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january 2018 / VOLUME 52 / NUMBER 3 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Mary Lou Eichhorn, Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Brobson Lutz, M.D., Jason Berry, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton, Mirella Cameran Web Editor Kelly Massicot Staff Writers Topher Balfer, Kelly Massicot, Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Sales Manager Kate Sanders Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Jessica Marasco Account Executives Claire Cummings Director of Marketing and Events Cheryl Lemoine Event Coordinator Whitney Weathers Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Manager Jessica DeBold Production Designers Emily Andras, Demi Schaffer, Molly Tullier Traffic Coordinator Topher Balfer Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Subscriptions Manager Brittanie Bryant WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 Subscriptions: (504) 830-7231 MyNewOrleans.com New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2018 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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Contents fe a t u r es

48 Fleur de List Carnival’s Top 10 Parades

on the cover Hermes Parade on the St. Charles parade route photo by james shaw

By Errol Laborde

48a A Guide to the St. Charles Parade Route By Morgan Packard

49 Triumph of the Messenger God Hermes Rolls By Errol Laborde

54 Tops of the Town Our Readers’ Picks

72 Emeril’s City Ella Brennan Lifetime Achievement Award Winner By Jay forman

74 Son Rise The School Board’s Second Koppel By Dawn Ruth Wilson

76 Guide to Schools By topher balfer


Contents dep a r tme n ts

Local Color Chris Rose A Distant Drum Beat 36

Modine Gunch Parade Watch 38

Joie d’Eve Kiddie Krewe 40

In Tune Fete Fantastique 42

44

Jazz Life The Print Beat 43

The Beat

Home Kindred Spirits 44

Marquee Entertainment calendar 22

Art Krewe de Glue 24

The Menu

Persona

Table Talk

King Zulu Brent D. Washington 26

Biz Condo Mondo 28

Health EMS & Mardi Gras 30

Style Carnival Crush 32

Chronicles Mardi Gras Madness 33

Adding Cachet 88

Restaurant Insider News From the Kitchens 90

Food Winters Bone 92

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Last Call Galatoire’s Special Cocktail 94

Dining Guide Plus restaurant spotlights 96

In Every Issue Inside When Saturday Night Live Came to Bacchus 12

Speaking Out 24

Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 16

Julia Street Questions and answers about our city 18

Try This All the World’s a Stage 126

Streetcar Lyons at Annunciation 128

DIAL 12, D1 Don’t miss three episodes of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “New Orleans” beginning Monday, January 29 at 7:30 p.m. Season 22 of ROADSHOW returns to New Orleans after 15 years at the New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Before the premiere, don’t miss at 7 p.m., a sneak peek at BACKSTAGE NEW ORLEANS: ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, a look behind-the-scenes of what it takes to pull off a 12-hour event with 75 appraisers evaluating almost 10,000 appraisals. Hosted by Tom Gregory.


inside

When Saturday Night Live Came To Bacchus

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acchus is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, that’s long enough for the group to have generated some sub-anniversaries including the 40th for an event that happened on February 20, 1977. And the nation was watching. That was the night that one of the hottest programs in television came to town, “Saturday Night Live.” Broadcast from the French Quarter as a special Sunday night edition of SNL, the show was timed to run concurrently with the passing of the Bacchus parade. In those days Bacchus, big as it was, actually wound through the Quarter near the end of its route. The plan was that the comedy show would be positioned to show snippets of the parade. Jane Curtin, one of the SNL cast members, acted as a sort of street reporter. Opening the show was another cast member, Dan Aykroyd, sitting on the Andew Jackson statue addressing the nation as President Jimmie Carter. Gilda Radner, as Roselyn Carter, stood at the base. Randy Newman, known for his songs “Louisiana 1927” and “Kingfish” was the host and musical attraction. Henry Winkler who played the beatnik-like Fonz on the show “Happy Days” rode as Bacchus.

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Humorist Buck Henry accompanied Curtin on the street and that proved to be a dangerous task. Every time the camera turned to them for a parade update they were baraged with beads and throws from the crowd. As a television show it was uneven. SNL was only in its second year and had never done a broadcast away from the comfort and protection of its studio. The French Quarter was a dicey place to do anything differently. Yet for a program that relished in nonconformity the evening certainly provided a lot of that. What not even the Titans at NBC could control was Bacchus’ timing. The parade ran late; way late. For all of Curtin’s being bashed by beads the show ended with nary a passing float. That however provided the moment for Curtin’s closing remarks that should be a carnival classic: “The parade has not been delayed. It doesn’t exist. It never did. ‘Mardi Gras’ is just a French word meaning ‘No Parade.’ Good night.” And Bacchus kept coming.


meet the sales staff

Kate Sanders Henry Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Jessica Marasco Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7220 JessicaM@myneworleans.com

Claire Cummings Account Executive (504) 830-7250, Claire@myneworleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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speaking out

been something as dramatically new as the Krewe of Bacchus, which introduced big floats packed with riders launching barrages of throws, and headed by a celebrity king. A new phrase had to be created to describe the group and thus came the term “Super Krewe,” which would later be applied to new krewes developed along the Bacchus template-- Endymion and Orpheus. From the Saturday before Carnival through Lundi Gras, the celebration of Mardi Gras has become super. 1979—Year of the police strike:

Carnival, A Tricentennial Tour

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his being a year of historical retrospective because of the Tricentennial celebration, here’s our list of some of the most historic years in Carnival’s evolution. March 3, 1699—A Night on the Bayou: This day provides Carnival’s

grandest coincidence. This is the date that Iberville and his exploring party spent near the mouth of the Mississippi River in what is now Plaquemines Parish. The date that year happened to be Mardi Gras, thus the stream they camped near was named Bayou Mardi Gras. There is no account of how a group of scruffy men celebrated the occasion though we assume champagne was in short supply. May 1743—Arrival of the Marquis: New Orleans was already

a scrappy 25 year old when Pierre Cavagnial de Rignand de Vaidreuil arrived in town. Known more simply as “the Grand Marquis” his ten year reign as France’s territorial governor was generally prosperous and peaceful. It was also as elegant as possible for a frontier town. He presented balls, banquets and promenades to the city as though he was Louis XIV’s extension in the new land. Vaudreuil introduced style 16

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and pageantry, which would later be incorporated into carnival balls. 1857— Comus’ Debut: This was a defining year. The Mystic Krewe of Comus which made its debut that year would set the template for all else that was to follow, including the use of the word “Krewe,” and what would become the New Orleans style Carnival parade. A form of celebration that would be much imitated throughout the continent germinated that year. 1872—Rex Claims His Kingdom:

Carnival did not have a lasting day parade until 1872 when a monarch who was so royal that his name was Latin for “king” made his debut. Once Carnival had a popular daytime event it was on a fast track to being a local holiday and an attraction to badly needed visitors. The future was in motion. 1916—Incorporation of the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Society: As Carnival’s first black

oriented parade grew so did the season’s civic stability. Social demands called for an integrated Carnival, Zulu opened the door and in the process gave the season some of its most colorful float characters including not only Zulu himself,

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but the “Witch Doctor” and the “Big Shot.” 1930 – Opening of the Municipal Auditorium: This was the city’s

first large multi-purpose entertainment facility and it was a tonic for Carnival. Built with two ballrooms and large corridors, the building triggered a rapid growth of new ball krewes and parading organizations. No building, until the emergence of the convention center, would have such an influence on Carnival. 1949-- Satchmo Reigns: Louis Armstrong was such a popular choice to be that year’s Zulu that one local musician rushed to see him even though his daughter was King of Carnival that year. Armstrong strutting in his kingly attire provided one of Carnival’s all time great images. 1962—Kings and Queens: There had been gay Carnival celebrations before 1962, but that year saw the debut of the first that would last, Petronius. Other krewe would come and go. Among the survivors would be Amon-Ra and Armeinius, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. 1968— Toast of the Wine God.: Not since Rex’s debut had there

There were no parades in New Orleans that year because of a strike by the city’s police department. Tempers were strained; feelings were hurt. Nevertheless, there were two good results. Civically it was a great moment as the krewes stood behind the mayor (who, it is relevant to the story, was the city’s first black mayor) in not giving in to the unions. The Carnival establishment showed that it could put care over frivolity. And secondly, by the next year there was renewed appreciation for Mardi Gras. 1987 Lundi Gras Emerges: With the creation of the Lundi Gras celebration, the riverfront became part of Carnival’s playground as Rex, and then later Zulu, staged arrivals in the early evening of the day before Mardi Gras followed by Carnival’s only fireworks show. The event has also become the stage for Zulu arriving to greet Rex, a celebration of Carnival’s brotherhood. 2018 Tricentennial With A Bang: Ever since the Phunny

Phorty Phellows began staging their 12th Night Streetcar ride to announce the arrival of Carnival there have been more imitators and more public demonstration of the day. This year fireworks heralded Carnival and the Tricentennial. History and tradition are celebrated in the night sky.•

AN ORIGINAL ©MIKE LUCKOVICH CARTOON FOR NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE


julia street

Dear Julia Love New Orleans Magazine. We come to New Orleans every couple of weeks for purchases for our restaurant, Geno’s, also because we love the city. We always go to Brocato’s. When I was a little girl my parents would take us to Brocato’s on Ursuline. Was this their original store from the beginning? If not, what street was the original one on? Such great memories there! Phyllis Jean Bruscato (Monroe, LA) Thank you for your kind words. There were other Brocato family members in the local ice cream and confectionery trade, but Angelo Brocato Sr. is the one whose business has endured to the present day. The current Brocato’s at 214 N. Carrollton Avenue opened in the late 1970s and is an offshoot of Angelo Brocato Sr.’s confectionery and ice cream parlor which oper-

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with poydras the parrot

ated at 615-617 Ursulines Avenue into genealogy. About half of my for more than half a century until ancestors landed in New Orleans shutting its doors in February 1981. between 1845 and 1855. I was Around 1905, the elder Angelo wondering where they landed. I am Brocato, who died in 1946, oper- thinking that it could be anywhere ated a small store at 511 Ursulines. along the New Orleans waterfront, He would soon move up the but can you narrow that down. street to 623 Ursulines, where What was the extent of the water he stayed until front back then? about 1916. City Where were immiPortrait of Mama directories show he grants processed? then moved back Brocato and two sons at How would they have Brocato’s Ice Cream and down the street to gotten to Louisville? Confectionary Parlor, 518 Ursulines before Walked the Natchez 617 Ursulines Ave., moving, setting up Trace? Steamboat? French Quarter, New shop at 615-617 Orleans. Printed in 1984 What can you tell me Ursulines. That is from a ca. 1960 negative. about the immigrant the address you experience in New visited as a child; the location Orleans? I am sure that there now houses Croissant D’Or. are many New Orleanians both native and transplants who had immigrants landing here who ----------------------------------------------------------------would also find this interesting. Thank you. T. Diemer (Kenner, LA) Dear Julia I moved here from Louisville, The mid-19th century immigraKentucky and am very much

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tion experience varied widely according to the health and socioeconomic condition of the passengers and the scruples of those responsible for shipboard conditions. Those who survived passage faced variable employment and living conditions in an age when nativist politics were popular. Unlike New York, 19th century New Orleans did not have an immigrant processing center like Castle Garden or Ellis Island. Although ships’ masters were required to submit quarterly passenger lists to the Collector of Customs, those lists were usually cursory, often only providing a name, age and country of origin. Passengers could have been deposited pretty much anywhere there was a dock at which a vessel had landing privileges. Because taxes were higher in the city proper, ships frequently

Photo by Abbye A. Gorin Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection Gift of Dr. Abbye A. Gorin


discharged their passengers at Algiers Point or at suburban docks stretching from present-day Lower Garden District to Arabi. Travel upriver could have been by steamboat, rail or walking. One’s mode of transportation was entirely dependent on one’s ability to pay. Period newspapers are a good source for information about the travel options that may have been available to your immigrant ancestors. ----------------------------------------------------------------Dear Julia, My brother and I attended Henry W. Allen School in the 40’s. Everyone in the school learned a song written by my grandfather, Henri Wehrmann. It was called New Orleans and went “New Orleans, New Orleans you’re such a great old town. We’re proud to say it now, we’d say it anyhow.” We cannot remember the rest. At that time, everyone in the New Orleans public schools learned that song. Could you please help us with the rest of the lyrics? Thank you, Wendy Wehrmann Taliaferro (Lookout Mountain, GA) Henri Wehrmann (1870-1956) was born into a well-known family of composers and engravers and was a prolific composer and performer. A violinist and organist for the French Opera House, Wehrmann also taught music and later headed Tulane University’s glee club. During the 1931 Mardi Gras season, the New Orleans Association of Commerce, to promote local tourism to a national audience, published and distributed sheet music for Wehrmann’s New Orleans. The work was marketed as a companion piece to the composer’s popular “My Louisiana,” in print since 1912. Your grandfather composed the music for New Orleans but it was Russell McGuire who penned the lyrics. The words you recall are part of the chorus. Copies of

the published sheet music may be found among the holdings of Tulane University and the Historic New Orleans Collection. The complete lyrics are below as reported in the New Orleans States, January 18, 1931. Down in Louisiana, where the bayous flow, There’s a grand old city all the world should know; ‘Mid the bales of cotton and the sugar cane, Where the mocking birds sing praises to her name. (chorus): New Orleans, New Orleans, you’re such a great old town! We’re proud to say it now – we’d say it anyhow. New Orleans, New Orleans, we’ll spread your name around -We’ll tell the world, with flags unfurled, We’re all for you! Gateway of the Valley! Pride of Dixieland! Where the Creole beauties smile on every hand; Land of love and dreaming, ‘neath the tropic sky, Turn your face right there and then you’ll hear them cry: (chorus repeats)

Win a restaurant gift certificate Here is a chance to eat, drink and have your curiosity satiated all at once. Send Julia a question. If we use it, you’ll be eligible for a monthly drawing for a Jazz Brunch for two at The Court of Two Sisters. To take part, send your question to: Julia Street, c/o New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Errol@MyNewOrleans. com. This month’s winners are Phyllis Bruscato, Monroe, LA and T. Diemer, Kenner, LA. my n e w or l e a n s . com

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The Beat MARQUEE . ART . PERSONA . BIZ . EDUCATION . HEALTH . STYLE . CHRONICLES

greg miles photo

2018 king zulu brent D. washington, Sr.


THE beat . marquee

January Our top picks for this month’s events By fritz esker

King Cake Festival

Tabasco: A Burlesque Opera

There are so many delicious king cakes to try in New Orleans, but so little time to eat them in Carnival season. Thankfully, the King Cake Festival on Jan. 28 gives aficionados a chance to sample as many varieties of the delicious dessert as possible in Champions Square. Proceeds will benefit the Ochsner Hospital for Children. KingCakeFestival. org.

This comedic opera was first performed in 1894 and has not been staged in its entirety since the 19th century. It follows a shipwrecked sailor searching for an acceptable spicy ingredient for an Ottoman ruler’s lunch. This is an official event of the New Orleans Tricentennial Commission. It will be held Jan. 25-28 at Le Petit Theatre. NewOrleansOpera.org/ Tabasco.

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Steve Martin and Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget for the Rest of Your Lives featuring The Steep Canyon Rangers and Jeff Babko Comedy legends Steve Martin and Martin Short are coming to the Saenger Theatre for day only on Jan. 21. It will be a matinee and evening of laughter and music featuring Martin’s bluegrass band The Steep Canyon Rangers. SaengerNOLA.com.

Bal Masque Guests at the 3rd annual Link Stryjewski Bal Masque will experience an evening of cuisine from celebrity chefs like Mario Batali, Nina Compton, Maggie Scales, Paul Kahan and more. Mixologist Neal Bodenheimer will present Caribbean-inspired and classic NOLA cocktails. The event is January 20th at the Sugar Mill. Proceeds benefit The Link Stryjewski Foundation, helping local impoverished children. BalMasque.linkstryjewski.org.

marianna massey photo


calendar Events, Exhibits & Performances Sept. 30-Jan. 21

Jan. 7

Solidary and Solitary: The Joyner and Giuffrida Collection, Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Information, OgdenMuseum.org.

Tricentennial Mass at St. Louis Cathedral, St. Louis Cathedral. Information, StLouisCathedral.org. Jan. 12-13

Oct. 6-Jan. 7

East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth Century American Landscape Photography, New Orleans Museum of Art. Information, noma.org. Jan. 1-Jun. 30

The Church in the Crescent: 300 Years of Catholicism in New Orleans, Old Ursuline Convent. Information, OldUrsulineConventMuseum.com.

Brahms Symphony No. 1, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com. Jan. 14

Milky Chance - Blossom Tour, Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com. Jan. 16

Moody Blues 50th Anniversary Tour, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Jan. 1 - Feb. 25

Jan. 16

Prospect.4, Various Locations. Information, ProspectNewOrleans. org.

Datsik 2018 Ninja Nation Tour, Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com.

Jan. 4

Jan. 20

Romance and Fantasy with Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com.

A Prairie Home Companion with Chris Thile, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com. Jan. 20

Jan 5

Katy Perry Witness Tour With Guest Carly Rae Jespen, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter. com.

Jurassic Park with Live Orchestra, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com. Jan. 24

Wild Kratts Live, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Jan. 6

Phunny Phorty Phellows Streetcar ride, St. Charles Ave. Information, PhunnyPhortyPhellows.com.

Jan. 25

Jan. 6

Jan. 26

King’s Day Celebration, Fireworks, and Kick-Off to Tricentennial Mardi Gras, Mississippi River. Information, 2018NOLA.com.

My Favorite Murder, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com.

Jan. 6

Todd Snider with Special Guest Luther Dickinson, Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com. Jan. 6

Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc, French Quarter. Information, JoanofArcParade.org.

Johnny Mathis - The Voice of Romance Tour, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Jan. 27

Tango Fire, Mahalia Jackson Theater. Information, MahaliaJacksonTheater.com. Jan. 30-Feb. 4

An American in Paris, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

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THE beat . art

Art on display local exhibits

Clay In Transit: Contemporary Mexican Ceramics

Krewe du Glue Eleanor Pritchard’s Glitzy Muses Shoes

January 17 – March 25 Newcomb Art Museum of Tulane Clay in Transit, presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico, is the work of seven Mexicanborn sculptors who have created contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. Newcombartmuseum. tulane.edu/portfolioitem/clay-in-transit/

By Alexa Renée Harrison new forms, new voices

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leanor “Nori” Pritchard is addicted to glitter. It all started seven years ago when she glittered a few shoes for friends who had gotten riding spots on one of the Krewe of Muses floats. Back then there wasn’t much information available on creating Muses shoes, so she started a blog, Confessions of a Glitter Addict, for other like-minded glitter enthusiasts. Her blog has since spawned an Instagram account, @glitter_addict_ nola, where she shares pictures of projects, techniques, inspiration, and glittering geniality. After receiving a note from one of her followers who was new to glittering, she became inspired to start hosting workshops. The Glittering 101 workshops are hosted in the fall before Carnival season, but Pritchard also hosts custom workshops and glitter parties for private groups year-round. Due to the growing popularity of glittering, she’s working on developing a permanent space to host these events. Aside from workshops, Nori also runs a burgeoning Etsy shop, Krewe du Glue, where she sells supplies to help people learn new techniques and take their glittering to the next level. The shop offers kits for “special effect” glittering (including a Red Beans & 24

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Rice Glittering Kit), custom glitter blends, digital downloads and chunky confetti. Keeping with NOLA tradition, Pritchard always throws a little lagniappe into her Etsy orders. While a Muses shoe would be the ultimate lagniappe, she doesn’t ever sell Muses shoes in her shop. She does, however, donate her custom shoes to charity auctions. “I think part of what makes a Muses shoe (or any handmade Carnival throw) so special is that they can’t be bought,” Pritchard said. “All that time, love, and money goes into creating a unique, beautiful work of art, and then you give them away to strangers. It’s crazy, but in the best possible way.” While she’s made countless shoes for the Krewe of Muses, this will be Pritchard’s first year as a riding member on a Muses float. “Carnival is my favorite time of year, especially the experience of giving out handmade throws,” Pritchard said. “Carnival is essentially built on an entire city’s generosity, and that’s such a beautiful thing to be a part of. I’m frequently awed by what an absolute privilege it is to help make that happen in my own small way.” Catch Pritchard’s sparkly shoes during the Krewe of Muses parade. •

On view through May 13 New Orleans Museum of Art NOMA exhibits modern and contemporary Japanese ceramics from the Gitter-Yelen Collection. NOMA.org/ exhibitions

Solidary & solitary

On view through Jan. 21 Ogden Museum of Southern Art Sponsored by the Helis Foundation, Solidary & Solitary tells the history of art by African American artists from the 1940s to present day, drawn from the Joyner/Giuffrida collection. OgdenMuseum.org.

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THE beat . persona

greg miles photo


Zulu King Brent D. Washington, Sr. By Ashley McLellan

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rent D. Washington, Sr. community. I appreciate the has music in his soul commitment to community. I and business in his am big on community work, brain. A graduate of Francis especially with my work in T. Nicholls High School, the school system. Zulu does Washington continued his so many things, for instance high school career in the Zulu on the Bayou and Toys marching and concert bands for Tots. That’s important with a pivotal percussion role to me. in the Southern University Marching Band. Q: What are some of your Professionally, Washington Carnival traditions, outside took that musical discipline of Zulu? Everything about and channeled it into a Mardi Gras. The whole nine successful accounting busi- yards. The excitement, the ness for more than 30 years parades. I am all the way in. Other than in New Orleans. Currently Chief Zulu naturally, Financial Office at I enjoy Bacchus True Confession: Edgar P. Harney and Endymion.  If I could do it Charter School, I used to march again, I would love Washington is in those when to play basketball. My son plays also owner of I was with the basketball at ULL, his own busiband in high and when I watch n e s s, w h i c h school. I also him play, I always specializes in enjoy Orpheus think about that. accounting, taxaand Pegasus.  tion, and special Q: What are you looking consulting projects. A member of Zulu for forward to most about being 27 years, Washington has King this year? I appreciate brought his professional the confidence of Zulu in knowledge and drive to me to represent the group be involved to the group, this year [as Zulu]. I want serving as Assistant Chairman to use my time as a platform of Finance, member of the to impact the community, Finance, Technology, Lounge especially with children. I am and Carnival Activities scheduled to visit 25 schools. Committees, and is currently I want to show kids that I am Chairman of Finance. a product of the community. Washington’s wife of This is where you can go with 30 years, Troye Madison hard work. Washington, will join him on the throne as Queen of Q: Music seems to have been a the Zulu Nation this Carnival big part of your life. What does season. music and playing in a band mean to you? Music is my out. Q: What are some things that It helps me relax and let go. I attracted you to the Zulu started playing music in the organization? It’s all about third grade. It allowed me to

get a scholarship. My parents worked hard and provided for us, but we didn’t have a lot of money, so music allowed me the opportunity to get a scholarship and continue my education. I play the drums, the snare drum and percussion. I love percussion. It’s the heartbeat Q: What do you love about New Orleans? The culture. That’s easy. New Orleans is a place where everyone can show each other love. I know we have had some challenges from time to time, but there is no place like New Orleans. I’ve traveled and there is no place like it. I learned that especially during Katrina. We were displaced to Atlanta and I learned that people just aren’t as open. New Orleans is different.

At a Glance Age: 58 Profession: CFO Edgar P. Harney Charter School, Accounting Resides: New Orleans Born/raised: I was born in Connecticut, but moved to New Orleans when I was four Education: Southern University Favorite Book: Accounting books are all I have time to read! Favorite Movie: Coming to America Favorite TV show: I don’t really watch t.v. Favorite Food: Barbecue Favorite restaurant: Houstons Favorite King Cake: Strawberry myne w orleans . com

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THE beat . biz

stats Local home prices

$174,300 Recent median home value in New Orleans. Values declined 0.1 percent in the past year.

$241 The median list price per square foot in New Orleans.

$1,550 The median rent price in New Orleans.

Condo Mondo

Source: Zillow Home Value Index, Oct. 31, 2017

Hot market raises questions By Kathy Finn

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here was a time not so long ago when real estate investors considered “condominium” a dirty word. That’s because just about anyone old enough to have lived through an economic recession knows what can happen to condo values during a downturn. When real estate goes cold, condo values can plunge. But at this moment in New Orleans, depressed condo values seem a distant concern, and new condos are proliferating. What is heating the market? Factors that are driving demand include the changing tastes of homebuyers. Across the country, buyers are gravitating toward urban centers rather than suburbs.

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Modern residences in or near downtown areas are magnets for people who want to live within walking distance of their offices, restaurants and entertainment venues. While the idea is particularly popular with young professionals, older buyers also are embracing the trend. It is this changing preference that over time led to New Orleans’ Warehouse District boasting nearly 100 percent occupancy in the residences created in former warehouses and factories. More recently, the continuing shift toward the urban core has sparked many new residential construction projects, aided by an expansion of Louisiana’s tax credit incentive for

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renovation of historic buildings. “Folks are moving now to areas they would not have considered years ago,” said Kurt Weigle, president of the Downtown Development District. He said nearly 7,000 people today call downtown New Orleans home, about double the pre-Hurricane Katrina total. The pull of downtown living and tax incentives has sparked apartment and condominium construction projects in areas from the Central Business District to the Tulane Avenue corridor and the Garden District. But a newer driver of residential development – short-term rentals – is changing the face of some other neighborhoods.

The short-term rental of residential properties has sparked heated debates in New Orleans. And while city leaders have stepped up enforcement of laws that limit French Quarter property owners’ ability to rent their homes to visitors, the city has made it easy for owners in other neighborhoods to advertise their homes for rent. A justification for allowing such rentals is that it provides income to owners who otherwise have difficulty making ends meet. But a downside of the policy is becoming clear as new condo construction expands. Nowhere is the impact more obvious than in the Bywater neighborhood, an area long filled


with modest houses, many of whose inhabitants work in the city’s hospitality industry. The neighborhood during the past decade has been a magnet for young home buyers who might have chosen to live downtown but could not afford the prices, and that influx of young buyers has pushed Bywater home prices up. But an even stronger stimulus, in the form of Air B&B rentals, now threatens to make the neighborhood unaffordable for local working people. Construction began recently on a new condo complex called The Saxony that will fill an entire block in Bywater with 72 luxury units. Developers say that neighbors are welcoming the project as it replaces a long-vacant factory with a spiffy new building. But underlying the enthusiasm for rejuvenation of the area is a concern that buyers of the condos will be absentee owners who rent their properties out to tourists for much of the year. This possibility gains credence from marketers of The Saxony, who emphasize that all of the new units “will be Air B&B compliant,” meaning that their use as short-term rentals is allowed under local law. Why does that matter to developers? Local real estate market analyst Wade Ragas says it’s simple. “Air B&B owners will pay a lot more per unit than anybody else.”

