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oyster recipes: Stewed, broiled, beignets and beyond!

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march/april 2017

Bicentennial Blowout! A salute to Baton Rouge on its 200th birthday The Red Stick's Dining, Arts, Architecture, Music, People, Events and More!

The iconic Louisiana State Capitol building, completed in 1932, is the tallest capitol in the United States.


contents

In Every Issue

22

4 From the Editor

THE GREAT FLOOD: AN ANNIVERSARY 6 photo contest

baton rouge debris 8 biz bits

Big Developments New investments keep jobs growing, visitors coming

10 health

Eye of the Beholder Regular eye examinations can help catch issues before the damage is done

12 reel news

Hollywood South’s Ripple Effect Efforts are underway to sustain a viable industry impacting small businesses throughout Louisiana

14 literary louisiana

Axed in New Orleans

24 Kitchen gourmet

Cream of the Crop Mascarpone, cream and crème anglaise are top-of-the-list toppings for berries

28 home

Back at the Ranch Christina Graci Javanmardi uses timeless design to update a 1955 Baton Rouge ranch home for a growing family

32 Artist

Baton Rouge and the Visual Arts

Latest book on the notorious cold case reads like fiction and provides new theories on the gruesome murders

The city’s architecture and museums provide a host of cultural options

16

traveler

made in louisiana

wildthings

Baton Rouge butcher Jordan Ramirez spices things up with his first retail pepper sauce

36

Quiet Times at the Capitol Pomp, circumstance, history and tragedy punctuate ths iconic building

Highlights and Events

100 direct destinations

Nonstop Travel

5 direct destinations that are just one flight away from LA

108 calendar

Parades Around the State

110 great louisiana chef

New Classic

Chef DeWitt Ginn takes the helm at Baton Rouge’s Galatoire’s, holds fast to favorites and adds his own take on new items

quirky places

House Music

Baton Rouge’s ‘listening room’ provides intimate space for musicians and fans

112 a louisiana Life

22 roadside dining

tsunami sushi

The Sexiest Spot in Baton Rouge

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on the cover

40

This year, Baton Rouge is celebrating its bicentennial. In honor of this auspicious 200th birthday, we are dedicating the issue to the Capitol City with stories that celebrate both old favorites and new. For the cover, we played with that idea melding an historic image with a new one of the iconic State Capital.

Waterscapes by Will Kalec photographs by Scott Mohrman

94 around Louisiana

20

features

Soldiering On

Baton Rouge military-veteranturned-doctor dedicates herself to saving people’s soles

46

Oh Shucks! Briny, sweet and packed with vitamins and minerals, Gulf oysters are a beloved Louisiana food. Whether they are broiled, chargrilled, stewed or fried, belly up to the bivalve this Valentine’s Day and beyond for a heaping helping of the food of love. By Stanley Dry Photography by Eugenia Uhl

54

Baton Rouge A Rolling River Town Where Culture Runs Deep By Teresa Day

62

Spring Festivals A quick survey of the state’s spring festivals By Chris Jay


March/april 2017 VOl. 37 No. 4 Editorial

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MANAGING Editor Art Director lead photographer web Editor travel EDITOR FOOD EDITOR HOME EDITOR copy EDITOR Associate editor

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & EVENTS event coordinator digital media associate

Errol Laborde Melanie Warner Spencer Sarah George Danley Romero Kelly Massicot Paul F. Stahls Jr. Stanley Dry Lee Cutrone Amanda Orr Jessica DeBold

marketing Cheryl Lemoine Whitney Weathers Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264

sales

vice president of sales sales executive

Production/Web Manager production designer production designer traffic coordinator

Chief Executive Officer President Executive Vice President ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Distribution Manager Subscription manager Subscriptions assistant

Colleen Monaghan Brittany Gilbert (504) 830-7298 BrittanyG@LouisianaLife.com

Production Staci McCarty Monique Di Pietro Demi Schaer Terra Durio

Administration Todd Matherne Alan Campell Errol Laborde Denise Dean John Holzer Sara Kelemencky Mallary Matherne For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

IRMA Awards 2016 Award of Merit for Reader Service Article

2011 Silver Award Winner Tiffani Reding Amedeo for Overall Art Direction

Bronze for Column to Melissa Bienvenue

Press Club of New Orleans Awards

Bronze for Food Feature

2016 Lifetime Achievement Award to Errol Laborde

Silver for Art Direction of a Single Story to Sarah George 2012 Gold Award Winner for Companion Website

