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january 2019 / VOLUME 53 / NUMBER 2 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Mary Lou Eichhorn, Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Jason Berry, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Social Media Assistant Becca Miller Staff Writers Topher Balfer, Kelly Massicot, Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Advertising Sales Manager Kate Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Claire Cummings Account Executives Meggie Schmidt, Rachel Webber Director of Marketing and Events Cheryl Lemoine Event Coordinator Abbie Dugruise Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Designers Emily Andras, Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney Special Projects Art Director Molly Tullier Traffic Coordinator Lane Brocato Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Subscriptions Manager Brittanie Bryant For subscription information call (504) 828-1380 WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 MyNewOrleans.com

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2019 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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Contents Local Color On the Cover: Old Again Cocktail at Longway Tavern. Photographed by Denny Culbert

Marquee Entertainment calendar 22

Persona Carol Markowitz 24

Education A Blue Ribbon For Lusher 26

Chris Rose Sunshine Thunder 28

Modine Gunch Top of the town, p. 54

BTW 30

Joie d’Eve No New Leaves 32

In Tune Symphony of Choices 34

Jazz Life Leading a Revivial 36

Home Behind the Lens 38

90

Features

In Every Issue

Bars for Every Reason

Inside

Top Bars for Every Occasion 42

Changes at the Bar 12

Tops of the Town

Speaking Out

Our Readers’ Picks 54

Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 16

A Vote for The Voice Mark Romig: Ella Brennan Lifetime Achievement Award 62

Guide to Schools Area public and private universities, private elementary and secondary and charter schools 72

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Julia Street Questions and Answers About Our City 18

Streetcar The Coat and the Krewe 120

DIAL 12, D1 Will revolution in Europe threaten Victoria’s reign? Jenna Coleman returns as Her fearless Majesty Queen Victoria in an all-new season of the hit drama on MASTERPIECE on Sunday, January 13 at 8:00 p .m. on WYES-TV/Channel 12. Join WYES for a free sneak peek of episode one on Thursday, January 10 at 7:00 p.m. in the WYES studios. Pre-screening champagne reception begins at 6:00 p.m. Tickets at wyes.org.

The Menu Table Talk Pascal’s Manale 84

Restaurant Insider News from the Kitchens 86

Food Chili Ways for Chilly Days 88

Last Call Espresso Martini 90

Dining Guide Listings by Neighborhood 92


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inside

Changes at the Bar Pay attention now, and I will

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teach you how to make the first cocktail I learned to make as a kid. There was no formal training. This was just from watching adults, usually at some sort of family gathering where the bar might have been the corner of a kitchen table. There was usually only one drink on the cocktail menu, the “Highball.” So here’s how to make it: 1. Get a glass. (This is important.) 2. Pour a shot of whiskey, or bourbon, into the glass. More than one shot is ok. 3. Add ice. (All we had were cubes from the refrigerator.) 4. Add Coke. 5. Stir. Plopping in a maraschino cherry was optional, but recommended because red makes any drink look better. If you wanted variety in your drinking, the Coke could be replaced by 7-Up, or if you really wanted to go radical, Sprite was acceptable, but please, never Fresca. (There was also the drink which we knew simply as “Rum and Coke” unaware that in some parts of the world it was known as Cuba Libre.) These drinks reminded me of Christmas, which was mostly when I had them, though never in great numbers, yet I always had a sentimental attachment to them. Then, I think I was a junior in high school when a spoilsport Health teacher, apparently trying to wisen us to the ways of the world, suggested that highballs, among other consumables, were not exactly health drinks. He actually thought there was something wrong with combining sugar, colorings, sodium, soda water and alcohol, into one drink. I could never enjoy a highball quite as much. That’s just as well, because the booze world has expanded.

Now we talk about craft cocktails, infusions and flavored grain alcohols. Even the old stand-bys, which were most often made in bars rather than at home, such as Sazerac and Old Fashioneds, have experienced a new surge of popularity.       This issue is about our picks of the city’s top bars. I am probably past the statute of limitations, so that I can now admit that the first time I had a drink at a bar was as a grade-schooler. I was downtown with my dad one Saturday when he stopped by the Roosevelt Hotel to see a friend who worked at the Sazerac bar. I sat on a stool at the end of the counter and watched the Army-Navy game on TV while my dad and the man talked. I guess it was a rite of man-hood but I was slipped a glass containing a sip of Sazerac. The sip was ok, but to me it tasted more like cough medicine. What I really liked most about the experience was being in a bar watching a football game on TV. ESPN, big screens and Buffalo chicken wings had yet to be created, but, even more so than craft cocktails, the barroom experience was about to change dramatically. I offer a champagne toast to the future, only let’s make it Prosecco.


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meet the sales staff

Kate Henry Advertising Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Claire Cummings Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7250 Claire@myneworleans.com

Rachel Webber Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Rachel@MyNewOrleans.com

Meggie Schmidt Account Executive (504) 830-7220 Meggie@myneworleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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myneworleans.com january 2019 1 5


speaking out

but across the street from each other, thus creating one of carnival’s newest traditions when Rex’s entourage walks the red carpet across Canal Street from the Sheraton to join Comus for the meeting of the courts at the Marriott hotel. At first, the feeling was that one day the auditorium would again be ball-ready and krewes would return. Now we do not think that will happen. It is a question of priorities. When the building first opened, it was the premiere presentation space; now there is a glut of places to have a show. And while balls provide revenue, they only do so during two months a year. There needs to be something else to pay the bills. Meanwhile, was so popular that he got married again (thankfully some krewes have become cozy to the same woman) on Sunday. Each Thanksgiving with their new surroundings. While weekend the Shrine Circus made the auditorium its no place offers the visual advanbig top. Karl Wallenda walked on the high wire and tages of the auditorium, ball-goers balanced on a chair, scaring the bejeebies out of have begun to appreciate the bars, the audience. It would be one of his last American restaurant and accommodations at performances. (The building even served as a tempo- the hotels. The auditorium offered rary casino while a new Harrah’s facility was being no such luxuries. developed. Win or lose, Harrah’s was appreciated For nostalgia’s sake, we wish for having improved the auditorium’s bathrooms.) the auditorium a speedy return Graduations were held there. Many New Orleanians as a full functioning public space. received their diplomas while sitting on the stage with At a recent forum, mayor LaToya the building’s spotlight on them for a fleeting moment. Cantrell mentioned the possibility of In other ways however, time has moved slowly. making the building the city’s new This carnival will mark the 14th consecutive year City Hall. That would provide new that the building has stood empty. It has never returned energy for the Treme/Armstrong from the devastation of Katrina’s high waters. Park area, plus give the city lucraAt first, the carnival balls moved to what some tive real estate at the present viewed as temporary housing. Among the society City Hall’s current location. The soirees, hotels, most notably the Sheraton and the Ritz idea, however, is still in its early Carlton, have become the new setting, as analytical stages. well as the country clubs, the Orpheum Whatever happens is theater and Kenner’s Pontchartrain Center. An original going to take great minds ©Mike Luckovich The Convention Center has a theater facility Cartoon for New with access to deep pockets that can house a traditional ball, as well Orleans Magazine coming up with big ideas. as the space for the big party events such That could be as tough as as Bacchus, Orpheus and Zulu. Endymion is so big balancing from a chair on a high wire. It would be the building’s that it needs the Superdome to contain it. Rex and Comus are no longer in the same building, greatest performance ever.

Carnival’s Forgotten Palace When the city’s Municipal Auditorium opened

in 1930, an unspoken truth about the building was that it, in addition to being intended as a multi-purpose facility, was also designed to provide a better place for carnival balls. From January through Mardi Gras of each year, balls were a big business and the auditorium was the best place to have them. The facility even had two separate theaters: the St. Peter Street side and the smaller St. Ann Street side. Thus, it was possible to have events, especially balls, simultaneously. The auditorium’s tiers of balconies allowed for uninterrupted sight lines to the floor where queens and maids had extra space as they royally walked the carpet. There was also room backstage at the balls, where the krewe guys could nourish themselves with turtle soup to counteract the impact of the whiskey served at the bar, while a jazz band played away, On Mardi Gras evening, Rex and Comus, who prior to the building had their events at separate downtown theaters, only had to walk down a back corridor for the meeting of the courts. If the krewes had a parade it could end at the auditorium after marching from Canal Street, then thorough the French Quarter along Royal Street, before heading down Orleans Street to the building where their ladies and guests waited. Out of season, the building hosted staged concerts and floor events. Hank Williams once married there during a Saturday evening concert. The ceremony

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julia street with poydras the parrot

Samuel Loewenberg memorial, St. Charles Avenue at South Carrollton Avenue.

recall my father saying the instrument was government issue but, in those days, my attention was captivated by my father’s efforts to play music for me so I gave little thought to how or where he had picked up the ocarina. Can you or Poydras help me fill in the blanks? Phil Reed (New Orleans)

Dear Julia and Poydras, On the neutral ground where St. Charles Avenue and South Carrollton Avenue meet, there is a granite monument to Samuel Loewenberg. It is fairly plain and looks as if may have once been a fountain but there is no date on it. Any information? Carol Janis (New Orleans)

and found employment in the clothing manufacturing firm of Wolf & Marks. He would remain associated with the company and its successor firm for the rest of his life, eventually becoming a partner and establishing the firm of Loewenberg, Marks and Company.

Carol, the memorial isn’t really a monument to Mr. Loewenberg. It was a charitable donation his widow, Rosa Marks Loewenberg (1860-1915), made in his memory. Its lower section is now used as a flower box but was originally a drinking trough for horses and mules; a slow flow from the fountain’s center pipe helped assure the trough water remained fresh and sanitary. Samuel Loewenberg (18571907), a native of Prussia, settled in New Orleans as a young adult

Dear Julia, My late father used to treasure a plastic sweet potato whistle (ocarina) he got while serving overseas during WWII. He never played it well but he played it enthusiastically and loudly, always tooting the only tune he’d mastered, which was part of the chorus of the song “Rum and Coca-Cola.” Unfortunately, my mother loathed that little ocarina and she remains the prime suspect in its permanent disappearance several decades ago. I seem to

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have a question for julia? Send your question to: Julia Street, c/o New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Errol@ MyNewOrleans. com.

Your father almost certainly obtained the ocarina during his wartime service and most likely got it directly from Uncle Sam. However, it is also possible he received it in a care package made possible through the Louisiana Coca-Cola Bottling Company. Having found that small simply-played music instruments provided a psychological outlet to troops serving overseas, the U.S. military requisitioned massive numbers of Bakelite ocarinas from the Fred Gretsch Company of Brooklyn and Chicago, with accompanying instruction manuals and song books. This military contract kept Gretsch going during the war. In December 1944, William W. Gretsch filed a patent application for an ocarina; U.S. Patent No. 2,460,931 was granted February 8, 1949. Here in New Orleans, the Louisiana CocaCola Bottling Company jumped on the patriotic bandwagon. In March 1944, it ran a two-week promotional campaign asking the public to provide small musical instruments for troops’ leisure use. Instruments could be dropped off anywhere Coca-Cola was sold. Suggested instruments included ocarinas and harmonicas as well as accordions and banjos - anything would do as long as it was musical and portable.


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Local Color MARQUEE . PERSONA . Education . CHRIS ROSE . MODINE GUNCH . JOIE D’EVE . IN TUNE . Jazz Life . HOME

greg miles photo

NOCHI Executive Director Carol Markowitz


marquee

January Our top picks for this month’s events by Fritz Esker

Les Miserables

The classic musical based on Victor Hugo’s timeless novel returns to the Saenger from January 8-13. After serving 19 years in jail for stealing bread for his sister’s starving child, Jean Valjean breaks parole and is pursued by the relentless Inspector Javert. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

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2019 Wizard World New Orleans

Justin Timberlake: The Man of the Woods Tour

Come get your geek on from January 4-6 at 2019 Wizard World New Orleans in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. There will be costume contests; panels on comic books, movies, and games; and celebrity guest appearances featuring many stars of TV and film. Information, WizardWorld.com.

The pop superstar and actor Justin Timberlake, is launching a tour in support of his new album. He will be at the Smoothie King Center on January 15 for what promises to be an unforgettable night for his fans. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

The Wolves

Making its regional premiere at the Southern Rep Theatre from January 9 February 3, this Pulitzer Prize finalist tells the stories of the members of a girls’ soccer team in a portrait of adolescent fear and fury. The play is the debut of talented new playwright Sarah DeLappe. Information, SouthernRep.com.


calendar Jan. 1

Jan. 17

Allstate Sugar Bowl, Mercedes Benz Superdome. Information, MBSuperdome.com.

Gregory Alan Isakov, Civic Theater. Information, CivicNOLA.com.

Jan. 1

Mahler’s 9th Symphony, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com.

Jan. 17

Allstate Sugar Bowl Fan Jam, Champions Square. Information, Champions-Square.com.

Jan. 18-Feb. 3 Jan. 5-6

Rock of Ages: 10th Anniversary Tour, Mahalia Jackson Theater. Information, MahaliaJacksonTheater.com. Jan. 6

Phunny Phorty Phellows, St. Charles Avenue. Information, PhunnyPhortyPhellows.com. Jan. 6

Jackson Day Race, Arabi. Information, RunNOTC.org. Jan. 6

Krewe Jeanne d’Arc, French Quarter. Information, JoanOfArcParade.org.

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, Le Petit Theater. Information, LePetitTheatre.com. Jan. 19

Jaws In Concert, Mahalia Jackson Theater. Information, MahaliaJacksonTheater.com. Jan. 19

The Steeldrivers, The Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com. Jan. 19

Link Stryjewski Foundation charity Bal Masqué, Sugar Mill. Information, BalMasque.linkstryjewski.org. Jan. 25

Jan. 8

Commemoration of the Battle of New Orleans, Chalmette Battlefield. Information, ExperienceNewOrleans.org. Jan. 10 & 12

Scherezade with BBC Young Musician of the Year Sheku Kanneh-Mason, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com.

Lake Street Dive, Civic Theater. Information, CivicNOLA.com. Jan. 26

Run on the Bayou, Bayou Segnette State Park. Information, NOLArunning.com. Jan. 27

King Cake Festival, Champions Square. Information, KingCakeFestival.org.

Jan. 11

The Amity Affliction & Senses Fail, The Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com.

Jan. 28-29

Tedeschi Trucks Band, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Jan. 11-27

Greater Tuna, Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts. Information, RivertownTheaters.com.

Jan. 31

Winter Jam 2019, UNO Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu.

Jan. 16-Feb. 9

Stockholm Syndrome, Little Gem Saloon. Information, NOLAProject.com.

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persona

What I love most about living in New Orleans are the people and the sense of community that I’ve never experienced anywhere else.  

When the New Orleans Culinary

and Hospitality Institute (NOCHI) opens its doors on January 7, the state of the art teaching facility will include training for students from across the region, reception areas, classrooms, wine and spirits labs and so much more. The 90,000 square foot, five-story building, and education system has been led from the near beginning in 2013 by executive director Carol Markowitz, who comes to the project with a clipboard fully loaded with business and creative ideas, and leadership skills honed by years in finance.

Carol Markowitz Executive Director, New Orleans Culinary and Hospitality Institute (NOCHI) by Ashley McLellan

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Q: What brought you to the NOCHI project initially, why did you want to be involved? I think if you were to have told any entrepreneurialminded person who understands the importance of food to this city’s heritage, culture and brand that New Orleans needs a culinary school, you’d get their attention. If [Commander’s Palace proprietor] Ti Martin is the one who told you that and then asked for your help, I don’t know how one could refuse?  Have you met the woman?   Q: What role do you see NOCHI playing in the New Orleans community? I see NOCHI being a game-changer for our community in so many critical ways. First and foremost, it will be a resource that creates access and opportunity through excellence in education and entrepreneurship. It will also be a demand generator for culinary tourism from all around the world by those who live to eat and drink like we do here in New greg miles photo


at a glance

Born: Los Angeles Education: Stanford University (BA, Economics) and Harvard Business School (MBA) Favorite restaurant: I’d like to take the “fifth” on this one . . . Favorite Cookbook: My go-to website sources for recipes include NYTCooking. com and Epicurious. com Favorite Comfort Food: My mom’s Korean food

True Confession: I put hot sauce on pretty much everything I eat and even carry a bottle on me at most times.

Orleans. Longer term, I see NOCHI helping to redefine New Orleans as a global thought leader as “the” place where industry and academia convene and collaborate on all things food and hospitality.     Q: What kinds of students do you see NOCHI attracting and appealing to, and how can it help their careers? We are setting a new standard for culinary training and education that provides the highest quality curricula, instruction, and facilities in a world-renowned culinary city. I believe NOCHI will attract and appeal to some of the shrewdest and most driven students who will choose to jump-start their careers in a matter of 100 intensive days at NOCHI for a total cost of $14,775, instead of $30,000, $50,000 or even $100,000 at much longer programs. These students will also have the unique advantage of starting their careers in a region that boasts approximately 2,000 non fast-food restaurants with a huge demand for trained professionals.    Q: What experience do you bring to NOCHI as Executive Director? My background is in finance and strategy, and it’s been incredibly rewarding to invest all my professional training and experience into something that can have such a permanent and meaningful impact to our city and to the industry. Applying my business mindset and approach to starting and building a non-profit educational venture that serves the hospitality industry is this amazing opportunity to “pay it forward” for an industry I’ve fallen absolutely in love with.   Q: How have you seen the restaurant industry changing in recent years? One of the biggest trends I continue to see having impact on the restaurant industry is that people are cooking less at home in favor of every other old and new way to dine including meal delivery services, restaurant delivery services, food halls, food trucks, pop-ups. This signals great opportunity for our students and future graduates, as does the increasing passion and pursuit for unique and authentic dining experiences.     Q: Where do you see the city and the industry moving in the future? My vision for the future of the industry is that it advances the ideals of diversity, equity and inclusion, and actively contributes to the ongoing development of a healthier, more equitable and sustainable food system. I see New Orleans being able to play a major leadership role in that vision and continuing to demonstrate that the hospitality industry is an industry that knows no limits. 

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education

A Blue Ribbon For Lusher And a Tribute to Kathy Hurstell Riedlinger by Dawn Ruth Wilson

At age 29, when a mere English

teacher, Lusher Charter School CEO Kathy Hurstell Riedlinger so impressed Superintendent Everett Williams that he visited her classroom one day and asked a life-changing question: “Well, little girl, what school are you going to apply for?” It was a strange way to address a nearly six-foot tall woman, but Riedlinger recalled being charmed, not offended.“Only Everett Williams could get away with calling me ‘little girl,’” she said. At the time, Riedlinger loved teaching 2 6 january 2019 myneworleans.com

and developing curriculum at Warren Easton High School. She had no interest in being a principal. Williams’ plan prevailed, however, and she was soon leading Lusher, then an elementary magnet school on Willow Street near Tulane University. She supervised 26 teachers and about 500 students. Now, 38 years later, she’s the celebrated leader of one of the most sought-after schools in the state. Under her stewardship, Lusher has grown to three schools, elementary, middle and high school, with a student body of

1,800 and a staff of 200. “Absolutely nobody is a better administrator,” Barbara MacPhee, founder and retired principal of New Orleans Charter Science and Math High School, said. “She gets an ‘A plus’ in administration. She leaves no stone unturned.” Attention to detail brings consistent “A” academic ratings by the state and many Lusher graduates attend prestigious universities, often on full scholarships. Riedlinger credits an arts-based curriculum for much of the academic success. “Every 6th grader at Lusher can tell you all the words to the musical Hamilton,” she said. “Now they are more interested in the American Revolution.” The journey has not always been easy. Riedlinger admitted she “hated” being a principal at first. She went from being loved as a teacher to making tough decisions that angered many. “The principalship is often a very lonely position,” she said. Raised by a family of engineers, Riedlinger never yearned to be a teacher, but after helping raise younger siblings and volunteering at an orphanage, educating children seemed a logical step when it came time to declare a major at Louisiana State University.

That decision proved fruitful for her and thousands of New Orleans school children. Within a dozen years of taking over Lusher, she’d polished its reputation so much, that camping out on its lawn to secure advantage in the application process was a rite of passage for many New Orleans parents. “The last campout we had was nine days,” Riedlinger remembered. “It was that crazy.” She was also on the ground floor of the charter school movement after Katrina. Because a charter application was already in the works before the storm hit, she was able to reopen Lusher by January 2006. Later, she helped develop an organization that encouraged more charter schools. It was a fateful move. Today, New Orleans schools are “much improved,” she said. All that navigating paid off. She received a U.S. Department of Education Lifetime Leadership Award in November. She was also one of 11 educators to receive a Terrel H. Bell Award for Outstanding School Leadership. Lusher was recognized as a 2018 Blue Ribbon School, an honor that Riedlinger said is her “favorite” award. “It recognizes everybody,” she said. “It’s an award for the parents, students and teachers. No one person can do this job.”

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cheryl gerber photo


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chris rose

As the Louisiana tricentennial

has drawn to a close, and Jazz Fest readies for its silver anniversary, it seems a fitting time to celebrate the Song of Louisiana. Er, make that, songs. If you ask most folks in Louisiana what our “official” state song is, they will likely respond: You Are My Sunshine. And they would be 16.67 percent correct. Truth is, Louisiana has six “official” state songs, more than most other states by, well...five. Who knew? Discerning why the guiding lights of our state government have seen fit to anoint six different musical compositions as “official” state songs over the decades is above my pay grade. Even Bacchus might blush at the excess. For the record, the first was Song of Louisiana, composed by Vashti Robertson Stopher, a professor of musical arts at LSU, and codified into law in 1932. In 1952, the legislature adopted Louisiana My Home Sweet Home, co-written by Castro Carazo, Huey P. Long’s handpicked director of the LSU marching band, as our second “official” state song. Next came Give Me Louisiana, enshrined by law in 1970 and written by the melodically named Doralice Fontaine. Then, in 1977, You Are My Sunshine was adopted as the “official” official state song. But our audiophilic legislators were far from sated. In 1990, our forward thinking representatives declared The Gifts of Earth, by Francis LeBeau, to be Louisiana’s “official” state environmental song. Then, ironically, it was a pair of catastrophic environmental disasters – Hurricanes Katrina and Rita – that prompted the legislature to declare Come 2 8 january 2019 myneworleans.com

Sunshine Thunder Reconsidering the state song by Chris Rose

Back to Louisiana, composed by Kenner natives Jay Chevalier and Bobby Attwood, as the “official” song of the recovery efforts for Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. And that was the last word – or song – on the matter. So far. No madrigal for the Deepwater Horizon disaster. No aria for the Saints Super Bowl victory. Hell, not even a roundelay for the state’s tricentennial. Then again, perhaps six songs are enough. Although it seems a shame there’s no more room in state’s legal annals for such classics as When the Saints Go Marching In, Doug Kershaw’s Louisiana Man, Hank Williams’ Jambalaya or Randy Newman’s sublime Louisiana, 1927. Or, for that matter, L’il Wayne’s La La La.

In general, “official” state songs celebrate the culture, history, agriculture, industry and geography of the pertinent state. But here’s the funny thing about You Are My Sunshine, Louisiana’s “official” official state song. You know it, right? Everyone knows it. Every third grader in Louisiana, every American, and most residents of the enlightened Western world. Country music legend George Jones once proclaimed it: “The most ubiquitous piece of music of the 20th century, second only to “Happy Birthday” and “Shave and a Haircut.” Made famous by former Governor Jimmie Davis during his first political campaign in the 1940s, the bright, infectious and, well – sunshiny – melody

boosted him to the Governor’s office twice and was subsequently covered by artists as diverse as Bing Crosby, Ray Charles, the Beach Boys, Johnny Cash, Carly Simon, Marvin Gaye, Mumford & Sons, Chris Stapleton and on and on and on. Our state song! Cool, right? But here’s the thing about You Are My Sunshine, the song that celebrates Louisiana, the song most identified with our state: Though some people think that Davis was the author, it was actually written by a guy from Georgia. And there’s not a word in it about Louisiana. Nothing. Nada. The only marginally tenuous connection between the song and the state is that sometimes the sun shines here. But in the song, that’s only a metaphor. Everyone knows the first verse of the song. In fact, it’s probably going through your head right now. But a casual examination of the rest of the lyrics reveal You Are My Sunshine to be the most vitriolic, menacing break-up song and stalker’s anthem ever recorded until Taylor Swift came on the scene. From our “official,” official state song, a few snippets: If you leave me to love another
you’ll regret it all some day. And then: But now you’ve left me and love another you have shattered all my dreams. There’s more. She took his sunshine away. He said please don’t. Fortunately, the song ends before he finds her in a roadside motel parking lot and goes all Taxi Driver on her. The eighth verse, one presumes. Never published. Our state song. Cool, right?