Ragas says that with some 5,000 short-term rental units now in use, demand continues to push condo prices into new territory. The one- to threebedroom Saxony condos are priced at about $450 a square foot – a surprisingly high price even amidst an unprecedented run-up that has pushed average home values in this workingclass neighborhood near $300 a square foot. And the growth continues. Construction will begin soon on at least two more luxury condo complexes in Bywater, and the units are expected to be priced at least as high as The Saxony. If the Bywater condo prices seem eye-popping, consider the soaring values in the downtown area. New condominiums recently completed or underway in the Warehouse and Central Business districts have reached $750 a square foot. How many of these residential units will end up in the hands of absentee owners who will offer their condos to Air B&B renters is impossible to predict. But as more and more prime local property becomes dedicated to transient use, and if tourists begin to outnumber permanent residents in some areas, New Orleans over time may see dramatic changes in some of its favorite neighborhoods. •

Neighborhood focus

NeighborhoodX researched listing and sales data for 17 New Orleans neighborhoods. Below are the average listing prices per square foot in selected areas as of August 2017. French Quarter............................................................................................. $531 CBD...................................................................................................................... $456 Garden District........................................................................................... $421 Marigny/Bywater..................................................................................... $359 Uptown............................................................................................................ $311 Source: Analysis by NeighborhoodX Corp. myne w orleans . com

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THE beat . HEALTH

EMS and Mardi Gras Signal 24 on the Parade Route By Brobson Lutz M.D.

“S

ignal 24 parade route” is police radio lingo for a medical emergency during a Mardi Gras parade. When Mardi Gras parades roll, calls for emergency services double. Mobile paramedics cruise parade route parameters with ears tuned for Signal 24 calls. “Bonked on the head by a coconut is our most unique injury. We get a couple of 9-1-1 coconut calls every Mardi Gras Day as Zulu rolls. One year we had at least half a dozen,” said Dr. Jeff Elder, head of Emergency Medical Services for New Orleans. “Even the lighter weight hollowed out coconuts can give rise to an egg hematoma if you are hit on the head hard enough.” From head trauma to stomped

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toes, multiple parade route injuries all come to the Mardi Gras. Veteran parade goers know the elementary rules to preserve life and limb. Be vigilant to avoid head and eye trauma from flying throws along the parade routes. If two people catch the same beads, beware of painful finger injuries from twisted strands of beads. In tight quarters a foot is the best way to claim that coveted doubloon over sacrificing some fingers to a rival’s boot. Fortunately, most parade route injuries are minor, but not all. “Most major injuries along the parade route are caused by doing stupid things while drunk. Hopefully, we will never see a repeat what happened during the Endymion parade last year. That

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was a special zone problem,” continued Dr. Elder referring to the mass trauma scene that occurred on the Saturday night before Mardi Gras 2017 in Mid City. A 25-year-old man plowed his out-of-control pickup truck into a crowd watching the Endymion parade near the intersection of Orleans and Carrollton Avenues. The impaired truck driver had an alcohol level three times the legal limit. Multiple bystanders helped treat and triage the injured according to Dr. Elder who was interviewed afterwards on a nationally televised CNN segment. The incident sent 21 people to hospitals and injured others who hobbled away independently. Broken wrists, hips and ankles, along with various degrees of

scrapes to major lacerations occur. Besides the occasional parade goer run over by a float or some other vehicle, Dr. Elder said serious reoccurring injuries are caused by jumping over fences and other barriers. Besides broken bones, jumping over wrought iron fences separating many of the sidewalks from front yards especially uptown lead to serious leg, thigh, and scrotum wounds that hurt even to write about. “People climbing over fences are very prone to injury. We see people impaled on fences with the spike penetrating their inner thigh or scrotal area. Unless someone has pulled them off the fence before we get there, we saw off the spike and rush them to the big trauma center with the spike

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intact. It can be dangerous to pull out an impaled spike on the street. It could be blocking a large lacerated blood vessel.” Eye injuries caused by projectiles from the floats are another painful way to end the paradewatching experience. According to data published by Tulane physicians back in 2000, 50 percent of all eye injuries were due to trauma from beads compared to 11 percent by doubloons. Diagnoses include corneal abrasions, hemorrhages, lid lacerations, and structural damage to the globe of the eye. While many injuries were considered minor, some 20 percent were classified as severe. Falls off floats are not as common as they formerly were thanks to mandated rider harnesses. Falls on but not off floats also occur. Riders descending for nature call trips to lower level portable potties are prone to stumbles and falls. Alcohol intake propels tumbles down inside float ladders. Even with intact rider harnesses, an occasional masker bends over too far, tumbles, and dangles against the side of the float. The safety harness at least keeps the rider from rolling underneath the float, but falls off the floats still occur. Near the end of the Krewe of Thoth parade in 2017, a masker prematurely unhooked his safety belt. As he leaned over to hand over a bag of beads, he tumbled off the float sustaining a head injury. In the there is always a silver lining department, one carnival aficionado commented online: “He fell off at the end, and not at the beginning. So, he still had his day.” Decades ago, Dr. Kenneth Sear, a young orthopedist who later reigned as Rex, was riding a horse in the Rex parade. A rider fell off a float breaking some bone on Napoleon Avenue in front of the then Southern Baptist Hospital. Duke Sear rode his horse right up the emergency room ramp, splinted the broken bone in the ER, and then returned to the parade on his horse. Several Mardi Gras

later, a woman was on a float in Metairie that caught on fire. She jumped off sustaining a nasty knee fracture that Dr. Lee Moss spent a Mardi Gras afternoon putting back together again. •

carnival safety Ladder safety at parades

For years, parents mounted seating platforms for children on step ladders planted curbside before parades. A surging crowd knocked one of these ladders over during a truck parade on St. Charles Avenue in 1981. The eight-year-old boy on the ladder died, crushed between the cab and the trailer of the float. Today a city ordinance mandates that all ladders be structurally sound and set back at least 6 feet from the street curb. Fastening two or more ladders together is prohibited. Nola.gov/nola/media/Mayor-sOffice/Files/29897_CERTIFIED.pdf Ambulance diversions

In an emergency, you might not get a ride to your hospital of choice. Most of the time ambulance drivers bend over backwards to make sure women in labor get to their hospital of choice. EMS providers know all the tricks to ensure that major trauma still goes to University Medical Center, but persons with other problems are likely routed to the most accessible emergency room. Nola.gov/ems Legal remedies following parade throw injuries

Good luck. A state law dating back to Governor Edward Edwards protects float riders who hand out coconuts in good faith. And a lady knocked silly by a bag of beads at the Endymion Extravaganza in 2012 lost a legal battle for damages with an appeal court ruling citing the “Mardi Gras immunity statute.” Law.justia.com/ cases/louisiana/fourth-circuit-courtof-appeal/2015/2014-ca-1096.html myne w orleans . com

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THE beat . style

Carnival Crush A selection of parade attire and accessories we love right now By Mirella Cameran

It’s Just Tuesday drink koozie, Parade Vibes Only tee, Mirage Rainbow Cocktail Set, all from Lionheart Prints, Lionheartprints. com. Purple glitter Unicorn Snot lip balm, Native gold glitter nail polish, green MSY baseball cap, all from Phina, Phinashop.com.

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THE beat . chronicles

Mardi Gras Madness The Independent Order of the Moon by Carolyn Kolb

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he 2007 Rex Parade featured a float decorated with an arched-backed black cat, with an orange tom cat in bowler hat and various dogs cavorting. The float, titled “The Independent Order of the Moon” honored a past parading krewe that enlivened the 1880s by lampooning elected officials. Humor has long been part of Carnival season, and two long ago krewes specialized in this approach. The Phunny Phorty Phellows (since revived into a streetcar riding krewe celebrating on Twelfth Night) and the shorter lived Independent Order of the Moon. The I.O.O.M. first paraded in 1881, having “organized only about three weeks ago,” according to the Picayune, but presenting floats and marchers following Rex. “Pictures of the Town” was

the theme, and the first float (no of mules with riders, all roped doubt honoring krewe members) together, and representing the city was titled “The Grand Mogul and administration. One mule carried His Staff,” and included “the Critic a costumed policeman with a sign who suggested the idea, the Wit “Police Department which lives on fines.” One mule with who worked it out, and a fireman’s sign read the Satirist who lent his “the Fire Department: it aid.” Invitation from Behind the theme float the Independent lives on promises.” One Order of the were grouped marchers mules’ rider depicted “a Moon “wearing wide white typical hoodlum, loaded pants, yellow ulsters (overcoats down with knives and pistols… with a cape,) and tall beavers (top and a sign which read ‘Paroled.’” hats.)” These “high-toned gents A mule with a rider in white was from the moon” also carried canes. labeled “The Water Department, Floats focused on other krewes: which spends its time in getting “Wrecks,” “Comb-Us,” “Momus,” fat and grabbing for balance of and the “Phunny Phorty Phellows,” salary.” who are shown “going to their Attached by rope to all the mules temperance ball” and, after the was a figure labeled “The Poor ball, “one of them is in the grasp Taxpayer,” and a final mule, with of a policeman,” another is on the a shabby rider labeled “The City” ground, and “a third is clinging was pulled in different directions to a lamppost.” by “the syndicate,” “the bondBehind the floats were a group holders,” and the “tax resisters.”

courtesy of the historic new orleans collection

The Mayor who bore the brunt of the krewe’s satire was Joseph Shakspeare (that’s right: only two E’s) who served from 1880-1882 and 1888-1892. He went in as a reform mayor, but his opponents (“The Ring”) controlled the city council. Shakspeare managed to reschedule city debt payments and privatized the Carrollton Street Railroad (the St. Charles streetcar line.) His efforts to curtail goats in city streets earned him an I.O.O.M. float depicting a goat pulling out a handkerchief from his pants. When Shakspeare served his second term he electrified the streetcars, added electric streetlights, and set up a professional fire department. Unfortunately, his police chief, David Hennessy, was killed, supposedly by Italians. Eleven Italian immigrants were lynched, causing an international incident. Shakspeare ran for a third term and lost. In addition to their zany parades, the I.O.O.M. held balls. In 1883, Representatives of the I.O.O.M. – “The Committee of Starlings,” along with their “Supreme High Chief Tohu” hand-delivered the two-foot square ball invitations. But, before the decade was over, the krewe had ceased to exist. After its 1881 start, the Independent Order of the Moon paraded in 1882: ”Moonlight, Mirth and Melody,” 1883:”Familiar Rhymes Liberally Interpreted,” 1884: “Vanity Fair,” 1886: “Twelfth Month’s Rations,” 1887: “The Yankee Nation,” and 1888: “Flights of Fancy.” Then, the moon went out. • myne w orleans . com

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Local Color CHRIS ROSE . MODINE GUNCH . JOIE D’EVE . IN TUNE . BOOK REVIEWS . JAZZ LIFE . HOME

Bal Masqué’s Carnival fundraiser extravaganza


LOCAL COLOR . CHRIS ROSE

A Distant Drum Beat On the Trail of the Mardi Gras Indians By Chris Rose

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o many spectacles compete to overload the senses during Mardi Gras. So many sights, sounds, colors, costumes, parades, songs, rainbows, fever dreams, unicorns and pounds of flesh to behold, light the eyes, satisfy appetites and quench every thirst. It takes effort to stand out amidst the glitter and gold, baubles and beads, spandex and spangles, flashing lights and fairy dust. It takes money, time and commitment. Serious commitment. It takes the Mardi Gras Indians. Those singular, mythic, mysterious and inscrutable men, women and children of color who preserve 36

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and perform a sacred 19th century ritual borne of slavery, emancipation, honor, impersonation and masquerade. It’s quite a challenge to try to describe the Indians to the uninitiated. They are tight-knit, turf-conscious, prideful working class black folks dressed up in flamboyant, meticulously handsewn, ceremonial Native American costumes, face paint and feathers, stalking each other through New Orleans back streets in some sort of concrete jungle war game. But instead of pretending to kill their rivals, they face-off in a ritualistic preening, drumming, dancing,

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chanting show-down, taunting each other and arguing over who is … prettiest. What’s not to understand about that? How the Mardi Gras Indians came to be is a subject of much academic – and barroom – debate. It’s all folklore, legend, history, mythology and braggadocio. Are they a living tribute to local Native American tribes who sheltered their fugitive forbearers from the indignities of lives waged in the fields of Confederate perdition? Or are they, as popular notion goes, a spin-off of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show from the late 19th Century. Or are they just a bunch of rowdy, ostentatious, over-the-top, halfcocked revelers who take this Mardi Gras thing…Way. Too. Seriously. Collectively, they are the proverbial golden needle in the messy Carnival haystack. The Wild Tchoupitoulas, Wild Magnolias, Flaming Arrows, Uptown Hunters, Yellow Pocahontas, Burning Spears, Congo Nation, Guardians of the Flame, Creole Osceola, Fi-Yi-Yi, Louisiana Star Choctaws and dozens more. From near extinction just four decades ago, Mardi Gras Indian culture has exploded in the new century, with new tribes forming every year to preserve this most elite, quixotic and exotic tradition. On Mardi Gras morning, gangs of chiefs, spy boys, flag boys and wild men debut their new costumes, a year-long labor sewing, stitching and beading, memorialized in the song “New Suit,” by legendary New Orleans composer Willie Tee: Every year for Carnival Time, we make a new suit Red, yellow, green, purple or blue, we make a new suit They shine like diamonds and stars Gotta be sure we’re together ‘Cause we the soul of Mardi Gras Indeed, they are the heart, the

soul and the beat of the street. I remember the first time my kids ever saw an Indian, one Fat Tuesday afternoon many years ago, when we were driving back Uptown after spending the morning basking in the colorful revelry of the Marigny and French Quarter. He was alone, turned out in Bimini lime feathers and mint green rhinestones, staggering erratically on the Broad Street overpass, a chief who seemed to have lost his way – and his tribe! He stumbled in front of my car, I swerved wide around him and watched from my rearview mirror as my kids asked: “Daddy, what was that?” How do you tell someone? Over the years, it became our Fat Tuesday tradition: We would not park down near the Quarter until we found an Indian gang wandering around the streets of the 6th, 7th or 8th Wards. And we always did. The last time I saw a Mardi Gras Indian was last March, on St. Joseph’s night, when the gangs and thousands of spectators annually pack the streets of Central City for intimate neighborhood rituals far from the wide prying eyes and intrusive cell phones of visitors and tourists. This was a young man, junior member of his tribe, splayed out on the sidewalk with a gunshot wound to the thigh. I heard the shot. I joined the crowd of previously joyous observers now looking on in wonder, fear and despair. Everyone wondered: What happened. Who is he? Why was he shot? And: Who the hell shoots an Indian? Another mystery of this town. It will build you up and tear you down. It’s the ecstasy and the agony. It’s the beauty and the beast. It’s laughter and forgetting. It’s the prettiest thing I’ve ever seen. With an ever-present menacing drumbeat out there in the distance. And so it goes. • Jason Raish Illustration


LOCAL COLOR . modine gunch

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am standing on St. Charles Avenue dressed as Darth Vader in a tutu. I got to explain. For Mardi Gras, the Gunches always dress alike. We started this years ago, because it made it easier to keep track of the kids. Unfortunately my two sistersin-law, Gloriosa and Larva, have got addicted — to tutus. They say we can be anything, as long as it includes tutus. But the kids now have their own ideas — Star Wars costumes. My mother-in-law, Ms. Larda, comes up with a compromise. After years of taking kids and grandkids and great grandkids to movies for their birthdays, she has become a expert on Star Wars. She happens to know that Tatooine is Luke Skywalker’s home planet. My grandson Go-Cup draws a picture of it, and misspells it “Tutu-ine.” This gives her a brilliant idea. We always rent a portable toilet, but this year we put a sign on it that says “The Planet Tutu-ine. ” We dress it in the World’s Biggest Tutu, which she creates with a whole lot of nylon net. We load The Planet Tutu-ine in the bed of Larva’s pick-up, and park it just off the parade route — Gloriosa has a friend who lets us use his driveway.

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Parade Watch The perils of modern times By Modine Gunch

And we all wear various Star Wars costumes with various tutus. Me and my sister-in-laws are also wearing Apple watches which we got for Christmas from our significant others. We chipped in and got one for Ms. Larda, too, and she is wearing it, but she ain’t excited about it. We decided she needed one because she ain’t getting any younger, and she could take a fall, and this watch got a special feature: if you press a button on the side for more than three seconds, it calls 911. But the main thing it does, it keeps track of your exercise and your heart rate and how many calories you burn up. If you do something right, it pings, and when you look at it, there’s a message congratulating you. I think it’s

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kind of fun, but Ms. Larda says she ain’t letting no watch tell her what to do. Anyway, The Rex parade comes, and me and Larva and Gloriosa are right there with the kids, yelling and chasing floats, and our watches ping like crazy. Ms. Larda sits on a lawn chair with a wookie blanket over her legs and tries to look feeble, so the float riders feel sorry for her. Her watch don’t ping once, but she gets a lot of long beads. After 80 floats or so, she waddles off to The Planet Tutu-ine. And her watch gets its revenge. Because all of a sudden, two police cars escorting the parade let loose with their sirens, and the police yell that they got to turn right on the street where we are standing, so everybody rushes

and clears a path. They whiz through, and screech to a stop at our potty. Three men and a lady cop swarm out and yank at the potty door, which is locked. Ms. Larda sings out, “One second, please.” The man says “Please step out of the... thing?” Ms. Larda steps out, sees the police, squawks and throws up her hands. The first man asks if she called 911, and she says no, and pulls out her cell phone and holds it up. Then the lady officer talks into her own cell phone, and says, “The operator says she is STILL calling it.” Everybody looks at each other. The lady officer sticks her head inside the portable and pulls it back in a hurry. Then I see the problem. Ms. Larda has an extra-long strand of beads looped over her arm. It is also wrapped around her watch. It is pressing the 911 button. So I explain, and apologize, and Ms. Larda insists on giving the police all her long beads for their trouble. Rex beads, too. And then, for the first time in its life, Ms. Larda’ s phone pings. It tells her that her heart rate went up. I guess it feels pretty smug about that. •

LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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LOCAL COLOR . JOIE D’EVE

Kiddie Krewe Tips for Carnival for the Under-12 set By Eve Crawford Peyton

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friends either moved back to the here are a ton of Mardi Gras survival guides out there, city when they had kids or come chock-full of great advice for back for Carnival every year with Carnival newbies: drink lots of their families in tow. water, wear comfortable shoes, As long as you stay out of be nice to the cops, respect the the Quarter, you’re not going to encounter anything too scanmarching band chaperones. Having done parades since I dalous, and I find that parades was a toddler, though, I already are actually a perfect way to teach know how to make it through my kids life lessons about disapthe season mostly unscathed as pointment (you didn’t manage an individual. What I had to figure to connect with the person you out as I got older was how to knew who was riding, even though navigate the scene as a parent. you knew where they were and To many outsiders, it seems screamed their name repeatedly), like a questionable or even irreunfairness (the guy clearly meant sponsible decision to take your that stuffed animal for you, but kids to Mardi Gras — the kid behind you because all you see on snatched it out of the the national news is Excerpted from Eve air instead), the imporCrawford Peyton’s topless drunken glittertance of endurance/ blog, Joie d’Eve, covered debauchery. To persistence (OK, you which appears people who live here, didn’t catch anything each Friday on however, it would be MyNewOrleans.com good from that float, irresponsible  not  to but look — there’s take your children to parades. another one just after this dance In fact, many of my high school troupe), and the vagaries of fortune (some years you get a 40

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shoe; some years you don’t). Attending parades with kids is an amazing tradition, but even a few years of trying to impart my years of acquired Carnival wisdom on my visiting college friends who’d grown up in Missouri or Nebraska did not prepare me for how much different the whole experience would be with kids along. Here are my top Carnival with Kids tips: 1. Instead of bagged ice to cool off your drinks in your ice chest use soft ice packs or bags of frozen peas. If no one gets hit in the face with a bag of beads you’ll still have cold drinks. If someone does get injured (and someone will almost certainly get injured), you’ll have an ice pack at the ready. 2. If you have a young kid who is prone to wandering, write your cell phone number on his/her arm in Sharpie. When Ruby was three, I lost her at Zoo to Do for Kids (she went out the back of the bouncy house while I was standing at the

front), French Quarter Fest (she saw a friend, darted off, and got lost in the crowd), and City Park (she went to the bathroom without telling me). Every time, lovely strangers helped reunite us, but they could have done so much easier if they’d been able to call me. So while we were walking to Bayou Boogaloo, I had a flash of inspiration, dragged her into Terranova’s, and tattooed her with my cell phone number. 3. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Mardi Gras is mostly familyfriendly, but that doesn’t mean it’s Disney World. You’re going to see drunk people. You’re going to hear bad language. You’re probably going to walk through a cloud of pot smoke. Your kids might catch lacy panties from a float. If these things bother you, you might not want to go to parades — but if these things bother you, you might not want to live in New Orleans at all. By the time she was four, Ruby could easily side-step a puddle of puke; she had cheered on a guy doing a kegstand; and she once told me she had to potty while we were in a parking lot but not to worry because she could just “cop a squat.” I try to use all of this as a learning experience for my kids; there’s something unforgettable about watching someone throw up in a gutter, and I hope they’ll use that image to help inform their own behavior as they get older. 4. Relax your standards. I wrote about a while ago, and it’s true every year — during Carnival time, my kids are filthy, fueled mostly by sugar, and never get enough sleep. Homework may or may not be done. My house is a complete disaster. I special order hand sanitizer normally, but on Sunday, Ruby plucked a doubloon from a puddle and then ate a piece of fried chicken. My basic mantra during Carnival is: “King Cake is breakfast. Dirt builds their immune systems. Reading logs are a sham.” Have fun and stay safe!• jane sanders illustration


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LOCAL COLOR . in tune

Musicians from RAM during a recent trip Chef Donald Link took to Haiti.

calendar must-see music jan. 5

Katy Perry turns the Smoothie King Center into a Pop Altar. jan. 16

The Moody Blues bring prog rock back to the Saenger. jan. 18

Marshmello dances into Mardi Gras World. jan. 18-20

Fete Fantastique Bal Masqué’s Carnival fundraiser extravaganza By Mike Griffith

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or the last few years Chefs Donald Link and the traditions of Mardi Gras Indian chants and Stephen Stryjewski have hosted one of the best funk and gave them a modern flair. They sound parties of the year both in terms of music and both like where New Orleans has been and where food in support their Link Stryjewski Foundation. it is going. Late last year, The Lost Bayou Ramblers Bal Masqué is easily the most stylish way to kick released their latest studio record, Kalenda, which off the Carnival season. The musical selections are was produced by Korey Richey who was most always top-notch and the hosts bring in chefs from recently seen working with Arcade Fire and LCD all over the country to participate. If that weren’t Soundsystem. Here the Ramblers have moved into enough, the celebration is a proper masked ball, which slightly more experimental territory while keeping adds an air of elegant mystery to the proceedings. the heart of their Cajun roots in tact. What we are This year the foundation will feature the Haitian looking at is an outstanding night of music. If the promise of great music weren’t enough band RAM as their headlining guest. RAM’s style of music is known as mizik rasin (roots music) Link and Stryjewski will be cooking along with which combines elements of tradition Haitian Vodou guests Mario Batali, Nina Compton, John Currence, ceremonial music with modern elements Suzanne Goin, Paul Kahan and more. of rock and roll. There is still a tremendous One of the things that makes this event kinship between Haitian music and New special is its textured nature. The masked Bal Masqué, Orleans music, especially in our funk and Saturday, January patrons mingle with members of several 20, at the Sugar brass traditions. Hearing RAM perform costumed carnival and burlesque groups Mill, BalMasque. highlights that shared heritage all the that contribute to the overall feel of the linkstryjewski.org. more. RAM will be supported by the space. Bal Masqué feels like a little taste of Mardi Gras Indian funk ensemble Cha Carnival distilled to its romantic essence. Wa and the progressive Cajun outfit the Lost Bayou To top it off the proceeds all go to the Link Stryjewski Ramblers. Cha Wa’s 2016 release Funk’n’Feathers Foundation to both nourish and educate the youth was a mini revolution on the local scene as it took of New Orleans. You’ll want to be at this party. •

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myneworleans.com

The Radiators family returns home for three nights at Tipitina’s. jan. 20

A Prairie Home Companion drops by the Saenger for a story. jan. 21

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club rolls into the House of Blues. jan. 27

Lucinda Williams will take the stage at the House of Blues. jan. 31

Yonder Mountain String Band will jam the night away at Tipitina’s. Dates are subject to change; email Mike@ MyNewOrleans.com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.