2nd Place for Best Magazine 2nd Place Layout/Design to Sarah George 2nd Place Best Portrait to Danley Romero 2nd Place Governmental/ Political Writing to Jeremy Alford

1st Place for Best Magazine

3rd Place Column to Melissa Bienvenu

1st Place Layout/Design to Sarah George

3rd Place Medical/Health Writing to Amanda Wicks

110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 • LouisianaLife.com Louisiana Life (ISSN 1042-9980) is published bimonthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: One year $10; Mexico and Canada $48. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional mailing entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Louisiana Life, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2017 Louisiana Life. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark Louisiana Life is registered. Louisiana Life is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork, even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in Louisiana Life are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the magazine or owner.

LouisianaLife.com | 3


from the editor

THE GREAT FLOOD: AN ANNIVERSARY

S

everal years ago I sat down with my mom and one of her cousins to talk about the Great Flood of 1927. They were both little girls then at a time of life when the adventures of a spring flooding disaster outshined the hardships created by it. The latter being for the grownups to worry about. All along the state, the Mississippi River water, which had already been exceedingly high when pushed from the upriver states, spilled onto Louisiana soil. Much of it had been funneled through the connecting bayous and rivers spreading equal flooding for all. My relatives lived in the Avoyelles Parish town of Bordelonville where the water in usually placid Bayou des Glaises was raised by the Atchafalaya River. Family members evacuated to a Red Cross camp at Mansura, where the land is higher and where the girls could be wide-eyed with the experience of living in tents and where Red Cross workers handed out free Hershey bars. Going home was not quite as much fun. In those days folks cooked with lard, which was kept stored in barrels near the kitchen. The high water upended the containers and as it receded left a coating of pig fat on the walls. To melt it off a bucket brigade was formed passing cans of hot water from a fire in the yard into the house where the containers were splashed on the already saturated walls. Flood insurance? FEMA? What were those?

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Food was scarce. One of the few products that nature provided was crawfish, which were driven from their burrowed holes in the ground. In those days crawfish had not yet achieved its cult status and was regarded as a junk food, nevertheless these hearty people of French, but not Cajun, ancestry, gathered the critters and boiled them in salt, the only seasoning they had. Ultimately the flood would have an impact on the state’s history, culture and politics. A system of spillways was built to divert high river water. Many of the bayous were subdued by locks and dams. (Once feral Bayou des Glaises was among many that were totally domesticated.) In 1974 Randy Newman recorded a song called “Louisiana 1927” telling about the flood’s despair: The river rose all day The river rose all night Some people got lost in the flood Some people got away alright The river have busted through clear down to Plaquemines

Edwards. He would grow up seeing the hardships of rural Louisiana and hearing the passionate populist rhetoric of Huey Long who ran for governor in 1928. The flood would mold Edwards’ politics, and the state’s. My Mom lived long enough to experience the state’s other great natural disaster, Hurricane Katrina in 2005. That time there was no adventure and certainly no free Hershey bars. Her last experiences of the state were of it recovering, just as she has seen it do after 1927. In between she had lived a good Louisiana life; knowing the fragrance of sweet potatoes in the oven, seeing the bayou banks in the spring when they are green and flowery; speaking with relatives in a unique Franglais dialect. She even developed an appreciation for crawfish boiled to be spicy.     Heavy rains forced some of the state’s small tributaries to flood last spring, but the Mississippi River, contained by superior levees and flood gates has a beautiful presence; powerful, picturesque yet, most of all — peaceful.

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline Something else significant happened in 1927 near the town of Marksville, probably not more than 10 miles away from where my mom and family were encamped. A boychild was born. His name was Edwin

Errol Laborde


meet the sales team

SALES Executive Brittany Gilbert (504) 830-7298 BrittanyG@LouisianaLife.com

Vice president of sales Colleen Monaghan (504) 830-7215 Colleen@LouisianaLife.com


photo contest

baton rouge debris Lucie Carter of Baton Rouge snapped this photo of a debris poor boy from Chef DeWitt Ginn. See more about Ginn on page 20. Send in your photos by going to myneworleans.com/ photocontest

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LouisianaLife.com | 7


biz bits

SHREVEPORT

Plant re-use revives business A $1 million investment has created an automobile distribution center and will bring 150 jobs to a former General Motors plant in Shreveport. Glovis America, which ships finished products for the makers of Kia and Hyundai automobiles, announced its lease on the 125,000-square-foot space in January and has begun moving imported vehicles through the center. Employees outfit the cars with added equipment and exterior upgrades, then send the vehicles on to dealers around the country. Company President Glenn Clift predicts the center will handle more than 75,000 new vehicles annually.