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Jason Raish Illustration


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modine gunch

BTW Understanding Abbrev’ns by Modine Gunch

My mother-in-law Ms. Larda

says her church bulletin is getting spicy. The St. Expedite Altar Society sisterhood is very upset. Bernetta Longtooth wrote the church bulletin for 40 years, but she can’t do it no more. She got herself a tell-all book contract and got no time for the church activities these days—that’s a whole other story. Thing is, Ms. Bernetta knew her grammar and spelling and didn’t abbreviate nothing that shouldn’t have been abbreviated. And now they got a little high schooler doing it forcommunity service points. She puts all the headlines in capital letters, and she abbreviates everything. For instance, instead of ST. EXPEDITE, she writes S.EX. So you read stuff like “S.EX CONFESSIONS SAT 6 PM” and “R U READY TO JOIN S.EX CHOIR?” Of course there’s a period after the ‘S,’ but still. It’s what you call suggestive. The parishioners are snickering. I got to explain. This high schooler is a sweet 3 0 january 2019 myneworleans.com

little thing named Akari from Japan. English is her second language, and she is very good at it—if you call Yat-speak English, because that’s what she has learned around here. Poor baby. Her ambition is to be a translator for the U.N. I can just hear that. “The prime ministuh of Jawdon says…” Also, she don’t pick up on English double meanings yet. Ms. Larda tells me all about this on our way to a post-holidays Weight Watchers meeting. It’s going to be a long king cake season this year— all the way into March — by which point our stretch pants will explode if we don’t do something. Well, we get to this meeting, and come to find out, it’s not Weight Watchers no more. It’s WW now. Ms. Larda storms out. Enough is enough with the abbreviations. She has had it. Now, Ms. Larda was a spelling bee champion back in her day, and she’s still proud of that. She don’t understand for the life of her why people don’t just use words, instead of putting

down initials and making you guess what they are trying to say. I am pretty sure the answer to that is Twitter, but that would take too long to explain. We drive past an IHOP and even that bothers her. “It should be International House of Pancakes,” she grumbles. “They call Burger King “B K” now,” I tell her. I shouldn’t have said that. She makes me pull over at a Waffle House—“That’s Waffle House, not WH!” — and scarfs down all her WW points for the month. I guess she feels better. That night, she calls me up, and says that, as president of the altar society sisterhood, she had a little talk with Akari. She explained how most people in the congregation are old and would rather read actual words than abbreviations. And if Akari HAS to abbreviate the word “Saint,” she should write ST., not just S. And she should always write out EXPEDITE, because S.EX sort of has a double meaning. Akari said sometimes it is hard to fit so many capital letters into so little space,

but she would be careful from now on. Ms. Larda also said it would be nice to have a little write-up about how proud she was of the ladies in the altar society sisterhood who took Christmas baskets to the needy, but Akari should be careful not to write the S.EX SISTERHOOD, because you could see that would be embarrassing. Akari said she got that. And come Sunday morning, I get a text from Ms. Larda— a picture of the St. Expedite bulletin, with the headline:“LARDA GUNCH PROUD OF GENEROUS ASS” To be fair, Ms. Larda didn’t say not to abbreviate Altar Society Sisterhood. I am afraid to call her for a few days, but finally I do. “I’m okay,” she says. “I prayed; I said the rosary; and I put it into perspective. Stuff happens. But it’s just here in this parish. It’s not like it’s a national headline or nothing. I’m at peace with it.” Thank God she don’t know it went viral on Twitter. #Iwillnevertell

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LORI  OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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JOIE D’EVE

No New Leaves Taking stock of my life as the year changes and deciding to change … nothing, really. By Eve Crawford Peyton

“What’re your new year’s

resolutions?” I asked Ruby as we chatted over FaceTime (she was visiting her dad in St. Louis). “I don’t make them anymore,” she said. “I always say it’s going to be to stop biting my nails, but I realized last year that I’d made the same resolution for five years so obviously it wasn’t working. So I stopped. Making them, I mean. Not biting my nails. I still do that. I probably always will.”

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“Makes sense,” I said. But still, I asked Georgia, just out of curiosity. “Hey, Georgie-Boo, what’re your new year’s resolutions?” “What’s that?” she asked. “You know – something you’re going to do differently in the new year …” “Oh,” she said. “Uh. I want to … eat more Nutella.” She went back to watching disembodied hands play with

toys on YouTube. bathtub. I’m content with my job. Basically, I am where Ruby I’m content with my house. I’m is. I don’t have any drastic way more than content with my plans for self-improvement. The friends and family. things I’d like to change about My life isn’t exciting – my myself – be less anxious, be more to-do list for the upcoming week organized, have some damn self- includes ordering new contacts, control around a bag of potato calling someone to come fix the chips – are things I’ve more or dishwasher, and figuring out the less accepted are too innate for source of the unpleasant smell me to ever effectively change. I’ve in my car (although, typing this, learned my own workarounds – I have just puzzled out that I the occasional Xanax, hundreds bet it’s water that leaked from of Post-It notes, and not keeping Georgia’s straw cup – the purple potato chips in the house – but cup is missing, and water, left at 37, I’m not going to change soaking into a floor mat, can smell who I am at my core, which is a almost as bad as milk, a fact almost everyone in New Orleans has messy neurotic salt addict. Ruby is wise to realize her learned after a heavy rain). limitations at 11, although of But I don’t want excitement. I course she might yet stop biting never really have, not even when her nails, and I always encourage I was much younger, and certainly her to push her own boundaries. not now. What I want – basic But she’s 11, not 37, and thus contentment – is what I have. My slightly more malleable. Still, we life is satisfying and full of small, are who we are. Mostly, I think, simple joys. (And frustrations, too, of course.) we’re born who we are. I’m lucky enough to be My goals for pretty darn content with this new year are Excerpted from Eve who I am and how I live. Crawford Peyton’s simple goals, easily I am content with the blog, Joie d’Eve, which achievable and solvfrequency with which I appears each Friday on able (with a little MyNewOrleans.com go to the gym: anywhere Febreeze). They from three times a week to never. don’t rise to the level of resoluI am content with the amount I tions, but I am going to take a eat and drink. I’m content with cue from my kids and not make my hobbies, which are basically resolutions this year at all. shuttling my kids to their hobbies Except maybe to eat more and reading terrible fiction in the Nutella.

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jane sanders illustration


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in tune

must-see music Jan. 13

Stonefield rocks with King Tuff at One Eyed Jacks.

Philip Glass

Jan. 15

Justin Timberlake pops into the Smoothie King Center. Jan. 17-19

The Radiators jam at Tips. Jan. 17

Gregory Alan Isakov plays indie folk at The Civic.

Symphony of Choice

Jan. 19 The Steeldrivers bring the bluegrass to the Joy.

LPO and more

Jan. 19 Amen Dunes experiment at One Eyed Jacks.

by Mike Griffith

Since returning home to the piece by Andrea Reinkemeyer that O r p h e u m , t h e L o u i s i a n a was commissioned by the LPO and Philharmonic Orchestra has been the League of American Orchestras. on a roll. After taking their first Just a week later on the 17th the tour earlier last year to play the LPO will be visited by Canadian works of Philip Glass in Carnegie violinist Nikki Chooi who recently Hall for the celebration of Glass’ served as Concertmaster of the 80th birthday, they have settled Metropolitan Opera Orchestra in into an excellent routine of exciting New York. Chooi will be part of a guests, original compositions and program featuring Mozart’s Violin old favorites. This month, they are Concerto No. 3 and Mahler’s 9th offering two outstanding events. First Symphony. on the 10th, 11th (in Covington) Of course, one of the highlights and 12th, the LPO is joined by BBC of January is the Link Stryjewski Young Musician of the Year—cellist Foundation’s Bal Masqué, which Sheku Kanneh-Mason who was this year will be on the 19th, featured on “Britain’s Got Talent” with a patron dinner the night before winning the before. For its fourth year, Young Musician the masquerade ball and fundraiser returns to the contest. Late last Playlist of mentioned year he played at the bands available Sugar Mill after its successful at: http://bit.ly/ wedding of Prince InTune1-19 transition to the larger space Harry and Meghan last year. This year, the event Markle. He will be joining the LPO will once again feature RAM, the for a program featuring Edward drum-roots-driven powerhouse band Elgar, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov from Port-au-Prince, Haiti. RAM and “Water Sings Fire”—an original will be joined by local favorites 3 4 january 2019 myneworleans.com

The Vermilionaires, Cha Wa, The Original Pinettes Brass Band, and The Roots of Music. As usual, the lineup for this is fantastic. RAM is an experience in and of itself and Cha Wa are making some of the best local music right now. In addition to the great music, food will be provided by a bevy of celebrity chefs from here and beyond. Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski will be joined by Andrew Carmellinii (Locanda Verde), Neal Bodenheimer (Cure), Nina Compton (Compere Lapin), John Currence (City Grocery), Suzanne Goin (Lucques) and many, many more. This is a great evening which supports the education and development New Orleans children. Finally, a reminder that every January, The Radiators come home to Tipitina’s for three nights. As always, this is a great opportunity to catch up with old friends and revisit this quintessential New Orleans band. This year the shows will be the 17th, 18th and 19th.

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Jan. 20 Perpetual Groove jam at Tips. Jan. 22 Carla Cooke brings the classics to Carver. Jan. 23 Parker Gispert solos at Gasa Gasa. Jan. 25 Lake Street Drive and Mikaela Davis rock at the Civic. Jan. 28-29

Tedeschi Trucks Band jams at the Saenger.

Dates are subject to change; email Mike@ MyNewOrleans.com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.


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jazz life

Leading A Revival    Bill Russell and the Discovery of Jazz by Jason Berry

An eccentric man of many

talents, William Russell was a catalytic presence in the rise of early jazz. Born in 1905 in Canton, Ohio, the classically trained violinist got hip to the groove in 1928 while teaching in New York. Like most seminal jazz producers, he began as an addictive record-collector scouring stores for rare discs, even going house to house in a black neighborhood of Cleveland seeking old ones from Depression-burdened people willing to sell. In 1936, Bill Russell and several comrades hauled down to New Iberia, Louisiana to interview Bunk Johnson, an early coronetist and influence on young Louis Armstrong. In 1939, Russell contributed key chapters to “Jazzmen,” the first major book in English on the new art form. He rehabilitated Johnson’s career and in the 40s produced influential recordings of Bunk and 3 6 january 2019 myneworleans.com

clarinetist George Lewis on the American Music Label (works still in issue), which helped spark the New Orleans Revival of the 50s. A longtime fixture at Preservation Hall in the 1960s, he was a founder of Tulane’s Hogan Jazz Archive, for which he conducted valuable oral history interviews. Russell’s vast research collection went to The Historic New Orleans Collection after his death in 1992; for all that energy, Russell was an introvert, a life-long bachelor and often self-effacing man. The riddles of his personality animate an impressive new book, “Bill Russell and the New Orleans Jazz Revival” by the English jazz scholars Ray Smith and Mike Pointon (Equinox). Based on marathon interviews with Russell in the mid-1980s, they reached far in questioning others who knew him. Like John Steiner, a Chicago producer, collector and

force behind the music there. The two men were roommates in the 1930s, when Russell was spending lots of time with Mahalia Jackson. Steiner calls Russell “inherently, a hermit… [but] those players were an essential live element of his study and hobby. However, it took both groups: his followers, who grasped and confirmed his gospel and could fulfill the psychological needs of his modest ego; and the musicians who were the performing angels to satisfy his artistic wants.” The house became a makeshift hotel when “a New Orleans band came to town, some carrying their own pallets,” Steiner continues. “Bill became a mother hen, running for strudel, helping place phone calls to their friends, and sewing on buttons.” Thirty years later, after Russell settled into a bohemian life in the French Quarter, living in a house

without a phone, his messages left at Preservation Hall, he played violin for the New Orleans Ragtime Orchestra while pouring himself into research on Jelly Roll Morton, writing articles, gathering more and more material. For some researchers, the quest becomes the story, the hunt for more begets more hunting. Bill Russell and the New Orleans Jazz Revival is a grand journey through the life and mind of a man who seriously mattered. “He enjoyed talking about the music he loved,” writes coauthor Pointon. “This remarkably kind man gave so willingly of his time, although it was clear he suffered badly from asthma, not helped by the humid New Orleans climate.” Several of the interview tapes were used for a BBC radio series. Now, in full scope, Russell has found the biographers he deserved.

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photograph courtesy of Preservation Hall


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home

The living room combines Scandinavian modern furnishings with organic elements and photographs by Conrad, whose work is available by appointment in her home/studio, via lisaconradphoto@hotmail.com or at Drift 30A Home & Gifts in Inlet Beach, Florida. “Western Lake” hangs above the door frame. Her misty photographs of horses (featured in Twilight Breaking Dawn) and herons are stacked on the walls at right. Table Scandinavia Inc.; pillow by Sean Yseult; chair, bowl, pods all Pottery Barn; white Moroccan tables and faux leather gold foil detail rug, World Market.

Behind The Lens Lisa Conrad, A Model Home by Lee Cutrone photographed by Greg Miles

Lunch with Lisa Conrad is a

lesson in the quick pace of her creative spirit. Moments in, she’s using my scarf to demonstrate at least a half dozen chic Parisian ways to tie it. As a model, Saks Fifth 3 8 january 2019 myneworleans.com

Avenue personal shopper/stylist, jewelry maker and photographer, she has plenty of ways to express her talents. It’s not surprising that her home, half of a tree-shaded bungalow double, reflects them.

Raised in Santa Barbara, California, New Mexico and Pennsylvania before setting out on her own at 18, the statuesque blonde with a west-meets-eastcoast sensibility began her career

in front of the camera as a model, appearing in such high-profile gigs as Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation video and posing for such renowned photographers as the Starn Twins and Ellen von Unwerth. In the early 1990s, she found that she also had a place behind the camera when a good friend gave her a Canon Rebel. “It was like somebody put a paintbrush in your hand, realizing you are an artist,” she said. “I took a roll of film and was so excited by how it came out. I learned how to manipulate light during my years as a model.” Soon her photographs were being shown in a home design store on Chartres Street and featured in the windows of the Gucci store on Canal Street. Conrad’s love of nature, the beach, outdoor sports, dogs, and travel all inform her work and her aesthetic. She says she’s happiest with her toes in the sand and a dog by her side. Along with her two lovable black lab rescues, Sadie and Lakin, Conrad makes four trips to Florida each year where she paddle boards and finds the Zen


center that enables her to take gorgeous images of landscapes and wild life. Her décor, like her fashion style, which often combines high-end designer pieces with beachy boho necklaces that she makes, is an eclectic mix. The look consists of minimalist Danish Modern furniture, hip on-trend appointments, and a 1970s California-surfer girl-coastal vibe. Sea shells, ocean-side

photographs, and surfboards are all part of the design scheme. “There are pieces of the beach everywhere,” said Conrad, who keeps a drawer stocked with bikinis and is devoted to wearing one daily as a way of reminding herself to keep in shape. “Whether buoys and oars from Apalachicola Bay or shells on my mantle partnered with a mannequin hand from my job.”

Top, left: Art and collected pieces surrounding the bedroom mantle include a set of vases from Saks Fifth Avenue, a painting of Conrad and her previous dogs (Beau and Luc) by Justin Forbes, and a trilogy of beach photos; table from Scandinavia Inc., coffee table books from Saks. Top, right: Bottom: Lisa Conrad and Laken, one of her two rescue dogs (from the North Shore Humane Society), in the back yard of her Uptown home; both are wearing pieces of Conrad’s BohoNolaJewelry.

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Facing page: Top, left: Conrad’s photographs are prominently displayed in the house. The photo above the mantle, entitled “Jane Doe”, was taken in Austria; the herons on either side have been described as Modern Day Audubons and were taken in Boca Grande, Florida; her “San Diego” watercolor print framed in silver wood molding sits on the mantle; small pieces framing the mantle, by Matteo Neivert; at the foot of the fireplace, glass jars hold sand and shells; Conrad made the decorative balls covered with shells. Bottom, left: An orange wool and linen throw from Saks Fifth Avenue, where Conrad has worked for more than 17 years as a personal shopper and stylist, echoes the sunset color of Conrad’s “Vegas” photograph above the bed; she took the photograph from an airplane window looking back at the Las Vegas hills; her photograph “La Femme” hangs at left and “Aruba” at right. Bottom, right: Conrad created her outdoor haven to be part New Orleans, part beach, two of her favorite places. This page: top, left: Almond croissants and sparkling sodas in the kitchen near a display of Conrad’s handmade necklaces; blue bucket from Pottery Barn, the yellow ice bucket was a gift from a friend; Conrad’s jewelry is available on her Etsy page – BohoNolaJewelry, by appt. at lisaconradphoto@hotmail. com or at Drift 30A in Inlet Beach, Florida. Top, right: Conrad’s photograph entitled “Alys” hangs above a large chest; Kartell tray and papier maché bird, from Perch.

In the backyard she’s used color, cacti and aquatic themes to create an outdoor haven with obvious ties to both her Southwest roots and her frequent beach destinations. Inspiration for the cactus garden also came from her love of architect Frank Ghery, whose own Santa Monica bungalow was seminal. The interior of the home is fragranced with a favorite pinon-scented incense that reminds her of New Mexico and evidence of her jewelry sideline is scattered atop a kitchen table turned workspace. Three separate wardrobes and two closets are neatly organized with a clothing collection accumulated over decades in the fashion industry. Conrad has exhibited her work at local galleries, The CAC and New Orleans Auction, as well as in other cities, including New York and Boston. They’ve also appeared in major films – “Twilight,” “Breaking” and “Girls’ Trip.” But, these days Conrad uses her home as the primary showplace for

her photographs, all printed, mounted and framed with archival quality materials. “At this stage, I prefer selling out of my home or working with interior decorators,” she said. “In my home, people like to sit and have a glass of wine and experience my art as they would in their own homes, so it creates a more personal experience.” Works by other artists and photographers including Sean Yseult, Matteo Neivert, David Halliday and Barbara Brainard, all friends, are also displayed for Conrad’s enjoyment. Like her photographs, Conrad’s home base - likely not to be the last for this self-described “nomad at heart” - tells a story about an occupant engaged in the art of living life to the fullest and using her artistry to share her passions. “When I take a photograph, I’m capturing a moment in time that meant something to me and then it’s my job to convey that emotion as best I can.”

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Our Guide to Drinking Spots with Character And Characters

BY Jyl Benson photographed by denny culbert


We humans are social creatures with a natural instinct to seek out the companionship of others. As largely insecure, but curious creatures, we are compelled to measure the quality of our lives by meeting new people face to face and comparing our lives to theirs. True, in New Orleans it is perfectly acceptable to strike up a lengthy conversation with a total stranger in the check-out line at the grocery or over a gas pump, but , for many, bars remain the historic fallback when we want to hang out with friends or make new ones. Of all the gathering places available to us, bars provide the social lubricant many of us need to strike out among strangers. Good, bad, or otherwise, drinking culture is tightly woven into the social fabric of everyday life in New Orleans. New Orleans’ bars are as a numerous and diverse as the people who populate them and the reasons for their patronage. Want to catch the game or some live music? We have bars for that. Dig on trivia, backgammon or bingo? Check. Check. Check. Lonely? Feeling romantic? Want to send a clear message to your companion to leave and never return? You get the point: New Orleans has all the bases covered. People go to bars for a million different reasons. Alcohol just happens to be there.


Cane and Table’s Mai Tai is served in a whole hollowed out pineapple. Brad Gocher crafts a cocktail behind the bar at Cane and Table. The courtyard seating is reflected in the window that looks into the Cane and Table dining room and bar. Piano Sour on the bar. Sipping a Hurricane and Table cocktail.

People Watching

Chef Eric Cook recently opened restaurant Gris Gris in the triangularshaped building at Magazine and Felicity. It’s a sweet spot for sure but the real estate came with the rare, tantalizing bonus of outdoor seating on the deep, graceful, climate-controlled second floor balcony. If people watching and a long hang with friends on a beautiful day is your jam then this is your spot. [ Gris Gris,1800 Magazine St., 272-0241, grisgrisnola.com. Catch the Game

Loads of televisions, a friendly crowd, and thriftily priced drinks are the order of the day when it’s Game Day. Best bets: Henry’s Bar, Uptown; MRB, French Quarter; and Avenue Pub, Lower Garden District. [ Avenue Pub, 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243, theavenuepub.com. [ Henry’s Bar, 5101 Magazine St., 324-8140, henrysbaruptown.com [ MRB (Mississippi River Bottom), 515 St. Philip St., 524.2558, no website. Pre-Dome Cocktails

Imbued with a sexy vibe and a secretive feel that comes as no surprise in a former brothel, CellarDoor operates in the circa 1830 Swoop-Duggins House just a short walk and a world away from the Dome. A shaded courtyard and seating on deep balconies add to the mysterious feel. Though the spot opens on Sundays when the Saints play just down the street, this upscale spot

seems like a better bet before a highly anticipated concert. [ CellarDoor, 916 Lafayette St., 265-8392, cellardoornola.com. Drinks with Out of Town Guests

Shame on you if you go no further than the hotel bar with your out-of-town guests or, worse, allow them to depart with the idea the “Big Ass Beers” on Bourbon Street is the best we have to offer. As one of the few surviving structures from the Spanish colonial period, Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop was erected at Bourbon and St. Philip streets in the 1770s, making it one of the city’s oldest structures. With peeling plaster walls, the dimly lit space (take care maneuvering over the cobblestone floors) is enlivened with music tinkling in from the rear piano bar, setting the proper stage to share the building’s fascinating history while sipping potent Obituary cocktails. [ Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop, 941 Bourbon St., 593-9761, lafittesblacksmithshop.com. Sipping cocktails on the veranda at The Columns Hotel while observing the rumbling streetcar making its way down the tracks under a canopy of oaks will fulfill every first-time visitor’s “Moonlight and Magnolias” vision of New Orleans. The tranquil, languorous beauty of the space will compel you to linger and reconnect with the more graceful aspects of our city. A daily 5 to 7 happy hour and free live local music nightly at 8 p.m. make this a pretty sweet destination.


Nick Detrich

Happy hour in the dining room of Copper Vine. Behind the bar are more than thirty wooden handled wine taps.

Nick Detrich became well-known in the cocktail world for Cane & Table, a tiki rum bar in the French Quarter. Last spring he teamed up with Chris Hannah of Arnaud’s French 75 and Konrad Kantor of El Libre, to open an El Floridita-inspired Cuban-themed bar that celebrates Havana›s golden age with classic drinks like the Daiquiri No. 4, Papa Dobles, and El Presidenté. At Manolito bartenders practice a “throwing’ technique whereby drinks are mixed by pouring liquids back and forth several times from high above the glass. The group named Manolito for Manuel “Manolito Carbajo, a Cuban bartender who died in 2017 and served as a mentor to Hannah and Detrich. Detrich and Kantor are also partners in Everywhen on Rampart Street. Manolito, 508 Dumaine St., 603-2740, manolitonola.com.


[ The Columns Hotel, 3811 St. Charles Ave., 899-9308, thecolumnshotel.com.

Live Jazz Music

The Royal Frenchmen Hotel, beautifully forged from two historic townhouses facing Washington Square Park, opened its doors last autumn with 13 rooms, three suites, and a large, interior courtyard with a stunning fountain. The courtyard, serviced by the cozy Royal Bar with inspired craft cocktails, artisan wines and spirits, and an extensive list of craft beers, is the scene for a changing roster of live jazz ensembles. The space offers a tranquil retreat from the crowds jamming the clubs on Frenchmen Street. [ The Royal Frenchmen Hotel, 1614-700 Frenchmen St., 619-9660, theroyalfrenchmenhotel.com. A Proposal

Located behind a high wooden fence, the fact that you have found N7 is indicated only by a small red impression in the wood. To step behind the swinging gate is to enter another world; a warmly lit romantic discovery that will send little shivers of pleasure through the stoniest of hearts. A lush garden surrounds the small, open building glowing with candlelight and a polished copper-topped wine bar. Within the petite French restaurant, beautiful people sip natural, handmade wines and share artfully arranged plates of French delicacies. [ N7, 1117 Montegut St., no telephone, n7nola.com. A First Date

A beautiful lighting plan that makes everyone look and feel their best is imperative for a first date. Both Bouligny Tavern and Cure deliver. The former, a gastro-pub, has a sexy, mid-century modern sensibility with banquet seating, clean-lined furnishings, and futuristic light fixtures straight out of Mad Men. The latter, coming up on its ninth year in

Trivia Nights, Episodes of Dr. Who and a Brit Vibe

Just blocks from the Algiers Ferry landing and, therefore, easily accessible from downtown New Orleans, the Crown & Anchor Pub bills itself as New Orleans’ only authentic English pub. Find an extensive selection of draught beer, single malt scotch, wine, mixed drinks and bottled beer. The Thursday night Pub Quiz and darts are popular attractions. The vibe is mellow and the place is decked in vintage Brit paraphenalia. [ Crown & Anchor Pub, 200 Pelican Ave., 227-1007, crownandanchor.pub.


Drink with your Dog The Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515, rustynailnola.com. Rendezvous, 3101 Magazine St., 891-1777, therendezvoustavern. com. Twelve Mile Limit, 500 S. Telemachus St., 488-8114, twelvemilelimit.com. Brieux Carre Brewing, 2115 Decatur St., 304-4242, brieuxcarre.com. Mid-City Yacht Club, 440 S. St. Patrick St., 483-2517, midcityyachtclub.com. Bulldog Uptown, 3236 Magazine St., 891-1516, deraftfreak. com. Bulldog Mid-City, 5135 Canal Blvd., 488-4191,draftfreak. com. Crown & Anchor Pub, 200 Pelican Ave., 227-1007, crownandanchor.pub. Colin Decarufel’s Old Again cocktail, garnished with sliced apples, can be found on the menu at Longway Tavern. From the Shot List, Jeppson’s Malort is served with a Slim Jim back.

Parleaux Beer Lab, 634 Lesseps St., 702-8433, parleauxbeerlab.com. Le Bon Temps, 4801 Magazine St., 895-8117, lbtrnola.com. Finn McCool’s, 3701 Banks St., 486-9080, finnmccools.com. Henry’s Bar, 5101 Magazine St., 324-8140, henrysbaruptown.com. Old Point Bar, 545 Patterson Dr., Algiers, 364-095., oldpointbarnola.com.

business, pioneered the now-thriving dining and nightlife scene on Freret Street when it opened in an elegantly re-imagined firehouse. Both have extensive craft cocktail and wine lists, and both feature the welcome addition of well-appointed outdoor courtyard sitting areas. [ Bouligny Tavern, 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, boulignytavern.com. [ Cure, 4905 Freret St., 302-2357, curenola.com. A Breakup

The Dungeon is the place to do “the deed,” if you have the heart of the Grinch. Lead your dumpee through the dark, narrow (turn side-ways), claustrophobia-inducing alley that feels more like the passageway to the gallows than a dimly lit bar with skulls and bones adorning the brick walls. Visit after midnight on the weekend when the upstairs bar is open and treat your date to the visage of the most garishly demonic art outside of Dante’s Inferno. If your companion has any sense at all, they will flee from your company and you will be off the hook to enjoy, in the solitude someone like you so richly deserves, a cup of Dragon’s Blood, Witches Brew, or Midnight Potion while perched on a bench inside one of the many cages, serenaded by screeching heavy metal music. [ The Dungeon, 738 Toulouse St., thedungeoneneworleaans.com. A Sultry Atmosphere [ Napoleon House, 500 Chartres St., 524.9752, napoleonhouse.com. [ Cane and Table, 1113 Decatur St., 581.1112, caneandtablenola.com.

