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august 2019


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AUGUST 2019 / VOLUME 53 / NUMBER 8 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Mary Lou Eichhorn, Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Jason Berry, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Social Media Assistant Becca Miller Staff Writers Topher Balfer, Kelly Massicot, Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Advertising Sales Manager Kate Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Account Executives Meggie Schmidt, Rachel Webber Director of Marketing and Events Jeanel Luquette Event Coordinator Abbie Dugruise Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Manager Emily Andras Production Designers Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney Special Projects Art Director Molly Tullier Patty Traffic Coordinator Lane Brocato Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Subscriptions Manager Brittanie Bryant WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 MyNewOrleans.com

For subscription information call (504) 828-1380

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2019 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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Contents Local Color Marquee Top Picks for August 22 On the Cover: Michael Moses, MD, FACS Plastic Surgery at Moses Plastic Surgery and Children’s Hospital Photograph by Craig Mulcahy

Persona Jesse Hernandez 24

Biz Cruise Control 26

Modine Gunch The Heat of Summer 28

Joie d’Eve Accepting My Age 30

In Tune Hello Louis! 32

Chronicles Unpacking “Saratoga Trunk” 34

Home Epoch Design 36

130

saints and sinners, p. 40

Features

In Every Issue

Saints and Sinners

Inside

How to indulge, smartly 40

The Best Antiseptic in Town 12

The Road Less Traveled

Speaking Out

Adventures, or lack thereof, in Lacombe 52

Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 16

Best Doctors

Julia Street

633 Physicians in 73 Specialties 58

Questions and Answers About Our City 18

Streetcar A Fair’s Farewell 152

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DIAL 12, D1 Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Woodstock with WYES on Tuesday, August 6 at 8pm. This new film brings the three-day concert to life through the voices of those who were present at what became the defining moment of the counterculture revolution. Miss “Downton Abbey”? Then be sure to tune in to DOWNTON ABBEY RETURNS! on Sunday, August 18 at 9pm on WYES-TV/ Channel 12. Join host Jim Carter (the Crawley family’s much-loved butler Mr. Carson) for a celebration of the series and a sneak peek at the new feature movie.

The Menu Table Talk A Fresh Taco Take 124

Restaurant Insider News from the Kitchen 126

Food Surviving the Hot Months 128

Last Call A Cool Martini 130

Dining Guide Listings by Neighborhood 132


inside

The Best Antiseptic in Town An early “Best Doctor”

This being our annual Best

Doctor’s issue brings to mind New Orleans’ first celebrity doctor. He even had his own pitchman singing a song for him on the radio. The doctor was G.H. Tichenor and his publicist went by the name of Cajun Pete. In the early days of New Orleans radio, Pete could be heard singing a Cajun accented commercial which began with, “Hello my friends, this is Cajun Pete” and ended with “good ‘ole Dr. Tichenor’s, the best antiseptic in town.” Other lyrics boasted of what the antiseptic could do for its consumer, which was most anything. There was a real Dr. Tichenor, though his time was before Cajun Pete’s. George Humphrey Tichenor was a Kentucky-born physician who served in the Confederate army. He is credited with having introduced antiseptic surgery in which germicides combatted bacteria. After the war he settled in Baton Rouge, where the practiced medicine and promoted his antiseptic. It was so popular that a New Orleans firm began bottling Dr. Tichenor’s Patent Medicine, which consisted of alcohol, oil of peppermint and arnica, a daisy-like flower long used for pain relief. (Tichenor was a big believer in the curative power of alcohol. One of his legs was badly wounded during the war. Alcohol as part of the treatment supposedly saved it from amputation)

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In listing Best Doctors we look for professionals who have been selected by peer review. In Tichenor’s day there were few peers, but we suspect that such a pioneering doctor could have made anyone’s list. Cajun Pete was a local band leader with a very un-Cajun real life name of Pinky Vidacovich. He was a talented jazz musician, but his most memorable hit would always be the one about the “best antiseptic in town.” Dr. Tichenor died in 1923 but his brand lives on mostly in the form of antiseptic, mouthwash, and toothpaste sold at select stores and on the internet. Conceivably there is someone right now whose wound is being helped by a splash of Tichenor’s antiseptic. To still be helping people heal so far into eternity-that’s really a best doctor.


meet the sales staff

Kate Henry Advertising Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Rachel Webber Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Rachel@MyNewOrleans.com

Meggie Schmidt Account Executive (504) 830-7220 Meggie@myneworleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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speaking out

save the riverfront. The area, which bordered the Treme neighborhood, was important in black culture, so some would say that the location was racially motivated. The fact is that in practically any city, the neighborhoods bordering the old parts of town tend to be more minority populated. Some had to go in the name of progress. (The site of New York’s Kennedy Center was once a Puerto Rican neighborhood as depicted in “West Side Story.”) What is saved and what is not becomes a question of historic significance, plus cultural The battle to save the French Quarter and architectural importance. When it came to preservation, no neighborhood was more important of the city, and would make the thoroughfares and elevated trains. than the French Quarter. Fifty years ago, New Orleans saved its historic district, and in port more vital by creating easy Some of the changes were perhaps Two of the key players in doing so, set an example for other access. necessary, but in the process many fighting the expressway were American cities. Though some Imagine, however, the view from parts of town were torn down. lawyers Richard Baumbach and William Borah. did not heed. Jackson Square facing the river Take that away and a city and instead of seeing the upper loses its soul. Salvation came from an unlikely Because they wrote a source, but the one that counted decks of passing ships, there is As the interstate system An original book about the episode, the most. On August 22, 1969, an elevated roadway cluttered expanded throughout the ©Mike Luckovich “The Second Battle of John Volpe, the nation’s Secretary with hurried trucks. Imagine the country, there would be Cartoon for New New Orleans,” they Orleans Magazine of Transportation under Richard clopping sound of the mule-drawn more examples of cities are best remembered, and deservedly so. (A Nixon, concurred that the Federal carriages being drowned out by that succumbed to planGovernment would no longer expressway noise; imagine the ners. A classic example is Mobile, reprint is being released this year.) support building an expressway café au lait and beignets being Alabama, where I-10 rolls across But there were many others who the old town to connect the Gulf fought the battle at the grass roots along New Orleans’ riverfront overwhelmed by diesel fumes. paralleling the French Quarter. What might have happened in Coast. In Philadelphia, an interstate level. Ultimately there was victory There was jubilation among New Orleans was influenced by parallels the historic Delaware because of passionate activism and preservationists, but disappoint- Robert Moses, a developer turned River area. because stopping the expressway ment among community leaders tyrant who redid Manhattan in Not to be naïve, interstates had was the right thing to do. who for years had been supporting his quest to develop a modern to go somewhere near urban downRather than from behind a the expressway by arguing that it city adapted to the age of the towns. In New Orleans, a section steering wheel, a waterfront is would provide a quick path for automobile. Old neighborhoods of N. Claiborne Avenue near the best enjoyed from the perspective commercial traffic into the heart were demolished to make way for French Quarter was sacrificed to of a stroll.

When New Orleans Said “No” to an Expressway

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julia street with poydras the parrot

A portion of Norman’s plan of New Orleans & environs, 1845. Courtesy of Library of Congress

Thank you for your vote of confidence. The “S.S.S. Pinetree Jim” was named in honor of the Seas Scouts’ national director “Pinetree Jim” Wilder. At least two of the “Pinetree Jim’s” sister vessels, the “Viking” and the “Bienville,” had illicit pasts as rum runners smuggling liquor during Prohibition until Federal revenue agents caught up with them, so the “Pinetree Jim’s” backstory is likely correct. I have heard that, in the mid-1950s, on a return trip from Camp Salmen, the “Pinetree Jim” got caught in a storm and sank off the seawall. If any former crew read this and can confirm her fate, please drop me a line; I would be happy to revisit her story if there is a better trail to follow.

Dear Julia and Poydras, I have researched high and low and have yet to find: How did Tivoli Circle get its name in the 19th century? Yours, Kelly Wally (New Orleans, LA) You’re talking about the site that is still officially known as Lee Circle. Just a few years after the Lousiana Purchase, surveyor Barthelemy Lafon laid out that part of town for Armand Duplantier, envisioning a classically-inspired and culturally-sophisticated metropolis. At the time, American urban design, architecture and education all emphasized Roman classicism. Place du Tivoli appears to have been named for the magnificent formal gardens – now a UNESCO world hertiage site – at the Villa d’Este in Tivoli, near Rome.

Dear Julia, I have to commend you for your extraordinary resourcefulness in the heavy excavation of New Orleans’ voluminous bits of intriguing history. I find it extremely remarkable how you’re able to connect such an array of dots – when any area for connection can be so remote. While living in New Orleans, I was a member of the Sea Explorers and we had a very close association with the Southern Yacht Club. On many occasions, we would go on the committee boat and assist with the conduct of 1 8 AUGUST 2019 myneworleans.com

the procedures for the different classes of sailboats. Although our Sea Scout ship (technically a “boat”) was not in the “yacht” class, it did take us across Lake Pontchartrain over to Mandeville/Madisonville (forgot which) and also over to Camp Salmen in Slidell. Our “boat” was the “Pinetree Jim,” and to the best of my knowledge, it was given to us since it was confiscated as a “rum runner” by the authorities (whoever they were at the time of repossession.) After going on active duty in the Navy – the real Navy – I lost all track of the “Pinetree Jim,” so I haven’t the slightest idea of what happened to her. Do any living souls know what happened to her? William C. Bradshaw (Apple Valley, CA)

have a question for julia? Send your question to: Julia Street, New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Julia@ NewOrleans Magazine.com

Dear Julia and Poydras: I grew up in the Jefferson Highway- Causeway Boulevard area, and was born in 1950. There was a restaurant (possibly Italian) in the 800-900 block of Jefferson Highway going towards the Parish line that my siblings and I are trying to remember the name of. It was a white building that is no longer there. I remember eating there in my late teens/early 20s. Can you possibly help with the name? Thanks, Sharon Penning (River Ridge, LA) I think you must mean Pete’s, a restaurant and bar located at 900 Jefferson Highway. It operated from the mid-1950s to mid-1970s and, during your high school years, owner Louis M. Peters operated it as Pete’s Italian Spaghetti House. I believe it was the only Italian restaurant in that area. Readers may recall that Pete’s was down the block from Manuel’s; it was also across the highway and a short distance away from the Sands Club and Tucker’s Steak House.


Local Color

greg miles photo

MARQUEE . PERSONA . education . MODINE GUNCH . JOIE D’EVE . IN TUNE . CHRONICLES

Saints cheerleader jesse hernandez


marquee

August Our top picks for this month’s events by Fritz Esker

100 Years of Women in Blues

Lagniappe Classic Dog Show

Queen + Adam Lambert

Backstreet Boys

From August 9-25, the Jefferson Parish Performing Arts Society and Jonathan Mares Productions present 100 Years of Women in Blues at Teatro Wego. The show features Big Easy Entertainment Award Winner Dorian Rush and pays tribute to female blues artists as diverse as Irma Thomas, Bonnie Raitt, Janis Joplin, Amy Winehouse and many more. Information, jpas.org.

Co-hosted by the Louisiana Kennel Club and Metairie Kennel Club, The Lagniappe Classic Dog Show features over 1,100 dogs representing 192 breeds. They will compete daily from August 1-4 at the Pontchartrain Center for awards. The event is open to the public. Information, AKC.org.

On August 20, see Brian May and Roger Taylor, founding members of the legendary rock group Queen, at the Smoothie King Center with pop superstar Adam Lambert providing the vocals for Queen’s greatest hits. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com

One of the world’s most popular boy bands comes to the Smoothie King Center on August 30 as a part of their DNA World Tour. It will be the biggest arena tour the group has done in 18 years. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com

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calendar Aug. 1

Aug. 21

Bring It! Live: The Dance Battle Tour, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

NOLA Downtown Music and Arts Festival, Warehouse District. Information, CuttingEdgeNOLA. com.

Aug. 2-4

Satchmo Summerfest, New Orleans Jazz Museum at the Mint. Information, SatchmoSummerfest. org.

Aug. 23

Double Vision Revisited, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Aug. 2-4

Aug. 25

JPAS Theater Kids Presents Aladdin, Jr., Jefferson Performing Arts Center. Information, jpas.org.

The B-52s: 40th Anniversary Tour, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Aug. 3

Aug. 25

Hancock Whitney White Linen Night, Julia St. Information, CACWhiteLinenNight.com.

Big 3 Basketball Playoffs, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Aug. 3

Aug. 25

Daniel Sloss: X, Fillmore New Orleans. Information, FillmoreNOLA.com.

Aaron Lewis, State I’m In Tour, Fillmore New Orleans. Information, FillmoreNOLA.com.

Aug. 4, 11, 18, 25

Aug. 26

Sunday Swing, National World War II Museum. Information, NationalWW2Museum.org.

WWE Monday Night Raw, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Aug. 8

Aug. 28

Summer Classic Movie Series at the Orpheum: Down by Law, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com.

Chris Brown: Indigoat Tour, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Aug. 10

Southern Decadence, French Quarter. Information, SouthernDecadence.com.

Aug. 29

Red Dress Run, Crescent Park. Information, Noh3.com. Aug. 10

Aug. 31

Dirty Linen Night, French Quarter. Information, DirtyLinen.org.

Eddie B - I’m Already Professionally Developed, Mahalia Jackson Theater. Information, MahaliaJacksonTheater.com.

Aug. 15

The Wiggles: Party Time Tour, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com. Aug. 17

Aug. 31

Randy Rainbow Live, Fillmore New Orleans. Information, FillmoreNOLA.com.

Big Easy Rollergirls, UNO Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu. Aug. 20

UB40 40th Anniversary Tour, House of Blues. Information, HouseOfBlues.com.

myneworleans.com august 2019 2 3


persona

Dancing with the Saints Jesse Hernandez By Ashley McLellan

Dance instructor Jesse Hernandez

blazed a trail last year by becoming the first male cheerleader for the New Orleans Saints, and one of the first in the NFL. The Maurice, Louisiana native quickly became a sideline favorite for many Saints fans. New Orleans Magazine and Hernandez take a look back at his rookie year, which lessons he learned, and what’s ahead as he goes into his sophomore year cheering on the black and gold.

Q: How long have you been dancing and interested in dancing as a career? I have been dancing since the age of 2. My mom was a dance instructor and needed a “little bit” in one of her routines and from there I fell in love with dance.

Q: What was your favorite moment from your first year? There were so many favorite moments from my first year on the team it’s hard to choose one! From my very first game to my last game in the Dome, it was all a dream come true. Feeling the cold air in the Dome and hearing all the fans cheering on our boys sends a rush of excitement through my body. I couldn’t have asked for a better season last year as my rookie year and now I’m ready to cheer those boys all the way to Miami for the Super Bowl!

greg miles photo

I’m ready to cheer those boys all the way to miami for the super bowl!


Q: What are some lessons you learned during your first year? Born/raised: Maurice, Louisiana Education: Dance Favorite food/ restaurant: Greek/ Poseidon’s (Lafayette) Best TV guilty pleasure: Currently rewatching “How to Get Away with Murder”  Favorite book: “Year of Yes” by Shonda Rhimes 

I’ve learned to sit back and take it all in. At the age of 26 and being in dance leadership positions, it was hard for me to take a step back and just dance. Towards the middle of the season, and now this season, I’m enjoying every little thing that comes along with being a part of this incredible team. Last season went by so quickly, and once it ended so abruptly, I missed dancing and seeing my teammates on a daily basis.

Q: What advice do you have for the new cheerleaders for 2019, specifically the two new male cheerleaders? To my teammates and my new brothers on the team: Just enjoy it! Take every opportunity and run with it. Do everything with a smile on your face; take a lot of pictures because you will never have another season with the same teammates again. These memories will last a lifetime.

Q: Do you have a special routine that you follow to get prepped before each game? Before every game the team gets in a circle and we pray and say some positive things before we go out on the field. Right before we run out for our pregame performance myself and another teammate have a little dance shimmy shake thing we do to get our nerves out!

Q: Are the Saints going all the way this year? OHHH ABSOLUTLEY! Well most people know this about me but I’m obsessed with Britney Spears and Jessica Simpson. Nineties child all the way!

See you guys in Miami and we will be returning with a ring!

myneworleans.com august 2019 2 5


BIZ

Cruise Control Thousands answer the call to ‘Come sail away’ by Kathy Finn

Though New Orleans’ history

is deeply intertwined with the growth of commerce on the lower Mississippi River, few could have imagined centuries ago that much of today’s industry would involve people and thier entertainment. Cruise ship business at the Port of New Orleans hit a new local record last year when some 590,000 passengers set sail from the city. More than 235 vessel arrivals included two 3,000-passenger ships operated by Carnival Cruise Line, Royal Caribbean’s “Vision of the Seas” and Norwegian Cruise Lines’ “Norwegian Breakaway,” which carries nearly 4,000 passengers. The cruise business has grown right along with the popularity of New Orleans as a visitor destination. As tourism marketers have promoted the idea of combining a few overnight stays in the Big Easy with week-long voyages through the Gulf of Mexico, passenger volumes have boomed. The port accommodates the growth with two modern passenger facilities 2 6 august 2019 myneworleans.com

at its Erato Street and Julia Street wharves, and a host of local businesses fulfill the service and supply needs of the big vessels. While most local cruise passengers board sleek ocean liners for voyages to Caribbean islands or Mexico, the total passenger count in New Orleans gets a boost from river travelers. Five river vessels, including old-fashioned paddlewheelers, carried more than 15,000 passengers from New Orleans in 2018. The itineraries include multi-night tours of the lower Mississippi and even a round-trip voyage to Minnesota, near the river’s head. The riverboats are operated by the American Queen Steamboat Company, which will soon introduce a new vessel in the city, and American Cruise Lines, whose modern-day cruisers resemble those that ply European waterways. Tourism marketers currently are celebrating news that yet another ocean cruise operator has decided to sink roots in the city. Starting in early 2020, passengers can

board the “Disney Wonder” for the Bahamas, the western Caribbean and a special voyage through the Panama Canal. Port officials are excited by the prospect of Disney joining the local cruise lineup, particularly as the “Wonder” features the popular New Orleans-based character Tiana from the movie “Princess and the Frog.” Disney will offer six cruises from New Orleans around the time of Mardi Gras, and port officials are hoping that local families who have a tradition of traveling to Disney World during the Carnival season may be enticed, instead, to take one of the themed cruises. “When a brand like Disney comes to New Orleans, it underscores the fact that we are a destination for the whole family,” Renee Aragon Dolese, a spokeswoman for the port, said. Marketers say the impact of the cruise business on the New Orleans economy is substantial. Cruise passengers generated some 300,000 room nights in local hotels

last year as they took time to explore the city before or after their voyage. Beyond the obvious spending by passengers in hotels, restaurants and retail stores before and after their cruise, businesses that service the vessels and re-supply them for outgoing cruises benefit from the cruise boom. The fueling, maintenance and supplies needed by the vessels each time they return to port constitutes an industry all its own. In addition, passenger business at the port generates revenue at Louis Armstrong International Airport. Port officials say 90 percent of cruise guests travel from out-of-state, and nearly a third of them fly into and out of the airport, which has helped fuel the growth of new direct air services. According to port President and CEO Brandy Christian, “Our homeport status is important for the local economy and helps us fulfill our role as an economic engine for Louisiana.”

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modine gunch

The Heat of Summer A dogs’ tale by Modine Gunch

My grandkids got a little education

before school even started this year. Not that we planned it. What happens is, my daughter Gladiola calls me all excited. She has been volunteering at her school, Celibacy Academy, helping the nuns get ready for fall, and she been chosen to look after their puppy over the weekend. They are going off to some nuns’ conference somewhere. There are only a few old nuns living at the academy these days, and I remember something about them adopting a puppy for protection a while back. If some burglar who didn’t care about his eternal salvation put a foot through the window, I guess she would yap loud enough to warn them. Gladiola said they dress her in a blue tutu to match the school uniform. I bet she’s adorable. And then Gladiola shows up with Immaculette, who happens to be a Great Dane. Well, this ain’t going to work. We live in a tiny apartment, and this dog takes up the entire sofa. She don’t sit under the kitchen table; she wears it. I call my mother-in-law Ms. Larda. She lives in half a shotgun double, but it’s roomier than this, and has a yard. Her sons Leech and Lurch live on the other side. There’s even a laundry room on the back of the house, which they supposedly share. Naturally, Ms. Larda is the only one who uses it. Lurch and Leach just pile their dirty clothes back there, and take them out when they are miraculously washed and dried and folded. Anyway, I tell her that if Chopsley, her Chihuahua, ain’t too scared of Immaculette, maybe he would enjoy some doggie company this weekend. Ms. Larda says he just loves other dogs, so I bring Immaculette over. That’s that.

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The next morning, Ms. Larda calls me back. Immaculette has gone into heat. And she ain’t behaving like a young lady from Celibacy Academy, either. Evidently the nuns never got her fixed. I guess they thought lecturing her about mortal sin would be enough. It worked with us back in the day. The thing is, Chopsley ain’t fixed neither. He was quite studly when he was younger. He had a lady Chihuahua friend named ChaCha and they produced a few litters of pedigree puppies. But even though he and ChaCha aged out of puppy-making, Ms. Larda never had the heart to take away his maleness. Anyway, he pretty much stays in the house, and behaves like a gentleman. Until Immaculette. And just like that, Chopsley transforms into a single-minded missile o’ love. Ms. Larda had to hustle Immaculette out the door, slam it on Chopsley’s muzzle, and drag her by the tutu to Lurch and Leech’s side. So they become Immaculette’s dogsitters. Which ain’t easy. Even without the tutu, she attracts lovelorn boy dogs whenever she so much as steps outside for potty purposes. Somebody has to stand guard, with the hose. Next day, the Gunches get together to celebrate the kids’ last weekend before school

starts. When it’s time to eat, Ms. Larda tosses Chopsley in the laundry room so he won’t be pestering everybody. The kids flock inside and sit on towels—they were playing with the backyard sprinkler — and Leech and Lurch wander in. Gladiola asks, “Where’s Immaculette?” “We didn’t want her chewing up nothing, so we stuck her in the laundry room before we came over,” Leech says. Ms. Larda drops her fried chicken. She throws open the laundry room door. Gloriosa grabs baby Flambeau and rushes her away, but the other kids stand around pop-eyed. So do I, to tell you the truth. I didn’t know a Chihuahua could do that. I got new respect for Chopsley. Ms. Larda yells “Throw water on them!” Lurch throws his beer, but that just works like a aphrodisiac. And then it’s too late. Well, the nuns are going to have a few little surprises. Afterward, my little granddaughter Lollipop whispers in my ear. “I got a question.” I brace myself. “Is that why they call these the dog days of August?” “Yep,” I say. “Every dog has its day.” I think they both did.