Concept illustration of new terminal at Louis Armstrong International Airport

NEW IBERIA

Drug researchers target Cajun Country

Big Developments New investments keep jobs growing, visitors coming By Kathy Finn

T

he $800 million terminal under construction at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport looks to become a boon to Louisiana business while solidifying the state’s brand. As the new 30-gate terminal progresses, several airlines have announced new international service, including flights to London, Frankfurt and Panama. Meanwhile, the airport has committed to giving visitors an authentic taste of Louisiana. Announcements of food concessions to be available at the airport include the cuisine of chefs Susan Spicer, Emeril Lagasse, John Besh, John Folse and such popular New Orleans restaurants as MoPho, Lucky Dogs, Ye Olde College Inn and the Munch Factory. Here are highlights of a few other business developments around the state. u

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BATON ROUGE

Startups get a leg up Three new tenants have signed on at the Louisiana Business & Technology Center, a business incubator run by Louisiana State University. The fledgling businesses will receive mentoring and technical assistance in their respective fields. The companies are Louisiana Multi-Functional Materials Group, developer of a “smart” polymer sealant; Cognosante, a provider of software technology solutions to health care clients; and Lubricity Labs, which uses proteins and polymer chemistry to strengthen human hair.

A $1 million expansion by California-based pharmaceutical company Crown Bioscience Inc. will put a new research and development facility in south Louisiana. Aimed at developing new treatments for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, the CrownBio project will operate in conjunction with the New Iberia Research Center, an affiliate of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, which manages nonhuman primates for applied and basic research. Company officials say the project will produce 10 local jobs.

BELLE CHASSE

Company injects billions into thriving industry

NEW ORLEANS

At least 250 new jobs in Plaquemines Parish will result from a huge corporate investment in natural gas exporting. Venture Global LNG plans to spend more than $8 billion developing a natural gas liquefaction plant and exporting terminal along the Mississippi River. If approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, construction will begin in 2018. Venture Global has another LNG plant under way in Calcasieu Parish, and it is slated to open in 2020.

French shipper likes New Orleans New container-cargo service arrived at the Napoleon Avenue Terminal in New Orleans in January when French shipping company CMA CGM brought one of its vessels into port. The world’s third-largest container carrier in December announced the new direct weekly service, which will allow faster container shipments to and from China, South Korea and Singapore. “We look forward to continued growth in the region,” company President Marc Bourdon said. Port officials say the service adds capacity at a time when exports of polyethylene resins, key raw materials for plastics production, are poised to surge.

photographs courtesy new orleans aviation board


health

Eye of the Beholder Regular eye examinations can help catch issues before the damage is done by Fritz Esker

C

aring for your eyes and your vision is more complicated than many realize. After a certain age, people often get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, but they won’t get their eyes examined unless they have vision problems. This is a mistake, one that could potentially cost you your eyesight from diseases like glaucoma or macular degeneration. Glaucoma is a condition of increased pressure within the eyeball, resulting in a gradual loss of eyesight. The emphasis is on the word gradual. Dr. Margaret Carter of the Eye Clinic of Lake Charles said glaucoma slowly takes away a person’s peripheral vision. Eventually, it can seem like the patient is looking through a straw. By the time it becomes noticeable, the damage is done. So what can you do? “The most important thing you can do is have an eye care professional examine you on a regular basis,” said Carter. Carter recommends that adults age 45 and over receive yearly checkups from an ophthalmologist. With regular examinations, glaucoma can be detected early and treated with eye drops that reduce fluid production in the eye and promote drainage. However, it is important to remember to stay on them and keep your appointments with your doctor. Carter said she’d talked to patients who started on the eye drops, but stopped taking them because their vision was fine. “Glaucoma never goes away, so it has to be treated and monitored on a regular basis,” said Carter. Another eye issue is macular degeneration, a degenerative condition involving the central part of the retina. Typically, this is a disease caused by aging. Vitamin supplements are the primary form of treatment. Genetics play a part in both glaucoma and macular degeneration. If a family member has had either disease, visiting an ophthalmologist should be considered mandatory. u

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reel news

Hollywood South’s Ripple Effect Efforts are underway to sustain a viable industry impacting small businesses throughout Louisiana By Lisa LeBlanc-Berry

R

esilience is in Hollywood South’s DNA. Despite the panic and predicted death knell following the Louisiana Legislature’s controversial cap that diminished the popular filmmaking tax incentives in 2015, industry leaders managed to limit the exodus. Meeting with producers and potential investors, they informed the money men about the greatly exaggerated facts and misperceptions in the aftermath. Things are looking up. The lull has been offset by big name stars and producers returning for feature films and new TV series. All that may change this spring if legislators make further cuts.