Hiding in Public

It was close to 30 years ago when I encountered Mick Jagger three times in one night. Never once did I or anyone else disrupt his evening out, so it’s safe to assume if Mick Jagger can hide in public in New Orleans, anyone can. The first time I saw the front man for The Rolling Stones was early in the evening and he was shooting pool at the eternally grubby Grit’s Bar. A few hours later he turned up amongst the clutter of old New Orleans memorabilia at The Saturn Bar. Then, as Saturday night edged ever closer to Sunday morning a group of us were dancing on the warped floors and passing a collection jug for J Monque’ D and his band at the now defunct Benny’s Blues Bar. When I passed the jug to Jagger he stuffed in a wad of cash, took a pull on his Dixie, and kept on dancing, just as cool as the other side of your pillow.

[ Grit’s Bar, 530 Lyons St., 899-921, no website. [ The Saturn Bar, 3067 St Claude Ave., 949-7532, no website.

When You Just Can’t Deal with Going Home Alone

It is no secret that some go out on the prowl with the singular intention of heading home with a willing near or total stranger for a tryst. No judgment, a few spots are known as places to look. Among them, F&M Patio Bar, Uptown, and The Gold Mine Saloon in the French Quarter. After midnight the main bar at the former has a frat house vibe and it’s packed with students, musicians, professionals on the prowl, and justoff-work waiters and bartenders. Down in the French Quarter the Gold Mine is known for its rowdy crowd as well as old arcade games, including The Amazing Spider-Man and Popeye, both of which, presumably, are effective icebreakers. Drink specials may include the two-for-one Flaming Dr. Pepper, Retro Nights and the Wheel of Booze. Spin the wheel to launch a drink special that will last between 10 minutes and half an hour. [ F&M Patio Bar, 4841 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-6784, fandmpatiobar.com. [ The Gold Mine, 701 Dauphine St., 586-0745, no website. Mardi Gras Day

While crowded, the balcony at The R Bar is a welcome way to take in Mardi Gras Day while staying above the crowds and out of the muck. Good Friends, on the other hand, is Ground Zero on the big day, a.k.a the stage for the Bourbon Street Awards. The Drag Queen Beauty Contest, is, inexplicably, not on Bourbon Street at all but is located just outside the front door to Good Friends on Dauphine Street. [ Good Friends Bar, 740 Dauphine St., 566-7191, goodfriendsbar.com. [ The R Bar (inside the Royal Street Inn), 1431 Royal St., 948-7499, royalstreetinn. com. Upscale Shots and a Warm Welcome

Though the French Quarter is an actual neighborhood, most businesses tend to overlook neighborhood patronage in favor of the more lucrative tourist dollars. At Longway Tavern, a relaxed, civilized, welcoming environment courts return patronage and casts Bourbon Street 1,000 miles away. This quality of hospitality comes honestly to 719 Toulouse St., once the home of writers Roark and Mary Rose Bradford, both of whom purportedly slept all day and


Stand Out Happy Hours 1

DTB All draft beers and wines by the glass are half off and the daily cocktail is $5 from 4 to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. 8201 Oak St #1,518-6889, dtbnola.com. 2

Apolline Mimosas are $2 and well drinks, beer and wine are half off every Tuesday through Friday from 5 to 6 p.m. Five dollar wine specials and $20 for select bottles of wine all day on Wednesdays. 4729 Magazine St., 894-8881, apollinerestaurant.com. 3

Bouligny Tavern $5 classic cocktails and wines by the glass, Monday through Friday, from 4 to 6 p.m. 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, boulignytavern.com.

Pups are always welcome at the Rusty Nail.

4

Toups South Happy hour from 3 to 7 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, plus Monday when wines by the glass are $5, and special cocktails are $6. 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd, 304-2147, toupssouth.com. 5

Bar 1908 at Pythian Market $5 wines; $4 draft beer; $6 frozen concoctions and old fashioneds from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. 234 Loyola Ave, 481-9599, pythianmarket.com. 6

Brennan’s Choose from seven cocktails, wines by the glass, and hearty, upscale snacks like smoked duck wings, crab and artichoke dip, and wood-grilled oysters at Happy Hour prices every day from 2 to 7 p.m. in the Roost Bar. On Fridays at 5 p.m., Champagne sabering is featured in the courtyard. 417 Royal St., 525-9711, brennansneworleans.com. 7

Cafe Degas Happy Hour is offered on Wednesday and Thursday from 3 to 6 p.m. Plates of assorted pates are $6; plump, expertly fried oysters with creamy aioli are also$6; classic escargot are $5; and a hearty portion of Moules au Fenouil & Frites is $8. Glasses of quality French wines, both still and sparkling, a daily house cocktail, and glasses of NOLA Blonde beer are $5. 3127 Esplanade Avenue, 945-5635, cafedegas.com.

wrote all night, graciously welcoming with food and drink those who took “the long way” home after work in the neighborhood. The spot made it on to Esquire magazine’s list of “Best New Restaurants” for 2018 and Chef John Sinclair’s upscale comfort food is mighty fine indeed, but Liam Deegan’s beverage program is equally striking. The list of creative shots made a decisive impression. Vivid green Chartreuse with an orange Fanta backer is oddly satisfying, both visually and on the palate. [ Longway Tavern, 719 Toulouse St., 962-9696, LongwayTavern.com. Service Industry

The service industry crowd drives its own micro-culture with few ready to head home after pulling an adrenaline soaked double shift. Enter the bars popular with the vampiric crowd, and that favors hard partying with the same people they have been working with for the past 12 to 16 hours. The Black Penny, an old-school dive bar, is a popular choice for French

Quarter servers, when they are ready to be served. There are reasonably priced craft cocktails and over 90 regional, American, and imported craft beers, all of which are canned. The Saint in the Lower Garden District is also popular with the service industry crowd with karaoke and rock bottom prices being the big draws. [ The Black Penny, 700 N Rampart St., 304-4779, no website. [ The Saint, 961 St. Mary St., 523-0050, thesaintneworleans.com. Watch the Sunset

Hot Tin Rooftop Bar (in the Pontchartrain Hotel), 2031 St. Charles Ave., 323-1500, hottinbar.com [

Classic Cocktails

With its African walnut bar, richly paneled walls, and impeccably restored Paul Ninas murals hailing from the height of the Art Deco era, The Sazerac Bar may be the most elegant drinking establishment in New Orleans. The environment compels you to sit a little


Bartender Brian Chambliss puts the final touches on a Penicillin cocktail at Hot Tin.


Gunshop Fizz, a Cure original, shines red


straighter and walk at bit taller, lest Huey P. Long stroll in and catch you slouching in the spot where he enjoyed many a Ramos Gin Fizz. [ The Sazerac Bar (in The Roosevelt Hotel), 130 Roosevelt Way, 648-1200, therooseveltneworleans.com. Dive Bar with Great Grub and Cheap, High Quality Drinks

Thrillist once said of Mid City’s Twelve Mile Limit: “It’s the neighborhood bar worth leaving your actual neighborhood to adopt as your own.” It’s true. Owner/ Bartender T. Cole Newton turns out inventive cocktails and serves them up at thrifty prices. He also keeps things interesting with frequent specials: Free Food Mondays (7 to 8 p.m.), Open Mic (Mondays 9 p.m.), Charity Bingo (first Tuesdays at 8 p.m.), Trivia Wednesdays (8 p.m.), and Heat-Wave Oldies Dance Parties (second Saturdays at 10 p.m.) The dive bar also turns out exceptional Texas style BBQ. [ Twelve Mile Limit, 500 S. Telemachus St., 488-8114, twelvemilelimit.com. Rubbing Shoulders with The Beautiful People [ The Elysian Bar at the Hotel Peter & Paul, 2317 Burgundy St., 356-6769.

Free Live Music and No One is a Stranger

Located on the Algiers riverfront, the Old Point Bar has a bohemian air. The walls are covered in license plates and old bobble head figures, and an old military police sign forms the backdrop behind the bandstand where live music is offered every night and on weekend afternoons. The feeling is warm, welcoming and lived-in. There’s a huge assortment of beers, many of them regional on tap, and no one is a stranger for more than a minute. Feel free to bring your dog. [ Old Point Bar, 545 Patterson Dr., Algiers, 364-0950, oldpointbarnola.com. Wine

Culinary entrepreneur Kyle Brechtel recently opened Copper Vine, a new wine bar concept in the CBD with a

state-of-the-art wine tap system in the historic, circa 1876, Edwardian building that once housed Maylie’s Restaurant. There is an expansive, lush, sexy tropical courtyard decked out with bench seating, throw pillows, rugs, and elegant minimalist outdoor furniture. Thirty wine varietals are available on tap. Wine flights allow for vertical exploration of flavors and varietals, and a Coravin system allows guests to taste 20 higher end and exotic wines that are not typically poured by-the-glass. There are eight local beers on tap, as well as a strong cocktail program. Other wine-centric spots worth checking out include The Delachaise, Uptown; The Vintage, Magazine Street; and Bacchanal Wine, Bywater. [ Bacchanal Wine, 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111, bacchanalwine. com. [ Copper Vine, 1009 Poydras St., 208-9535, coppervinewine.com. [ Delachaise, 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, thedelachaise.com. [ The Vintage, 3121 Magazine St., 324-7144, thevintagenola.com. A cocktail in a glass featuring a cartoon character

Turkey & the Wolf is as ridiculous as it is brilliant. Mismatched glasses featuring throwbacks like the Hamburgler keep time with rummage sale finds of Mawmaw’s old china and a menu that is surely planned with a bong. Knock it all back with one of the ever changing cocktails like Snickerpoodle My Labradoodle (vodka, mint, cinnamon, rice milk, and hellfire bitters). [ Turkey & the Wolf, 739 Jackson Ave., New Orleans, 218-7428, turkeyandthewolf.com. Tiki Cocktails

What could be more perfect than a tiki bar in the French Quarter? Jeff “Beachbum” Berry spent decades unearthing and publishing “lost” exotic tiki drink recipes, many of which you will find on the list at his colorful hangout, complete with an indoor pool. [ Beachbum Berry’s Latitude 29, 321 N. Peters St., 609-3811, latitude29nola.com.

Mark Schettler Mark Schettler started his career in Chicago and took a chance on New Orleans when he needed a fresh start. Today he is one of those bartenders that high-end liquor brands pay to represent them at events all around the world. When he’s not jet-setting, he serves as the General Manager and Bartender at Bar Tonique. He is the former president of the New Orleans Chapter of the U.S. Bartender’s Guild. He co-founded and serves as executive director of Shift Change, an organization devoted to ending sexual violence the service industry. Bar Tonique, 820 N. Rampart St., 324-6045, bartonique.com.


OUR READERS’ PICKS A couple of notes: to make the list, a choice had to have a significant number of votes; places without enough votes were eliminated. Categories without enough voters were also removed. Where there was evidence of ballot stuffing (and there wasn’t much) the votes were adjusted accordingly. We know that there are some significant places that didn’t make the list, nevertheless we’re confident that those that are listed are all worthy and are among the tops in their field. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA ESSEX BRADLEY


Top Bloody Mary Ruby Slipper Café The Ruby Slipper Café’s selection of award winning Bloody Mary’s gives new meaning to the term “rise and shine.” Diners can choose between vodka, house made baconinfused vodka, or tequila based bloody’s. Pair with the restaurant’s classic breakfast and brunch favorites at any of the city’s five locations (or three locations when in Baton Rouge, Pensacola or Orange Beach.) Therubyslippercafe.net.

King Cake 1. Nonna Randazzo’s Bakery 2. Manny Randazzo 3. Haydel’s Bakery Fried Chicken 1. Popeye’s 2. Willie Mae’s Scotch House Poor Boys 1. Parkway Bakery & Tavern 2. Parran’s Po-Boys 3. Domillise’s Po-Boy & Bar Tacos 1. Superior Grill 2. Taqueria Corona 3. Juan’s Flying Burrito Sushi 1. Tsunami 2. Sake Café 3. Rock N Sake Wings 1. Hooters Onion Rings 1. Mr. Ed’s Oyster House 2. Hooter’s Pizza 1. Midway 1. Pi 2. Katie’s Restaurant Snowballs 1. Sal’s Sno-Ball Stand 2. Hansen’s Sno-Bliz 3. Plum Street Snowballs Local Grocery Store 1. Rouses 2. Dorignac’s 3. Langenstein’s 3. Zuppardo’s Local Sandwich Shop 1. Stein’s Deli 2. World Deli 3. Francesca’s Food Truck 1. Bona Fried Places for Cajun 1. Mulate’s 2. Cajun Cookery Places for Creole 1. Creole Cookery Middle Eastern 1. Saba 1. Byblos 2. Lebanon Cafe


Italian 1. Vincent’s 2. Red Gravy 3. Venezia Japanese 1. Hoshun 1. Mikimoto Chinese 1. Five Happiness 2. Little China Town Vietnamese 1. Pho NOLA 2. Hoshun Thai 1. La Thai 2. Banana Blossom Korean 1. Little Korea BBQ Indian 1. Saffron NOLA 2. Taj Mahal Mexican/Southwest 1. Superior Grill 2. El Gato Negro 2. Taqueria Corona Tapas 1. Saba 2. Avo 2. Baru Steakhouse 1. Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse 2. Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse 2. Mr. John’s Steakhouse Burgers 1. Company Burger Hot Dogs 1. Dat Dog 2. Lucky Dog Gumbo 1. Mulate’s 2. Commander’s Palace 2. Chef Ron’s Gumbo Stop Turtle Soup 1. Commander’s Palace

Sweet Shop 1. Sucre 2. Angelo Brocato 3. Maple Street Patisserie

Coffee House 1. PJ’s

Ice Cream/Gelato Shop 1. Angelo Brocato 2. Creole Creamery

Coffee House For Food 1. PJ’s 2. District Donuts

Place for Seafood 1. Mr. Ed’s Seafood

Dessert Menu 1. Commander’s Palace

Place for Raw Oysters 1. Acme Oyster House 2. Drago’s

Barbecue Shrimp 1. Pascal’s Manale Top Restaurant 1. Commander’s Palace Top Restaurant in 2018 1. Saba Restaurant Worth the Drive 1. Middendorf’s 2. Zydeco’s

Top Sushi Tsunami Tsunami Sushi, located in the CBD, has quickly become one of New Orleans’ favorite places for creative sushi rolls, traditional sashimi and grilled items, along with daily specials, hot sake and desserts. Servingsushi.com


Top Local Sandwich Shop Stein’s Deli Imagine bringing together the best New York bagel shop, Jewish deli and Italian eatery and sprinkle liberally with New Orleans laissez faire attitude and you have Stein’s Market And Deli. Steins serves up customers with cured meats, cheeses, and fully loaded sandwich creations in the lower garden district, as well as attracting a dedicated following of those who drive across town specifically for their loaded specialty sandwiches. Steinsdeli.com.


Top Vietnamese Pho NOLA Pho Nola puts a local twist on its traditional dishes; check out “NOLA Combination� Banh Mi Po-Boy that will give any traditional roast beef poor boy a run for its money. Pho-nola.com.


Hotel Bar 1. Carousel Bar Local Beer 1. Abita 2. Dixie Happy Hour 1. Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar & Restaurant Craft Cocktail Bar 1. Cure French Bread 1. Leidenheimer 2. Maple Street Patisserie Vegetarian Dishes 1. Byblos 2. Sala Breakfast 1. Ruby Slipper Café Brunch 1. Red Gravy Buffet 1. Court of Two Sisters Late Night Dining 1. Hoshun Live Music 1. House of Blues 2. Tipitina’s Live Theater 1. Southern Rep 2. Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre Radio 1. WWL 2. WWOZ 3. Magic 101 Carnival Parade 1. Endymion

Top Hot Dogs Dat Dog The Hawaiian-shirt sporting Dat Dog team have been providing hot dogs with all, and we do mean ALL, the fixins’ since 2011. Since then, that first solo restaurant on Freret Street has grown to a doggone dynasty, with five locations across New Orleans, in Lafayette and College Station, Texas. Datdog.com

Caterer 1. Joel Catering World Deli Pigeon Catering Outdoor Dining 1. Avo 2. Broussard’s Fine Dining 1. Commander’s Palace Power Lunch 1. Galatoire’s Commander’s Palace

Neighborhood Restaurant 1. Katie’s Restaurant Margarita 1. Superior Grill 1. El Gato Negro Sports Bar 1. Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar & Restaurant Dive Bar 1. Snake & Jake’s 2. Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar & Restaurant

State Festival 1. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival 2. Sugar Festival 3. New Orleans Festival 4. French Quarter Festival 5. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival Museum 1. New Orleans Museum of Art 2. National WWII Museum Art Gallery 1. Gallery Osborne 2. Newcomb Gallery


Top Hotel 1. Royal Sonesta 2. Windsor Court 3. Ritz-Carlton Bed And Breakfast 1. Degas House 2. Terell House Golf Course 1. TPC 2. Bayou Oaks at City Park Gym 1. Orange Theory Yoga/Pilates Studio 1. NOLA Pilates Fitness Studio 1. Orange Theory Day Spa 1. Woodhouse Day Spa 2. EarthSavers Spa + Store 3. Chronos Body Health Wellness Dry Cleaner 1. Young’s Dry Cleaning 1. One Cleaners Men’s Clothing Store 1. Rubensteins 2. Perlis Womens’ Boutique 1. Bra Genie 2. A. Renee Boutique Children’s Boutique 1. Auraluz Local Shoe Store 1. Good Feet Store Local Jeweler 1. Aucoin Hart Wedding Dress 1. Wedding Belles 2. Bliss Bridal

Top Bakery Maple Street Patisserie Walk past Maple Street Patisserie and you feel as if you’ve traveled abroad. Conveniently tucked away in Uptown, it draws customers looking for breakfast, lunch, dessert and breads. Cargocollective.com/maplestreetpatisserie

Bookstore 1. Barnes and Noble 2. French Library Antiques 1. M.S. Rau Antiques 2. Keil’s Antiques Furniture Store 1. Compass Furniture Lawn/Garden Store 1. Perino’s 2. Jefferson Feed, Pet & Garden

Place to Gamble 1. Harrah’s Casino Place to Buy Liquor and Wine 1. Martin Wine Cellar 2. Dorignac’s

Gulf Coast Getaway 1. Beau Rivage Gulf Coast Hotel 1. Beau Rivage 2. Scarlet Pearl

Top Bank 1. Iberia Bank 2. Fidelity Bank 3. Regions Bank

Local Charity 1. LA SPCA 2. Real Men Wear Pink

Top Realtor 1. Robert Ripley 2. Steve Bean

Local Craft Brewery 1. Abita 2. Urban South


Top 2018 Restaurant Top Middle Eastern Top Tapas Saba Chef Alon Shaya’s restaurant Saba, the first launch for his own Pomegranate Hospitality Group, attracts guests who are looking to share a home-cooked, modern Israeli menu that is inspired-with a New Orleans twist. Warm and inviting, the menu, which recently grew to include lunch, dinner and a brunch menu is the perfect place for families, date night, and fun with friends Uptown. Eatwithsaba.com


A VOTE FOR

TheVoice Mark Romi g : E l l a Bre nna n Li fet i me Ac h i eveme n t Award By Jay Form an

C

p hot og r ap h by g r e g m ile s

hances are you’ve seen New Orleans singled out in “Places to Visit” lists across the national media landscape recently, culminating with the #1 spot on the New York Times “52 Places to go in 2018.” Messaging like this doesn’t just simply happen, it is the payoff of a long game played by the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation team, whose purpose is to bring leisure travelers to our fair city. And the man leading them is President and CEO Mark Romig, whose tireless efforts in this regard have made him the clear choice for the New Orleans Wine and Food Experience’s 2019 Ella Brennan Lifetime Achievement Award. For NOWFE president Gail Varuso, the selection made perfect sense. “Mark’s genuine passion and enthusiasm for New Orleans and the state of Louisiana are contagious. He truly is ‘Mr. Hospitality,’” Varuso said. “We are so pleased to honor Mark Romig for the extraordinary achievements he has made to the hospitality and tourism industry, not to mention his spirit for community collaboration.” In person, it’s clear why so many find Romig to be a natural leader. He is charismatic and possessed of an enthusiasm that draws people in. Even if you haven’t met him, chances are you’ve heard of him – like his father Jerry did for decades, Mark calls the home games in the Superdome for the Saints. (His is the voice that thunders “touchdown”, ”field goal” or other plays.) Romig’s self-effacing manner belies the professional success he has had over the years. Romig grew up in Lakeview. He went to Brother Martin High School and later UNO, where he received his B.S. from the School of Business Administration. He got his feet wet in the hospitality business in hotels, first interning at the Royal Orleans and then later with a team that helped build the Hotel Intercontinental. “I remember the great joy of being there when they first opened that hotel,” Romig recalled. He also served as the VIP Liaison for the 1984 World’s Fair. His career ascended. He moved to Washington D.C. and worked high up in the Department of Transportation with an eye on the West Coast. But at that pivotal moment he was summoned back to New Orleans to work for Hibernia Bank. “I threw myself into volunteering at this point,” he

said. “The bank asked me to represent their interests on things like the Ballet Board and Project Lazarus. That was the point where I became deeply involved in volunteering. I reveled in it – I just loved it.” After Hibernia he spent 16 years with Peter Mayer advertising agency, building up a suite of public relations skills that have served him ever since. His tenure with the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation began in 2011. Romig’s messaging has since bulled its way through the national noise, helping to sell the city with his early embrace of social media and out-the-box campaigns such as ‘One Time in New Orleans…’ He is quick to credit his staff for the heavy lifting, explaining his role as that of a manager to create the best possible environment for his crew to shine. “I’ve just been blessed having such a strong team. Everyone has a role, I try to keep them out of all the external issues so they can do their job the best that they can,” he explained. Initiatives in 2018 included an increased focus on inclusiveness, with a concerted effort to include more minority-owned businesses in his messaging campaigns. Community projects slated for 2019 include Healthy Hospitality - a program that arranges the disparate clinics available to hospitality workers in an easy-to-use platform that will take the legwork out of navigating the system. “This will be a concierge type of service that a worker can use by calling or going on an app to get help,” he said. Along the way Romig has found time to serve on the Super Bowl Host Committee, Idea Village and the Allstate Sugar Bowl Committee, to name just a few. Reflecting on the loss of Ella Brennan, Romig’s memories go back to sitting with her in her den off the back patio of Commander’s Palace and talking over an Old Fashioned. “She was she was a mentor for so many people,” he recalled. “And hospitality wasn’t something she taught you – it was something you picked up from her. The idea of how things should be.” If Miss Ella embodied the essence of hospitality, it has been Mark’s job to message this to the world. He has done so with remarkable success. Editor’s Note: Each year the New Orleans Wine and Food Experience recognizes someone in the hospitality industry with the Ella Brennan Lifetime Achievement Award named in honor of the late matriarch of Commander’s Palace. New Orleans Magazine annually profiles the winner who, this year,will be honored at an event at the Ritz Carlton Hotel on January 17.


new orleans kingfish promotional section

G

enerous, durable and unflinching in character – the men of New Orleans who fit this archetype are known as Kingfish. They are the very essence of power and compassion combined with masculinity, and give more to others than to themselves. A Kingfish always shows

up – fashionably late, of course, as he’s on New Orleans time – and when he enters the room, it’s under his command. Socializing is as important as business and often is one and the same. He’s dapper, a masterful storyteller and minds his manners the way his mama taught him. Leadership comes as natural to a Kingfish as breathing. He measures his success by the success of those coming up behind him and lends his strong shoulders for them to stand upon. Whether sipping a sazarac or a beer; conducting a meeting or jumping into a secondline; spending time with his family or serving on the board of a favorite charity, a Kingfish does it all with that special brand of savoir faire perfected in New Orleans. He’s not just a boss, he's a Kingfish.