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LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


JOIE D’EVE

Accepting My Age If my kids are getting older, I must be, too. By Eve Crawford Peyton

It goes so fast. Everyone says

it, typically folded in with some “cherish every moment” drivel that I never feel like listening to because “every moment” includes the times I’m chiseling dried puke out of the crevasses of the car seat or carrying my kicking, howling child out of Target, but it really does go so fast. “The days are long,” they say wistfully, “but the years are short.” And damned if that’s not true. The days are long; the hours are

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longer. Last winter, when one and then the other of my girls had the flu, the hours were impossibly long. I slept fitfully next to them, waking up every hour to take their temperature, check their breathing, coax them awake to swallow some Tylenol. The nights when Ruby and I fight over her math homework seem endless; the days of thick dread spent waiting for a doctor’s appointment seem eternal. And yet, somehow, my girls are

not babies anymore and it seems Perry (RIP) on the cover and we to have happened in the proverbial discussed whether we’d stop at blink of an eye. Ruby is almost a Sbarro for pizza before or after teenager, two-thirds of the way to we went to Claire’s the next day a legal adult. Georgia is 6 – almost at Lakeside Mall. 7 – and even though I still call her While I was putting some clothes “my baby” and can’t bring myself away in Ruby’s room (and eavesto part with her hooded towels, dropping), I also had a brief illusion she can read and write and play that I was a “cool mom” and that maybe they’d invite me to stay soccer in PE class. Not only does it seem like their and listen to the gossip for a bit, growing up is going too quickly but but then one of them said, “Oh, also like mine went too quickly. yeah, I totally ship them,” and I Ruby recently had a sleepover, said, “What does ‘ship’ mean?” and as I heard them giggling in her and they both looked at me and room over boys, it was hard for me Ruby rolled her eyes and the bubble to wrap my brain around the fact burst. I was just a middle-aged that I couldn’t just plop down on mom again, wearing glasses and her bed with a bowl of chips and sweatpants emblazoned with the join in the fun and demand that name of my college and trying too hard to fit in. I put the rest of the they French-braid my hair. “How did I become the mom in shirts away and hurried out of her this scenario?” I wondered, even room to go drown my sorrows in though I know logically that I am cheap white wine and a mystery 38-and-a-half years old and my novel on my Kindle, like all the sleepover days are far behind me. cool people do on Saturday night. I heard myself saying mom But if the bad news is that I’m things – “clean up your mess out getting old, the good news is that here, girls!” and “after all that I’m not doing it alone. Morgan and candy, PLEASE do not go to bed Kelly are both boring old moms without brushing your teeth!” too now, although their kids and “I am going to bed, are younger and not ladies, so please don’t quite to the sleepover stay up too late!” – but Excerpted from Eve stage, and I sent them Crawford Peyton’s I just also felt like my blog, Joie d’Eve, which Facebook messages own tween sleepover appears each Friday on that night. experiences were not MyNewOrleans.com “Get ready,” I told so far behind me, as them. “When your kids though they were just beyond the start having sleepovers, you’re veil and somewhere, in an alternate going to feel so old and lame. And reality, I was still whispering a I know your kids are still little … ghost story to my BFF Morgan but just be ready … because it while my other BFF Kelly paged goes so fast!” through a “Tiger Beat” with Luke

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jane sanders illustration


myneworleans.com august 2019 3 1


in tune

must-see music AUGUST 2

Hello Louis! Satchmo SummerFest, and more by Mike Griffith

August begins with the return of the Satchmo SummerFest to The

of the African Diaspora. With this group he manages to keep all of the traditional elements of jazz and blend them with African rhythms that keep the crowd moving. They are joined on Saturday by the Big 6 Brass Band. Formed in 2017, these relative newcomers first established themselves with elaborate brass covers of popular hits, but they have recently begun work on a new album of original material. The Big 6 have an absolutely huge sound that you’ll want to check out. Saturday the festival also hosts the Treme Brass Band, Shannon Powell and Robin Barnes with The Fiyabirds. Finally, on Sunday you can catch a headlining performance from local soul vocalist Tonya Boyd-Cannon. She has a remarkable playfulness and palpable wittiness in her performance style that is sheer joy. As always, the festival ends with an all-star trumpet tribute to Armstrong led by Ashlin Parker and the Trumpet Mafia. Sunday also hosts performances from a trio of local heavyweights: Ellis Marsalis, Jeremy Davenport, and Leroy Jones. Taken together this collection of performers represents one of the great collections of local talent of the year. When you combine the music with food from The Praline Connection, Company Burger, Crepes a La Cart, and Ajun Cajun among others, it becomes a weekend of treats for the mind, body and soul.

New Orleans Jazz Museum at the Mint for its 19th edition. The festival is always held over the weekend closest to Louis Armstrong’s birthday Queen + Adam Lambert (August 4)—this year it falls the 2nd through the 4th. I love this event as Looking a bit further into the month, it is heavy on two of my favorite things—traditional jazz and remarkable Queen + Adam Lambert will be playing local cuisine. This year, the organizers have collected an exceptional the Smoothie King Center on the 20th. selection of talent steeped in local musical traditions. You really can’t go While I was initially skeptical of anyone’s wrong with anyone in the line-up but there are a few exceptional talents. ability to sing Freddie Mercury’s songs, Friday’s highlights include The Preservation Hall Brass Band. Lambert retains enough of their original spirit while adding This band is actually a super-group of brass band musicians Playlist of mentioned his own touches—all without from the Treme, Olympia and Tornado brass bands. Together bands available stepping on the legacy of the as the PresHall Brass, they act as ambassadors for the cultural at:http://bit.ly/ heritage of brass music. They will be joined in the line-up InTune8-19 originals. Mercury’s tragic by Corey Henry and The Treme Funktet. Henry is a child of passing deprived us all of the New Orleans. He was raised in Treme and grew up among second lines. screaming “Don’t Stop Me Now” along Henry has been playing the trombone since the age of 10 and was part of with a stadium full of fans. Lambert’s Rebirth Brass Band’s Grammy win in 2012. In addition to these great acts, alliance with Queen’s Brian May and Friday also boasts appearances by Kermit Ruffins and Charmaine Neville. Roger Taylor has opened that door again. On Saturday, the festival welcomes Bill Summers and Jazalsa. Summers’ While nothing can be the original, this Jazalsa project brings his extraordinary percussive talents to the music is a whole lot of fun.

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32 august 2019 myneworleans.com

Drab Majesty’s dream pop at One Eyed Jacks. AUGUST 3

$uicideboy$ bring cult horrorcore to Mardi Gras World. AUGUST 6

Planet Booty funk up Gasa Gasa. AUGUST 11

Godspeed You! Black Emperor shoe gaze at the Joy Theater. AUGUST 11

Kyle Craft rocks One Eyed Jacks. AUGUST 14

Pedro The Lion takes slowcore to The Civic. AUGUST 20

Queen + Adam Lambert rock the Smoothie King Center. AUGUST 22

Mannequin Pussy punk Gasa Gasa. AUGUST 25

B-52s pop into the Saenger.

Dates are subject to change; email Mike@ MyNewOrleans. com or contact him through Twitter @ Minima. cheryl gerber photo


myneworleans.com august 2019 3 3


chronicles

“No matter what I say I am –

that I am. I shall be what it suits me to be. “ Clio Dulaine, heroine of the 1941 blockbuster novel “Saratoga Trunk,” is the beautiful daughter of a free woman of color and her wealthy white partner. Returning to New Orleans from Paris, she styles herself a Countess and has two goals: finding a rich husband and vengeance against her late father’s family (his accidental death while grabbing the gun from her suicidal mother was the cause of the mother’s and Clio’s exile to France.) Meeting her match in guile and ultimately her life partner, gambler-cowboy Clint Maroon, Clio scrambles to the top of Gilded-Age society, exemplified by the Saratoga Springs, New York, resort. Edna Ferber, the novelist, admitted in her autobiography “A Peculiar Treasure,” that “everything that I have written ... has had a sound sociological basis.” Ferber chronicled outsiders, people who reinvented themselves, who bounced back from adversity. Her own life was her best creation. She was Jewish, and grew up in small Midwestern towns with few Jewish families. Eventually, Ferber would make a fortune from her writing: short stories, novels and plays. She moved in New York literary circles and travelled the world. She started small. After graduating from high school, Ferber began working as a newspaper reporter in Appleton, Wisconsin, moved on to the staff of the Milwaukee Journal, and became skilled at her job. “I learned that if you asked…. almost anyone would tell you almost anything.” She was observant, she had a good memory, and she could work without taking notes: she wrote it all down later. Born in the 19th century, she was an ardent supporter of 34 august 2019 myneworleans.com

Unpacking “Saratoga Trunk” Edna Ferber’s semi-local novel by Carolyn Kolb

American democracy and in the 1930s was horrified by Hitler’s rise. Perhaps because of her patriotism, Ferber explored American regional culture in her fiction, and used her reporter’s skills in her work. Ethnicity and social mobility were key elements in her characters. “Cimarron,” set in Oklahoma, deals with Native Americans and white settlers; “Giant,” in Texas, covers Mexican Americans with cattle ranchers and oil barons; “Show Boat” depicts the tangled racial ties of a theatrical troop. Ferber usually began novels with on-the-ground research. According to her second autobi-

ography “A Kind of Magic,” Ferber had never visited New Orleans until 1940. “It was enchanting, it was gay, it was hot and delicious and steaming,” she wrote, while noting the “shabby plantations” and “lethargic” tempo of life. The only Orleanian she mentions by name was Roark Bradford, a Times- Picayune editor, whose stories of a black pastor became a 1930 Broadway hit: “Green Pastures.” She did not discuss doing local research for the book. However, the Works Progress Administration “Guide to New Orleans” was published in 1938, and contained enough local color

for any novelist. Ferber’s New Orleans section in “Saratoga Trunk” has it all: street vendors, French Market stalls, Begue’s Restaurant, a house on Rampart Street, the French Quarter, the river, the cathedral. Local idioms dot the conversations. A few months before the novel’s publication in November, 1941, a disheartened Ferber wrote her editor, Malcolm Johnson “I’ve loathed every writing minute of it…. Nothing can convince me that anyone will read this mass of blubber.” Not only was it a best seller, it made a great movie: Warner Brothers paid $175,000 for the rights. Ingrid Bergman (in a dark wig) is Clio; her faithful retainer is British actress Flora Robson (in very dark make-up --- she was nominated for Best Supporting Actress) and Gary Cooper plays Clint Maroon. “Saratoga Trunk” is the only film in which Bergman sings --her singing coach was Dalton S. Reymond, a onetime music professor at LSU; and her songs were French folk songs, the second one collected in Louisiana. Filming of the New Orleans scenes was done in Pasadena, California, from February to June, 1943, but the film was not released until 1945 when World War II ended. Because of wartime rationing, the produce in the French Market scenes was fake. In the Saratoga Springs, New York, section of the film, the train wreck, and subsequent fight, was filmed on location. And, the name “Saratoga Trunk?” --- It refers to a trunkline railroad: Clint Maroon’s skullduggery in controlling this railroad investment is the start of the couples’ financial success!

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photo courtesy of Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research


home

Epoch Design Modernist house with a period aesthetic by Lee Cutrone photographed by Greg Miles

36 august 2019 myneworleans.com


“We both like old stuff,” said

Top, left:Shelves from IKEA serve as a dividing wall between the living area and kitchen; the Midcentury style clock (left) is from The Bridge House Thrift Store, the Herman Miller by George Nelson turbine clock (center) is from Ebay and the one at right is from an estate sale; the Barcelona chairs were found on Craigslist; dark laminate floors are a striking contrast to the white walls. Top, right: Rachel Vette and Zak Loy on their patio with their four hairless dogs.

guitarist/music producer/songwriter Zak Loy of the passion for midcentury modern design he shares with his wife, singer/ songwriter/realtor Rachel Vette. “Outside of music, we express ourselves through design and remodeling houses and collecting things.” In the carport is a 1982 Mercedes 240D. In the cupboards are an assortment of Madmen-worthy cocktail glasses, including some from TWA and Continental airlines. And there’s Zak’s collection of classic vintage guitars and amplifiers, perfectly showcased in the 1962 house they took from nondescript ranch to distinctively retro. The couple previously renewed what Rachel describes as a Cape Cod style cottage. Yet the interior they designed for it was modern and sleek. It made sense that their next house would have modern architecture as well. “We’ve done traditional, but our preferred style is modern,” Rachel said. After purchasing the Jefferson Parish house through a foreclosure sale, they gutted and remodeled it with an open concept and clean

modern finishes. For structural purposes they hired an architect, but Rachel used a computer program to remove walls and reconfigure much of the layout herself. The living, dining and kitchen areas are no longer separated by walls and a hall that ran between the public and private zones has been eliminated. The couple acted as their own contractor and did much of the work themselves along with the help of Rachel’s father, Sonny Breaux, and brother, Brian, who also happens to be the drummer in her band The Vettes. (Zak is part of the platinum selling band, +Live+.) Midcentury modern design provided the inspiration for the remodel. Rachel and Zak both appreciate the work of such local modernists as Albert Ledner and Curtis & Davis and of the father of modern architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright. Yet the couple point out that the final result is more a mix of midcentury and contemporary than purely midcentury. While sliding glass doors and terrazzo floors were original 1960s features they wanted to salvage, it proved easier and more cost effective to cover the floors than to repair myneworleans.com august 2019 3 7


Top, left: At the rear of the dining room are a pair of picture windows the couple found at The Green Project; the sliding glass door, original to the house, was salvaged and reused in the renovation; the dining table previously belonged to Zak’s parents and the wall mirrors were found at Bridge House Thrift Store. Top, right: Zak’s collection of guitars includes (left to right) a Fender Mandolin, a Gibson J100, and a 1967 Fender Telecaster; amps (top to bottom) are a 1962 Alamo Titan, a 1953 Gibson BR9, a Morgan ac20 and a 1964 Supro 16t (in rare Trinidad Blue). Bottom, left: Mint condition windows found on Craig’s list set the tone for the rectilinear shapes repeated on the front of the house. Bottom, right: A linear row of shelves next to an egg chair is used to display art and objets.


Left: A starburst mirror and a portrait of Marilyn Monroe add a touch of glam to the master bath; the couple found the freestanding slipper/soaker tub on Craigslist in Houston and took a road trip to pick it up. Right: The kitchen combines glossy white cabinets from IKEA, a glass mosaic backsplash and counters topped with a glass tile ordered directly from the manufacturer; the hood and sink were purchased on Ebay. Range, lights and dishwasher from IKEA.

them. The dark prefinished floor they chose is a striking contrast to the white of the walls and the cabinets and a durable surface for the couple’s adorable and wellbehaved quartet of hairless dogs. The original brick exterior was likewise freshened with stucco. The couple searched the internet tirelessly for innovative and affordable ideas and materials. Rachel found both the mint-condition windows across the façade of the house and the living room’s Barcelona chairs on Craig’s list; the

kitchen’s range is from IKEA; the sink, from Ebay; the textured wall tiles used for a feature wall that acts as a transition space into the dining room at Inhabit.com; the retro light kit at the front door was ordered online from a company in Austin, Zak’s hometown. “We are constantly bargain hunting and doing research online,” Zak said. When the stone the couple originally wanted for the kitchen counters was out of their budget, they opted for a less expensive

but equally impactful white glass tile that Rachel found online and ordered directly from the manufacturer at a savings. The Green Project, estate sales and thrift stores have been valuable resources as well. The couple, who’ve turned their mutual talent for design into a sideline business, renovates about a house a year on average and is always on the lookout for their next project. “Having a vision and seeing what it becomes is the fun part,” Rachel said. “It’s a love-hate thing,” added Zak, who noted that renovations often have unforeseen complications and hurdles. “We’re good at it and we enjoy the process. We love seeing the finished house and putting a personal touch on it.”

Rachel and Zak’s 5 Design Tips Figure out where to splurge and where to save. In the kitchen, they opted for IKEA cabinets that delivered high style at a savings rather than on a higher-end version. Paint the interior with a single shade of a stock paint color. Stock colors are easier to touch up than custom colors, which don’t always match exactly from batch to batch. Using salvaged materials (like the windows they installed across the front of their house) helps save money and reduces the carbon footprint we leave behind. When renovating, look for a house with good guts and bones to minimize the size of the job. Don’t overplay your accent colors. Pick a great color but use it minimally.

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myneworleans.com august 2019 3 9


s t n i a s

By Topher Balfer Photographed by Sara Essex Bradley

s r e Sinn A guide to curbing — but not compromising — your summer ref reshment temptat ions

I

t’s summertime, and while the living might be easy, choosing clean and healthy foods that still satisfy our cravings might not be as simple. What better way to cool down on hot days than with an icy daiquiri, and how can anything other than a poor boy satiate a hankering for classic soul food? It might seem that there is no way around those sudden cravings for our favorite New Orleans treats, and while there’s nothing wrong with going

for the real thing, it can’t be our go-to every time. With the help of Molly Kimball, registered dietitian with Ochsner Fitness Center and founder of Ochsner Eat Fit, we propose alternatives to satisfy whatever your palate might be longing for. By electing for a cleaner version of whatever your temptation of choice might be — or by making small modifications to your usual order — you can still enjoy your favorite dishes while still being mindful of your health and nutrition.


Frozen Daiquiri?

Fros'E

Try a

5 ounces of rose'

100120

32 oz daiquiri

1,800

calories

When temperatures skyrocket, a frozen daiquiri can seem like the ideal treat — they’re icy, refreshing and sweet, and even the occasional brain freeze is welcome if it means cooling down. What we often overlook, however, is the sugar crash: according to Kimball, a regular 32 oz. daiquiri contains around 1,800 sugary calories, which means you might find yourself more dehydrated and exhausted after consuming one. Enter frosé, a frozen version of rosé that still delivers coolness and sweetness at just a fraction of the nutritional cost: there are about 100-120 calories in 5 ounces of rose — which means even lower values for frosé when ice is blended in. This thirstquenching treat can be found at many local favorites, like Wayfare (garnished with basil and strawberry), Bayou Wine Garden, Tchoup Yard, Flamingo A-Go-Go and even a few daiquiri shops

calories

s

Craving a


Craving a

Additional tips: There’s no shame in a half-size order, and if you’re preparing these at home, try a low-fat mayo and make sure to load up with f resh veggies. Reduce the amount of bread with a bottom-only poor boy , and if you simply can’t resist a traditional sandwich, get a half-and-half order with your favorite meat on one side and a healthier option on the other.

d o o f a e S d e i Fr Poor Boy? Try a

Grilled


Swapping out a poor boy for a different kind of poor boy might not seem like a major change, but the proteins we choose for our orders are the biggest determinates of nutritional value. Not only that, but the preparation of your protein can further impact sodium and fat levels. Opt for chicken, catfish or shrimp for a leaner protein that doesn’t come with the high fat percentages of sausage and other processed meats — and get it grilled. These healthier options also open doors for some non-traditional flavor profiles: Green Room Kukhnya makes the delicious Chicken Shashlik PoBoy, a grilled chicken sandwich that comes dressed with peppers, onions and Georgian spiced plum sauce.

Chicken

y o b r Poo

Even fried seafood can be nearly as high in sodium, calories, and fat as sausage, averaging 100 calories per ounce of higherfat protein compared to about 25-40 calories per ounce of grilled seafood - Molly Kimball


Craving a Burger?

I was a nonbeliever, and then I tried it: The Beet Burger at Green Room Kukhnya, made from a blend of beets, lentils, rice, almonds and other herbs and spices, then topped with goat cheese and traditional veggie dressings and served on a grilled bun. Even though there’s no meat, the experience is the same as eating a traditional burger - you get all the richness and texture of a beef patty while substantially cutting back on fat intake.

try a

r e g r u b t e e b

grams of fat

calories

221 5 300

mg of sodium

yo according to a Ma Clinic recipe A BEET ound BURGER average ar


A d e s s e r d l a n traditio burgeR beefcludes around

497

mg of sodium

17

Beer?

t grams of fa

350

calories

in

The legendary beer belly isn’t necessarily caused by the beer itself it’s the calories and alcohol content. When you drink, the liver focuses on burning alcohol instead of fat, which means that larger amounts of alcohol consumption can eventually lead to a rounder midsection. So which beer is the healthiest? The best option is a light beer, which has less alcohol and calories than other varieties, but does come with the sacrifice of richness and flavor. Instead, choosing a stout or porter before an amber or a lager will grant you more vitamins and minerals but may come with a higher alcohol content. No matter what you drink, monitoring the alcohol content will be the biggest factor in avoiding too high of a calorie intake.

’t your If beets just aren rger at Bu n w to thing, The Up dressed TruBurger comes ula, goat with garlic, arug oes and is cheese and tomat ith a beef or available ei ther w veggie patty.


1,980 Craving

Spaghetti and Meatballs? try a

s l l a b t a e M y e Turk and Zoodles

mg of sodium

1,037

calories

Measured by the plate, a serving of spaghetti and meatballs at a leading Italian food restaurant averages at about


370

mg of sodium

250

calories

Their turkey meatballs and zoodles (a kind of pasta made from zucchini) comes in 12 oz. servings that amount to only There’s nothing quite like a perfectly-twirled forkful of spaghetti with spicy meatballs on the side. While this favorite dish is not the unhealthiest dish in this guide, there are still cleaner ways to enjoy it that don’t compromise on flavor. Sweg’s Kitchen, with multiple locations in New Orleans and Metairie, offers an alternative that divides these nutritional values by more than half. All the best elements of the original dish are still there, but each one is modified ever-soslightly to give your diet that healthy edge.


Craving hot wings? try

r e w o l f i l u a c buffalo nuggets

grams of fat

calories

120 2 1,172

mg of sodium

This particular craving might not be local to New Orleans, but when it strikes, it means business. It’s a roll-up-your-sleeves, tuck-in-your-napkin, and dive-in kind of meal that goes best with a tall pitcher of beer — but it’s also high in sodium. While not as good a source of protein, buffalo cauliflower wings are just as delicious. Even better, this alternative won’t require several hours of exercise to burn off.

Still too high in sodium? Vegan dining spot Seed offers a delicious order of cauliflower nuggets with alternate choices of agave mustard, BBQ, and garlic aioli for dipping.


Pizza?

Try gluten-free or cauliflower crust.

calor

ies

Additional tips: Want to decrease nutritional values even further? Molly Kimball recommends grilled chicken wings with Hanley’s Creole Ranch. The dip is made f rom a cayenne pepper mash and is f ree of GMOs. Even better, it’s only 75 calories and 90 mg of sodium per tablespoon.

1

0 4 ,5

mg of

of fat

4 3 660

grams

s wing s s e s l bone contain f o ) r ces rde x pie all o A sm aining si t (con

sodium

This one is easy to satisfy without compromising flavors: substitute a regular crust for cauliflower or gluten-free crust. You get all the great flavors from your toppings and reduce your carbohydrate intake from an average of 30g to 14g. Reginelli’s will prepare any of their specialty pizzas on a 12” cauliflower crust. Theo’s Pizza offers a gluten-free crust option, and red sauce can be replaced with olive oil or pesto.


Craving ice cream? try

Nutrition facts will vary by gelateria, with calories typically ranging from

150-230

calories

Gelato

Gelato is denser than ice cream and can be served at a slightly warmer temperature, resulting in a rich texture with an intense, pure fLavor - Molly Kimball


350

calories

in a half- cup serving of ice cream

Snoball? Try all-natural or no sugar added flavors.

It’s impossible to address summer cravings without mentioning the big one: ice cream. “I’m a big believer that there are no ‘bad’ ice creams, just bad choices when it comes to sizes and toppings,” said Molly Kimball. Sure, don’t get a loaded sundae if you’re trying to be smarter about your sugar intake, but what about a regular cup or cone? With up to 350 calories in a half-cup serving of ice cream, it’s certainly possible to enjoy the real thing without putting too big a dent in your daily fat and calorie intake — but you might end up with a kid’s size scoop. And Kimball said that if your favorite parlor tends to be more generous with their scoops, those values might change. Many people have already discovered alternatives like sorbet and non-dairy ice cream, but our personal favorite is Italian-style gelato, which is lower in both fat and calories. Some of the best in town can be found at Piccola Gelateria on Freret Street, which specializes in house-made artisanal gelato. Flavors include traditional favorites like Chocolate and Hazelnut and lighter flavors like Rose Petal and Sea Salt Caramel.

It seems impossible to propose a decent alternative to a New Orleans snoball, so why bother trying? However, there is a way to enjoy these while staying health-conscious. Start with the obvious solution and forego any sugary add-ons like condensed milk or a stuffed ice cream center. If you need a little extra dimension, adding fresh fruit can go a long way in providing texture. To further cut back on sugar intake, consider a No Sugar Added or sugar-free flavor. Favorite spot Hansen’s Sno-Bliz offers sugar-free variants of traditional flavors like Cream of Coffee, Cream of Strawberry, and Cream of Wedding Cake. There’s also a wide selection of all-natural flavors, including Honey Lavender, Ginger-Cayenne, Anise, Cardamom, Plain Chocolate and Vanilla Bean.


T h e R oa d L e s s T r av e l e d A dve ntures, or lack thereof, i n Lacom b e

I

t’s not a commuters’ paradise like Mandeville. It doesn’t have that upscale boutique vibe like Covington. If you’re looking for big box stores or movie theaters, try Slidell. It’s not deliberately eccentric like Abita Springs. It doesn’t have pastures and ponies like Folsom. No wooden boats like Madisonville. But it does have its own post office. And two strings of lights across the main street during Christmas. So there’s that. But much, much more. And much, much less. And that’s the charm of Lacombe, Louisiana, my favorite faraway place that’s actually really close. Straddled along the motor raceway known as U.S. 190, a high speed back-a-town dusty two-lane connector between Mandeville and Slidell – a former trading route for the French, Choctaw and British and now a road where everyone seems to be in a hurry to get somewhere else – Lacombe is a sleepy town in all the right ways. It’s a place to pretend you’re in the country even though you can see the glow of New Orleans’ city lights on a clear evening. It’s the closest place to the city that you could call bucolic. Although this stretch of 190 is home to a few of St. Tammany Parish’s more notable and historic

commercial destinations – Banting’s Nursery, Sal & Judy’s restaurant, and the now-shuttered fine dining bistro, La Provence – much of it has the feel of, and looks like, 1952. All that’s missing is an old abandoned Sinclair gas station with its green dinosaur logo looming over the one traffic light in town. Except there are no traffic lights in town. There are dirt driveways that disappear into nowhere. More rust per square mile than anywhere outside of Pittsburgh. Stacks of crab traps in front yards that look like model cities made of iron and wire. Old threadbare houses with patches of missing sideboard where you’d swear nobody lives, but somebody does. Seafood vendors that look like they closed decades ago, but they didn’t. The mildly haunting (and haunted?) Star Motel, where you’d swear nobody stays, but somebody does. And the sublimely named Alice’s Restaurant – looking dark, shuttered, vacant and lonely to late afternoon or evening passersby – but bustling with locals trading news and gossip over hot coffee and scrambled eggs every morning. Little more than a half-hour drive from New Orleans, it’s inevitable that Lacombe would share at least some characteristics of the city. But it does so with a Bizarro World inversity. For instance, many neighbors here don’t know each other, don’t even know each others’ names. But that’s because

By C hris Rose

they can’t see each others’ houses. You can hear gunshots on a daily basis, but it’s target practice, maybe hunting, not a turf war. The sounds of morning are whistling cardinals, the roar of pickups and Harleys down 190, and the poppop-pop of shotguns and pistols. The local gunsmith, across the highway from where I stay, assures me that it’s legal to fire a weapon outdoors if it’s more than 200 yards from the adjacent property. Lots of people here live more than 200 yards from the adjacent property. As someone firmly rooted to the pavement all of my life – andconstitutionally averse to the Northshore over my three and half decades in New Orleans – I found my way to Lacombe the way people all over the world find their way to new places. I met a girl. She lives in the woods, in a veritable bamboo forest, in not so much a house as a cabin – let’s go with “dwelling” – built in1880,

Illustration by Jason Raish


with floorboards leaning this way and that, with a fresh water well and underground septic, and heated solely by a giant wood-burning stove that serves as the centerpiece of her home.

angles comprised an 18-hole golf course. He built a “clubhouse” and ran poker games and crab boils. Boutte now lives in the clubhouse. He wanders the backwoods each morning with his walking stick, lording over the gardens and goldfish ponds and vast woods, feeling like he made it to Paradise before he even died. 
“I never thought I would live anywhere but New Orleans, but I found this place and found out that I could breathe again,” he said, taking a break from auditioning a new guitar player – and grilling corn – to show me around the place, the woods, the ponds, the garden, the greens – and the shooting range, natch. He’s way more than 200 yards from his neighbor. “I miss the food in the city, and meeting people on the street every day,” he said. “But I don’t miss the noise and the hustle and the bustle. I hear songbirds in the morning, crickets all day, and I can see the Milky Way at night. I never thought I would live a life like this. But it’s so good for my health, good for my peace, good for my spirit, and good for my voice.” The voice of John Boutte – farmer, greens keeper, country squire, converted and committed Lacombian. Or whatever folks here are called. Who would have ever thought?