Hugh Jackman’s resurrection as the iconic “X-Men” character, Wolverine, returns in the $127 million New Orleans-shot sequel, “Logan” for a March release. Clint Eastwood’s locally filmed Civil War drama “The Beguiled” directed by Sophia Coppola hits theatres in June with an all-star cast including Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning. Ongoing productions in 2017 include the $60 million Fox Studios action thriller “Underwater,” currently being filmed in St. Bernard Parish at The Ranch, which recently added three, 30,000 square-foot

12 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

stages and a mill space to accommodate the production. The Disney/Marvel series “Shadows” budgeted at $42 million, has an 86-day shoot in Louisiana. Ryan Murphy’s smash hit TV series on FX, “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story” that won 10 Emmys in September, moves from California to Louisiana for Season 2. “American Crime Story: Hurricane Katrina” is set for production in New Orleans with a far larger cast (starring Sarah Paulson and John Travolta again) and a longer season of 13-15 episodes, to air in 2018.

AMC’s “Preacher” also moved to Louisiana (from New Mexico) for its second season. The $66 million budget includes $48 million being spent in-state, and an $18 million payroll. Season two of Oprah Winfrey’s “Queen Sugar” resumes in March, and Season three of “NCIS: New Orleans” wraps April 28. “2017 is off to a great start with projects currently prepping or shooting in Louisiana,” says Chris Stelly, Executive Director of the Louisiana Film and Entertainment Association. “Other projects are on their way for this year as well. We are finalizing another economic impact study in advance of the upcoming regular session of the legislature. It is worth highlighting that in the last study in 2015, the economic impact of this program was well over $1 billion, with another $717 million in household earnings. This industry also supported over 12,000 jobs in the state.” In an effort to sustain the thousands of film industry jobs, strong infrastructure and hundreds of businesses throughout the state that depend on income from productions, organizers have been finalizing key policy proposals for the upcoming session. “Last summer, Gov. John Bel Edwards directed LED to review, analyze and recommend policy changes for the film incentive program, which may be presented for consideration in the 2017 legislative session,” says Don Pierson, Louisiana Economic Development Secretary. “Louisiana remains committed to the film industry, which has generated more than $6 billion in film and

Photo courtesy Ben Rothstein-© 2017 Marvel. TM and © 2017 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.


TV production work since the modern-era program got its start in 2002. “In recent months, we have undertaken an extensive internal analysis and gathered broad input from stakeholders throughout Louisiana,” Pierson says. “We have included legislators and entertainment industry experts to help identify recommendations for best practices and enhanced economic impact of the public’s investment. The end result is to provide policy recommendations that will improve state budget predictability, improve return-on-investment for the state, support industry sustainability and improve the statewide entertainment industry impact.

Small Businesses Appeal to Legislators Productions often serve as an economic engine and as job creators for small businesses, according to locals throughout Louisiana who are appearing in weekly PSAs starting March 6. The testimonial-style PSAs, which continue until the regular Louisiana legislative session commences April 10, are designed to drive home to lawmakers and the public how greatly local businesses depend on the film industry to make ends meet.

“With those elements in mind, we are confident that a stronger program will encourage the decisionmakers in the film industry to operate here and invest more permanently in Louisiana. Our proposals are being finalized and will be presented to the Governor and to legislators for their consideration this spring.” “One would hope that this upcoming session keeps in mind the value that our industry brings,” says Hornbeak. “This includes those who feel the ripple effect of spending, whether they are a small business, vendor or crew. We ask them to be vocal, take action and contact their legislator to keep our film industry vibrant for years to come.” (filmlouisiana.com) u

In anticipation of the spring session, Louisiana’s economic development leaders, film industry officials and business owners are coming together as one voice to address legislators regarding the film industry’s survival for years to come. “This is a do-or-die session for us and our future,” says Jimmy Hornbeak, chief marketing officer of The Ranch, public relationsandmarketing chairman of LFEA and union public relations consultant for IATSE local 478. “Our hope is that the PSA messages of local impact in all our communities affected by film will resonate inside the legislative chamber in Baton Rouge. We’re

not asking for a new cap, we are just asking to keep everything the way it is, without making any substantial changes to the existing program.” For every direct job created by film productions, two indirect jobs are created, according to Hornbeak. “The ripple effect of film-related spending and jobs in parishes and small businesses across the state has been documented,” he says. “It is a clean, diverse industry that offers those with creative interests a reason to stay in Louisiana.”