New Orleans Magazine would like to thank Saks Fifth Avenue for providing the clothing and styling and The Windsor Court for providing the venue for our 2019 Kingfish photo shoot. Also, John Jay Salon and Hollywood Makeup Bootcamp


new orleans kinfish promotional section

Left-Right: Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Saks Men’s Collection, Canali; REDA; Emporio Armani Samuelsohn; Samuelsohn; Canali; Hugo Boss


New orleans kingfish promotional section

Anthony Pope Senior Vice President and Region Manager, Cox Communications Southeast Region A 20-year cable industry veteran, Anthony is new to Louisiana as senior vice president and region manager of Cox’s Southeast region. In this role, he is responsible for leading 1,900 employees and the day-to-day operations of six markets across three states. Strengthening connections has been a big part of Anthony’s focus at Cox, and he appreciates the rich conversations he’s shared with Cox customers, Louisiana citizens and its leaders. For the past several years, the company has been working hard to deliver the best in smart home, smart business and smart city technologies, announcing a $10 billion investment in its products and infrastructure. Pope is actively involved with both formal and informal mentoring programs to grow talent that is reflective of the diverse communities Cox serves. He was also named one of CableFax Magazine’s 2018 Most Influential Minorities in Cable. To Cox customers statewide, Pope says, “Here’s to staying connected, Louisiana!” Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Samuelsohn


New orleans kingfish promotional section

Stephen Rue Stephen Rue & Associates, Owner Stephen Rue is a New Orleans renaissance man, having been named Best Attorney, Top Lawyer and Super Lawyer in various publications. He also is an active member of the Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum and Lawyers of Distinction. Rue is a published author of four legal books, an accomplished artist and sculptor and a competitive marathon runner, with 12 marathons completed since he turned 40. He is also a former King of the Krewe of Alla and a proud member of the Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club, the Krewe of Rolling Elvi, the Men of Fashion and the St. Patrick’s Day Marching Club. In addition to his work at Stephen Rue & Associates, Rue is the founding CEO of two successful national companies and is a former recipient of the Great Gentlemen’s Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service. As a self-improvement advocate, Stephen has gained much wisdom and insight from motivational speakers such as Tony Robbins and others. Rue believes in gratitude, never-ending improvement and “Living with Passion!” Above all, Stephen is most grateful for his faith in God and his loving relationship with family and friends. Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Saks Men’s Collection


New orleans kingfish promotional section

Robert Stone Vice President, Stone Insurance Even as a child, Robert Stone’s active imagination was paving the way for a promising future in business: throughout high school and college, he started several small businesses that helped mold his ability to execute innovative ideas. Because of these experiences, stepping into his family’s 100-year-old insurance business was a perfect fit. Whether selling insurance for businesses or homes, he strives to be a partner to his clients by finding them the best possible coverage and offering creative solutions for those that may not fit the normal insurance guidelines. Stone’s favorite part of his job is problem solving and working next to his father, brother and dedicated staff. His main motivators are his wife, three kids and a great camaraderie of friends who guide, advise and support him. In 2019, Stone will serve as president of both the Greater New Orleans Insurance Agent Board and the Independent Insurance Agents of Greater New Orleans, all leading up to the distinguishing honor of becoming president of Stone Insurance. Stone also serves on the National Progressive Insurance Board and plans to continue his support of dozens of local nonprofit organizations. Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Hugo Boss


New orleans kingfish promotional section

Walter M. Kimbrough, Ph.D. President, Dillard University For Dr. Walter Kimbrough, success is not simply defined by personal gains or profits — it’s defined by how he can improve the lives of the people around him. As President of Dillard University, he is responsible for nurturing the minds of thousands of students, a responsibility he does not take lightly. “Every day I have an opportunity to engage in transforming the lives of students and their families. For some, it means helping them focus their talents and gifts to fulfill their purpose in life. For others, it is exposing them to new ideas and opportunities that they never knew existed. And for some, it means ensuring they graduate, because there may be generations of their family that depend on their success.” Kimbrough is also passionate about using his platform to advocate for students of all backgrounds, both regionally and nationally, to ensure equal treatment and opportunity for all. Because of his dedicated work, he has been named one of “10 Twitter Accounts Every Higher-Ed Leader Should Follow” by Education Dive and was named a Power 100 honoree by Ebony Magazine, a list that also includes notable figures like Tyler Perry, Jay-Z, and Barack and Michelle Obama. Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Saks Men’s Collection


New orleans kingfish promotional section

Nicholas G. Pejic, M.D. Founder & Medical Director, Atlas Psychiatry When asked what inspired him to create Atlas Psychiatry, Dr. Pejic will tell you about his own father, a prominent surgeon who survived a traumatic childhood during World War II — and his lifelong reluctance to seek mental health treatment. “I wanted to create a center where people from all walks of life would feel comfortable seeking help and could receive the most advanced and comprehensive treatment possible,” Dr. Pejic said. Today, Atlas Psychiatry is widely recognized as one of New Orleans’ preeminent mental health providers, offering a full range of services for adults, adolescents and children in a private and elegant setting. Dr. Pejic’s patients describe him as a trusted confidant with a vast understanding of neuroscience and exquisite attention to detail. Above all, Dr. Pejic is driven by a tireless passion for improving the lives of those who entrust him with their care. Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Saks Men’s Collection, J. Brand


New orleans kingfish promotional section

Joshua Walther Realtor® and Co-Owner of Witry Collective By the time Joshua Walther became a licensed Realtor®, he’d already been around the world representing the United States Equestrian Team and had lived in several European cities. However, after Hurricane Katrina, Walther felt an undeniable pull to help rebuild New Orleans and the lives of its residents. More than 12 years into his career, he continues to be energized and passionate about the revitalization of the city, now through his own endeavor, the Witry Collective brokerage. To Walther, his career is more than houses and neighborhoods; it is personal, and he plays a significant role in helping others make their dreams a reality. For all his efforts, Walther and Witry Collective were named Gambit’s 2018 Best Real Estate Agent in the Metro Area. He is also an Accredited Home Stager and, along with his Witry Collective colleagues, an avid supporter of the Preservation Resource Center. Walther says that his career “has evolved into a community that enriches every aspect of my life.” Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Saks Men’s Collection, ETON


New orleans kingfish promotional section

Brett A. Rector Broker and Co-Owner of Witry Collective “Your reputation is everything,” says Brett Rector, and he means this for every aspect of life. Over the course of his career, Rector has grown to understand the value of both personal and professional relationships and in holding himself to the highest standard. Under the guidance of his mentor, Martha Ann Samuel, Rector relocated from a successful career in Ft. Lauderdale to set up home base in New Orleans, mere weeks before Hurricane Katrina. After the storm, Rector came to understand a new definition of “hard work” and worked diligently to bring a fresh perspective to his clients and his industry. His efforts have paid off tenfold with the founding of Witry Collective, which he established with three of his colleagues and which Rector calls his “crowning achievement.” In addition to his day-to-day work and serving as a Historic House Specialist, Rector and the Witry team are actively involved with the Preservation Resource Center, sponsoring several of their events and hosting a residence during their Shotgun House Tour. Clothing by Saks Fifth Avenue: Saks Men’s Collection


New Orleans Magazine’s

Area public and private universities, private elementary and secondary and charter schools

COLLEGES Delgado Community College: Top Executive: William S. Wainwright, Ph.D. Address: 501 City Park Ave. Website: DCC.edu Phone: 483-4410 Total enrollment: 20,393 % of applicants admitted: 100% % of students receiving financial aid: 62% Tuition per semester: $2,040 for a full-time student Year founded: 1921 Academic specialties: Nursing, business, criminal justice, health professions Number of full-time faculty: 342 Number of part-time faculty: 450 Average professor salary: $46,882 Accredited by: SACSCOC Highest academic degree issued: Associate *Loyola University of New Orleans: Top Executive: Rev. Kevin Wm. Wildes, S. J. Address: 6363 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 865-3240 Website: Loyno.edu Total Enrollment: 3,836 % of Applicants Admitted: 90% % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 81% Tuition per Semester: $12,205 Year Founded: 1912 Academic Specialties: Music Industry, Advertising, Public Relations, Journalism, Psychology, Biology/Pre-Med, Criminal Justice, Music, International Business, College of Law No. of Full Time Faculty: 225 No. of Part Time Faculty: 104 Average professor salary: $94,091.55 Accredited By: SACS Highest academic degree issued: J.D. *New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary: Top Executive: Dr. Charles S. Kelley Jr. Address: 3939 Gentilly Blvd. Phone: 282-4455/800-6628701 Website: NOBTS.edu Total Enrollment: 3,800 No. of Student Receiving Financial Aid: 1,020 Tuition per Semester: $2,100 Year Founded: 1917 Academic Specialties: Counseling, Pastoral Ministry, Theology, Christian Education, Church Music No. of Full Time Faculty: 63 No. of Part Time Faculty: 13 Accredited By: Association of Theological Schools, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctor of Philosophy Nunez Community College: Top Executive: Dr. Tina Tinney Address: 3710 Paris Road, 7 2 january 2019 myneworleans.com

Chalmette Phone: 278-6476 Website: Nunez. edu Total Enrollment: 2,292 No. of Student Receiving Financial Aid: 2,009 Tuition per Semester: $2,087.52 Year Founded: 1992 Academic Specialties: Aerospace Manufacturing Technology, Business Information Technology and Business Technology, Culinary Entrepreneurship; Electrical Construction; EMT & Paramedic; General Studies, Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning, Industrial Maintenance and PTEC, Medical Coding and Billing, Nursing (LPN), Paralegal Studies; Patient Care Technician, Teaching (Grades 1-5); Solar Construction; Welding; and Louisiana Transfer Degrees (Associate of Arts and Associate of Science) No. of Full Time Faculty: 42 No. of Part Time Faculty: 63 Accredited By: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). Individual programs may also have industry-specific accreditations (i.e., NCCER for Electrical Construction, AWS for Welding) Highest Academic Degree Issued: Associate Degree The University of Holy Cross: Top Executive: Dr. David M. Landry, President Address: 4123 Woodland Drive Phone: 394-7744 Website: Uhcno.edu Total Enrollment: 1,227 % of applicants admitted: 39.8% %. of Student Receiving Financial Aid: 92% Tuition per Semester: $6240 based on 12 credit hours Year Founded: 1916 Academic Specialties: Nursing and Health Sciences, Counseling, Education, Business No. of Full Time Faculty: 69 No. of Part Time Faculty: 99 Accredited By: Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN); Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP); Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP); Joint Review Committee on Education and Radiologic Technology; International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education; National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission; and Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACSCOC), Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs

COMPiLeD BY TOPHER BALFER

(CACREP), Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE), Joint Review Committee on Education and Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), and Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctorate *Tulane University : Top Executive: Michael A. Fitts Address: 6823 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 865-5000 Website: Tulane.edu Total Enrollment: 14,062 % of applicants admitted: 21% % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 78% Tuition per Semester: $24,460 Year Founded: 1834 Academic Specialties: Architecture, Business, Law, Liberal Arts, Social Work, Medicine, Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Science and Engineering No. of Full Time Faculty: 1,436 No. of Part Time Faculty: 386 Accredited By: The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctorate University of New Orleans: Top Executive: Dr. John Nicklow, President Address: 2000 Lakeshore Drive Phone: 280-6595 Fax: 504-280-3973 Website: UNO.edu Total Enrollment: 8,151 %of Applicants Admitted: 59.9 % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 75.6 Tuition per Semester: $4,511 Year Founded: 1958 Academic Specialties: Accounting; Computer Science; Counselor Education; School of the Arts; Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism Administration; Engineering, Planning and Urban Studies No. of Full Time Faculty: 290 No. of Part Time Faculty: 161 Accredited By: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctorate *Xavier University of Louisiana: Top Executive: Dr. Norman C. Francis Address: 1 Drexel Dr. Phone: 520-7568 Total Enrollment: 3,013 % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 90% Tuition per Semester: $6,450 (College of Pharmacy Tuition- $8,600/semester) Year

Founded: 1925 Academic Specialties: Sciences, Engineering, Pharmacy, Business No. of Full Time Faculty: 167 No. of Part Time Faculty: 23 Accredited By: SACS Highest academic degree issued: Doctor of Pharmacy, Master of Arts SECONDARY SCHOOLS *Academy of Our Lady: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Sister Michelle Geiger, FMA Principal Address: 5501 Westbank Expressway, Marrero Phone: 341-6217 Website: TheAcademyOfOurLady.org Total Enrollment: 530 Year Founded: 2007 Avg. Class Size: 17 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 46 Academy of the Sacred Heart: Grades Served: 5-12 Top Executive: Sr. Melanie A. Guste, Ph.D. Address: 4521 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 891-1943 Website: AshRosary.org Total Enrollment (PreK-12): 758 Year Founded: 1867 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 145 (total) *Archbishop Chapelle High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Principal Leila Benoit Address: 8800 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie Phone: 467-3105 Website: ArchbishopChapelle. org Total Enrollment: 650 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Private Catholic School Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 41 Archbishop Hannan High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Fr. Charles Latour, O.P. Address: 71324 Highway 1077, Covington Phone: 985-249-6363 Website: HannanHigh. org Total Enrollment: 618 Year Founded: 1987 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 50


Archbishop Rummel High School: Top Executive: Marc Milaro Grades Served: 8-12 Address: 1901 Severn Ave., Metairie Phone: 834-5592 Website: RummelRaiders.com Total Enrollment: 678 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Brothers of the Christian Schools Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 11:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 81 Benjamin Franklin High School: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Dr. Patrick Widhalm, Head of School Address: 2001 Leon C. Simon Drive Phone: 286-2600 Website: BFHSLA.org Total Enrollment: 992 Year Founded: 1957 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Casual, Appropriate Attire Affiliation: Accredited by SACS and National Consortium of Secondary STEM Schools; Affiliation with NOCCA; Type III Public, Charter School/Charted by Orleans Parish School Board and Governed by: Advocates for Academic Excellence in Education, Inc.; Member of the Greater New Orleans Collaborative of Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 % of applicants admitted: 39.4 Number of Full Time Faculty: 69 Archbishop Chapelle High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Leila Benoit Address: 800 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie Phone: 467-3105 Website: Archibishopchapelle. org Total Enrollment: 600 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/ Teacher Ratio: 13:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 46 Archbishop Shaw High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Rev. Louis Molinelli, SDB Address: 1000 Barataria Blvd., Marrero Phone: 340-6727 Website: ArchbishopShaw.org Total Enrollment: 462 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/ Teacher Ratio: 13:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 37 Bishop McManus Academy: Grades Served: PreK2-8 Top Executive: Jonathan Sorapuru Address: 13123 I-10 Service Road Phone: 246-5121 Website: bishopmcmanus.com Total Enrollment: 125 Year Founded: 1975 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 13

21:1 % of applicants admitted: 85% Number of full-time faculty: 28

Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 127

Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 37

De La Salle High School: Top Executive: Michael Giambelluca, President Grades Served: 8-12 Address: 5300 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 895-5717 Fax: Website: DeLaSalleNola.com Total Enrollment: 583 Year Founded: 1949 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Private Catholic School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 38

*Lutheran High School of Greater New Orleans: Top Executive: Carol Christen, Principal Grades Served: 9-12 Address: 3864 17th St., Metairie Phone: 455-4062 Website: LutheranHighSchool.net Total Enrollment: 103 Year Founded: 1970 Avg. Class Size: 13 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LCMS) Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 7

*St. Katharine Drexel Preparatory School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Cheryllyn M. Branche; Jacob Owens Address: 5116 Magazine St. Phone: 899-6061 Website: DrexelPrep.com Total Enrollment: 213 Year Founded: 2013 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Xavier University of Louisiana Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 15

Ecole Classique: Grades Served: PreK-6 Top Executive: David Federico Address: 5236 Glendale St., Metairie Phone: 887-3507 Website: EcoleClassique.com Total Enrollment: 140 Year Founded: 1956 Avg. Class Size: 10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 12 Holy Cross School (Middle & High School Campus): Grades Served: 5-12 Top Executive: Mr. Sean Martin, Headmaster Address: 5500 Paris Ave. Phone: 942-3100 Website: HolyCrossTigers. com Total Enrollment: 855 Year Founded: 1849 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 59 Holy Rosary High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Cathy Yaeger Address: 2437 Jena St. Telephone: 482-7173 Website: HolyRosaryNola.org Total Enrollment: 63 Year Founded: 2005 Avg. Class Size: 8-10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of New Orleans Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 6:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 10 *Isidore Newman School: Grades Served: Early Childhood-12 Top Executive: Dale M. Smith, Head of School Address: 1903 Jefferson Ave. Phone: 899-5641 Website: NewmanSchool. org Total Enrollment: 1,029 (for Pre K-12); 169 (for Green Trees) Year Founded: 1903 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Lower: Uniform; Middle & Upper: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent, Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 132

*Metairie Park Country Day School: Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: Carolyn Chandler Address: 300 Park Road, Metairie Phone: 837-5204 Website: MPCDS.com Total Enrollment: 725 Year Founded: 1929 Avg. Class Size: Depends on Class Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Depends on Class Number of Full Time Faculty: 96 Mount Carmel Academy: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Sister Camille Anne Campbell, O.Carm., President/Beth Ann Simno, Principal Address: 7027 Milne Blvd. Phone: 288-7626 Website: MCACubs.com Total Enrollment: 1,232 Year Founded: 1896 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 138 NOLA Micro Schools: Grades Served: 2-10 Top Executive: Kimberly Gibson, Head of School Address: 2705 S. Broad Street, New Orleans Phone: 218-5092 Website: nolamicroschools.org Total Enrollment: 50 Year Founded: 2015 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: No Uniform Affiliation: Independent Student Mix: CoEd Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 5 *Northlake Christian School (Upper School): Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Monty Fontenot, Head of School: Jenni Vega, Upper School Principal Address: 70104 Wolverine Drive, Covington Phone: 985-635-0400 Website: NorthlakeChristian.org Total Enrollment: 260 Year Founded: 1977 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 32

Jesuit High School of New Orleans: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Fr. Christopher Fronk, S.J. Address: 4133 Banks St. Phone: 486-6631 Website: JesuitNola.org Total Enrollment: 1,371 Year Founded: 1847 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 120

Pope John Paul II High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Douglas V. Triche Address: 1901 Jaguar Drive, Slidell Phone: 985-649-0914 Website: PJP.org Total Enrollment: 338 Year Founded: 1980 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Roman Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30

Cabrini High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Jack S. Truxillo Address: 1400 Moss Street, New Orleans, LA 70119 Phone: 482-1193 Website: CabriniHigh.com Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 1959 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 41

*John Curtis Christian School: Grades Served: 7-12 Top Executive: J.T. Curtis Address: 10125 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge Phone: 737-4621Website: JohnCurtis.com Total Enrollment: 550 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 16:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 40

*Ridgewood Preparatory School Grades Served: PreK4-12 Top Executive: M.J. Montgomery Jr. Address: 201 Pasadena Ave., Metairie Phone: 835-2545 Website: RidgewoodPrep.com Total Enrollment: 300 Year Founded: 1948 Avg. Class Size: 17 Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: None Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30

*Crescent City Christian School: Top Executive: Bill Rigsby Address: 4828 Utica St., Metairie Phone: 885-4700 Website: CrescentCityChristian.com Total Enrollment: 425 Year founded: 1956 Average class size: 21 Dress requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio:

Louise S. McGehee School: Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: Dr. Kim Field-Marvin Address: 2343 Prytania St. Phone: 561-1224 Website: McGeheeSchool.com Total Enrollment: 461 Year Founded: 1912 Avg. Class Size: 12-15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Female

*St. Charles Catholic High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Andrew Cupit Address: 100 Dominican Drive, LaPlace Phone: 985-652-3809 Website: StCharlesCatholic.org Total Enrollment: 484 Year Founded: 1952 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of New Orleans Student Mix:

Brother Martin High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Greg Rando, President; Ryan Gallagher, Principal Address: 4401 Elysian Fields Ave. Phone: 283-1561 Website: BrotherMartin. com Total Enrollment: 1,140 Year Founded: 1869 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Brothers of Sacred Heart/ Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 109

St. Martin’s Episcopal School: Grades Served: 8 weeks-12th Top Executive: Merry Sorrells Address: 225 Green Acres Road, Metairie Phone: 736-9917 Website: StMSaints.com Total Enrollment: 600 Year Founded: 1947 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: PreK-4: Uniform; 5-12: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent Episcopal School Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 87 St. Mary’s Academy: Grades Served: Pre K 3-12 Top Executive: Sr. Clare of Assisi Pierre, SSF, President; Sr. Jennie Jones, SSF, Principal Address: 6905 Chef Menteur Blvd. Phone: 245-0200 Website: SMANewOrleans.com Total Enrollment: 550 Year Founded: 1867 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Co-Ed (Elementary); All girls (Middle and High); Male Academy (Grades 5-7) Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 50 St. Mary’s Dominican High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Dr. Cynthia A. Thomas, President Address: 7701 Walmsley Ave. Phone: 865-9401 Website: StMarysDominican. org Total Enrollment: 889 Year Founded: 1860 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 74 St. Paul’s School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Brother Raymond Bulliard, FSC, President Address: 917 S. Jahncke Ave., Covington Phone: 985-892-3200 Website: StPauls.com Total Enrollment: 950 Year Founded: 1911 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic; owned and operated by Christian Brothers Student Mix: Male Student/ Teacher Ratio: 24:1 % of applicants admitted: 99 Number of Full Time Faculty: 75 St. Scholastica Academy: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Elizabeth Cerise LaForge, Ph.D. Address: 122 South Massachusetts St., Covington Phone: 985-892-2540 Website: SSAcad.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 1903 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 19:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 47 Ursuline Academy High School: Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Dr. Karen Thomas McNay, Academy President Address: 2635 State St. Phone: 861-9150 Website: Uanola. org Total Enrollment: 318 Year Founded: 1727 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Academy of the Sacred Heart: Grades Served: PreK-4 Top Executive: Sr. Melanie A. Guste, Ph.D. Address: 4301 St. Charles Ave. (PreK-4) myneworleans.com january 2019 7 3


Phone: 891-1943 Website: AshRosary.org Total Enrollment (Prek-12): 731 Year Founded: 1867 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 145 (total) Arden Cahill Academy: Grades Served: Infant Centre: 6 weeks to Pre3; PreK4-High School Top Executive: Mary Kevin Cahill Address: 3101 Wall Blvd., Gretna Phone: 392-0902 Website: ArdenCahillAcademy.com Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 1968 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Dress Code Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies by grade level Number of Full Time Faculty: 65 Atonement Lutheran School: Top Executive: Douglas C. Molin Address: 6500 Riverside Dr., Metairie, LA Phone Number: 504- 887-0225 Website: alcs.org Total Enrollment: 232 Year founded: 1960 Average class size: 20 Dress requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Student/Teacher Ratio: 19:1 % of applicants admitted: 80% Number of full-time faculty: 14 Average teacher salary: $32,000 Cathedral Montessori School: Grades Served: PreK3-3rd Top Executive: Billie Andersson Address: 9 Fortress Road Phone: 252-4871 Website: CathedralMontessori.com Total Enrollment: 83 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 27 Dress Requirements: None Affiliation: Louisiana Montessori Association; Greek Orthodox Church Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 8 Cedarwood School: Grades Served: Preschool-7 Top Executive: Kathryn S. LeBlanc Address: 607 Heavens Drive, Mandeville Phone: 985-8457111Website: CedarwoodSchool.com Total Enrollment: 303 Year Founded: 1983 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform (K-7) Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 36 Christian Brothers School (City Park Campus): Grades Served: 5-7 Top Executive: Joey M. Scaffidi Address: 8 Friedrichs Ave. Phone: 486-6770 Website: cbs-no.org Total Enrollment: 332 Year Founded: 1960 Avg. Class Size: 27 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 25 Christian Brothers School (Canal Street Campus): Grades Served: PreK4-7 Top Executive: Joey M. Scaffidi Address: 4600 Canal St. Phone: 488-4426 Website: cbs-no.org Total Enrollment: 508 Year Founded: 2016 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: PreK-4 Coed; 5-7 Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 55 *Concordia Lutheran School: Grades Served: PreK4-8 Top Executive: Jacqueline H. Daniilidis Address: 6700 Westbank Expressway, Marrero Phone: 347-4155 Website: CLSMarrero.com Total Enrollment: 162 Year Founded: 1965 Avg. Class Size: 12-15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: ECLA, Good Shephard & Trinity Lutheran Church Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Pre-K 8:1; K 12:1; 1-8 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 20 *Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orleans: Grades Served: 10 months-7 Top Executive: Pauline Dides Address: 821 General Pershing St. Phone: 896-4500 Website: EBNola.com Total 7 4 january 2019 myneworleans.com

Enrollment: 236 Year Founded: 1998 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: French Accredited School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 37 *Ecole Classique: Grades Served: PreK-6 Top Executive: Sal Federico Address: 5236 Glendale St., Metairie Phone: 887-3507 Website: EcoleClassique.com Total Enrollment: 140 Year Founded: 1956 Avg. Class Size: 10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 12 *Faith Lutheran: Grades Served: PreK3-8 Top Executive: Gregory Wood, Principal Address: 300 Colonial Club Drive, Harahan Phone: 737-9554 Website: FaithLutheran-school.com Total Enrollment: 75 Year Founded: 1958 Avg. Class Size: 10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 8 Holy Cross School (Primary Campus): Grades Served: Pre-K-4th Top Executive: Mr. Sean Martin, Headmaster Address: 5601 Elysian Fields Ave. Phone: 942-1850 Website: HolyCrossTigers.com Total Enrollment: 125 Year Founded: 1849 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/ Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 14 Holy Name of Jesus: Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Jessica Dwyer, M.Ed., Principal Address: 6325 Cromwell Place Phone: 861-1466 Website: HNJSchool.org Total Enrollment: 501 Year Founded: 1891 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Roman Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies by grade level Number of Full Time Faculty: 50 Holy Rosary Academy: Grades Served: PK4-7 Top Executive: Cathy Yaeger Address: 2437 Jena St. Phone: 482-7173 Website: HolyRosaryNola. org Total Enrollment: 50 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: 10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 6 International School of Louisiana: Grades Served: Dixon Campus K-2, Spanish and French Immersion; Uptown Campus 3-8, Spanish and French Immersion; Westbank Campus K-5, Spanish Immersion Top Executive: Melanie Tennyson Address: 4040 Eagle St (Dixon); 1400 Camp St (Uptown); 502 Olivier St. (Westbank) Phone: Dixon 934-4875; Uptown 654-1088; Westbank 274-4571 Website: isl-edu.org Total Enrollment: 1,400 Year Founded: 2000 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: LABEL France / DELE & DELF Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 *Isidore Newman School : Grades Served: Early Childhood-12 Top Executive: Dale M. Smith, Head of School Address: 1903 Jefferson Ave. Phone: 899-5641 Website: NewmanSchool.org Total Enrollment: 1,029 (for Pre K-12); 169 (for Green Trees) Year Founded: 1903 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Lower: Uniform; Middle & Upper: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent, Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 132 Jewish Community Day School: Grades

Served: PreK-6th Top Executive: Sharon Pollin Address: 3747 W. Esplanade Ave. North, Metairie Phone: 887-4091 Website: JCDSNola.org Total Enrollment: 80 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: 12 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Jewish Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 8 *John Curtis Christian School: Grades Served: PreK2-6 Top Executive: Deborah Eutsler Address: 10125 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge Phone: 737-0208 Website: JohnCurtis.com Total Enrollment: 450 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 35 *Kehoe-France: Grades Served: 8 weeks-7 Top Executive: Dr. Tanya Price, Sarah Block Address: 720 Elise Ave., Metairie Phone: 733-0472 Website: Kehoe-France.com Total Enrollment: 420 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 14 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 81 *Kehoe-France (Northshore): Grades Served: 8 weeks-7 Top Executive: Kyle M. France, Brad Humphreys Address: 25 Patricia Dr., Covington, LA Phone: 985- 892-4415 Total Enrollment: 205 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Independent Student mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of full-time faculty: 32 *Lake Castle Private School – New Orleans: Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Jane Butera McGovern, Head of School Address: 8400 Hayne Blvd. Phone: 242-6270 Website: LakeCastleNewOrleans.com Total Enrollment: 475 Year Founded: 1963 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Private Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 24 *Lake Castle Private School – Slidell: Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Brian Butera Address: 59461 LA Hwy 433, Slidell Phone: 985-641-3363Website: LakeCastleSchool.com Total Enrollment: 450 Year Founded: 1987 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic/Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 Louise S. McGehee School: Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: Dr. Kim Field-Marvin Address: 2343 Prytania St. Phone: 561-1224 Website: McGeheeSchool.com Total Enrollment: 461 Year Founded: 1912 Avg. Class Size: 12-15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 127 Mary, Queen of Peace Catholic School: Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Sybil W. Skansi, Principal Address: 1515 West Causeway Approach, Mandeville Phone: 985-674-2466 Website: MQPCS.org Total Enrollment: 483 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 49 *Metairie Park Country Day School: Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: Carolyn Chandler Address: 300 Park Road, Metairie Phone: 837-5204 Website: MPCDS.com Total Enrollment: 725 Year Founded: 1929 Avg. Class Size: Depends on