A STAC K I N T HE T RUNK We get the fire wood from a guy down the highway who leaves stacks of logs out on the side of the road where there’s an old black mailbox with a note asking folks to pay for what they take, twenty bucks a stack. One cold night last winter, I didn’t have the cash on me so I piled a stack in my trunk and left a note with my phone number and told him to call if he had any concerns and that I’d come back to square up. He didn’t, and I did. There’s no uncertain charm to living a life like that in 2019. Trust thy neighbor. But leave him – or her – pretty much alone. In the five years Janelle has lived in Lacombe, three people have breached her driveway: A guy just recently, asking for her vote for St. Tammany Parish Councilman; a woman with a flat tire who later returned with a gift of fresh fish as thanks for the help; and a random drifter walking down the highway a while back who seemed to want nothing more than a conversation. Lacombe probably has a higher rate of random highway drifters than most of St. Tammany Parish, guys walking down the road carrying a duffel bag or maybe just a bicycle tire, headed who knows where. K N O W I N G T HE A N S W E R That’s part of its charm. (Yeah, I know – until someone One who knows the answer to that question is Charles gets hurt. But nobody’s got hurt yet.) Greer. He’s a Lacombe lifer, the son of a West Bank Janelle is the girl. She lives here. I live in the city. mother and Kenner dad who settled in Lacombe a So we swap, back and forth across the Causeway, generation ago to raise a family. Born in Lacombe, which I have crossed more in the past three years schooled in Lacombe, employed in Lacombe, Greer than I had in the prior 30. A circumstance I would left Lacombe only once in his life – to join the Navy, have sworn upon the Good Book would never happen a military branch he chose because he had spent his entire youth on the water. in my lifetime. But hey, stuff happens. But even after seeing the great wide world in the Another new and unlikely member of the community is John Boutte, the soul singer, service, he came back here. “I gospel singer, the angelic voice don’t know exactly why I came and muse of Frenchmen Street. back here after the Navy,” he The Boutte name has been reflects. “I just wanted to come home. This place may be just a synonymous with New Orleans 7th Ward for as long as the Neville I never thought dot on a map on a piece of paper, I would live name has been steadfastly 13th a census-designated place that’s anywhere but Ward. A family of renown singers not even a town, it’s a village, but N ew Orleans, – Tricia, Lillian to name a couple there is something about this but I found this – most Bouttes got flushed out place – family, history, community place and found after Katrina. John bounced – that keeps you here.” out that I could The only time he ever leaves around New Orleans for a little breathe again town – er, the village – now is to over a decade and then in 2016, made the leap. Across the lake head out on the water as a deckTo Lacombe, where he settled on hand on a crab boat. The water a cozy expanse of 22 acres that he bought from a – Bayou Lacombe, Big Branch, Lake Pontchartrain – is retired Italian grocer. the life he has known and cherished for his 38 years. The grocer used the property as a weekend “When we were kids and teens, we got on our getaway for his friends – the ultimate rural man bikes and rode to the Bayou or down Lake Road to cave – building five golf greens that, with tee boxes go crabbing or fishing. And that’s pretty much what distributed at different locations from different we still do. Everything is outdoors here. Hunting.

Trapping. It’s wide open. It’s a place you can breathe.” It seems that breathing should be one of the Lacombe chamber of commerce’s marketing pitches. If Lacombe had a chamber of commerce, that is. But it’s more a loose patch of independent small businesses – save a Subway and a couple of national retail stores whose names begin with Dollar. And there’s Bayou Adventure. Bayou Adventure, at the bend in 190 by the old cemetery full of French and Choctaw names and families mostly lost to time, is Lacombe’s de facto village commons – an old gas station converted into a bait shop, pizza joint, purveyor of craft beers, kayak and bike rentals, Friday night crawfish boils, the place where old locals drop by to brag about the big one that got away – or even get married. That is, unless you’d prefer that Bayou Adventure proprietor Shannon Bordelon – a mail order minister – conduct a waterborne nuptial ceremony under the moon in the tranquil drift of the Big Branch, the bride not so much walked down the aisle as paddled. Yup, that’s a thing here in Lacombe. Marry at the bait shop. Or in a kayak. Hit balls on your DIY golf range. Shoot the breeze or just shoot. It’s all so close to New Orleans. But so far away. A place out of time, in our times. And what could possibly be better than that? One night, I was out in Janelle’s yard, staring, marveling, at the stars above. The same stars over New Orleans that we can’t see. It was transcendent, incandescent. I started to say something and she said to me what she often does: Stop talking. And I did. And I listened. And, at night with no Harleys and target practice, I heard the sound of pure night. The sound of almost nothing. And I could feel myself breathing again. •


best doctors 633 physicians in 73 specialties

Q&A There is no responsibility that we take more seriously than publishing our annual list of best doctors. We totally want to be right about this and we want you to understand our methodology. How are the selections made? We partner with Best Doctors, Inc.®, a division of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Best Doctors serves more than 40 million members worldwide, utilizing access to the brightest minds in medicine, analytics, and technology to deliver improved health outcomes while reducing costs. Best Doctors serves more than 40 million members worldwide. Best Doctors undertakes the largest, continuous, peer-topeer survey of the medical profession to develop the Best Doctors in America® List. The Best Doctors in America List is the companion to the Best Doctors proprietary database of close to 50,000 global physicians in over 450 specialties and subspecialties. Close to 40,000 Best Doctors in America, are peer selected as the best 4% of U.S. Physicians.

What question is asked of the doctors who nominate and vote? Best Doctors contacts each doctor on the previous list and asks the same question: “If you or a loved one needed a doctor in your specialty, to whom would you refer them?” Do doctors get a chance to respond to other names recommended? Every doctor has the opportunity both to comment (confidentially) on the other doctors included in his or her specialty and related specialties, and to make additional nominations. As new nominees are added to the database, each undergoes the same peer review process. What happens to the data? Best Doctors has developed proprietary software that analyzes the votes and provides an aggregate score for each physician candidate. This yields a preliminary set of physicians who meet the initial criteria for inclusion. Only physicians who earn consensus of their peers and meet all additional criteria are selected to the database. Best Doctors verifies all physicians in its database for clinical activity and medical licensure. How does this differ from local surveys? Only currently listed Best Doctors physicians are eligible to submit nominations and vote in the poll. Best Doctors does not survey the medical community randomly or in its entirety. The large pool of voting physicians helps eliminate the commercial, financial and other biases of smaller-scale surveys and the potential distortion that results from a random survey of the entire physician community. Why do some hospitals seem to have such a preponderance of doctors listed? Because they have so many doctors. As hospitals expand and open more facilities, their number of doctors increases. Through the years the dominant hospitals have shifted, and they may shift again in the future.

The Best Doctors in America database represents the top four percent of physicians practicing in the country and includes many department heads, chiefs of staff and doctors in other major positions at the largest medical centers and health systems nationwide. Do doctors have to pay to be on the list? No! We would never use the list if that were the case. Here is the company’s own statement on that issue: “Best Doctors never takes compensation of any kind from doctors or hospitals in return for listing doctors in its database, nor does Best Doctors pay doctors to participate in its poll.” What are some of the rules that the company uses? Doctors are allowed to vote on others in their hospital and medical practices. The feeling is that those doctors know their peers best – that’s where the survey gets some of its most outspoken evaluations, good and bad. • All of the voting is strictly confidential. • Once a consensus of peer support is achieved, additional research is conducted on credentials, disciplinary actions and clinical activity. • Doctors aren’t notified of their inclusion on the list until after the survey process is completed. Doctors aren’t allowed to pay a fee or required to make a purchase to be included. Are the surveys administered randomly? No. To get opinions with weight and professional credibility, Best Doctors consults the very best. Researchers contact all current physicians on the list, which includes many department heads at major teaching hospitals, and asks them to rate specialists within their own area of expertise. According to Best Doctors. Where is the bias? There is no perfect, bias-free way to conduct a ranking of any sort. Though Best Doctors has refined its techniques to eliminate biases through the years, any nomination process that relies on peer evaluations will naturally favor more senior doctors who have had time to develop a reputation. Those who are new in their profession or those who haven’t had much peer interaction will sometimes get less recognition. The breadth and the depth of the voting pool help to eliminate biases and cronyism that might be reflected in smaller surveys. In addition to the peer evaluation, Best Doctors conducts research on each physician’s credentials, disciplinary actions and clinical activity to determine selections. How were the doctors who are profiled in this section selected? The editorial staff of New Orleans Magazine selected them. We tried to choose people who represented a variety of specialties. Is this the definitive list? No. We have no doubt that there are many worthy doctors who weren’t included in the list. We are confident, however, that all who are listed are truly among the best doctors.


These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America 2019-2020 database, which includes close to 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 450 medical specialty/subspecialty combinations. The Best Doctors in America database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site.”

Addiction Medicine Metairie Kenneth Boyd Sumner Jefferson Psychiatric Associates 3340 Severn Ave, Ste 206 504-889-1448 New Orleans Milton L. Harris, Jr. Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System New Orleans VA Outpatient Clinic Mental Health Services, 3434 Canal St 504-507-5744 Dean Anthony Hickman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Arwen Podesta Podesta Wellness 4322 Canal St 504-252-0026 Allergy and Immunology Covington Richard Joseph Guillot North Shore Allergy & Immunology 355 Lakeview Ct 985-892-3122 Houma Robert Douglas Haydel, Jr. Haydel Asthma and Allergy Clinic 4752 Hwy 311, Ste 108 985-857-8271 Metairie Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Doctors - Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans W. Edward Davis III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy, 504-842-6742 Luis R. Espinoza LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Rheumatology 478 S Johnson St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517 Kenneth Paris Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3030 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 Laurianne G. Wild Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600

Anesthesiology Covington Thomas Anzalone St. Tammany Parish Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1202 S Tyler St 985-898-4431

Jason B. Falterman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Leslie C. Thomas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Gary D. Menszer East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl, 504-454-4170

Joseph Thomas Spalitta, Jr. St. Tammany Parish Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1202 S Tyler St 985-898-4421

Donald Robert Ganier, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

T. Michael Truxillo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Nicholas D. Pappas East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842

Hammond Richard J. Grisoli North Oaks Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 15790 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-345-2700

Stuart R. Hart Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Anesthesiology Kenner John L. DiLeo II Zephyr Anesthesia Medical Group 2816 Kingston St, Ste C 504-408-0804

John Frederick Heaton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3053

Slidell Carl A. Mayeaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center - North Shore Department of Anesthesiology 100 Medical Center Dr 504-842-3755

Metairie Joseph T. Crapanzano, Jr. East Jefferson Pain Management 4320 Houma Blvd, 6th Fl 504-503-4109 H. Jerrel Fontenot Jefferson Ambulatory Surgery Center 2701 Lake Villa Dr 504-274-3100 Patrick Houstoun Waring The Pain Intervention Center 701 Metairie Rd, Unit 2A310 504-455-2225 New Orleans David M. Broussard Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Eric H. Busch Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Emilie Donaldson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Logan S. Emory Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Bryan M. Evans Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Alan David Kaye LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Anesthesiology 1542 Tulane Ave, Ste 656 504-568-2319 Logan J. Kosarek Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 James Riopelle LSU Health Sciences Center Department of Anesthesiology 1542 Tulane Ave, Ste 659 504-568-2319 Melissa Russo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Section of Obstetric Anesthesiology 2700 Napoleon Ave 504-842-3755 Vivek Sabharwal Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurocritical Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Armin Schubert Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Robin B. Stedman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 W. David Sumrall III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755

Thibodaux Jorge J. Bravo Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 602 N Acadia Rd, 985-493-4750 Cardiovascular Disease Houma Richard P. Abben Cardiovascular Institute of the South 225 Dunn St 985-876-0300 Peter S. Fail Cardiovascular Institute of the South 225 Dunn St 985-876-0300 Marrero Leslie Wayne Levenson West Jefferson Heart Clinic of Louisiana 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N613 504-349-6800 Metairie Roland J. Bourgeois, Jr. East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842 Fortune Anthony Dugan East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170 Yvonne E. Gilliland Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 8th Fl 504-842-4168

Lehman Kullman Preis, Jr. East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170 David Warren Snyder East Jefferson General Hospital East Jefferson Cardiology Consultants 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4170 Gregory D. Tilton East Jefferson Cardiovascular Specialists 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 500 504-455-0842 New Orleans Freddy Michel Abi-Samra Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - O’Neal John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 16777 Medical Center Dr 225-761-5200 Murtuza J. Ali LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Patrick C. Breaux Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Mark M. Cassidy Tulane Doctors - Heart & Vascular 2800 Veterans Blvd, Ste 140 504-988-0501 Tyrone Jean Collins Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3727 Ivory Crittendon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-5200

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Clement C. Eiswirth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Keith C. Ferdinand Tulane Cardiology Clinic Downtown 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-6113 Robert C. Hendel Tulane Cardiology Clinic Downtown 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-6113 James Stephen Jenkins Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3724 Colleen J. Johnson Tulane Cardiology Clinic Downtown 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-6113 Carl Joseph Lavie, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Thierry H. Le Jemtel Tulane Cardiology Clinic Downtown 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-6113 Stacy Mandras Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Richard Virgil Milani Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Hamang M. Patel Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Rajan A. Patel Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721

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Stephen Robert Ramee Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3724

Charles B. Whitlow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060

Gary Edward Sander Tulane Doctors - Heart & Vascular 2800 Veterans Blvd, Ste 140 504-988-0501

Critical Care Medicine Hammond Richard J. Grisoli North Oaks Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 15790 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-345-2700

Sangeeta Shah Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4135 Frank Wilson Smart LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Cardiology, 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1390 Hector Osvaldo Ventura Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Heart Transplant Clinic 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-4721 Christopher James White Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 3rd Fl 504-842-3724 Colon and Rectal Surgery Metairie Sean G. Mayfield Colon & Rectal Surgery Associates 3100 Galleria Dr, Ste 303 504-456-5108 Jennifer D. Silinsky Colon & Rectal Surgery Associates 3100 Galleria Dr, Ste 303 504-456-5108 New Orleans David A. Margolin Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060 Guy R. Orangio LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Colorectal Surgery 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Herschel D. Vargas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4060

Arvind Yertha North Oaks Pulmonology North Oaks Clinic Bldg, Ste 401A 15813 Paul Vega MD Dr, 985-230-1580 Kenner Carol M. Mason LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705 Metairie Thomas Gerard Nuttli East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 New Orleans Bennett Paul DeBoisblanc University Medical Center New Orleans Comprehensive Pulmonary Hypertension Center 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Stephen Phillips Kantrow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Bobby D. Nossaman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Jairo I. Santanilla Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 514-842-3000 Leonardo Seoane Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonology, Lung Transplant and Critical Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4400

My toughest case

Addiction and Trauma

Sonia Malhotra, MD, MS, FAAP Palliative Medicine and Supportive Care at University Medical Center New Orleans/Tulane School of Medicine

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orking in palliative care means that Dr. Sonia Malhotra deals with serious illnesses that are often life limiting. She cares for adults and adolescents living with cancer and other organ diseases, along with people who’ve experienced trauma and addiction. Hospice, comfort care, and end-of-life care are aspects of what palliative medicine doctors can do. They also “care for cancer survivors and those with chronic, complex medical illnesses,” she says, emphasizing, “my field is not just about death and dying — it’s so much further upstream and can help people at an earlier stage of their illness.” Malhotra says that patients dealing with addiction and trauma (which can often coincide) are challenging due to the “array of distress” they have, ranging from symptom management, mental health, family dynamics and living situations. “Trauma cases are difficult because you see how quickly life changes for a patient and their family when a trauma occurs,” she says. “Outcomes are mixed when it comes to trauma palliative care cases.” Meanwhile, many patients with addiction problems simply don’t do well, but not from a lack of trying. “It’s a tough disease to get through,” she says. “Even with the best of treatment, the rate of success is low.” Malhotra has been forced to reckon with the unknown, as patients’ prognosis is often unclear. “I have to be comfortable in relaying this to patients and their families, while still helping them through tough decision-making, based on their loved ones’ goals, hopes and expectations of their quality of life,” she says. Doctors face limitations and sometimes people in her field must reframe what they are hoping for – and that may not be the next best medical intervention, but rather, time with a loved one, aggressive symptom management, or goal-setting that make sense for a patient’s vision. Ultimately, Malhotra says, “hope and realism are both important to my practice, and the balance of the two is often a challenge I have to tackle.” – Sarah Ravits

Undergraduate: University of California, Riverside Medical School: Ross University School of Medicine Year Graduated: 2007

Photograph by Craig Mulcahy


David E. Taylor Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Emergency Medicine New Orleans Liza DiLeo Thomas Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460

Dermatology Metairie William Patrick Coleman III 4425 Conlin St 504-455-3180

Joseph S. Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460

Leonard E. Gately III Family Dermatology Specialists 3421 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 202 504-885-1670 Mara A. Haseltine Pure Dermatology 3100 Galleria Dr, Ste 203 504-226-7873 Brian David Lee Academic Dermatology Associates 3421 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 202 504-832-6612 Jeffrey C. Poole Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225 Marilyn Claire Ray Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center - Metairie Department of Dermatology 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 5th Fl 504-842-3940 Nicole E. Rogers Hair Restoration of the South Galleria Medical Bldg, Ste 201 3100 Galleria Dr 504-315-4247 New Orleans Erin E. Boh Tulane Medical Center Dermatology Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-1700 Lisa Donofrio Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center 1224 St Charles Ave 504-227-3873 Julie Mermilliod Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Dermatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 11th Fl 504-842-3940 Richard N. Sherman The Skin Institute of New Orleans 2633 Napolean Ave, Ste 815 504-899-7159 Peter W. Simoneaux Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Dermatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3940

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Erik Sundell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3460 Endocrinology and Metabolism Metairie Joseph Murray Diabetes & Metabolism Associates 3901 Houma Blvd, Ste 103 504-455-1300 New Orleans Vivian Andrew Fonseca Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Endocrinology 275 LaSalle St, 504-988-5030 Brandy A. Panunti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 6th Fl 504-842-4023 Family Medicine Covington Richard George Marek, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Kevin C. Plaisance Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Timothy Lacey Riddell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Family Medicine 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Hammond Michael Ashley Dunn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Tangipahoa Department of Family Medicine 41676 Veterans Ave 985-543-3600 Ted Joseph Hudspeth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Tangipahoa Department of Family Medicine 41676 Veterans Ave 985-543-3600

Mandeville Paul Guilbault Mandeville Private Physician Group 521 Asbury Dr 985-630-9618 Daniel Keith Jens Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Mandeville Department of Family Medicine 3235 E Causeway Approach 985-875-2340 Marrero James Theis 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N408 504-349-2908 Metairie Robert Combel Ryan East Jefferson Family Medicine Clinic 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-7878 New Orleans Leandro Area Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lake Terrace Department of Family Medicine 1532 Robert E Lee Blvd 504-846-9646 Tara G. Berner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lake Terrace Department of Family Medicine 1532 Robert E Lee Blvd 504-846-9646 Rade N. Pejic Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Department of Family and Community Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000 James Taylor Tebbe, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Mid-City Department of Family Medicine 411 N Carrollton Ave, Ste 4 504-842-7400 Pamela Wiseman University Medical Center New Orleans Family Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg, 2nd Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Slidell James Howard Newcomb, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Slidell Department of Family Medicine 2750 E Gause Blvd 985-639-3777 Gastroenterology Covington Steven Anthony Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Section of Gastroenterology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828

My toughest case

Delivering Emotional News

Michael Moses, MD, FACS Plastic Surgery at Moses Plastic Surgery and Children’s Hospital

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s a college student at Yale University, Michael Moses contemplated a career as an architect before ultimately pursuing medicine, specifically plastic surgery. “Plastic surgery has the same dichotomy of form versus function,” he said. “But the stakes are different, and I love people.” Over the course of his 37-year-career, Moses has operated on thousands of patients. “Most people have assumed that plastic surgeons were either reconstructive surgeons or cosmetic surgeons, as if the two categories were mutually exclusive,” he said. “I’ve always wanted to do both, and to be both. I still love doing cleft lip and palate surgery at Children’s’ Hospital, and I love my aesthetic practice.” He finds equal satisfaction in doing a cleft lip surgery as he does a facelift. “I think both worlds exist because of the same premise,” he said. “If someone is uncomfortable with their appearance and we can safely, reliably and predictably operate on them to make them comfortable in their own skin, then that is a success. This is as true for those with birth defects as for those that want to look younger, thinner and sexier.” He says his toughest cases are the emotional ones, not the technical ones. “There have been several times when I’ve been asked to see a newborn baby to repair their cleft lip or palate, and I’ve examined the baby and realized that there is a lot more wrong with the child than just their cleft,” he said. “Explaining this to anxious parents, and sometimes telling them that cleft repair isn’t indicated because of the long-term prognosis for the child is heart-wrenching.” Moses noted that he would rather perform the most difficult surgery “a thousand times over” then having these difficult conversations with families. “We surgeons are human, too. Sometimes we just have to hug families, wipe away tears, and help everyone do the best they can.” – Sarah Ravits

Undergraduate: Yale University Medical School: Tulane University School of Medicine Year graduated: 1977

Photograph by Craig Mulcahy


august 2019 6 3


Felix Rabito, Jr. The Gastroenterology Group 131 Cherokee Rose Ln, Ste B 985-871-1721 Marrero Shantiprakash Kedia Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Sanjeeva Reddy Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Gary (Taavi) Reiss Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Charles G. Schibler II Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Rian Moss Tanenbaum Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Steve George Venturatos Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S450 504-349-6401 Metairie Howard I. Brenner Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 George E. Catinis Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020 Elizabeth Ann McDonald 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 308 504-456-5070

John (Jerry) Alfred Evans Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Gastroenterology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4015 Benjamin Alfred Guider, Jr. Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 720 504-896-8670 James D. Lilly Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 720 504-896-8670 Fredric Gary Regenstein Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl, 504-988-5344 James William Smith Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Gastroenterology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4015 Thibodaux Charles J. Monier, Jr. Digestive Health Center 764 N Acadia Rd, Ste A 985-446-1958 Geriatric Medicine New Orleans Lumie Kawasaki Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Geriatrics and Extended Care Service 2400 Canal St, 504-507-2000 Susan Ellen Nelson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Division of Palliative Care, 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-5211

William Morrison Meyers, Jr. Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020

Hand Surgery Metairie Eric R. George Hand Surgical Associates Hand Center of Louisiana 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 600B 504-454-2191

George Richard Puente Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 520 504-456-8020

Harold M. Stokes Pontchartrain Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 3939 Houma Blvd, Ste 21 504-885-6464

David Ralph Silvers Metairie Gastroenterology 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 120 504-456-6701

New Orleans Donald C. Faust 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 600 504-899-1000

New Orleans Christopher N. Barrilleaux Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500

Claude S. Williams IV Southern Orthopaedic Specialists 2731 Napoleon Ave 504-897-6351