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Literary Louisiana

Axed in New Orleans Latest book on the notorious cold case reads like fiction and provides new theories on the gruesome murders By Amanda Orr

O

n August 13, 1910, Harriet Crutti, age 29, awoke around 3 a.m. to the vision of a shadowy male figure wielding a meat cleaver over her. She looked to her husband for help only to find him lying on the floor, unconscious and already bloodied from the blade. Harriet and her 40-year-old husband, August Crutti, had owned the grocery store and saloon at the corner of Royal and Lesseps streets (just east of the French Quarter) for only a month. The layout of their business was typical of the time, with their commercial enterprises and residence combined under a single roof where they lived and worked with their sons.

Miraculously, the Cruttis survived the harrowing attack after handing over $8 to the man. That same, cleaver-wielding man went on to terrorize the city of New Orleans — specifically Italian grocers — for nine more years according to Miriam Davis, in her newly

published book “The Axeman of New Orleans.” This book is distinctive in the canon of Axeman literature because it goes against the widely held belief that the murderer was only active for 18 months during 1918 and 1919. Robert Tallant is a legend among New Orleans history

and literature lovers, so it’s no small hurdle Davis clears when she discredits some of his assertions about the Axeman in his much-loved book, “Ready to Hang.” Davis says her book contains the most comprehensive research and exploration of the crimes — and after reading it, I agree. Davis is a formidable opponent to Tallant’s barroom-style research — she holds a PhD in history and works as a Smithsonian Journeys lecturer; her book contains 22 pages of notes, an 11-page bibliography as well as 28 photographs, floor plans, cartoons and maps from primary sources. Don’t let the highbrow credentials scare you though, the book reads like a modern-day thriller: “Moving noiselessly, the intruder passed through the kitchen through the grocery store, and on into the bedroom. There, he pulled back the mosquito netting that protected sleepers in subtropical New Orleans from harassing insects, raised the stolen meat cleaver, and struck the sleeping grocer twice.” What follows is a recounting of the crimes Davis believes can be attributed to the Axeman.

Literary excellence

On My Nightstand

“Birds of Opulence” by Crystal Wilkinson, $24.95. Kentucky writer Crystal Wilkinson’s novel, “Birds of Opulence” has been named winner of the 2016 Earnest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence. The book follows several generations of women in the fictional Southern black township of Opulence. Wilkinson was honored at the January ceremony in Baton Rouge.

“The Weight of Him” by Ethel Rohan, $21.98. Food-addict Billy Brennan weighs 400 pounds and his beloved son has just committed suicide. He launches a public weight-loss campaign to raise funds for suicide prevention against the wishes of his family.

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Using police documents, newspapers and other source material of the day, she follows the killer’s trail as he moved through New Orleans, DeRidder and Lake Charles. She tests the theories that police subscribed to during their investigations; was he a murderous burglar, drug addict or member of the Black Hand? Davis says the reason the crimes remain unsolved is due to lack of forensic capabilities. Additionally, the New Orleans police department was a lateadopter of basic crime scene preservation procedures and woefully undertrained. The 1911 force is described thusly in her book: “Poorly paid, haphazardly paid, often inexperienced, New Orleans policemen were almost as much a menace as the criminals they pursued. They routinely broke the law against carrying concealed weapons. Worse, when they drew their revolvers, they were lousy shots, usually missing the criminals at whom they aimed and frequently hitting innocent bystanders.” Despite this, Davis finds herself in agreement with one of the Axeman investigators regarding the murderer’s profile and she points out that

serial killers are notoriously difficult to identify, even today. She also works to disprove that the man long-suspected in the media of being the killer was in fact, not. The last quarter of the book is devoted to the highly emotional and legal arc (think “To Kill a Mockingbird”) of the fatherand-son duo falsely accused of one of the Axeman’s crimes, Iorlando and Frank Jordano. “The story of Frank and his family merits telling because it illustrates the experience of Italian immigrants and the niche they carved out for themselves in the social hierarchy of early 20-century Louisiana as well as the social prejudice against them,” Davis writes in her preface. Her previous book, “Dame Kathleen Kenyon,” is a non-fiction account of the most influential female archaeologist of the 20-century. “The Axeman of New Orleans: The True Story” By Miriam C. Davis. Chicago Review Press, $26.99.

