ Broussard’s French 819 Conti St., 581-3866, Broussards.com. D daily, Br Sun. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table Gastropub 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Open late, this chefdriven rustic colonial cuisine and rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House Italian 601 Chartres

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St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. L, D daily. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters Louisianian Fare 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters. com. Br, D daily. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Louisianian Fare Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. B, L, D daily. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various cultures reflected in Louisiana cooking and cuisine, often with a slight contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster Seafood 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. L, D daily. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery Seafood 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. L, D daily. Crowd-pleasing destination in the French

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Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. L Fri, D daily. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan Steakhouse 620 Chartres St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. Innovative, genre-busting steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro World 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. L, D daily. Central Mexican cuisine along with

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hand-muddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s Louisianian Fare 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$

H GW Fins Seafood 808 Bienville St., 581-FINS (3467), GWFins.com. D daily. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak Steakhouse 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. L Fri, D Sun-Thu. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers handcrafted cocktails to accompany classic steakhouse fare as well as inspired dishes like the Gouté 33: horseradish-crusted bone marrow and deviled eggs with crab ravigote and smoked trout. Reservations accepted. $$$ Hard Rock Café AMERICAN 125 Bourbon St., 529-5617, HardRock.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Local outpost of this global brand serves burgers, café fare and drinks in their

rock memorabilia-themed environs. $$ House of Blues Louisianian Fare 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues.com/ NewOrleans. L, D daily. Surprisingly good menu complements music in the main room. World-famous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Irene’s Cuisine Italian 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. D Mon-Sat. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$

H Italian Barrel Italian 430 Barracks St., 569-0198, ItalianBarrel.com. L, D daily. Northern Italian dishes like Braciola di Maiale as well as an exhaustive pasta menu tempt here at this local favorite that also offers al fresco seating. $$$ Killer Poboys Louisianian Fare 811 Conti St., 252-6745, KillerPoboys.blogspot.com. L, D Wed-Mon. This quasi-popup operating out of the Erin Rose Bar serves some of the city’s best poor boys, including one featuring glazed pork belly. $ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen Louisianian Fare 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul. com/KPaul. L Thu-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to a grateful nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a


destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish Seafood 337 Charters St., 5985005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chefdriven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou Seafood 208 Bourbon St., 5254755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafoodcentric destination on Bourbon Street. Fried alligator is available for the more daring diner. $$$

gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas, and for sipping, a Sazerac or lemony Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $$ NOLA Louisianian Fare 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. L Thu-Mon, D daily. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedarplank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill Seafood 739 Conti St., 5256002, OceanaGrill.com. B, L, D daily. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro

H Marti’s French 1041 Dumaine St., 522-

Gastropub 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930,

5478, MartisNola.com. L Fri, D daily. Classic French cuisine, small plates and chilled seafood platters like Grand Plateau Fruits De Mer are the calling cards for this restaurant with an elegant “Old World” feel. $$$

OrleansGrapevine.com. D daily. Wine is the

Muriel’s Jackson Square Italian 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Enjoy pecan-crusted drum and other local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-be-haunted establishment. $$$$ Napoleon House Italian 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. L Mon-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites

muse at this beautifully renovated bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin Gastropub 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. D daily. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 Seafood 424 Bourbon St., 3091574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. L, D daily. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster prepared crawfish-style in spicy crab boil.

$$$

Louisianian Fare 301 Dauphine St., 586-

Port of Call Burgers 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. L, D daily. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/ restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

0972, RichardFiskes.com. B, Bar Lunch daily. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street you can find this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$

H R’evolution Italian 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the more cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Chris Lusk and executive sous chef Erik Veney are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Ralph Brennan’s Red Fish Grill Italian 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill. com. L, D daily. Chef Austin Kirzner cooks up a broad menu peppered with local favorites such as barbecue oysters, blackened redfish and double-chocolate bread pudding. $$$$$

Royal House Louisianian Fare 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. L, D daily. B Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$ SoBou Louisianian Fare 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. B, L, D daily. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. B, D daily, L MonSat, Br Sun. Old World elegance and high ceilings, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$

H Tableau Louisianian Fare 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. B Mon-Fri, L Mon-Sat, D daily, Brunch SatSun. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre on the corner of Jackson Square. $$$

Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant

H The Bistreaux Louisianian Fare New

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Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy. com/dining.html. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$ The Bombay Club Louisianian Fare Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 5772237, TheBombayClub.com. D daily. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub. com. D daily. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to claypot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

Wood-fired pizza and seasonal Italian cuisine with a locavore philosophy brings respite to the burbs. Family friendly with patio seating to boot. $$ Kenner H Fiesta Latina World 1924 Airline Drive, 469-5792, FiestaLatinaRestaurant. com. B, L, D daily. A big-screen TV normally shows a soccer match or MTV Latino at this home for authentic Central American food. Tacos include a charred carne asada. $$

Lakeview

823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$

H Cava Louisianian Fare 789 Harrison

District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders.com. B, L, D daily. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this nextgeneration café. $ Hoshun Restaurant Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Offers a wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Five-pepper calamari is a tasty way to begin the meal, and their creative sushi rolls are good. Private dining rooms available. $$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. D Tue-Sat, L FriSat. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$ Gretna H Tan Dinh Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1705 Lafayette St., 361-8008. B, L, D daily. Roasted quail and the beef pho rule at this Vietnamese outpost. $$ Harahan H Oak Oven Italian 6625 Jefferson Highway, Harahan, 305-4039, OakOvenRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat.

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Mistletoe Madness at Tableau By Mirella Cameran

Lacombe H La Provence French 25020 Highway 190, (985) 626-7662, LaProvenceRestaurant.com. D Wed-Sun, Br Sun. Time-honored Provençal cuisine and rewards guests with a true farm-life experience, from house-made preserves, charcuterie, herbs, kitchen gardens and eggs cultivated on the property. $$$$$

H Tujague’s Louisianian Fare

Garden District Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s AMERICAN 2001 St. Charles Ave., 5939955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro. com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sun. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$

restaurant spotlight

Ave., 304-9034. D daily. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$ Lakeview Harbor Burgers 911 Harrison Ave., 486-4887. L, D daily. Burgers are the name of the game at this restaurant. Daily specials, pizza and steaks are offered as well. $ Lakeview Pearl Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 6300 Canal St., 309-5711, LakeviewPearl. com. L, D Mon-Sat. A long list of specialty rolls rounds out the offerings of this Asian-Fusion restaurant. $$

H Mondo World 900 Harrison Ave., 224-2633, MondoNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. Make sure to call ahead because the place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$ Lower Garden District H The Green Fork Vegan/Vegetarian 1400 Prytania St., 267-7672, GreenForkNola.com. B, L Mon-Sat. Fresh juices, smoothies and vegetarian-friendly fare make The Green Fork a favorite for lovers of healthy food. Catering is offered as well. $$ The Tasting Room Gastropub 1906 Magazine St., 581-3880, TTRNewOrleans. com. D Tue-Sun. Flights of wine and sophisticated small plates are the calling cards for this wine bar near Coliseum Square. $$ Voodoo BBQ Barbecue 1501 St. Charles Ave., 522-4647, VoodooBBQAndGrill. com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

This year if we see mommy kissing Santa under the Mistletoe, it might be at Dickie Brennan’s Tableau restaurant in the heart of the French Quarter. Hanging from its balcony on the corner of Chartres and St. Peter’s, is reportedly, the largest mistletoe in the city. Any couple who takes a shot of the kiss and posts it on social media with the hashtag #tableaumistletoe stands the chance of winning a dinner for two. Other festivities at the restaurant include a four course Reveillon dinner for the month of December, and a Santa Brunch on December 10. If you are still looking for Holiday spirit, try the new “Reveillon on the Rocks” cocktail, a warming mixture of Rye Whiskey and Vermouth. Tableau, 616 St. Peter Street, 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com.