Hepatology New Orleans Natalie H. Bzowej Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Nigel Girgrah Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Shobha Joshi Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Martin W. Moehlen Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 Fredric Gary Regenstein Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 6th Fl 504-988-5344 Infectious Disease Covington Michael Kevin Hill St. Tammany Parish Hospital Department of Hospital Medicine 1202 S Tyler St, 985-898-4000 Houma Mary Louise Eschete Ochsner Health System Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Specialty Care Clinic, 1978 Industrial Blvd 985-873-1880 Metairie Richard Stephan Witzig East Jefferson General Hospital Department of Hospital Medicine 4200 Houma Blvd, 6th Fl 504-503-4331 New Orleans Katherine Baumgarten Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Christopher M. Blais Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Rebecca Adair Clark CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273

6 4 august 2019

My toughest case

A Malnourished Pregnant Teenager

Pamela Markiewicz  Wiseman, MD Family Medicine at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

O

ne of the most important – and most challenging – parts of Dr. Pamela Wiseman’s job as a family physician is to help patients adopt healthier behaviors. For 20 years, she delivered babies; now she works doing prenatal and pediatric care with her family medicine partners and sees patients of all ages. During a particularly tough case, two lives were at stake: that of a teenage girl and her unborn child. Wiseman first met the teen early on in her pregnancy. Despite an iron deficiency, she was “generally healthy and very motivated to do all the right things to ensure that her baby had a good start in life.” The teenager decided to become vegetarian, thinking it would be a healthier option for pregnancy. But instead of gravitating toward alternative protein sources, along with fruits and vegetables that are recommended for a wellrounded diet, the expectant mother began to solely consume carbohydrates and fats – especially because there was a lack of resources and access to healthy food in her neighborhood. Her anemia continued to worsen and she soon developed Kwashiorkor, a serious nutritional disorder most often seen in developing countries and places experiencing famine. “I tried contacting her to ask her to come to the hospital for evaluation, but her phone had been disconnected,” recalled Wiseman. Wiseman always makes an effort to get to know her patients. “It is so much easier to take care of patients when you really know them and their families,” she said. In this case, she and her nurse chose to make an unexpected house call. “[The family] was very surprised to see us, but she grabbed her bag and left for the hospital right away.” She was then given blood transfusions and after a few days was well enough to return home to carry out her pregnancy. “She continued to learn about healthy food and changed her diet to better nourish herself and the baby.” The fortunate outcome? Wiseman eventually delivered the young woman’s healthy, full-term infant. – Sarah Ravits

Undergraduate: Loyola University New Orleans Medical School: University of Virginia Medical School Year Graduated: 1992

Photograph by Craig Mulcahy


august 2019 6 5


Joseph Raymond Dalovisio Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Eric R. Ehrensing Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 866-624-7637 Julio Enrique Figueroa II University Medical Center New Orleans Infectious Disease Services 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Julia B. Garcia-Diaz Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Michael Edward Hagensee University Medical Center New Orleans Infectious Disease Services Ambulatory Care Bldg, 4th Fl 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Jonathan M. Hand Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005

Internal Medicine Hammond Charles R. Ducombs Northshore Internal Medicine Associates North Oaks Clinic Bldg, Ste 300 15813 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-230-7675 Harahan Joseph A. Miceli III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 4th Fl 504-842-4747 Stacy D. Siegendorf Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 4th Fl 504-842-4747 Fayne M. St. John Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1221 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 4th Fl 504-842-4747 Marrero Craig A. Ehrensing Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Lapalco Department of Internal Medicine 4225 Lapalco Blvd 504-371-9355

Mary J. Murphy CrescentCare Specialty Clinic NO/AIDS Task Force 1631 Elysian Fields 504-821-2601

Metairie James Donald Conway Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820

David Michael Mushatt Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Infectious Diseases 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030

Janine M. Ferrier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veteran’s Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820

George A. Pankey Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4006

Jo Ellen Plunkett-Kasparek Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Department of Internal Medicine 2005 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 7th Fl 504-836-9820

Nicholas J. Van Sickels CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273

New Orleans Mary Moore Abell St. Thomas Community Health Center 1020 Saint Andrew St 504-529-5558

Slidell Mary Faith Joubert IMG Physicians 1051 Gause Blvd, Ste 260 985-641-5523

Dominique Anwar New Orleans East Hospital Department of Internal Medicine 5620 Read Blvd, 2nd Fl, 504-592-6760 Jennifer M. Bertsch Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Medicine Clinic, Saint Charles Ave, 4th Fl 504-897-7007

6 6 august 2019

Leslie Anne Blake Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Karen Blessey Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist Napoleon Medical Plaza Department of Internal Medicine 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 890 504-897-4250 David M. Borne LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 James W. Bragg Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Pedro Cazabon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Terry L. Cummings Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Sections of General Academic Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-5263 Nona Epstein Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Sara E. Fernandez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Steven J. Granier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Timothy S. Harlan Tulane Medical Center Internal Medicine Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-1001 Kristin Johnson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Danielle King Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Medicine Services 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

My toughest case

Helping a youth with gender dysphoria and depression

Myo Thwin Myint, MD, FAAP, FAPA, DFAACAP Child, adolescent and adult psychiatry at Tulane University, Children’s Tulane Pediatric Clinic, CrescentCare (Elysian Fields location) and the VA

F

rom an early age, Dr. Myo Thwin Myint felt compelled to help underserved populations. A native of Myanmar, who moved to the U.S. at age 14, he noticed a “stigma of mental health” and wanted to heal people living with mental illness, particularly those of a younger generation and members of the LGBTQ community. He currently works in child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry, integrated with pediatric colleagues most of the time. “Children, adolescents and young adults possess innocence, hope and resilience,” he said. One of his biggest challenges was treating a youth with significant gender dysphoria, major depression and anxiety. The teen also had symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. All of these conditions can have a good prognosis with evidence-based treatments, he said, but “it can take time and we are still in the middle of treatments.” This transgender youth drove to New Orleans from several hours away; lacking access to providers who have been adequately trained made it even more difficult to receive help. The individual’s family also struggled to understand the diversity and spectrum of gender and sexuality. Myint helped identify a support team for that youth, a network that included an adolescent medicine pediatrician; community agencies; and The Trevor Project, the nonprofit organization that focuses on suicide prevention efforts for young people in the LGBTQ community. “I worked with the youth, their friends, parents and caregiver – helping each to understand the complexity of mental health and to affirm the diverse identities – not just gender and sexuality, but also religion, race, ethnicity,” he said.      The young person’s issues reminded Myint that acceptance is a powerful healing mechanism. “Humility is the foundation to understand the unique and complex aspects that we each possess. Assuming things because of who we are, how we look and where we came from is not usually helpful. Rather, trying to understand the perspectives leads to better outcomes.” – Sarah Ravits

Undergraduate: Virginia Commonwealth University Medical School: Virginia Commonwealth University Year Graduated: 2008

Photograph by Craig Mulcahy


august 2019 6 7


Michael Landry Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Department of Internal Medicine 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

Jeffrey Wiese University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Internal Medicine 2000 Canal St 504-988-7518

Michelle M. Guidry Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Section of Hospital Medicine 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000

Gloria Leary Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

Internal Medicine/Hospice and Palliative Medicine Metairie Kenneth B Smith East Jefferson General Hospital Respiratory Care 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205

Catherine E. Jones University Medical Center New Orleans Section of Hospital Medicine 2000 Canal St 504-702-3000

Christopher J. Lege Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Internal Medicine 3434 Prytania St, Ste 460 504-897-7999 Betty P. Lo-Blais LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 Rene Albert Louapre III 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 400 504-897-3305 Marlowe Maylin Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-7518 Angela M. McLean LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 478 S Johnson St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517 Susan Ellen Nelson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Division of Palliative Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-5211 Eboni G. Price-Haywood Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747 Charles Clarence Smith III Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500 Benjamin F. Springgate LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Community & Population Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 James D. Stoll Ochsner Health System Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness 1401 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4747

6 8 august 2019

New Orleans Dominique Anwar New Orleans East Hospital Department of Internal Medicine 5620 Read Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-592-6760 Christopher M. Blais Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-4005 Sonia Malhotra University Medical Center New Orleans Division of Hospice and Palliative Medicine 2000 Canal St 504-702-3669 Internal Medicine/Hospital Medicine Kenner Kristi Boudreaux Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner Section of Hospital Medicine 180 W Esplanade Ave 504-468-8600 Najy Masri Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner Section of Hospitalist Medicine 180 W Esplanade Ave 504-468-8600 New Orleans John R. Amoss Touro Infirmary Section of Hospital Medicine 1401 Foucher St 504-568-4624 Deepa Bhatnagar Tulane Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5800 Oren Blalock Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 11th Fl 504-842-5766 Steven Deitelzweig Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 11th Fl 504-842-5766

Danielle King Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Medicine Services 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000 Marianne Maumus Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 11th Fl 504-842-7505 Marlowe Maylin Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-7518 Geraldine E. Menard Tulane Medical Center Section of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-7518 Philip J. Putnam Tulane Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5800 Emily J. Ramee Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Hospital Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-7518 David W. Spruill University Medical Center New Orleans Department of Internal Medicine 2000 Canal St, 504-988-7518 Frank Charles Wharton Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Department of Hospital Medicine 2700 Napoleon Ave 866-624-7637 Medical Genetics New Orleans Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101

Medical Oncology and Hematology Metairie Jayne Schlosser Gurtler Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Division of Hematology and Oncology 2121 Ridge Lake, 4th Fl 504-885-0577 Robert Woody Veith 3800 Houma Blvd, Ste 200 504-455-0600 New Orleans Salvador Caputto Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Division of Hematology and Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8970 John Thomas Cole Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910 Bridgette M. Collins-Burow Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Jyotsna Fuloria University Medical Center New Orleans Cancer Center Tower 1, 1st Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Marc J. Kahn Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Cindy Anne Leissinger Tulane Medical Center Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders 1430 Tulane Ave 504-988-5433 Nakhle S. Saba Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Hana F. Safah Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-6300 Oliver Sartor Tulane Cancer Center Clinic 150 S Liberty St 504-988-7869 Chris Theodossiou Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Hematology and Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 3rd Fl 504-842-3910

Nephrology Houma Shaminder M. Gupta Ochsner Health System Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Section of Nephrology 1978 Industrial Blvd 985-850-2328 Metairie Friedrichs Henry Harris, Jr. New Orleans Nephrology Associates 4409 Utica St, Ste 100 504-457-3687 Jill Suzanne Lindberg New Orleans Nephrology Associates 4409 Utica St, Ste 100 504-457-3687 New Orleans A. Brent Alper, Jr. Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology & Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5800 Vecihi Batuman Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology & Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 Adrian J. Baudy IV Tulane Medical Center Section of Nephrology & Hypertension 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-5030 L. Lee Hamm Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology & Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-9831 N. Kevin Krane Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology & Hypertension 275 Laselle St, 504-988-5030 Eric Edward Simon Tulane Multispecialty Clinic Downtown Section of Nephrology & Hypertension 275 LaSalle St 504-988-5030 Federico J. Teran Tulane Medical Center Tulane Urology & Fertility Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5030 Juan Carlos Velez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Nephrology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3930


Rubin Zhang University Medical Center New Orleans Nephrology & Renal Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg, 5th Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Thibodaux Allen W. Vander Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Nephrology 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 405 985-446-0871 Neurological Surgery Metairie Najeeb M. Thomas Southern Brain & Spine 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-0141 Rand Marcel Voorhies Southern Brain & Spine 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 200 504-454-0141 New Orleans Aaron Dumont Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561 Christopher M. Maulucci Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561 Roger Douglas Smith Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurosurgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 7th Fl 504-842-4033 Neurology Covington Kristin M. Johnson Ochnser Health System Ochsner Neurosciences Institute – Covington 1341 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Metairie Archibald L. Melcher III East Jefferson Neurological Associates 3800 Houma Blvd 504-885-7337 Stephen L. Nelson Tulane Doctors - Neurology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 New Orleans Aimee M. Aysenne Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561 Lionel A. Branch, Jr. University Medical Center New Orleans Neurology Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg, 5th Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

John D. England LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 478 S Johnson St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517

Chi P. Dola Tulane Center for Women’s Health Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 302 504-988-8070

John Freiberg Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-5561

Susan G. Jeanfreau Fleur De Lis Ob-Gyn Associates 3040 33rd St 504-846-5279

Jessica B. Kraker Tulane Medical Center Tulane Neuroscience Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 5th Fl 504-988-9190 Sheryl Martin-Schild Touro Infirmary Department of Neurology 1401 Foucher St 504-982-7246 Piotr Wladyslaw Olejniczak LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Neurology 478 S Johnson St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517 R. Eugene Ramsay Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 6th Fl 504-842-4111 Angela N. Traylor Tulane Medical Center Tulane Behavioral Health Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-4794 Richard Zweifler Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Neurology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 7th Fl 504-842-3980 Obstetrics and Gynecology Covington Patricia S. Braly Women’s Cancer Care 606 W 12th Ave 985-892-2252 Hammond William F. Beacham North Oaks Obstetrics & Gynecology 15748 Medical Arts Plaza 985-542-0663 Timothy Joseph Mooney 42333 Deluxe Plaza, Ste 7 985-345-2555 Metairie Stephen Champlin East Jefferson Women’s Care 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 410 504-454-0606 Ralph R. Chesson, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600

Peter Lu The Fertility Institute of New Orleans 4770 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 201 504-454-2165 Gabriella Pridjian Tulane Center for Women’s Health Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 302 504-988-8070 Belinda Sartor The Fertility Institute of New Orleans 4770 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 201 504-454-2165 New Orleans Joseph R. Biggio Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2700 Napoleon Ave, 4th Fl 504-842-4151 Robin B. Bone Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist Napoleon Medical Plaza Women’s Services 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 520 504-885-8563 Louis Paul DuTreil Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3434 Prytania St, Ste 130 504-897-7580 Jacob M. Estes Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Gynecologic Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4165 Veronica C. Gillispie Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clara St, Ste 500 504-842-9620 Richard Carl Kline Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Gynecologic Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4165

Sherri Anne Longo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Baptist - A Campus of Ochsner Medical Center Section of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2700 Napoleon Ave, 4th Fl 504-842-4151 Robert T. Maupin, Jr. Touro Infirmary Maternal Fetal Medicine Clinic Buckman Bldg, Ste 105 3434 Prytania St 504-897-8213 George Morris IV Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clara St, Ste 640 504-842-9616 George Brazil Morris III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center Baptist McFarland Medical Plaza Women’s Services 4429 Clare St, Ste 400 504-842-4155 Rebecca Perret Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3434 Prytania St, Ste 130 504-897-7580 Kathleen T. Sullivan Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center Baptist Napoleon Medical Plaza Women’s Services 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 520 504-885-8563 William F. von Almen II Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3434 Prytania St, Ste 320 504-897-7142 Donna S. Waters Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3434 Prytania St, Ste 320 504-897-7142 Felton L. Winfield, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Ophthalmology Marrero Rudolph Michael Franklin Eye Associates of West Jefferson 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N213 504-349-6910

Metairie Ronald Andrew Landry Eyecare Associates 4324 Veterans Blvd, Ste 102 504-455-9825 New Orleans Maria Bernal LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Ophthalmology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 James G. Diamond Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System New Orleans VA Outpatient Clinic Department of Ophthalmology 2400 Canal St 504-412-3700 Peter R. Kastl University Medical Center New Orleans Vision Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg, 3rd Fl 2000 Canal St 504-702-3950 Jonathan Nussdorf Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Ophthalmology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 10th Fl 504-842-3995 Jayne S. Weiss LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Ophthalmology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 6th Fl 504-412-1200 Orthopaedic Surgery Covington Kevin Darr Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117 Tim Devraj Louisiana Heart Hospital Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Clinic 70411 Hwy 21 985-400-5566 Mark J. Hontas St. Tammany Parish Hospital Bone and Joint Clinic 71211 Hwy 21 985-893-9922 H. Reiss Plauche Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117 Jason L. Rolling Covington Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute 19343 Sunshine Ave 985-892-5117

august 2019 6 9


Harahan Scott C. Montgomery Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1201 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 1st Fl 504-736-4800 Misty Suri Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Elmwood Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute 1201 S Clearview Pkwy, Bldg B, 1st Fl 504-736-4800 Kenner Vinod Dasa LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 671 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 100 504-412-1700 Michael W. Hartman LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 671 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 100 504-412-1700 Marrero Matthew R. Grimm Jefferson Orthopedic Clinic 920 Ave B 504-349-6804 Mark Juneau, Jr. Jefferson Orthopedic Clinic 920 Ave B 504-349-6804 Metairie David W. Aiken 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 650 504-456-5152 R. Douglas Bostick III Metairie Orthopedics & Sports Medicine 3001 Division St, Ste 204 504-541-5800 John B. Cazale IV Crescent City Orthopedics 3600 Houma Blvd 504-309-6500 Luis M. Espinoza Orthopedic Center for Sports Medicine 4921 Airline Dr 504-889-2663 William F. Sherman, Jr. Orthopedic Center For Sport Medicine 4921 Airline Dr 504-889-2663 New Orleans George Chimento Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Donald C. Faust 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 600 504-899-1000

7 0 august 2019

Wendell Heard Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476 Andrew G. King Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Ambulatory Care Center 1st Fl, 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Peter C. Krause University Medical Center New Orleans Orthopaedics Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg 4th Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 James F. Mautner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Mark S. Meyer Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Chad Millet Southern Orthopaedic Specialists 2731 Napoleon Ave 504-897-6351 Michael J. O’Brien Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476 J. Lockwood Ochsner, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Fernando L. Sanchez Tulane Medical Center Tulane Orthopaedic Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl 504-988-2177 Felix H. Savoie III Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476 Robert Treuting Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Orthopaedics 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3970 Robert D. Zura University Medical Center New Orleans Orthopaedics Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg 4th Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Slidell James C. Butler Elite Orthopaedic Specialists 1150 Robert Blvd, Ste 240 985-646-3662

Thibodaux Neil James Maki Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 602 N Acadian Rd, Ste 101 985-446-6284 Otolaryngology Covington R. Graham Boyce Associated Surgical Specialists 350 Lakeview Ct, Ste C 985-845-2677 Anna Maria Pou Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Otolaryngology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Marrero Moises A. Arriaga CNC Hearing & Balance Center 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste S630 504-934-8320 New Orleans Ronald G. Amedee Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Paul L. Friedlander Tulane Medical Center ENT Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5451 H. Devon Graham III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Christian Hasney Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4080 Edward D. McCoul Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Rahul Mehta University Medical Center New Orleans ENT Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg 3rd Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

New Orleans Timothy Blake Molony Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Brian A. Moore Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4080 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Plastic Surgery 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642 Elisabeth Rareshide 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 820 504-897-4455 Rohan R. Walvekar University Medical Center New Orleans ENT Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg 3rd Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-3440 Thibodaux James Vance Broussard Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Justin M. Tenney Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Guy Paul Zeringue III Southern ENT Associates Medical Office Bldg, Ste 101 604 N Acadia Rd 985-446-5079 Pathology Marrero James E. Brown West Jefferson Medical Center Department of Pathology 1101 Medical Center Blvd 504-347-5511 New Orleans Edwin Norquist Beckman Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-3330 Edgar Shannon Cooper Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3510

Randall Douglas Craver Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Pathology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 2nd Fl 504-896-9873 Pamela Canale Martin Touro Infirmary Division of Dermatopathology 1401 Foucher St, 2nd Fl 504-897-8418 Elise Occhipinti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3510 Francis Rodwig Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3510 Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Metairie Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Doctors - Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans Kenneth Paris Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Allergy and Immunology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3030 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9589 Pediatric Anesthesiology New Orleans Brandon Black Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3053 Jimmie E. Colon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Stanley Martin Hall Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3053 John Frederick Heaton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3053 Louis G. Shenk III Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3053


august 2019 7 1


Pediatric Cardiology New Orleans Kelly Gajewski Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3309 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9751 Victor William Lucas, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-5200 Scott L. Macicek Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-5200

Edwin Michael Frieberg Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Critical Care 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-899-9511 Pediatric Dermatology Metairie Jeffrey C. Poole Poole Dermatology 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 406 504-838-8225 Pediatric Endocrinology Metairie Mary A. Younger Tulane Doctors - General Pediatrics and Obesity Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253

Theodorus Johannes Mulder Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-5200

New Orleans Stuart A. Chalew Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Endocrinology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

Ernest S. Siwik Children’s Hospital of New Orleans The Heart Center Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3309 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9751

Ricardo Gomez Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Endocrinology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3020 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

Thomas Young Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Cardiology 1319 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-5200

Pediatric Gastroenterology New Orleans Raynorda F. Brown Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9534

Pediatric Cardiovascular Anesthesia New Orleans Brandon Black Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Anesthesiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3053 Jimmie E. Colon Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3755 Pediatric Critical Care Metairie Robert Lee Hopkins Tulane Doctors - Pulmonology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans Olugbenga Akingbola Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Critical Care 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-899-9511 Gary L. Duhon Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Critical Care 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-899-9511

7 2 august 2019

Ilana S. Fortgang Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology 1315 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3900 Pediatric General Hepatology New Orleans Ilana S. Fortgang Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology 1315 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-3900

Pinki K. Prasad Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740

Ihor V. Yosypiv Tulane Doctors - Nephrology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253

Maria C. Velez-Yanguas Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740

New Orleans Diego H. Aviles Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Nephrology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9238

R. P. Warrier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 1315 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4249 Raymond G. Watts Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 Lolie Chua Yu Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740 Pediatric Infectious Disease Metairie Margarita Silio Tulane Doctors - Infectious Diseases Children’s Pediatrics 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 200 504-988-6253 Russell Barrett Van Dyke Tulane Doctors - Infectious Diseases Children’s Pediatrics 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 200 504-988-6253 New Orleans Lorna Seybolt CrescentCare Health & Wellness Center 3308 Tulane Ave 504-207-2273 Russell Wesley Steele Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900

Pediatric HematologyOncology Metairie Tammuella E. Singleton Tulane Doctors - Hematology and Oncology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253

Pediatric Medical Genetics New Orleans Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101

New Orleans Renee V. Gardner Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders 200 Henry Clay Ave, 1st Fl 504-896-9740

Pediatric Nephrology Metairie Samir S. El-Dahr Tulane Doctors - Nephrology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253

Caroline Straatmann Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Nephrology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9238 Pediatric Ophthalmology New Orleans George S. Ellis, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Ophthalmology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3104 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Horatio Sprague Eustis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Division of Pedriatric Ophthalmology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 10th Fl 504-842-3995 Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery New Orleans William K. Accousti Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Ambulatory Care Center, 1st Fl 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Joseph A. Gonzales, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Ambulatory Care Center, 1st Fl 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Andrew G. King Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Ambulatory Care Center, 1st Fl 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9569 Pediatric Otolaryngology New Orleans John Lindhe Guarisco Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Kimsey Rodriguez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080

Pediatric Pathology New Orleans Randall Douglas Craver Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Pathology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 2nd Fl 504-896-9873 Pediatric Pulmonology Metairie Scott H. Davis Tulane Doctors - Pulmonology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 Robert Lee Hopkins Tulane Doctors - Pulmonology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans Kristin N. Van Hook Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3900 Pediatric Radiation Oncology New Orleans Troy Gene Scroggins, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3440 Ellen (Elly) Zakris Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Radiation Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8387 Pediatric Radiology New Orleans Jane D. Congeni Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Radiology 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9565 Arthur J. Kenney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Pediatric Rheumatology Metairie Jane M. S. El-Dahr Tulane Doctors - Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 501 504-988-6253 New Orleans Abraham Gedalia Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Rheumatology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3030 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9385


august 2019 7 3


Pediatric Specialist/Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine New Orleans Sue Ellen Abdalian Tulane Doctors - Adolescent & Young Adult Health Ruth U. Fertel Tulane Community Health Center 711 N Broad St 504-988-0000 Pediatric Specialist/Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Covington Daphne Ann Glindmeyer 601 River Highlands Blvd, Ste 100 504-392-8348

Paul G. Pelts Pelts, Kirkhart & Associates 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 300 504-581-3933 Jason Murphy Wuttke Pelts, Kirkhart & Associates 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 300 504-581-3933 Charles Henry Zeanah, Jr. Tulane Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology Services 131 S Robertson St, 14th Fl 504-988-5402

Metairie Stacy Drury Tulane Pediatric Behavioral Health Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 309 504-988-4794

Pediatric Specialist/NeonatalPerinatal Medicine Houma Bedford Nieves-Cruz Terrebonne General Medical Center Division of Neonatology 8166 Main St 985-858-7300

Mary Margaret Gleason Tulane Pediatric Behavioral Health Clinic 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 309 504-988-6253

Metairie Jay Paul Goldsmith Tulane Doctors - Neonatology 4700 S I-10 Service Rd W 504-988-5315

Myo T. Myint Tulane Doctors - Child Psychiatry Children’s Pediatrics 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 200 504-988-6253

New Orleans Brian Barkemeyer Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418

Douglas S. Pool 300 Codifer Blvd, Ste A 504-835-6320 New Orleans Milton Webster Anderson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Ted Bloch III 3525 Prytania St, Ste 211 504-897-7939 Stephen R. Cochran 1426 Amelia St 504-891-6020 x2 Charles Calvin Coleman Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Calhoun Behavioral Center 935 Calhoun St 504-896-7790 Robert A. Dahmes 4480 General DeGaulle Dr, Ste 107 504-393-6355 Martin J. Drell LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 478 S Johnson St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 Jessica Hof 1426 Amelia St 504-810-7590 Lakisha Y. Mamon LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 478 S Johnson St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 7 4 august 2019