LOCAL COLOR . jazz life

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he New Orleans music culture is so densely intertwined, from brass bands to new compositions in traditional jazz, gospel, R&B, bounce and back again, as to challenge music writers to keep up, much less provide textured coverage. No disrespect to Keith Spera, Allison Fensterstock, Ben Sandmel, John Swenson, John Wirt and others who scramble from gigs to interviews and the hours of listening it takes to capture some piece of the whole – hey, I’ve been there. The overarching problem, as print coverage shrinks, is that even the best blogging has yet to find great reach. The music, for all of its impact on the tourist economy, receives less substantive coverage than in the 1970s when two alternative weeklies, now buried, competed with long features. It’s hard to go deep when everyone is deadlinesprinting to tighter space. That’s why it helps to heed an expert, as once defined by a rockarolla pitchman of my acquaintance: “A man with a briefcase who gets off an airplane from someplace else.” Thus we turn to Jack Sullivan, English Department chair at Rider

The Print Beat Jack Sullivan delivers a classic By Jason Berry

University, up in New Jersey, a man who has carried his briefcase to and from the holy city where jazz began, sometimes with student groups. Sullivan’s just-published New Orleans Remix is a superb blend of history and reportage, sparkling with insights from years of interviewing the artists and a learned lens on cultural patterns. A five-star book. Sullivan explores a culture of myriad connections across genres. “Certain identifiable qualities set New Orleans music apart,” he writes. “An unapologetic embrace of melody, an indifference to anything that isn’t danceable, a rhythmic displacement that goes

back to the history of second lines.” “Musicians themselves speak of the untamable ‘spirit’ of the city, the near-palpable presence of ancestors, the ineffable ambience that makes the music happen. Indeed, ‘magic’ is a central word in their vocabulary. They disagree on many issues – the meaning of tradition, the musicianship of new immigrants, the significance of bebop, the definition of funk – but on that fundamental point they are united.” Sullivan’s surgical quotations from a wide base of interviewees bolster his take on spirit and magic. At various turns, he dwells on

Danny Barker’s influence on the 1970s’ Fairview Baptist Church Brass Band, quoting Leroy Jones, Gregg Stafford, Michael White, among others; women of the Pinettes brass band (drummer Christine Jordan: “A lot of the guys can’t really transfer the streets to the stage”); assessing Big Freedia in the context of LGBT artists “surging onto the music scene.” His section on the long influence of Louis Moreau Gottschalk touches down on compositions by Wynton Marsalis and Donald Harrison, Jr. John Boutté says how he wrote the “Tremé” song: “I was having my morning coffee on my front porch as a funeral procession was leaving St. Augustine Church. I was moved to describe what I was seeing and immediately wrote the lyrics of what I observed.” On a related note, University of Minnesota Press has just reissued the 40th anniversary edition of Albert Murray’s Stomping the Blues, a classic of American nonfiction. Only Murray could write: “There are blue devils, and there is also the Holy Ghost. Thus not everybody defines blues music and blues-idiom dance movements in the same terms.” Amen. •

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LOCAL COLOR . home

Kindred Spirits Theirs and Hers Uptown Cottage By Lee Cutrone

W

ith her two children grown, Elizabeth Boh was thinking of downsizing and relocating from Old Metairie to Uptown, but the prospect of moving from a home where she’d spent 13 years seemed daunting. That is, until she found the perfect cottage. “I fell in love with the house the minute I walked in,” said Boh, a certified financial advisor and member of the civic-minded family that owns Boh Brothers Construction. “I wasn’t even sure I wanted to be Uptown but I knew I wanted a master bedroom downstairs because I wanted to stay a long time.” The house, which wasn’t yet on the market when Boh found out that it would be soon, had a master suite on the first floor and much more. With approximately 2,900 square feet (compared to her previous 4,800 square foot home), three bedrooms, a newly renovated kitchen and baths, a pool, good classic bones, and a prime Uptown location, the 100-year old cottage had everything going for it. In fact, the ink had barely dried on her offer when a neighbor asked to buy the house from Boh, who politely declined. Boh’s transition to the house was as smooth as the house was

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Top: The kitchen’s sleek gray and white arrangement is illuminated by abundant sunlight from floor to ceiling windows and a pair of painted iron chandeliers. ideal. The neutral paint palette, as well as the pink shutters on the exterior, was a keeper, the appliances top-grade and key areas had already been updated. Even the retro Hollywood glam wallpaper in the master suite’s vanity area delighted the new owner. “I didn’t change a thing,” said Boh, who’s one big purchase was a generator. “The house really resonated with me. It was in such perfect condition, I loved the style, the exterior and interior, the master suite downstairs and the pool. I wasn’t looking for a pool, but now that I have it, I really do enjoy it and I’ve used it a lot.” The sellers, a Memphis couple who graduated from Tulane and used the house as a second home, had hired a Memphis decorator to furnish the house with a polished mix that also appealed to Boh. She wasted no time purchasing some of the contents, all of which were for sale. Because the move was a downsize, she sold some of her own

Greg Miles photographs


belongings at an estate sale and kept others that made the cut for the move. “This house is a mix of what they had along with pieces from my other houses,” she said. With the help of designer Rivers Spencer, Boh blended “theirs” and “hers” and made a few new acquisitions to fill in the gaps. Contemporary art works by artists such as George Dunbar, Luc Leestemaker, Kevin Gillentine, Andrew Bucci and Michael Schulteis are integral to the pleasing effect. The final edit, a sophisticated blend with a dash of shine and glamour, is so harmonious it’s hard to believe it’s a combination of multiple persons’ tastes – including the owner who preceded the Memphis couple. That owner, a local decorator, renovated the kitchen with timeless gray and white surfaces, Bosch appliances and playful white chandeliers. She also turned one wall of the hall leading to the kitchen into a fabric-covered bulletin board that Boh loves and uses. When at home, Boh spends most of her time in the comfort of the family room/ casual dining room next to the kitchen. It overlooks the pool and a thick wall of bamboo. “I like the sound the bamboo makes at night when it rustles against the trellis on one end of the porch,” she said.

Left: Boh mixed the striking agate chandelier that already resided in the dining room with her own mirrored dining table and painted antique chairs; Luc Leestemaker painting from Soren Christensen Gallery; white taffeta curtains from Rivers Spencer; Boh purchased the English buffet on Royal Street for a previous house. Top, right: Boh kept the palette of the house, including the pink shutters on the exterior. Bottom: Homeowner Elizabeth Boh; the cowhide rug and sheepskin ottoman were purchased from the previous owners.

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Yet every area of the house gets used. Upstairs, there are two bedrooms for visiting children and other guests. Outside, the pool and patio, which Boh had freshly landscaped, offer a private oasis for one or many. “The family who lived here entertained a lot and said it was a great party house,” said Boh, adding yet another attribute to the house’s long list of selling points. Having lived in a cottage as a young adult, she is happy to have rediscovered the comforts and charm of a cottage once again. “I’m glad I was able to downsize enough to be in a cottage,” she said. “It’s so much cozier.” •

Facing page: Top,left:: The taupe of the master bedroom’s walls and the neutral linen curtains with gold medallion pattern were kept as is; suede headboard, from Villa Vici, bed linens by Yves Delorme, botanicals from Rivers Spencer; the Louis XVI style carved bench was Boh’s. Top, right: The former owners turned a closet into the vanity area, which features retro floral metallic wallpaper and a crystal chandelier; Boh collects the Baccarat butterflies on the ledge. Bottom, left: The living room’s predominant color scheme is a combination of pale pinks and grayish-blues; the velvet sofa, rug, curtains and end tables were purchased with the house; the acrylic and glass coffee table, French chairs and nesting tables are from Boh’s last house; the watercolors above the antique end table are by Andrew Bucci. Bottom, right: Boh kept the carved console, neoclassical mirror, contemporary lamp and crystal chandelier of the perfectly appointed foyer. This page: Top: The sofas, art and coffee tables came from Boh’s Metairie house; the animal print rug was purchased new and the alabaster lamp was a keeper from the previous owners. Bottom: Boh had the front and back yards freshly landscaped, but kept the wall of bamboo near the back porch. m y neworleans . com

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Fleur de List Carnival’s Top 10 Parades (Arranged by category) by errol laborde

Day Parades 1. Rex. For 146 of the city’s 300 years Rex has been around setting standards for the carnival and enriching Mardi Gras as it is imitated across the continent. This is the classic Mardi Gras parade at its best done by a krewe that does things right. Rex always uses original design to carry across a usually literary theme. Among its regular “signature floats,” look for the Butterfly King based on a design from Rex’s 1882 parade as well as His Majesty’s Bandwagon, the Boeuf Gras, the Royal Barge and of course, the regal throne float carrying Rex himself. Having first paraded in 1872, the King of Carnival’s annual procession is the longest running parade in Carnival. Rex is about tradition, style and elegance – a classic New Orleans Carnival parade. If you can only make one authentic Mardi Gras parade make it this one, Mardi Gras, St. Charles Avenue, 10 a.m. 2. Thoth. Now in its 70th year, the krewe has a great Egyptian motif among its first few floats. It is a big and festive parade. An ambitious Uptown neighborhood route takes it past several care institutions. Approximately 1,600 riders are on board a total of 50 floats ranking it, after Endymion, Carnival’s biggest parade. Sun., Feb. 11, St. Charles Avenue, noon 3. Zulu. This is the only organization that selects its monarch by popular election of its membership (see Persona). Now in its second century, Zulu, whose mission was to give black New Orleanians a parade of their own, is big and brassy – and lately more on time. It is one of Carnival’s favorites. Mardi Gras, St. Charles Avenue, 8 a.m. 4. Tucks. Heading toward its 50th anniversary next year, the krewe of Tucks continues to march to its own beat. While some krewes get their name from mythology, Tucks was named after a bar, Friar Tucks, where a couple of Loyola University students decided to create their own parade, ostensibly because they couldn’t land positions as flambeaux. Not fancy, a bit naughty, but lots of fun. Sat., Feb. 10, St. Charles Avenue, noon

SUPERKREWES A three-way tie: Endymion is the biggest. Orpheus is the prettiest. Bacchus has the history. Endymion. The only parade to march along Canal Street, the parade’s coming is a weekendlong social event. There is a lot to behold in this, Carnival’s biggest parade. There is no celebrity King (the crown is worn by a member drawn from a lottery), but there are many big names riding as grand marshals or celebrity guests. Look for the seven-part Pontchartain Beach tandem float. The parade will have more than 3,000 masked riders. Sat., Feb. 10, Canal Street, 4:15 p.m. Orpheus. Orpheus has the size of a superkrewe and the design elements of the old-line groups. It has great walking units, too, and is one of Carnival’s prettiest parades. Lundi Gras, St. Charles Avenue, 6 p.m. Bacchus. Having started in 1968 Bacchus is celebrating its 50 the anniversary this year. Bacchus always draws a huge crowd to gaze at it towering floats. Among the signature floats, look for the Bacchawhoppa and the Bacchagator. Sun., Feb. 11, St. Charles Avenue, 5:15 p.m.

NIGHT PARADES 1. Proteus. Don’t worry about mindless bead catching. Instead, appreciate Proteus for the floats – and the history. Born in the 19th century, Carnival’s only surviving nighttime 19th-century parade is something to behold for its design and its tradition. Proteus is more than a parade; it’s historic preservation. Lundi Gras, St. Charles Avenue, 5:15 p.m. 2. Le Krewe d’Etat. Celebrating carnivals’ most profound motto, this is the only krewe in which the throne float is ridden by a dictator rather than a king. The krewe has all original floats and its own house-made flambeaux torches. This is one of Carnival’s most popular krewes, featuring good design, biting satire and great walking groups. Fri., Feb. 9, St. Charles Avenue, 6:30 p.m. 3. Muses. If fan base were the sole measurement this krewe would be number one. Having begun in the year 2000, Muses has had a major impact on Carnival by dramatically expanding female participation. It also increased the quality and quantity of marching groups and is rich with innovations such as its decorated high-heeled shoes. Though its floats are a little boxy, this witty all-female krewe is a must-see. Thurs., Feb. 8, St. Charles Avenue, 6:30 p.m.


Porta-Potties

Funnel Cake Stands

Academy of the Sacred Heart

Gallier Hall 545 St. Charles Ave., 658-3627

4301 St. Charles Ave., 269-1230

Operation Lost Kids

Igor’s 2133 St. Charles Ave., 568-9811 must be 21

Funnel Cake Stands

The Pontchartrain Hotel 2031 St. Charles Ave., 323-1400

New Orleans Hamburger & Seafood 4141 St. Charles Ave., 247-9753

St. Charles Tavern 1433 St. Charles Ave., 523-9823

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar 4338 St. Charles Ave., 293-3474

Operation Lost Kids

Fat Harry’s 4330 St. Charles Ave., 895-9582

The Delachaise 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858 must be 21

Gracious Bakery 2854 St. Charles Ave., 301-9949

Desi Vega's Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600 Trolley Stop Café 1923 St. Charles Ave., 523-0090

The Avenue Pub 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243 must be 21

Circle Bar 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 must be 21

Superior Grill 3636 St. Charles Ave., 899-4200 © RENAISSANCE PUBLISHING

* NOT DRAWN TO SCALE


Porta-Potties

Friday, Feb. 2 French Quarter Krewe of Cork 3:00 p.m. Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Oshun 6:00 p.m. Krewe of Cleopatra follows Metairie Krewe of Excalibur 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 3 Slidell Krewe of Paws 10:00 a.m. Krewe of Titans 6:30 p.m. Westbank The Mystic Knights of Adonis 11:45a.m. Madisonville Krewe of Tchefuncte 1:00 p.m. Chalmette Knights of Nemesis 1:00 p.m. Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Pontchartrain 1:00 p.m. Krewe of Choctaw follows Krewe of Freret follows Knights of Sparta 6:00 p.m. Krewe of Pygmalion follows Marigny 'tit R x 5:00 p.m. Krewe of Chewbacchus 7:00 p.m. e

Metairie Krewe of Caesar 6:00 p.m. Covington Krewe of Olympia 6:00 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 4 Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Femme Fatale 11:00 a.m. Krewe of Carrollton follows Krewe of King Arthur and Merlin follows Krewe of Alla follows Slidell Krewe of Claude 1:00 p.m. Krewe of Dionysus follows French Quarter Krewe of Barkus 2:00 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 7 Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Druids 6:30 p.m. Krewe of Nyx 7:00 p.m.

Slidell Krewe of Selene 6:30 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 8 Uptown New Orleans Knights of Babylon 5:30 p.m. Knights of Chaos 6:15 p.m. Krewe of Muses 6:30 p.m.

Mandeville Original Krewe of Orpheus 7:00 p.m.

Friday, Feb. 9 French Quarter Krewe of Bosom Buddies 11:30 a.m. Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Hermes 6:00 p.m. Krewe d'Etat 6:30 p.m. Krewe of Morpheus 7:00 p.m.

Metairie Krewe of Centurions 7:00 p.m.

Saturday, Feb. 10 Westbank Krewe of NOMTOC 10:45a.m. Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Iris 11:00 a.m. Krewe of Tucks 12:00 p.m. Mid-City Krewe of Endymion 4:15 p.m. Metairie Krewe of Isis 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 11 Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Okeanos 11:00 a.m. Krewe of Mid-City 11:45 a.m. Krewe of Thoth 12:00 p.m. Krewe of Bacchus 5:15p.m. Metairie Corps de Napoleon 5:00 p.m. Krewe of Athena 5:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 12 Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Proteus 5:15 p.m. Krewe of Orpheus 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 13 Uptown New Orleans Krewe of Zulu 8:00 a.m. Krewe of Rex 10:00 a.m. Krewe of Elks Orleans follows Krewe of Crescent City follows Metairie Krewe of Argus 10:00 a.m. Krewe of Elks Jefferson follows Krewe of Jefferson follows Covington Krewe of Lyra 10:00 a.m.

The city of New Orleans offers free porta-potties (that I personally saw being cleaned twice on the Saturday before Mardi Gras 2017) on the neutral ground side of Napoleon Avenue, catty-corner to Superior Seafood, as well as on the neutral ground side of St. Charles Avenue at Napoleon.

Operation Lost Kids Operated by the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office, these tents are supervised by special reserve deputies in conjunction with the NOPD Juvenile Division to reunite children separated from their parents.

Funnel Cake Stands Though these iconic stands sell many things (such as chicken on a stick, Polish sausage, corn dogs, nachos, cotton candy, sno-cones, candy apples,and popcorn), it’s the funnel cakes that you smell from blocks away that lead you like a cartoon toucan following your nose to their window. They also typically serve sodas with crushed ice, which can make for a good break between alcoholic beverages.

Fat Harry’s (4330 St. Charles Ave., 895-9582) An iconic college spot (for those currently studying and those looking to rekindle memories from when they were), this bar comes with reasonably priced bar food (cheese fries, burgers, wings, poor boys, red beans, nachos and more) and strong drinks. Bathroom lines get long and business is cash-only during Mardi Gras, so come prepared.

Academy of the Sacred Heart (4301 St. Charles Ave., 891-1943, AshRosary.org) The Fathers Club of the Academy of the Sacred Heart sets up a very popular concession stand every year with all proceeds going to the school, which features the usual (red beans and rice, hot dogs, nachos, candy, soda and water) along with the not so usual (coffee, hot chocolate, beer, daiquiris, spiked coffee – and refills), oh, and mini King Cakes. They also have a line of portapotties (with a $5 all day pass to go with those refills).

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar (4338 St. Charles Ave., 293-3474, SuperiorSeafoodNola.com) More than just a great corner location, here you can find dedicated to-go ordering. Though their menu is somewhat limited for Mardi Gras, their frozen drinks (including

mojitos, French 75s and mimosas), oyster bar and crawfish, when available, offer more than enough. You can’t make reservations during parades, but you can reserve a table for lunch starting at 11 a.m., and they’re one of the only restaurants open for Mardi Gras dinner. With 14 oyster bar chairs and 200 seats, you won’t have to wait long if you want some climatecontrolled atmosphere; just don’t try to walk in and get a seat by the window – those book for a set price (plus alcohol) almost a year in advance. However, on certain days you can buy a wristband for the balcony (though for most parades the space is booked for private parties).

New Orleans Hamburger & Seafood (4141 St. Charles Ave., 247-9753, NOHSC.com) Offering both climate-controlled seating and a walk-up window, this comfort food establishment (think burgers, poor boys, seafood platters {including thin or thick fried catfish) and their signature garlic herb fries) also has wine by the glass, beer and signature drinks – oh, and café au lair and beignets – all offered fast and fresh. There is also “The Next Level,” their upstairs party room, which comes complete with package deals, but you’ll need to book early.

Superior Grill (3636 St. Charles Ave., 899-4200, SuperiorGrill.com) Long an outpost for the just-drinking-legally set, lately the vibe here is changing though the party atmosphere isn’t. Complete with viewing stands, a DJ, margaritas and their full menu, this family-friendly restaurant just might have everything you need.

The Delachaise (3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelachaise.com) Fabulously placed outdoor seating (if you can score a chair), an extensive list of wines by the glass (including daily specials) as well as a shorter list of craft beers on tap and spirits for making your favorite cocktail, and a small plates menu complete with goose fat fries served with a malt vinegar aioli and a spicy peanut satay – trust me, the fries are definantly a must.

Gracious Bakery (2854 St. Charles Ave., 301-9949, GraciousBakery.com) Opening just in time for Mardi Gras 2016, I can personally attest that Gracious was a fabulous addition to the Carnival scene. The walk-through line quickly provides you with

sandwiches, chips, their famous King and Queen Cakes, a selection of mixed drinks, craft beer and wine. You can also purchase one-time and all-day passes for the outside porta-potties.

Igor’s (2133 St. Charles Ave., 568-9811) The family-like atmosphere inside this 24-hour bar comes complete with strong bloody Marys, burgers, fries, chicken nuggets, pool and games upstairs – and a laundromat, in case you need such a thing.

The Pontchartrain Hotel (2031 St. Charles Ave., 323-1400, ThePontchartrainHotel.com) Within the Caribbean Room, the Silver Whistle Café, the Bayou Bar and the Hot Tin rooftop bar, which offers unobstructed views of the New Orleans skyline, you can escape the crowds, noise, sights and smells of Mardi Gras. The Bayou Bar also hosts a pop-up tent on the ground-level courtyard serving New Orleans food staples alongside mixed drinks and canned beer and wine.

Trolley Stop Café (1923 St. Charles Ave., 523-0090) This iconic diner offers an outstanding breakfast at a price that can’t be beat, alongside sandwiches, salads, crab cakes and a seafood platter. Lines might get long late at night.

cold drinks and remarkably clean bathrooms.

Desi Vega's Steakhouse (628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegasSteaks.com) Almost hidden behind viewing stands lies a bastion of civility for those times when you need a little quiet, a glass (or bottle) of wine, a steak and a baked potato – though I’d suggest the andouille-crawfish mac and cheese. Look out for special Carnival menus – last year’s Endymion Dinner Menu looked delicious.

Lafayette Square From the parade route through Carnival, all you can see of Lafayette Square are bleacherlike stands filled with people. Just behind those stands, however, are lines of porta-potties provided and cleaned by the city. As you make your way downtown, these bathrooms are strategic stops, and you may see your City Councilmember, Mayor or a celebrity in the stands on your way.

gallier hall From the stands at the edge of Lafayette Square you can face Gallier Hall and see the Mayor toast the Kings and Captains of most of the krewes that pass by. Also look for members of the City Council and their families as well as honored guests. On Mardi Gras Day, take a longer look because almost everyone will be in coustume!

The Avenue Pub (1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243, TheAvenuePub.com) Most of the usual seating is removed and the craft beers they’re known for are served in plastic, but this local favorite continually puts out your favorite brew alongside stomachcoating comfort food and upstairs space with a balcony right on the route. Of note: For each drink you purchase you receive a bathroom ticket. Also, make sure to put Mardi Gras night on your calendar for their “Blow the Kegs” discount on beers.

St. Charles Tavern (1433 St. Charles Ave., 523-9823) Stick to the basics (like poor boys and pancakes) at this true tavern, where you can get a slice of pie, a burger and an omelet at the same time, 24 hours a day, alongside a fountain soda or well drink.

Operation Lost Kids

Restroom

Drinks

Food

Circle Bar

Alcohol

(1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616, CircleBarNewOrleans.com) One of the oldest structures on the Circle houses a small, low key bar known for its live music that provides, along with its neighborhood feel,

Funnel Cake


Triumph Of The Messenger God by errol laborde photographed by james shaw

Hermes on the Avenue

H

Hermes maintains the traditions of the so-called “old line” organizations. Original masking and costuming is a must. Note the mask with the curtain over the moth area and the flattopped float riders’ hat. To the left is one of the magnificent oaks that line St. Charles Avenue.

ermes, whose band of followers is properly known as “The Knights” rather than a “krewe” is in its 80th year, and with age has grown richer in style, sparkle and spirit. From the beginning the Knights have been masters of presentation, being first to introduce electric lights on its floats to complement the sparkle of flambeaux rollicking along the sides. Like the best of ancient crusaders, the Knights are smart and orderly with original costumes and the classic flat-top hats. They are also learned storytellers. To reflect the originality of their floats, the parade themes are always properly highbrow and literary as though spreading thought elixir to the masses. Last year, to honor its anniversary, the group’s theme was “A Hermes Miscellany,” recognizing titles from past years such as “The Enchanted Fountain,” “The Pyramid of the Moon,” and “Xanadu.” Pictured here are scenes from the 2017 Hermes march. The Knights pageant is always on the Friday before Mardi Gras beginning a non-stop time of frivolity that doesn’t stop until the wee hours of Ash Wednesday. In Greek tradition Hermes held many titles including that of the “Messenger god.” On the Friday before Mardi Gras with the sound of sirens and drums approaching, the message is clear.


Top: Hermes, Messenger of Dreams, reviews the parade from the front of his temple. Bottom: A strong pair of shoulders is always a parade benefit. (Note the reflection of the parade on the store glass behind the crowd.) Facing page: Marching bands, flambeaux and flowers on floats that waddle as they go down the street are all elements of a good parade. The crowd provides its spectacles too.


Top: Flambeaux sometimes twirl the light for tips. Bottom: Napoleon’s steed rears. (Perhaps he was confused by crossing Napoleon Avenue.)Facing page, top: St. Charles Avenue also displays its own majesty Bottom: See you again next year.


Angelo Brocato

tops town of the

Our Readers’ Picks

photographed by sara essex bradley

A couple of notes: to make the list, a choice had to have a significant number of votes; places without enough votes were eliminated. Categories without enough voters were also removed. Where there was evidence of ballot stuffing (and there wasn’t much) the votes were adjusted accordingly. We know that there are some significant places that didn’t make the list, nevertheless we’re confident that those that are listed are all worthy and are among the tops in their field.

Angelo Brocato has served up cold treats and pastries since 1905, bringing traditional Sicilian granita, gelato, cannoli, biscotti and more to New Orleans. The original location was in the French Quarter. The family decided to relocate to Mid-City in 1985. To date, the business is still family run and uses only the most traditional methods, which shows in their menu. It’s that Old World charm and family-inspired recipes make Brocato’s our readers’ top pick for items such as the lemon ice and gelato. Lucky for many of us who are too busy to stop by the N. Carrollton Street location, Brocato’s creations may also be found in local groceries. Check the restaurant’s website for products and store availability. Serving all of New Orleans and areas of the north shore, West Bank and Baton Rouge, your neighborhood grocery probably has your favorite ice, gelato, or cannoli in stock, so you never need run out. Angelo Brocato, 214 N. Carrollton Avenue, 486-0078, AngeloBrocato IceCream.com.


Top Ice Cream/ Gelato Shop: Angelo Brocato’s


Top Place for Fine Dining & Turtle Soup: Commander’s Palace


Commander’s Palace

Peeking out from its iconic teal, or “Commander’s Blue,” striped awnings, Commander’s Palace has been providing top notch dining memories at the corner of Washington and Coliseum for nearly 125 years. Our readers consistently vote for Commander’s as their favorite fine dining establishment, and note the restaurant’s famed turtle soup as a traditional highlight. Siblings Ella, Dottie, Dick and John Brennan took over the establishment in 1979, and under Ella’s watchful eye produced some of New Orleans most beloved cuisine with legendary chefs such as Paul Prudhomme, Emeril Lagasse, Jamie Shannon and, currently, Tory McPhail, all taking a turn in the kitchen. Now guided by co-proprietors Ti Martin and Lally Brennan, and after a monumental postKatrina renovation, Commander’s continues to be the go-to place for locals’ special celebrations, anniversaries, birthdays and romantic dinners. Commander’s Palace, 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace. com.