Metairie

H Andrea’s Restaurant Italian 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.

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com. L Mon-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$ Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Austin’s Louisianian Fare 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo. com. D Mon-Sat. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$ Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. L, D daily. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. D daily, L Mon-Fri. Br Sun. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this familyfriendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. B, L Mon-Sat. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. B, L daily; D Mon-Sat. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options combine with gourmet coffee and espresso drinks to create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. Try

the egg white spinach wrap. $ Crabby Jack’s Louisianian Fare 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. L Mon-Sat. Lunch outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$ Don’s Seafood seafood 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials, which offer a good deal on popular dishes. $$$

crowd and offers a freshly squeezed juice menu to go along with its regular menu and express two-course lunch. $$

destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available.

Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN 714 Elmeer Ave., 896-7300, MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, towering burgers, hearty soups and salads and giant, deli-style sandwiches. $

Vega Tapas Café World 2051 Metairie Road, 836-2007, VegaTapasCafe.com. D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Fun, eclectic small plates destination offers creative fare keeps guests coming back with frequent regionally inspired specialty menus served with humor and whimsy. $$

Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Seafood 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

H Royal China Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 600 Veterans Blvd., 831-9633. L daily, D Tue-Sun. Popular and family-friendly Chinese restaurant is one of the few places around that serves dim sum. $$

Drago’s Louisianian Fare 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant. com. L, D Mon-Sat. This famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris. com. L Fri, D daily. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

Heritage Grill AMERICAN 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 934-4900, HeritageGrillMetairie.com. L Mon-Fri. This lunch-only destination caters to the office

Sucré Specialty Foods 3301 Veterans Blvd., 834-2277, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Voodoo BBQ Barbecue 2740 Severn Ave., 353-4227, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$ Mid-City

H Blue Dot Donuts Specialty Foods 4301 Canal St., 218-4866, BlueDotDonuts.com. B, L Tue-Sun. The Bacon Maple Long John gets all the press, but returning customers are happy with the classics as well as twists like peanut butter and jelly.

H Café Minh Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4139 Canal St., 482-6266, CafeMinh.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Chef Minh Bui and

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Cynthia Vutran bring a fusion touch to Vietnamese cuisine with French accents and a contemporary flair. $$

H Crescent City Steaks Steakhouse 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. L Tue-Fri & Sun, D Tue-Sun. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$ Five Happiness Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. L, D daily. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and house-baked duck. $$ Gracious Bakery + Café Bakery/Breakfast 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B, L daily. Boutique bakery on the ground floor of the Woodward Building offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $ Juan’s Flying Burrito World 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 486-9950, JuansFlyingBurrito.com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Louisianian Fare 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as

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gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

H Liuzza’s Italian 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120, Liuzzas.com. L, D daily. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

H Mandina’s Louisianian Fare 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$

H Mona’s Café World 3901 Banks St., 4827743. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tender-tangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H MoPho Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-andmatch pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$

some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $ Ralph’s On The Park Italian 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. Br Sun, L Tue-Fri, D daily. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/ Breakfast 139 S. Cortez St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

H Taqueria Guerrero World 208 N. Carrollton Ave., 484-6959. B, L, D, Tue-Sat. Friendly staff and authentic Mexican cuisine make this affordable neighborhood restaurant a neighborhood favorite. BYOB $

H Toups’ Meatery Louisianian Fare 845 N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. L, D Tue-Sat. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$

Parkway Bakery and Tavern

AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to

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Trèo Gastropub 3835 Tulane Ave., 3044878, TreoNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D daily. Craft cocktail bar also serves a short but excellent small plates menu to accompany its artfully

composed libations. $$ Multiple Locations Byblos World Multiple Locations, ByblosRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Upscale Middle Eastern cuisine featuring traditional seafood, lamb and vegetarian options. $$ Café du Monde Bakery/Breakfast Multiple Locations, CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Bakery/Breakfast Multiple locations in New Orleans, Metairie and Northshore, CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $ Copeland’s Louisianian Fare Multiple Locations, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$ Little Tokyo Asian Fusion/Pan Asian Multiple locations, LittleTokyoNola.com. L, D daily. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$ Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Seafood Multiple Locations, MrEdsRestaurants. com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. A seafood lover’s


paradise offering an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. An elaborate raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw is part of the draw. $$$ Reginelli’s Pizzeria pizza Multiple Locations, Reginellis.com. L, D daily. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$ Theo’s Pizza Multiple Locations, TheosPizza.com. L, D daily. The cracker-crisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with a lot of local ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN Multiple Locations, ZeaRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular restaurant serves a variety of grilled items as well as appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Also offers catering services. $$$ Northshore Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 1202 N. Highway 190, Covington, (985) 2466155, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Dakota AMERICAN 629 N. Highway 190, (985) 892-3712, TheDakotaRestaurant.com. L Tue-Fri, D M on-Sat. A sophisticated dining

experience with generous portions. $$$$$

H Del Porto Ristorante Italian 501 E. Boston St., (985) 875-1006, DelPortoRistorante.com. L, D Tue-Sat. One of the Northshore’s premier fine dining destinations serving Italian food that makes use of locally sourced meats and produce. $$$ Gallagher’s Grill Louisianian Fare 509 S. Tyler St., (985) 892-9992, GallaghersGrill. com. L, D Tue-Sat. Chef Pat Gallagher’s destination restaurant offers al fresco seating to accompany classically inspired New Orleans fare. Event catering offered. $$$ Riverbend H Ba Chi Canteen Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 7900 Maple St., 373-5628. L, D Mon-Sat. The kitchen plays fast and loose with Vietnamese fare at this eclectic outpost on Maple Street. Try the caramelized pork “Baco”. $

H Boucherie Louisianian Fare 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola. com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$ Brigtsen’s Louisianian Fare 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole

cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

and Creole Italian specialties as well. $$

H Ancora pizza 4508 Freret St., 324-1636,

Carrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. L Sat-Sun, D Tue-Sat. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$

AncoraPizza.com. D daily. Authentic Neapolitan-style pizza fired in an oven imported from Naples. The housemade charcuterie makes it a double-winner. $$

H Chill Out Café Asian Fusion/Pan Asian

4729 Magazine St., 894-8881, ApollineRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sun, Br Sat-Sun. Cozy gem serves a refined menu of French and Creole classics peppered with Southern influences such as buttermilk fried quail with corn waffle. $$$

729 Burdette St., 872-9628. B, L daily, D Mon-Sat. Thai food and breakfast favorites like waffles and pancakes can both be had at this affordable college-friendly hangout. $