Raegan Wetzel Gupta Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Christy G. Mumphrey Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Staci Marie Olister Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Dana L. Rivera Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Jeffrey W. Surcouf Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Neonatology 200 Henry Clay Ave, 5th Fl 504-896-9418 Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, General Metairie Stephen L. Nelson Tulane Doctors - Neurology Children’s Hospital Specialty Center 4720 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 401 504-988-6253 New Orleans Diane K. Africk Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Department of Neurology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900

Allison Conravey Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Department of Neurology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Stephen Russell Deputy Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888 Jessica R. Gautreaux Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

Pediatric Surgery New Orleans Vincent Robert Adolph Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pediatric Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 6th Fl 504-842-3907 Rodney B. Steiner Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pediatric Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 6th Fl 504-842-3907

Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458

Pediatric Urology New Orleans Frank Raymond Cerniglia, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of Pediatric Urology 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4083

Maria Weimer Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

Joseph Ortenberg Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Urology Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9233

Joaquin Wong Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-2888

Pediatrics/General Covington Kathryn Quarls Fairway Pediatrics 7020 N Hwy 190, Ste C 985-871-7337

Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Movement Disorders New Orleans Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458

Houma Kimberley J. Barner Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440

Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Muscular Dystrophy New Orleans Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458 Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Neuromuscular Disease New Orleans Ann Henderson Tilton Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Department of Neurology Ambulatory Care Center, Ste 3040 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-9458 Pediatric Specialist/Pediatric Metabolic Diseases New Orleans Hans Christoph Andersson Hayward Genetics Center Tulane Lakeside Medical Office Bldg, 4th Fl 4720 S I-10 Service Rd 504-988-5101

Metairie John S. Barbara Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374 Cary A. Culbertson Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374 David Anderson Estes, Jr. Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880 Patrice B. Evers Tulane Doctors - General Pediatrics Children’s Pediatrics 4740 S I-10 Service Rd W, Ste 200 504-988-6253 Amy Glick Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133 Patricia Granier Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133 Michael G. Heller, Jr. Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880 Mark Vincent Morici Metairie Pediatrics 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 300 504-833-7374

Richard Louis Brooke Ochsner Health System Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center Pediatric Clinic, 1990 Industrial Blvd 985-873-1730

Heather C. Porche Collins Pediatrics Clinic 2017 Metairie Rd 504-832-8022

Robert W. Clarke, Jr. Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440

Jeanne Rademacher Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 4901 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-887-1133

Bernard Ferrer Bayou Pediatric Associates 569 Enterprise Dr 985-868-5440 Marrero Marc A. Fisher 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N313 504-361-0234 Carlos Alberto Trujillo Jefferson Pediatric Clinic 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N813 504-349-6813 Lindsay R. York 1111 Medical Center Blvd, Ste N803 504-934-8333

Sam Jude Solis Napoleon Pediatrics 3040 33rd St 504-219-0880 Scott Rory Zander Children’s Pediatrics - Lakeside Children’s Clinic 4845 Veterans Memorial Blvd 504-883-3703 New Orleans Daniel Richard Bronfin Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900


august 2019 7 5


Terry L. Cummings Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Sections of General Academic Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-5263 Theresa Lynn Dise Tulane Multispecialty Clinic at University Square Section of General Academic Pediatrics 200 Broadway St, Ste 230 504-988-9000 Kathleen Gorman Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744 George “Jay” C. Hescock, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Hospital Medicine 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-899-9511 Charles Maurice Kantrow III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Betty P. Lo-Blais LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of General Internal Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366 Elizabeth Swanson Milvid Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744 M. Nora Oates Hales Pediatrics 3525 Prytania St, Ste 602 504-897-0744 Jennifer M. Parkerson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Renee F. Reymond Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center for Children Section of General Pediatrics 1315 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3900 Thibodaux Henry M. Peltier Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine Medical Office Bldg, Ste 200 604 N Acadia Rd 985-448-3700 Pediatrics/Hospital Medicine New Orleans George “Jay” C. Hescock, Jr. Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Hospital Medicine 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-899-9511

Chelsey T. Sandlin Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Division of Hospital Medicine 200 Henry Clay Ave 504-896-3924 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation New Orleans Stephen Kishner University Medical Center New Orleans Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg, 4th Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 Gregory W. Stewart Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine 202 Janet Yulman Way 504-988-8476 Plastic Surgery Covington R. Graham Boyce Associated Surgical Specialists 350 Lakeview Ct, Ste C 985-845-2677 Mandeville Michele M. Cooper 1090 W Causeway Approach 985-626-6163 Metairie Eileen S. Black 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 100 504-883-8900 Elliott B. Black III 3798 Veterans Blvd, Ste 100 504-883-8900 David Albert Jansen Jansen Plastic Surgery 3900 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Ste 200 504-455-1000 New Orleans Robert Johnson Allen The Center for Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction 4429 Clara St, Ste 330 888-890-3437 Frank J. DellaCroce Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 H. Devon Graham III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4080 Michael H. Moses 1603 2nd St 504-895-7200 Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Plastic Surgery 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642

Hugo St. Hilaire LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 3rd Fl 504-412-1240 Scott K. Sullivan, Jr. Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Christopher G. Trahan Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Psychiatry Covington Daphne Ann Glindmeyer 601 River Highlands Blvd, Ste 100 504-392-8348 Gretna Charles Kelso Billings, Jr. 720 Lafayette St 504-366-9707 Hammond Schoener Michele LaPrairie Florida Parishes Human Services Authority 835 Pride Dr, Ste B 985-543-4333 Mandeville John Robert Macgregor, Jr. 1502 W Causeway Approach, Ste D 985-626-3400 Metairie Charles Chester Center for Individual and Family Counseling 3500 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 1410 504-838-9919

Jose Manuel Pena Tulane Medical Center Tulane Behavioral Health Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl, 504-988-5405

Erich J. Conrad LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 478 S Johnson St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580

Arwen Podesta Podesta Wellness 4322 Canal St 504-252-0026

Robert A. Dahmes 4480 General DeGaulle Dr, Ste 107 504-393-6355 George Cecil Daul, Jr. Professional Psychotherapy Network 1529 River Oaks Rd W, Ste 123 504-729-4414 David Galarneau Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Kendall Genre 8438 Oak St, Ste B 504-322-3936 Milton L. Harris, Jr. Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System New Orleans VA Outpatient Clinic Mental Health Services 3434 Canal St 504-507-5744 Dean Anthony Hickman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025

P. Michael Mahony Center for Individual and Family Counseling 3500 N Causeway Blvd, Ste 1410 504-838-9919

Janet Elaine Johnson Tulane Medical Center Section of Adult Psychiatry Tidewater Bldg, 10th Fl, 1440 Canal St 504-988-2201

A. Kenison Roy III Addiction Recovery Resources 4933 Wabash St 504-780-2766

Harminder Singh Mallik Gulf South Psychiatry 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 220 504-592-9500

New Orleans James G. Barbee 3439 Magazine St 504-891-8808

Donna M. Mancuso 3606 Magazine St 504-208-1035

J. Robert Barnes 1301 Amelia St, Ste A 504-891-7000 John William Bick III 3705 Coliseum St 504-891-0094 Ted Bloch III 3525 Prytania St, Ste 211 504-897-7939 Janet B. Bradley 1440 Canal St 504-407-7135 Stephen R. Cochran 1426 Amelia St 504-891-6020 x2

7 6 august 2019

Charles Calvin Coleman Children’s Hospital of New Orleans Calhoun Behavioral Center 935 Calhoun St, 504-896-7790

Christopher D. Meyers 3525 Prytania St, Ste 518 504-895-5533 Andrew E. Morson Integrated Behavioral Health 400 Poydras St, Ste 1950 504-322-3837 Nicholas G. Pejic Atlas Psychiatry Antonine Professional Arts Center 1301 Antonine St, 504-899-1682

C. Ted Reveley 3525 Prytania St, Ste 514 504-264-7988 Dean Edward Robinson Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Mental Health Service 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000 Alvin Martin Rouchell Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 4th Fl 504-842-4025 Janet Seligson-Dowie 3606 Magazine St, 2nd Fl 504-507-8201 John Walter Thompson, Jr. Tulane University School of Medicine Division of Forensic Neuropsychiatry 1440 Canal St, Ste 1000 504-988-0847 Mark Harold Townsend LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Psychiatry 478 S Johnson St, 7th Fl 504-412-1580 Jason Murphy Wuttke Pelts, Kirkhart & Associates 1539 Jackson Ave, Ste 300 504-581-3933 Thibodaux Maria Cruse Thibodaux Regional Medical Center Department of Psychiatry 604 N Acadia Rd, Ste 201 985-493-9304 Pulmonary Medicine Hammond Arvind Yertha North Oaks Pulmonology North Oaks Clinic Bldg, Ste 401A 15813 Paul Vega MD Dr 985-230-1580 Kenner Carol M. Mason LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705 Judd Ernest Shellito LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 701 504-412-1705


august 2019 7 7


Metairie Thomas Gerard Nuttli East Jefferson General Hospital Pulmonary Services 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 Kenneth B Smith East Jefferson General Hospital Respiratory Care 4200 Houma Blvd, 3rd Fl 504-503-5205 New Orleans Juzar Ali LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 2nd Fl 504-412-1366

Leonardo Seoane Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonology, Lung Transplant and Critical Care 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4400

New Orleans Edward Bluth Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470

Charles Clarence Smith III Internal Medicine Specialists 3525 Prytania St, Ste 526 504-648-2500

James Gary Caridi Tulane Medical Center Department of Radiology 1415 Tulane Ave 504-988-7627

David E. Taylor Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Daniel A. Devun Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470

Bennett Paul DeBoisblanc University Medical Center New Orleans Comprehensive Pulmonary Hypertension Center 2000 Canal St, 504-702-5700

David Allen Welsh University Medical Center New Orleans Infectious Disease Services Ambulatory Care Bldg, 4th Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700

Susan H. Gunn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055

Slidell Janine S. Parker IMG Physicians 1051 Gause Blvd, Ste 260 985-641-5523

Surma Jain Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Stephen Phillips Kantrow Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 9th Fl 504-842-4055 Ross C. Klingsberg Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600 Joseph Alexander Lasky Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600 Jaime Palomino Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System Section of Pulmonary Disease 2400 Canal St 504-507-2000 Nereida Alicia Parada Tulane Medical Center Tulane Lung Center 1415 Tulane Ave, 7th Fl 504-988-8600

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Radiation Oncology Metairie Paul David Monsour East Jefferson Radiation Oncology 4204 Houma Blvd, Ste 100 504-454-1727 New Orleans Mini J. Elnaggar Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 1st Fl 504-842-3440 Ellen (Elly) Zakris Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Radiation Oncology 1401 Foucher St, 1st Fl 504-897-8387 Radiology Covington Evangelos A. Liokis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology, 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Robert Restrepo Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Department of Radiology 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 Metairie Puneet Singha East Jefferson General Hospital Department of Radiology 4200 Houma Blvd, 2nd Fl 504-454-4314

Dennis Kay Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Arthur J. Kenney Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Charles Claiborne Matthews Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 James Milburn Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Dana Hampton Smetherman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Richard Tupler Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Radiology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-3470 Rheumatology Metairie John F. Nitsche Arthritis & Immunology Associates Hand Center of Louisiana 4228 Houma Blvd, Ste 600B 504-454-2191 New Orleans William Eugene Davis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920

Luis R. Espinoza LSU Healthcare Network Campus Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Rheumatology 478 S Johnson St, 5th Fl 504-412-1517 Madelaine T. Feldman The Rheumatology Group 2633 Napoleon Ave, Ste 530 504-899-1120 Robert James Quinet Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920 Eve Scopelitis Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920 Tamika A. Webb-Detiege Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920 Jerald Marc Zakem Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Rheumatology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 5th Fl 504-842-3920 Surgery Covington Michael J. Thomas Surgical Specialists of Louisiana 7015 Hwy 190 E Service Rd, Ste 200 985-234-3000 Hammond Fred J. Liner 120 N Cate St 985-542-1364 Kenner J. Philip Boudreaux LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500 Metairie Kelvin Contreary 4224 Houma Blvd, Ste 310 504-454-6338 New Orleans Humberto Bohorquez Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925

John S. Bolton Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Surgical Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4070 David Bruce Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Ian Carmody Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Ari J. Cohen Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Ralph Corsetti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070 Paul L. Friedlander Tulane Medical Center ENT Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5451 Christian Hasney Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4080 John Patrick Hunt III University Medical Center New Orleans Trauma Surgery Clinic Ambulatory Care Bldg, 5th Fl, 2000 Canal St 504-702-5700 George E. Loss, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 1st Fl 504-842-3925 Brian A. Moore Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4080


Thomas Moulthrop Hedgewood Plastic Surgery 2427 Saint Charles Ave 504-895-7642 Anil Paramesh Tulane Medical Center Tulane Transplant Institute Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 4th Fl, 504-988-5344 William S. Richardson Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070 Edward Ballou Staudinger 2820 Napoleon Ave, Ste 640 504-897-1327 Alan Jerry Stolier Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Michael C. Townsend Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070 Surgical Oncology Kenner J. Philip Boudreaux LSU Healthcare Network Kenner Multi-Specialty Clinic Neuroendocrine Clinic 200 W Esplanade Ave, Ste 200 504-464-8500 New Orleans John S. Bolton Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Section of Surgical Oncology 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4070 Russell E. Brown Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy 504-842-4070 Ralph Corsetti Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070 George Michael Fuhrman Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070

Alan Jerry Stolier Center for Restorative Breast Surgery 1717 Saint Charles Ave 504-899-2800 Thoracic Surgery Covington Charles J. DiCorte Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health Center - Covington Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery 1000 Ochsner Blvd 985-875-2828 New Orleans Michael J. Bates Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070 P. Eugene Parrino Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 2nd Fl 504-842-4070 Urology Metairie Scott E. Delacroix, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Urologic Oncology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 Stephen M. Lacour LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 Jack Christian Winters LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600 New Orleans Stephen F. Bardot Ochsner Health System The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, 2nd Fl 504-842-4083 Harold Anthony Fuselier, Jr. LSU Healthcare Network St. Charles Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3700 Saint Charles Ave, 5th Fl 504-412-1520 Ryan M. Krlin LSU Healthcare Network Metairie Multi-Specialty Clinic Department of Urology 3601 Houma Blvd, Ste 302 504-412-1600

Eric Laborde Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083 Melissa M. Montgomery Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083 Lester J. Prats, Jr. Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083 Raju Thomas Tulane Medical Center Tulane Urology & Fertility Clinic 1415 Tulane Ave, 3rd Fl 504-988-5271 Joanna Togami Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Department of Urology 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Atrium Tower, 4th Fl 504-842-4083 Richard M. Vanlangendonck Touro Infirmary Crescent City Physicians Department of Urology 3434 Prytania St, Ste 450 504-897-7196 Vascular Surgery Marrero Robert Craig Batson LSU Healthcare Network Westbank Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Vascular Surgery 4500 10th St, Ste B 504-412-1960 Malachi G. Sheahan LSU Healthcare Network Westbank Multi-Specialty Clinic Section of Vascular Surgery 4500 10th St, Ste B 504-412-1960 New Orleans Larry Harold Hollier LSU Health Sciences Center Section of Vascular Surgery 433 Bolivar St, Ste 815 504-568-4800 W. Charles Sternbergh III Ochsner Health System Ochsner Medical Center Section of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 1514 Jefferson Hwy, Clinic Tower, 8th Fl 504-842-4070

Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause.” “Copyright 2019, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. Best Doctors, Inc. is the only authorized source of the official Best Doctors in America® plaque and other recognition items. Best Doctors does not authorize, contract with or license any organization to sell recognition items for Best Doctors, Inc. Please contact Best Doctors at plaques@bestdoctors. com with any questions. For more information or to order visit usplaques.bestdoctors.. com or call 617-963-1167.” “BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.” “Founded in 1989 by Harvard Medical School physicians, Best Doctors connects individuals facing difficult medical treatment decisions with the best doctors, selected by impartial peer review in over 450 medical specialty/ subspecialty combinations, to review their diagnosis and treatment plans. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and proprietary balloting software, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise The result is the Best Doctors in America® List,

which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information. Best Doctors is part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care delivering a powerful connected care platform – a single solution for addressing a complete spectrum of medical conditions. Through Teladoc Health’s global footprint of 50,000 medical experts, employers, health plans, and health systems have a comprehensive solution for patients to seek resolution across a wide spectrum of needs with convenient access in the U.S. and around the globe. As part of Teladoc Health, Best Doctors focuses on improving health outcomes for the most complex, critical and costly medical issues. More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Through its global network of Best Doctors and other critical services, Teladoc Heatlh is expanding access to high quality healthcare, lowering costs and improving outcomes around the world. The company’s award winning, integrated clinical solutions are inclusive of telehealth, expert medical opinions, AI and analytics, and licensed platform services.•

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2019 MEDICAL PROFILES myneworleans.com AUGUST 2019 8 1


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Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center

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tre Cosmetic Dermatology & Laser Center is built around a talented team of physicians that are devoted to providing exceptional individualized treatments to the patients they serve. Dr. Lisa Donofrio and Dr. Kyle Coleman are board-certified dermatologists that practice the most advanced techniques in cosmetic surgical specialties, including body contouring, liposuction, Botox®, dermal fillers, and fat grafting. The doctors at Etre Cosmetic Dermatology & Laser Center are advancing cosmetic dermatology through cutting-edge clinical trials and by integrating the latest technologies and leading-edge treatments such as body contouring through CoolSculpting® and laser liposuction, leading skin rejuvenation services such as IPL Photofacials, and anti-aging techniques like Botox® and Dermal Fillers. Dr. Lisa Donofrio received her medical degree from Tulane University School of Medicine and currently runs Tulane’s aesthetic dermatology teaching clinic for residents. Dr. Donofrio

actively works with other experts in the medical aesthetic realm; she is a member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology and also a member of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, where she previously served on the board. Dr. Kyle Coleman also received his medical degree from Tulane University School of Medicine and has contributed to the field by teaching other dermatologists and publishing numerous scientific articles and book chapters on liposuction, body contouring, laser procedures, chemical peels, and dermal fillers. Additionally, he has contributed to clinical trial research as an investigator for several FDA trials, including trials of botulinum toxin, dermal wrinkle fillers, and other new technologies. Drs. Donofrio and Coleman pride themselves on providing premium, personalized treatment coupled with the highest level of service.

1224 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans | 504-227-3873 | EtreCosmeticDerm.com


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Eva L. Jessup, DDS

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learview Dental Care is the private practice of Eva L. Jessup, DDS, a New Orleans native with over 21 years of General Dentistry experience in the Metairie area. Dr. Jessup provides dentistry for the entire family in a relaxed environment. Procedures offered include everything from routine cleanings to tooth-colored fillings, crowns, bridges, dentures, partials, veneers and implants. She graduated from Archbishop Chapelle high school, LSU and LSU School of Dentistry. She is commited to excellence in all areas of her practice and is dedicated to continued education for herself and her staff. 2221 Clearview Pkwy, Metairie 504-455-1667 | ClearviewDentalCare.com

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2019 MEDICAL PROFILES INDEX Allergy and Asthma Alan Sheen, MD Colon & Rectal Surgery Sean G. Mayfield, MD Dentistry Bridget Brahney, DDS Damon DiMarco, DDS Joanne Hoppe, DDS Eva L. Jessup, DDS Margaret Patterson, DDS Troy Patterson, DDS Troy Patterson, Jr., DDS Kristie Reine, DDS Edmund Ring, DDS Michael Tufton, DDS Peter Tufton, DDS   Dermatology Katherine Brag, MD Erin E. Boh, MD, PhD, FAAD Elizabeth Bucher, MD Kyle Coleman, MD Lisa Donofrio, MD Leah Jacob, MD Keith LeBlanc, MD Andrea Murina, MD Cory Rougelot, MD Brittany Stumpf, MD Laura Williams, MD Gynecologic Oncology Jessica Shank, MD

DiMarco Dental

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iMarco Dental has provided quality care for over 50 years in a friendly, family environment. DiMarco Dental provides a holistic approach to dental health. Doctors Damon DiMarco, DDS and Joanne Hoppe, DDS offer individualized care and tailored solutions unique to each patient’s health and smile. We love creating and keeping beautiful smiles. We keep up with the latest technology and techniques to bring patients the highest quality most economical options. Patients travel from all over the metro area and across the lake to come to our Gretna office located just minutes from the CBD.

309 Gretna Blvd., Gretna 504-366-5611 | DiMarcoDental.com

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Psychiatry Arwen Podesta, MD Pediatrics Heather Porche, MD Plastic Surgery Kyle V. Acosta, MD John Guste, MD David Jansen, MD Mohammed Suleman, MD Ravi Tandon, MD


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Crescent City Surgical Centre (CCSC) is America’s premier physician owned surgical hospital. Owned and operated by a combination of 32 elite local practicing physicians and Louisiana Children’s Medical Center, CCSC offers eight operating rooms and two procedure rooms. Using cutting edge DaVinci robotic laparoscopic technology, CCSC offers patients minimally invasive surgery resulting in less pain and faster recovery time. Twenty VIP private rooms are available, and CCSC can make accommodations for those whose loved ones wish to stay overnight. Catered restaurant-style meals are served and designed to meet patients' personal dietary needs. They offer expedited wait times on appointments in a relaxing and comfortable environment. CCSC features surgical specialists in the fields of Bariatric, Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, ENT, Colo-Rectal, General Surgery, Gynecological Procedures, Urology, Interventional Radiology, Pain Management, Plastic, Reconstructive and Advanced Cosmetic Surgery. For more information about Crescent City Surgical Centre, please call 504-830-2500, or visit CCSurg.com.

Hospital Buzz

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reater New Orleans is fortunate to be home to a number of hospitals and hospital systems that bring world-class care to the people of the region. As medicine continues to evolve with the latest research and technologies, so do the hospitals as they institute best practices and expand treatment options for patients with all varieties of health needs. From advances in radiation treatments to award designations, cutting-edge programs for new moms, expanded behavioral health services, and virtual access to doctors, local hospitals are buzzing with news to share. When you or a loved one are in need of a certain treatment or could benefit from a special new program, it’s helpful to know what’s available regionally. Check out the new and expanded offerings from the following hospitals and see if the latest information can benefit you.

The Gamma Knife® Icon™ (Icon) delivers the most-precise brain radiation treatment in the world. Available at Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center in Baton Rouge, the Icon can treat a variety of conditions, including brain tumors, brain metastases, trigeminal neuralgia, arteriovenous malformations, central nervous system disorders and more. The Icon targets the most critical, difficult-to-access areas in the brain with a highly accurate dose of radiation, while sparing healthy brain tissue. And with a frameless design, patients receive a more comfortable, non-invasive treatment. This means they can return home and back to their daily routine in a few hours. The Cancer Center’s team of Icon-credentialed physicians collaborate with highly specialized neurosurgeons, physicists and the patient’s referring physician to deliver the most effective, highly individualized care. Patients and physicians throughout the Gulf South now have access to gold-standard brain care close to home. To learn more or refer a patient, visit ConquerDifferently.org.

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West Jefferson Medical Center (WJMC) has provided compassionate and quality care for communities since its founding in 1956 by the citizens of Jefferson Parish. With 419 beds and a full set of medical services, it’s the go-to center for medical care in the West Bank, Gretna, Harvey, and New Orleans area. Its extraordinary care is frequently recognized with national accolades, including in patient safety and stroke care. West Jefferson Medical Center most recently earned the Healthgrades 2019 America’s 250 Best Hospitals Award and is the only hospital in Louisiana to receive such prestigious recognition. West Jeff would like to thank its physicians, nurses, and staff who deliver the best care possible to patients and the community. WJMC is a proud member of LCMC Health, a Louisiana-based, not-for-profit hospital system serving the healthcare needs of the Gulf Coast region. LCMC Health currently manages award-winning community hospitals including Children’s Hospital, Touro, New Orleans East Hospital, University Medical Center New Orleans, and West Jefferson Medical Center. To learn more about West Jefferson Medical Center’s services, visit WJMC.org. Because medical concerns can arise at any time, Children’s Hospital New Orleans is making access to its pediatricians more convenient than ever. Virtual Care allows parents to connect with a Children’s Hospital provider during business hours and also in the evenings and on weekends. The app allows families to receive expert pediatric care via secure video connection from anywhere in Louisiana. Virtual Care benefits include seeing a provider when most convenient, not having to pack up the kids and spend time traveling or waiting in a crowded waiting room, and having a specialist referral or a prescription called in from the comfort of home. To learn more or to download the Children’s Hospital Virtual Care app, visit chnola.org/virtual-care. To reach Children’s Hospital’s After Hours walk-in clinics in Metairie and River Ridge, visit chnola.org/ Pediatrics/AfterHours. For more information about Children’s Hospital, visit CHNola.org.