Top Place for King Cake

Top Local Sandwich Shop

1. Manny Randazzo Tie 2. Nonna Randazzo 2. Sucre

1. Stein’s Market and Deli Top Buffet

Top Place for Fried Chicken

1. Harrah’s New Orleans Casino 2. The Court of Two Sisters

1. Popeye’s Fried Chicken 2. Willie Mae’s Scotch House 3. Mr. Ed’s Fried Chicken

1. Mulate’s Cajun Restaurant

Top Place for Cajun

Top Place for Poor Boys

Top Place for Creole

1. Parkway Bakery & Tavern 2. Bear’s Poboys

1. New Orleans Creole Cookery

Top Place for Tacos

1. Shaya 2. Byblos

Top Place for Middle Eastern

1. The Rum House Top Place for Sushi

Top Place for Italian

1. Tsunami 2. Rock ‘N Sake

1. Red Gravy 2. Vincent’s Italian Cuisine 3. Marcello’s Restaurant and Wine Market

Top Place for Wings

1. Wow Café Wingery 2. Hooters

Top Place for Asian

1. Hoshun Top Place for Pizza

1. Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza

Top Place for Japanese

1. Tsunami Top Place for Snowballs

1. Plum Street Snowballs 2. Hansen’s Sno-Bliz 3. Sal’s Sno-balls

1. Five Happiness

Top Local Grocery Store

1. Namese

Top Place for Chinese

Top Place for Vietnamese

1. Rouse’s Supermarket 2. Dorignac’s

editor’s pick Politician Of The Year: Stacy Head

Though she would have been eligible for another atlarge term on the council, Stacy Head chose not to run again, closing a segment of her career that was distinguished for its honesty and tough questioning. And when council credit card spending habits were studied she as the only one to show $0. It’s still not too late for a comeback.


Top Place for Thai

Top Coffee House for Food

1. SukhoThai 2. La Thai Uptown

1. PJ’s Coffee 2. Caffe Caffe

Top Place for Korean

Top Bakery

1. Little Korea BBQ

1. Dorignac’s

Deanie’s

Top Place for Indian

Top Sweet Shop

Tie 1. Nirvana 1. Taj Mahal

1. Sucre

Top Place for Mexican/ Southwest

1. Angelo Brocato’s Tie 2. Creole Creamery 2. Sucre

Top Ice Cream/Gelato Shop

1. El Gato Negro Top Place for Steaks

Top Place for Seafood

1. Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse Tie 2. Crescent City Steaks 2. Mr. John’s Steakhouse

1. Deanie’s Tie 2. GW Fins 2. The Galley Seafood

Top Place for Burgers

Top Place for Raw Oysters

1. Port of Call 2. Company Burger

1. Deanie’s 2. Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar and Fish House

Top Place for Hot Dogs

Top Place for Boiled Crawfish

1. Dat Dog 2. Lucky Dogs

1. Deanie’s

Top Place for Gumbo

1. Pascal’s Manale 2. Mr. B’s Bistro

Top Place for Barbecued Shrimp

1. The Gumbo Shop Top Place for Turtle Soup

Top Place for Fine Dining

1. Commander’s Palace

1. Commander’s Palace

Top Coffee House

Top Neighborhood Restaurant

1. PJ’s Coffee

1. Katie’s Restaurant & Bar

editor’s Pick

New Direction Of The Year: LaToya Cantrell

The novelty of LaToya Cantrell being elected mayor is not that she is the first female so elected in the city, there have been several woman mayors throughout the state, but, more importantly her ascendancy is through the neighborhood movement, in her case, Broadmoor, She will have seen the ivory towers of City Hall from the grass roots.

When you eat at Deanie’s, you invariably have the “my eyes were bigger than my stomach” experience. The plates are (more than) generously heaped with love and seafood and sides. You want to eat it all, a feat that only a few can complete. In any case, you will go home satisfied and deliciously full. Originally opened as a seafood market along Lake Pontchartrain in Bucktown in 1961, the restaurant has expanded from its menu of boiled seafood, to a full, family friendly menu of fried, broiled, baked seafood, gumbo, jambalaya and more Louisiana favorites. Currently with two locations, the original Bucktown and French Quarter location, the restaurant recently announced a third location in the lower Garden District. Deanie’s Bucktown, 1713 Lake Avenue, 831-4141, Deanies. com. Deanie’s French Quarter, 841 Iberville, 581-1316. Deanie’s Garden District, 2200 Magazine Street.


Top Place for Seafood, Raw Oysters & Boiled Crawfish: Deanie’s


Top French Bread: Leidenheimer Baking Co. Leidenheimer Baking Co.

New Orleans cuisine, with its rich variety of soups, sauces, gumbos and sandwiches, is served with a much consumed, yet silent partner – the French bread loaf. And when many locals reach for their favorite, they choose the distinct, paper wrapped Leidenheimer loaf. The company, in fact, states that its sacred mission is to “producing the perfect French bread” in an attempt to honor the food of New Orleans. Leidenheimer Baking Co. was founded in 1896 by George Leidenheimer, who moved to New Orleans from his native Germany and found fame with his light and crispy French bread. The bakery, which has operated from its Simon Bolivar Avenue location since 1904, bakes up Leidenheimer, Zip and Reising brand products for distribution across the city, state and country. When you see their distinct delivery trucks, with Bunny Matthews’ own Vic and Nat’ly dining on a fresh poor bread served up on fresh Leidenheimer bread, you’ll know a fresh delivery of baked goods has arrived.


Top Restaurant of 2017

Top French Bread

1. Meril 2. Briquette

1. Leidenheimer Baking Co.

Top Restaurant Worth the Drive

1. Seed

Top Place for Vegetarian

1. Mosca’s Tie 2. Middendorf’s 2. Sal and Judy’s Top Place for Burgers: Port of Call

Top Place for Breakfast

1. The Ruby Slipper Café Top Place for Brunch

1. Red Gravy 2. The Ruby Slipper Café

Top Caterer

1. Pigeon Catering Top Place for a Margarita

1. Superior Grill 2. The Velvet Cactus

Top Place for Late Night Dining

1. Hoshun

Top Place for a Bloody Mary

Top Chef

1. The Ruby Slipper Café

1. Alon Shaya

Top Sports Bar

Top Place to Hear Live Music

1. Poppy’s Time Out Sport Bar & Grill

1. The House of Blues

Top Dive Bar

1. WWOZ

Top Local Radio Station Top Place for Hot Dogs: Dat Dog

1. Finn McCool’s Irish Pub Top Carnival Parade Top Hotel Bar

1. The Carousel Bar at the Hotel Monteleone

1. Muses Tie 2. Endymion 2. Nyx

Top Local Beer

Top State Festival

1. Abita Brewing Company

1. Nachitoches Christmas Festival

Top Craft Cocktail Bar

Top New Orleans Festival

1. Cure 2. Briquette

1. French Quarter Festival 2. New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival

Top Place for Pizza: Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza

editor’s Pick

Most Famous Lost New Orleanian Of The Year: Fats Domino

Top Coffee House: PJ’s Coffee

Fats Domino mastered a sound that combined rhythm and blues with the emerging rock and roll to create a rhythm that drove the kids on the dance floor crazy. He lived mostly shy and withdrawn, but will be remembered for those videos with tight shots of him at a piano relishing those thrills of “Blue Berry Hill.” He’s gone, “Ain’t that a shame.”


Top Museum

Top Fitness Studio

1. New Orleans Museum of Art 2. National WWII Museum 3. Ogden Museum of Southern Art

1. OrangeTheory Top Day Spa

1. Woodhouse Day Spa Top Art Gallery

1. M.S. Rau Antiques

Top Dry Cleaner

1. Young’s Top Antiques Store

1. M.S. Rau Antiques

Top Men’s Clothing Store

Top Furniture Store

1. Jeff’s Haberdashery 2. Perlis

Tie 1.Doerr Furniture 1. Hurwitz Mintz 2. M.S. Rau Antiques

1. Trashy Diva

Top Women’s Boutique

Top Lawn/Garden Store

Top Children’s Boutique

1. Perino’s 2. Jefferson Feed & Seed

Tie 1. Auraluz 1. Little Miss Muffin

Top Place to Gamble

Top Local Shoe Store

1. Harrah’s Casino 2. The Scarlet Pearl

1. Feet First

Top Place to Buy Liquor and Wine

Tie 1. Adler’s 1. Aucoin Hart

Top Local Jeweler

1. Dorignac’s Top Bank

Best Bridal Boutique

1. Whitney Hancock

Tie 1. Town & Country 1. Wedding Belles

Top Hotel

1. The Windsor Court

Parkway Bakery and Tavern

Top Gulf Coast Hotel

1. Scarlet Pearl Top Golf Course

1. TPC Louisiana

Top Craft Brewery

Top Yoga/Pilates Studio

Tie 1. NOLA Brewing 1. Port Orleans

1. NOLA Pilates

editor’s pick Sport Duo Of The Year: Drew Brees and Anthony Davis

You won’t see Drew Brees completing passes to Anthony Davis; nor will you see Davis rebounding a Brees hook shot. The Saints Quarterback and the Pelicans Forward are united by city not by sport, but oh what a blessing for the city. Both are superstars; both a classy men who provide great roles models. New Orleans is lucky to have both. A couple of more championships would help too.

The poor boy sandwich is as much a part of New Orleans culture as Carnival, the streetcar and the French Quarter. It was created in 1929 during the great streetcar strike to feed the hundreds of “poor boys,” with scraps of French fried potatoes, gravy and spare bits of roast beef on French bread. Parkway Bakery and Tavern, which originally opened in Mid-City as a bakery in 1911, joined the ranks and begin serving up its own version of the poor boy to workers at the nearby American Can Factory, also in 1929. Since that year, the Parkway poor boy has won over fans of the crusty sandwich, dominating our reader’s voting preferences. Whether you like your poor boy dressed or plain; roast beef, oyster or shrimp (or any of the other savory sandwich selections on the menu), Parkway takes the crown and continues a tradition that attracts both locals and visitors alike. Parkway Bakery and Tavern, 538 Hagan Street, 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys. com.


Top Place for Poor Boys: Parkway Bakery & Tavern


new orleans kingfish promotional section

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enerous, durable and unflinching in character – the men of New Orleans who fit this archetype are known as Kingfish. They are the very essence of power and compassion combined with masculinity, and give more to others than to themselves. A Kingfish always shows

up – fashionably late, of course, as he’s on New Orleans time – and when he enters the room, it’s under his command. Socializing is as important as business and often is one and the same. He’s dapper, a masterful storyteller and minds his manners the way his mama taught him. Leadership comes as natural to a Kingfish as breathing. He measures his success by the success of those coming up behind him and lends his strong shoulders for them to stand upon. Whether sipping a sazarac or a beer; conducting a meeting or jumping into a secondline; spending time with his family or serving on the board of a favorite charity, a Kingfish does it all with that special brand of savoir faire perfected in New Orleans. He’s not just a boss, he's a Kingfish.

New Orleans Magazine would like to thank Saks Fifth Avenue for providing the clothing and styling and The Westin New Orleans Canal Place for providing the venue for our 2018 Kingfish photo shoot.


new orleans KINGFISH promotional section

Clothing from Saks Fifth Avenue: Chris, Hugo Boss; John, Hugo Boss; Leo, Pal Zileri; Ryan, Giorgio Armani; Russ m herman, Eton

new orleans KINGFISH promotional section


Emeril’s City Ella Brennan Lifetime Achievement Award Winner

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ew Orleans can lay claim to an impres$8 million to children’s charities that support culinary, nutrition and sive number of famous restaurateurs, but arts-based programs. “Our work is all about mentoring and inspiring there is one whose celebrity surpasses youth in the culinary and hospitality fields,” explains Emeril. “Right now we have a really cool culinary program at NOCCA and we are all the others combined. So when the board at the New Orleans Wine & Food building culinary learning centers with edible gardens.” Emeril is Experience met to decide who would also constantly active at the St Michael Special School, a Catholic receive the 2018 Ella Brennan Lifetime institution that provides a nurturing and supportive environment Achievement Award in Hospitality there for children with special educational needs. His foundation’s work wasn’t a whole lot of discussion. “In is not limited to New Orleans; it extends across the Gulf Coast to the Florida panhandle and has branched out to Orlando, Las fact, it was kind of no-brainer,” says NOWFE President Jim Fein. Vegas, and beyond. But regardless of the initiative supported by “If you think about Emeril, his personality and what he means to the Emeril Lagasse Foundation, one bedrock principal underpins the city of New Orleans, this was an easy choice.” Emeril has reached that rarified status where he can get by on just all: Mentorship. “It all comes back to mentorship,” Emeril says. “I one name whereas we mere mortals require at least two. Already think that everybody has to have a mentor. Whether you want to be well-known by the standards of the time when he left a mechanic, a chef or a doctor – you need a mentor. Commander’s Palace in the early nineties to open his And I am very proud to call Ella Brennan mine.” by jay forman first restaurant in a sleepy, inexpensive part of town For those that think that Emeril is resting on his photograph by called the Warehouse District, his career bloomed laurels, and lord knows he could, they haven’t seen greg miles in the spotlight with the concurrent rise of the Food him lately. On the heels of his ambitious, globallyNetwork. He went from being a New Orleans name to inspired Meril which opened in 2016 (the seeds of a national one, and since then his company has grown to employ which were planted during the filming of his Amazon TV series Eat the World) he opened Emeril’s Coastal Italian in Miramar more than 1,400 employees across 14 restaurants with substantive Beach, Florida in 2017. Along with his New Orleans properties, he positions in television, publishing, merchandizing and more. His reach is more than global; he has also contributed recipes to NASA maintains a clutch of restaurants in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania as for use on the International Space Station. well as Las Vegas and Orlando. But he is far more than a successful The Ella Brennan Award recognizes an individual who has made a restaurateur. He is an ambassador, a mentor and philanthropist as lifetime commitment to the hospitality industry through leadership, well. And all these elements come together to form the principals personal and professional accomplishments and philanthropy. It is of the hospitality industry. And this is where Emeril, Ella and New named in honor of ‘Miss Ella’, whose singular personality has made Orleans all converge as well. “Ella really showed me what it is like her a living legend in the field. And in this instance the connections to be a restaurateur – a good restaurateur – and what it is to be a could not be more direct. “I had the pleasure of working side-by-side part of the hospitality business,” Emeril says. “What that means with her for almost eight years,” Emeril says. “I think that she is to a guest for example, and how to treat a guest. And not just a one of the greatest restaurateurs on the planet. If I had to pin any guest, but also the staff, and human beings in general. I think that the hospitality business in New Orleans is just that – it is New label on her, and it is hard to put a label on her, it would be the Orleans. You can’t go to many places that have, dollar for dollar, as ‘Grande Dame of Hospitality.’” Emeril has leveraged his fame to make a difference. Since its great of food and service and fun that we have right here in New founding in 2002, the Emeril Lagasse Foundation has donated over Orleans.” Miss Ella couldn’t agree more. •


Son Rise The School Board’s Second Koppel By Dawn Ruth Wilson

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oody Koppel, now in his third term as a New Orleans School Board member, started learning about the inner workings of school system management while still a teenager. He remembers sitting in the back during school board meetings, while his father, the first Woody Koppel to be elected to the school board, fought for transparency and fiscal responsibility with a fiery passion that awed admirers and infuriated detractors. And as often happens with larger-than-life personalities, Harwood “Woody” Koppel lives on in the memories of many people who talk about him as if he were still fighting the good fight. George Harwood “Woody” Koppel, who followed his dad to the board in 2008, favors his father so much he is often mistaken for him, even though the

Photograph by Greg Miles

elder Koppel died two decades ago. Koppel says people he does not know come up to him and start talking about the old days. “That’s my dad,” he tells them, once he is certain he has been mistaken for his father again. “It’s like he has been away at a spa in California and never aged,” he said. He not only looks like his father, he also shares his father’s burning desire to makes things right, which is why he sought to follow his father to the school board. “If there’s a job left unfinished,” he said, “and I see the opportunity where I can take a chance to make a difference, I am going to act on it.” And act, he did. By the time Koppel was elected after Katrina, the school system had been divided into two districts. The state took over about a hundred “failing” schools and left the school board with a handful of successful schools and $500 million in debt incurred by


former boards. The unsound decisions that his father railed about but he does remember the drama Koppel brought to school board in the 1970s and 1980s continued in the years leading up to Katrina. meetings. He didn’t mind making enemies, even among his fellow Faced with colossal debt and loss of public trust created by pre-Katrina board members if he felt they weren’t playing by the rules. scandals of corruption and malfeasance, board members elected at Lyn Koppel, wife of the first Woody and mother of the second, the same time as Koppel in 2008 tackled the debt problem head-on. remembers one occasion when her husband and an ally on the Today, only 10 years later, that debt has been halved, and the system’s board became incensed that the board was hashing out business bond rating has climbed to the top level of credit worthiness, he says. over lunch. Members were essentially holding meetings and trading “We had to make choices,” he said, some harder than others. “If votes in secrecy. you are trying to choose between ROTC and English, come on.” Determined to stop the practice, Koppel arranged for a TV news As a result of continuous budget scrubbing and $2 billion in FEMA reporter to meet him at Commander’s Palace restaurant where the board construction funds, Koppel noted the board will be debt free by 2021, was dining and deciding matters soon to come before them in public. a rare feat in urban education. “Then we can start dreaming,” he said. The cameramen arrived, and Koppel escorted them to the board’s table This financial turnaround was one reason the state Legislature decided to catch the cabal on film. “Everyone was very annoyed,” Lyn Koppel to return all Orleans said. “It ruined everyParish schools to the one’s lovely lunch.” local board by next Another time her summer. As of 2018, the h u s b a n d ’s a n g e r present school board reached a boiling point will be gatekeeper for happened on a rainy, about 75 schools, most first day of school, of which will be semishe says. At 7 a.m., autonomous charter he started getting calls schools. The board about students with disabilities, some in will monitor them, but charter operators wheelchairs, getting will manage them and drenched while waiting be accountable for for school buses that academic performance. never came. Not only did Koppel A few phone calls follow his father to the later, he discovered board, he also followed buses dedicated to him into the real estate disabled students had business. Koppel real broken down and had estate expertise has never been fixed. No Woody’s Mom (Lyn guided multiple boards in matters of buying and selling one had been informed that the buses weren’t in service, Koppel) and Dad and property, said Ken Ducote, a former school board facilities she recalled. “Harwood was absolutely out of his mind.” supporters campaigning for school board director, who worked with both Koppels in his 30-year career. One of the decisions that the board took despite elder in the early 70’s on Decatur Street But that’s where similarities between father and son Koppel’s strident opposition was building an elementary French quarter. end, according to Ducote. The communication style of school on top of a toxic waste dump. Today, his son noted, the Koppel of yesteryear was far different, he said. The father was no one would even consider such an action, but in 1986 his father aggressive while the son has a more tactful approach. was accused of racial prejudice and vilified for his opposition. “He is adamant about stuff behind the scenes,” Ducote said, “very That debacle wasted millions in construction and relocation costs and jeopardized the health of hundreds of children and school professional. I’d say he is an excellent school board member.” The father, however, was a different story. “He always called employees. The legal ramifications are ongoing. “Here it is 40 years himself the watchdog of the school board,but it was a combination. later, and we are still dealing with this,” Koppel said. His father’s critics accused of him being more divisive than helpful, Sometimes watchdog, sometimes pit-bull,” Ducote said. In any case, he always made himself known. The first time Ducote a charge that he countered with a typically challenging comment. met the first Woody Koppel they were both standing in line at a K&B The obituary published in the Times-Picayune at the time of his 1997 drugstore on Claiborne Avenue. Koppel was standing behind him death said he defended himself by saying, “I’m a team player, as long and recognized him as a New Orleans school teacher. After tapping as the team is not trying to throw the game.” him on the shoulder, Koppel said he was running for an elected seat Right or wrong, after 18 years of angry outbursts and lost causes on the school board and asked: “In three words, what can we do to he was defeated for office in 1992. improve the school system?” His son, blessed with a better situation in a different time, accepts “Smaller middle schools,” Ducote answered. the fact that his father “had his way, and I have mine.” But the Woody Koppel of today really is an apple that fell close Ducote, who became a board administrator a few years later, said he doesn’t remember Koppel doing anything to change the size of to the tree. When asked how long he plans to toil for New Orleans’ middle schools, which may have been too difficult to do anyway, children, he said: “As long as they will have me.” •


*For schools marked with an asterisk listing is based on 2016 information; for all others, information is current to 2017.

NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE’S

GUIDE TO SCHOOLS COMPLIED BY TOPHER BALFER

Area public and private universities, private elementary and secondary and charter schools

COLLEGES *Delgado Community College Top Executive: Dr. Alex Johnson Address: 501 City Park Ave. Phone: 504- 483-4410 Total Enrollment: 11,989 % of Applicants Admitted: 100% % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 62 Year Founded: 1921 Academic Specialties: Culinary Arts, Charity School of Nursing, Automotive No. of Full Time Faculty: 874 No. of Part Time Faculty: 179 Average professor salary: $45,000 Accredited By: SACS Highest academic degree issued: Associate Degree *Loyola University of New Orleans Top Executive: Rev. Kevin Wm. Wildes, S. J. Address: 6363 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 504- 865-3240 Website: Loyno.edu Total Enrollment: 3,836 % of Applicants Admitted: 90% 76

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% of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 81% Tuition per Semester: $12,205 Year Founded: 1912 Academic Specialties: Music Industry, Advertising, Public Relations, Journalism, Psychology, Biology/Pre-Med, Criminal Justice, Music, International Business, College of Law No. of Full Time Faculty: 225 No. of Part Time Faculty: 104 Average professor salary: $94,091.55 Accredited By: SACS Highest academic degree issued: J.D. *New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Top Executive: Dr. Charles S. Kelley Jr. Address: 3939 Gentilly Blvd. Phone: 504-282-4455/800-6628701 Website: NOBTS.edu Total Enrollment: 3,800 No. of Student Receiving Financial Aid: 1,020

myne w orl eans .com

Tuition per Semester: $2,100 Year Founded: 1917 Academic Specialties: Counseling, Pastoral Ministry, Theology, Christian Education, Church Music No. of Full Time Faculty: 63 No. of Part Time Faculty: 13 Accredited By: Association of Theological Schools, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctor of Philosophy *Nunez Community College Top Executive: Dr. Thomas Warner Address: 3710 Paris Road, Chalmette Phone: 504-278-6476 Fax: 504-278-6487 Website: Nunez.edu Total Enrollment: 2,618 No. of Student Receiving Financial Aid: 2,409 Tuition per Semester: $1,749.48 Year Founded: 1992 Academic Specialties: Culinary Entrepreneurship; Electrical Construction; EMT & Paramedic; Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism

Administration; Industrial Technology (PTEC), Nursing (LPN), Paralegal Studies; Teaching (Grades 1-5); Solar Construction; Welding; and Louisiana Transfer Degrees (Associate of Arts and Associate of Science) No. of Full Time Faculty: 42 No. of Part Time Faculty: 63 Accredited By: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). Individual programs may also have industry-specific accreditations (i.e., NCCER for Electrical Construction, AWS for Welding) Highest Academic Degree Issued: Associate Degree The University of Holy Cross Top Executive: Dr. David M. Landry (President) Address: 4123 Woodland Drive Phone: 504-394-7744 Website: Uhcno.edu Total Enrollment: 1,301 % of applicants admitted: 39.6% %. of Student Receiving Financial

Aid: 80% Tuition per Semester: $5,760 Year Founded: 1916 Academic Specialties: Nursing, Counseling, Education No. of Full Time Faculty: 56 No. of Part Time Faculty: 56 Accredited By: Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN); Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP); Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP); Joint Review Committee on Education and Radiologic Technology; International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education; National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission; and Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctorate Tulane University Top Executive: Michael A. Fitts


Address: 6823 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 504-865-5000 Website: Tulane.edu Total Enrollment: 13,602 % of applicants admitted: 21% % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 78% Tuition per Semester: $24,460 Year Founded: 1834 Academic Specialties: Architecture, Business, Law, Liberal Arts, Social Work, Medicine, Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Science and Engineering No. of Full Time Faculty: 1,436 No. of Part Time Faculty: 386 Accredited By: The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctorate University of New Orleans Top Executive: Dr. John Nicklow, President Address: 2000 Lakeshore Drive Phone: 504-280-6595 Fax: 504-280-3973 Website: UNO.edu Total Enrollment: 7,964 % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 84 Tuition per Semester: $4,472 (approximate); $8,805 with room and board Year Founded: 1958 Academic Specialties: Accounting; Computer Science; Counselor Education; Film & Theatre; Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism Administration; Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering; Planning & Urban Studies No. of Full Time Faculty: 255 No. of Part Time Faculty: 147 Accredited By: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Highest Academic Degree Issued: Doctorate

Address: 5501 Westbank Expressway, Marrero Phone: 504-341-6217 Fax: 504-341-6229 Website: TheAcademyOfOurLady. org Total Enrollment: 563 Year Founded: 2007 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 44 Academy of the Sacred Heart Grades Served: 1 year-12 Top Executive: Sr. Melanie A. Guste, RSCJ, Ph.D. Address: 4521 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 504-269-1212 Fax: 504-891-9939 Website: AshRosary.org Total Enrollment: 758 Year Founded: 1867 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 145 Archbishop Chapelle High School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Principal Leila Benoit Address: 8800 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie Phone: 504-467-3105 Fax: 504-466-3191 Website: ArchbishopChapelle.org Total Enrollment: 650 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Private Catholic School Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 41

*Xavier University of Louisiana Top Executive: Dr. Norman C. Francis Address: 1 Drexel Dr. Phone: 504- 520-7568 Total Enrollment: 3,013 % of Students Receiving Financial Aid: 90% Tuition per Semester: $6,450 (College of Pharmacy Tuition$8,600/semester) Year Founded: 1925 Academic Specialties: Sciences, Engineering, Pharmacy, Business No. of Full Time Faculty: 167 No. of Part Time Faculty: 23 Accredited By: SACS Highest academic degree issued: Doctor of Pharmacy, Master of Arts

Archbishop Hannan High School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Fr. Charles Latour, O.P. Address: 71324 Highway 1077, Covington Phone: 985-249-6363 Fax: 985-249-6370 Website: HannanHigh.org Total Enrollment: 613 Year Founded: 1987 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 50

Secondary Schools Academy of Our Lady Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Sister Michelle Geiger, FMA Principal

*Archbishop Rummel High School Top Executive: Mark Milaro Grades Served: 8-12 Address: 1901 Severn Ave.,