H Cowbell Burgers 8801 Oak St., 2988689, Cowbell-Nola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Burgers and homemade sauces on potato rolls are the specialty here, along with other favorites like skirt steak. $$ Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market Louisianian Fare 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket. com. B, L, D daily. Beautiful restoration of historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ Uptown Amici Italian 3218 Magazine St., 300-1250, AmiciNola.com. L, D daily. Coal-fired pizza is the calling card for this destination, but the menu offers an impressive list of authentic

H Apolline Louisianian Fare

Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute. org. B, L Tue-Sat, Br Sun. A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Blue Frog Chocolates Specialty Foods 5707 Magazine St., 269-5707, BlueFrogChocolates.com. Open daily, closed Sundays in summer. French and Belgian chocolate truffles and Italian candy flowers make this a great place for gifts. Bouligny Tavern Gastropub 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern. com. D Mon-Sat. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$

H Café Abyssinia World 3511 Magazine

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St., 894-6238. L, D daily. One of a just few authentic Ethiopian restaurants in the city, excellent injera and spicy vegetarian fare make this a local favorite. $$ Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. B, L, D daily. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $ Casamento’s Louisianian Fare 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. L Thu-Sat, D Thu-Sun. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and for all major holidays. $$ Chiba Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 8312 Oak St., 826-9119, Chiba-Nola.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Contemporary restaurant features fresh, exotic fish from all over the world and fusion fare to go along with typical Japanese options. Extensive sake list and late night happy hours are a plus. $$$

8324 Oak St., 861-0886, Jacques-Imos. com. D Mon-Sat. Reinvented New Orleans cuisine served in a party atmosphere. The deep-fried roast beef poor boy is delicious. The lively bar scene offsets the long wait on weekends. $$$$

Celebrate in Style at The Ritz By Mirella Cameran

Juan’s Flying Burrito 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000, JuansFlyingBurrito.com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Jung’s Golden Dragon Asian Fusion/ Pan Asian 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280, JungsChinese.com. L, D daily. This Chinese destination is a real find. Along with the usual, you’ll find spicy cold noodle dishes and dumplings. One of the few local Chinese places that breaks the Americanized mold. $

H La Crêpe Nanou French 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. D daily, Br Sun. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$

Clancy’s Louisianian Fare 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. L Thu-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$

La Petite Grocery French 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. L Tue-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$

Commander’s Palace Louisianian Fare 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Award-winner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$

Lilette French 3637 Magazine St., 8951636, LiletteRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

H Coquette French 2800 Magazine St.,

restaurant spotlight

H Magasin Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4201

265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from chef Michael and his partner Lillian Hubbard. $$$

Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe. com. L, D Mon-Sat. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $

Dick and Jenny’s Louisianian Fare 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys.com. D Mon-Sat. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$

Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN 3827 Baronne St., 899-7411, MartinWine.com. Wine by the glass or bottle with cheeses, salads, sandwiches and snacks. $

Domilise’s Louisianian Fare 5240 Annunciation St., 899-912. L, D Mon-Sat. Local institution and rite-of-passage for those wanting an initiation to the real New Orleans. Wonderful poor boys and a unique atmosphere make this a one-of-akind place. $

Mat & Naddie’s Louisianian Fare 937 Leonidas St., 861-9600, MatAndNaddies. com. D Mon-Tue, Thu-Sat. Cozy converted house serves up creative and eclectic regionally inspired fare. Shrimp and crawfish croquettes make for a good appetizer and when the weather is right the romantic patio is the place to sit. $$$$

Papa Noel teas and breakfasts offer cookie decorating,

H Panchita’s World 1434 S. Carrollton

few finer ways in the city to ring in the New Year than

Ave., 281-4127. L, D daily. Authentic, budget-friendly Mexican restaurant serves tamales, mole and offers free chips and salsa as well as sangria. $

at the hotel’s New Year’s Eve Moët Masquerade. Each

Pascal’s Manale Italian 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale. com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Vintage neighborhood restaurant since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves icy cold, freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are

entertainer Jeremy Davenport.

Frankie & Johnny’s Seafood 321 Arabella St., 243-1234, FrankieAndJohnnys.net. L, D daily. Serves fried and boiled seafood along with poor boys and daily lunch specials. Kid-friendly with a game room to boot. $$

H Gautreau’s Louisianian Fare 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along with contemporary creations. $$$$$ Jacques-Imo’s Cafe Louisianian Fare 136

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With the holidays here, seasonal celebrations are taking place at The Ritz Hotel, located on Canal Street. festive crafts and a visit with Santa. Also for the little ones are gingerbread house building events for groups of four. The Reveillon dinner, Christmas Eve Dinner and Christmas Day Jubilee are sumptuous events offered at both adult and ‘petit gourmand’ price points. There are

of the six courses will be paired with a champagne and the evening will be hosted by resident trumpeter and

The Ritz Hotel, 921 Canal Street, reservations, 262-5048, RitzCarlton.com.

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also solid. $$$$

dishes to try. $$$

H Patois World 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441,

St. James Cheese Company Specialty Foods 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737, StJamesCheese.com. Open daily. Specialty shop offers a selection of fine cheeses, wines, beers and related accouterments. Look for wine and cheese specials every Friday.

PatoisNola.com. L Fri, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. The food is French in technique, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$ Pizza Domenica pizza 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. James Beard Award Winning Chef Alon Shaya’s pizza centric spinoff of his popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitan-style pies to Uptown. Excellent

Sucré Specialty Foods 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily & nightly. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available.

salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast 200 Magazine St., 525-9355; 1005 Canal St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

H Shaya World 4213 Magazine St., 891-4213, ShayaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef Alon Shaya’s menu pays homage to his native Israel with this contemporary Israeli hotspot. Cauliflower Hummus and Matzo Ball Soup made with slow-cooked duck are

Tracey’s Irish Restaurant & Bar AMERICAN 2604 Magazine St., 897-5413, TraceysNola. com. L, D daily. A neighborhood bar with one of the best messy roast beef poor boys in town. The gumbo, cheeseburger poor boy and other sandwiches are also winners. Grab a local Abita beer to wash it all down. Also a great location to watch the game. $

H The Company Burger Burgers 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger. com. L, D daily. Custom-baked butterbrushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $ The Delachaise Gastropub 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise.com. D daily.

Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$ H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. D Wed-Sun. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger and talented chef Dave Bridges make for a winning combination at this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$ H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 309-0069, WayfareNola.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Creative sandwiches and southerninspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. D Tue-Sat. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sun. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Warehouse District Lucy’s World 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 523-8995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. L, D daily. The focus is on fun at this islandthemed oasis with a menu that cherry-picks

tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay well into the wee hours at this late-night hangout. $ West Bank Nine Roses Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1100 Stephen St., 366-7665, NineRosesResturant. com. L, D Sun-Tue, Thu-Sat. The extensive Vietnamese menu specializes in hot pots, noodles and dishes big enough for everyone to share. $$ West End Landry’s Seafood Seafood 8000 Lakeshore Drive, West End, 283-1010, LandrysSeafood.com. L, D daily. Kid-friendly and popular seafood spot serves of heaping platters of fried shrimp, Gulf oysters, catfish and more. $$

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com

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Dining & Entertainment

ADVERTISING SECTION

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Arnaud's

Austin's

ArnaudsRestaurant.com 813 Bienville St., New Orleans 504-523-5433

AustinsNO.com 5101 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie 504-888-5533

In 2018, Arnaud’s Restaurant will celebrate one hundred years of delivering a quintessential New Orleans dining experience, from its original, historic location in the city’s most prized gem, the French Quarter. Arnaud’s offers an unmatched New Orleans experience that celebrates the city’s culture with every sip and every bite.