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The Touro Foundation is pleased to announce the creation of two NOLA Baby Cafés at Touro. A program of the H.E.R. Institute, the Baby Café works to reduce breastfeeding disparities by providing a free drop-in space for breastfeeding families to network and share resources. NOLA Baby Café provides a relaxed, non-judgmental, safe environment for all women, bringing together women from all socioeconomic and racial backgrounds. This program, made possible at Touro by the Touro Foundation, is key to addressing the challenges of access to support and resources for new and expectant mothers. The Touro Baby Café is the first hospital-based Baby Café in the Gulf South. NOLA Baby Café will meet weekly at two locations: every Monday from 6:15 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. at the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Clinic located on Touro’s campus (3434 Prytania Street, Ste 105) and 6:15 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. on Tuesdays at Touro’s Bywater clinic (3322 St. Claude Ave.), excluding holidays. New and expectant mothers are invited to attend. For event information, visit Touro.com/event-calendar/. The Tulane Doctor’s vision, "Healing people, defining medicine," is supported by its mission to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research, and clinical care. Diverse and inclusive, Tulane educates medical students, scientists, health care professionals and the public, conducts biomedical research, and provides patientcentered medicine to prevent, diagnose, and treat human illness. Your family deserves the best, and you can feel confident that the doctors at Tulane are working to deliver the best quality

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healthcare to you and those you love. Whether you’re looking for life-saving treatment or just a primary care physician, choose the doctors at Tulane. Find your Tulane doctor by calling 504-988-5800, or visit TulaneDoctors.com. Tulane Doctors—healing people, defining medicine. With work underway on a new Ambulatory Surgical Center and the launch of new behavioral health and addiction recovery programs, University Medical Center New Orleans continues to expand services and increase access to care for the region. The new $14M Ambulatory Surgical Center, which will be located at the corner of South Claiborne and Tulane avenues in an existing building, will expand University Medical Center’s capacity by five surgical suites and two endoscopy rooms. Over the past 18 months, University Medical Center’s growth has included the opening of a Primary Care Center, Burn Center, and the launch of a Center for Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery and a Palliative Medicine program. Additionally, several new clinics recently launched to expand access to behavioral health and addiction treatment services, including outpatient addiction psychiatry services, integrated healthcare to treat opioid use disorders in a primary care setting, and substance abuse intensive outpatient therapy with a licensed clinical social worker. University Medical Center is a part of LCMC Health. For more information, visit UMCNO.org. •


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sponsored Jansen Plastic Surgery’s unique group of plastic surgeons offers a complete package of cutting edge surgical techniques including use of microfat in skin rejuvenation. Call 504-455-1000 to schedule your consultation today. Does your appearance reflect your inner energy? If it doesn't, consider a consultation with board certified plastic surgeons Dr. Elliott Black or Dr. Summer Black. There are a variety of surgical and non-surgical techniques available to help individuals enhance and refresh their appearance. “Surgery is not the only option these days,” Dr. Elliott Black emphasizes. “Laser technology and other developments in the cosmetic field such as Botox and fillers offer alternatives to surgery with excellent results,” Dr. Summer Black adds. “The patient benefits with little downtime and minimal or no swelling or bruising. Many non-invasive procedures also provide immediate results," she says. With a new office, the father and daughter team have expanded their facilities to house a full range of laser equipment, including SculpSure non-invasive fat melting, IPL, laser hair removal, fractionated erbium, and fractionated CO2. For information on available surgical or non-invasive cosmetic procedures, contact Dr. Elliott Black or Dr. Summer Black at 504-883-8900, or visit their office at 3798 Veterans Memorial Blvd. in Metairie.

Allergy & Immunology

Specialty Clinics

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here’s a doctor for everything—from surgeons who specialize in a particular kind of skin cancer removal to those who do joint replacements, cosmetic procedures, spinal surgery, and more. And while some practices and clinics are focused on one specialty alone, some house a variety of specialists all under one roof. Greater New Orleans is rich with highly qualified specialists in just about every field of medicine, which means that when you or a family member are in need of specific care or a particular treatment, you’ll likely find the help you need close to home. From cancer care to immunology, dentistry to dermatology, orthopedics to women’s health, specialties highlighted below may be useful to you when deciding what kind of care to seek and where. While some specialists require referrals, many do not. Explore your options and see what an abundance of gifted healthcare providers we have right here in New Orleans.

Aesthetics & Plastic Surgery Microfat use in aesthetic surgery is fast becoming one of the best methods for skin rejuvenation. The rejuvenate cell in the microfat contains millions of growth factors and other key components that, when placed directly in the affected skin area, cause restoration of the skin and surrounding tissues. The skin is able to produce more and better collagen and elastin—two key components of healthy, youthful appearing skin. This is the same science and physiology behind the use of microfat injections to promote an arthritic joint surface to repair itself when used in orthopedic surgeries. A minimal amount of fat is harvested under local anesthesia, and the microfat cells are prepared and isolated. These cells are then placed in the areas needing rejuvenation. The results appear within two months as the skin has a new luster and less wrinkly appearance. While the longevity of these rejuvenative cells is unknown, recent European studies have shown long-lasting effects. 9 4 AUGUST 2019 myneworleans.com

Alan Sheen, MD, is a well-known and highly respected allergist serving both the Northshore and Southshore regions of the New Orleans metropolitan area. A graduate of LSU’s School of Medicine in New Orleans and a known specialist in allergies and asthma, Dr. Sheen has been recognized several times as one of the city's Top Doctors by New Orleans Magazine. With a focus on immunology and allergies, Dr. Sheen's longstanding medical practice treats patients of all ages. He has a strong interest in the management of childhood and infant allergies, especially food allergies and problems with formula. Dr. Sheen also treats conditions such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, hives and related allergic conditions. He has two convenient locations to greater serve area patients. For Dr. Sheen’s Metairie office, located at 3701 Houma Blvd., call 504-456-1999. Dr. Sheen’s Covington office, located at 208 Highland Park Plaza may be reached by calling 985-2466077. Find out additional information on Dr. Sheen and his practice at DrAlanSheenAllergist.com.

Audiology Drs. Daniel Bode and Alaina Johnson at Associated Hearing have been positively impacting patients’ lives for more than 40 years. Using state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment, they evaluate patients with hearing loss and tinnitus and provide customized treatment plans based upon individualized lifestyles and listening environments. Employing the latest, cutting-edge hearing aid technology from leading manufacturers, Associated Hearing’s doctors create a personalized listening experience second to none for a more natural blend of sound. After the fitting of hearing devices, patients continue to enjoy their remarkable experience and the services they have come to expect. Your complementary consultation awaits you. Please call today to begin your journey to better hearing, or visit AssociatedHearingInc.com for more information. Associated Hearing treats patients at its Metairie (504-8334327) and Covington (985-249-5225) locations, as well as at assisted living and nursing care facilities on both sides of the lake.

Behavioral Health & Addiction Services With earlier professions in massage therapy, then biochemistry and genetics, Arwen Podesta, MD, psychiatrist, addiction specialist, holistic medicine physician and forensic psychiatrist, has merged her interests in mind-body wellness and biology by opening Podesta Wellness. Operating in Mid-City, she collaborates closely with an


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extraordinary team of providers. Tricia Brown, PLPC, received her Master’s Degree in Counselor Education in 2005. She is experienced in working with anxiety, depression, addiction, co-dependency, relationships, stress management, self-esteem/self-worth, grief and trauma. Receiving her Master's Degree from Naropa University, Tori Buckley, LPC-S utilizes mindfulness, experiential, and somatic therapies in treating clients. Tori has expertise with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, sex and gender related concerns, mood disorders, and trauma. Enrica-Anne Montalbano, a licensed massage therapist, specializes in Ortho-Bionomy, sports massage, craniosacral, and healing touch. She works well with clients with anxiety, depression, trauma, injuries, and lymphedema. Nutritionist and Functional medicine specialist, Jan Johnson, RD, LDN, CLT, helps people achieve whole health by addressing the underlying disease etiology through nutrition and habits. To inquire about an appointment, please visit PodestaWellness.com.

Cancer Care Tulane Cancer Center provides a multidisciplinary approach to cancer care with a distinguished team of experts who offer the most advanced cancer treatments and access to cutting-edge clinical trials. Radiation Oncologist Dr. Kendra Harris and the Radiation Oncology Department at Tulane provide curative therapy to patients using the best equipment and techniques. The department is excited to announce the installation of a new linear accelerator—the TruBeam®—which adds new capabilities, including breath-hold gated radiation treatment delivery. In addition, the department is receiving all new CT equipment, which will add the ability to take scans during patient breath holds, providing the data necessary to further focus radiation treatments on a patient's tumor while avoiding normal tissues. The department is also excited to welcome Dr. Audrey Dang as a faculty

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member. Dr. Dang returns home having recently finished a radiation oncology residency at UCLA. “I'm proud of and excited about the care we deliver—it’s timely, multidisciplinary, and uses the best technology available while offering clinical trials,” says Dr. Harris. For more information, call 504-988-1070. The newly expanded comprehensive Kidney and Bladder Cancer Program at Tulane Cancer Center is at the forefront of kidney and bladder cancer care in the state. The program offers access to a large number of clinical trials for kidney and bladder cancer patients in all stages of their disease. With a focus on access to care, the clinical team is able to see newly diagnosed patients in clinic within a few days and quickly develop a plan for treatment. “It’s wonderful to be able to offer patients quick access to care in addition to novel treatments they won’t find anywhere else,” says Dr. Pedro Barata. Prior to overseeing the Tulane Kidney and Bladder Cancer Program, Dr. Barata worked extensively with clinical trials at the Cleveland Clinic and at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. As a GU-focused medical oncologist, Dr. Barata specializes specifically in the management of kidney, bladder, and prostate cancers. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 504-988-1118 or email pbarata@tulane.edu. The number of treatment options facing prostate cancer patients can be confusing and daunting. And the appointments required to explore those options are often time consuming and inconvenient. That's why Tulane Health System created the Tulane Multidisciplinary Prostate Cancer Clinic, bringing patients and family members together with medical oncologists, urologic surgeons and radiation oncology specialists to discuss all options in one convenient visit. And because waiting is often the hardest part, a medical team member will speak with any patient


sponsored within 48 hours of their initial inquiry. “We’ve assembled the most experienced prostate cancer team in the Gulf South region,” says urologic surgeon Dr. Spencer Krane. “We offer the latest treatment options and cutting-edge clinical trials. We want to share this expertise with patients who need us and take away some of the stress of an incredibly stressful time.” For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 504-988-2342.

Colon & Rectal Surgery Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates is a practice dedicated to always being on the forefront of technology and patient care. With four board-certified surgeons and a highly qualified staff of nurses and administrators, Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates is a comfortable place to seek help for uncomfortable problems, everything from hemorrhoids and ulcerative colitis to fissures, fistulas, and cancers of the colon, rectum, and anus. The practice of Drs. Hildreth McCarthy, Sean Mayfield, Jennifer Silinksy, and Matthew Zelhart, Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates is also equipped to treat Crohn’s Disease, diverticulitis and diverticulosis, lower GI bleeding, infections, abscesses, and more. The practice has participated on past research projects working to reduce surgical infection and post-operative nausea and remains focused on the latest news and research. To that end, the surgeons started three new research projects last year. Conveniently located in Metairie, the practice is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday. Learn more and make an appointment by calling 504-456-5108 or visiting nolacrsa.com.

Dentistry Want a brighter, whiter smile? Drs. Kristie Reine and Edmund Ring are eager to answer your questions and help create a beautiful, brilliant smile while boosting your confidence. With a wide range of services and

advanced equipment and technology, Lakeshore Family Dentistry can help you maintain clean teeth, restore shine and whiteness to your teeth, or restore lost or damaged teeth with services such as implants. Drs. Reine and Ring are both Louisiana natives and proud graduates of LSU School of Dentistry. They are each active members of the American Dental Association, Louisiana Dental Association, and Lake Pontchartrain Study Club. Take the first step towards a more beautiful smile and call Lakeshore Family Dentistry to make an appointment with Dr. Reine or Dr. Ring. A variety of payment options ensure a beautiful, healthy smile is within reach for everyone. The practice is located at 435 Robert Boulevard in Slidell. Call 985-643-1852, and visit LakeshoreFamilyDentistry.com. For nearly 20 years, Dr. Jason Parker has been taking care of the dental needs for children of all ages with gentleness and compassion. Patients travel from within a 45-mile radius of his Metairie, Covington, and Slidell offices to see him and his incredible staff. “The key is having an energetic, friendly, experienced staff that creates a relaxed, positive and fun experience for every child,” says Dr. Parker. In 2008, Parker received the New Dentist Award from the Louisiana Dental Association. Throughout his career, he has extended care beyond his practice with a number of philanthropic endeavors. As chairman for the 2007 March of Dimes Gala, he raised $7,000 for neonatal research. Parker has also been involved in many levels of organized dentistry; he has served as chairman for Children’s Dental Health Month for the New Orleans Dental Association, helped to produce a documentary with the American Dental Association, and is a 2019 Honoree for the American Cancer Society Belles & Beaus Gala. To schedule an appointment for your child or for more information, visit DocParker4Kids.com.

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sponsored With almost 40 years of experience, Oak Family Dental, the family-run practice of Drs. Troy Sr., Jr., and Margaret Patterson has continued to adapt and grow with the advances in dental treatment. With the advent of digital dental technology, including radiology, impressions, same-day crowns, Invisalign, implants and cosmetics, this practice in Metairie has continued to excel by offering the latest and greatest dentistry has to offer. A family-run practice, this father-daughter-son dental team works together creating beautiful smiles for patients of all ages. Recognizing the wants and needs of their patients, this practice focuses on comprehensive care, with particular attention to overall health. A variety of procedures ranging from preventative to full-mouth rehabilitations, including implants, are offered. Providing top of the line procedures in house makes it more convenient for patients and reduces the overall cost. A membership plan is available for non-insurance patients, which includes preventative and emergency visits at no charge, as well as a discount on all procedures. For more information, visit OakFamilyDental. com or call 504-834-6410. All that is good begins with a smile. At Dr. Bridget Brahney Family Dentistry, your smile is a top priority. Dr. Brahney and her team are dedicated to helping you achieve and maintain long-term dental health and a beautiful smile, whether it be through routine cleanings and checkups or through finding a solution to a more complex dental concern. When you visit Dr. Bridget Brahney Family Dentistry, you will experience all that modern dentistry has to offer, including the latest advancements that reduce discomfort and expedite care. Dr. Brahney offers a comprehensive list of general, restorative, and cosmetic dental services to meet the needs of the whole family, from Velscope oral cancer screening to fillings, crowns, and tooth whitening. Not only are Dr. Brahney and her team focused on the beauty of your smile, but they’re also concerned about your health. To that end, they focus

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on thorough exams and routine cleanings. For more information about Dr. Bridget Brahney and her practice, or to schedule an appointment, visit SmileNewOrleans.com or call 504-888-6860. DeFelice Dental is committed to a conservative approach in patient care—focusing on preventative measures and maintenance as well as on patient education. They provide top quality care in a relaxed atmosphere. For patients who may require more complex treatment, the DeFelice Dental team provides comprehensive care with a gentle, caring touch. Services provided at the practice include gentle cleanings, tooth-colored fillings, nonsurgical gum care, teeth whitening, porcelain veneers, natural looking crowns, and implants. In addition to visual cancer screenings completed during appointments, Velscope oral cancer early detection technology is available for patients needing or requesting more advanced screening. Prior to leading his team at DeFelice Dental, Dr. Tre DeFelice worked as the Clinical Director of a unique specialty practice in New Orleans, where he planned, delivered, and coordinated patient treatment along with a team of dental specialists, gaining tremendous experience and knowledge along the way. Dr. DeFelice spends many hours in continuing education to advance in areas of comprehensive patient care, esthetics, and dental implants. DeFelice Dental is conveniently located on at 1900 N. Causeway Blvd. near I-10. For more information, visit DeFeliceDental.net or call 504-833-4300. From her beautiful, historic Uptown office, Dr. Elizabeth Riggs practices both restorative and cosmetic dentistry. She performs every procedure to the highest standard
while expertly creating beautiful life-like porcelain veneers, crowns, bonding, and implant/tooth replacement procedures. Additionally, she administers dermal fillers and Botox


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sponsored injections, emphasizing quality and comfort, to enhance the framework of her patients’ smiles. Dr. Riggs also offers platelet therapy, a modern and effective procedure that promotes healing after dental and oral surgery. She has received numerous awards and accolades for her transformative work and her outstanding dedication to her patients, including the “Excellence in Cosmetic Dentistry Award” from the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. She is empathetic and effective, truly dedicating her life’s work to fulfilling her patients’ goals for beautiful, healthy smiles. For more information, call 504-891-1115 or visit SmilesByRiggs.com. The practice is located at 3442 Magazine Street in New Orleans. A family and team of native New Orleanians, Tufton Family Dentistry is the practice of Dr. Peter Tufton, who works side-by-side with his wife, a dental hygienist, and his son, Dr. Michael Tufton. Dr. Peter Tufton founded the practice in the ‘70s and offers decades of invaluable dental experience. A comfortable and inviting space for patients of all ages, Tufton Family Dentistry is equipped with advanced technology to provide outstanding care. They use the Trios 3D scanner for digital impressions, intraoral cameras, and digital x-rays for more accurate diagnoses. DentalVibe is used by the practice for pain-free injections. Each treatment room is equipped with a touch-screen computer, which allows patients the opportunity to see firsthand the images of their teeth while discussing the diagnosis and treatment process directly with doctors. The wide range of services offered by Tufton Family Dentistry include implants, veneers, and botox. Tufton Family Dentistry offers affordable care and several financing options. Visit Tuftondds.com for more information. At Clearview Dental Care, Dr. Eva Jessup wants her patients to feel at home and comfortable while receiving the quality dental care they deserve.

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The Clearview Dental Care team offers comprehensive general dentistry services for the entire family—everything from routine cleanings to toothcolored fillings, crowns, bridges, dentures, partials, veneers and implants. With over 21 years of experience practicing in the Metairie area, Dr. Jessup remains committed to excellence in all areas of her practice, from utilizing advanced technologies and procedures to continued education for herself and her entire staff. A New Orleans native, Dr. Jessup is a graduate of Archbishop Chapelle High School, LSU Baton Rouge and LSU School of Dentistry. She completed her general practice residency at Charity Hospital and an externship at Guy’s Hospital in London, England. Clearview Dental Care is located at 2221 Clearview Parkway in Metairie. Interest-free financing is available for qualified patients and senior citizen discounts are also available. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 504-455-1667 or visit ClearviewDentalCare.com.

Dermatology & Skincare Services At The Skin Surgery Centre, Dr. Keith LeBlanc, Jr., Dr. Elizabeth Bucher and Dr. Corey Rougelot are fellowship-trained in Mohs micrographic surgery, the most effective and advanced treatment for skin cancer today. This gold-standard treatment modality offers the highest potential for cure even if the skin cancer has been previously treated by another method. Using the Mohs method, the surgeons at The Skin Surgery Centre are able to remove as little skin as necessary to cure the cancer. Their training includes advanced reconstruction techniques to achieve an excellent cosmetic result. Patients go from cancer to cure and repair, all in a state-of-the-art facility, usually in just one day. The Skin Surgery Centre—your skin cancer and Mohs surgery experts with locations in greater New Orleans, the Northshore, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. If you or a loved one has


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sponsored questions or concerns about skin cancer and skin cancer prevention, contact your board certified dermatologist right away. If you are facing a skin cancer diagnosis, you could be a good candidate for Mohs micrographic surgery. Innovators in the treatment of skin diseases, faculty physicians at Tulane University Department of Dermatology provide cutting-edge general dermatology care as well as advanced treatment of complicated dermatological problems. Led by Erin Boh, MD, PhD, the department offers expert treatments for psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and cosmetic dermatology. Their physicians also provide phototherapy, photopheresis, and unique biologic-targeted treatments for skin diseases in addition to mole mapping, a photographic service for individuals with numerous moles, melanoma, and those possibly at risk for melanoma. Tulane Dermatology works in consultation with many physicians to ensure that each patient receives the best possible treatments. All patients have access to highly specialized care in addition to general dermatology. No matter the health concern, Tulane Dermatology is the go-to destination for skincare and concerns that go deeper than the surface. Tulane specialists’ ability to overlap into the other medical fields allows for bigpicture care and better, quicker outcomes. To schedule an appointment, call 1-504-988-1700 (Downtown) or 985893-1291 (Covington). Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center specializes in cosmetic dermatologic procedures that include facial injectables, laser treatments, body contouring, and cellulite reduction. Co-owned by boardcertified dermatologists Dr. Lisa Donofrio and Dr. Kyle Coleman, Etre Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center is equipped to provide patients with anything from subtle changes to dramatic results. In addition to

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rejuvenation with Botox, Fillers and Lasers, Etre also specializes in non-and minimally invasive body contouring procedures like Coolsculpting, Laser Liposuction and Cellulaze. “Because we offer both non-invasive and minimally invasive surgical body contouring procedures, we are able to tailor treatment to each patient's specific problems,” says Dr. Coleman. “When it comes to cosmetic procedures, there is no one-size-fits-all,” he says. Drs. Coleman and Donofrio use cutting-edge therapies along with combination treatments to optimize their patient results. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit EtreCosmeticDerm.com or call 504-227-3873.

Gastroenterology Metropolitan Gastroenterology Associates (MGA) has provided state of the art gastroenterology care to the greater New Orleans community for the past 36 years. The practice started with four gastroenterologists in 1983 and now has 25 gastroenterologists and four physician assistants servicing the city from three convenient locations in Metairie, Uptown, and on the Westbank. In addition to providing painless colonoscopy with the assistance of staff anesthetists, MGA is on the cutting edge of all new GI modalities. The staff includes sub-specialists additionally trained in advanced endoscopic procedures and hepatology. MGA has been the city’s premier GI group for 36 years and is poised to continue this tradition. Compassionate, superior care is just a call away. Call 504-349-6401 for a prompt consultation at any location.

Hair Restoration “Surgical advancements in hair restoration have really evolved,” says Dr. Nicole Rogers. “From 1950s plugs until now, it’s like we've moved from the horse and buggy to a sleek modern racecar,” she says.


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sponsored Dr. Rogers explains that as follicular groupings get smaller, results are more and more natural. Although the traditional linear strip still delivers quality follicles, FUE (follicular unit excision) now allows for harvesting hair without leaving a linear scar. Men who prefer a shaved back of the head in hot weather love the styling flexibility. Besides hair surgery, Dr. Rogers offers numerous medical therapies including platelet rich plasma (PRP), finasteride, dutasteride, spironolactone, and minoxidil. Additionally, she has a dedicated photo room to help track patients’ hair regrowth over time. Usually, six to twelve months are enough to start seeing results. Dr. Rogers is a board certified dermatologist with fellowship training in hair transplantation in Manhattan. She has lectured and published extensively and enjoys working with dermatology residents at Tulane and LSU. Her Metairie-based practice, Hair Restoration of the South, is devoted exclusively to hair restoration for men and women. Call 504-315-4247 or visit HairRestorationoftheSouth.com for more information.

Hand Surgery For over 40 years, the physicians and staff of The Hand Center of Louisiana have pursued a passion for patient-centered care. A one-stop shop for all medical and surgical services for patients with upper extremity conditions, the Hand Center is proud of their facility upgrade, and excited to bring the Therapy Center back under one roof. With comprehensive services all-in-one facility, the Hand Center of Louisiana is the leading provider in the region. Board certified Hand Center surgeons are widely recognized for their expertise and successful outcomes. Using the most current approaches in surgical and non-surgical treatments, they develop a plan of care suited to each individual patient.

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Certified Hand Therapists at The Hand Therapy Center use advanced techniques and protocols for post-operative management of surgical patients. Therapists are often able to move patients into therapy more quickly, resulting in earlier clinical results and recovery. At The Center for Rheumatology and Neurological Testing, advanced diagnostic tools such as ultrasound imaging, Bone Mineral Density, and Nerve Conduction Studies are being used to customize treatments. For information and scheduling, visit HandCenterofLouisiana.com.

Internal Medicine & Geriatrics The faculty of Tulane University’s Section of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics are dedicated to providing high quality patient health care and resident education through several clinical programs and locations across New Orleans, including Tulane Medical Center, University Medical Center, and the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care. Their Internal Medicine clinics provide excellent care in the areas of wellness, prevention, management of chronic illness, and acute care for adults. Faculty are trained in a variety of areas such as ambulatory medicine, geriatrics, hospital medicine, medicine-pediatrics, palliative care, and preventative health care. To find a clinic near you, visit Tulane.edu/som and select Medicine under Departments. Under General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics, you can find additional information. Schedule an appointment by calling 504-988-1001 (Tulane Internal Medicine Practice), 504-988-8050 (Metairie-Lakeside Hospital) or 504-988-9000 (Tulane-Uptown Square).