Coming Soon “The Tequila Mockingbird Kit: Cocktails with a Literary Twist” by Tim Federle, $9.95. Available April 4. Includes a stainless steel bartender’s jigger, four cocktail stirring sticks and 15 cocktail recipe cards combining beloved classic novels and alcohol.

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louisiana made

wildthings Baton Rouge butcher Jordan Ramirez spices things up with his first retail pepper sauce BY JEFFREY ROEDEL photos by romero & Romero

Ramirez was raised in Sulphur and expertly blends the flavors of Louisiana with that of his Puerto Rican father and grandparents.


T

he shop is closed on this post-Christmas rush Tuesday in late December, but the work continues feverishly inside Iverstine Farms Butcher in Baton Rouge. A smoky, salty scent drifts through the air. “We’re making head cheese,” says Jordan Ramirez from behind the block, his meaty, tattooed arms crossed over a black apron, a tuft of dark hair tucked beneath a well-worn Filson patch cap. “We didn’t plan on closing today, but we’ve literally run out of everything.” That’s saying something for the butcher who, along with owner Galen Iverstine, savors using every piece possible of every animal delivered through the door of the popular space that opened last fall. At 34, Ramirez is not long into his career as a butcher but loving it. The launch of Iverstine Farms Butcher, founded from a generations-old family farm near Kentwood, has not only given Ramirez a new career and the opportunity to create his own menu, it has made immediate waves with capital city foodies looking for locally-sourced chicken twice a week, fresh cuts of responsiblyraised livestock, deli-style lunch sandwiches and Louisiana classics like andouille sausage links and gumbo. It was after six years as a Whole Foods team leader where he oversaw beer, wine and cheese stock and organized monthly five-course dinners for the brand’s Baton Rouge location that Ramirez decided he was in need of a major change. He wanted to learn the skills of a butcher, and even more he wanted to become a food entrepreneur on the back of a little

something he’d been cooking up in his kitchen for friends and family. It was Carnival season a few years ago when Ramirez debuted the first gallon jug of his hot sauce as a condiment for the Cuban sandwiches he made while hosting a pre-parade house party. “They lapped it up so fast and wanted to know how I made it,” Ramirez recalls. He began bottling it and giving it out as gifts, then selling small batches at local festivals and arts markets. Those market appearances led to pop-up dinners Ramirez called the Southern Wild Supper Club where he featured the sauce in his own tacos, tamales and red curry turkey nachos. In a state known for ruby

“It’s got a depth of flavor that’s unique. You can mix it with more foods and other sauces, and because of the texture you can spread it on anything.” red liquid hot sauces like TABASCO and homegrown shake-on seasonings, Ramirez’s Southern Wild Spicy Pepper Sauce stands out. His is not vinegar based — in fact there is no vinegar in it at all — and its emulsified texture feels more like a thin paste. “People think it’s mustardbased because of the color, but it’s not,” Ramirez says. “It’s an olive oil base with cooked vegetables and peppers, and

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louisiana made

that makes it more versatile. It’s got a depth of flavor that’s unique. You can mix it with more foods and other sauces, and because of the texture you can spread it on anything.” Raised in Sulphur near Lake Charles, Ramirez spent his youth roving the outdoors and learning the food and culture of his Puerto Rican father and grandparents. His sauce is a culmination of sorts, a flavorful blend of his roots in the Caribbean and southwest Louisiana — places where whether one is hunting, raising or sharing food, it’s always an adventure. Ramirez is already testing recipes for his next sauce. “This one is just my baby to start with,” he says. After some help with the logistics of launching a small business from the LSU AgCenter’s Food Incubator, Ramirez settled on Southern Wild for the name of his creation, and launched the first sauce in local stores last summer. “The name describes the hot sauce well,” he says. “I wanted to keep it regional, and it reminds me of my youth, time spent outdoors, and tying that into what I’m passionate about now and what Louisiana has always been all about.” Bottles of Southern Wild Spicy Pepper Sauce as well as Southern Wild merchandise are available directly from southernwildfoods.co, and the sauce can be found at Baton Rouge retail locations including Calvin’s Market, Main Street Market, Mod Salon and Red Stick Spice Company. u