Austin’s Restaurant has been known as Metairie’s hot spot for steak, seafood and the Creole-Italian creations of Ed McIntyre and his culinary staff. Serving dinner Monday-Saturday, 5 pm ‘till. Private rooms are available for luncheons, banquets, rehearsal dinners and corporate events. Reservations recommended.

B On Canal brings Self-Expression HospitalityTM to New Orleans, unveiling the ultimate lifestyle experience. Lively amenities include a sultry, full-service, locally-sourced seafood restaurant with a craft cocktail bar. It’s exactly where you want to B!

Briquette

Broussards (Creole Cuisine)

Caffe Caffe

BriquetteNOLA.com 701 South Peters, New Orleans

Broussards.com 819 Rue Conti St., New Orleans 504-581-3866

CaffeCaffe.com 4301 Clearview Pkwy., Metairie 504-885-4845 3547 North Hullen St., Metairie 504-267-9190

Award-winning chef Robert Vasquez will create a coastal contemporary menu and will utilize a large charcoal grill to highlight fresh fish and seafood. There will also be handcrafted cocktails and well curated wine list as well as small plates perfect for sharing.

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In a city that joyously celebrates fine dining as an art form, Broussard’s has been a New Orleans fixture for nearly a century. Located in the heart of New Orleans’ venerable French Quarter, Broussard’s offers chef Neal Swidler’s creative contemporary renditions of classic Creole cuisine in a timeless historic setting.

B on Canal BOnCanal.com 1300 Canal St., New Orleans 866-316-5607

You love their delicious salads, sandwiches and soups for lunch – don’t forget to stop in for breakfast, too, at both Metairie locations of Caffe! Caffe! Enjoy bacon and egg breakfast sandwiches, creamy grits made from scratch daily, a variety of breakfast pastries and all of your favorite espresso beverages.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Crazy Lobster

CompereLapin.com 535 Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans 504-599-2119

TheCrazyLobster.com 500 Port of New Orleans Pl., Suite 83 504-569-3380

dickandjennys.com 4501 Tchoupitoulas St, New Orleans 504-894-9880

Compère Lapin (kom-pare la-pan) n. 1. French for “brother rabbit” 2. traditional Caribbean and Creole folktales featuring a mischievous rabbit named Compe  re Lapin 3. Ground-breaking restaurant helmed by renowned Chef Nina Compton in the heart of the Warehouse Arts District in New Orleans.

Enjoy Riverside dining on the banks of the Mississippi River. Their signature dish is the Bounty of Sea, featuring a twopound Maine lobster, shrimp, crawfish, snow crab, clams, mussels, corn and potatoes. Listen to the sounds of live music featuring the best entertainment straight off Frenchmen Street. Visit them after a long day at Jazz Fest.

Our new Executive Chef Rita Bernhardt cooks up authentic Creole and Cajun food. Each dish is seasonal and flavorful like the fried green tomatoes with crab ravigote, pickled shallots & jalepenos. Open for happy hour and dinner Wednesday-Sunday at 5:30-9:00 pm. Special Events on Monday-Tuesday.

Dickie Brennan & Co.

Effervescence

FrenchQuarter-Dining.com

NolaBubbles.com 1036 N. Rampart St., New Orleans 504-509-7644

Fair Grounds Race Course

It’s important to take time to celebrate the small things in life. Dickie Brennan & Co.’s four restaurants help make it easy. Book any event with 20 guests or less, and their chefs will work with you to create a specialized menu with additions like wine, beer, or spirit pairings. Book now at FrenchQuarter-Dining.com.

Effervescence bubbles & bites is an elegant champagne bar with chef inspired sharing plates on the edge of the french quarter. We have beautiful courtyard seating and we are now serving brunch on Sunday.

FairGroundsRaceCourse.com/groupsales 1751 Gentilly Blvd., New Orleans 504-948-1285

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Dick & Jenny's

Compère Lapin

Since 1872, Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots has been a part of the cultural fabric of this wonderful city. With great pleasure, we offer our considerable experience, southern hospitality and unique facilities to make your occasion truly memorable.

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Five Happiness

Galatoire’s 33

Hoshun

FiveHappiness.com 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans 504-482-3935

Galatoires33BarandSteak.com 215 Bourbon St., New Orleans 504-335-3932

HoshunRestaurant.com 1601 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504-302-9171

At Five Happiness, the ambience and friendly staff will take you to a new level of dining experience. This award-winning restaurant always strives to achieve its best. Private party and banquet rooms are available.

Whether stopping in for a short visit or a comfortable stay, Galatoire’s “33” Bar & Steak offers classic, hand-crafted cocktails and the finest wines and spirits, alongside USDA prime steaks from the dinner menu and lighter fare at Bar “33”.

Chinese or Japanese? Can’t decide? Hoshun is your answer, offering an extensive menu from classic Chinese dishes to Japanese sushi and everything in between (like Vietnamese pho or pad Thai). Stick with one cuisine, or mix and match. Open daily until 2 a.m.

Katie's

Mr. Ed's Oyster Bar and Fish House

Mr. Ed's Seafood and Italian

KatiesInMidCity.com 3701 Iberville St., New Orleans 504-488-6582 Fresh and delicious, the Oysters Slessinger features chargrilled oysters with creamy proven, shrimp, spinach and bacon. Call to ask about daily special. Open for lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday and don’t miss the bottomless mimosa Sunday brunch.

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MrEdsRestaurants.com Mid-City, Metairie, French Quarter & St. Charles Now open in Mid-City at the corner of Carrollton and Bienville, Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar serves your choice of chargrilled, fried or raw oysters, as well as long time favorites such as Oyster Rockefeller and Bienville. Offering both a stand up oyster bar and cocktail bar, it’s the perfect place to relax and enjoy. Four unique locations; one great menu.

MrEdsRestaurants.com 1001 Live Oak, Metairie 504-838-0022 910 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner 504-463-3030 Mr. Ed’s has been a local favorite since 1989, offering home-style cooking, Italian cuisine, seafood favorites, and Mr. Ed’s Famous Fried Chicken. Open MondaySaturday for lunch and dinner. Daily lunch specials and catering are available as well.


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New Orleans Creole Cookery

Mulates.com 201 Julia St., New Orleans 504-522-1492

NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com 510 Toulouse St., New Orleans 504-524-9632

NopsiHotel.com 317 Baronne St., New Orleans 844-439-1463

Mulate's is famous for preserving and celebrating the food, music and culture found in the small towns and along the bayous of South Louisiana. Enjoy fresh seafood and local brews. Open at 11 a.m. daily and live Cajun music nightly.

Savor authentic Creole dishes prepared by chef John Trinh, formerly of Eleven 79. Delight in traditional dishes such as gumbo, shrimp Creole and crawfish etouffée, as well as an oyster happy hour Monday-Friday, 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. Enjoy handcrafted cocktails and signature drinks in the historic French Quarter.

NOPSI loves happy hour. That’s why each of our bars — Public Service, underCURRENT and Above the Grid — hosts happy hour 4-6pm daily. Join us for seasonal drink & appetizer specials. Whether you’re looking to mingle with the rooftop scene or get classy at our whiskey bar, we promise you the happiest of hours at NOPSI Hotel.