Multispecialty Health Care Centers CrescentCare provides whole-person health services to anyone living in the greater New Orleans area, regardless of income, insurance, or any other circumstance. So often, all sorts of barriers to care stop New


sponsored Orleanians from accessing vital health services—especially those who work in the service industry or who are part of the LGBTQ community. That’s why as a Federally Qualified Health Center, CrescentCare is dedicated to serving the unique needs of those individuals. It doesn’t stop there—to anyone who needs services, CrescentCare offers primary care, dentistry, behavioral health, OB-GYN, gender-related care, pediatrics, sexual health services, insurance/Medicaid enrollment assistance, and so much more, all on a sliding scale. Building on over 30 years of history as the NO/AIDS Task Force, CresentCare is also a leader in HIV care in Southeast Louisiana. CrescentCare operates facilities across the city and continues to expand its reach to care for more New Orleanians. For more information, visit CrescentCare.org or call 504-821-2601. Stuck with long delays in getting care? High copays? St. Thomas Community Health Center can help. With their affordable, incomebased sliding scale, you can receive care with or without insurance. Since 1987, St. Thomas Community Health Center has continued its mission of providing comprehensive primary care to the community regardless of ability to pay. As a Federally Qualified Health Center and Patient-Centered Medical Home, their robust teams of dedicated providers work to address individual health needs and ensure delivery of the highest quality of care. Completing their 31st year of providing the community with primary care, pediatrics, OB-GYN, optometry, behavioral health, and mammography, St. Thomas now offers same-day and next-day cardiology appointments at the new St. Thomas Heart and Vascular Center. All St. Thomas sites offer same-day and next-day appointment scheduling with office hours from 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday-Friday. Call 504-529-5558 to schedule an appointment for basic services at any of their eight convenient locations. For the St. Thomas Heart and Vascular Center,

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call 504-529-9115.

Ophthalmology Eyecare Associates physicians are excited about new cataract surgery technology, now available for New Orleans area patients. The Catalys Precision Laser System is designed to make cataract surgery safer and more accurate, while new lens implant options, such as the latest in multifocal and extended focus intraocular lenses, provide patients with the bestcorrected vision for both distance and near at the same time. The Ora System, used at the time of surgery, delivers the most accurate calculation for determining the power of the intraocular lens implanted. In addition to the new technology offered for cataract patients, Eyecare is excited to offer a non-dilated thorough retinal examination with the OPTOS ultra-wide retinal imaging system. This system allows physicians to detect diseases such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and even cancer much earlier than previous options have allowed. Optometrists at Eyecare Associates offer the latest options in daily wear contact lenses that are known for exceptional comfort and clear vision. Patients have access to comprehensive routine and medical examinations as well as refractive surgery, glaucoma treatment and retina services and procedures. For more information, call 504-455-9825 or visit EyeCareNewOrleans.com.

Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Serving the West Bank and Greater New Orleans region, Westside Orthopaedic Clinic provides superior general orthopaedic treatment with a specialty in spinal care. The clinic has been in operation since 1961, making it one of the longest standing orthopaedic clinics in the city.


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sponsored Dr. Ralph. Katz is a board certified and fellowship trained orthopedic specialist who has performed over 500 minimally invasive procedures with consistently excellent outcomes. For the right patient who has failed conservative treatment (e.g. medication, physical therapy, injections), a minimally invasive microdiscectomy can be done in an outpatient setting with an incision that can be covered by a band-aid. The procedure typically takes less than an hour. Most patients can return to normal activities within three to six weeks. Additionally, Dr. Katz performs cervical and lumbar spinal fusions, utilizing small incisions with minimally invasive systems. He is one of few local surgeons who perform both cervical and lumbar disc replacements. Westside offers full-service, in-house x-rays, as well as physical therapy services with access to new rehabilitation equipment. Same day appointments can be accommodated. For more information, visit WestsideOrtho.com or call 504-347-0243. At Southern Orthopaedic Specialists, patients experience care that goes above and beyond normal expectations. A group of seven orthopaedic surgeons, six physical therapists, and a hand therapist, Southern Orthopaedic Specialists offers prompt, comprehensive Orthopaedic care to Greater New Orleans with locations in Uptown (2731 Napoleon Avenue) and Metairie (1615 Metairie Road). Each Physician not only specializes in Orthopaedic Surgery but also has a sub-specialty as well. Their specialties and sub-specialties include: General Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine, Total Joint Replacements and Revisions, Upper Extremity, Hand, Shoulder, Foot and Ankle, and Back and Spine Care/Surgery. This level of advanced specialization allows Southern Orthopaedic Specialists to provide the absolute best treatment for patients. As a team, they can treat just about any orthopaedic problem. Southern Orthopedics is excited to welcome Dr. Ryan Charles and Dr. Jourdan Cancienne. For more information, visit SOSNewOrleans.com. Both locations are

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easily accessible and provide complimentary parking. For all departments, as well as scheduling, call 504-897-6351. They accept all major health insurance plans and worker’s compensation insurance plans. Metairie Orthopedics & Sports Medicine is the new clinical practice location of long-established orthopedic surgeon and New Orleans native, Dr. R. Douglas Bostick III. Although he has developed a reputation as a “shoulder specialist,” he specializes in Sports Medicine and is proficient at arthroscopic and minimally invasive surgery of both upper and lower extremities. Dr. Bostick prides himself on staying on top of the latest surgical and non-surgical orthopedic treatments. His expertise includes emerging technology such as PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma), Adipose Cell Therapy (commonly referred to as "Stem Cells") and state-of-the-art arthroscopy procedures to quickly repair a variety of orthopedic conditions. These techniques give his patients the best possible results with the quickest recovery time and little to no hospitalization. Additionally, the practice offers ultrasound guided injections and minimally invasive surgery. Dr. Bostick is also a trusted surgeon for worker’s compensation and litigation support and has extensive experience testifying as an expert in the field of orthopedics. Metairie Orthopedic & Sports Medicine is located at 3001 Division Street, Suite 204, in Metairie. To learn more or to schedule a consultation, visit MetairieSportsMed.com or call 504-541-5800. Tulane Orthopaedics is proud to announce the opening of Tulane Doctors – Sports Medicine Plus. Located at 7030 Canal Blvd. in New Orleans, the clinic marks a new effort to provide greater access in a residential area with a full service office and extended hours. Tulane Doctors – Sports Medicine Plus will be open for physician visits from 3 – 8 p.m. during the week, “plus” Saturday mornings and 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. on Wednesdays. If your insurance allows specialist visits without a referral, you are welcome to just walk in. The clinic also, of course,


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sponsored offers scheduled appointments. At least 90% of the time you will be seen by a physician, the same ones you are accustomed to seeing at the Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine and at Tulane Medical Center. Additionally, the clinic offers daily full service Physical Therapy provided by Team Exos, a national leader in PT and Sports Performance Training. For more info, go to SportsMedicinePlus.com or call 504-988-0100. One of the region’s top orthopaedic surgeons, Dr. Neil Maki practices in Thibodaux and is on staff at Thibodaux Regional Medical Center. He and his orthopaedic staff insure that patients’ individual needs are met by the most effective means. Dr. Maki specializes in the shoulder and has pioneered many shoulder arthroscopic procedures including obtaining patents on arthroscopic instrumentation. He also performs joint replacements and is one of few specialists in the region who performs endoscopic carpal tunnel (wrist) and endoscopic cubital tunnel (elbow) surgery. Board-certified in both orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, Dr. Maki is also fellowship trained in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery. He has served on the medical staff of the New Orleans Saints and the Nicholls State University athletic programs. Dr. Maki holds a distinction as a Clinical Professor in Orthopaedics and Honorary Alumnus at LSU Medical School. He may be reached by calling 985-446-6284.

Obstetrics & Gynecology Selecting an OB/GYN is a very important choice, and Touro hopes to make that choice a little easier. Whether you are becoming a mother for the first time, expanding your growing family, or looking for a doctor for annual wellness and pre- or post-menopausal health needs, Touro OB/GYNs offer unique, comprehensive care to women at every stage of life. The extensive OB/GYN services at Touro include comprehensive

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gynecology for adolescents and adults, family planning and contraceptive, peri/postmenopausal care, preconception counseling, prenatal, birth, postpartum care, and STI testing and counseling. Additionally, the practice is pleased to offer midwifery services to patients. Their Certified-Nurse Midwives help care for women across their lifespan and assist expectant mothers with their individualized birth plan. Midwives are available to care for patients at Touro’s Uptown, Mid-City, West Bank, and St. Claude locations. Touro offers eleven convenient clinic locations throughout Greater New Orleans with delivery at Touro’s Family Birthing Center—“the place where babies come from.” Learn more at Touro.com/obgyn or call 504-897-7197. Around the age of 52, most women will go through menopause, a typically 3-7 year process in which the ovaries stop producing estrogen and progesterone hormones. During this time, periods become infrequent and eventually stop altogether. Unpleasant symptoms that can accompany menopause include hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and pain with intercourse. If symptoms are severe, a gynecologist will often recommend a temporary course of hormone replacement. According to Dr. Jessica Shank, Gynecologic Oncologist at Tulane Cancer Center, menopausal women and postmenopausal women should talk with their gynecologist about proper courses of treatment for the symptoms and effects of menopause, as hormone replacement doses will differ for women who have and haven’t had a hysterectomy. “If a woman ever experiences vaginal bleeding after stopping her periods, she needs to be evaluated by her OBGYN for precancerous cells or cancer of the endometrium regardless of whether she has taken hormones or not,” says Dr. Shank. Schedule an appointment with Dr. Shank or another Tulane OB/GYN downtown at the Tulane Cancer Center by calling 504-988-6300 or in Metairie at the Tulane Center for Women’s Health by calling 504-988-2160.


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Pain Management Southern Pain & Neurological is happy to offer Superion Indirect Decompression System, a new, minimally invasive approach to treat lumbar stenosis that fits in the gap of treatment offerings between conservative care and invasive surgery. FDA approved and covered by Medicare, this outpatient treatment is especially helpful for older patients and those not able to tolerate more invasive laminectomy to treat significant limitation in walking or continuous standing. Clinical trials indicated 90% patient satisfaction through 60 months. Successful reduction in leg pain was rated at 75% for Superion, which was better than a laminectomy and for the same evaluation period. Doctors Paul Hubbell, Barry Faust, and Donald Richardson understand that chronic pain, especially stenosis and resultant claudication, creates a prison for patients, which disables them from an active lifestyle. The stress from the walking and standing pain negatively affect personalities and decreases freedom. If you are suffering from chronic pain, contact Southern Pain and find out if the Superion minimally invasive indirect decompression system or something else is right for you. For information and scheduling at the Metairie, Marrero and Covington office, please call 1-800-277-1265.

Pediatrics Collins Pediatrics strives to provide the highest level of personal and professional care to patients and their families. Founded by Keith and Jennifer Collins in 2005, Collins Pediatrics has grown from a three-person team to two offices with five doctors, one NP, twenty RNs, and a large support staff of professionals who attend competently, politely, and efficiently to patient needs. Many of Collins Pediatrics’ providers and staff are parents themselves and know firsthand the primary importance of a child’s well-being and health. The practice offers convenient, same-day sick appointments.

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“We appreciate your trust in this practice and respond by providing exceptional care for your children from birth through young adulthood. It is the goal of the practice for everyone to leave our office feeling good, despite illness,” says Dr. Heather Porche. A longtime Collins pediatrician, Dr. Porche purchased the practice after the passing of Dr. Keith Collins. Collins Pediatrics has offices located in Old Metairie and in Lakeview. For more information, visit CollinsPediatrics.com. To make an appointment, call 504-832-8022.

Urology Has someone you love been diagnosed with prostate cancer, kidney cancer, or bladder cancer? The Department of Urology at Tulane University Medical Center, a national leader in providing minimally invasive surgical procedures for various urologic maladies, stands at the forefront of cancer treatment through state-of-the-art robotic procedures, breakthrough treatments, and research. Tulane Urology is proud to be recognized as the first and most experienced robotic urologic surgical center in the entire Gulf South. Using the daVinci high-definition robot, Tulane Urology’s expertly trained surgeons offer patients a highly advanced therapeutic option for cancer treatment. This cutting-edge, minimally invasive surgical technology, combined with the extensive experience of the Tulane Urology team, has made Tulane Urology the go-to center for the treatment of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancers. Visit MyProstateCancer.com and TulaneUrology.com for more information on the various treatments and procedures offered at Tulane Urology. Call 504-988-2536 to schedule an appointment or get a second opinion today. •


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Cutting-edge Health

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f you are living in pain, whether physical or emotional, a single breakthrough in medicine could have a life-changing impact on your ability to enjoy life and navigate its challenges. Physicians, surgeons, and researchers are constantly looking for ways to solve medical mysteries and develop new procedures and treatments to alleviate pain and cure or treat problematic health conditions. Local healthcare providers strive to offer the best in cutting-edge options for patients suffering from a variety of issues. Brain, spine, and neurological conditions as well as behavioral health problems such as depression and anxiety are just a few of the areas in which local healthcare professional are working to provide new, advanced solutions. Check out the offerings of the following centers, surgeons, clinics, and physicians, and learn about the latest cutting-edge health services available here in New Orleans.

“This state-of-the-art procedure is supported by the highest level of medical evidence available for a medical device. Mobi-C offers patients who suffer from two-level cervical disease a superior treatment option to traditional cervical spine fusion that maintains motion,” says Dr. Thomas. Physicians at SBS treat all spine and brain-related problems, specializing in brain microsurgery and cutting-edge, minimally invasive procedures. The practice’s five neurosurgeons include Drs. Lucien Miranne, Jr., Everett Robert, Jr., Najeeb Thomas, Manish Singh and Rand Voorhies. Additionally, Dr. Justin Lundgren specializes in non-surgical spine care and EMG-nerve conduction testing, and Dr. Kevin Martinez’s specialty is interventional pain management. The practice is conveniently located in Metairie at 3798 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 200. SBS participates in all major insurance plans and can typically arrange same-day or next-day appointments. For information and scheduling, call 504-454-0141, Ext. 1 or visit sbsdoc.net.

Brain & Spine Tulane University School of Medicine’s Center for Clinical Neurosciences is dedicated to providing the highest quality patient-centered care by combining cutting-edge technology with personalized attention. The center allows for faster consults between physicians who specialize in different neuroscience disciplines and provides an improved continuity of care for neuro patients. The center, in partnership with the world-class physicians at Tulane University School of Medicine’s Center for Neurosciences, offers the expertise and capabilities to effectively diagnose and treat spine, brain, and neurological conditions. To continue their tradition of excellence and expertise in providing the best quality care, education and research are integrated through the combined resources of Tulane University Hospital and Clinics and the Tulane School of Medicine. The Center for Clinical Neurosciences operates an outpatient clinic located in Tulane Hospital that can be reached at 504-988-5561. Visit online at TulaneNeurosciences.com. Surgeons at Southern Brain & Spine (SBS) are excited to announce a new option for patients who previously required fusion surgery for replacing diseased disks in the back. Unlike fusion surgery, Mobi-C® Cervical Disc replaces diseased discs in the neck and is designed to maintain motion. 1 1 4 AUGUST 2019 myneworleans.com

Psychiatry At Atlas Psychiatry, psychiatrists Dr. Nicholas Pejic and Dr. Lauren LaRose work tirelessly to get you or your child well. They and their astute team of psychologists and social workers work together, harnessing a wide range of expertise to make a precise diagnosis and comprehensive treatment plan. Their full range of services and advanced technologies includes psychological testing, individual therapy, group therapy, couples therapy, psychiatric genetic testing, medication, Ketamine Therapy (SPRAVATO™), and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). Atlas Psychiatry offers two cutting-edge, highly effective treatments for depression when traditional medications haven’t worked. TMS is a non-invasive outpatient procedure in which the brain is stimulated using soft magnetic pulses. Dr. Pejic uses an advanced localizing technique and faster frequency allowing for shorter and more costeffective treatments than typical TMS. SPRAVATO™ (es-ketamine) nasal spray is administered in-office and produces rapid and sustainable improvements in mood. Both TMS and SPRAVATO™ are safe and do not cause side effects that are commonly associated with antidepressants, such as weight gain or sexual problems. For more information, visit AtlasPsychiatry.com or call 504-899-1682. •


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what mortgage product is the best fit for you. Fortunately, First American Bank’s new physician’s home loan program is designed to help put you in your dream home faster than you ever thought possible. Whether you are looking to buy or build, First American Bank has a product that can help. The bank offers competitive rates and terms with financing options up to 100 percent with no private mortgage insurance. First American Bank will never sell your loan, so you can rely on the highest level of professional and local customer service that the bank is known for. Speak to one of First American Bank’s experienced lenders today at (800) 738-BANK (2265), or visit the bank online at FABT.com to learn more and find the branch location nearest you. [Member FDIC, Equal Housing Lender]

Scrubs & Uniforms

Resources for Home & Health

H

ome and health are perhaps the two main pillars that support our lives, lifestyles, and families, and whether you’re trying to lose weight and be more active or find retirement living for your next chapter in life, these are decisions that have a large impact on your future. The following resources for improving home and health may provide a solution to one of your needs and may be, literally, just what the doctor ordered. And speaking of doctors, healthcare professionals require resources as well. From special lending products to comfortable, long-lasting scrubs and uniforms, various businesses in the metro region are here to help make the busy lives of healthcare professionals less complicated and more convenient. Improve your home and health this summer, and check out the following local options for banking, uniforms, weight loss, retirement living, insurance, and much more.

Resources for Healthcare Professionals Mortgages & Lending First American Bank understands that as a medical professional, you stay busy and don’t often have time to research 1 1 6 AUGUST 2019 myneworleans.com

Scrub Stop is your locally owned, one-stop shop for the latest styles and fabrics of the uniform industry. The properties of today’s fabrics offer anti-microbial features, are stain resistant and moisture wicking, allow spandex movement, and have colorfast qualities. Even Scrub Stop’s professional-wear shoes offer fashion and comfort for your feet with lively prints and solids to add variety to your uniform. The Scrub Stop team believes that looking good and loving what you wear will uplift not only your appearance but also your spirit! Other products offered at Scrub Stop include chef wear, medical accessories, slip-resistant shoes, hosiery, nursing school uniforms, medical and black-and-gold-themed jewelry, embroidery, and logo services. They are competitively priced with a slogan that states “Everyday Discounted Prices.” Open 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. on Saturdays, Scrub Stop is located at 1213 Eastridge Drive in Slidell. Though located in Slidell, Scrub Stop has serviced Greater New Orleans, St. Tammany and Tangipahoa Parishes, and parts of Mississippi since 2004. Call 985-661-8998 and email scrubstop@ bellsouth.net for more info. Like Scrub Stop on Facebook for monthly specials. Online shopping coming soon. Uniforms by Bayou is a family-owned business celebrating over 40 years of serving the uniform needs of regional healthcare professionals. Uniforms by Bayou offers a complete line of nursing uniforms, shoes and accessories, as well as chef wear, corporate apparel, and monograming. They offer the largest selection of styles, colors, and fabrics in the south. The company is proudly home to the designers and manufacturers of the new, exclusive IRG scrub line. Stop at one of the Bayou stores and try on the new Elevate and Edge collection by IRG. IRG is changing the industry with unique fabrics and styles at very competitive prices. With locations in Covington, Baton Rouge, Mobile, Marrero, and their newest state-of-the-art uniform outlet in Metairie, they offer easy access for all of Greater New Orleans along with superior customer service delivered by highly trained sales consultants. Contact Uniforms by Bayou at 1-800-222-8164 to have one of their professional sales staff visit your group for an on-site visit, or stop by one of the five retail outlets for a truly pleasant shopping experience.

Home & Health Resources for All Weight Loss After pursuing her own journey in weight loss and experiencing remarkable success, Registered Nurse Peggy Rodriguez became passionate about helping others get and stay healthy. Since founding


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sponsored EveryBody Wellness in 2008, Peggy has built lifelong relationships with clients by educating them on how to both lose weight and maintain it. “Losing weight is intimate and can be an intimidating process. There is no single path that works for everyone, and everyone’s goals are different,” says Peggy. The Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method at Everybody Wellness is scientifically proven—it is dependable, repeatable, and predictable. Based on the principles of being a low calorie, low carb, low fat, and “right amount of” protein protocol, the program helps clients lose fat pounds while maintaining muscle mass. Everbody Wellness’s team of registered nurses, dieticians, nutritionists and certified weight loss coaches educate clients in the understanding of the impact food has on the body, the mechanism that helps lose fat, and the food combinations that may lead to fat storage. To learn more and read success stories, visit EverybodyWellnessNola.com. Mention this article and receive a complimentary consultation and body composition analysis.

Retirement Living As an award-winning and full-service retirement community, Lambeth House offers the best of all worlds—Independent Living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care, and Memory Care in the event it’s ever needed. With an exceptional approach to living and a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities including the fitness center with a stunning indoor, salt-water swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options, and engaging activities and social events. Nonresidents (55+) can access Fitness Center memberships, and Lambeth House’s Wild

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Azalea Café is open to the public for breakfast and lunch, TuesdaySaturday. Nestled in the heart of Uptown and overlooking the Mississippi River and Audubon Park, Lambeth House offers luxurious accommodations and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its last expansion. For more information or a tour of the community, call 504-8651960 or visit LambethHouse.com. Poydras Home is a Life Plan Community offering independent living, assisted living, and nursing care in the heart of Uptown New Orleans. Poydras Home is known for its quality of care and innovative programs that allow residents to enjoy life to the fullest with emphasis on including residents experiencing Alzheimer’s and dementia. “Poydras Home has tapped into the New Orleans arts community to bring exceptional depth and variety to these residents,” says CEO Erin Kolb. Music is a big part of life at Poydras Home. Poydras Home has forged a relationship with Loyola University and integrated Music Therapy student internships into its Life Enrichment Program for residents. Music Therapy students are paired with individual Poydras Home residents. The students complete a song history with their resident, perform/listen to each song together, and engage in discussion about the song and any memories the resident may have associated with it. The students then create a song booklet for the resident to keep with lyrics and notes from their conversations. The students also create playlists for the resident for more relaxation or reminiscence. For more information, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-897-0535.


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In-Home Care This year, Dependable In-Home Care celebrates 50 successful years of providing proven dependability through referrals of quality caregivers at affordable costs. As the only nationally accredited caregiver registry in the region, Dependable In-Home Care holds high standards for caregivers. Accreditation requires caregivers have a minimum of two years of experience, a national background check, drug screen, TB test, and carry professional liability insurance. “No other caregiver service in the area can boast our credentials. We provide access to a vetted pool of nearly 175 experienced professional caregivers, certified nursing assistants, and LPNs,” says Joni Friedmann-Lagasse, Owner. With over 100,000 successful referrals, Dependable In-Home Care has helped thousands of families find the high-level companionship and support their loved one needs, from daily activities like meal prep and transportation to bathing, dressing, and mobility assistance. After experiencing first-hand the challenges families face when caring for a loved one, Joni’s mother founded Dependable in 1969, and Joni has been at the helm for over 40 years. A founding member of the CRSB accreditation board, Joni served as its Chairmen from 2012-2014. For more information, visit DependableCare.net or call 504-486-5044 or 985-690-6353. Home Instead offers peace of mind for families of aging adults who wish to remain in the home. A local franchise owned by a New Orleans native, Home Instead offers the added benefit of staff who understand New Orleans’ culture and hospitality. Home Instead New Orleans has a team of fully trained CAREGiversSM who provide the care and companionship your loved one deserves. CAREGivers provide support through non-medical services like meal preparation,

transportation, personal care, medication reminders, and more, while working in tandem when needed with healthcare providers, home health, and hospice. “Most older adults want to stay home, the place they know and love,” says Owner Lisa Rabito. “Our focus is to build relationships first.” Available from eight hours a week to 24 hours a day, CAREGivers can take your loved one to church, the salon, and their weekly bridge game, or care for bed-bound clients who need full personal care, all while providing safety and companionship. Aging adults no longer in the home can also request Home Instead services at the retirement community or nursing facility where they reside. For more information, visit HomeInstead.com/339 or call 504-455-4911.

Health Insurance Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is devoted to its mission to improve the health and lives of Louisianians. Founded in New Orleans in 1934, the company remains committed to those roots with a new office in the Central Business District and a full-service, regional office in Metairie. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana has offices in every major Louisiana city to serve its customers. In 2019, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana was recognized by Points of Light as a 2019 honoree of The Civic 50, the 50 most community-minded companies in the United States, and by the Baton Rouge Area Chamber as a 2019 Diversity Star. The company invites all Louisianians to visit its website at www.bcbsla.com Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. It is a private mutual company, owned by its policyholders, with an independent Louisiana Board of Directors and no shareholders.

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Planning & Arrangements Jacob Schoen & Son has been a member of the community and served its greater New Orleans family for close to 150 years. Located in Mid-City on Canal Street, the beautiful, architecturally stunning home and designated city landmark has been a preferred location to gather for life’s milestone moments for generations of New Orleanians. The recent addition by managing partner Patrick Schoen of an equally stunning 5,000-squarefoot chapel with ample parking offers families the ease and comfort of services on site and simplifies the event planning process. The Schoen family extends their home to you and your family as it continues its tradition of offering exceptional services in an exquisite location. Their experienced staff is committed to working with you and your vision and passionate about making your event whether it is a celebration of life, love, or other event memorable for many years to come. For information, visit SchoenFH.com, call 504-482-1111, or email wecare@schoenfh.com.

Pharmacies Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy and the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long-term care as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Long Term Care, and Consultant Pharmacy Services. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Boulevard in Metairie. For more information, call 504-889-7070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.”