Class Size Dress Requirements: None Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: Depends on Class Number of Full Time Faculty: 96 NOLA Micro Schools: Grades Served: 2-10 Top Executive: Kimberly Gibson, Head of School Address: 2705 S. Broad Street, New Orleans Phone: 218-5092 Website: NolaMicroSchools.org Total Enrollment: 50 Year Founded: 2015 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: No Uniform Affiliation: Independent Student Mix: CoEd Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 5 *Northlake Christian School (Lower School): Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Monty Fontenot, Head of School; Missie Arnold – Lower School Principal Address: 70104 Wolverine Drive, Covington Phone: 985-635-0400 Website: NorthlakeChristian.org Total Enrollment: 160 Year Founded: 1977 Avg. Class Size: 15-25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 22 *Northlake Christian School (Middle School): Grades Served: 5-8 Top Executive: Monty Fontenot, Head of School; Ben Haindel – Middle School Principal Address: 70104 Wolverine Drive, Covington Phone: 985-635-0400 Website: NorthlakeChristian.org Total Enrollment: 240 Year Founded: 1977 Avg. Class Size: 15-25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 25 *Our Lady of Divine Providence School: Top Executive: Elvina DiBartolo Grades Served: Nursery-7 Address: 917 N. Atlanta St., Metairie Phone: 466-0591 Website: OLDPSchool.com Total Enrollment: 220 Year Founded: 1967 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 24 Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School – Slidell: Grades Served: Nursery (6 weeks) - 7 Top Executive: Roy Delaney Address: 345 Westchester Blvd., Slidell Phone: 985-643-3230 Website: OLLOnline.com Total Enrollment: 365 Year Founded: 1929 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Number of Full Time Faculty: 32 Our Lady of Prompt Succor: Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Annette Accomando Address: 2305 Fenelon St., Chalmette Phone: 271-2953 Website: OLPSSchool.org Total Enrollment: 429 Year Founded: 1952 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 16:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 27 *Ridgewood Preparatory School: Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: M.J. Montgomery Jr. Address: 201 Pasadena Ave., Metairie Phone: 835-2545 Website: RidgewoodPrep.com Total Enrollment: 300 Year Founded: 1948 Avg. Class Size: 17 Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: None Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 St. Andrew’s Episcopal School: Grades Served: 18 months - 8 Top Executive: Kathryn Fitzpatrick Address: 8012 Oak St. Phone: 861-3743 Website: standrewsepiscopalschool.org Total Enrollment:


199 (147 – PK-8; 52 – 18months-3 years old) Year Founded: 1957 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 31

833-1471 Website: StFrancisXavier.com Total Enrollment: 460 Year Founded: 1926 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 40

*St. Angela Merici: Grades Served: PreK2-7 Top Executive: Paige Bennett Address: 835 Melody Drive, Metairie Phone: 835-8491 Website: StAngelaSchool.org Total Enrollment: 365 Year Founded: 1965 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 35

*St. George’s Episcopal School: Grades Served: Age 1 - 8th grade Top Executive: Ralp Wales, Interim Head of School Address: 923 Napoleon Ave. Phone: 891-5509 Website: StGeorgesEpiscopal.com Total Enrollment: 405 Year Founded: 1969 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Lower/Middle: 5:1; Preschool: 4:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 80

St. Ann School: Grades Served: PreK2-7 Top Executive: Susan R. Kropog Address: 4921 Meadowdale St., Metairie Phone: 455-8383 Website: StAnnSchool.org Total Enrollment: 828 Year Founded: 1975 Avg. Class Size: 23 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 62 St. Benilde School: Grades Served: Nursery-7 Principal: Thomas Huck Address: 1801 Division St., Metairie Phone: 833-9894 Website: StBenilde. com Total Enrollment: 274 Year Founded: 1968 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 23 St. Christopher School: Grades Served: 6 weeks-7 Top Executive: Ruth Meche Address: 3900 Derbigny St., Metairie Phone: 837-6871 Website: StChristopherSchool.org Total Enrollment: 475 Year Founded: 1949 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 21:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 64 Average teacher salary: $36,000 *St. Clement of Rome: Top Executive: Dr. Patricia Speeg Grades Served: PreK2-7 Address: 3978 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie Phone: 888-0386 Website: SCRSchool.org Total Enrollment: 484 Year Founded: 1968 Avg. Class Size: 23 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: SACS, CEC, NCEA, LAP/NAESP Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 16:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 30 St. Cletus School: Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Jill Grabert, Principal Address: 3610 Claire Ave., Gretna Phone: 366-3538 Website: StCletusColts.com Total Enrollment: 330 Year Founded: 1978 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 25 St. Dominic School: Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Dr. Ashley Lynn Seatter Address: 6326 Memphis St. Phone: 482-4123 Website: StDominicNola.org Total Enrollment: 716 Year Founded: 1924 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 54 St. Elizabeth Ann Seton: Grades Served: PreK1-7 Top Executive: Joan Kathmann, Principal Address: 4119 St. Elizabeth Drive, Kenner Phone: 468-3524 Website: SEASSchool.org Total Enrollment: 470 Year Founded: 1984 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed St. Francis Xavier Catholic School: Top Executive: Barbara M. Martin Grades Served: PreK2-7 Address: 215 Betz Place, Metairie Phone:

St. Joan of Arc Catholic School: Grades Served: PreK2-7 Top Executive: Jeffrey M. Montz, Principal Address: 412 Fir St., LaPlace Phone: 985-652-6310 Website: SJA-school.com Total Enrollment: 320 Year Founded: 1961 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 St. John Lutheran: Grades Served: Preschool-8 Top Executive: Bethany Gonski Address: 3937 Canal St. Phone: 488-6641 Website: SJLNo.com Total Enrollment: 150 Year Founded: 1854 Avg. Class Size: Preschool: 10; Elementary: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 10 *St. Louis King of France Catholic School: Grades Served: 6 weeks-7 Top Executive: Pamela Keenan Schott Address: 1600 Lake Ave., Metairie Phone: 833-8224 Website: SLKFSchool.com Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 1953 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12-15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 88 *St. Martin’s Episcopal School: Grades Served: 8 weeks-12th Top Executive: Merry Sorrells Address: 225 Green Acres Road, Metairie Phone: 736-9917 Website: StMSaints.com Total Enrollment: 600 Year Founded: 1947 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: PreK-4: Uniform; 5-12: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent Episcopal School Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 87 St. Mary Magdalen Catholic School: Grades Served: PreK-7 Top Executive: Valerie Rodriquez Address: 6421 West Metairie Ave., Metairie Phone: 733-1433 Website: SMMCougars.org Total Enrollment: 252 Year Founded: 1956 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic, Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 19 St. Mary’s Academy: Grades Served: Pre K 3-12 Top Executive: Sr. Clare of Assisi Pierre, SSF, President; Sr. Jennie Jones, SSF, Principal Address: 6905 Chef Menteur Blvd. Phone: 245-0200 Website: SMANewOrleans.com Total Enrollment: 550 Year Founded: 1867 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Co-Ed (Elementary); All girls (Middle and High); Male Academy (Grades 5-7) Student/ Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 50 St. Paul’s Episcopal School: Grades Served: Toddler-8 Top Executive: Charleen Schwank, Head of School Address: 6249 Canal Blvd. Phone: 488-1319 Website: StPauls-lakeview.org Total Enrollment: 284 Year Founded: 1961 Avg. Class

Size: 13 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Independent, Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 39

uniform) Affiliation: Private Independent Nonprofit Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Early Childhood: 8:1; Grades: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 12

*St. Peter Catholic School: Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Michael Kraus Address: 130 E. Temperance St., Covington Phone: 985-8921831Website: StPeterCov.org Total Enrollment: 774 Year Founded: 1878 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies per grade level Number of Full Time Faculty: 48

CHARTER SCHOOLS Arthur Ashe Charter School: Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Kamisha Gray/Shanda Gentry Address: 1456 Gardena Drive Phone: 373-6267 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/arthur-ashe-charterschool Total Enrollment: 842 Year Founded: 2007 Avg. Class Size: 28 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 17:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 83

St. Philip Neri Catholic School: Grades Served: 6 weeks-7 Top Executive: Carol Stack, Ph.D. Address: 6600 Kawanee Ave., Metairie Phone: 887-5600 Website: StPhilipNeri.org Total Enrollment: 710 Year Founded: 1961 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 90 St. Pius X Catholic School: Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Deirdre Macnamara Address: 6600 Spanish Fort Blvd. Phone: 282-2811 Wesbite: School.StPiusXNola.org Total Enrollment: 530 Year Founded: 1953 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 45 St. Rita School – Harahan: Grades Served: 2 years-7 Top Executive: Rev. Steven V. Bruno Address: 194 Raven Ave., Harahan Phone: 737-0744 Website: School.StRitaHarahan.com Total Enrollment: 410 Year Founded: 1953 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies Number of Full Time Faculty: 31 Stuart Hall School for Boys: Grades Served: PK3-7 Top Executive: Kevin Avin, Head of School Address: 2032 South Carrollton Ave. Phone: 861-1954 Website: StuartHall.org Total Enrollment: 352 Year Founded: 1984 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: Preschool: 18:2; Lower & Middle: 18:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 58 Trinity Episcopal School: Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: The Rev. Gary Taylor, Head of School Address: 1315 Jackson Ave. Phone: 525-8661 Website: TrinityNola.org Total Enrollment: 350 Year Founded: 1960 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 49 Ursuline Academy Elementary School: Grades Served: Toddler 2-7 Top Executive: Dr. Karen Thomas McNay, Academy President Address: 2635 State St. Phone: 861-9150 Website: uanola.org Total Enrollment: 303 Year Founded: 1727 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 35 Waldorf School of New Orleans: Grades Served: Nursery-8 Top Executive: Lisa Lynde, Business Administrator Address: Main Campus: 517 Soraparu St.; Early Childhood Center: 2010 Peniston St. Phone: Soraparu: 525-2420; Peniston:345-2366 Email: enrollment@ waldorfnola.org Website: WaldorfNola.org Total Enrollment: 142 Year Founded: 2000 Avg. Class Size: 14 Dress Requirements: Dress Code (no

Athlos Academy of Jefferson Parish: Grades Served: K-7 Top Executive: Ben Bourgeois – Board Chair Address: 979 Behrman Highway, Terrytown Phone: 290-2510 Website: AthlosJP.org Total Enrollment: 1,000 Year Founded: 2016 Avg. Class Size: 27 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 27:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 100 Audubon Charter School - Uptown: Grades Served: Pre-K(3)-8 Top Executive: Ms. Missy Forcier (Lower Campus Principal); Ms. Adrienne Collopy (Upper Campus Principal) Address: 428 Broadway Street, NOLA 70118 (Lower Campus); 1111 Milan Street, NOLA 70115 Phone: 324-7100 Website: auduboncharter.org Total Enrollment: 870 Year Founded: 1981 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: N/A Affiliation: Audubon Schools Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Montessori program, 24:1 French Audubon Charter School - Gentilly: Grades Served: Pre-K - 2 Top Executive: Mr. David LaViscount, Principal Address: 4720 Painters Street, NOLA 70122 Phone: 309-9434 Website: auduboncharter.org Total Enrollment: 140 Year Founded: 2018 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: N/A Affiliation: Audubon Schools Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Bricolage Academy: Grades Served: PK-5; 2019-20 PK-6 Top Executive: Josh Densen Address: 2426 Esplanade Ave. Phone: 539-4505 Website: BricolageNola.org Total Enrollment: 575 Year Founded: 2012 Avg. Class Size: 27 Dress Requirements: No Uniform Required Affiliation: Orleans Parish School Board Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 - PreK; 13:1 - Kindergarten; 26:1 - 1-5 Number of Full Time Faculty: 72 *Cypress Academy: Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Bob Berk, Ph.D. Address: 4238 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 383-3337 Website: CypressAcademy.org Total Enrollment: 150 Year Founded: 2015 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: OPSB Charter School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 33 *Einstein Charter School Village de l’Est: Grades Served: PreK-5 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Teisha Goudeau, Interim Principal Address: 5100 Cannes St. Phone: 324-7450 Website: EinsteinCharter.org Total Enrollment: 487 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 63 *Einstein Charter School Sherwood Forest: Grades Served: PreK-5 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Shimon Ancker, Principal Address: 4801 Maid Marion Phone: 503-0110 Website: myneworleans.com january 2019 7 5


EinsteinCharterSchools.org Total Enrollment: 502 Year Founded: 2012 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 65 *Einstein Charter Middle: Grades Served: 6-8 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Anna Faye Caminita, Acting Principal Address: 5316 Michoud Blvd. Phone: 503-0470 Website: EinsteinCharterSchools.org Total Enrollment: 330 Year Founded: 2015 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 38 *Einstein Charter High: Grades Served: 11 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Nathan Stockman, Interim Principal Address: 5316 Michoud Blvd. Phone: 503-0749 Website: EinsteinCharterSchools. org Total Enrollment: 168 Year Founded: 2016 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 34 Harriet Tubman Charter School: Grades Served: PreK - 8 Top Executive: Julie Lause Address: 2013, 2832 General Meyer Phone: 227-3800 Website: Tubmancharterschool.org Total Enrollment: 950 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 30 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 18:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 119

Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 45

Class Size: 26 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 87

Year Founded: 2012 Avg. Class Size: 27 Dress Requirements: Navy Blue Pants and Polo Shirt w/ School Logo Affiliation: ReNEW Schools Number of Full Time Faculty: 70

KIPP Central City: Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Theresa Schmitt (K-5), Lauren Hammond (6-8) Address: 2514 Third St. (K-5), 1201 S. Roman St. (6-8) Phone: 373-6290 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 600 Year Founded: 2008 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 56

Live Oak Charter School: Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Dione Singleton Address: 3128 Constance St.Phone: 324-4207 Website: Firstlineschools.org/firstline-live-oak Total Enrollment: 458 Year Founded: 2018 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Number of Full Time Faculty: 59

*Samuel J. Green Charter School: Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Ava Lee Address: 2319 Valence St. Phone: 304-3532 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/samuel-j-green-charter-school Total Enrollment: 503 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 29 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 58

KIPP Morial: Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executives: Mark Burton (PK-5), Deanna Reddick (6-8) Address: 7701 Grant St. Phone: 609-2280 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 1000 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 90 KIPP Leadership: Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Jenni Seckel (K-4), Herneshia Dukes (5-8) Address: 2300 St. Claude Ave. Phone: 322-3924 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 85

Lusher Charter School: Grades Served: K-12 Top Executive: Kathy Riedlinger Address: K-5: 7315 Willow St.; 6-12: 5624 Freret St. Phone: 862-5110/304-3961 Website: LusherSchool.org Total Enrollment: 1,821 Year Founded: 1913 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: Advocates for Arts-Based Education; Orleans Parish School Board Charter Student Mix: Coed Number of Full Time Faculty: 194 Mildred Osborne Charter School: Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Jolene Galpin, Principal of Osborne; Cari Killian & Kiril Johnson, Co-Directors of ARISE Schools Address: 6701 Curran Blvd., New Orleans, LA, 70126 Phone: 400-0614 Website: ariseschools.org/mildred-osborne-charter-school/ Total Enrollment: 499 Year Founded: 2013 Avg. Class Size: 24 students Dress Requirements: School uniform shirt and khaki bottoms Affiliation: ARISE Schools Student Mix: 96% Black, 3% Hispanic/Latino; 1% White Student/Teacher Ratio: 1:12 Number of Full Time Faculty: 71

KIPP Renaissance High School: Grades: 9-12 Top Executive: Towana Pierre-Floyd Address: 3820 St. Claude Ave. Phone: 373-6255 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 48

*New Orleans Charter Science and Math High School: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Chana Benenson Address: 5625 Loyola St. Phone: 324-7061 Website: NoSciHigh.org Total Enrollment: 470 Year Founded: 1993 Avg. Class Size: 18-22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 70

KIPP East Community: Grades Served: PreK-5 Top Executive: Jenny Dennis Carey Address: 6519 Virgilian St. Phone: 373-7171 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 600 Year Founded: 2014 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 20

*New Orleans Military and Maritime Academy: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Col. Schlafer, Commandant; Dr. Cecilia Garcia, Principal Address: 425 O’Bannon St. Phone: 227-3810 Website: NOMMA.net Total Enrollment: 645 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: JROTC Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 55

KIPP Leadership Academy: Grades Served: 5-8 Top Executive: Jonny Bartlett Address: 2300 St. Claude Ave. Phone: 373-6256 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 45

Phillis Wheatley Community School: Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Dana Archuletta Address: 2300 Dumaine St. Phone: 373-6205 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/phillis-wheatleycommunity-school Total Enrollment: 833 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 26 Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 85

KIPP Believe: Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Sorby Grant Address: 3805 St. Bernard Ave. Phone: 304-8857 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 750 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 80

Lake Forest Elementary School: Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Mardele S. Early Address: 11110 Lake Forest Blvd. Phone: 826-7140 Website: LakeForestCharter.org Total Enrollment: 646 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Orleans Parish School Board Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 52

ReNEW Accelerated High School: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Tanya Bryant, CEO; Emily Perhamus, School Director Address: 3649 Laurel St, New Orleans, LA 70115 Phone: 267-3882 Website: rahs.renewschools.org Total Enrollment: 275 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 41

KIPP Booker T. Washington High Schol: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Robert Corvo Address: 1201 S. Roman St. Phone: 410-5289 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2016 Avg. Class

*Langston Hughes Academy: Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Carrie Bevans Address: 3519 Trafalgar St. Phone: 373-6251 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/langston-hughes-academy Total Enrollment: 802 Year Founded: 2010 Avg.

ReNEW Dolores T. Aaron Academy: Grades Served: Pre-K through 8th Grade Top Executive: John Gravier Address: 10200 Curran Boulevard New Orleans, LA 70127 Phone: 570-6354 Website: dta.renewschools.org Total Enrollment: 830

Homer A. Plessy Community School: Grades Served: PreK 4 - 8 Top Executive: Meghan Raychaudhuri, Head of School Address: 721 St. Philip Street New Orleans, LA 70116 Phone: 503-0055 Website: PlessySchool.org Total Enrollment: 407 Year Founded: 2013 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: School T-shirt Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 40 *International High School of New Orleans: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Sean Wilson Address: 727 Carondelet St. Phone: 613-5702 Website: IHSNola.org Total Enrollment: 566 Year Founded: 2009 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 72 Kenner Discovery Health Sciences Academy: Grades Served: PreK-10 Top Executive: Dr. Patty Glaser Address: 2504 Maine Ave., Metairie Phone: 233-4720 Website: DiscoveryHSF.org Total Enrollment: 1,536 % of Applicants Admitted: 100 Year Founded: 2013 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Type 1 charter authorized by JPPSS Student Mix: Coed Student/ Teacher Ratio: 25:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 181

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Success Preparatory Academy at Thurgood Marshall: Grades Served: K - 8 Top Executive: Adam Meinig Address: 4621 Canal St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Phone: 909-6275 Website: thurgoodmarshallschool.org Total Enrollment: 425 Year Founded: 2008 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Co-Ed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 60 The NET Charter High School: Central City: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Elizabeth Ostberg Address: 1614 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. Phone: 267-9060 Website: TheNetNola.org Total Enrollment: 150 Year Founded: 2012 Avg. Class Size: 8-15 Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 6:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 22 The NET Charter High School: Gentilly: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Elizabeth Ostberg Address: 6601 Franklin Ave. Phone: 267-9765 Website: TheNetNola.org Total Enrollment: 175 Year Founded: 2017 Avg. Class Size: 8-15 Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 6:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 20 Warren Easton Charter High School: Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Mervin Jackson Address: 3019 Canal St. Phone: 324-7400 Website: WarrenEastonCharterHigh.org Total Enrollment: 1006 Year Founded: 1843(Boys School) 1913 at current location Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: OPSB Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 25:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 58 SPECIAL SCHOOL St. Michael School: Top Executive: Tish Sauerhoff M.Ed., President/Principal Address: 1522 Chippewa St. Phone: 524-7285 Website: StMichaelSpecialSchool.com Total Enrollment: 205 Year Founded: 1965 Avg. Class Size: 12 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Archdiocese of New Orleans Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:2 No. of Full Time Faculty: 37 *For schools marked with an asterisk listing is based on 2016 information; for all others, information is current to 2018.


ADVERTISING SECTION student-to-teacher ratio is 8 to 1, allowing each student an opportunity to have personalized attention for a better, differentiated education. For more information on the school, visit EBNola.net. To schedule a tour, call 504-896-4500.

Education

T

he holidays are officially over, and Mardi Gras approaches. No matter the time of year—fun never stops in New Orleans. While many adults are planning their Fat Tuesday costumes and enjoying football playoffs, plenty of young parents are consumed with making plans that affect their little ones’ futures. Finding the right area school for your young one can present a challenge, as there’s an abundance of quality schools with a number of different approaches to education to consider. It’s never too early to be exploring your options, from private schools founded on the guiding principles of a certain faith to public charter schools that highlight an arts or STEM curriculum—you’ll find there are just about as many approaches to education as there are area schools. Midway through the school year is a great time to be asking questions and researching what’s available for your family, and winter open houses are now underway.

Early Education / Primary Schools Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans is the only private French school in New Orleans that is accredited by the French Ministry of Education and State of Louisiana. Founded in 1998, the mission of the school is to develop globally literate students by combining the best of French and American academics.  Ecole Bilingue follows the curriculum of the French Education Nationale, considered to be one of the most rigorous educational systems in the world. Ecole Bilingue also offers rich English language arts and American mathematics and social studies programs designed to balance out and complement the strength of the French curriculum. Additionally, the school introduces Spanish as a third language in middle school. The campus has three buildings in Uptown New Orleans on General Pershing Street and will open an arts and athletics center on Magazine Street in 2019.  Classes are offered for preschool (18 months) through 8th grade. The

Trinity is a co-educational, Prekindergarten through Eighth Grade school. Their campus is located in the Garden District and offers a pleasant and stimulating learning environment for students and faculty. Trinity continues in the tradition of its predecessor school, Miss Edith Aiken’s Little School, and in that of Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity nurtures a child’s mind, body, and spirit through a fun and challenging program that offers the best in the academic disciplines, uses best practices, and is taught by a skillful, experienced, and loving faculty and staff. The School’s mission is to build confident, resilient upstanders on a foundation of academic excellence, moral responsibility, and faith, who are prepared to make a positive difference in the world. Characteristics of Trinity graduates include being an empathetic upstander, a reflective person, an ardent questioner, a fluent communicator, and a collaborative learner. For more information or to schedule an individual tour, please visit TrinityNola.org or call the Admission Office at 504-525-8661. Open House for Grades Prekindergarten–Eight will take place at 9 a.m. on Friday, January 11. The mission of the Stuart Hall School for Boys is to live the words of Catholic educator, Janet Erskine Stuart, RSJC: “Education is formation, not just information.” Faculty and staff are dedicated to working with parents to help each child build a foundation for a life centered on a love for learning, a desire to help others, and a commitment to Gospel values. Now in its 35th year, Stuart Hall School is the only school in the greater New Orleans area to offer a Catholic, independent, all-boy education in a traditional, elementary school configuration (PK3-7th). Faith, honor, leadership, and scholarship are the foundations upon which Stuart Hall builds future community leaders who have an unselfish commitment to the service of others. It truly is a school “Where Good Boys Become Great Men.”   Tours are available by appointment throughout the year. For more information on Stuart Hall School for Boys, please call 504-861-5384 or visit StuartHall.org.     Known as the “Jewel of Freret,” Samuel J. Green Charter School opened in 2005 as part of FirstLine Schools. Serving grades Pre-K 8th, Green is working to provide more seats for children from all New Orleans backgrounds to learn together. The mission of Samuel J. Green Charter School is to prepare 100% of students for college, careers, and a successful life. With a rigorous and creative curriculum, Green focuses on providing a strategic use of blended and personalized learning. This dedication to the individual needs of each student is why Green was recently recognized by the state as a top performer both in the city and statewide with an “A” rating for student growth. In addition to the academic curriculum, students at Green benefit from hands-on learning experiences daily through FirstLine’s nationally renowned gardening and culinary program, Edible Schoolyard New Orleans. The school will host an Open House on January 24th, 5:30 – 7 p.m. School tours will be held on January 15th and February 5th at 9 a.m. For more information, visit FirstLineSchools.org/ Samuel-J-Green-Charter-School, call 504-304-3532 or email gogreen@ firstlineschools.org. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School is the oldest Episcopal school in New Orleans with 61 years of experience in educating the mind, body, and spirit of young children. St. Andrew’s enrolls boys and girls 18 months through Grade 8, offering ten+ years of nurturing yet challenging education that focuses on myneworleans.com january 2019 7 7


the Decade of Childhood. St. Andrew’s utilizes small classes to promote a challenging learning environment where students interact with teachers and grow spiritually, socially, and intellectually. A strong academic program, enhanced by state-of-the-art technology, includes Spanish, music, chapel, fine arts, athletics, and library skills. Student publications, dramatics, interscholastic sports, and community service round out St. Andrew’s program. See their students and teachers in action by scheduling a personal tour. Applications are currently being accepted for the 2019-20 school year. For more information, please visit the school’s website at saesnola.org/admissions. Established in 1978 and celebrating over forty years of serving area children, University Montessori School is a not-for-profit, pre-primary school dedicated to the Montessori philosophy and method of education. University Montessori School has two complete and individual classrooms: a twenty-month to three-year-old class and a combination 3- to 6-year-old preschool, transitional, and kindergarten class. University Montessori School devotes itself to the total child—his or her emotional, social, intellectual, and physical well-being. A childcentered classroom is the basis of the Montessori approach. In each prepared environment, the child has the opportunity to progress at his or her own rate and reach the potential that each child carries within. By combining age groups in the preschool, transitional, and kindergarten class, the children develop a sense of community. The younger children teach the older children patience and empathy and give them a feeling of competency, while the older children practice leadership, providing younger children with assistance with work and classroom adjustment. For more information, visit umsnola.org, email info@umsnola.org, or call 504-865-1659.