Opal Basil

Parkway Bakery

OpalBasil.com 719 South Peters, New Orleans

ParkwayPoorBoys.com 538 Hagan Ave., New Orleans 504-482-3047

Pascal's Manale

Chef Robert Vasquez draws on his vast restaurant, catering, and retail experience to helm Opal Basil. Originally based in Old Mandeville, Opal Basil, a wine bar and restaurant, is set to dazzle taste buds at their new home in the Warehouse District serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Voted “Best Po’ Boy in Louisiana” by USA Today’s 10 Best, Parkway Bakery & Tavern is the oldest poor boy shop in New Orleans, overlooking the historic Bayou St. John in Mid-City. Enjoy one of Parkway’s legendary poor boys in the restaurant, covered patio or classic New Orleans bar.

PascalsManale.com 1838 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans 504-895-4877

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

NOPSI Hotel

Mulate's

This famous restaurant has been familyowned and operated since 1913. Pascal’s Manale is the origin of the well known Original Pascal’s Barbeque Shrimp. The old-time oyster and cocktail bars offer raw oysters on the half shell and all types of cocktails, as well as a great selection of fine wines. Fresh seafood, Italian dishes and delicious steaks are featured.

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Poppy's Time Out Grill

Ralph Brennan

PoppysTimeOutSportsBar.com Spanish Plaza across from Harrah's Casino 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 80 504-247-9265

RalphBrennanCatering.com 504-539-5510

RedGravyCafe.com 125 Camp St., New Orleans 504-561-8844

Poppy's Time Out is the place with the hottest sports action. They have all the DirecTV packages on 21 huge screens, great food and 20 beers on tap. They are open seven days a week, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Catch the game with them.

Ralph Brennan Catering is known as New Orleans’ premier caterer for groups from 100 to 1,200 people. With the ability to match your palate, theme and budget in your home, restaurant, or venue of your choice, they are dedicated to providing a seamless, professional and, above all, memorable experience.

Ritz Carlton

Rizzutos

Sala

RitzCarlton.com 921 Canal St., New Orleans 504-524-1331

6262 Fleur de Lis Dr., New Orleans 504-300-1804

SalaNola.com 124 Lake Marina Ave., New Orleans 504-513-2670

M Bistro’s menu is an indigenous approach to the preparation of the finest meats, seafood and produce from farmers in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama. Fresh, organic, seasonal, local and farm to table, that is M Bistro.

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Rizzuto’s focuses on bringing you “Village Classics” that have been mainstays of our family for over half a century, as well as steak and chop specialties. With an exquisite wine list and specialty cocktail menu, your experience at Rizzuto’s will be nothing short of satisfied.

Chef de cuisine Roseann says its cool enough for her Yes! You Can Have Soup combo. The Soup del giorno will warm your heart this coming fall season and will be always be accompanied by a pairing to compliment the seasonal flavor. Voted #1 Brunch in New Orleans Magazine and on Open Table! Open Wednesday through Monday 8 a.m. To 2 p.m.

Enjoy brunch with bottomless mimosas on Saturdays and Sundays starting at 8 a.m. Try Traditional or Crab Cakes Benedict, Eggs Sardou, Omelets or something sweet like Zeppole or French Toast. Weekdays, happy hour is from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the bar. Open until midnight Thursday through Saturday. Closed Mondays.


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ScarletPearlCasino.com 9380 Central Avenue, D'Iberville, MS 228-275-3032

St. Charles Parish Edward A. Dufresne Community Center EdwardDufresneCommunityCenter.com 274 Judge Edward Dufresne Pkwy., Luling 985-331-3795

The Country Club TheCountryClubNewOrleans.com 634 Louisa St., New Orleans 504-945-0742

St. Charles Parish’s multi-functional facility is designed to host numerous functions from meetings to formal banquets and receptions. Their full-service, on-site caterer is available to meet all your food and beverage needs from ten guests to a formal dinner for 500.

Dive into a tasty paradise, tucked away in the heart of the Bywater. With a newly renovated space, The Country Club offers the perfect setting for enjoying chef-driven cuisine inspired by Italian-French and Creole- Southern heritages. From chateaubriand to jumbo sea scallops, the new menu by Chef Chris Barbato, has all the foodies talking.

The Court of Two Sisters

The Pearl Room

CourtOfTwoSisters.com 613 Royal St., New Orleans 504-522-7261

MrEdsRestaurants.com 2310 Hickory Ave, River Ridge 504-737-0604

The Ruby Slipper Café

The Court of Two Sisters, known for its large dining courtyard, serves a lavish daily Jazz Brunch buffet, and now serves appetizers at the Carriageway Bar. Enjoy Blackened Alligator or BBQ Shrimp while sipping cocktails at the bar. At night, order la carte or the four-course dinner menu. Reservations recommended.

The Pearl Room at The Grotto is NOW OPEN in River Ridge, offering modern elegance and the delicious cuisine of Mr. Ed's Restaurant Group. Available for Receptions, Rehearsal Dinners, Luncheons, Corporate Parties and all of your Holiday Events from 50-250 guests.

With a menu that is crafted from Chef Anthony Rametta’s 29 years of experience, Scarlet’s Steaks & Seafood, located inside Scarlet Pearl Casino Resort, offers mouthwatering cuisine completed by sultry décor, dark woods and luxe leather booths. Open Wednesday – Sunday.

TheRubySlipperCafe.net Locations in New Orleans: Mid-City, Marigny, CBD, French Quarter, Uptown; Baton Rouge, LA; Pensacola, FL; Orange Beach, AL and Mobile, AL… opening Spring 2018! 504-525-9355

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Scarlet Pearl Casino

The Ruby Slipper Café adds a New Orleans twist to Southern breakfast, brunch and lunch classics. The scratch kitchen and eye-opening cocktails, such as the awardwinning Bacon Bloody Mary, make it a hot spot for fueling up before a festival or grabbing a quick lunch during the weekday. my n e w or l e a n s . com

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Tommy's (Creole Cuisine) TommysNewOrleans.com 746 Tchoupitoulas St, New Orleans 504-581-1103 True Italian Cuisine with touches of French Creole influence served proudly in the heart of the Warehouse District. Tommy’s Cuisine combines a quintessential New Orleans reverence for fine ingredients with artfully concocted combinations to create a worldclass dining experience.

Tropical Isle/ Orleans Grapevine OrleansGrapevine.com 720 Orleans Ave., New Orleans 504-523-1930 Enjoy true New Orleans atmosphere in a beautiful, tropical courtyard. Orleans Grapevine serves high quality cuisine and one of the largest selections of wine by the bottle or by the glass. Don’t miss the popular Bacon Happy Hour, where you’ll enjoy free bacon with your cocktails and wine. 4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m. to midnight daily.

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1. Aunt Sally's auntsallys.com 750 St. Charles & 810 Decatur, New Orleans 504-944-6090 Sweeten your holidays with the best handmade pralines and unique NOLA gifts from Aunt Sally's Pralines! Order online or visit our shops at 750 St. Charles & 810 Decatur. Pick up ready-made gift baskets or place a custom order by calling 504-944-6090.