Metairie Phone: 504-834-5592 Fax: 504-832-4016 Website: RummelRaiders.com Total Enrollment: 678 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Brothers of the Christian Schools Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 11:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 61 Archbishop Shaw High School Top Executive: Rev. Louis Molinelli, SDB Grades Served: 8-12 Address: 1000 Barataria Blvd., Marrero Phone: 504-340-6727 Fax: 504-347-9883 Website: ArchbishopShaw.org Total Enrollment: 462 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 23 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 37 Bishop McManus Academy Grades Served: PreK2-8 Top Executive: Pastor Jonathan Sorapuru Address: 13123 I-10 Service Road Phone: 246-5121 Fax: 246-5564 Website: BishopMcManus.com Total Enrollment: 108 Year Founded: 1975 Avg. Class Size: 10-16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 13 *Brother Martin High School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: John Devlin Address: 4401 Elysian Fields Ave. Phone: 504-283-1561 Fax: 504-286-8462 Website: BrotherMartin.com Total Enrollment: 1,151 Year Founded: 1869 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Brothers of Sacred Heart Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 95 Cabrini High School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Jack S. Truxillo Address: 1400 Moss St. Phone: 504-482-1193 Website: CabriniHigh.com Total Enrollment: 548 Year Founded: 1959 Avg. Class Size: 19

Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 44 *Crescent City Christian School Top Executive: Bill Rigsby Address: 4828 Utica St., Metairie Phone: 504- 885-4700 Website: CelebrationChristian SchoolSystem.org Total Enrollment: 425 Year founded: 1956 Average class size: 21 Dress requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 21:1 % of applicants admitted: 85% Number of full-time faculty: 28 De La Salle High School Top Executive: Michael Giambelluca, President Grades Served: 8-12 Address: 5300 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 504-895-5717 Fax: 504-895-1300 Website: DeLaSalleNola.com Total Enrollment: 583 Year Founded: 1949 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Private Catholic School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 38 *Ecole Classique Grades Served: 7-12 Top Executive: Sal Federico Address: 5236 Glendale St., Metairie Phone: 504-887-3507 Fax: 504-887-8140 Website: EcoleClassique.com Total Enrollment: 140 Year Founded: 1956 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 12 Holy Cross School (Middle & High School Campus) Grades Served: 5-12 Top Executive: Mr. Sean Martin, Headmaster Address: 5500 Paris Ave. Phone: 504-942-3100 Website: HolyCrossTigers.com Total Enrollment: 944 Year Founded: 1849 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 73 Holy Rosary High School Grades Served: 8-12

Top Executive: Cheryl Orillion Address: 2437 Jena St. Phone: 504-482-7173 Website: HolyRosaryNola.org Total Enrollment: 60 Year Founded: 2005 Avg. Class Size: 8-10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of New Orleans Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 6:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 10 Isidore Newman School Grades Served: Early Childhood-12 Top Executive: Dale M. Smith, Head of School Address: 1903 Jefferson Ave. Phone: 504-899-5641 Fax: 504-896-8597 Website: NewmanSchool.org Total Enrollment: 1,029 (for Pre K-12); 169 (for Green Trees) Year Founded: 1903 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Lower: Uniform; Middle & Upper: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent, Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 132 Jesuit High School of New Orleans Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Fr. Christopher Fronk, S.J. Address: 4133 Banks St. Phone: 504-486-6631 Fax: 504-483-3942 Website: JesuitNola.org Total Enrollment: 1,362 Year Founded: 1847 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 116 *John Curtis Christian School Grades Served: 7-12 Top Executive: J.T. Curtis Address: 10125 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge Phone: 504-737-4621 Fax: 504-739-2341 Website: JohnCurtis.com Total Enrollment: 550 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 16:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 40 *Louise S. McGehee School Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Eileen F. Powers Address: 2343 Prytania St. Phone: 504-561-1224 Fax: 504-525-7910

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Website: McGeheeSchool.com Total Enrollment: 121 Year Founded: 1912 Avg. Class Size: 12-15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 32 *Lutheran High School of Greater New Orleans Top Executive: Carol Christen, Principal Grades Served: 9-12 Address: 3864 17th St., Metairie Phone: 504-455-4062 Fax: 504-455-4453 Website: LutheranHighSchool.net Total Enrollment: 103 Year Founded: 1970 Avg. Class Size: 13 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LCMS) Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 7 *Metairie Park Country Day School Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: Carolyn Chandler Address: 300 Park Road, Metairie Phone: 504-837-5204 Fax: 504-837-0015 Website: MPCDS.com Total Enrollment: 725 Year Founded: 1929 Avg. Class Size: Depends on Class Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Depends on Class Number of Full Time Faculty: 96 Mount Carmel Academy Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Sister Camille Anne Campbell, O.Carm., President/Beth Ann Simno, Principal Address: 7027 Milne Blvd. Phone: 504-288-7626 Fax: 504-288-7629 Website: MCACubs.org Total Enrollment: 1,240 Year Founded: 1896 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 138 Northlake Christian School (Upper School) Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Monty Fontenot, Head of School: Jenni Vega, Upper School Principal Address: 70104 Wolverine Drive, Covington Phone: 985-635-0400 Website: NorthlakeChristian.org Total Enrollment: 260 78

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Year Founded: 1977 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 32 *Pope John Paul II High School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Martha M. Mundine Address: 1901 Jaquar Drive, Slidell Phone: 985-649-0914 Fax: 985-649-5494 Website: PJP.org Total Enrollment: 346 Year Founded: 1980 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 11:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 *Ridgewood Preparatory School Grades Served: PreK4-12 Top Executive: M.J. Montgomery Jr. Address: 201 Pasadena Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-835-2545 Fax: 504-837-1864 Website: RidgewoodPrep.com Total Enrollment: 300 Year Founded: 1948 Avg. Class Size: 17 Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: None Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 *St. Charles Catholic High School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Andrew Cupit Address: 100 Dominican Drive, LaPlace Phone: 985-652-3809 Website: StCharlesCatholic.org Total Enrollment: 484 Year Founded: 1952 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of New Orleans Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 37 *St. Katharine Drexel Preparatory School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Cheryllyn M. Branche; Jacob Owens Address: 5116 Magazine St. Phone: 504-899-6061 Website: DrexelPrep.com Total Enrollment: 213 Year Founded: 2013 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Xavier University of Louisiana Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1

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Number of Full Time Faculty: 15 St. Martin’s Episcopal School Grades Served: 8 weeks-12th Top Executive: Merry Sorrells Address: 225 Green Acres Road, Metairie Phone: 504-736-9917 Fax: 504-736-8802 Website: StMSaints.com Total Enrollment: 600 Year Founded: 1947 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: PreK-4: Uniform; 5-12: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent Episcopal School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 87 *St. Mary’s Academy Grades Served: 5-12 Top Executive: Sr. Clare of Assisi Pierre, SSF; Sr. Jennie Jones, SSF Address: 6905 Chef Menteur Blvd. Phone: 504-245-0200 Website: SMANewOrleans.com Total Enrollment: 325 Year Founded: 1867 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 26 *St. Mary’s Dominican High School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Dr. Cynthia A. Thomas Address: 7701 Walmsley Ave. Phone: 504-865-9401 Fax: 866-5958 Website: StMarysDominican.org Total Enrollment: 883 Year Founded: 1860 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 60 St. Paul’s School Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Brother Raymond Bulliard, FSC, President Address: 917 S. Jahncke Ave., Covington Phone: 985-892-3200 Fax: 985-892-4048 Website: StPauls.com Total Enrollment: 820 Year Founded: 1911 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic; owned and operated by Christian Brothers Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 24:1 % of applicants admitted: 99 Number of Full Time Faculty: 75

*St. Scholastica Academy Grades Served: 8-12 Top Executive: Elizabeth Cerise LaForge, Ph.D. Address: 122 South Massachusetts St., Covington Phone: 985-892-2540 Fax: 985-893-5256 Website: SSAcad.org Total Enrollment: 540 Year Founded: 1903 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 63 Ursuline Academy High School Grades Served: Toddler 2-12 Top Executive: Dr. Karen Thomas McNay, Academy President Address: 2635 State St. Phone: 504-861-9150 Website: Uanola.org Total Enrollment: 680 Year Founded: 1727 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies per Grade Number of Full Time Faculty: 75 Elementary Schools Academy of the Sacred Heart Grades Served: 1 year-12 Top Executive: Sr. Melanie A. Guste, Ph.D. Address: 4521 St. Charles Ave. (Toddler-4); 4301 St. Charles Ave. (5-8) Phone: 504-269-1213 Fax: 504-891-9939 Website: AshRosary.org Total Enrollment: 758 Year Founded: 1867 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 145 (total) Arden Cahill Academy Grades Served: Infant Centre: 6 weeks to 3; PreK4-8 Top Executive: Mary Kevin Cahill Address: 3101 Wall Blvd., Gretna Phone: 504-392-0902 Fax: 504-392-3813 Website: ArdenCahillAcademy.com Total Enrollment: 550 Year Founded: 1968 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Dress Code Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies by grade level Number of Full Time Faculty: 65 *Atonement Lutheran School Top Executive: Douglas C. Molin

Address: 6500 Riverside Dr., Metairie, LA Phone Number: 504- 887-0225 Website: alcs.org Total Enrollment: 254 Year founded: 1960 Average class size: 20 Dress requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 % of applicants admitted: 80% Number of full-time faculty: 14 Average teacher salary: $29,800 Cathedral Montessori School Grades Served: PreK3-3rd Top Executive: Billie Andersson Address: 9 Fortress Road Phone: 504-252-4871 Website: CathedralMontessori.com Total Enrollment: 54 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: None Affiliation: Louisiana Montessori Association; Greek Orthodox Church Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 6 Cedarwood School Grades Served: Preschool-7 Top Executive: Kathryn S. LeBlanc Address: 607 Heavens Drive, Mandeville Phone: 985-845-7111 Fax: 985-845-0669 Website: CedarwoodSchool.com Total Enrollment: 300 Year Founded: 1983 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform (K-7) Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 38 Christian Brothers School (City Park Campus) Grades Served: 5-7 Top Executive: Joey M. Scaffidi Address: 8 Friedrichs Ave. Phone: 504-486-6770 Fax: 504-486-1053 Website: cbs-no.org Total Enrollment: 348 Year Founded: 1960 Avg. Class Size: 29 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 25 Christian Brothers School (Canal Street Campus) Grades Served: PreK4-7 Top Executive: Joey M. Scaffidi Address: 4600 Canal St. Phone: 504-488-4426 Website: cbs-no.org Total Enrollment: 470 Year Founded: 2016


Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: PreK-4 Coed; 5-7 Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 50 *Concordia Lutheran School Grades Served: PreK4-8 Top Executive: Jacqueline H. Daniilidis Address: 6700 Westbank Expressway, Marrero Phone: 504-347-4155 Fax: 504-348-9345 Website: CLSMarrero.com Total Enrollment: 162 Year Founded: 1965 Avg. Class Size: 12-15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: ECLA, Good Shephard & Trinity Lutheran Church Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Pre-K 8:1; K 12:1; 1-8 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 20 *Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orleans Grades Served: 10 months-7 Top Executive: Pauline Dides Address: 821 General Pershing St. Phone: 504-896-4500 Fax: 504-896-9610 Website: EBNola.com Total Enrollment: 236 Year Founded: 1998 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: French Accredited School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 37 *Ecole Classique Grades Served: PreK-6 Top Executive: Sal Federico Address: 5236 Glendale St., Metairie Phone: 504-887-3507 Fax: 504-887-8140 Website: EcoleClassique.com Total Enrollment: 140 Year Founded: 1956 Avg. Class Size: 10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 12 *Faith Lutheran Grades Served: PreK3-8 Top Executive: Gregory Wood, Principal Address: 300 Colonial Club Drive, Harahan Phone: 504-737-9554 Fax: 504-737-9599 Website: FaithLutheran-school.com Total Enrollment: 75 Year Founded: 1958 Avg. Class Size: 10

Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 8 Holy Cross School (Primary Campus) Grades Served: Pre-K-4th Top Executive: Mr. Sean Martin, Headmaster Address: 5601 Elysian Fields Ave. Phone: 504-942-1850 Website: HolyCrossTigers.com Total Enrollment: 133 Year Founded: 1849 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 15 Holy Name of Jesus Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Jessica Dwyer, M.Ed. Address: 6325 Cromwell Place Phone: 504-861-1466 Fax: 504-861-1480 Website: HNJSchool.org Total Enrollment: 480 Year Founded: 1891 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Roman Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies by grade level Number of Full Time Faculty: 56 *Holy Rosary Academy Grades Served: PK-7 Top Executive: Sr. Paulette Tiefenbrunn, S.S.N.D. Address: 2437 Jena St. Phone: 504-482-7173 Website: HolyRosaryNola.org Total Enrollment: 79 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: 12 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 14 *International School of Louisiana Grades Served: Metairie & Uptown K-8; Westbank K-4 Top Executive: Melanie Tennyson Addresses: 8101 Simon St., Metairie; 1400 Camp St.; 502 Olivier St. Phone: Jefferson 934-4875;Uptown 654-1088;Westbank 274-4571 Fax: Jefferson 754-7845; Uptown 654-1086; Westbank 265-9447 Website: isl-edu.org Total Enrollment: 1,404 Year Founded: 2000 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: None

Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Isidore Newman School Grades Served: Early Childhood-12 Top Executive: Dale M. Smith, Head of School Address: 1903 Jefferson Ave. Phone: 504-899-5641 Fax: 504-896-8597 Website: NewmanSchool.org Total Enrollment: 1,029 (for Pre K-12); 169 (for Green Trees) Year Founded: 1903 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Lower: Uniform; Middle & Upper: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent, Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 132 Jewish Community Day School Grades Served: PreK-6th Top Executive: Sharon Pollin Address: 3747 W. Esplanade Ave. North, Metairie Phone: 504-887-4091 Fax: 504-780-6539 Website: JCDSNola.org Total Enrollment: 52 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: 10 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Jewish Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 8 *John Curtis Christian School Grades Served: PreK2-6 Top Executive: Deborah Eutsler Address: 10125 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge Phone: 504-737-0208 Fax: 504-738-8292 Website: JohnCurtis.com Total Enrollment: 450 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 35 Kehoe-France Grades Served: 8 weeks-7 Top Executive: Kyle M. France; Sarach Ficarra, Lower School Principal; Janet Pananos, Upper School Principal Address: 720 Elise Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-733-0472 Website: Kehoe-France.com Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 1962 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Depends on grade level

Number of Full Time Faculty: 62 Kehoe-France (Northshore) Grades Served: 8 weeks-7 Top Executive: Kyle M. France; Brad Humphreys, Principal Address: 25 Patricia Dr., Covington, LA Phone: 985- 892-4415 Total Enrollment: 224 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Independent Student mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 18:1 Number of full-time faculty: 40 Lake Castle Private School – New Orleans Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Jane Butera McGovern, Head of School Address: 8400 Hayne Blvd. Phone: 504-242-6270 Fax: 504-241-7844 Website: LakeCastleNewOrleans. com Total Enrollment: 475 Year Founded: 1963 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Private Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 24 *Lake Caste Private School – Slidell Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Brian Butera Address: 59461 LA Hwy 433, Slidell Phone: 985-641-3363 Fax: 985-641-3363 Website: LakeCastleSchool.com Total Enrollment: 450 Year Founded: 1987 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic/Christian Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30

Address: 1515 West Causeway Approach, Mandeville Phone: 985-674-2466 Fax: 985-674-1441 Website: MQPCS.org Total Enrollment: 483 Year Founded: 1996 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 10:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 49 *Metairie Park Country Day School Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: Carolyn Chandler Address: 300 Park Road, Metairie Phone: 504-837-5204 Website: MPCDS.com Total Enrollment: 725 Year Founded: 1929 Avg. Class Size: Depends on Class Size Dress Requirements: None Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Depends on Class Number of Full Time Faculty: 96 Northlake Christian School (Lower School) Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Monty Fontenot, Head of School; Missie Arnold – Lower School Principal Address: 70104 Wolverine Drive, Covington Phone: 985-635-0400 Website: NorthlakeChristian.org Total Enrollment: 160 Year Founded: 1977 Avg. Class Size: 15-25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 22

*Louise S. McGehee School Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: Eileen F. Powers Address: 2343 Prytania St. Phone: 504-561-1224 Fax: 504-525-7910 Website: McGeheeSchool.com Total Enrollment: 390 Year Founded: 1912 Avg. Class Size: 12-15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 75

Northlake Christian School (Middle School) Grades Served: 5-8 Top Executive: Monty Fontenot, Head of School; Ben Haindel – Middle School Principal Address: 70104 Wolverine Drive, Covington Phone: 985-635-0400 Website: NorthlakeChristian.org Total Enrollment: 240 Year Founded: 1977 Avg. Class Size: 15-25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Non-Denominational Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 25

Mary, Queen of Peace Catholic School Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Sybil W. Skansi, Principal

*Our Lady of Divine Providence School Top Executive: Elvina DiBartolo Grades Served: Nursery-7 Address: 917 N. Atlanta St.,

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Metairie Phone: 504-466-0591 Fax: 504-466-0671 Website: OLDPSchool.com Total Enrollment: 220 Year Founded: 1967 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 24 *Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School – Slidell Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Michael Buras Address: 345 Westchester Blvd., Slidell Phone: 985-643-3230 Fax: 985-645-0648 Website: OLLOnline.com Total Enrollment: 370 Year Founded: 1929 Avg. Class Size: 19 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Number of Full Time Faculty: 26 Our Lady of Prompt Succor Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Annette Accomando Address: 2305 Fenelon St., Chalmette Phone: 504-271-2953 Fax: 504-271-1490 Website: OLPSSchool.org Total Enrollment: 403 Year Founded: 1954 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 18:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 23 *Ridgewood Preparatory School Grades Served: PreK-12 Top Executive: M.J. Montgomery Jr. Address: 201 Pasadena Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-835-2545 Fax: 504-837-1864 Website: RidgewoodPrep.com Total Enrollment: 300 Year Founded: 1948 Avg. Class Size: 17 Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: None Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 St. Andrew’s Episcopal School Grades Served: 18 months-8 Top Executive: Melville Brown Address: 8012 Oak St. Phone: 504-861-3743 Fax: 504-861-3973 Website: StAndrewsEpiscopalSchool.org Total Enrollment: 168 – PK-8; 45 80

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– 18mths-3 Year Founded: 1957 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 31 *St. Angela Merici Grades Served: PreK2-7 Top Executive: Paige Bennett Address: 835 Melody Drive, Metairie Phone: 504-835-8491 Fax: 504-835-4463 Website: StAngelaSchool.org Total Enrollment: 365 Year Founded: 1965 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 35 St. Ann School Grades Served: PreK2-7 Top Executive: Susan R. Kropog Address: 4921 Meadowdale St., Metairie Phone: 504-455-8383 Fax: 504-455-9572 Website: StAnnSchool.org Total Enrollment: 815 Year Founded: 1975 Avg. Class Size: 23 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 62 *St. Anthony of Padua Top Executive: Sr. Ruth Angelette, O.P., Principal Grades Served: Preschool2-7 Address: 4600 Canal St. Phone: 504-488-4426 Fax: 504-488-5373 Website: StAnthonyOfPadua.net Total Enrollment: 165 Year Founded: 1915 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 17 *St. Benilde School Grades Served: Nursery-7 Top Executive: John “Matt” Downey V Address: 1801 Division St., Metairie Phone: 504-833-9894 Fax: 504-834-4380 Website: StBenilde.com Total Enrollment: 336 Year Founded: 1968 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1

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Number of Full Time Faculty: 26 St. Christopher School Grades Served: 6 weeks-7 Top Executive: Ruth Meche Address: 3900 Derbigny St., Metairie Phone: 504-837-6871 Fax: 504-834-0522 Website: StChristopherSchool.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 1949 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 21:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 60 Average teacher salary: $36,000 St. Clement of Rome Top Executive: Dr. Patricia Speeg Grades Served: PreK2-7 Address: 3978 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-888-0386 Fax: 504-885-8273 Website: SCRSchool.org Total Enrollment: 484 Year Founded: 1968 Avg. Class Size: 23 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: SACS, CEC, NCEA, LAP/ NAESP Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 16:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 30 St. Cletus School Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Jill Grabert, Principal Address: 3610 Claire Ave., Gretna Phone: 504-366-3538 Fax: 504-366-0011 Website: StCletusColts.com Total Enrollment: 370 Year Founded: 1978 Avg. Class Size: 17 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 28 St. Dominic School Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Dr. Ashley Lynn Seatter Address: 6326 Memphis St. Phone: 504-482-4123 Fax: 504-486-3870 Website: StDominicNola.org Total Enrollment: 687 Year Founded: 1924 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 50 *St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Grades Served: PreK2-7 Top Executive: Joan Kathmann,

Principal Address: 4119 St. Elizabeth Drive, Kenner Phone: 504-468-3524 Fax: 504-469-6014 Website: SEASSchool.org Total Enrollment: 440 Year Founded: 1984 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed *St. Francis Xavier Catholic School Top Executive: Barbara M. Martin Grades Served: PreK2-7 Address: 215 Betz Place, Metairie Phone: 504-833-1471 Fax: 504-833-1498 Website: StFrancisXavier.com Total Enrollment: 460 Year Founded: 1926 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 No. of Full Time Faculty: 40 St. George’s Episcopal School Grades Served: Age 1 - 8th grade Top Executive: Dr. Rob E. Eichberger Address: 923 Napoleon Ave. Phone: 504-891-5509 Fax: 504-895-1225 Website: StGeorgesEpiscopal.com Total Enrollment: 403 Year Founded: 1969 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Lower/ Middle: 5:1; Preschool: 4:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 90 St. Joan of Arc Catholic School Grades Served: PreK2-7 Top Executive: Jeffrey M. Montz, Principal Address: 412 Fir St., LaPlace Phone: 985-652-6310 Fax: 985-652-6390 Website: SJA-school.com Total Enrollment: 350 Year Founded: 1961 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 30 *St. John Lutheran Grades Served: Preschool-7 Top Executive: Bethany Gonski Address: 3937 Canal St. Phone: 504-488-6641 Fax: 504-482-2101 Website: SJLNo.com Total Enrollment: 150 Year Founded: 1854 Avg. Class Size: Preschool: 10; Elementary: 20

Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Lutheran Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 10 St. Louis King of France Catholic School Grades Served: 6 weeks-7 Top Executive: Pamela Keenan Schott Address: 1600 Lake Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-833-8224 Fax: 504-838-9938 Website: SLKFSchool.com Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 1953 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12-15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 88 St. Martin’s Episcopal School Grades Served: 8 weeks-12th Top Executive: Merry Sorrells Address: 225 Green Acres Road, Metairie Phone: 504-736-9917 Fax: 504-736-8802 Website: StMSaints.com Total Enrollment: 600 Year Founded: 1947 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: PreK-4: Uniform; 5-12: Dress Code Affiliation: Independent Episcopal School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 9:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 87 *St. Mary Magdalen Catholic School Grades Served: PreK-7 Top Executive: Valerie Rodriquez Address: 6421 West Metairie Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-733-1433 Fax: 504-736-0727 Website: SMMCougars.org Total Enrollment: 252 Year Founded: 1956 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic, Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 13:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 19 *St. Mary’s Academy Grades Served: 4-6 Top Executive: Sr. Clare of Assisi Pierre; Chad Smith, Dean of Male Academy Address: 6905 Chef Menteur Blvd. Phone: 243-1888 Fax: 872-9501 Website: SMANewOrleans.com Total Enrollment: 44 Year Founded: 2015 Avg. Class Size: 15 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic


Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 3 *St. Paul’s Episcopal School Grades Served: Toddler-8 Top Executive: Charleen Schwank, Head of School Address: 6249 Canal Blvd. Phone: 504-488-1319 Fax: 504-304-8315 Website: StPauls-lakeview.org Total Enrollment: 284 Year Founded: 1961 Avg. Class Size: 13 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Independent, Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 39 *St. Peter Catholic School Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Michael Kraus Address: 130 E. Temperance St., Covington Phone: 985-892-1831 Fax: 985-898-2185 Website: StPeterCov.org Total Enrollment: 774 Year Founded: 1878 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Depends on grade level Number of Full Time Faculty: 48 St. Philip Neri Catholic School Grades Served: 6 weeks-7 Top Executive: Carol Stack, Ph.D. Address: 6600 Kawanee Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-887-5600 Fax: 504-456-6857 Website: StPhilipNeri.org Total Enrollment: 710 Year Founded: 1961 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 90 St. Pius X Catholic School Grades Served: PreK3-7 Top Executive: Deirdre Macnamara Address: 6600 Spanish Fort Blvd. Phone: 504-282-2811 Fax: 504-282-3043 Wesbite: School.StPiusXNola.org Total Enrollment: 527 Year Founded: 1953 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 40 St. Rita School – Harahan Grades Served: 2 years-7 Top Executive: Rev. Steven V.