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Q&A What do you do for fun when you’re not working? I grew up fishing, shrimping and crabbing in Cameron Parish with my dad, and still love to do that. I will go see family in Puerto and fish down there, too. I have good friend, and each year we plan a big hiking and climbing trip together. We’ve done Wyoming, Arkansas and Colorado. Once in the Ozarks we found these old bootleggers caves and just hung out where they used to hide their liquor. It’s not on any official trails. That was really cool. What’s the highest you’ve climbed? Last year in Colorado we did the Maroon Bells in the Elk Mountains, which was four different mountain passes at about 12,000 feet. But I did my first 14,000-foot peak in Snowmass, Colorado. Talk about how social media has affected your brand. That’s how I tried to build the whole thing, through Instagram and posting photos from pop-ups and events,

and building up a bank of recipes that we try at home and getting pictures of those dishes. What else happens is that friends will use the sauce in different ways and tell me about it. Usually I think, “Wow, that’s a great idea I hadn’t thought of yet.” Who are some entrepreneurs that inspire you? Locally, the first was Nathan Gresham of Beausoleil Restaurant and Bar. The guy cooks good food. Really down to earth. Has always been willing to help me out and answer my questions. He’s really into his family and the outdoors. He was one of the first people in town I really kind of followed. The second is, and I hope it doesn’t come off as cheesy, but my wife, Erica. When I met her she had just opened Mod Salon a few months earlier. She’s now been open for almost six years. She’s the one who really drove me to do the hot sauce as a business, has given me tons of advice and gotten me in touch with the right people.


great louisiana chef

New Classic Chef DeWitt Ginn takes the helm at Baton Rouge’s Galatoire’s, holds fast to favorites and adds his own take on new items By Marie Simoneaux photos by romero & romero

“When you play up simple, good tasting food, mostly served cold, they are really tasting your food, your cooking. You put your soul in it.”

W

hen Louisiana Life last spoke to Chef DeWitt Ginn, he was at the helm of Baton Rouge’s Table Kitchen & Bar. Now, he is the captain of a different ship. Ginn took over as executive chef of Galatoire’s Bistro in Baton Rouge in August of 2016 and quickly settled in. “I’ve just recently changed the bar menu and we’re doing house-made charcuterie boards, which I’m excited about,” says Ginn. Though Ginn was trained in the classic French Creole style that Galatoire’s is known for, his own style is simple and pure, like his charcuterie boards. “It really hits the soul of who I am,” says Ginn. “I worked in a slaughterhouse in high school and then I was out of the food industry for many years. When I got back into it, I wanted to go back to those roots. It brings me back to who I am as a person, as a chef. It takes a lot of technique to make a good pâté. Not a lot of people can do it, but a lot of people can cook a piece of fish.” Ginn plans to keep most of Galatoire’s traditional menu, but new items are also in the works, as well as a rotation of ever-evolving specials to keep him fresh. “I’m always playing and always experimenting and whatever I put out that day is truly my favorite thing to cook while I’m doing it,” says Ginn. “That keeps me enjoying it.” u

Galatoire’s 3535 Perkins Rd. #400 Baton Rouge 225-753-4864 galatoiresbistro.com

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“This is a dish that I cook for my Dad a lot. We’ve fished together since I was a toddler, and he passed his love of gardening to me as well. A few years ago he was coming over for dinner. I had fresh drum from the camp and fresh squash from the garden. He gets a variation of this dish almost every time he visits the restaurant.”

Dad’s Favorite Fish For the beurre blanc

1 5 1 ½ ½ 1 10 4 ¼ 1 12

shallot fine diced cloves garlic minced lemon cut into eight pieces cup white wine vinegar cup white wine sprig fresh thyme whole peppercorns bay leaves cup heavy cream lb unsalted butter cut into ¼ inch pieces. pieces saffron

for the fish and vegetables

2 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ¼

seven to nine ounce black drum filets cups zucchini large, diced cups large, diced yellow squash teaspoon minced garlic tablespoon fine diced shallot cup fine diced red bell pepper salt and pepper to taste white wine

1. For the beurre blanc In saucepan add all

ingredients except cream, butter and saffron. Bring to a boil and reduce until au sec (or nearly dry). 2. Add heavy cream and

reduce by half. Take off heat and mount with the butter (emulsify butter into it). Strain through fine mesh and add saffron. The saffron will take a few minutes to bloom and add color to the sauce, so it should be made prior to starting the fish.