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2. Auraluz ShopAuraluz.com 4408 Shores Drive, Metairie 504-888-3313 Thymes...a great holiday gift! The favorite Frasier Fir and its blend of Siberian Fir needles, cedarwood and sandalwood creates that perfect justcut forest fragrance. Also, available Vanilla Blanc, the newest fragrance, capturing the warmth and comfort of vanilla. Just a few of the Thymes collections you will find at AURALUZ. 3. Boundless 1511 Metairie Rd., Metairie 504-309-8628 Double old fashion rock glasses with all the neighborhoods we call home. Comes in a boxed set of four. Exclusively at Boundless Shipping and Cutee Patootee gifts. 4. Celebration in the Oaks at City Park NewOrleansCityPark.com/celebration-in-the-oaks 1 Palm Drive, New Orleans 504-482-4888 Celebration in the Oaks is the most spectacular holiday lights festivals in the country. City Park’s famous oaks are swathed in over a million twinkling lights with light displays placed throughout 25 acres of the Park. Tickets to this breathtaking event make great gifts! 5. Cristy's Collection cristycali.com 504-407-5041 The Fleur de Knot Key - “Sterling silver key design inspired by the ancient Celtic love knot. Represents finding the key to happiness in love."

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6. Fleur d'Orleans FleurDOrleans.com 3701a Magazine St., New Orleans 504-899-5585 818 Chartres St., New Orleans 504-475-5254 Inspired by the design of a traditional New Orleans art glass window, this beautiful pair of 14 karat gold plated earrings add the sparkle of gold, and New Orleans, to any holiday gift. Fleur D'Orleans has more than 100 designs inspired by the heritage of New Orleans.

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7. HGM Fine Jewelry hgmjewelry.com 3617 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-957-3409 Lovely Art Deco emerald and diamond ring. The emeralds are approx. .50cts each. The diamond in the middle is an antique cushion cut and weighs approx. .50cts. The ring has tested positive for platinum and is from the 1940's. $5900.00 8. Jaci Blue JaciBlue.com 2111 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-603-2929 At Jaci Blue, you’ll find gorgeous clothing hand picked to flatter women sizes 12 and up. This Karen Kane dress with a wispy hemline flows and flutters with this enchanting mixed floral print dress making it a fall favorite. $171. 9. Judy at the Rink 2727 Prytania St., New Orleans 504-891-7018 Stop by for a Thanksgiving greetings for your door!

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10. Konnie's Gift Depot 859 Brownswitch Road, Slidell In the Country Club Plaza 985-643-8000 The Latest From Swan Creek….Swan Creek large Petal Pot candles using American pro-duced soybean wax, which is 100% environmentally friendly and renewable. Soy wax burns cleanly, is lead-free and imparts great aroma. Swan Creek Petal Pots and other styles and fragrances are in stock and available now as well as one of the largest candle selections in the South. See Swan Creek and our many other candles at Konnie’s. my n e w or l e a n s . com

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11. Louisiana Children's Museum lcm.org 420 Julia St., New Orleans 504-523-1357 Retail price: $28.95 From puppets to puzzles, the Louisiana Children’s Museum Store carefully selects every item to help children discover the world around them. This holiday season give the gift of imaginative puppet play. Children will delight as they learn to express their ideas, feelings and creativity with Silly Puppets! 12. NOLA Boards NolaBoards.com 4304 Magazine St.,New Orleans 504-516-2601 519 Wilkinson St.,New Orleans 504-435-1485 From left to right: Hand-turned Cheese Knives $40 Crawfish Pin $12 Mosquito Roux Spoon $30 Hand-turned Rolling Pin $40 Lightning Coasters $20 Apple Nutmeg Shrub $15 Holiday Pie Bitters $22 LA State & Fleur-de-lis Stamped Glassware $36 Olive You Card $8 Cheese Board $160

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13. Perlis perlis.com 6070 Magazine St., Uptown 504-895-8661 600 Decatur St., French Quarter 504-523-6681 1281 N Causeway Blvd, Mandeville 985-674-1711 Stay dry and stylish with this New Orleans umbrella featuring a vintage map collage of New Orleans and the Mississippi River. A big 40" across, button operated, wrist strap and outer sleeve for storage. 14. Queork Queork.com 838 Chartres St., French Quarter 504-481-4910 3005 Magazine St., Garden District 504-388-6803 This women's wallet is made using REAL CORK! The outer fabric is sealed with silicone making it durable like leather, water resistant and easy to clean with a damp cloth. $65.

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15. Symmetry Jewelers SymmetryJewelers.com 8183 Hampson St., New Orleans 504-861-9925 Symmetry is a full service jewelry store and graphic design studio, offering antique jewelry restoration, traditional jewelry repairs, and the finest in original custom creations using your gemstones or ours. Pictured is the diamond clover pendant in 18k yellow gold with .30 carats of diamonds designed by in-house designer craftsman, Tom Mathis. $550.00

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16. The Basketry TheBasketry.com 12337 Highway 90, Luling 985-785-8769 The Basketry has been providing beautiful custom designed gift baskets since 1995. Customers from across the globe simply call Kristi and her team with a price range and they handle the rest. Same day hand delivery and shipping to anywhere with baskets starting at $25. Pictured item is “Cheers to the Holidays Gift Box” filled with fine wines and gourmet foods. $84. 17. The Historic New Orleans Collection hnoc.org/shop The Shop at The Collection, part of The Historic New Orleans Collection 533 Royal St., New Orleans 504-598-7147 Local designer Jill Shampine used images from the Michael P. Smith Archive at The Historic New Orleans Collection to create decorative pillows exclusively for The Shop at The Collection. Multiple designs available. Item shown: $65 (16" x 12").

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18. Tickets to 32nd Sandestin Wine Festival Sandestin.com/wine 9300 Emerald Coast Pkwy W Miramar Beach, FL 855-859-1045 Uncork Fun in the Sun April 12-15 at one of the top wine festivals in the country! Affectionately called the “Kentucky Derby of Wine Festivals,” enjoy a picture-perfect weekend event with flowing wine, delicious food, live music and more. Save up to 25% on tickets and deluxe accommodations with code WINE18.

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Aging Parents

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s you and your parents grow older, the care dynamic often shifts. Even with older parents who are active and leading productive lives, worry can sometimes set in with the adult children who want to make sure their parents’ health and safety are always intact. Services for aging adults are abundant across the metro area and include everything from totally independent living to specialized healthcare services for those experiencing some of the natural health concerns that come with aging. Assuaging worries by finding the right support for older adults can mean better health and wellness for them as well as for their adult children. From Alzheimer’s and memory support, to simply finding a good primary care physician or a helpful, friendly pharmacy, there are professionals who can help make sure your older parents age well and worry-free. Alzheimer’s Support Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive brain disease robbing the lives of more than 85,000 Louisiana seniors. Statewide, over 232,000 caregivers are affected by the burden of the disease. There is no prevention, no cure, or way to slow down Alzheimer’s, but there is hope. The Alzheimer’s Association provides care and support to families and those living with Alzheimer’s with a mission to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. The Community Resource Finder (ALZ.org/crf ) can help you find support groups, educational programs, events, and community services in your community. Volunteer, and learn more about the disease and how you can become a champion for the cause at ALZ.org/Louisiana. 