Bruno Address: 194 Raven Ave., Harahan Phone: 504-737-0744 Fax: 504-738-2184 Website: School.StRitaHarahan. com Total Enrollment: 410 Year Founded: 1953 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. Of N.O. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies Number of Full Time Faculty: 31 Stuart Hall School for Boys Grades Served: PK3-7 Top Executive: Kevin Avin, Head of School Address: 2032 South Carrollton Ave. Phone: 504-861-1954 Fax: 504-861-5389 Website: StuartHall.org Total Enrollment: 349 Year Founded: 1984 Avg. Class Size: 18 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Male Student/Teacher Ratio: PreSchool: 18:2; Lower&Middle: 18:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 58 Trinity Episcopal School Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: The Rev. Gary Taylor, Head of School Address: 1315 Jackson Ave. Phone: 504-525-8661 Fax: 504-523-4837 Website: TrinityNola.com Total Enrollment: 350 Year Founded: 1960 Avg. Class Size: 16 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Episcopal Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 7:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 49 Ursuline Academy Elementary School Grades Served: Toddler 2-12 Top Executive: Dr. Karen Thomas McNay, Academy President Address: 2635 State St. Phone: 504-861-9150 Website: uanola.org Total Enrollment: 680 Year Founded: 1727 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Catholic Student Mix: Female Student/Teacher Ratio: Varies per Grade Number of Full Time Faculty: 105 Waldorf School of New Orleans Grades Served: Nursery-8 Top Executive: Lisa Lynde, Business Administrator Address: Main Campus: 517

Soraparu St.; Early Childhood Center: 2010 Peniston St. Phone: Soraparu: 504-525-2420; Peniston: 504-345-2366 Email: enrollment@waldorfnola.org Fax: 504-525-3223 Website: WaldorfNola.org Total Enrollment: 125 Year Founded: 2000 Avg. Class Size: 14 Dress Requirements: Dress Code (no uniform) Affiliation: Private Independent Nonprofit Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: Early Childhood: 8:1; Grades: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 10 Charter Schools *Arthur Ashe Charter School Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Sivi Domango Address: 1456 Gardena Drive Phone: 504-373-6267 Fax: 504-896-4003 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/ arthur-ashe-charter-school Total Enrollment: 745 Year Founded: 2007 Avg. Class Size: 30 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 90 *Athlos Academy of Jefferson Parish Grades Served: K-6 Top Executive: Ben Bourgeois – Board Chair Address: 1001 Behrman Highway, Terrytown Phone: 866-721-0181 Website: AthlosJP.org Total Enrollment: 900 Year Founded: 2016 Avg. Class Size: 27 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 27:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 45 Benjamin Franklin High School Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Dr. Patrick Widhalm, Head of School Address: 2001 Leon C. Simon Drive Phone: 504-286-2600 Fax: 504-286-2642 Website: BFHSLA.org Total Enrollment: 970 Year Founded: 1957 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Casual, Appropriate Attire Affiliation: Accredited by SACS; Affiliation with NOCCA; Type III Public, Charter School/Charted by Orleans Parish School Board and Governed by: Advocates for Academic Excellence in Education, Inc.; Member of the Greater New Orleans Collaborative of Charter

Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 % of applicants admitted: 39 Number of Full Time Faculty: 63 Average teacher salary: $51,680 *Bricolage Academy Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Josh Densen Address: 3368 Esplanade Ave. Phone: 504-539-4505 Website: BricolageNola.org Total Enrollment: 335 Year Founded: 2012 Avg. Class Size: 27 Dress Requirements: No Uniform Required Affiliation: Orleans Parish School Board Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Kindergarten; 25:1 - 1-4 Number of Full Time Faculty: 25 Cypress Academy Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Bob Berk, Ph.D. Address: 4238 St. Charles Ave. Phone: 504-383-3337 Website: CypressAcademy.org Total Enrollment: 150 Year Founded: 2015 Avg. Class Size: 21 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: OPSB Charter School Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 33 Einstein Charter School Village de l’Est Grades Served: PreK-5 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Teisha Goudeau, Interim Principal Address: 5100 Cannes St. Phone: 504-324-7450 Website: EinsteinCharter.org Total Enrollment: 487 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 63 Einstein Charter School Sherwood Forest Grades Served: PreK-5 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Shimon Ancker, Principal Address: 4801 Maid Marion Phone: 504-503-0110 Website: EinsteinCharterSchools. org Total Enrollment: 502 Year Founded: 2012 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 65

Einstein Charter Middle Grades Served: 6-8 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Anna Faye Caminita, Acting Principal Address: 5316 Michoud Blvd. Phone: 504-503-0470 Website: EinsteinCharterSchools. org Total Enrollment: 330 Year Founded: 2015 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 38 Einstein Charter High Grades Served: 11 Top Executive: Shawn Toranto, CEO; Nathan Stockman, Interim Principal Address: 5316 Michoud Blvd. Phone: 504-503-0749 Website: EinsteinCharterSchools. org Total Enrollment: 168 Year Founded: 2016 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Einstein Charter Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 34 International High School of New Orleans Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Sean Wilson Address: 727 Carondelet St. Phone: 504-613-5702 Website: IHSNola.org Total Enrollment: 566 Year Founded: 2009 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 72 Average teacher salary: $49,500 *Joseph S. Clark Preparatory High School, a FirstLine School Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Jay Altman Address: 1301 N. Derbigny St. Phone: 373-6202 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/ joseph-s-clark-preparatory-highschool Total Enrollment: 428 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 17:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 60 Kenner Discovery Health Sciences Academy Grades Served: PreK-10 Top Executive: Dr. Patty Glaser

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Address: 2504 Maine Ave., Metairie Phone: 504-233-4720 Website: DiscoveryHSF.org Total Enrollment: 1,216 Year Founded: 2013 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Jefferson Parish Public School System Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: PreK-1 25:2; 2-8 - 25:1; 9 - 27:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 150 *KIPP Believe College Prep Grades Served: 5-8 Top Executive: Luke Naegele Address: 1607 S. Carrollton Ave. Phone: 504-304-8857 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 40 *KIPP Believe Primary Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Sara Beth Greenberg Address: 421 Burdette St. Phone: 504-266-2050 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 46 *KIPP Central City Academy Grades Served: 5-8 Top Executive: Alex Jarrell Address: 2514 Third St. Phone: 504-609-2283 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 2007 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 38 *KIPP Central City Primary Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Korbin Johnson Address: 2625 Thalia St. Phone: 504-373-6290 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2008 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. 82

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Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 56 *KIPP McDonogh 15 Middle Grades Served: 5-8 Top Executives: Deanna Reddick & Tony Cognata Address: 5500 Piety Drive Phone: 504-609-2280 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 41 *KIPP Leadership Primary Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Colin Smith Address: 2300 St. Claude Ave. Phone: 504-322-3924 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 46 *KIPP Renaissance High School Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Joey LaRoche Address: 5316 Michoud Blvd., Floor 2 Phone: 373-6255 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 48 *KIPP East Community Primary Grades Served: K-1 Top Executive: Jenny Dennis Carey Address: 4500 Mendez St. Phone: 504-373-7171 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 200 Year Founded: 2014 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 20 *KIPP McDonogh 15 Primary Grades Served: K-4 Top Executive: Mark Burton Address: 721 St. Philip St. Phone: 504-566-1706

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Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 500 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 56 *KIPP Leadership Academy Grades Served: 5-8 Top Executive: Jonny Bartlett Address: 2300 St. Claude Ave. Phone: 504-373-6256 Website: KippNewOrleans.org Total Enrollment: 400 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 24 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: KIPP New Orleans Schools, Inc. Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 45 *Lake Forest Elementary School Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Mardele S. Early Address: 11110 Lake Forest Blvd. Phone: 504-826-7140 Website: LakeForestCharter.org Total Enrollment: 613 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Orleans Parish School Board Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 20:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 45 *Langston Hughes Academy Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Jay Altman Address: 3519 Trafalgar St. Phone: 373-6251 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/ langston-hughes-academy Total Enrollment: 847 Year Founded: 2010 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 16:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 72 Lusher Charter School Grades Served: K-12 Top Executive: Kathy Riedlinger Address: K-5: 7315 Willow St.; 6-12: 5624 Freret St. Phone: 504-862-5110/504-3043961 Fax: 504-866-4292/504-861-1839 Website: LuscherSchool.org Total Enrollment: 1,761 Year Founded: 1913 Avg. Class Size: Varies Dress Requirements: Dress Code Affiliation: Advocates for Arts-Based Education; Orleans

Parish School Board Charter Student Mix: Coed Number of Full Time Faculty: 194 New Orleans Charter Science and Math High School Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Chana Benenson Address: 5625 Loyola St. Phone: 504-324-7061 Fax: 504-309-4178 Website: NoSciHigh.org Total Enrollment: 470 Year Founded: 1993 Avg. Class Size: 18-22 Dress Requirements: Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 8:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 70 *New Orleans Military and Maritime Academy Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Col. Schlafer, Commandant; Dr. Cecilia Garcia, Principal Address: 425 O’Bannon St. Phone: 504-227-3810 Fax: 504-875-4326 Website: NOMMA.net Total Enrollment: 645 Year Founded: 2011 Avg. Class Size: 20 Dress Requirements: JROTC Uniform Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 12:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 55 *Phillis Wheatley Community School Grades Served: PreK-8 Top Executive: Jay Altman Address: 2300 Dumaine St. Phone: 504-373-6205 Fax: 504-488-4091 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/ phillis-wheatley-community-school Total Enrollment: 700 Year Founded: 1954 Avg. Class Size: 28 Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 17:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 93 *Samuel J. Green Charter School Grades Served: K-8 Top Executive: Jay Altman Address: 2319 Valence St. Phone: 504-304-3532 Website: FirstLineSchools.org/ samuel-j-green-charter-school Total Enrollment: 526 Year Founded: 2006 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: FirstLine Schools Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 15:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 71 The NET Charter High School (Central City)

Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Elizabeth Ostberg Address: 1614 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. Phone: 504-267-9060 Fax: 504-267-9059 Website: TheNetNola.org Total Enrollment: 150 Year Founded: 2012 Avg. Class Size: 8-15 Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 6:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 22 The NET Charter High School: Gentilly Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Elizabeth Ostberg Address: 6601 Franklin Ave. Phone: 504-267-9765 Fax: 504-605-3431 Website: TheNetNola.org Total Enrollment: 175 Year Founded: 2017 Avg. Class Size: 8-15 Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 6:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 20 Warren Easton Charter High School Grades Served: 9-12 Top Executive: Alexina Medley Address: 3019 Canal St. Phone: 504-324-7400 Fax: 504-324-7946 Website: WarrenEastonCharterHigh.org Total Enrollment: 1006 Year Founded: 1843 Avg. Class Size: 25 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: OPSB Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 25:1 Number of Full Time Faculty: 57 Special School St. Michael Special School Top Executive: Tish Sauerhoff M.Ed., President/Principall Address: 1522 Chippewa St. Phone: 504-524-7285 Fax: 504-524-5883 Website: StMichaelSpecialSchool. com Total Enrollment: 204 Year Founded: 1965 Avg. Class Size: 13 Dress Requirements: Uniform Affiliation: Arch. of New Orleans Student Mix: Coed Student/Teacher Ratio: 14:2 or 13:1 depending on program No. of Full Time Faculty: 36


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qualities of an outdoor country environment just minutes from downtown, check out Arden Cahill Academy, which is nestled on a 12-acre tract of land along Bayou Fatma in Gretna. Not only does the campus provide state of the art classroom learning facilities, but an equestrian arena, stables, and petting farm help the school provide unique learning experiences outside of the traditional classroom environment. The school focuses on cultural enrichment as one part of its primary education and tradition of academic excellence. Their 300-seat theater, art studios, music rooms and foreign language programs ensure students’ abilities to excel in the arts, while a football field, competition pool, gymnasium, and extra-curricular athletics allow students to excel in physical competition as well. Arden Cahill Academy offers before- and after-school care and a specialized Infant Center that accepts children as young as six weeks. The academy also offers Camp Corral, a 10-week summer camp. For more information or to set up a tour, please call 504-392-0902 or visit ardencahillacademy.com. Open House takes place January 18 at 9:00am.

Education

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ur school years are often defined by the relationships we form, and not just the mentorship from teachers and friendships with fellow students, but also our relationship to the world around us. From how we experience the planet to our use of language and numbers to further grow and learn, it’s often our relationship with education that determines our futures as business professionals, social workers, artists and astronauts. New Orleans schools offer a number of unique approaches to education and the relationships it fosters, from Roman Catholic private educations to arts-integrated or French immersion schools. Whether your priority as a parent or student is on academic, cultural, or spiritual enrichment, you’ll find institutions that center on one, two, or even all of these interests. As winter arrives with spring on its heels, summer will be here before you know it. Get an early look now at area schools and you’ll be prepared when the new school year arrives.

Primary & Early Education For a strong primary education combined with the unique

St. Andrew’s Episcopal School is the oldest Episcopal school in New Orleans with 60 years of experience in educating the mind, body, and spirit of young children. St. Andrew’s enrolls boys and girls 18 months through Grade 8, offering ten+ years of nurturing yet challenging education that focuses on the Decade of Childhood. St. Andrew’s utilizes small classes to promote a challenging learning environment where students interact with teachers and grow spiritually, socially, and intellectually. A strong academic program, enhanced by state-of-the-art technology, includes Spanish, music, chapel, fine arts, athletics, and library skills. Student publications, dramatics, interscholastic sports, and community service round out St. Andrew’s program. See their students and teachers in action at the upcoming STEM Expo Open House for PK-Grade 8 on January 26 at 4:00pm or call for a personal tour. For more information, please visit the school’s website at saesnola.org/admissions. Trinity is a co-educational, Pre-kindergarten through Eighth Grade school. The campus is located in the Garden District and offers a pleasant and stimulating learning environment for students and faculty. Trinity continues in the tradition of its predecessor school, Miss Edith Aiken’s Little School, and in that of Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity nurtures a child’s mind, body, and spirit through a fun and challenging program that offers the best in the academic disciplines, uses best practices, and is taught by a skillful, experienced, and loving faculty and staff. The school's mission is to build confident, resilient upstanders on a foundation of academic excellence, moral responsibility, and faith, who are prepared to make a positive difference in the world. Characteristics of Trinity graduates include being an empathetic upstander, a reflective person, an ardent questioner, a fluent communicator, and a collaborative learner. my n e w or l e a n s . com

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For more information or to schedule an individual tour, please visit trinitynola.org or call the Admission Office at 504-525-8661. Open House for Grades Pre-kindergarten through Eight will take place on January 19 at 9:00am. Established in 1891, Holy Name of Jesus School is located in the Uptown area of New Orleans, adjacent to Loyola and Tulane Universities. It is a Roman Catholic, co-educational school for grades PK3 through 7th grade. Serving the Greater New Orleans area, the educational philosophy of Holy Name of Jesus centers on teaching children confidence, compassion, and integrity while achieving academic excellence and maintaining the Catholic faith in an inclusive community. The school has flourished under the guidance of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas and the Jesuit Fathers for over 125 years and continues to guide their mission of educating the whole child both academically and spiritually. Private tours are available throughout the year by appointment. For more information, call 504-861-1466 or visit hnjschool.org. Experience the difference at Holy Name of Jesus— Faith, Family, Foundation for over 125 years. Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans is the only private French school in New Orleans that is accredited by the French Ministry of Education and State of Louisiana. Founded in 1998, the mission of the school is to provide a strong and distinctive education by combining the best of French and American

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academics. Ecole Bilingue follows the curriculum of the French Education Nationale, considered to be one of the most rigorous educational systems in the world. Ecole Bilingue also offers a rich English language arts and American mathematics and social studies programs designed to balance out and complement the strength of the French curriculum. The school has a campus of three buildings off Magazine Street in Uptown New Orleans with students and teachers from the U.S. and around the world. Classes are offered for children in preschool (18 months) through 8th grade. The student-to-teacher ratio is 8 to 1, allowing each student an opportunity to have personalized attention for a better, differentiated education. For more information on Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans, please visit ebnola.net. To schedule a tour, call 504-896-4500. Since 2000, Waldorf School of New Orleans (WSNO) has offered local families a progressive schooling alternative. WSNO is part of a worldwide independent education movement with over 1,100 schools on six continents. Its approach is grounded in a profound understanding of human development and the natural world, based on the insights of philosopher and scientist Rudolf Steiner. Waldorf School of New Orleans provides children in nursery through eighth grade an experiential, developmentally appropriate program that engages and educates the whole child. In


ADVERTISING SECTION

Early Childhood, this means respecting the integrity of childhood itself. Within the structure of daily, weekly, and seasonal rhythms, Waldorf Nursery and pre-K/Kindergarten children experience a nurturing sensory and social environment, and most importantly, the opportunity to imagine and play. The Waldorf Class Teacher leads their class, year by year, through a well-rounded, arts-integrated, and academically rigorous curriculum, working with each student and the class as a whole to realize personal gifts, meet individual challenges, and grow as valued members of the community. Waldorf graduates are eager, confident, and competent free thinkers. For more information or to schedule a tour, visit WaldorfNOLA.org or call 504-345-2366.

Continuing Education / K-12 Founded in 1867, the Academy of the Sacred Heart is a Catholic, independent, college prep school for girls, ages 1 through Grade 12. The school is committed to values of faith, intellectual advancement, social awareness, the building of community, and personal growth. As part of a network of 150+ Sacred Heart schools, its global exchange program allows students to visit other sister schools in the U. S. and abroad. With global exchange opportunities, STEAM, service learning activities, a tech-forward campus, design thinking, and more, Sacred Heart girls are truly inspired to make change in the world. Open House Tuesday Tours for Ages 1 – Grade 4 take place on

January 9 from 8:30-11:00am. For grades 5-12, come spend a “Day in the Life” of an ASH student. Call 504-269-1213 for details or visit ashrosary.org. Lusher Charter School, a National Blue Ribbon School in partnership with Tulane University, offers a rigorous, interdisciplinary, college-focused curriculum. Lusher students engage in a comprehensive program, enhancing critical, analytical, and creative thinking. Serving 1,750 students, Lusher maintains two Uptown campuses, the Lower School on Willow Street, and the Middle and High schools on Freret Street. From arts integration and engineering classes starting in the Lower School to AP classes and courses at Tulane, Lusher students, K-12, master the academic skills and knowledge for successful college careers. Students pursue in-depth studies in the arts, Humanities/Communications, Math/Science, or Engineering/Biomedical. The No. 1 rule at Lusher is to “Be Kind.” There is as much emphasis placed on social-emotional health as on academics, with its core principles of kindness, hard work, responsibility, and respect. Numerous extracurricular offerings and sports teams let students explore their talents and interests. Campus facilities include the Brees Family Field, dance studios, performance theatres, art studios, and music rooms. Call 504-862-5110 (Willow) or 504-304-3961 (Freret) to find out more. •

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The Menu

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TABLE TALK . RESTAURANT INSIDER . FOOD . LAST CALL . DINING LISTINGS

Fried Brussel Sprout Salad at Josephine Estelle


THE MENU . TABLE TALK

the Campanelle Pasta

meet the chefs Chris Borges

Adding Cachet Josephine Estelle in the Ace Hotel By Jay Forman

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hen the Ace Hotel opened in 2016 it brought with it a roster of out-of-state talent. Along with Portland’s third wave coffee pioneer Stumptown, and Seaworthy, a restaurant with DNA from New York’s schooner-based Grand Banks Oyster Bar, came their flagship restaurant

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Josephine Estelle, a U.S. Southern/Italian concept by James Beard-nominated Memphis Chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman. With this all-star team behind it, the Ace quickly established itself as a serious player on the local dining scene. And now there is a new executive chef at the

After graduating from Newman, New Orleans native Chris Borges went to Stanford University and along the way fell in love with the restaurant business. He went on to become the executive chef of Taste Catering, working with clients such as Pixar and Barack Obama. But as his family grew, he got the itch to return to New Orleans so that his children could grow up in the city he calls home. “For me, it was just a perfect fit – I love the vibe of the Ace, which fits in with my California sensibilities,” Borges says. “The Ace does a good job of balancing traditional New Orleans tastes with a progressive mentality.”

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helm. All foodservice operations at list is what we are most proud the hotel now fall on the shoulders of – we spend a lot of time on it of Chris Borges, a New Orleans and put a lot of thought into it,” native recently returned from Borges says. a high-end catering career in Borges also brings to the menu the San Francisco Bay Area. His many dishes with a lighter touch experience working with clients and California sensibilities. These like Pixar plays well with the include his fried brussels sprouts progressive vibe of the Ace, which salad, a compelling haystack itself plays host to its fair share augmented with toasted sourdough and lima beans and a of celebs. The Portland-based Ace has a chewy sweetness courtesy of practice of pairing with notable golden raisins, all bound together chefs to create stand-alone type with a cardamom-spiked yogurt restaurants, which adds cachet dressing. Another is an entrée and helps to differentiate them built around an imposing doublein a crowded market. “For cut pork chop atop a of bed of Josephine Estelle, their model what he calls ‘shrimp rice’ – a is Italian cooking with Southern spin on traditional dirty rice. roots,” Borges explains. “Ticer and Borges’ version gets its earthiness Hudman are both from a compound of Italian lineages butter built with uni but are also from the that gets stirred into Josephine Estelle, Greater Memphis the rice. The seafood 600 Carondelet area. So the idea is spin results in a Street, CBD, to fuse classic Italian lighter dish while 930-3070. B, L, home-style cooking still maintaining it D Daily, Brunch with southern connection to Italy weekends, JosephineEstelle.com sensibility.” Call it and the US South. a Southern osteria Going into the with a little bit of West Coast style. New Year, watch for Josephine A hallmark of Josephine Estelle Estelle to begin rolling out a is its extensive in-house pasta series of Family Dinners served program, which typically offers on Monday nights. Think shared eight or so pastas in a variety platters of Italian goodness served of shapes, including a couple of Goodfellas/Godfather style; “A stuffed versions. “We also follow big family spread – more food classic Italian techniques for than anyone can eat,” as Borges pairing the type of sauce with describes it. Initially slated for one the particular shapes, though in Monday a month, Borges hopes terms of ingredients we do add to expand its service to every some twists to make them more Monday – call ahead for details. • contemporary,” Borges explains. Recent pastas include a visually striking squid ink campanelle, tossed with an octopus Bolognese sauce perked up with pepper an italian marriage vinegar, n’juda (a spicy Italian Another place that melds pork spread) and salsa verde. Southern and Italian cuisine with a “That one quickly became the California sensibility is Palladar 511. staff favorite,” Borges says. Dishes This Marigny gem serves dishes rotate frequently, but other pastas such as Braised Rabbit with Sweet that highlight the Southern U.S. Potato Gnocchi and offers a terrific / Italian connection recently house-made pappardelle with included a turkey rigatoni with a spicy pork ragu. A pizza menu collard greens and a Gulf Shrimp has compositions that will tempt version that incorporated green adults and children alike. tomatoes. “The housemade pasta

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THE MENU . restaurant insider

News From the Kitchen Belgian Waffles, Hummus, Deanie’s Uptown By Robert Peyton

Fruity Liège Waffle seasonal fruit & whipped cream (with the choice to add chocolate chips)

Cloud 9 Bistro

Hummus & More

Deanie’s

Cloud 9 Bistro focuses on Belgian waffles, and specifically the rich, brioche-like variety from Liège. Owner Mark O’Donnell imports the batter from the home country, where he also purchased the waffle iron. The restaurant opened with a small menu of breakfast items, sandwiches and salads, but by now should have a liquor license and expanded offerings. Cloud 9 Bistro, 3138 Magazine St., entrance is on 9th, open daily from 8 to 3, 702-9514.

Hummus & More recently opened a second location; the first having opened in Metairie in 2015. The menu features the standards of local “Middle Eastern” restaurants, with wrinkles such as nachos made with pita chips and an eggplant crab cake with a creamy Parmesan sauce. Hummus & More, 7724 Maple St., open daily 11 to 8 on Sunday, 11 to 9 Monday through Thursday, and 11 to 10 Friday and Saturday, 314-0010.

I have fond memories of visiting the original Deanie’s location in Bucktown as a kid, and this month a new location is opening in the Garden District spot formerly occupied by Charcoal’s Gourmet Burger Bar. The new place will have an oyster bar in addition to their classic menu. Deanie’s, 2200 Magazine St., open Monday through Thursday from 11 to 9, until 11 on Friday and Saturday, 962-7759.

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Winter’s Bone

RECIPE Milanese Osso Buco

Osso Bucco—A Cold Weather Classic BY Dale Curry

Ingredients 4 to 6 veal shanks, 1 ½ inches thick

F

orecasters predict a mild winter this year, but we can always expect a few of those cold days when a fire and hearty meal at home meet our needs. A favorite at our home is osso buco, an Italian favorite that originated in Milan. The name literally means “bone with a hole,” a description of the marrow bone in the center of the veal shanks. The bone’s content is the crown jewel of the dish. Restaurants often serve a tiny spoon to retrieve all of the marrow from the bone. To make this succulent dish, you season the shanks, flour and brown them, and cook in an aromatic white wine sauce until the meat is practically falling off the bones. Why white wine? Because the veal is delicate and should not be overpowered by a heavier red. The only drawbacks are that veal shanks are quite expensive and not always found in chain supermarkets, with local grocery stores more likely to have them. A less expensive and more readily available version uses beef shanks, in which case you can use red wine and beef broth to accompany the bolder flavor of the beef. In Italy, risotto is a frequent companion for osso buco, but in New Orleans, you are more likely to see it with pasta. Polenta and rice are also good options. Some chefs accompany osso buco with gremolata, a chopped herb condiment classically made of lemon zest, garlic, parsley and anchovy. It’s optional when used as a garnish, since most cooks put

Sea salt, freshly ground black pepper, cayenne pepper (if desired) the ingredients in the sauce itself with anchovies being optional. The recipe has many variations. Some cooks use lamb or pork shanks. Chef Mario Batali cuts his veal shanks three inches thick. My preference are veal shanks, imported tomatoes and a small shot of cayenne, an ingredient that I often slip into a recipe that doesn’t call for it. I’m guessing a lot of local Italian cooks sneak it in, too. Relatively speaking, osso buco is an easy dish to produce because most of its cooking time is spent in the oven. Some say it is better cooked the day before to absorb all of the flavors. At the least, it’s easy to work into a busy schedule.

1 cup all-purpose flour 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup imported Cento San Marzano tomatoes, chopped and juice combined 1 cup dry white wine 1 1/2 cups chicken broth 1 teaspoon lemon zest 1 bay leaf 1 sprig fresh rosemary leaves, removed from stalk 1/3 cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped Directions 1. Sprinkle the shanks with salt, pepper and a little cayenne, if desired. Place twine around the edges of the shanks to secure the meat to the bone. Add more seasoning to the

Warm side dish

flour, roll the shanks in flour, and shake off

Baked Acorn squash

excess. 2. Preheat oven to 375.

There are many winter side choices. One of the easiest and best is baked acorn squash. Cut acorn squash in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds. Place as many as you need, cut side up, on a baking pan with 2 tablespoons butter and a 2 tablespoons of brown sugar in the center of each. Put in a 350-degree oven. When butter melts, mix sugar and butter together, and brush over the meat of the squash. Bake until fork-tender, basting occasionally. Qne half equals one serving.

3. Heat olive oil in heavy Dutch oven, and brown the shanks over high heat on both sides. Remove from pot. Add onions, carrots and celery to the pot and saute over medium heat until transparent. Add garlic and saute a minute more. Add tomatoes, wine, broth, lemon zest, bay leaf and rosemary. Mix well and reduce over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Return shanks to pot. Cover and bring contents of pot to a boil. 4. Place pot, covered, in preheated oven for about 1 ½ hours or until meat is very tender. Remove from heat, and stir in parsley. Serve with your choice of pasta, risotto, rice or polenta. Place one shank on each plate with the accompanying side dish, and spoon gravy from the pot over all. Serves 4 to 6.