Blood Donation Did you know that every three seconds someone needs blood? A non-profit community service organization, The Blood Center has a long-standing tradition of providing quality blood products to over 30 regional health facilities. Blood shortages typically occur during the summer season when schools are out and families are taking vacations. Your business or organization could help combat shortages—donating blood is a great team building exercise for organizations both big and small. If you can get 25 or more people sign up to save a life, The Blood Center will help you host a blood drive and send a team to your business, school, civic, or religious center. If you’re a small group, visiting one of their dozen fixed site locations in Southeastern Louisiana or Southern Mississippi is easy and convenient. Visit TheBloodCenter.org to find a blood drive or donor center near you, and consider calling 800-86-BLOOD to organize your own blood drive. •

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The Menu

jeffery johnston photo

TABLE TALK . RESTAURANT INSIDER . FOOD . LAST CALL . DINING LISTINGS

Chicken Taco and Farmer Taco on Blue Corn with Salted Cantaloupe Aqua Fresca Cocktail at Barracuda Taco


table talk

meet the chef

Fish Taco with Canary Beans and Mezcal Margarita Cocktail

A Fresh Taco Take Barracuda Tacos and Tortillas

Barracuda owner Brett Jones fell in love with tacos on a trip to Mexico City as a teenager. He worked through a series of restaurants in college, where he also played in a band. After gigs he’d cook tacos for the after-parties. He picked up business experience working with Dinner Lab and, later, helping open the Ace Hotel. Along the way he got burned out with high-end dining and decided to do something casual. “I wanted a place where people could just come to relax and enjoy a Margarita,” he said. “Have something well-made but simple and at a good value.”

by Jay Forman

What happens when taco appreciation,

culinary curiosity and entrepreneurship come together in a new restaurant concept? For Dinner Lab and Ace Hotel alum Brett Jones, the result is Barracuda.

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Already popular with families, hospitality types and millennials, this blink-and-you-miss-it Tchoupitoulas taco stand looks small from the street but unfolds hacienda-like into a huge backyard. The covered and al fresco seating is cooled by

jeffery johnston photo


‘Cajun AC’ – i.e. fans blowing over feel healthy,” Brett shrugged. Of blocks of ice. For Jones, love of note – while the other tacos will the taco was instilled early. “Tacos change, the fish is locked down. are the reason I started cooking in “It was a surprise hit. It looks like the first place,” he explained. “I the fish taco is going to stay the took a trip to Mexico City when I way it is forever.” was 16 years old and I got to walk The bar menu echoes the ethos around and fell in love with the of the kitchen – use the least street food. I came home with a amount of the best ingredients. lot of curiosity about how I could The margaritas might be on draft, recreate those flavors.” but Barracuda batches them and Since every cuisine of Mexico always uses 100 percent agave is represented in Mexico City, it and fresh lime juice. If you are was a great place to get in search of creative exposure to different non-alcoholic styles, although one b eve ra g e s, t r y Barracuda Tacos could easily get lost their housemade & Tortillas, 3984 Tchoupitoulas St., in a maze of regional horchata, made Uptown, 266-2961. L, D variations. Jones’s from Louisiana Tues-Sun. Closed Mon. takeaway was a few brown rice, toasted EatBarracuda.com core principals – make almonds, spices and the tortillas fresh and make the cane sugar. components that go into them The taco stand is counter service fresh as well. “A lot of things and most of the seating is in follow from this approach,” he the backyard, although there is said. “Just keep it simple and do a decent amount of courtyard seating for inclement weather. it in-house.” It starts with the tortillas. He Vegetarians will also find more makes both flour and corn versions. than a few choices here – the The flour tortilla is Sonoran-style, Farmer Taco (recently umami-rich so thin it is almost translucent but griddled mushrooms) is never an with a little bit of chew, different afterthought and Jones always from the thicker, more prevalent runs at least one veg special. “If Tex-Mex style. The corn tortillas I could have opened a vegetable are hand-pressed. The taco menu taco stand and kept the lights on, is short but sweet, and follows I probably would have,” he said. a template of chicken, beef, But this is better - Barracuda is pork, veg and fish. “The menu a place that everyone can love. will always read that way, but the compositions will change,” according to Jones, who takes a market-driven approach. On one recent trip, the ruddy-hued chicken was chopped into chunks and garnished simply with chopped onion and cilantro. The prevailing flavor was provided by the adobo rub, a piquant paste of annatto Taking a Taco Stand seeds, achiote and other seasonIf you are in search of even ings. Pork was shoulder cooked more tacos, the popular Taceaux al pastor-style and garnished with Loceaux food truck recently grilled pineapple. And the fish was levelled up into a brick and mortar farm-raised Mississippi catfish location on Octavia Street just off smothered with shredded cabbage, of Magazine. Here you will find onion, salsa macha and crema. classics like Pollo Asado sharing Sprinkled atop was a scattering of real estate with mashups like Seoul colorful pomegranate seeds. Why Man (Korean bulgogi chicken) and pomegranate seeds? “They look locally inspired takes like Kermit’s really pretty and they make you BBQ Pork. Liquor license is a +1.

.

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restaurant insider

News From the Kitchen La Mensa, Levee Baking Co., The Tiger Bakery

Sourdough Focaccia Bread with Rose Mary and Heirloom Tomatoes

by Robert Peyton

La Mensa

Levee Baking Co.

The Tiger Bakery

La Mensa, an Italian spot helmed by chef Britten Carboni, has opened in the space occupied for many years by Maximo’s and, more recently, by nouvelleCreole restaurant Trinity. Chef Carboni’s menu features dishes such as octopus salad with olives, orange, fennel and mint; goat cheese and ricotta-stuffed squash blossoms with romesco sauce and pork shank osso bucco with orange gremolata and house-made spaghetti. La Mensa 1117 Decatur St.; 325-5789; Tuesday - Saturday, 5:30-9:00 (Bar: 4-9), Sunday, 10:30 to 2:30; LaMensaNola.com.

Levee Baking Co. started as a pop-up before opening on Magazine Street late last month. Baker Christina Balzebre is originally from Miami, and learned her craft working with local operations such as Satsuma Café, the Link Restaurant Group and Willa Jean. Her breads, pastries, cakes and both sweet and savory baked goods employ local products wherever possible and use freshly milled flour from Carolina Ground. Levee Baking Co., 3138 Magazine St., Ste. D; Wednesday – Saturday, 9:00-3:00, Sunday 10:00-3:00; LeveeBakingco.com.

Another bakery that opened recently is The Tiger Bakery, which started service in a somewhat out of the way spot in Broadmoor. It’s a beautiful little spot for coffee, tea, freshly made lemonade and, of course, baked goods both sweet and savory. Look for free-form tarts, cream puffs, flatbreads and pastries stuffed with ham and cheese, sausage or vegetables. The Tiger Bakery, 3030 General Pershing St.; 430-3812; Wednesday - Friday, 7:30-3:00, Saturday 8:30-3:00 and Sunday 8:30-2:00; The-Tiger-Bakery.business.site.

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jeffery johnston photo


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food

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styled by photographed by eugenia uhl


Surviving the Hot Months

RECIPEs

Dishes prepared away from the stove by Dale Curry

Pimento Cheese

It’s a known fact that tourists avoid New

Ingredients 8 ounces extra-sharp cheddar

Orleans in the heat of summer. And many who live here try to escape. Hard as I try, my trips lean toward early summer or fall, leaving me to survive the inferno of August. In the midst of sweat and torture, I refuse to turn on an oven or be anywhere that is not wet or air-conditioned. That said, I try to make the most of it by eating light and falling back on some of my childhood favorites, especially pimento cheese, which made it into my school lunch box three out of five days. It hasn’t been long since people in New Orleans didn’t eat pimento cheese, but somehow the long-time Deep South (that’s not Nawlin’s) favorite blossomed. Not only here but in many places where people had never heard of it before. Once when working for The Times-Picayune, we had a little argument over how to make the best pimento cheese, and mine won the taste-test. Truth is, my recipe is the simplest of all with just three ingredients: cheese, pimentos and mayonnaise. The type of cheese shares a secret that New Orleans’ queen of cheese straws Lady Helen Hardy demanded in her now-famous recipe, and that is Kraft’s extra-sharp cheddar. It applies to her cheese straws and to my pimento cheese. I’m a little picky on the other two ingredients, too. For the pimento, I use jarred roasted red bell peppers and for the mayo, I demand Hellman’s. No declaration needed. Unfortunately, I am not financially connected to any of these brands. Another summer favorite is chicken salad. As I said, I refuse to cook In August so I buy a rotisserie chicken from Sam’s or Costco where the chickens are huge. I serve all but the breasts for dinner that night and make chicken salad the next day. All that for $4.99. I even find it hard to light up the grill this month so instead of grilling the chicken, I sometimes add a few splashes of liquid smoke to the mix. Again, sometimes the best approach is the simplest one. Finding your own cool meals is easy with rotisserie chicken and cheese on hand, and there is so much more delicious cold stuff - fresh peach ice cream, gazpacho, smoked salmon, chocolate milk shakes, pesto, pineapple sandwiches, iced coffee, spinach-feta salad, cucumber-dill soup

1/3 cup mayonnaise ¼ cup roasted red peppers or pimentos, roughly chopped Directions 1. Cut cheese into chunks. 2. Place cheese and mayonnaise in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add peppers or pimentos and pulse several times, just until peppers or pimentos are in small pieces, not ground into the cheese. 3. Serve on sandwiches or crackers. Makes 4 to 6 sandwiches.

Chicken Salad

Ingredients 2 breasts from a large store-bought rotisserie chicken or 2 large chicken breasts, poached until just done 1 large rib celery, minced 3 green onions, white and green parts, minced ¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste ¼ teaspoon Creole seasoning Dash or 2 garlic powder ¼ cup mayonnaise Several drops liquid hickory smoke, optional Directions 1. Shred or pull apart chicken, and chop any large pieces. Place in a large bowl. 2. Add all other ingredients and mix well. Pick of the Season August is a great month for fresh fruit in Louisiana. Look for peaches, pears, plums, apples, blackberries, melons and figs. Think ice cream, sorbet, sundaes and, best of all, fresh out of hand.

3. Serve cold or at room temperature on lettuce leaves as salad, on bread as sandwiches or on crackers as snacks. Serves 4 to 6 as a light meal. Optional add-ins: sliced green or red grapes, chopped pecans or almonds

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last call

A Cool Martini Refresh the Palate by Tim McNally

Of all the months of the year,

August has the worst reputation. Other months are beastly hot, crazy humid, and even provide the settings for hurricanes. But August is the month that catches most of the grief for our discomfort and complaining. And that is all the more reason to encourage us to keep it simple. Too darn hot for complications. Lucky for you, the nice people in the air-conditioning at Boulevard American Bistro on Veterans Boulevard in Metairie have kept their wits about them and created a refreshing and simple-to-make martini. This cool concoction soothes the throat all the way down.

Cucumber Basil Martini

2 oz. St. Roch Vodka 0.75 oz. Thatcher’s Cucumber Liquor 0.05 oz. simple syrup 0.5 fresh lime squeezed 2 torn basil leaves Combine all ingredients except the basil. Depending on your preference, the drink is either shaken with the slightest touch of ice, or stirred in a very cold bar glass, then poured into a chilled coupe. James Bond is envious. Add basil for garnish. As created at Boulevard American Bistro, 4241 Veterans Boulevard, Metairie, 889-2301, BoulevardBistro.com.

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eugenia uhl photo


dining listings H= New Orleans Magazine award winner

Bywater

H Pizza Delicious pizza 617 Piety St., 6768482, PizzaDelicious.com. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant, that also offers excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes. Outdoor seating a plus. $ Carrollton Breads on Oak Bakery/Breakfast 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak St. serves breads, breakfast, sandwiches, 100 percent vegan. $ City Park Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Cir., NO Museum of Art, 482-1264, CafeNoma. com. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $ CBD/Warehouse District Balise Louisianian Fare 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Carefully crafted fare fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

H BH Steak Steakhouse Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne Seafood 601 Loyola Ave., 613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. Coastal Louisiana with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this highvolume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$

H Cochon Louisianian Fare 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski feature Cajun and Southern cuisine. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine Reservations recommended. $$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this menu, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$ Drago’s Louisianian Fare Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

H Domenica Italian The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. Authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products. $$$$ Emeril’s Louisianian Fare 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims 1 3 2 AUGUST 2019 myneworleans.com

$ = Average entrée price

$ = $5-10 $$ = $11-15 $$$ = $16-20 $$$$ = $21-25 $$$$$ = $25 & up

from all over the world. $$$$$

H Herbsaint Louisianian Fare 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$

H La Boca Steakhouse 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Lüke World 333 St. Charles Ave., 378-2840, LukeNewOrleans.com. Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, housemade pâtés and plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$

324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. $$$$ The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. Modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine Italian 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$

Mother’s Louisianian Fare 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net.Locals and tourists alike endure long lines to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$

Central City Café Reconcile Louisiana fare 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile. org. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$

Mulate’s Louisianian Fare 201 Julia St., 5221492, Mulates.com. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$

H Café Degas French 3127 Esplanade Ave.,

Palace Café World 605 Canal St., 5231661, PalaceCafe.com. Cassic New Orleans restaurant, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates at the Black Duck Bar. $$$

H 1000 Figs World 3141 Ponce De Leon St.,

H Pêche Seafood 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by Chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven, and an excellent raw bar. $$$

HRed Gravy Bakery/Breakfast 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. Farm-to-table brunch restaurant offers a creative array of items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$ H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. James Beard Awardwinning menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Rock-N-Sake Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake. com. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution. There are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sac-A-Lait Seafood 1051 Annunciation St.,

Faubourg St. John 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$ 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-to-table alternative to cookiecutter Middle Eastern places. $$ French Quarter Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s Louisianian Fare 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade Italian 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. Home of the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$ Antoine’s Louisianian Fare 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$ Antoine’s Annex Specialty Foods 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/Antoines-Annex. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available. BB King’s Blues Club Barbecue 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/new-orleans. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician with a menu loaded with BBQ and southern specialties. Live music and

late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$ Bayou Burger Burgers 503 Bourbon St., 5294256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$ Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes, bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Bayona World 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455, Bayona.com. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ Brennan’s Louisianian Fare 417 Royal St., 525-9711, Brennansneworleans.com. Chef Slade Rushing’s innovative Cerole menu borrows influences from French and Spanish ancestry with modern updates and distinct seasonal offerings. $$$$ Broussard’s French 819 Conti St., 581-3866, Broussards.com. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table Gastropub 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. Open late, this chef-driven rustic colonial cuisine with rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House Italian 601 Chartres St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters Louisianian Fare 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters.com. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Louisianian Fare Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various Louisiana cultures, with a contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster Seafood 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery Seafood 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. Crowdpleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House


Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan Steakhouse 620 Chartres St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. Innovative steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro World 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. Central Mexican cuisine along with handmuddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s Louisianian Fare 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this worldfamous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak Steakhouse 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails and classic steakhouse fare and inspired dishes.

Reservations accepted. $$$

Bourbon Street. $$$

H GW Fins Seafood 808 Bienville St.,

Muriel’s Jackson Square Italian 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. Enjoy local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumoredto-be-haunted establishment. $$$$

581-FINS (3467), GWFins.com. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$ House of Blues Louisianian Fare 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues.com/ NewOrleans. Good menu complements music in the main room. World-famous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Irene’s Cuisine Italian 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen Louisianian Fare 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul.com/ KPaul. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to the nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish Seafood 337 Charters St., 5985005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chef-driven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou Seafood 208 Bourbon St., 5254755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafood-centric destination on

Napoleon House Italian 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas. A Sazerac or Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $ NOLA Louisianian Fare 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedar-plank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill Seafood 739 Conti St., 5256002, OceanaGrill.com. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro Gastropub 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. Wine is the muse at this bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin Gastropub 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 Seafood 424 Bourbon St., 309-1574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. Seafood-centric

restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster. $$$ Port of Call Burgers 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

H Restaurant R’evolution Italian 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola. com. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Jana Billiot and executive sous chef Gabriel Beard are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Red Fish Grill SEAFOOD 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. This vibrant, seafood-centric polished-casual landmark delivers innivative twists on casual New Orleans seasfood, including local favorites BBQ oysters and double chocolate bread pudding. $$$ Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. Old World elegance, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$ Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant Louisianian Fare 301 Dauphine St., 5860972, RichardFiskes.com. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street is this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished

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with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$ Royal House Louisianian Fare 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowdpleasing appeal. $$$ SoBou Louisianian Fare 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on an accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tableau Louisianian Fare 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre. $$$

H The Bistreaux Louisianian Fare New Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy.com/dining.html. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$ The Bombay Club Louisianian Fare Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange

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Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

H Tujague’s Louisianian Fare 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$ Garden District Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s AMERICAN 2001 St. Charles Ave., 593-9955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro.com. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$ Commander’s Palace Louisianian Fare 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Award-winner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$ District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders. com. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $ Hoshun Restaurant Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. A wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Private dining

rooms available. $$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$ Lakeview H Cava Louisianian Fare 789 Harrison Ave., 304-9034. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$

H Mondo World 900 Harrison Ave., 2242633, MondoNewOrleans.com. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. This place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$ Metairie H Andrea’s Restaurant Italian 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.com. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$ Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Austin’s Louisianian Fare 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$ Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and

more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this family-friendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options, and gourmet coffee and espresso drinks create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. $ Crabby Jack’s Louisianian Fare 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. Outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$ Don’s Seafood seafood 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials. $$$ Drago’s Louisianian Fare 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as


well. $$$$ Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Seafood 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

bakery offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Louisianian Fare 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris. com. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution, and great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

H Liuzza’s Italian 3636 Bienville St., 482-

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$

Mid-City H Crescent City Steaks Steakhouse 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$ Five Happiness Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and house-baked duck. $$ Gracious Bakery + Café Bakery/Breakfast 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com.Boutique

9120, Liuzzas.com. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

H Mandina’s Louisianian Fare 3800 Canal

H Mona’s Café World 3901 Banks St., 482-7743. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros. The lentil soup and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H MoPho Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-and-match pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$ Parkway Bakery and Tavern AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys. com. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a

classic at a great price. $

soups, salads and deli-style sandwiches. $

Ralph’s On The Park louisianaian fare 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark. com. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Seafood MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar.A seafood lover’s paradise offers an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. A raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw. $$$

H Toups’ Meatery Louisianian Fare 845

Reginelli’s Pizzeria pizza Reginellis.com. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$

N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$ Multiple Locations Café du Monde Bakery/Breakfast CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Bakery/Breakfast CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $ Copeland’s Louisianian Fare CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$ Little Tokyo Asian Fusion/Pan Asian LittleTokyoNola.com. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, burgers,

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast TheRubySlipperCafe.net. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$ Theo’s Pizza TheosPizza.com. The crackercrisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with local ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN ZeaRestaurants.com. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular spot serves a variety of grilled items, appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Catering services available. $$$ Riverbend

H Boucherie Louisianian Fare 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola. com. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$ Brigtsen’s Louisianian Fare 723 Dante St.,

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861-7610, Brigtsens.com. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

HCarrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$ Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market Louisianian Fare 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket. com. Historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ Uptown Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute.org. B, A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Bouligny Tavern Gastropub 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern.com. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$ Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $ Casamento’s Louisianian Fare 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and

for all major holidays. $$ Clancy’s Louisianian Fare 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$

H Coquette French 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from the chefs. $$$ Dick and Jenny’s Louisianian Fare 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys. com. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$

H Gautreau’s Louisianian Fare 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant. com. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along

H La Crêpe Nanou French 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery French 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette French 3637 Magazine St., 895-1636, LiletteRestaurant.com. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

H Magasin Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4201 Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe.com.

available at dinner

Now - September!

3 Appetizers$

+ a Glass of Wine Coconut, Corn & Crab Soup

33

Crab Gratin brie & cream cheese, garlic crumbs

Jumbo Lump Crab & Creole Tomato Salad basil vinaigrette, sweet onion, fresh mozzarella, greens

City Park Salad red oak & romaine, green apples, blue cheese, bacon

Grilled Vegas Strip Romesco sauce, baby kale, sherry vinaigrette

Tempura Shrimp Creole Creole sauce spiked with lime & bonito, Napa cabbage slaw

Parmesan-Black Pepper Fries garlic dipping sauce

Turtle Soup with sherry

Tuna Tartare Teriyaki sesame crackers, avocado, wasabi aioli, sweet chili Fried Oysters Skully Skully’s Crystal & pepper jelly reduction, almonds, green onions

Seafood Broken Rice Risotto Louisiana middlins rice, shrimp & crab nage, tomato, jumbo shrimp Crab Daniel Salad French dressing, brandy, celery root remoulade, chervil, local greens Duck & Mushroom Flatbread duck confit, caramelized onions, organic mushrooms Blackened Shrimp Tartine smoked fish rillettes, spicy mayo, cilantro, cucumber, radish *menu subject to seasonality - Chef Chip Flanagan

900 city park ave

| 488-1000 | ralphsonthepark.com

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Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $

elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$

Pascal’s Manale Italian 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. A neighborhood favorite since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$

H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger presents this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$

H Patois World 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441, PatoisNola.com. French food, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$ Pizza Domenica pizza 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. A pizza centric spinoff of the popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitan-style pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

H Shaya World 4213 Magazine St., 8914213, ShayaRestaurant.com. James Beard Award-winning menu pays homage to Israel at this contemporary Israeli hotspot. $$$

H The Company Burger Burgers 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger.com. Custom-baked butter-brushed buns and freshground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $ The Delachaise Gastropub 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise.com. Cuisine

H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 3090069, WayfareNola.com. Creative sandwiches and southern-inspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine. com. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Warehouse District Lucy’s World 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 5238995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. Island-themed oasis with a menu that cherry-picks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay into the wee hours. $

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com


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streetcar by errol laborde

On the closing night of the

1984 World’s Fair, Congressmember Lindy Boggs stood on the big amphitheater stage. With the passing ships on the river as the background, Boggs and Seymore D. Fair, the event’s pelican mascot, plus some miscellaneous dancers, performed the fair’s last act as they swayed to Lionel Richie’s “All Night Long.” A few weeks earlier Richie had performed that song live at the finale of the Los Angeles Summer Olympics where the world’s athletes who had assembled on the field served as the chorus for a global audience. By contrast, the closing at the fair was far more modest; Boggs, plus a pelican and a few extras before a crowd of teary eyed fair fans. Since the fair had been a financial failure, Boggs was the only office holder who took part in the finale, for which the budget was so deeply cut that even the song was borrowed. This year is the 35th anniversary of the exposition, which ran from May 12 to November 11 of ‘84. By August, the verdict for the event was already in: It was an economic disaster, partially because of an overestimated attendance that did not materialize; on the other hand, it did stimulate riverfront development, and oh, locals loved it. New Orleans was founded in 1718 along the river, but it

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myneworleans.com

A Fair’s Farewell wasn’t until 1984 that most New Orleanians discovered the river. Prior to that the Mississippi’s banks were mostly an industrial area blocked by warehouses, a brewery and “No Trespassing” signs. But by ’84 urban waterfronts around the world were being converted to leisure use. The heavy industry was moved away from the old town areas to accommodate bigger ships and containerized cargo. Because of its fair, few waterfronts were converted to leisure as quickly New Orleans’. During the summer of ’84 locals, many toting season passes, headed to the river during their free time. In what was once a dreary industrial neighborhood,

there was wonderment of color, light and music. A monorail rolled above carrying its load to and from the new international pavilion. Gliding capsules known as the gondola, dangled passengers across the river. At the German Beer Garden, fair-goers flapped their arms to the chicken dance. Oversized Belgian waffles were introduced to the world. And there was even a space shuttle, loaned by NASA, parked near the midway. Old industrial streets and buildings were suddenly part of an entertainment area, including the previously little known Fulton Street and the nearby Federal Fiber Mills, which now housed

both condos and a depot for the monorail. On the April day before the fair was to open, there had been a media tour and it had been a disaster. Carpenters were still swinging hammers; painters were yielding their brushes; electricians were running wires. Nothing seemed ready. “Don’t judge us by what you see today,” Fair President Petr Sprurney told the media who had gathered from throughout the country. But no one listened. Later that evening, I was walking through the press room when I heard a radio reporter record his report: “Less than 24 hours before its scheduled opening the world’s fair in New Orleans is nowhere near ready…” The word spread around the continent faster than a speeding monorail. But Spurney was right. There was a miracle along the river that night, and the next day the fair was indeed ready, only the image of trouble had already been cast. Locals would know better though. Like “Brigadoon,” the musical set in Scotland about an idyllic village that only appears once a century, the fair provided the summer of a lifetime. Lindy Boggs and Seymore must have felt the same emotion that those in the tearful audience were feeling. And the emotion continued—all night long.

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ARTHUR NEAD Illustration


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine August 2019  

New Orleans Magazine August 2019