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For additional help or guidance, call the 24/7 Helpline at 1-800-272-3900. You can also follow the association on Twitter (@ALZ_LA) and like them on Facebook (Alzheimer’s Association Louisiana Chapter). Women’s Health Many women suffer from incontinence or overactive bladder in silence. Often these conditions occur from childbirth, aging, and at times medical problems. But according to Margie Kahn, MD, associate professor and Board Certified Section Head of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery in the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology at Tulane’s School of Medicine, “Urinary incontinence is not a normal part of aging! We address all pelvic floor disorders, including accidental bowel leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, at the same time. We have an experienced and sensitive team that understands most women are embarrassed to bring up these problems and may have had them ignored if they did so. We offer a multidisciplinary approach comprising behavioral interventions, physical therapy, simple office procedures, and more complex, minimally invasive surgery in the operating room.” Dr. Kahn’s patients are given every option for treatment, and every woman chooses what options are right for her. To schedule an appointment at Tulane’s downtown or Metairie offices, or for more information on Tulane’s OB/GYN department, call 504-988-8070. Multi-specialty Healthcare Centers The new CrescentCare Health and Wellness Center provides a variety of primary care and specialty services for men, women, and families. The holistic, community-based center is dedicated


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to providing affordable, accessible healthcare for all. Additional services offered at the wellness center include behavioral health, case management, infectious disease referrals, and pediatric care. The center proudly offers dental care from its new suite. Services are provided on a sliding scale based on income or through several insurance providers. CrescentCare Health and Wellness Center is open at 3308 Tulane Avenue in Mid-City (in the Marine Building, near the intersection of Jefferson Davis Boulevard). For more information, call 504-207-CARE (2273) or visit CrescentCareHealth.org. Hospice Care Anyone looking for compassionate and dignified care for their terminally ill loved ones should take a look at the services offered by Canon Hospice. The caring team at Canon is dedicated to a hospice ministry that helps patients and families accept terminal illness positively and resourcefully. Their stated goal is to “allow our patients to live each day to the fullest and enjoy their time with family and friends.”  With special expertise in pain management and symptom control, Canon Hospice designs individualized plans of care for each patient based on their unique needs. Home Based Services provide doctors, nurses, social workers, pastoral care, and volunteers.  For patients with more intensive symptom management needs, Canon has an Inpatient Hospice Unit. This unit provides 24-hour care in a home-like environment where patients are permitted to receive visits at any hour. For more information, visit CanonHospice.com or call 504-818-2723. Medicine & Medical Equipment Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-thecounter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy and the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long-term care and infusion needs as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Long Term Care and Home Infusion Pharmacy, and Consultant Pharmacy Services. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Boulevard in Metairie. For more information, call 504-889-7070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.” Retirement Living Celebrating its Bicentennial Birthday this year, Poydras Home is a Life Plan Community offering independent living, assisted living, and nursing care within its Uptown New Orleans campus. Poydras Home is known nationally for its quality of care and innovative programs that allow residents to enjoy life to the fullest. Poydras Home is the only Life Plan community in Greater 154

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New Orleans offering secure memory support care areas in both assisted living and nursing care as well as an adult day program. Poydras Home has recently partnered with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra to launch a music therapy program, designed to benefit people with Alzheimer’s and dementia. Soul Strings For Seniors: Musical Memories, the first program of its kind in the area, debuted to an enthusiastic group of Poydras participants, thanks to a generous donation by Whitney Bank. “Together the musicians and music therapist improve communication, memory, and attention in our residents, impacting wellness as they reach those who can find traditional modes of communication difficult,” says Erin Kolb, Interim CEO and Vice President of Resident Affairs. For more information, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504- 897-0535. Vista Shores is a luxury senior living and memory care community located on Bayou St. John. Vista Shores residents enjoy delectable chef-prepared meals in the bistro, socialize over coffee or cocktails in the lounge, and enjoy the community’s scenic views on the comfortable wrap-around porch. Vista Shores’ diverse social and cultural activities calendar and fitness programs keep residents active and engaged, while weekly housekeeping, laundry, and transportation services ensure that residents are able to relax and focus on living their best lives. Vista Shores also boasts an award-winning specialized Memory Care program—each staff member has been vigorously trained in Alzheimer’s/dementia care to enrich the lives of memory care residents. The community also supports family members and caregivers through hosting a monthly Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group every second Saturday of the month at 2:00pm.  To learn more about what makes Vista Shores the difference between a place to live and a place one can truly call home, visit vistashores.com or call 504-288-3737. When it comes to the art of living and aging well, Lambeth House, a full-service retirement center, offers the best of all worlds—independent living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care, and Memory Care in the event that it’s ever needed. Lambeth House recently received top ranking in the Best Retirement Community category of City Business’s 2017 Reader Rankings. Nestled in the heart of Uptown New Orleans, Lambeth House offers luxury retirement living at its best and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its latest expansion. With a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities including the fitness center with a stunning indoor, salt-water swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options, and engaging activities and social events. Nonresidents (55+) can access Fitness Center memberships, and Lambeth House’s Wild Azalea Café is open to the public for breakfast and lunch, Tuesday-Saturday. For more information, call 504-865-1960 or explore online at LambethHouse.com.


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Serving the West Bank and Greater New Orleans region, Westside Orthopaedic Clinic provides superior general orthopaedic treatment with a specialty in spinal care. The clinic has been in operation since 1961, making it one of the longest standing orthopaedic clinics in the city. Dr. Ralph. Katz is a board certified and fellowship trained orthopedic specialist who has performed over 500 minimally invasive procedures with consistently excellent outcomes. For the right patient who has failed conservative treatment (e.g. medication, physical therapy, injections), a minimally invasive microdiscectomy can be done in an outpatient setting with an incision that can be covered by a Band-Aid. The procedure typically takes less than an hour. Most patients can return to normal activities within three to six weeks. Additionally, Dr. Katz performs cervical and lumbar spinal fusions, utilizing small incisions with minimally invasive systems. He is one of few local surgeons who perform both cervical and lumbar disc replacements. Westside offers full-service, in-house x-rays, EMG/NCS, as well as physical therapy services with access to new rehabilitation equipment. Same day appointments can be accommodated. For more information, visit westsideortho.com or call 504-347-0243. 

Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

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ocal orthopedists help patients of all ages, from the older adult with aching knees to the young athlete who needs a repaired shoulder. The specialty covers all manner of bone and muscle issues, from the spine and hips to fingers and toes. With new minimally invasive procedures, cutting-edge practices, and advanced technologies, the field is continually evolving its methods and finding better ways to get you out of pain or immobility and back into your daily activities. A little research can go a long way in finding the specialist right for you, and fortunately for Louisiana, New Orleans offers a number of all-star, board-certified orthopedic specialists who know well the ins and outs of hip replacements, fractures, scoliosis, and much more. Learn more about this important and vast field of medicine with information from the following providers. 156

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Children’s Hospital’s Orthopedic Center is committed to providing comprehensive and compassionate care for pediatric, adolescent, and young adult patients. Orthopedic residents from several medical centers complete pediatric rotations at Children’s Hospital to train with the largest group of board certified orthopedic surgeons in the area. Established in 1955, it contains the region’s largest and most experienced pediatric orthopedic team. In its specialty clinics, last year the hospital recorded more than 24,000 visits, treating the full spectrum of orthopedic conditions—ranging from fractures and sports-related injuries to scoliosis, hip conditions, limb length discrepancies, and cerebral palsy. The center blends cutting-edge treatments and innovative surgical approaches with prompt, family-centered care. A specialized critical care spinal unit is available to all patients who undergo a spine related surgical procedure. The center’s team is committed to providing the best possible care for every patient. For more information about the Orthopedic Center at Children’s Hospital, visit chnola.org/orthopedics. Orthopedic care at East Jefferson General Hospital is best described as personalized. EJGH orthopedists take the approach that not every patient, knee, hip, shoulder, or injury is the same. The hospital takes great pride in providing the surgical and non-surgical solutions needed to provide each patient the best outcomes possible. Recognized as a Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Distinction Orthopedic Center and recognized as Best in Region by US News and World Report for both Hip Replacement and Knee Replacement, EJGH is the leader in providing minimally invasive solutions that get you back to work, play, and life as quickly and safely as possible. Visit ejgh.org for more information and orthopedic solutions at East Jefferson General Hospital.