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Continuous Education / K-12 Founded in 1867, the Academy of the Sacred Heart is a Catholic, independent, college prep school for girls, ages 1 through Grade 12. As part of a network of 150+ Sacred Heart schools, its global exchange program allows students to visit other sister schools in the U. S. and abroad. With global exchange opportunities, thought leadership, service learning activities, a tech-forward campus, design thinking and more, Sacred Heart girls are truly inspired to go out and make change in the world. The school’s last Admission Tuesday Tours for Ages 1 – Grade 4 is January 8 from 8:30 – 10 a.m. Academy of the Sacred Heart cordially invites students to come “Spend A Day at ASH” and invites parents to take a personal Tour. Call 504-269-1213 or visit AshRosary.org/openhouse for more information. Ursuline Academy, founded in 1727, enjoys the distinction of being both the oldest school for girls and the oldest Catholic school in the United States. Ursuline Academy provides a broad, challenging, and contemporary curriculum in a nurturing environment from early childhood (Toddler 2) through a college preparatory secondary program (12th grade). The Academy’s strong musical, visual, and performing arts are matched by the excellence of STEM. Ursuline is the first all-girls school in Louisiana to implement a full K-12 engineering and computer science pathway program known as Project Lead The Way. Ursuline fosters spiritual formation, academic excellence, and a life-long commitment to Serviam: I will serve. Elementary School Tours (Toddler-2 through seventh grade) will take place on January 16 and 30 at 8:30 a.m. Please register online at UANola.org. For more information, please contact the Office of Admissions at 504-866-5292 or admissions@uanola.org.


For a strong education combined with the unique qualities of an outdoor country environment, consider Arden Cahill Academy for students six weeks through 12th grade. Nestled on 12 acres, the campus provides state-of-the-art classroom learning facilities in addition to an equestrian arena, stables, and petting farm that provide unique learning experiences outside of the traditional classroom. After 50 years, Cahill is proudly expanding into high school with the addition of a freshman class this year and subsequent grades each following year. The school focuses on cultural enrichment as one part of its education and tradition of academic excellence. Their STEM Lab, 300-seat theater, art studios, music rooms and foreign language programs ensure students’ abilities to excel in the arts, while a sports field, competition pool, gymnasium, and extra-curricular athletics allow students to excel in physical competition as well. Before- and after-school care are available. A specialized Infant Center accepts children starting at six weeks. The academy hosts Camp Corral, a 10-week summer camp.  For information, visit ArdenCahillAcademy.com or call 504-392-0902 to schedule a spend-a-day. Winter Open House is January 17 at 9 a.m. (elementary) and 1 p.m. (high school). Lusher Charter School, a National Blue Ribbon School in partnership with Tulane University, offers a rigorous, interdisciplinary, collegefocused curriculum. Lusher students engage in a comprehensive program, enhancing critical, analytical, and creative thinking. Serving 1,800 students in its K-12 program, Lusher maintains two Uptown campuses, the Lower School on Willow Street, and the Middle and High schools on Freret Street. Arts integration starts in the Lower School; many Lusher students continue artistic pursuits in high school Certificate of Artistry programs. Students may choose an area of concentration in Humanities/ Communications or Math/Science/Engineering. Beginning with intro-

ductory Engineering classes in Lower School, STEM options expand to include Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Science and AP courses in all sciences. A Learning Resource Center and state-of-the-art science laboratories support academic excellence. Qualifying juniors and seniors earn college credit at Tulane. Lusher’s numerous extracurricular offerings include 27 sports teams that operate with the support of Saints quarterback Drew Brees, who provided funding for Lusher’s Brees Family Field. Call 504-862-5110 (Willow) or 504-304-3961 (Freret) to find out more about Lusher’s outstanding program.

Colleges & Universities The University of Holy Cross encourages students to do good and to do well. A fully accredited Catholic university in New Orleans, the University of Holy Cross (formerly Our Lady of Holy Cross College) offers more than 65 majors and programs to more than 1,300 students. With 154 faculty members and a student-faculty ratio of 13:1, students enjoy a personalized academic experience on an active campus where they are encouraged to explore spiritual values and pursue service opportunities. Some of the university’s most distinctive programs are in Business, Education, Healthcare, Counseling, and Nursing. The university was founded in 1916 as a mission of the Marianites of Holy Cross, whose distinguished history of educating minds and hearts dates to 1848. Located on the West Bank, minutes from downtown New Orleans, UHC offers an affordable, liberal arts education within a small, private university setting.  For more information, visit uhcno.edu.

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Since 1869, Dillard University has been committed to providing students with a quality, four-year, liberal arts education. Dillard is a fully accredited, private, historically Black university. The product of two other HBCUs, Dillard premiered as its own separate entity in 1935 and has been serving the New Orleans community ever since. In 2019, Dillard University will celebrate its 150th anniversary. Over that time, Dillard became the first accredited nursing program in all of Louisiana. In 2017, Dillard ranked eleventh among all HBCUs in U.S. News and World Report’s Best College Rankings. The University is known for its robust programs in film, nursing, pre-law, and physics, and in 2017, Dillard ranked second in the nation for number of graduating Black physics undergrads. Dillard is home to the Ray Charles Program in African American Material Culture, the first program of its kind at any HBCU or any other American university. Dillard University has positioned itself for success throughout the 21st century and will continue to educate the bright, young leaders of tomorrow. For more information, including student life and athletics opportunities, visit Dillard.edu.

Schools for Those with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities St. Michael School is a Catholic school that educates over 200 students each year age six through adulthood with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Established in 1965 by the Archdiocese of New Orleans and Sr. Lillian McCormack of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, the school has served over 6,000 students in more than 50 years as a prized New Orleans institution. Individualized instruction develops the whole child—academically, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Curriculum includes reading, religion, language arts, math, science, social studies, technology, creative arts, culinary science, independent living, community integra-

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tion, industrial arts, music, and job training. Extracurricular activities include speech therapy, music therapy, adaptive physical education, club participation, student council, sports, cheerleading, and various inclusive activities with respective peer groups. In 2017, a new transition program was added for recent high school graduates. Exploration Academy focuses on job readiness through selfdetermination, independent life skills, and community work experiences. St. Michael is accredited by LDOE, AdvancEd, and recognized as a NASET School of Excellence. Open House takes place Thursday, February 7, 2019 from 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. Sign up for a tour at  stmichaelspecialschool.com/admissions or call 504-524-7285. 

Educational Programs and Resources The New Orleans Opera Association (NOOA) serves diverse audiences throughout the region and provides educational programs that include live performances for schools and educational centers, innovative courses in musicology, world opera, hip-hopera and more, free tickets to students for dress rehearsals of opera productions, summer camp sessions, roundtable discussions with the performers, Nuts & Bolts pre-performance lectures, an annual vocal competition for high school students, and an interactive Opera Nouvelle series. NOOA was founded in 1943, and its mission is “to enrich the lives of all people by producing opera of the highest artistic quality and providing education opportunities through traditional and innovative approaches.” NOOA’s school-based programs are continually expanding to include new initiatives, engaging students at a more academic level with opera and making it more relatable to their lives. For more information or to find out how you can support these wonderful programs, contact 504-529-3000 or go to NewOrleansOpera.org. •


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The Menu TABLE TALK . RESTAURANT INSIDER . FOOD . LAST CALL . DINING LISTINGS

jeffery johnston photo

BBQ shrimp at Pascal’s Manale


table talk

about the book

Combination Pan Roast

Pascal’s Manale Connecting the Roots by Jay Forman

New Orleans’ reputation as a dining destination stems in part from its legacy restaurants, a clutch of national treasures whose roots reach back well over 100 years. One place on this list which is often overlooked is Pascal’s Manale. Now in its fifth generation, its roots reach back 8 4 january 2019 myneworleans.com

to southern Italy. Specifically, the community of Contessa Entellina, a town on the Island of Sicily notable for its Albanian heritage. “They speak a different language, Arbëreshë, and their Catholicism is more akin to Greek Orthodox,” explained culinary historian and food personality

This article barely scratches the surface of this restaurant’s long history. To learn more, check out “Pascal’s Manale Cookbook” by Poppy Tooker, which traces the lineage of this Creole Italian gem through its five generations of local ownership. Along with recipes, this exhaustively researched work shines a light on the oft-neglected Italian contribution to New Orleans cuisine. “I wrote this one after my Tujague’s book,” Tooker said. “Tujague’s is the second oldest continually operating restaurant where Pascal’s Manale is the second oldest continuingly operating family owned restaurant. Tujague’s tells the French Creole story whereas this tells the Italian Creole story.” Together these two books are companion pieces to the fundamental elements of New Orleans cuisine.

jeffery johnston photo


Poppy Tooker. “Many settled here to do with garlic, butter, pepper, in New Orleans and they’ve always proprietary seasoning and jumbo regarded themselves as different peel-and-eat crustaceans, with from other Sicilians.” crusty French bread to sop up Whereas most legacy restau- the leftover sauce. Reinterpreted rants are the French Creole versions abound around town, Grande Dames like Arnaud’s but this is where it all began. If and Antione’s, Pascal’s Manale you are too dainty to strap on is notable for being Italian. Also a bib and get your hands dirty, unlike the French Creole places, there is a pre-peeled poor boy Pascal’s Manale is a neighborhood version on the lunch menu and spot, more suited to regular visits peeled shrimp are offered as an than special occasions. Its unique add-on with many of the entrees. residential Uptown location sets Other recommended dishes it apart. Over the years it has include the combination become woven remoulade, which comes into the fabric of with not one, but two the community, Pascal’s Manale, versions of the iconic sauce. making it feel like 1838 Napoleon Ave., One – a blonde version in an extension of Uptown, 895-4877. L, D which the crabmeat and Mon.-Fri. D Sat. Closed the home. Its Sun. Pascalsmanale.com shrimp are tossed. The other oyster bar, tucked is the more traditional red to the right of the barroom when sauce, used to garnish the plate you enter, has been shucking the and add a last-second punch of goods since 1913, while its actual tomato and horseradish to each bar – an atmospheric masterpiece bite. of carpentry – was originally For desser, try the caramel installed by Dixie Beer as part custard – a light counterpoint to of an exclusivity agreement not what can be a heavy meal – or you too long after the turn of the 20th can swing the other way with the century. Considering that Dixie bread pudding or their justifiably essentially left and came back in famous cheesecake. Oyster lovers the decades that followed, the bar take note of the half-off happy hour more than anything is a testament from 3-6 p.m. Monday through to the fact that time stands still Friday, with discounts on select here. It looks and feels much the premium drinks. Complimentary same as it has for generations, gated off-street parking is offered with a post-Katrina renovation as well. being the primary measuring stick of the passing years. On the menu, the predominance of Creole seafood dishes sets it apart from other Creole Italian restaurants. “Take for example their Combination Pan Roast,” Tooker said, “which is not a roast and has no meat in it. While it is a Road Trip Pascal’s Manale stands apart counter-intuitive name for a dish from the pack of Creole Italian – it refers to the technique rather restaurants around town, so it is hard than the ingredients – this dish to draw a comparison. One that contains all the best Gulf seafood comes to mind however is Mosca’s in in the world.” This garlicy, chopped Westwego, which has been serving mélange of oysters, shrimp and crabmeat is a classic not found heaping platters of their signature Oyster’s Mosca and inimitable elsewhere. Pascal’s Manale is perhaps most Chicken Cacciatore for over sixty famous for its BBQ shrimp, another years. Their out-of-the-way location misnomer as the dish has nothing makes going here a special occasion to do with BBQ but everything best enjoyed with a group of friends.

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Hungry?

ONL Y

$17.9 5 A collection of 50 traditional and contemporary recipes by Stanley Dry — Louisiana Life “Kitchen Gourmet” columnist, former senior editor of Food & Wine magazine and accomplished cook — top-notch ingredients are paired with fresh seafood to create delectable dishes imbued with the author’s signature simplicity. The easy-to-follow recipes emphasize Louisiana seafood and quality, local ingredients. Inspired, innovative and delicious, the seafood dishes in this collection are sure to become favorites in your kitchen.

Visit LouisianaSeafoodCookbook. com to order yours today!

myneworleans.com january 2018 8 5


restaurant insider

News From the Kitchen Molly’s Rise and Shine, Secret Thai, Bonnets NOLA by Robert Peyton

“The Dan Stein Breakfast” A bagel, caper/olive pepper cream cheese, soppressata, mortadella, red onions, pickled banana peppers

Molly’s Rise and Shine

Secret Thai

Bonnets NOLA

Molly’s Rise and Shine is the second restaurant by the folks who opened Turkey and the Wolf in 2016. The focus is on breakfast, which you may have gathered from the name, but it’s breakfast through the lens of fine-dining chefs making imaginative, eclectic fare. There’s a take on the McMuffin, but also a sweet potato burrito, “whirled” green peas on toast and collard greens with grits and poached eggs. Molly’s Rise and Shine, 2368 Magazine St., 302-1896, open 7-3 daily, closed Tuesday, mollysriseandshine.com.

New Thai restaurants are always of interest to me, and recently a friend tipped me off to Secret Thai, a new place in Chalmette. Chefs Panlada Tan and Chaiyarpar Unkulsopakdee serve a wide range of Thai classics with a few twists here and there, such as fried catfish with a house-made chili paste or Thai-style deep-fried beef or pork jerky that the chefs recommend with the green papaya salad. Secret Thai, 9212 W. Judge Perez Dr. Ste. C, Chalmette, 345-2487, open Tuesday – Saturday 11-9; until 7 on Sunday.

I’m also happy to see new Caribbean restaurants come to town; particularly when the food is done well. Bonnets NOLA opened recently on Magazine street, and in addition to Island standards like jerked meats and conch fritters, chef Myesha Brown’s menu includes classic soul food and a number of vegetarian and vegan dishes. Bonnets NOLA, 1910 Magazine St., 827-1959, open Monday – Thursday 11 to 11:30; Friday and Saturday until midnight and Sunday until 11, bonnetsnola.com.

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jeffery johnston photo


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food

8 8 january 2019 myneworleans.com

styled by photographed by eugenia uhl


RECIPE

Chili Ways for Chilly Days

CHILI CON CARNE WITH BEANS

Ingredients 2 pounds beef chuck or seven steaks or other ribboned beef

And bowl game watching too

4 thick slices bacon

by Dale Curry

Oil, if needed 1 large onion, chopped

Although Texans live next door, we are miles

1 bunch green onions

apart when it comes to cooking. Two ingredients bring us together, however, and they are beans and peppers, usually prepared very differently except for one big dish - chili. With some cooks, even chili has its differences. Louisiana folks love their beans and usually tuck some kidney or pinto beans into theirs, while a lot of Texans say beans have no place in the dish. Personally, I like the beans along with meat, peppers and tomatoes cooked slowly together with a few spices and fresh peppers. Known in Texas as a bowl of red, chili matches well with cornbread or crackers on the side and can be topped with cilantro, grated cheese and/or avocado chunks. Warm tortillas add a Tex-Mex touch. A pot of chili helps take the chill out of winter, serves a multitude of Bowl game watchers and is a good standby for crowds. There are legends about its origin, but most agree it was invented in Texas, not Mexico, hundreds of years ago as an inexpensive way to stew together a little meat with a lot of peppers. When you’re looking for snacks or feeding a family, don’t stop at the chili bowl. The many ways to serve chili include chili mac, which means spooning chili over macaroni or other pasta; topping hot dogs or hamburgers; adding it to a bag of Fritos, still in the bag; blanketing French fries; saucing enchiladas, or serving inside and over an omelet. My husband invented his own dish - chili and eggs - and served many a late night crowd with soft scrambled eggs alongside a bowl of chili. Not bad. Some cooks make chili with bison, venison or chicken. Some versions are so hot, they have names like Leatherthroat Chili. Myths surround the dish, contests abound, and there are those who say eating chili makes you sleep better. The only thing I know for sure is that having a having a large zip-lock of chili in your freezer sure can come in handy.

1 bell pepper, chopped ½ jalapeno pepper or more, if desired, chopped 1 each poblano and Anaheim peppers, chopped 6 cloves garlic, minced 2 14.5-ounce cans whole plum tomatoes with liquid 3 cups beef stock, homemade, canned or made from roasted beef base 2 15.5-ounce cans pinto beans, preferably Trappey’s* 1 cup Abita amber beer Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 teaspoons cumin 1 teaspoon paprika 1 tablespoon chili powder 2 tablespoons masa harina, corn flour or cornmeal for thickening, if desired Optional garnishes: Avocado in chunks, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped green onions, cilantro, sliced red or yellow pepper.

Directions 1. Cut beef into ½-inch cubes and sprinkle with salt and pepper. In a large, heavy pot, fry bacon until crisp, remove from pot and place on paper towels. In grease left from bacon, brown beef cubes on all sides and remove from pot.

Keeping Warm A Crock-Pot is the best tool for serving hot dishes at winter parties. Use a large one for gumbo, chili, red beans or jambalaya. A hot dip such as crab, spicy cheese, artichoke or spinach stays warm in a small one.

2. If more oil is needed, add a tablespoon or two. Add onions and peppers to pot and saute until wilted, stirring occasionally. Add garlic and saute another minute. Add liquid from tomatoes, and chop tomatoes before adding. Add stock and return meat and bacon to the pot. Add beans, beer and seasonings and mix well. Cover and simmer over low heat for 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Taste and adjust seasonings. Toward the end of cooking, add thickening agent, if desired. Skim any excess fat from surface and discard. 3. Serve with optional toppings and cornbread, crackers or tortillas. Serves 6 to 8. *Trappey’s liquid is thickened. Drain first if using a brand of beans in water.


last call

New Possibilities Espresso Martini by Tim McNally

A New Year almost demands an attempt at a new beginning. We don’t start completely from “fresh” but we should make an effort to cast away habits and beliefs that are no longer serving the greater purpose of improving our lives. Resolutions are traditional. This opportunity to “begin anew” is not to be shrugged aside. Embrace the moment and make the effort. Open the mind to new possibilities. Maybe last month the idea of a coffee martini would not have appealed, but now with colder temps and the beginning of Carnival, this approach is making more sense. The creative gang at Bonefish Grill know a thing or two about combining wonderful ingredients for happy outcomes.

Espresso Martini

1.5 oz. Vanilla vodka 0.25 oz. Kahlua 0.25 oz. Dark Crème de Cacao 1 shot Fresh brewed espresso Combine all ingredients into a pint glass filled with ice. Shake until ice cold and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with three espresso beans. As created and featured at Bonefish Grill, 4848 Veterans Boulevard, Metairie, 780-9964, Bonefishgrill.com/locations/ la/Metairie.

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eugenia uhl photo


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dining listings H= New Orleans Magazine award winner

Bywater

H Pizza Delicious pizza 617 Piety St., 676-8482, PizzaDelicious.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant , that also offers excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes. Outdoor seating a plus. $ Carrollton Bourré AMERICAN 1510 S. Carrollton Ave., 510-4040. L, D Tue-Sun. “Elevated” street food along with quality daiquiris and wings are the draw at this newcomer from the team behind Boucherie. $$ Breads on Oak Bakery/Breakfast 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. B, L WedSun. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak St. serves breads, sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan-friendly options. $ City Park Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Cir., NO Museum of Art, 482-1264, CafeNoma. com. L, (snacks) Tue-Sun. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $$ CBD/Warehouse District Balise Louisianian Fare 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. L Tue-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Carefully crafted fare fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

H BH Steak Steakhouse Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. D daily. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne Seafood 601 Loyola Ave.,

$ = Average entrée price

$ = $5-10 $$ = $11-15 $$$ = $16-20 $$$$ = $21-25 $$$$$ = $25 & up

appeal. $$$

burning oven, and an excellent raw bar. $$$

Drago’s Louisianian Fare Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D daily. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

Q&C Hotel/Bar AMERICAN 344 Camp St., 587-9700, QandC.com. B, D daily, L Fri-Sun. Boutique hotel bar offering a small plates menu with tempting choices such as a Short Rib Poor Boy and Lobster Mac and Cheese to complement their sophisticated craft cocktails. $$

H Domenica Italian The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products. $$$$ Emeril’s Louisianian Fare 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from all over the world. $$$$$

H Herbsaint Louisianian Fare 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$ H La Boca Steakhouse 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. D Mon-Sat. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Lüke World 333 St. Charles Ave., 378-2840, LukeNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, house-made pâtés and plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$

613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Coastal Louisiana with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$

Morton’s The Steakhouse Steakhouse 365 Canal St., One Canal Place, 566-0221, Mortons.com/NewOrleans. D daily. Private elevator leads to the plush, wood-paneled environs of this local outpost of the famed Chicago steakhouse popular with politicians and celebrities. $$$$

Calcasieu Specialty Foods 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2188, CalcasieuRooms.com. For large and small gatherings, the catering menus feature modern Louisiana cooking and the Cajun cuisine for which chef Donald Link is justifiably famous.

Mother’s Louisianian Fare 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net. B, L, D daily. Locals and tourists alike endure long lines to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$

H Cochon Louisianian Fare 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. L, D, Mon-Sat. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski feature Cajun and Southern cuisine. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine Reservations recommended. $$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. L Mon-Fri, D Tue-Sat. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this menu, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the

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Mulate’s Louisianian Fare 201 Julia St., 5221492, Mulates.com. L, D daily. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$ Palace Café World 605 Canal St., 523-1661, PalaceCafe.com. B, L, D daily. Cassic New Orleans restaurant, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates at the Black Duck Bar. $$$

H Pêche Seafood 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by Chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-

HRed Gravy Bakery/Breakfast 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. B, Br, L, Wed-Mon. Farm-to-table brunch restaurant offers a creative array of items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$ H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. L Fri, D daily. James Beard Award-winning menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Rock-N-Sake Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake.com. L Fri, D Tue-Sun, late night Fri-Sat. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution. There are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sac-A-Lait Seafood 1051 Annunciation St., 324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. D TueSat, L Fri. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. $$$$ The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine Italian 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. D daily. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$ Central City Café Reconcile Louisiana fare 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile. org. L Mon-Fri. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$ Covington Don’s Seafood seafood 126 Lake Dr., (985) 327-7111, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Popular neighborhood seafood joint offers an array of crowd-pleasing south

Louisiana dishes, including char-broiled oysters and Zydeco shrimp. Kid’s Menu makes it a good choice for families. $$$ Faubourg Marigny The Marigny Brasserie AMERICAN 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472, MarignyBrasserie. com. L, D daily. Chic neighborhood bistro with traditional dishes like fried green tomatoes and innovative cocktails such as the cucumber Collins. $$$ Faubourg St. John

H Café Degas French 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. L, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

H 1000 Figs World 3141 Ponce De Leon St., 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-to-table alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$ French Quarter Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s Louisianian Fare 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. D daily, Br Sun. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade Italian 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. L, D daily. Home of the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$ Antoine’s Louisianian Fare 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$ Antoine’s Annex Specialty Foods 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/Antoines-Annex. Open daily. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available. BB King’s Blues Club Barbecue 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/ new-orleans. L, D daily. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician with a menu loaded with BBQ and southern specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$ Bayou Burger Burgers 503 Bourbon St., 529-4256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$ Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes,


bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Bayona World 430 Dauphine St., 5254455, Bayona.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ Broussard’s French 819 Conti St., 5813866, Broussards.com. D daily, Br Sun. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table Gastropub 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Open late, this chefdriven rustic colonial cuisine with rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House Italian 601 Chartres St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. L, D daily. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters Louisianian Fare 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters.com. Br, D daily. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Louisianian Fare Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. B, L, D daily. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various

Louisiana cultures, with a contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster Seafood 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. L, D daily. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery Seafood 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. L, D daily. Crowd-pleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. L Fri, D daily. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan Steakhouse 620 Chartres St., 267-3500,

DorisMetropolitan.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. Innovative steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro World 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. L, D daily. Central Mexican cuisine along with hand-muddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s Louisianian Fare 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak Steakhouse 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. L Fri, D SunThu. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails and classic steakhouse fare and inspired dishes. Reservations accepted. $$$

H GW Fins Seafood 808 Bienville St., 581FINS (3467), GWFins.com. D daily. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$ Hard Rock Café AMERICAN 125 Bourbon St., 529-5617, HardRock.com. L, D daily, Br SatSun. Local outpost of this global brand serves burgers, café fare and drinks in their rock

memorabilia-themed environs. $$ House of Blues Louisianian Fare 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues. com/NewOrleans. L, D daily. Good menu complements music in the main room. Worldfamous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Irene’s Cuisine Italian 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. D Mon-Sat. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen Louisianian Fare 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul. com/KPaul. L Thu-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to the nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish Seafood 337 Charters St., 598-5005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chefdriven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou Seafood 208 Bourbon St., 5254755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafood-centric destination on Bourbon Street. $$$ Muriel’s Jackson Square Italian 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Enjoy local classics while

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dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-be-haunted establishment. $$$$ Napoleon House Italian 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. L Mon-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas. A Sazerac or Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $$ NOLA Louisianian Fare 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. L Thu-Mon, D daily. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedar-plankroasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill Seafood 739 Conti St., 5256002, OceanaGrill.com. B, L, D daily. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro Gastropub 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. D daily. Wine is the muse at this bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin Gastropub 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. D daily. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 Seafood 424 Bourbon St., 3091574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. L, D daily. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by

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unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster. $$$ Port of Call Burgers 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. L, D daily. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

H Restaurant R’evolution Italian 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola. com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Jana Billiot and executive sous chef Gabriel Beard are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Ralph Brennan’s Red Fish Grill Italian 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. L, D daily. Chef Austin Kirzner cooks up a broad menu peppered with local favorites such as barbecue oysters, blackened redfish and double-chocolate bread pudding. $$$$$ Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. B, D daily, L MonSat, Br Sun. Old World elegance, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$ Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant Louisianian Fare 301 Dauphine St., 5860972, RichardFiskes.com. B, Bar Lunch daily. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street is this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with

dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$ Royal House Louisianian Fare 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. L, D daily. B Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$

bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. D daily. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

SoBou Louisianian Fare 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. B, L, D daily. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on an accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tujague’s Louisianian Fare 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$

H Tableau Louisianian Fare 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. B Mon-Fri, L Mon-Sat, D daily, Brunch Sat-Sun. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre. $$$

Garden District Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s AMERICAN 2001 St. Charles Ave., 593-9955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sun. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$

H The Bistreaux Louisianian Fare New Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy.com/dining. html. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$

District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders.com. B, L, D daily. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $

The Bombay Club Louisianian Fare Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. D daily. Popular martini

Hoshun Restaurant Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. L, D daily. A wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes


culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Private dining rooms available. $$

L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse Steakhouse

Austin’s Louisianian Fare 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. D Mon-Sat. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$

2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri-Sat. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$ Lakeview

H Cava Louisianian Fare 789 Harrison Ave., 304-9034. D daily. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$

H Mondo World 900 Harrison Ave., 2242633, MondoNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. This place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$ Lower Garden District The Tasting Room Gastropub 1906 Magazine St., 581-3880, TTRNewOrleans. com. D Tue-Sun. Flights of wine and sophisticated small plates are the calling cards for this wine bar. $$ Metairie H Andrea’s Restaurant Italian 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.com. L Mon-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$ Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com.

Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. L, D daily. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. D daily, L Mon-Fri. Br Sun. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this familyfriendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. B, L Mon-Sat. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. B, L daily; D Mon-Sat. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options, and gourmet coffee and espresso drinks create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. $ Crabby Jack’s Louisianian Fare 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. L Mon-Sat. Lunch outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue

shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

available.

Don’s Seafood seafood 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials. $$$

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D MonSat. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

Drago’s Louisianian Fare 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. L Tue-Fri & Sun, D Tue-Sun. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$

Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Seafood 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

Five Happiness Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. L, D daily. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and housebaked duck. $$

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris. com. L Fri, D daily. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution, and great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sucré Specialty Foods 3301 Veterans Blvd., 834-2277, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering

Mid-City

H Crescent City Steaks Steakhouse

Gracious Bakery + Café Bakery/Breakfast 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B, L daily. Boutique bakery offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Louisianian Fare 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

H Liuzza’s Italian 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120, Liuzzas.com. L, D daily. Classic

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neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

H Mandina’s Louisianian Fare 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$ H Mona’s Café World 3901 Banks St., 4827743. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros. The lentil soup and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $ H MoPho Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-and-match pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$ Parkway Bakery and Tavern AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys. com. L, D Wed-Mon. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $ Ralph’s On The Park Italian 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. Br Sun, L Tue-Fri, D daily. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$$

H Toups’ Meatery Louisianian Fare 845

9 6 january 2019 myneworleans.com

N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. L, D Tue-Sat. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$ Multiple Locations Café du Monde Bakery/Breakfast CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Bakery/Breakfast CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $ Copeland’s Louisianian Fare CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$ Little Tokyo Asian Fusion/Pan Asian LittleTokyoNola.com. L, D daily. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, burgers, soups, salads and deli-style sandwiches. $ Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Seafood MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. A seafood lover’s paradise offers an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. A raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled

and raw. $$$

destination. $$$$$

Reginelli’s Pizzeria pizza Reginellis.com. L, D daily. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$

HCarrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. L Sat-Sun, D Tue-Sat. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$ Theo’s Pizza TheosPizza.com. L, D daily. The cracker-crisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with local ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN ZeaRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular spot serves a variety of grilled items, appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Catering services available. $$$

Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market Louisianian Fare 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket.com. B, L, D daily. Historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ Uptown Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute. org. B, L Tue-Sat, Br Sun. A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$

H Boucherie Louisianian Fare 1506

Bouligny Tavern Gastropub 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern.com. D MonSat. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$

S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, BoucherieNola.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$

Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. B, L, D daily. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $

Brigtsen’s Louisianian Fare 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie

Casamento’s Louisianian Fare 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. L Thu-Sat, D ThuSun. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed

Riverbend


during summer and for all major holidays. $$ Clancy’s Louisianian Fare 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. L ThuFri, D Mon-Sat. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$ Commander’s Palace Louisianian Fare 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Awardwinner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$

H Coquette French 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from the chefs. $$$ Dick and Jenny’s Louisianian Fare 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys. com. D Mon-Sat. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$

H Gautreau’s Louisianian Fare 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant. com. D Mon-Sat. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along

H La Crêpe Nanou French 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. D daily, Br Sun. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery French 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. L Tue-Sat,

D daily, Br Sun. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily Frenchinspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette French 3637 Magazine St., 8951636, LiletteRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

H Magasin Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4201 Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $ Pascal’s Manale Italian 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. L MonFri, D Mon-Sat. A neighborhood favorite since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$

H Patois World 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441, PatoisNola.com. L Fri, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. French food, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$ Pizza Domenica pizza 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. A pizza centric spinoff of the popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitanstyle pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and

charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

small plates. $$

H Shaya World 4213 Magazine St., 891-

Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. D Tue-Sat. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$

4213, ShayaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. James Beard Award-winning menu pays homage to Israel at this contemporary Israeli hotspot. $$$ Sucré Specialty Foods 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily & nightly. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available.

H The Company Burger Burgers 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger. com. L, D daily. Custom-baked butter-brushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine. com. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sun. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Warehouse District Lucy’s World 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 5238995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. L, D daily. Island-themed oasis with a menu that cherrypicks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay into the wee hours. $

The Delachaise Gastropub 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise.com. D daily. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$ H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. D Wed-Sun. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger presents this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$ H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 3090069, WayfareNola.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Creative sandwiches and southern-inspired

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com

myneworleans.com january 2018 9 7


ADVERTISING SECTION

The Wellness Center of Thibodaux Regional

Wellness

J

anuary is officially here, and resolution season is in full swing. We’re often seeking new versions of ourselves in the New Year—healthier, thinner, more relaxed, and more fit versions of ourselves. Wellness is a noble goal to strive for; when we’re better to ourselves, we’re often better to others as well. Whether improving your self-care routine means adding regular massages to the calendar or losing twenty pounds and keeping off the weight, find supportive friends and family to cheer you along and hold you accountable to the health goal that’s right for your mind, body, and spirit. Wellness is a wonderful thing to achieve. And while a longer, more fulfilling life may mean making more resolutions, it will also mean making more memories with those you love. Consider the region’s various resources for fitness, weight loss, therapeutic massage, and much more.

Fitness Start the New Year off right with Club Pilates. Pure to Joseph Pilates’ original Reformer-based Contrology Method, but modernized with group practice and expanded state-of-the-art equipment, Club Pilates offers high-quality, life-changing training at a surprisingly affordable price. More than just Reformers, Club Pilates teaches classes using TRX, Barre, Exo-Chair, Bosu ball, mats, rollers and more. The studio’s certified instructors perform hundreds of hours of training to meet teacher standards and maximize your workout. Dynamic class sessions are available at a variety of levels and at convenient class times. The Club Pilates team believes that Pilates is the path to a fuller, more satisfying physical existence and that being in control of your body helps you to be in control of your life. And best of all, you can start anytime. No matter your level of fitness, there’s a Pilates class for you. Book your own stress-free intro class for free at clubpilates.com/ oldmetairie, or call 504-484-9650 for more information. Nola Pilates & Yoga/ Xtend Barre is one of Lakeview’s premier fitness studios. The studio’s extensive schedule features over 65 group classes per week, including Pilates Reformer, Tower, Mat, Yoga, MELT Method, TRX Suspension and Xtend Barre. One-on-one sessions are available in the private equipment studio seven days per week. Classes range in focus and intensity from open-level Pilates Mat and Yoga classes to musclesculpting, calorie-torching classes like TRX and Xtend Barre. November 2018 marked the studio’s 11-year anniversary, and owner Kim Munoz fondly recalls opening its doors back in 2007, as small business owners worked tirelessly to revive their city following Hurricane Katrina. “In our first years, we were grateful for the opportunity to offer the local community a positive outlet following such devastation,” explained Munoz. “Over a decade later, we look forward to continuing to serve the New Orleans community and helping you meet your goals, restore your mind, body, and spirit.” Visit the studio online at NolaPilates.com to schedule your first session. For more information, visit the website or call 504-483-8880. 9 8 january 2019 myneworleans.com

Weight Loss Based in the New Orleans area, Sensible Meals is the largest meal prep program in the country. People across the U.S. are signing up for this simple and effective path towards fast weight-loss results, all by consuming flavorful, chef-prepared, fresh foods. Sensible Meals boasts of the numerous health benefits including blood sugar regulation and overall heart health. This diet plan is changing lives. “After five days on the meal plan the appetite shrinks, and when you eat restaurant or home-prepared food, the desire for smaller portions remains,” explains Ingrid Rinck, Owner and Founder of Sensible Meals. Sensible Meals ships nationally to thousands of clients with free local pickup in 10 cities. For videos, client testimonials—including exciting local “before and after” photos and success stories—visit Sensible Meals’ Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter pages or head over to EatSensibleMeals.com. 

Massage Therapy Most people have some level of pain they deal with on a daily basis. It could be caused by an injury, a medical condition such as arthritis, or most commonly, from poor posture and overuse of today’s smartphones and mobile devices. At Metairie Massage Center, Mika Brauner works individually with clients to get to the source of their pain so that permanent changes can be made to increase health and happiness. Simply need to destress? Brauner offers world-class techniques for relaxation in an inviting atmosphere. Additionally, Metairie Massage Center offers neuromuscular, deep tissue, myoskeletal alignment, and sports massage. Since graduating from the Florida School of Massage in 1979, Brauner has continued to study with top massage teachers across the country. She incorporates her degree in Health & Wellness with extensive experience in neuromuscular therapy, sports massage, myoskeletal alignment, and therapeutic exercise. At Metairie Massage Center, Brauner offers a calming and personable atmosphere to ensure your experience is as comfortable as possible. Book an appointment and let the healing begin. Visit MetairieMassage.net or call 504-723-7239.

Wellness Centers The Wellness Center of Thibodaux Regional, located in Lafourche Parish, is changing the health of the community. Since opening in November 2016, membership of the Fitness Center, one of the Centers within the Wellness Center, has averaged 5,500 people. During the first year, there were 350,000 visits to the Fitness Center alone. The Fitness Center houses all of the latest technology, a wrap-around track, and many opportunities for group exercise as well as spacious locker rooms, saunas, steam rooms and hot tubs for men and women. In addition to the Fitness Center, Thibodaux Regional has carefully integrated a significant amount of health care services within the Wellness Center resulting in complementary care and a real clinicalbased orientation toward health and wellness. Call 985-493-4400 for more information or visit thibodaux.com. No one can impact how you age as much as you can. Of course, your heredity plays a role in your propensity for certain ailments, but your lifestyle choices can play an equal or larger role in your health and quality of life.  The Wellness Center at East Jefferson General Hospital has been recognized for its excellence as both a fitness and wellness center and a disease management facility. With specific programs designed for those with cancer, heart disease, Parkinson’s Disease, multiple sclerosis and more, the Wellness Center is a unique resource that can help keep you mobile, active, flexible, strong and well. For more information on the Wellness Center or all East Jefferson General Hospital offers the community, please visit ejgh.org. •


ADVERTISING SECTION

Pain Management

W

hether suffering from long-term, chronic pain or dealing with the new, negative effects of a recent injury, the frustrations that accompany pain can change entire lifestyles. Beyond the physical effects of pain, the mental effects also can change a person’s personality and outlook. Knowing where to turn for diagnosis and treatment of pain can be as simple or complicated as the pain itself. You might know to head to the ER for a broken arm or leg, but do you know where to go when the injury is less obvious? Knowing your options is helpful when seeking professional help in Greater New Orleans. From specialists in pain and neurological care to specialists in orthopedics or even family medicine, you can rest assured there’s an expert in your illness or injury who’s ready to take on and solve your pain mystery.

Chronic Pain Southern Pain & Neurological is happy to offer Superion Indirect Decompression System, a new, minimally invasive approach to treat

lumbar stenosis that fits in the gap of treatment offerings between conservative care and invasive surgery. FDA approved and covered by Medicare, this outpatient treatment is especially helpful for older patients and those not able to tolerate more invasive laminectomy to treat significant limitation in walking or continuous standing. Clinical trials indicated 90% patient satisfaction through 60 months. Successful reduction in leg pain was rated at 75% for Superion, which was better than a laminectomy and for the same evaluation period. Doctors Paul Hubbell, Barry Faust, and Donald Richardson understand that chronic pain, especially stenosis and resultant claudication, creates a prison for patients, disabling them from an active lifestyle. The stress from the walking and standing pain negatively affects personalities and decreases freedom. If you are suffering from chronic pain, contact Southern Pain and find out if the Superion minimally invasive indirect decompression system or something else is right for you. For information and scheduling at the Metairie, Marrero and Covington office, please call 1-800-277-1265.

Resources for Children & Parents Illnesses and injuries don’t follow a schedule, so it’s important to be close to medical care that’s available after hours. Children’s Hospital’s Virtual After Hours care allows parents access to Children’s Hospital care from wherever they are through a free app. Simply register online and receive face-to-face pediatric care from your computer, tablet, or smartphone. Children’s Hospital is committed to providing each child with expert pediatric primary care. With 14 primary care clinics, two After Hours Clinics and the new Virtual After Hours Clinic, quality pediatric care from Children’s Hospital is within reach. To register for Virtual After Hours care, visit chnola.org/ VirtualAfterHours. To learn more about physicians and services offered through Children’s Hospital, visit chnola.org. •

myneworleans.com january 2019 9 9


ADVERTISING SECTION

Vista Shores

Senior Living

L

iving options for older adults in New Orleans continue to expand. With luxurious, amenity-laden retirement communities, quaint, shared houses, and in-home care services, the lifestyle choices available to seniors run the gamut. Social adults may opt for communities boasting lounges, coffee shops, and exciting activities, while quieter types may opt for the familiar comforts of their own homes or seek out a community with quiet, relaxing grounds. Children of aging parents who are seeking peace of mind and additional care for loved ones will find a wealth of local resources that can help distinguish an individual’s needs and customize care to those needs. Adults needing memory care can find a variety of resources and experienced, trained professionals available to help at a number of local communities and homes. As the number of aging adults rises across New Orleans, fortunately so do the number of options for living healthy and comfortable lives.

In-Home Assistance Home Instead offers peace of mind for families of aging adults who wish to remain in the home. As a local franchise, Home Instead offers the added benefit of staff who understand New Orleans’ culture and hospitality. Home Instead New Orleans has a large team of fully trained CAREGiversSM who provide the care and companionship

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your loved one deserves. CAREGivers provide support through nonmedical services like meal preparation, transportation, personal care, medication reminders, and more, while working in tandem when needed with healthcare providers, home health, and hospice. “Most older adults want to stay home, the place they know and love,” says Owner Lisa Rabito. “Our focus is to build relationships first.” Available from as little as eight hours a week to 24 hours a day, CAREGivers can take your loved one to church, the salon, and their weekly bridge game, or care for bed-bound clients who need full personal care, all while providing safety and companionship. Aging adults no longer in the home can also request Home Instead services at the retirement community or nursing facility where they reside. For more information, visit HomeInstead.com/339 or call 504-4554911.  When you can’t be at home to care for your family member, you want peace of mind knowing that the person who is there will treat your loved one with the same level of care and concern that you would. At Personal Homecare Services, your family is their family. Providing 24/7, in-home companion care, Personal Homecare Services offers clients the ability to remain in the comfort of their own home with their personal memories and possessions while you regain the time and energy needed to experience being a real family again.


ADVERTISING SECTION Personal Homecare Services is one of the first non-medical services specializing in live-in care and working in conjunction with doctors, healthcare providers, and hospices to provide continuous around-theclock care without the worry and expense of hourly services. They’ve built a solid reputation with word-of-mouth referral, evidence of the trust their clients have in their caretakers and services. Services include meal preparation, help with personal hygiene, medicinal reminders, light housekeeping, transportation to/from appointments, and companionship. To learn more, visit PersonalHomecare.net or call 877-336-8045. Home Care Solutions, newly acquired by Poydras Home, specializes in compassionate in-home care, Alzheimer’s care, and Aging Life Care Management™ services to help your elderly loved ones extend their independence at home. They are committed to providing the highest quality of care, keeping loved ones safe and comfortable while giving families peace of mind. Caregiver’s are carefully matched to meet both your loved one’s needs and personality. Home Care Solutions Care Managers navigate the care of your loved ones with expertise and heart and are experienced advocates with creative solutions for complex situations and all care concerns. Care Managers’ familiarity with local resources saves you time and often saves you money while their compassionate understanding of the aging process saves you unnecessary distress. Home Care Solutions, a licensed Personal Care Attendant Agency, is a member of Home Care Association of America and Aging Life Care Association™.  Call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com. Home Care Solutions would be honored to assist your family in navigating elder care.

Community Retirement Living Poydras Home is reaching deeper into the Greater New Orleans area to fulfill the diverse care needs of even more seniors with the acquisition of an independent, in-home, personal care attendant company, Home Care Solutions. Continuing Care Retirement Communities such as Poydras Home recognize that community living is not the only option available to the region’s aging population. With Poydras Home’s new home support, seniors and their families can choose their optimum environment. For the first time in its 201-year history, Poydras Home will now be able to offer non-medical sitter/companion services to those who elect to remain at home. Through Home Care Solutions, Poydras Home can also deliver care management services, personally advising seniors and their families as they face a wide variety of healthcare choices. This new venture and expansion of services will allow greater flexibility to meet the growing needs of more New Orleanians. For more information about Poydras Home, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-897-0535. As an award-winning and full-service retirement center and community, Lambeth House offers the best of all worlds— independent living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care, and Memory Care in the event it’s ever needed.  With an exceptional approach to living and a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities including the fitness center with a stunning indoor, salt-water swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options, and engaging activities and social events. Nonresidents (55+) can access Fitness Center memberships, and Lambeth House’s Wild Azalea Café is open to the public for breakfast and lunch, Tuesday-Saturday. Nestled in the heart of Uptown and overlooking the Mississippi River, Lambeth House offers luxurious

accommodations and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its last expansion. For more information, call 504-865-1960 or visit LambethHouse.com. Peristyle Residences offer Residential Assisted Living and Memory Care in the comfort of luxurious, intimate homes complete with private bedrooms and congregate dining and living areas. This alternative approach to senior living is ideal for seniors who seek assistance with day-to-day living in a more private, home-like setting than traditional assisted living communities can provide. Peristyle Residences consists of nine beautiful homes throughout Greater New Orleans. Old Metairie Gardens Memory Care Assisted Living Homes, opening in January, are the only senior living homes in Old Metairie. Peristyle’s quaint, lovely residences provide the highest level of care, comfort, and compassion possible to the seniors they serve, along with convenience and peace of mind for their loved ones. Expert consultation from Chef Aaron Burgau of Patois adds distinction and flavor to the healthy, delicious meals prepared at the community daily, and an array of stimulating activities, including an exceptional Music Therapy program, keeps residents active and engaged at home. Peristyle Residences caregivers are highly trained in dementia care and have ample experience caring for seniors. Schedule a tour today at PeristyleResidences.com or by calling 504-517-3273. The region’s newest option in senior living, The Blake at Colonial Club, is currently under construction at the corner of Jefferson Highway and Colonial Club Drive in Harahan. The Blake offers resort-style amenities such as a salon and spa, a chef-led dining program, a full service bar and lounge, and an espresso and ice cream bar. Residents participate in activities and outings such as onsite live music and trips to festivals and theatrical performances. Options for Assisted Living include one- and two-bedroom apartments with 10-foot ceilings, walk-in closets, and traditional millwork. Balconies and porches overlooking the landscaped courtyards are also available. Pricing will be based on service needs and apartment selection; however, the high-end community will be affordable and competitive with other options in the area. Reservations are currently being accepted. For more information, call 504-737-7770 or visit  blakeliving.com/colonialclub. Vista Shores is a luxury senior living community offering the highest quality assisted living and memory care in the New Orleans area. Located on Bayou St. John, Vista Shores delights residents with chef-prepared meals in the bistro and quaint dining rooms, its relaxing lounge for coffee or cocktails, and the wrap-around porch perfect for sunset. Vista Shores’ diverse social and cultural activities and fitness programs keep residents active and engaged, while weekly housekeeping, laundry, and transportation services ensure that residents can relax and focus on living their best lives. Vista Shores residents are provided with 24-hour personal care and individualized assistance plans. The Filmore Neighborhood is an entire floor dedicated to Memory Care residents. The care team has been rigorously trained in Alzheimer’s/dementia care to enrich the lives of memory care residents. If you have a loved one living with Alzheimer’s or Dementia, find support at Vista Shores’ free Alzheimer’s Association Caregivers Monthly Support Group on the second Saturday of every month at 11 a.m.  For more information, visit vistashores.com or call 504-288-3737. •

myneworleans.com january 2019 1 0 1


PROMOTIONAL

1 0 2 january 2019 myneworleans.com


A Special Section of New Orleans Magazine WYES-TV/Channel 12 PROGRAM & EVENTS GUIDE january 2019

Will revolution in Europe threaten Victoria’s reign? Season 3 Premieres January 13 at 8pm Tune in to WYES-TV/Channel 12


W YES- TV/ Ch a n n e l 1 2 P r o g r a m G u i d e

WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

Enjoy a FREE screening of Victoria, Season 3

Thursday, January 10, 7pm This event is free but reservations are required. Reserve your seats today at wyes.org. Sip sparkling wine and enjoy sweet and savory bites at 6pm for $20 per person before the screening begins. Tickets at wyes.org.

Save the Date! WYES PASSPORT TO THE WORLD Join WYES for the 2019 global-themed annual Gala Friday, April 12, 2019 Home of Bob and Sheryl Merrick, New Orleans 6:30 p.m. Patron | 8:00 p.m. Gala $500 – Patron |$225 – Jr. Patron (ages 21-40) $200 – Gala | $100 – Jr. Gala  (ages 21-40)

Co-Chairs: Bridget and Bobby Bories, Lauren and Ken Flower, Lisa and Karl Hoefer

Proceeds from this event supports WYES’ mission of serving greater New Orleans, southeast Louisiana and the Mississippi Gulf Coast with educational, entertaining and enlightening programming. All WYES event and ticket information are available at wyes.org. D106


W YES- TV/ Ch a n n e l 1 2 P ROGRAM GUID E

WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

Applause all around! The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Suncoast Chapter awarded WYES with three Suncoast Regional Emmy® Awards during its 42nd Annual awards ceremony held last month.

Congratulations to Terri Landry, Dawn Smith, Larry Roussarie, and Kevin Belton for winning Best Instructional Program for their work on “Kevin Belton’s New Orleans Kitchen.”

Also, a big winner of the evening was Tom Gregory who won for Best in Magazine Program and Talent in Feature/Human Interest for his behind-the-scenes look at July 2017’s “Antiques Roadshow” visit to New Orleans.

Thank you to the crew and WYES staff who worked on these award-winning projects. You help WYES continue to shine!

WYES congratulates Paulette and Frank Stewart, Bobby Bories and Danny Conwill on their AFP Greater New Orleans Chapter Awards for their efforts on behalf of WYES as well as other charitable interests throughout the Greater New Orleans area. Outstanding Philanthropist Frank & Paulette Stewart

Outstanding Volunteer Fundraisers Robert Bories & Daniel Conwill IV D107


WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

W YES- TV/ Cha n n e l 1 2 P ROGRAM GUID E

Special Thanks to Our Sponsors! PARROTHEAD Presenting Sponsor LCI Workers Comp

SON OF A SAILOR Associated Branch Pilots/ Michael Miller Boudreaux's Jewelers CJ Ladner State Farm Insurance Cleco Demo Diva Greenleaf Lawson Architects Susan & Jimmy Gundlach Latter & Blum Sue & Tom Lavin Morgan Stanley/ Jim Walther

D108 DIAL 12 | January 2019

CHANGES IN LATITUDES, CHANGES IN ATTITUDES Entertainment Sponsor Stone Title of LA LLC

Nunmaker Yachts, Inc. Outdoor Living Center The Paretti Family of Dealerships Jaguar - Land Rover - Mazda The Sanctuary Michelle & Rowland Stalter/HUB International Southland Plumbing Supply Media Partners Inside Northside Lake 94.7

FINS Banner Ford & Chevrolet Braswell Drugs Fidelity Bank Ross Downing Auto Group Stone Creek Club & Spa Susan & Pierre Villere

WJSH - The Highway 104.7 Special Thanks Acquistapace's Covington Supermarket Chilero© Coca-Cola Bottling Company United Event Rentals The Event Glossary/ Z Event Company MPRESSED Todd Wanner & Fidelity Bank Grill


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Programming Highlights! WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY Weeknights at 10pm Examine the global issues, domestic news and trends impacting the world. Christiane Amanpour leads conversations with thought leaders and influencers, with other interviews from Walter Isaacson, Michel Martin, Alicia Menendez and Hari Sreenivasan. *Pictured: Author and journalist Walter Isaacson, professor of history at Tulane University.

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue” Saturday, January 5 at 8:00 p.m. New Orleans native Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews led his own band by the age of six and released his first album when he was only 16. Now in his 20s, Andrews is bringing his special blend of funk, rock, jazz and hip-hop to a national audience.

FINDING YOUR ROOTS WITH HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR. Tuesdays, January 8-February 26 at 7pm; April 2 and 9 at 7pm Join Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. to uncover the surprisingly ancestral stories of 28 cultural trailblazers with fascinating histories. Featuring Laura Linney, Michael Strahan, Sarah Silverman, Andy Samberg, Seth Meyers, Tig Notaro, Paul Ryan, Marco Rubio and more.

THE DICTATOR’S PLAYBOOK Wednesdays, January 9-February 13 at 9pm From Mussolini to Saddam Hussein, dictators have had a profound effect on the 20th century. How did they seize and wield power? What forces rose up against them or resisted them in secret? How did they finally come to the bitter end? This series answers those questions in six immersive hours, each a revealing portrait of brutality and power.

INDEPENDENT LENS “Rodents of Unusual Size” Monday, January 14 at 9pm; Wednesday, January 16 at 11pm It’s humans vs. rodents. May the best mammal win. Nutria are a nuisance and one diehard Delacroix Island fisherman is fighting back — Thomas Gonzales, who tries to pick off as many as he can. The state is also helping out by paying a $5 bounty for every nutria tail collected. Kermit Ruffins barbecues nutria outside his concerts to create interest in eating the rodents. Hear some initial missteps in bringing nutria to Louisiana and ways others have dreamed up business ventures to capitalize on their large numbers. Narrated by Wendell Pierce with music by the Grammy Award-winning Lost Bayou Ramblers.