THE MENU . last call

Ready to Celebrate Galatoire’s Specialty Cocktail By Tim McNally

Y

ou are on the journey with New Orleans as we enter the 300th year since our founding, May 7, 1718, by JeanBaptiste LeMoyne de Bienville. The name of his settlement was Bienville’s attempt to ingratiate himself with the court of Louis XIV, the Sun King, by naming the land which was lived on by the Chitimacha Indian tribe for the Regent of the Kingdom

of France, Philippe II, Duke of Orléans. Ever since its founding, this town has taken the good times and the bad times in stride, but always with a spirit envied by others who have mimicked but never duplicated our style. Travel & Leisure Magazine in a recent reader poll named New Orleans the “Quirkiest City in America.” Thank you.

Just because we are an older community does not mean the quest for good times has been diminished. Going “all in” with the year-long celebration of our 300th year will be even more manic and essential than our usual style. An “older” establishment, one of the infamous Grande Dames of New Orleans dining, is Galatoire’s, founded in 1905

on Bourbon Street but first in operation in 1896 as a saloon on Canal Street. There is no more fitting way to ring in another New Year and a once-only Tricentennial than with old friends, a grand City, a historic restaurant and its signature drink.

RECIPE Galatoire’s Specialty Cocktail

2 oz Benchmark or Knob Creek whiskey 0.25 oz simple syrup 3 dashes Herbsaint 4 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters  Stir and serve over ice with a lemon twist.

Galatoire’s, 209 Bourbon Street, 525-2021, Galatoires.com; Galatoire’s 33 Bar and Steak House, 215 Bourbon Street, 335-3932, Galatoires33BarandSteak.com. As served at Galatoire’s Restaurant and Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak House. Thanks to Rene Sudduth, Wine and Spirits Director for all three Galatoire’s Restaurants.

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THE MENU . dining listings

H= New Orleans Magazine award winner

Abita Springs Abita Brew Pub Gastropub 72011 Holly St., (985) 892-5837, AbitaBrewPub.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Better-than-expected pub food in its namesake eatery. “Tasteful” tours available for visitors. $$ Akers Middendorf’s Seafood Interstate 55, Exit 15, 30160 Highway 51 South, (985) 386-6666, MiddendorfsRestaurant.com. L, D Wed-Sun. Historic seafood destination along the shores of Lake Maurepas is world-famous for its thin-fried catfish fillets. Open since 1934, it’s more than a restaurant, it’s a Sun. drive tradition. $$ Avondale

H Mosca’s Italian 4137 Highway 90 West, 436-8950, MoscasRestaurant.com. D TueSat. Italian institution dishes out massive portions of great food, family-style. Good bets are the shrimp Mosca and chicken à la grande. Cash only. $$$ Bywater H Pizza Delicious pizza 617 Piety St., 676-8482, PizzaDelicious.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant that began as a pop-up, but they also offer excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes as well. Outdoor seating a plus. $

H Mariza Italian 2900 Charters St., 598-5700, MarizaNewOrleans.com. D Tue-Sat. An Italian-inspired restaurant by chef Ian Schnoebelen features a terrific raw bar, house-cured charcuterie and an array of refined adult beverages served in the industrial/contemporary setting on the ground floor of the Rice Mills lofts. $$$ Carrollton Bourré AMERICAN 1510 S. Carrollton Ave., 510-4040. L, D Tue-Sun. “Elevated” street food along with quality daiquiris and reconsidered wings are the draw at this newcomer from the team behind Boucherie. $$ Breads on Oak Bakery/Breakfast 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. B, L Wed-Sun. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak Street serves breads, sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan-friendly options. $

$ = Average entrée price

Dreyfous Drive, City Park, 885-4068, NewOrleansCityPark.com/in-the-park/ morning-call. 24 hours a day; cash-only. Chicory coffee and beignets coated with powdered sugar make this the quintessential New Orleans coffee shop. $ CBD/Warehouse District

$$$ = $16-20

1016 Annunciation St., 568-0245, AnnunciationRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Steven Manning brings a refined sensibility to this refined Warehouse District oasis along with his famous fried oysters with melted brie. $$$

628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. L Mon-Fri, D Tue-Sat. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this Mr. John’s offshoot overlooking Lafayette Square, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$

Balise Louisianian Fare 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. L Tue-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Decidedly masculine fare – think beef tartare with horseradish and pumpernickel – is carefully crafted and fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

H BH Steak Steakhouse Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. D daily. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne Seafood 601 Loyola Ave., 613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Coastal Louisiana seafood with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$ Café Adelaide Louisianian Fare Loews New Orleans Hotel, 300 Poydras St., 595-3305, CafeAdelaide.com. B, L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. This offering from the Commander’s Palace family of restaurants has become a power-lunch favorite for business-people and politicos. Also features the Swizzle Stick Bar. $$$$ Calcasieu Specialty Foods 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2188, CalcasieuRooms.com. For gatherings both large and small, the catering menus feature modern Louisiana cooking and the Cajun cuisine for which chef Donald Link is justifiably famous.

Morning Call Bakery/Breakfast 56

Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123,

H Cochon Louisianian Fare 930

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$$$$ = $21-25

CochonRestaurant.com. L, D, Mon-Sat. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski showcase Cajun and Southern cuisine at this hot spot. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme here, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine from the bar. Reservations strongly recommended. $$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse Steakhouse

Chophouse New Orleans Steakhouse 322 Magazine St., 522-7902, ChophouseNola.com. D daily. In addition to USDA prime grade aged steaks prepared under a broiler that reaches 1,700 degrees, Chophouse offers lobster, redfish and classic steakhouse sides. $$$

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$$ = $11-15

H Annunciation Louisianian Fare

City Park Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Circle, NO Museum of Art, City Park, 4821264, CafeNoma.com. L, (snacks) Tue-Sun. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $$

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$ = $5-10

Drago’s Louisianian Fare Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D daily. This famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

H Domenica Italian The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Chef Alon Shaya serves authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products, some from chef John Besh’s Northshore farm. $$$$

$$$$$ = $25 & up

870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. D Mon-Sat. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Lüke World 333 St. Charles Ave., 3782840, LukeNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef John Besh and executive chef Matt Regan serve Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, house-made pâtés and abundant plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$ Manning’s AMERICAN 519 Fulton St., 593-8118. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Born of a partnership between New Orleans’ First Family of Football and Harrah’s Casino, Manning’s offers sports bar fans a step up in terms of comfort and quality. With a menu that draws on both New Orleans and the Deep South, traditional dishes get punched up with inspired but accessible twists in surroundings accented by both memorabilia and local art. $$$

H Merchant Bakery/Breakfast 800 Common St., 571-9580, MerchantNewOrleans.com. B, L daily. Illy coffee and creative crêpes, sandwiches and more are served at this sleek and contemporary café on the ground floor of the Merchant Building. $

Emeril’s Louisianian Fare 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from all over the world. $$$$$

Morton’s The Steakhouse Steakhouse 365 Canal St., One Canal Place, 566-0221, Mortons.com/NewOrleans. D daily. Private elevator leads to the plush, wood-paneled environs of this local outpost of the famed Chicago steakhouse popular with politicians and celebrities. $$$$

Gordon Biersch Gastropub 200 Poydras St., 552-2739, GordonBiersch.com. L, D daily. Local outpost of this popular chain serves specialty brews made on-site and crowd-pleasing lunch and dinner fare. $$

Mother’s Louisianian Fare 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net. B, L, D daily. Locals and tourists alike endure long queues and a confounding ordering system to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$

H Herbsaint Louisianian Fare 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$ Johnny Sanchez World 930 Poydras St., 304-6615, JohnnySanchezRestaurant. com. L, D daily. Contemporary Mexican mecca offering celebrity chef cachet to go along with the locally sourced produce accompanying the Bistec a la Parilla. Popular happy hour and downtown locale next to South Market District add to the appeal. $$$

H La Boca Steakhouse

Mulate’s Louisianian Fare 201 Julia St., 522-1492, Mulates.com. L, D daily. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$ Palace Café World 605 Canal St., 5231661, PalaceCafe.com. B, L, D daily. A classic New Orleans restaurant, located at the foot of the French Quarter, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team constantly evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates athe Black Duck Bar on the second floor. $$$

H Pêche Seafood 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by chef Donald Link serves


whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven. An excellent raw bar is offered as well. $$$ Q&C Hotel/Bar AMERICAN 344 Camp St., 587-9700, QandC.com. B, D daily, L Fri-Sun. Newly renovated boutique hotel offering a small plates menu with tempting choices such as a Short Rib Poor Boy and Lobster Mac and Cheese to complement their sophisticated craft cocktails. $$ Red Gravy Bakery/Breakfast 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. B, Br, L, WedMon. Farm-to-table Italian restaurant offers a creative array of breakfast items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more for lunch. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$ H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. L Fri, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef John Besh’s menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Rock-N-Sake Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake.com. L Fri, D Tue-Sun, late night Fri-Sat. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$ H Root AMERICAN 21800 Magazine St., 309-7800, RootNola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Chef Philip Lopez opened Root in November 2011 and has garnered a loyal following for his modernist, eclectic cuisine. $$$$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sac-A-Lait Seafood 1051 Annunciation St., 324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. The striking buildout in the Cotton Mill lofts adds to the appeal. $$$$ The Grill AMERICAN 540 Chartres St., 522-1800. B, L, D daily. A diner with local character staffed by local characters. $ The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Featuring modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine Italian 746

Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. D daily. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$ Walk-On’s Bistreaux & Bar AMERICAN 1009 Poydras St., 309-6530, Walk-Ons. com. L, D, daily. Burger, sandwiches, wraps and more made distinctive with a Louisiana twist are served at this sports bar near the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. $$ Warehouse Grille AMERICAN 869 Magazine St., 322-2188, WarehouseGrille. com. L, D daily, Br Fri-Sat. Creative fare served in an art-filled environment. Try the lamb spring rolls. $$ Victory Gastropub 339 Baronne St., 522-8664, VictoryNola.com. D daily. Craft cocktails served by owner and acclaimed bartender Daniel Victory, as well as refined small plates and gourmet pizza. $$ Central City Café Reconcile Louisiana fare 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile.org. L Mon-Fri. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$ Covington Don’s Seafood seafood 126 Lake Dr., (985) 327-7111, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Popular neighborhood seafood joint offers an array of crowd-pleasing south Louisiana dishes, including charbroiled oysters and Zydeco shrimp. Kid’s Menu makes it a good choice for families. $$$ Darrow Café Burnside Louisianian Fare Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. L daily, Br Sun. Historic plantation’s casual dining option features dishes such as seafood pasta, fried catfish, crawfish and shrimp, gumbo and red beans and rice. $$ Latil’s Landing Louisianian Fare Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. D Wed-Sun. Nouvelle Louisiane, plantationstyle cooking served in an opulent setting features dishes like rack of lamb and plume de veau. $$$$$ Faubourg Marigny Feelings Cafe, Bar and Courtyard Lounge Louisianian Fare 535 Franklin Ave, 446-0040, FeelingsCafeBar.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri. The All New Feelings Marigny is a complete relaunch of the much beloved “Feelings Cafe”. Under the guidance of new ownership and Executive Chef Scott Maki, everything has been completely transformed into one of the most absolutely charming neighborhood restaurants in the area. Chef Maki’s

emphasis on contemporary CreoleLouisiana fare is winning diners over from near and far.$$$$ Langlois AMERICAN 1710 Pauger St., 9341010, LangloisNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D WedSun. *Reservations only Supper club and boutique cooking school in the Marigny serves up culturally informed, farm-to-table fare with the added bonus of instruction. Open kitchen and convivial atmosphere add up to a good time. $$$

L, D daily. Granite-topped tables and an antique mahogany bar are home to the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$

H Mona’s Café World 504 Frenchmen

Antoine’s Louisianian Fare 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$

St., 949-4115. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tendertangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

Antoine’s Annex Specialty Foods 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/ Antoines-Annex. Open daily. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available.

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/ Breakfast 2001 Burgundy St., 525-9355,

BB King’s Blues Club Barbecue 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/neworleans. L, D daily. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician features a menu loaded with BBQ and southern-inspired specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$

TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$ The Marigny Brasserie AMERICAN 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472, MarignyBrasserie.com. L, D daily. Chic neighborhood bistro with traditional dishes like the fried green tomatoes and innovative cocktails such as the cucumber Collins. $$$

Bayou Burger Burgers 503 Bourbon St., 529-4256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$

Faubourg St. John H Café Degas French 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. L, D WedSat, Br Sun. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

H 1000 Figs World 3141 Ponce De Leon St., 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-totable alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$

Bayona World 430 Dauphine St., 5254455, Bayona.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$

French Quarter Angeline AMERICAN 1032 Chartres St., 308-3106, AngelineNola.com. B Mon-Thu, D daily, Br Sat-Sun,. Modern southern with a fine dining focus is the hallmark of this bistro tucked away in a quiet end of the French Quarter. Southern Fried Quail and Duck Confit Ravoli represent the style. $$$

Broussard’s French 819 Conti St., 581-3866, Broussards.com. D daily, Br Sun. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table Gastropub 1113 Decatur

Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s Louisianian Fare 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. D daily, Br Sun. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade Italian 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com.

Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes, bourbon is offered as well. $$$

St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Open late, this chefdriven rustic colonial cuisine and rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House Italian 601 Chartres St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. L, D daily. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters Louisianian Fare 613

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Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters. com. Br, D daily. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Louisianian Fare Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. B, L, D daily. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various cultures reflected in Louisiana cooking and cuisine, often with a slight contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster Seafood 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 5693380, TheCrazyLobster.com. L, D daily. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery Seafood 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. L, D daily. Crowd-pleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. L Fri, D daily. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan Steakhouse 620 Chartres St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. L Fri-Sun, D daily. Innovative, genre-busting steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro World 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola. com. L, D daily. Central Mexican cuisine along with hand-muddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s Louisianian Fare 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. L, D TueSun. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous FrenchCreole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for 98

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dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$

H GW Fins Seafood 808 Bienville St., 581-FINS (3467), GWFins.com. D daily. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$

restaurant spotlight Pascal’s Manale Better at 105 By Mirella Cameran

Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak Steakhouse 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. L Fri, D Sun-Thu. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails to accompany classic steakhouse fare as well as inspired dishes like the Gouté 33: horseradishcrusted bone marrow and deviled eggs with crab ravigote and smoked trout. Reservations accepted. $$$ Hard Rock Café AMERICAN 125 Bourbon St., 529-5617, HardRock.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Local outpost of this global brand serves burgers, café fare and drinks in their rock memorabilia-themed environs. $$ House of Blues Louisianian Fare 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues. com/NewOrleans. L, D daily. Surprisingly good menu complements music in the main room. World-famous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Irene’s Cuisine Italian 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. D Mon-Sat. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$

H Italian Barrel Italian 430 Barracks St., 569-0198, ItalianBarrel.com. L, D daily. Northern Italian dishes like Braciola di Maiale as well as an exhaustive pasta menu tempt here at this local favorite that also offers al fresco seating. $$$ Killer Poboys Louisianian Fare 811 Conti St., 252-6745, KillerPoboys.blogspot. com. L, D Wed-Mon. This quasi-popup operating out of the Erin Rose Bar serves some of the city’s best poor boys, including one featuring glazed pork belly. $ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen Louisianian Fare 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul. com/KPaul. L Thu-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to a grateful nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish Seafood 337 Charters St., 598-5005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chef-driven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou Seafood 208 Bourbon St., 5254755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are

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If you haven’t visited Pascal’s Manale Restaurant, the 105 year-old Uptown restaurant, you’ve missed an essential New Orleanian culinary landmark. As soon as you walk in, a sense of history embraces you. The beautiful wooden bar has been there for 100 years, and the dish that won the restaurant national acclaim when it was invented here in 1954, BBQ Shrimp, is served in exactly the same way as the original. The best way to start lunch or dinner might be at the standing room only oyster bar where the best oysters from around the country are shucked in front of you. Next find your way through a menu that is the perfect blend of Italian-Creole with Turtle Soup sitting next to a caprese salad. With recipes perfected for more than 100 years, it’s not surprising they are as near to perfection as possible. 1838 Napolean Avenue, 895 4877, PascalsManale.com.

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a just a few of the choices at this seafoodcentric destination on Bourbon Street. Fried alligator is available for the more daring diner. $$$

H Marti’s French 1041 Dumaine St., 522-5478, MartisNola.com. L Fri, D daily. Classic French cuisine, small plates and chilled seafood platters like Grand Plateau Fruits De Mer are the calling cards for this restaurant with an elegant “Old World” feel. $$$ Muriel’s Jackson Square Italian 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Enjoy pecan-crusted drum and other local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-be-haunted establishment. $$$$ Napoleon House Italian 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. L Mon-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas, and for sipping, a Sazerac or lemony Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $$ NOLA Louisianian Fare 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. L Thu-Mon, D daily. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedarplank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill Seafood 739 Conti St., 5256002, OceanaGrill.com. B, L, D daily. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro Gastropub 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. D daily. Wine is the muse at this beautifully renovated bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin Gastropub 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin. com. D daily. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 Seafood 424 Bourbon St., 3091574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. L, D daily. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “CajunBoiled” Lobster prepared crawfish-style in spicy crab boil. $$$ Port of Call Burgers 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. L, D daily. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/ restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

H R’evolution Italian 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the more cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de

cuisine Chris Lusk and executive sous chef Erik Veney are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Ralph Brennan’s Red Fish Grill Italian 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill. com. L, D daily. Chef Austin Kirzner cooks up a broad menu peppered with local favorites such as barbecue oysters, blackened redfish and double-chocolate bread pudding. $$$$$ Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. B, D daily, L Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Old World elegance and high ceilings, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$ Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant Louisianian Fare 301 Dauphine St., 586-0972, RichardFiskes. com. B, Bar Lunch daily. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street you can find this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$ Royal House Louisianian Fare 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant. com. L, D daily. B Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$ SoBou Louisianian Fare 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. B, L, D daily. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tableau Louisianian Fare 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. B Mon-Fri, L Mon-Sat, D daily, Brunch SatSun. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre on the corner of Jackson Square. $$$ H The Bistreaux Louisianian Fare New Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy. com/dining.html. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$ The Bombay Club Louisianian Fare Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. D daily. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such

as Bombay drum. $$$$

include a charred carne asada. $$

The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. D daily. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

Lacombe H La Provence French 25020 Highway 190, (985) 626-7662, LaProvenceRestaurant.com. D Wed-Sun, Br Sun. Time-honored Provençal cuisine and rewards guests with a true farm-life experience, from house-made preserves, charcuterie, herbs, kitchen gardens and eggs cultivated on the property. $$$$$

H Tujague’s Louisianian Fare 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$ Garden District Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s AMERICAN 2001 St. Charles Ave., 593-9955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro.com. L MonFri, D daily, Br Sun. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$

Ave., 304-9034. D daily. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$ Lakeview Harbor Burgers 911 Harrison Ave., 486-4887. L, D daily. Burgers are the name of the game at this restaurant. Daily specials, pizza and steaks are offered as well. $ Lakeview Pearl Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 6300 Canal St., 309-5711, LakeviewPearl. com. L, D Mon-Sat. A long list of specialty rolls rounds out the offerings of this AsianFusion restaurant. $$

District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders.com. B, L, D daily. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this nextgeneration café. $

H Mondo World 900 Harrison Ave., 2242633, MondoNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. Make sure to call ahead because the place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$

Hoshun Restaurant Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Offers a wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Five-pepper calamari is a tasty way to begin the meal, and their creative sushi rolls are good. Private dining rooms available. $$

Lower Garden District H The Green Fork Vegan/Vegetarian 1400 Prytania St., 267-7672, GreenForkNola. com. B, L Mon-Sat. Fresh juices, smoothies and vegetarian-friendly fare make The Green Fork a favorite for lovers of healthy food. Catering is offered as well. $$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. D Tue-Sat, L Fri-Sat. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$ Gretna H Tan Dinh Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1705 Lafayette St., 361-8008. B, L, D daily. Roasted quail and the beef pho rule at this Vietnamese outpost. $$

The Tasting Room Gastropub 1906 Magazine St., 581-3880, TTRNewOrleans. com. D Tue-Sun. Flights of wine and sophisticated small plates are the calling cards for this wine bar near Coliseum Square. $$ Voodoo BBQ Barbecue 1501 St. Charles Ave., 522-4647, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

Harahan

H Oak Oven Italian 6625 Jefferson

Metairie

Highway, Harahan, 305-4039, OakOvenRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Wood-fired pizza and seasonal Italian cuisine with a locavore philosophy brings respite to the burbs. Family friendly with patio seating to boot. $$

H Andrea’s Restaurant Italian 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant. com. L Mon-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$

Kenner

H Fiesta Latina World 1924 Airline Drive, 469-5792, FiestaLatinaRestaurant.com. B, L, D daily. A big-screen TV normally shows a soccer match or MTV Latino at this home for authentic Central American food. Tacos

Lakeview

H Cava Louisianian Fare 789 Harrison

Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster. com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Austin’s Louisianian Fare 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. D Mon-Sat. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves

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contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$ Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 8892301. L, D daily. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. D daily, L Mon-Fri. Br Sun. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this familyfriendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. B, L Mon-Sat. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. B, L daily; D Mon-Sat. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options combine with gourmet coffee and espresso drinks to create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. Try the egg white spinach wrap. $ Crabby Jack’s Louisianian Fare 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. L Mon-Sat. Lunch outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$ Don’s Seafood seafood 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. L, D Daily. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials, which offer a good deal on popular dishes. $$$ Drago’s Louisianian Fare 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant. com. L, D Mon-Sat. This famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$ Heritage Grill AMERICAN 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 934-4900, HeritageGrillMetairie.com. L Mon-Fri. This lunch-only destination caters to the office crowd and offers a freshly squeezed juice menu to go along with its regular menu and express two-course lunch. $$ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN 714 Elmeer Ave., 896-7300, MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, towering burgers, hearty soups and salads and giant, delistyle sandwiches. $ Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Seafood 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat.

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Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

H Royal China Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 600 Veterans Blvd., 831-9633. L daily, D Tue-Sun. Popular and family-friendly Chinese restaurant is one of the few places around that serves dim sum. $$

restaurant spotlight Pan Asian Cuisine on St. Charles Avenue By Mirella Cameran

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris.com. L Fri, D daily. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sucré Specialty Foods 3301 Veterans Blvd., 834-2277, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available. Vega Tapas Café World 2051 Metairie Road, 836-2007, VegaTapasCafe.com. D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Fun, eclectic small plates destination offers creative fare keeps guests coming back with frequent regionally inspired specialty menus served with humor and whimsy. $$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Voodoo BBQ Barbecue 2740 Severn Ave., 353-4227, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$ Mid-City

H Blue Dot Donuts Specialty Foods 4301 Canal St., 218-4866, BlueDotDonuts. com. B, L Tue-Sun. The Bacon Maple Long John gets all the press, but returning customers are happy with the classics as well as twists like peanut butter and jelly.

Hoshun on St. Charles Avenue in the Lower Garden District brings together dishes from China, Japan, Vietnam and Thailand and includes some specialties such as kung pao shrimp, General Tso’s chicken and Hunan steak. You

H Café Minh Asian Fusion/Pan Asian

can also choose from classics such as pad thai, Vietnamese

4139 Canal St., 482-6266, CafeMinh.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Chef Minh Bui and Cynthia Vutran bring a fusion touch to Vietnamese cuisine with French accents and a contemporary flair. $$

spring rolls or pho soup. Lighter options include grilled

H Crescent City Steaks Steakhouse 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. L Tue-Fri & Sun, D Tue-Sun. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$

and steamed fish, and vegetables and options from the fresh sushi bar. Owner Steve Ho, has been involved with some of the city’s most successful Asian restaurants. Check also for sushi and lunch specials. 1601 Saint Charles Avenue, 302- 9716, HoshunRestaurant.com.

Five Happiness Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935,

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FiveHappiness.com. L, D daily. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and house-baked duck. $$ Gracious Bakery + Café Bakery/Breakfast 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B, L daily. Boutique bakery on the ground floor of the Woodward Building offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $ Juan’s Flying Burrito World 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 486-9950, JuansFlyingBurrito.com. L, D daily. Hardcore tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Louisianian Fare 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

H Liuzza’s Italian 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120, Liuzzas.com. L, D daily. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$ H Mandina’s Louisianian Fare 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New Orleans experience. $$ H Mona’s Café World 3901 Banks St., 482-7743. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tendertangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H MoPho Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-andmatch pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$ Parkway Bakery and Tavern AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $ Ralph’s On The Park Italian 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. Br Sun, L Tue-Fri, D daily. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/ Breakfast 139 S. Cortez St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast,

lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

H Taqueria Guerrero World 208 N. Carrollton Ave., 484-6959. B, L, D, Tue-Sat. Friendly staff and authentic Mexican cuisine make this affordable neighborhood restaurant a neighborhood favorite. BYOB $

H Toups’ Meatery Louisianian Fare 845 N.

ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN Multiple Locations, ZeaRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular restaurant serves a variety of grilled items as well as appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Also offers catering services. $$$

Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. L, D Tue-Sat. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$

Northshore Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 1202 N. Highway 190, Covington, (985) 2466155, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

Trèo Gastropub 3835 Tulane Ave., 3044878, TreoNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D daily. Craft cocktail bar also serves a short but excellent small plates menu to accompany its artfully composed libations. $$

Dakota AMERICAN 629 N. Highway 190, (985) 892-3712, TheDakotaRestaurant. com. L Tue-Fri, D M on-Sat. A sophisticated dining experience with generous portions. $$$$$

Multiple Locations Byblos World Multiple Locations, ByblosRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Upscale Middle Eastern cuisine featuring traditional seafood, lamb and vegetarian options. $$

H Del Porto Ristorante Italian

Café du Monde Bakery/Breakfast Multiple Locations, CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Bakery/Breakfast Multiple locations in New Orleans, Metairie and Northshore, CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $ Copeland’s Louisianian Fare Multiple Locations, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$

Burgers and homemade sauces on potato rolls are the specialty here, along with other favorites like skirt steak. $$ Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market Louisianian Fare 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket. com. B, L, D daily. Beautiful restoration of historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ Uptown Amici Italian 3218 Magazine St., 3001250, AmiciNola.com. L, D daily. Coal-fired pizza is the calling card for this destination, but the menu offers an impressive list of authentic and Creole Italian specialties as well. $$

H Ancora pizza 4508 Freret St., 324-1636, AncoraPizza.com. D daily. Authentic Neapolitan-style pizza fired in an oven imported from Naples. The housemade charcuterie makes it a double-winner. $$

501 E. Boston St., (985) 875-1006, DelPortoRistorante.com. L, D Tue-Sat. One of the Northshore’s premier fine dining destinations serving Italian food that makes use of locally sourced meats and produce. $$$

H Apolline Louisianian Fare 4729 Magazine St., 894-8881, ApollineRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sun, Br Sat-Sun. Cozy gem serves a refined menu of French and Creole classics peppered with Southern influences such as buttermilk fried quail with corn waffle. $$$

Gallagher’s Grill Louisianian Fare 509 S. Tyler St., (985) 892-9992, GallaghersGrill. com. L, D Tue-Sat. Chef Pat Gallagher’s destination restaurant offers al fresco seating to accompany classically inspired New Orleans fare. Event catering offered. $$$ Riverbend H Ba Chi Canteen Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 7900 Maple St., 373-5628. L, D Mon-Sat. The kitchen plays fast and loose with Vietnamese fare at this eclectic outpost on Maple Street. Try the caramelized pork “Baco”. $

H Boucherie Louisianian Fare 1506 S.

Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute. org. B, L Tue-Sat, Br Sun. A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Blue Frog Chocolates Specialty Foods 5707 Magazine St., 269-5707, BlueFrogChocolates.com. Open daily, closed Sundays in summer. French and Belgian chocolate truffles and Italian candy flowers make this a great place for gifts.

Little Tokyo Asian Fusion/Pan Asian Multiple locations, LittleTokyoNola.com. L, D daily. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$

Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola. com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$

Bouligny Tavern Gastropub 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern. com. D Mon-Sat. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Seafood Multiple Locations, MrEdsRestaurants. com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. A seafood lover’s paradise offering an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. An elaborate raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw is part of the draw. $$$

Brigtsen’s Louisianian Fare 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

H Café Abyssinia World 3511 Magazine St., 894-6238. L, D daily. One of a just few authentic Ethiopian restaurants in the city, excellent injera and spicy vegetarian fare make this a local favorite. $$

Carrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. L Sat-Sun, D Tue-Sat. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$

Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. B, L, D daily. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $

Reginelli’s Pizzeria pizza Multiple Locations, Reginellis.com. L, D daily. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$ Theo’s Pizza Multiple Locations, TheosPizza.com. L, D daily. The cracker-crisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with a lot of local

H Chill Out Café Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 729 Burdette St., 872-9628. B, L daily, D Mon-Sat. Thai food and breakfast favorites like waffles and pancakes can both be had at this affordable college-friendly hangout. $

H Cowbell Burgers 8801 Oak St., 2988689, Cowbell-Nola.com. L, D Tue-Sat.

Casamento’s Louisianian Fare 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. L Thu-Sat, D Thu-Sun. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and for all

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major holidays. $$ Chiba Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 8312 Oak St., 826-9119, Chiba-Nola.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Contemporary restaurant features fresh, exotic fish from all over the world and fusion fare to go along with typical Japanese options. Extensive sake list and late night happy hours are a plus. $$$ Clancy’s Louisianian Fare 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. L Thu-Fri, D MonSat. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$ Commander’s Palace Louisianian Fare 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Award-winner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$

H Coquette French 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sun. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from chef Michael and his partner Lillian Hubbard. $$$ Dick and Jenny’s Louisianian Fare 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys.com. D Mon-Sat. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$ Domilise’s Louisianian Fare 5240 Annunciation St., 899-912. L, D Mon-Sat. Local institution and rite-of-passage for those wanting an initiation to the real New Orleans. Wonderful poor boys and a unique atmosphere make this a one-of-akind place. $ Frankie & Johnny’s Seafood 321 Arabella St., 243-1234, FrankieAndJohnnys.net. L, D daily. Serves fried and boiled seafood along with poor boys and daily lunch specials. Kid-friendly with a game room to boot. $$

H Gautreau’s Louisianian Fare 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along with contemporary creations. $$$$$ Jacques-Imo’s Cafe Louisianian Fare 8324 Oak St., 861-0886, Jacques-Imos. com. D Mon-Sat. Reinvented New Orleans cuisine served in a party atmosphere. The deep-fried roast beef poor boy is delicious. The lively bar scene offsets the long wait on weekends. $$$$ Juan’s Flying Burrito 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000, JuansFlyingBurrito.com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Jung’s Golden Dragon Asian Fusion/ Pan Asian 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280, JungsChinese.com. L, D daily. This Chinese destination is a real find. Along with

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the usual, you’ll find spicy cold noodle dishes and dumplings. One of the few local Chinese places that breaks the Americanized mold. $

restaurant spotlight Ruby Slipper Set to Open in Alabama

H La Crêpe Nanou French 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. D daily, Br Sun. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$

By Mirella Cameran

La Petite Grocery French 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. L Tue-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette French 3637 Magazine St., 8951636, LiletteRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

H Magasin Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4201 Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe. com. L, D Mon-Sat. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN 3827 Baronne St., 899-7411, MartinWine.com. Wine by the glass or bottle with cheeses, salads, sandwiches and snacks. $ Mat & Naddie’s Louisianian Fare 937 Leonidas St., 861-9600, MatAndNaddies. com. D Mon-Tue, Thu-Sat. Cozy converted house serves up creative and eclectic regionally inspired fare. Shrimp and crawfish croquettes make for a good appetizer and when the weather is right the romantic patio is the place to sit. $$$$

H Panchita’s World 1434 S. Carrollton Ave., 281-4127. L, D daily. Authentic, budget-friendly Mexican restaurant serves tamales, mole and offers free chips and salsa as well as sangria. $ Pascal’s Manale Italian 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale. com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Vintage neighborhood restaurant since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves icy cold, freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$

H Patois World 6078 Laurel St., 8959441, PatoisNola.com. L Fri, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. The food is French in technique, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$

“All happiness depends on a leisurely breakfast,” or so said journalist John Gunther, and by the success of the Ruby Slipper cafes, he might have been right. Opened in 2008 as part of the rebuilding of New Orleans, the family-owned and operated business now boasts five locations in the city, two on the Gulf Coast, one in Baton Rouge and one in Mobile, Alabama, due to open in early 2018. Each location serves breakfast, brunch and lunch 363 days a year. The menu is a combination of the best comfort food around and the most iconic dishes of the region. The first awards came in 2009 and they haven’t stopped since. TheRubySlipperCafe.net

Pizza Domenica pizza 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. L FriSun, D daily. James Beard Award Winning Chef Alon Shaya’s pizza centric spinoff of

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his popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitan-style pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast 200 Magazine St., 525-9355; 1005 Canal St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

H Shaya World 4213 Magazine St., 891-4213, ShayaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef Alon Shaya’s menu pays homage to his native Israel with this contemporary Israeli hotspot. Cauliflower Hummus and Matzo Ball Soup made with slow-cooked duck are dishes to try. $$$ St. James Cheese Company Specialty Foods 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737, StJamesCheese.com. Open daily. Specialty shop offers a selection of fine cheeses, wines, beers and related accouterments. Look for wine and cheese specials every Friday. Sucré Specialty Foods 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily & nightly. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging

makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available. Tracey’s Irish Restaurant & Bar AMERICAN 2604 Magazine St., 897-5413, TraceysNola. com. L, D daily. A neighborhood bar with one of the best messy roast beef poor boys in town. The gumbo, cheeseburger poor boy and other sandwiches are also winners. Grab a local Abita beer to wash it all down. Also a great location to watch the game. $

H The Company Burger Burgers 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger. com. L, D daily. Custom-baked butterbrushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $ The Delachaise Gastropub 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise. com. D daily. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$ H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. D Wed-Sun. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger and talented chef Dave Bridges make for a winning combination at this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade

specializes in hot pots, noodles and dishes big enough for everyone to share. $$

originated here. $$$$ H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 309-0069, WayfareNola.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Creative sandwiches and southern-inspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. D Tue-Sat. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$

West End Landry’s Seafood Seafood 8000 Lakeshore Drive, West End, 283-1010, LandrysSeafood.com. L, D daily. Kidfriendly and popular seafood spot serves of heaping platters of fried shrimp, Gulf oysters, catfish and more. $$

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sun. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Warehouse District Lucy’s World 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 5238995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. L, D daily. The focus is on fun at this island-themed oasis with a menu that cherry-picks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay well into the wee hours at this late-night hangout. $ West Bank Nine Roses Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1100 Stephen St., 366-7665, NineRosesResturant.com. L, D Sun-Tue, Thu-Sat. The extensive Vietnamese menu

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com

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ADVERTISING SECTION

When it comes to the art of living and aging well, Lambeth House, a full-service retirement center, offers the best of all worlds— independent living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care, and Memory Care in the event that it’s ever needed. Lambeth House recently received top ranking in the Best Retirement Community category of City Business’s 2017 Reader Rankings. Nestled in the heart of Uptown New Orleans, Lambeth House offers luxury retirement living at its best and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its latest expansion. With a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities including the fitness center with a stunning indoor, salt-water swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options, and engaging activities and social events. Nonresidents (55+) can access Fitness Center memberships, and Lambeth House’s Wild Azalea Café is open to the public for breakfast and lunch, Tuesday-Saturday. For more information, call 504-865-1960 or explore online at LambethHouse.com.

Senior Living

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etween the food, the arts, and a laissez-faire outlook that prioritizes enjoyment, New Orleans is a great city in which to live, love, work, and play. It’s also a great place to age, as this thriving community offers something for everyone and fun for all ages. Finding the right living environment and levels of independence for the older adults in our lives doesn’t require leaving the metro area, as the city’s offerings for senior living are plentiful and varied. From home care companions that allow our loved ones to age in place to continuum of care communities that offer independent living and assistance when needed, families have a many options to choose from when making the necessary adjustments that come with age. Other health professionals in the area also promote better living with services that range from pain management and symptom control to prescription delivery and home medical equipment. Get to know the services and providers around New Orleans, and you’ll find a wealth of resources for your aging loved ones.

Retirement Living Schonberg Care is proud to provide seniors in the Greater New Orleans area with every opportunity to live a life worth celebrating at their award-winning assisted living and memory care communities. At Schonberg communities, you're not just a resident, you're part of the family, and your loved ones are, too. Schonberg Care understands the importance of being close to the ones you care about most, which is why they offer several conveniently located communities throughout the Greater New Orleans area, including Vista Shores in New Orleans, Beau Provence in Mandeville, Park Provence in Slidell, and Ashton Manor in Luling. If you or a loved one are seeking an exciting, engaging, and completely customized assisted living experience coupled with the highest quality of specialized care, Schonberg communities are here to provide a lifestyle tailor-made to fit your wants and needs. To learn more about living your best life at a Schonberg community near you, visit schonbergcare.com.

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Poydras Home is a Life Plan Community offering independent living, assisted living, and nursing care in the heart of Uptown. Poydras Home is known for its quality of care and innovative programs that allow residents to enjoy life to the fullest with emphasis to enrich residents experiencing Alzheimer’s and dementia. “Poydras Home has tapped into the New Orleans arts community to bring exceptional depth and variety to these residents,” says Interim CEO Erin Kolb. In 2016 the New Orleans Museum of Art launched, “Artful Minds at NOMA,” and Poydras Home memory care residents were the first to experience monthly curated visits led by specially trained docents, which increased social interaction, concentration, and vocalization in residents. Poydras Home also partnered with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra in 2016 to initiate “Soul Strings For Seniors: Musical Memories,” a program delivered by four string musicians and led by a licensed music therapist that offers sensory stimulation while enhancing memory through song. This year Poydras Home teamed up with Southern Rep Theatre to guide memory care residents through beneficial scripted improvisation techniques. For more information, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-897-0535. Home Care Home Care Solutions believes in providing better answers for aging well in New Orleans. Home Care Solutions specializes in compassionate care, Alzheimer’s care, and Aging Life Care Management™ services to help your elderly loved ones extend their independence. They believe every family deserves a customized plan of care. The Home Care Solutions team provides assistance with daily living with a belief that caregivers should know how your mom likes her coffee. Each caregiver is carefully matched to meet both your loved one’s needs and personality. They are committed to providing the highest quality of care, keeping loved ones safe and comfortable while giving families peace of mind. Care Managers navigate the care of your loved ones with expertise and heart and are experienced advocates with creative solutions for complex situations and all care concerns. Home Care Solutions, a licensed Personal Care Attendant Agency, is a member of Home Care Association of America and Aging Life Care Association™. Call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Hospice Care Anyone looking for compassionate and dignified care for their terminally ill loved ones should take a look at the services offered by Canon Hospice. The caring team at Canon is dedicated to a hospice ministry that helps patients and families accept terminal illness positively and resourcefully. Their stated goal is to “allow our patients to live each day to the fullest and enjoy their time with family and friends.”  With special expertise in pain management and symptom control, Canon Hospice designs individualized plans of care for each patient based on their unique needs. Home Based Services provide doctors, nurses, social workers, pastoral care, and volunteers.  For patients with more intensive symptom management needs, Canon has an Inpatient Hospice Unit. This unit provides 24-hour care in a home-like environment where patients are permitted to receive visits at any hour. For more information, visit CanonHospice.com or call 504-818-2723.

Medicine & Medical Equipment Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy and the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical

equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long-term care and infusion needs as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Long Term Care and Home Infusion Pharmacy, and Consultant Pharmacy Services. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Boulevard in Metairie. For more information, call 504-8897070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.”

Health Insurers As the state’s oldest and largest health insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is committed to improving the health and lives of Louisianians. The company and its subsidiaries offer a full line of health insurance plans for people of every age—from birth through retirement, including supplemental coverage such as dental and senior plans, at affordable rates. The Blue Cross provider networks offer the peace of mind that comes with being covered by the Cross and Shield. Blue Cross is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association and headquartered in Baton Rouge. To better serve customers, Blue Cross operates regional offices in Alexandria, Houma, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Monroe, New Orleans, and Shreveport. Louisiana-owned and operated, Blue Cross is a private, fully taxed mutual company owned by policyholders—not shareholders. To learn more, call a Blue Cross agent or visit bcbsla.com. •

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Hurricane Katrina. “In our first years, we were grateful for the opportunity to offer the local community a positive outlet following such devastation,” explained Munoz. “Ten years later, we look forward to continuing to serve the New Orleans community and helping you meet your goals, restore your mind, body and spirit.” Visit the studio online at NolaPilates.com to schedule your first session. For more information, visit NolaPilates.com or call 504-483-8880.

Health Fitness & Aesthetics Infinite Health Integrative Medicine Center is empowered medicine for the body, mind, and soul. Every day, their comprehensive patient-centric approach to optimized health and longevity helps motivated people eradicate diabetes and overcome fibromyalgia, pain and inflammation, neuropathy, stress, anxiety, depression, hormone imbalances, ED, unwanted weight, and more. Infinite Health is happy to file claims for the insurance covered portion of their care to most private insurances, including most Medicare programs. There is an additional mind-body program investment required to cover the services that Infinite Health provides that insurance does not cover. Infinite Health is located at 3900 Veteran’s Memorial Parkway, Suite 204 in Metairie. To schedule an initial consultation, call 337-312-8234 or visit YourInfiniteHealth.com. The Wellness Center of Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, located in Lafourche Parish, addresses wellness at every level, including prevention, education and rehabilitation. The medically-integrated Center offers easy access to many physician specialists, and many clinical needs can be addressed by the facility’s specialty centers which include an Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center, Neurosciences Center, Spine Center, and Weight Management Center. The Wellness Center also has an Education Center and a Fitness Center that houses all of the latest technology, a wrap-around track and many opportunities for group exercise as well as spacious locker rooms, saunas, steam rooms and hot tubs for men and women. Call 985-493-4400 for more information or for a virtual tour of the Wellness Center, visit Thibodaux.com.

Nola Pilates & Yoga/ Xtend Barre is one of Lakeview’s premier fitness studios. The studio’s extensive schedule features over 65 group classes per week, including Pilates Reformer, Tower, Mat, Yoga, MELT Method, TRX Suspension and Xtend Barre. One-on-one sessions are available in the private equipment studio seven days per week. Classes range in focus and intensity from open-level Pilates Mat and Yoga classes to muscle sculpting, calorie torching classes like TRX and Xtend Barre. November marked the studio’s 10-year anniversary, and owner Kim Munoz fondly recalls opening its doors back in 2007, as small business owners worked tirelessly to revive their city following 106

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The unique workout experience at OrangeTheory Fitness combines the energy of a group workout with the attention and personal care of one-on-one training. Over the course of a one-hour workout, members can expect to burn between 500 and 1,000 calories, but the positive effects don’t stop there, as the afterburn can continue to burn calories for up to 36 hours. This month, OrangeTheory is launching their newest app, Connected Fitness, which offers more comprehensive data for each member. “Right now you have to remember how far you ran and how far you rowed, and this new app will keep track of all of that for you and will drive that into your profile,” said Elle Mahoney, area developer and franchise owner. “It will deliver more information, more accurately. And when you work out outside with your heart monitor on, it will feed into your overall summary, and it challenges you to set personal records.” OrangeTheory currently has two New Orleans locations, as well as one in Mandeville and two in Baton Rouge. Try your first class free by signing up at OrangeTheoryFitness.com.

The Woodhouse Day Spa is a full-service, luxury spa conveniently located in Mid City. With a focus on personal care, Woodhouse aims to help their visitors find a balance of beauty, health and wellness. Their team of dedicated professionals possess a genuine desire to provide the ultimate retreat, and with outstanding facilities and therapies, they will go beyond your expectations to provide head-to-toe relaxation. The spa offers over 70 advanced body and skin care treatments, from nurturing facials and body treatments in a Vichy shower to Swedish, deep-tissue and volcanic hot stone massages. Take a break from the hectic day-today stress with expert manicures and pedicures, all while relaxing in a luxurious robe and enjoying a beverage. To book your ultimate spa experience, call 504-482-6652 or visit NewOrleans.WoodhouseSpas.com. Instant gift cards are also available online. Pain Management Started by Mo and Sharon Crane nearly twenty years ago, Crane Rehab Center has helped thousands of people achieve or return to their highest level of function through innovative care. With the experience of a larger provider but the focus of a small, outcomededicated team, Crane Rehab Center is positioned to assist you in living your best life. Crane’s River Road location and their new CBD location give adult patients opportunities to attend therapy before or after work, or even during a lunch break. In the adult clinic, the team can help identify pain-causing habits in the workspace and can provide ergonomic solutions. Both the CBD and River Road locations offer physical therapy and treat lower back and spinal injuries, neurological disorders, arthritis and other injuries. Additionally, they offer aquatic therapy, dry needling, Pilates and massage, yoga and more. Their pediatric location on Earhart Blvd offers physical, occupational, speech therapy, ABA services, music therapy, as well as enrichment programs for children. Physicians’ referrals are accepted but not required. For more information, visit CraneRehab.com or call 504-828-7696 (Adults); 504-293-2454 (CBD); 504-866-6990 (Pediatrics). •


TRY THIS

An American in Paris, Jan. 30 - Feb. 4 at Saenger Theatre

All The World’s A Stage Broadway in New Orleans is the perfect Big Easy “try this” by KELLY MASSICOT

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t’s inspirational. It’s moving. It will make you laugh, and it will make you cry. There is something about watching actors in person, on a stage that can’t be fulfilled by watching a movie or a television show. For a few years now, I have been a frequent patron of The Saenger Theatre. And I am sure to be spotted at the theater many times throughout the Broadway in New Orleans season. In 2013, it was announced that the newly renovated Saenger was bringing Broadway shows back to its stage. Since then, patrons have seen Tony award-winning production, after Tony award-winning production. Already this year, the Saenger has been visited by Jimmy Buffet and the debut of Escape To Margaritaville, The King and I and Irving Berlin’s White Christmas. But New Orleanins should not fret. As the start of the new year brings resolutions, Broadway in New Orleans is delivering a lineup 126

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to ensure your “new year, new you” has a dose of artistic flair. Try these upcoming productions; I know I will. An American In Paris Jan. 30 - Feb. 4 If you’re like me, typically the book is better than the movie. The same, I feel, can be said for a play and a movie. That being said, I don’t know how a production could be better than the 1951 MGM Technicolor dream staring Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron. As mentioned in a review by The New York Times, “the production pays a loving tribute to the movie.” I am envisioning beautiful costumes, stellar dancing and a beautiful love story set in the city of light. The Color Purple Feb. 20 - Feb. 25 This is a production everyone should be dying to see. The

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2016 Tony award winner for Best Musical hits the stage this February, bringing with it the journey of a young southern women through love and triumph. A New York Times review called it “a glory to behold.” This production is highly anticipated and sure to bring a flood of emotion throughout the theater. I, personally, cannot wait for opening night. Phantom of the Opera March 14 - March 25 With the exception of Cats (yes, I said it; Cats is awful), Andrew Lloyd Weber is responsible for a number of Broadway powerhouses that have changed the way we view live theater. And the Phantom of the Opera is probably my favorite of the bunch. The drama, the power ballads, period-piece costuming – it all makes for a goosebump-giving, quintessential Broadway moment. If you haven’t already, buy a ticket and join the “Masquerade” this March.

Rent April 17 - April 22 “We’re not gonna pay rent!” If only we all could say that to our landlords or the mortgage company. This rollercoaster of emotion set in the early 90s, at the height of the AIDs epidemic, is sure to have you on your feet, and probably crying. Inspired partly by Giacomo Puccini’s opera La Bohème, Jonathan Larson’s Tony and Pulitzer Prize winning1996 production is still speaking loudly to issues we are facing today. From the Big Apple to the Big Easy, see the story of seven New Yorkers living, loving and surviving this spring. Waitress June 12 - June 17 This is another production I am dying to see. The show premiered on Broadway to rave reviews, and is surrounded by powerful women. The music and lyrics, from Grammy nominee Sara Bareilles, are original to the play, as well as original direction by Tony award winner Diane Paulus. Based on the film, Waitress is the story of a small town waitress, duh, and pie maker who dreams of leaving her hometown and loveless marriage and moving on to bigger and better things, by winning a baking contest in a nearby town. It’s a show about strength, courage and is sure to inspire. New Orleans Magazine attempted to gain additional information on the highly anticipated visit of Tony award-winning Hamilton: An American Musical. All we can confirm is that Hamilton is set to play next season and is listed among the tour cities for the 2018-2019 season on the Hamilton U.S. Tour website. Until the official announcement, we are all “Helpless.” •


ETC.

Arden Cahill Academy ‘s 50th Anniversary Fifty years ago when Arden and Harry Cahill decided to open the Arden Cahill Academy, they had high hopes in creating a school focused on early childhood education. However, they might have struggled to believe that today the Academy is a Louisiana State Department of Education approved school for infants through eighth grade on a beautiful campus with a wide of facilities. These include state of the art classrooms, library, art studio, Olympic size swimming pool as well as science and computer labs. 3101 Wall Blvd, Gretna, 392-0902, ArdenCahillAcademy.com.

Opera Celebrates Jazz In 2013 a new opera in jazz, Champion, debuted in St. Louis. It was an original creation by five-time Grammy award winner and New Orleans native son, Terence Blanchard. As part of the 75th birthday celebrations for the New Orleans Opera, the work is being reprised in March 2018 at the Mahalia Jackson Theatre for Performing Arts. Other productions in 2018 include Tabasco, a comic burlesque operetta, which can be caught in late January at Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre in the heart of the French Quarter. NewOrleansOpera.com

By Mirella Cameran

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streetcar

by errol laborde

Lyons At Annunciation The View From Grit’s

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arnival has its historic moments, such as when Rex bows to Comus in the waning hours of Mardi Gras Night, or on the night before when Rex and Zulu push a plunger to ignite a fireworks show over the Lundi Gras sky; but there are more subtle moments that nevertheless ooze with the allusive real spirit of Carnival. For that, the high holy day is on the third Sunday before Mardi Gras (this year Jan. 28) one 128

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weekend before the big parades start. Already by that date the passions have been greased by the rowdy Krewe du Vieux that on the night before walked (“marched” is not quite the word) serpentine-like through the streets of the Marigny and the French Quarter pulling quartersized floats displaying the sassiest of satire. But on the day after, the scene shifts uptown. Grit’s Bar (530 Lyons Street at

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Annunciation) could deservedly be recognized as the epicenter of all street culture. Nearby in this neighborhood that was “multi-cultured” long before the phrase became exhausted from over-use is a float den where two of the city’s parades are built in anonymity, kept secret by the unmarked warehouse that contains them. Down the block is Hansen’s Sno Bliz, home of undoubtably the world’s greatest snowball shop. The

Neville Brothers grew up in this neighborhood. F & M Patio, home of late night funk is just around the corner. And for something that oozes with gravy, the neighborhood is also the home of Domilese’s poor boys. Then there are the walking groups that the neighborhood gave birth to; the Jefferson City Buzzards and the Lyons club created in 1890 and 1946 respectively. Both consist of lubricated men who saunter along the Avenue on Mardi Gras morning toward the French Quarter. They do so well rehearsed, for both perform practice marches on that magic third Sunday before. So it happens that anyone in or near Grit’s that afternoon will see the Lyons (whose practice march begins at Grit’s) and elements of the Buzzards (whose club house is nearby up Annunciation Street) muster by. (The Buzzards always dress in drag for the occasion, though no one can confuse the gender behind the beards.) In recent years the Phunny Phorty Phellows have recovered at Grit’s from their 12th Night Streetcar ride by nourishing on crawfish. Like the Tigris and  Euphrates merging in Babylon, cultural streams gather at Grit’s. We worry sometimes about the loss of character in New Orleans, and there are obstacles, but then there are days like that third Sunday at Grit’s where the pageantry has included Buzzards, crawfish and Lyons. For the Phellows the crawfish bounty is quickly depleted, but there is that last slice of king cake. The walls vibrate to the Hawkette’s “Mardi Gras Mambo.” Despite it all, if you go to the right places at the right time, New Orleans is still a special town. • ARTHUR NEAD Illustration


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine January 2018  

New Orleans Magazine January 2018