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TRY THIS

Take off The airport is located in Hammond, only about 45 minutes outside of the city. And Rastanis teaches seven days a week, by appointment only, with the training outline including about 20 lessons. To achieve their pilot license, flyers much complete a minimum of 15 hours dual instruction time and five hours of solo flight time before being able to take the written exam. AutoGyro of Louisiana, 225-503-5168, autogyrooflouisiana.com.

Flying High Test-driving an AutoGyro by KELLY MASSICOT

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t’s a bird, it’s a plane... no, it’s Steve Rastanis and his autogyro flying high above Hammond. Rastanis offers flying lessons to those looking to learn to pilot this tiny scooter in the sky. It’s always been a dream of mine to fly an airplane. I was dreaming of a bit of a bigger situation, but until someone offers me that type of flying lesson, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on the autogyro. The autogyro is different aesthetically from normal planes in the sense that you’re completely out in the open. There are no doors on an autogyro, making it the windiest flight I’ve ever taken. “Gyro’s cannot stall or go into a

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spin like a fixed wing,” explained Rastanis. “ It’s more stable in the air and needs very little room to land in the event of an engine failure.  It is also about 10 percent of the cost of a helicopter.” Rastanis has been a pilot for years manning aircrafts such as fixed wing Cesnas, powered parachutes and was even a semiprofessional skydiver. As he began to talk of his love of flying and how he’s taught countless pilots everything they know, I knew I was in good hands. Since it was my first flight, Rastanis gave me a mini lesson. Typically, an autogyro can cruise at 100 mile per hour and fly to 10,000

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feet. I’m unsure of the speed we were going, though my hair acted as if we were at tornado speed, but Rastanis only took me about 2,000 feet for my first fly. It was pretty magical, and I couldn’t imagine being five times higher than I was already. The day was perfect for flying. Not a cloud in the sky and the sun was shining in full force. I felt like I could see on for days at how high we were eventually soaring. When I first arrived, Rastanis gave me a lowdown of what to expect and situated me with a helmet and into my seat for the flight. When taxiing into position for takeoff, I was unsure

that this thing I was in was going to get off the ground. But I trusted Rastanis, he gave me the signal we were going – which he will let you know means a warning to move your legs out of the way, as the control stick pulls back full force, and we were off. Rastanis told me we only went about six miles away from the airport that day, but it felt like much longer. The ride is smooth and, unlike in a regular airplane, you can see everything right below you. Though I tried to act unmoved, I was a little uneasy at some moments. I have literally jumped out of a plane, landing on the ground, but something about my arms and legs being able to hang out of the plane was a feeling I had to move past. I did, and even when it was my turn to “take the wheel” I felt comfortable with Rastanis there to back me up. Landing was as nerve-wracking as taking off, but after seeing miles and miles of lush green and the clear blue sky, I can’t wait for my next lesson. •


CHERYL GERBER PHOTO

ETC.

Textile Collection at Lambeth House A private collection of Japanese woodblock is now on display at La Petit Galerie in Lambeth House, thanks to private collector and Lambeth House resident Diane Genre. Mokuhanga, or woodblock printing, transferring images and patterns onto textiles and paper was widely used throughout East Asia and was hugely popular during the Edo period (1603-1868) in Japan. Lambeth House is a continuing care retirement community. Visitors can also examine an historic letter collection and Mitchell Goudet glass sculptures. Lambeth House, 50 Broadway Street, 865-1960, LambethHouse. com.

A Natchitoches Christmas The City of Natchitoches, founded in 1714, only has a population of 40,000, however it punches well above its weight in reasons to visit. Named the “Best Southern Small Town” by USA Today, it is also the home to a six-week long festival of Christmas that sees the Cane River Lake illuminated by more than 300,000 twinkling lights and 100-lighted set pieces. Among many events, is the Fete d’hiver, which takes you back to Christmas in the 18th Century. City of Natchitoches, 781 Front Street, Natchitoches, 318-352-2746, NatchitochesChristmas.com. By Mirella Cameran

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streetcar

by errol laborde

1826 North Broad A cure for all that ails you

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Sometimes the greatness of an individual can be measured by the poetry of his words. Consider these three quotes on the subject of winning: “Nothing can seem foul to those that win.” - William Shakepeare “Victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival.” - Winston Churchill “Stay with Al Scramuzza and you’ll never be a looza.” - Al Scramuzza What can be said of a state that created Edwin Edwards, Tom Benson and Al Scramuzza in the same year, 1927? Each celebrated his 90th birthday this year with 184

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great fanfare. Nineteen TwentySeven also produced the Great Flood, which, come to think about it, is also part of the story, more later. Edwards, Benson, Scramuzza—a triumvirate in which each member can claim great accomplishments; for Edwards the current state constitution; Benson has a Superbowl ring; and Scramuzza, by his account, made the crawfish popular. Once regarded as a junk food, the little red critters did not begin achieving widespread consumer recognition until the 1950s when Scrmauzza began selling them. Such a conversion of tastes required marketing, and here Scramuzza was a master. By the 1980s, he was starring in a series of seafood commercials some of them showing him dressed as a doctor

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playfully proclaiming that crawfish was good for just about all that ails a person—a fact that even the great Dr. Ochsner apparently missed. While he delivered his message the chorus sang those memorable words, “Seafood City, very pretty” touching on the fundamental truth that customers expect beauty from seafood joints. Lest there should be any doubt where Scramuzza’s store, Seafood City, stood, New Orleanians were infected with singing the jingle’s punch line, “1826 North Broad!!” Added to the appeal was that Scramuzza had a look, featuring a pencil thin moustache beneath a prominent proboscis, and a name that were made for merriment. Edwin Edwards spent much of his career facing voters and jurors; Benson dealt with bankers and team owners; Scramuzza-- he faced

the mighty tide of those with a craving to suck heads. Now back to 1927: Many Louisianans were sent to Red Cross relief camps that year as they waited for the water to recede, The story has been handed down by relatives that when their kinsmen returned to their farms in central Louisiana they were dismayed to see that the water had driven crawfish all over their lawn. They were poor people, nevertheless this was a food that they did not eat, but these were hardly times for being picky. The wild crawfish were plopped in pots, seasoned with salt, and boiled until they turned red. It was the plight of refugees to have crawfish boils forced on them. Even in hard times, they were never loozas. •

ARTHUR NEAD Illustration


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine November 2017  

New Orleans Magazine November 2017