INDEPENDENT LENS “The King” Monday, January 28 at 8pm Climb into Elvis’ 1963 Rolls-Royce for a musical road trip that traces the rise and fall of Elvis as a metaphor for the country he left behind. Pictured: The Handsome Family

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2 WEDNESDAY

4 FRIDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm WE’LL MEET AGAIN, SEASON 2 “Escape From Cuba” (Episode 5 of 6) Join Ann Curry as two men search for those who helped them settle in the U.S. when they fled Castro’s Cuba.

7pm NATURE “Fox Tales” Intelligent, resilient and bold, the red fox can change its behavior to thrive in new environments, from urban locales to the Arctic tundra. New scientific research offers a fascinating look into the secret life of these foxes.

7pm INFORMED SOURCES

8pm NOVA “Beyond Pluto” Uncover in real time the secrets of what lies beyond Pluto.

8pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “From Vienna: The New Year’s Celebration 2019” Ring in the New Year with the Vienna Philharmonic under the baton of conductor Christian Thielemann at the Musikverein. Hosted by Hugh Bonneville and featuring favorite Strauss Family waltzes accompanied by the dancing of the Vienna City Ballet. 9:30pm SYMPHONY FOR NATURE: THE BRITT ORCHESTRA AT CRATER LAKE Enjoy an extraordinary musical experience at the edge of Oregon’s Crater Lake. 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY Examine the global issues, domestic news and trends impacting the world. Christiane Amanpour leads conversations with thought leaders and influencers, with other interviews from Walter Isaacson, Michel Martin, Alicia Menendez and Hari Sreenivasan. 11pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘Entente Cordiale’ (Episode 3 of 7) Victoria decides to try her hand at foreign relations, and takes the royal court on an adventure to France, stepping toe to toe with the cunning King of the French, Louis Philippe. *Victoria fans can enjoy a sneak peek of Season 3 at WYES on January 10th (tickets at wyes.org/events). Don’t miss the WYES broadcast premiere on January 13 at 8pm!

LET’S GO LUNA! 8am & 1:30am

9pm AMERICAN MASTERS “James Watson” Season 32 continues with the story of the life of Nobel Prizewinning biologist James Watson, the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, and his impact on science. 10:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11:30pm LITTLE WOMEN ON MASTERPIECE

3 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR 8pm CRAFT IN AMERICA “California” The tenth season of this series explores the vitality, history and significance of the craft movement in the United States and its impact on our nation’s rich cultural heritage. Continues next Thursday, January 10 at 8pm.

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT Missed an episode? Watch it on the WYES YouTube channel at wyes.org. 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm NEW ORLEANS: THE FIRST 300 YEARS Narrated by actor John Goodman. Rare photos and films illustrate a city that began and continues to be a mix of cultures. 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11pm STEPPIN’ OUT 11:30pm INFORMED SOURCES

5 SATURDAY 6pm THE LAWRENCE WELK SHOW 7pm THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW “Cake”

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9pm THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS: A MEANINGFUL VICTORY 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘Faith, Hope & Charity’ (Episode 4 of 7) News of the horrific famine in Ireland has finally reached the Queen. She is adamant that her government should be doing more to help, but meets with surprising opposition from her Prime Minister.

8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue” Revel in an hour with New Orleans funk masters Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, with special guest Cyril Neville. Shorty lays down the grooves with highlights from his recent Voodoo Threauxdown tour. DIAL 12 | January 2019 D111

WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

1 TUESDAY


WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

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9pm SHALLOW GRAVE (1994) Starring Kerry Fox, Christopher Eccleston, Ewan McGregor and Ken Stott.

10:30pm MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 5” (Episode 9 of 9)

11pm TEACHING FOR EXCELLENCE: A WYES COMMUNITY FORUM A panel of education leaders, moderated by WYES Community Projects Producer Marcia Kavanaugh, talks about solutions to the teacher shortage and incentives to education careers in Louisiana.

7 MONDAY

7pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘The King Over the Water’ (Episode 5 of 7) Feeling suffocated by the weight of the crown, Victoria escapes with her court to the Scottish Highlands. 8pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘The Luxury of Conscience’ (Episode 6 of 7) Victoria and Albert have to face their worst nightmare as parents. 9:30pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘Comfort and Joy’ (Episode 7 of 7) Victoria gets more than one surprise visitor and finds herself threatened by a relative. *Victoria fans can enjoy a sneak peek of Season 3 at WYES on January 10th (tickets at wyes.org/events). Don’t miss the WYES broadcast premiere on January 13 at 8pm!

8 TUESDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

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6 SUNDAY 6pm WE’LL MEET AGAIN

11pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘The Luxury of Conscience’ (Episode 6 of 7)

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7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Meadow Brook Hall” (Hour 1 of 3) Experience ROADSHOW’s all-new look as it kicks off a groundbreaking season of incredible items appraised at settings that are treasures in their own right. From the grounds of the historic Meadow Brook Hall in Rochester, Michigan, learn the story behind beloved family heirlooms, thrift store finds and more — including a $77,500 appraisal! Pictured: a Willem Blaeu world map, ca. 1635 8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Chicago” (Hour 1 of 3) 9pm THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS: A MEANINGFUL VICTORY explores how the British misjudged their opponent and miscalculated the complexities of the battle ground. Produced by WYES. 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Grandparents and Other Strangers”(Episode 1of 10) This season, explore ancestry stories of Felicity Huffman, Andy Samberg, George R.R. Martin, Christiane Amanpour, Michael Strahan, Laura Linney, Paul Ryan, Joe Madison, Michael Moore, Sarah Silverman, Kal Penn, Michael K. Williams, Tig Notaro, Lisa Ling, Alejandro Innaritu, Chloe Sevigny and more. Hosted by Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Watch it Tuesdays, January 8-April 9 at 7pm. 8pm WE’LL MEET AGAIN, SEASON 2 “The Fight for Women’s Rights” (Episode 6 of 6) 9pm USS INDIANAPOLIS LIVE – FROM THE DEEP Take a live tour of the wreckage.

Weekdays on

LET’S GO LUNA! 8am & 1:30pm

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5am PEG + CAT 5:30am ARTHUR 6am READY JET GO! 6:30am WILD KRATTS 7am NATURE CAT 7:30am CURIOUS GEORGE 8am LET’S GO LUNA! 8:30am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 9am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 9:30am PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC 10am SESAME STREET 10:30am SPLASH AND BUBBLES 11am DINOSAUR TRAIN

11:30am CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT! Noon SESAME STREET 12:30pm SUPER WHY! 1pm PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC 1:30pm LET’S GO LUNA! 2pm NATURE CAT 2:30pm WILD KRATTS 3pm WILD KRATTS 3:30pm ODD SQUAD 4pm ODD SQUAD 4:30pm ARTHUR 5pm ARTHUR 5:30pm READY JET GO!


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10:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11:30pm POV SHORTS: EARTHRISE

10 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR

9 WEDNESDAY

8pm CRAFT IN AMERICA “Visionaries” delves into stories of craft artists and influencers who by sheer genius, inspire succeeding generations. 9pm FRENCH QUARTER THAT WAS 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

7pm NATURE “Attenborough and the Sea Dragon” Join Sir David Attenborough as he pieces together the remarkable discovery of the Ichthyosaur, a fearsome fish lizard that lived during the age of dinosaurs. 8pm NOVA “Quantum Entanglement” Join physicists as they capture light from across the universe in a bid to prove Einstein’s “spooky action at a distance.”

11pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Grandparents and Other Strangers” (Episode 1 of 10)

11 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm INFORMED SOURCES

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11pm STEPPIN’ OUT 11:30pm INFORMED SOURCES

12 SATURDAY 6pm THE LAWRENCE WELK SHOW 7pm THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW “Cake” 8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Residente” 9pm GILDA (1946) A small-time gambler hired to work in a Buenos Aires casino learns that his ex-lover is married to his employer. 11pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “The Cleveland Orchestra Centennial Celebration”

13 SUNDAY

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9pm THE DICTATORS PLAYBOOK “Kim Il Sung” From Mussolini to Saddam Hussein, dictators have had a profound effect on the 20th century. How did they seize and wield power? What forces rose up against them or resisted them in secret? How did they finally come to the bitter end? This series answers those questions in six immersive hours, each a revealing portrait of brutality and power. Watch it Wednesdays through February 13 at 9pm. 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘Comfort and Joy’ (Episode 7 of 7)

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT Peggy Scott Laborde is joined weekly by regular guests Poppy Tooker and Alan Smason, plus art reviews, local theatre productions, live music and more! 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “The Cleveland Orchestra Centennial Celebration” Celebrate the orchestra’s centennial with a gala concert conducted by Franz WelserMost, featuring pianist Lang Lang and works by Mozart, Strauss and

6pm CHEF PAUL PRUDHOMME: A LOUISIANA LEGEND Before the age of chef superstars, a selftrained son of a sharecropper from Opelousas revolutionized American gastronomy. Hear the story of renowned Cajun chef Chef Paul Prudhomme.

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6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

Ravel, with vignettes of past music directors.


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6:30pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 2” ‘Comfort and Joy’ (Episode 7 of 7)

WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

Pr Sea em s o ie n re !

8pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 1 of 8) It is 1848, and revolution is breaking out across Europe. In Britain, one woman stands between order and chaos: Queen Victoria. Jenna Coleman stars as the young but fearless monarch, facing a crisis that threatens to end her reign. 9pm VICTORIA & ALBERT: THE WEDDING (Episode 1 of 2) Join a team of experts preparing to reconstruct the royal wedding that changed history. 10pm MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 6” (Episode 1 of 9) 11:30pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3”

14 MONDAY

15 TUESDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Meadow Brook Hall” (Hour 2 of 3) Discover Detroit-area items appraised at the historic Dodge-Wilson estate. One is $40,000-$60,000!

7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Mystery Men” (Episode 2 of 10) Host Henry Louis Gates, Jr. brings Felicity Huffman and Michael K. Williams their family histories.

8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Chicago” (Hour 2 of 3)

8pm AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “The Swamp” Explore the dramatic story of the quest to conquer Florida’s Everglades, America’s greatest wetland.

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9pm FRONTLINE “The Gang Crackdown”

9pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Rodents of Unusual Size” Go deep into the bayous with fisherman Thomas Gonzales, who has lived through hurricanes and oil spills but now faces a bigger threat: monstrous 20-pound “swamp rats” who are eating up coastal wetlands. It’s man vs. rodent. May the best mammal win.

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11pm WITH INFINITE HOPE: MLK AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT looks back at the life, leadership, and legacy of The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

16 WEDNESDAY

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

11pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3”

7pm NATURE “Equss: The Story of the Horse “Origins” 8pm NOVA “Day the Dinosaurs Died”

SATURDAYS on

Kevin Belton’s New Orleans Kitchen • 9:30am

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Winner Best Instructional Program at the 42nd Annual Suncoast Regional Emmy® Awards!

5:00am MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD 5:30am SPLASH AND BUBBLES 6:00am SESAME STREET 6:30am DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 7:00am THE WOODWRIGHT’S SHOP 7:30am P. ALLEN SMITH’S GARDEN HOME 8:00am ROUGH CUT – WOODWORKING WITH TOMMY MAC 8:30am THIS OLD HOUSE 9:00am ASK THIS OLD HOUSE  9:30am KEVIN BELTON’S NEW ORLEANS KITCHEN 10:00am NEW ORLEANS COOKING WITH KEVIN BELTON

10:30am CHEF PAUL PRUDHOMME’S ALWAYS COOKING 11:00am TASTE OF LOUISIANA WITH CHEF JOHN FOLSE & COMPANY 11:30am AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN FROM COOK’S ILLUSTRATED NOON MARTHA BAKES 12:30pm CHRISTOPHER KIMBALL’S MILK STREET 1:00pm MARTHA STEWART’S COOKING SCHOOL 1:30pm COOK’S COUNTRY 2:00pm A CHEF’S LIFE 2:30pm FOOD OVER 50 3:00pm NOVA 4:00pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS 5:00pm NATURE


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Willibald Gluck’s enduringly popular opera based on the famous Greek myth.

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

11pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Rodents of Unusual Size”

11:30pm INFORMED SOURCES

19 SATURDAY 17 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR 8pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 1 of 8) 9pm LOST RESTAURANTS OF NEW ORLEANS 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Mystery Men” (Episode 2 of 10)

6pm THE LAWRENCE WELK SHOW

8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Arctic Monkeys/Wild Child” Enjoy modern rock from Arctic Monkeys, including songs from their album Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino; Wild Child presents music from their album Expectations. 9pm LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962) Starring Peter O’Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn and Jack Hawkins.

20 SUNDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm WE’LL MEET AGAIN “Great Alaskan Earthquake” 7pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 1 of 8) 8pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 2 of 8) Victoria must decide whether to fight the Chartists with force or allow them to present their petition.

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “Orphee et Eurydice from Lyric Opera of Chicago” Reimagine Christoph

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Meadow Brook Hall” (Hour 3 of 3) Magnificent Michigan treasures shine at Meadow Brook Hall, including a $40,000-$50,000 appraisal! 8pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Chicago” (Hour 3 of 3)

7pm THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW “Bread”

18 FRIDAY

7pm INFORMED SOURCES Now in its 34th season, this weekly, local news special brings together our region’s top print and broadcast journalists to examine the stories behind the headlines. Marcia Kavanaugh hosts. Errol Laborde is producer.

21 MONDAY

9pm VICTORIA & ALBERT: THE WEDDING (Episode 2 of 2) Witness the most accurate reconstruction of Victoria and Albert’s wedding ever staged.

9pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World” Take an electrifying look at the Native American influence in popular music, despite attempts to ban, censor and erase Indian culture. Pictured: Steven Van Zandt, member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band. 10:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11:30pm QUEEN OF THE SOUTH: NEW ORLEANS IN THE 1850s

22 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Reporting on the Reporters” (Episode 3 of 10) Journalists Christiane Amanpour, Ann Curry and Lisa Ling learn their fascinating family histories.

10pm MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 6” (Episode 2 of 9)

8pm AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “The Big Burn” Learn the story of a wildfire that devoured more than three million acres in the Rockies in 1910.

11pm MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 6” (Episode 3 of 9)

9pm FRONTLINE 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY DIAL 12 | January 2019 D115

WYES Program • March 2017 2019 WYES ProgramGuide Guide • JANUARY

9pm DICTATOR’S PLAYBOOK “Saddam Hussein”


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11pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 2 of 8)

24 THURSDAY

23 WEDNESDAY

7pm THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR

WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

8pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 2 of 8) 9pm FRENCH QUARTER THAT WAS 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

7pm NATURE “Equss: The Story of the Horse “Chasing the Wind” Travel around the world with anthropologist Niobe Thompson to uncover the history of mankind’s relationship with the horse. Discover the habits and biology of these majestic animals and ride along with the world’s last nomadic tribes. 8pm NOVA “Island Volcano” Join scientists and residents as they investigate the Kilauea volcano’s recent spike in activity.

11pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Reporting on the Reporters” (Episode 3 of 10)

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

8:30pm TONY BENNETT: THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS GERSHWIN PRIZE FOR POPULAR SONG features Chris Botti, Michael Bublé, Michael Feinstein, Savion Glover, Josh Groban, Wé McDonald, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Vanessa Williams, Wynton Marsalis and host Bruce Willis.

7pm INFORMED SOURCES

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

7:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT

11pm STEPPIN’ OUT

8pm WASHINGTON WEEK

11:30pm INFORMED SOURCES

25 FRIDAY

9pm DICTATOR’S PLAYBOOK “Benito Mussolini”

26 SATURDAY

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

6pm THE LAWRENCE WELK SHOW

11pm INDEPENDENT LENS “Rodents of Unusual Size”

7pm THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW “Desserts”

SUNDAYS on

WEEKENDS WITH YANKEE • 3:30pm

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Enjoy unique attractions that define the region, and the hidden New England that only locals know.

NOON MOVIE/VARIOUS 5:00am MISTER ROGERS’ PROGRAMMING NEIGHBORHOOD 1:00pm KEVIN BELTON’S NEW 5:30am SPLASH AND BUBBLES ORLEANS KITCHEN 6:00am SESAME STREET 1:30pm ELLIE’S REAL GOOD FOOD 6:30am DANIEL TIGER’S 2:00pm SARA’S WEEKNIGHT MEALS NEIGHBORHOOD 7:00am PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC 2:30pm TASTE OF MALAYSIA WITH MARTIN YAN 7:30am CURIOUS GEORGE 3:00pm PATI’S MEXICAN TABLE 8:00am LET’S GO LUNA! 3:30pm WEEKENDS WITH YANKEE 8:30am NATURE CAT 4:00pm RICK STEVES’ EUROPE 9:00am READY JET GO! 4:30pm SAMANTHA BROWN’S 9:30am MOTORWEEK PLACES TO LOVE 10:00am MOVIE/VARIOUS 5:00pm HISTORY DETECTIVES PROGRAMMING


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8pm AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Willie Nelson” The Texan superstar performs a set of hits and songs from his latest album My Way.

30 WEDNESDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Ca’ d’Zan” (Hour 1 of 3) Highlights include 1954-1956 Topps baseball cards, a The John Ringling Hotel plate, and a Harry Bertoia bronze. Which is $30,000-$50,000?

7pm NATURE “Naledi: One Little Elephant”

9pm DICTATOR’S PLAYBOOK “Manuel Noriega”

10pm QUEEN OF THE SOUTH: NEW ORLEANS IN THE 1850s

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

27 SUNDAY 6pm WE’LL MEET AGAIN “Korean War Brothers in Arms” 7pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 2 of 8) 8pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 3 of 8) At Osborne House, Albert relishes the opportunity to spend time with the family away from London, but Victoria is desperate to get back to the Palace and the business of politics.

8pm NOVA “First Face of America” Discover the extraordinary remains of a 13,000 year-old teenager in an underwater cave in Mexico.

8pm INDEPENDENT LENS “The King” Climb into Elvis’ 1963 Rolls-Royce for a musical road trip that traces the rise and fall of Elvis as a metaphor for the country he left behind. Featuring Alec Baldwin, Rosanne Cash, Ethan Hawke, Chuck D and many more. 10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 11pm THE MIGHT MISSISSIPPI: ELECTRONIC FIELD TRIP

11pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Dreaming of a New Land”

31 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm       THE THIS OLD HOUSE HOUR 8pm MASTERPIECE “Victoria, Season 3” (Episode 3 of 8)

29 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

9pm TALES FROM THE ROYAL WARDROBE Examine the significance of the royal wardrobes of English monarchs over the last 400 years. Learn why most kings and queens have carefully choreographed every aspect of their apparel and why, for those who haven’t, the consequences have sometimes been calamitous. 10pm MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 6” (Episode 4 of 9) 11pm MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 6” (Episode 5 of 9)

7pm FINDING YOUR ROOTS, Season 5 “Dreaming of a New Land” Henry Louis Gates, Jr. reveals the family history of Kal Penn, Sheryl Sandberg and Marisa Tomei.

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

9pm LOST HOMECOMING: WHEN OUR VIETNAM VETERANS CAME HOME discuses new research showing a significant correlation between a negative homecoming and severity of PTSD symptoms among a substantial minority of Vietnam veterans. Filmed primarily in Mississippi, it includes a heart warming ceremony in Pass Christian belatedly welcoming Vietnam veterans home.

11pm INDEPENDENT LENS “The King”

10pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

8pm AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “Surviving the Dust Bowl” 9pm FRONTLINE

11pm AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “Surviving the Dust Bowl” DIAL 12 | January 2019 D117

WYES Program • March 2017 2019 WYES ProgramGuide Guide • JANUARY

9pm GREAT PERFORMANCES “Doubt from Minnesota Opera” Watch an adaptation of John Patrick Shanley’s hit 2005 Broadway play and the 2008 film about suspicion leading to a battle of wills at a Bronx Catholic school. Starring Christine Brewer, Adriana Zabala, Matthew Worth and Denyce Graves.

28 MONDAY


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WYES Program Guide • JANUARY 2019

Lagniappe Business partnerships

WYES’ quality programming and events are brought to you through the generous support of the following businesses and corporations. We encourage you to take note of the companies that help underwrite our programs and events. Please make a special effort to support these companies as well. To join our list of communityminded groups, contact Jim Tapley at (504) 837-8987, jtapley@ wyes.org or Kerri Blache at (504) 483-8487, kblache@wyes.org.

NEW ORLEANS COOKING WITH KEVIN BELTON

New Orleans Tricentennial Project

masterpiece

Jack Eardley made his living building the power grid. “The flow of power really is the flow of information. And public television is one of the best sources.”

STEPPIN’ OUT

Jack includes his public television station in his will. Consider joining the community of people who want public television to span generations.

PBS KIDS 24/7

The Theresa Bittenbring Marque and John Henry Marque Fund PBS NewsHour

Nature

For information on including W  YES in your estate plans, contact: ROBIN COOPER WYES Vice-President of Development (504) 486-5511 • rcooper@wyes.org

WYES Address: 916 Navarre Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana 70124 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 24026, New Orleans, Louisiana 70184 Web Site: wyes.org • Questions or Comments: info@wyes.org General (504) 486-5511 • Membership (504) 831-1503 Programming Questions (504) 838-0389 WYES OFFICERS Chairman Cleland Powell Vice-Chair Anne Redd Secretary Rick Kirschman Treasurer Alan Philipson President & Chief Executive Officer Allan Pizzato

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WYES TRUSTEES Herschel L. Abbott, Jr. Paul Peyronnin Len Aucoin Richard Rodriguez Greg Bensel Mark Romig Manny Blanco Lori Savoie Karen Coaxum Susu Stall Katie Crosby Alison ToussaintRenette Dejoie Hall LeBeaux Jennifer Heebe Iam Tucker Bill Langenstein Pierre B. Villere II Marc Leunissen Roger Villere Jonathan McCall Tommy Westervelt Sharon Perlis

WORLD airs 24/7 and is dedicated to delivering outstanding nonfiction, science, nature, news, public affairs and documentary programming.

on 12.2 Enjoy do-it-yourself programming on cooking, arts & crafts, gardening, home improvement and travel. NEW ORLEANS COOKING WITH KEVIN BELTON can now be seen on Create.


streetcar by errol laborde

The Coat And The Krewe We were on the way to Washington

for the annual Mystick Krewe of Louisianians Carnival ball via Southwest Airlines through Baltimore. Southwest does not assign seating, so as a person obsessed with elbow room, I always try to develop a seating strategy. My plan this day was to head to the back of the plane. Because I am one of those people who prints my pass at the exact allowable moment 24 hours before the flight, I could have sat upfront with the “A” seating group, however I thought I had outfoxed them. From the gate agent I found out that the flight was only 70 percent full. That being the case I reasoned that, if I went to the back, most of the passengers would be siphoned off as they passed through the front part of the plane leaving me with arm room from 30 percent emptiness. As I headed back, I put my overcoat and carry-on case in an overhead bin, and then, just to fully implement my plan, I 1 2 0 january 2019

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sat a few seats further back. I buckled myself into the aisle seat, hoping that by take-off time the two seats next to me would be vacant. My plan would backfire even worse than I imagined. There must have been a rush of new passengers because the plane was practicaly full, including two husky guys who sat in my row. From New Orleans across the confederacy I felt an elbow at my ribs. My favorite sound in the world is the “ping” from the cockpit indicating that it is okay to get off the plane. I bulldozed myself to the bin, grabbed my overcoat and case and plodded toward the entrance. Our destination was the Washington Hilton, but because the trip was last minute, it was more economical to arrive through Baltimore. Or at least it would have been had the freeway linking the two cities not been jammed with traffic and slowed by accidents. Our taxi driver

at least had a heartwarming story. He was a native of one of those “…-stan” countries that made up the former Soviet Union. The only way his family was able to move to America was through the intercession of Bill Clinton when he was president. My heart would have been warmed even more had the fare only been $50 instead of $100. The taxi driver was certainly learning to appreciate capitalism. After settling in the hotel room, I had to run an errand, so I grabbed my overcoat and headed toward the elevator. While going down I noticed something strange. Somehow during the flight, either the coat had shrunk or I had gotten bigger. I knew it wasn’t the latter, given Southwest’s peanuts-based food service. I reached into the coat’s pocket and pulled out a set of someone else’s keys. Back in the room I came to terms with what happened. Another passenger with a coat that looked exactly like mine had put his luggage in the same bin. We had walked away with each other’s coat. Worse yet, for him, not only did I have his boarding pass for a connecting flight to Connecticut, but also his keys, included those for his car and his home. Dreading the voice mail hell that comes with calling a 1-800 number I tracked down Southwest’s “Lost and Found” department, where I actually linked up with a real person who said she could not give me the passenger’s phone number, but agreed to place a call and to leave a message for him. I gave her

my office number, along with instructions to have him leave an address and I would mail his coat to him and then he could mail mine to me. Somehow this plan worked. Later that night I checked my office number. The man had called and said that although he had no keys when he arrived in Connecticut, he called his son who picked him up and who had a spare key to his house. He left his address. The only problem was that he no longer had my coat. He left that with the Southwest “Lost and Found” in Baltimore. Once again, I weathered voice mail and got another live person. Southwest had my coat and they would mail it, all I had to do was give a Fed Ex credit number. The hotel helped me ship the other coat to Connecticut, but for that, too, I had to give a shipping credit number. At first I felt guilty for taking the wrong coat, but then I realized the other guy probably got off before me so he made the initial wrong grab. In retrospect I wish I had sent his coat to him COD but no, I absorbed the cost. The bill, I would later learn, for the combined shipping was $90. Curiously, none of this would have happened had I just taken a seat in the front of the airplane. I would have been crowded, but I was crowded anyway, plus it took me longer to get out. All was not lost though. I did at least beat the system once: Somewhere over Virginia, when the flight attendant passed by—I got an extra bag of peanuts.

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ARTHUR NEAD Illustration


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine January 2019  

New Orleans Magazine January 2019