3. FOR THE FISH and vegetables Bring small

amount of vegetable oil to moderate heat in sauté pan or cast iron skillet. Salt and pepper fish filets and lay them presentation side down in oil. Flip after 2 to 3 minutes. The fish will develop a crispy crust on the edges. 4. In separate skillet, heat small amount of vegetable oil over medium heat. Add shallots and red bell pepper, cooking for around a minute. Add squash, garlic, salt and pepper to taste. As the squash begins to caramelize, add a tablespoon of white wine. The vegetables will cook a little quicker than the fish.

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roadside dining

tsunami sushi The Sexiest Spot in Baton Rouge By Jyl Benson photo by romero & Romero

Luscious Lemonfish sashimi

I

n 2000, forward-thinking entrepreneurs, revivalists and sisters, Leah Simon and Michele Ezell, started a revolution when they opened Tsunami, a West Coast-style sushi restaurant — complete with a rotating roster of in-resi-

dence sushi masters flown in from Japan — in downtown Lafayette. The region had never seen anything like it, and Tsunami was an instant, white-hot success. Ezell said when they launched Tsunami they tried to keep the offerings

22 | Louisiana Life november/december 2016

very traditional Japanese but customers soon started driving the menu. Hence, the incorporation of alligator, crawfish and soft shell crab on the bill of fare. Four years after the opening of the Lafayette location,

Tsunami Baton Rouge opened in the Shaw Center on the city’s shockingly underutilized riverfront, affording stunning views from the sixth-floor rooftop dining room. The LSU Art School is located downstairs so the place is


always bustling with a chic crowd taking advantage of the Tuesday-through-Friday happy hour specials, some days the specials are for drinks, others for rolls, but there are bargains to be had. Now heading into its 13th year in business, Tsunami shows no signs of age and its outdoor terrace is surely the number one destination in the city for those on a date wanting to make an impression. It’s hard not to get dreamy-eyed by the stunning view. The eclectic Manship Theater, also located downstairs, makes it possible to take in an exquisite dinner and a show, play or film without leaving the elegant building. Tsunami prides itself on “LA flair with southern care” by offering a diverse menu that takes sushi in inventive, globally-inspired directions. Across the Tsunami brand, the menu is extensive, with traditional Japanese dishes and sushi bar standards augmented by signature flavors showcasing a Louisiana influence. There are fried oysters with wasabi tartar sauce, the Ragin’ Cajun roll with panko-crusted alligator and the John Breaux roll, named for the longtime U.S. Senator from Acadiana, filled with spicy crawfish. Soy-braised fish, short ribs over congee, pork belly ramen and calamari Ika “fries” are

Kolache Kitchen 4245 Nicholson Drive, Suite B Baton Rouge 225-757-6666 7930 Jefferson Highway Baton Rouge 225-248-6430 kolachekitchenbr.com

Tsunami 100 Lafayette St., 6th Floor Baton Rouge 225-346-5100 servingsushi.com

Good Bets If your date night at Tsunami goes spectacularly well and you are in need of an impressive breakfast, look no further than Kolache Kitchen. In 2013, Will Edwards, a newly minted LSU grad and a Houston native, stepped up to fill the kolache void in Baton Rouge when he opened his first shop on Nicholson Drive. Wildly popular and super thrifty, the kitchen’s kolaches are hot, freshly baked pastries prized for their soft, pillowy dough and versatile fillings that include both sweet and savory such as boudin, sausage, spinach, bacon, raspberry, apricot and cherry. Breakfast tacos, empanadas, cinnamon rolls and muffins round out the morning offerings. Lunch brings a menu of inventive sandwiches and fresh tacos. The sandwiches include brisket and pork that are marinated in a guarded recipe and then slow-smoked for 12 hours.

other distinctive dishes, as are Luscious Lemonfish sashimi with jalapeños, lemon and ponzu, the Pimp salad (seared tuna, snow crab, “krab” stick, cucumber, tomato, asparagus, avocado, masago and sesamesoy-ponzu dressing) and Cisotaki (thin slices of seared choice tenderloin with ponzu, Sriracha and cisco sauces). Not to be missed is the TransBestBite roll with no rice, minced spicy tuna, tempura shrimp, kani, cream cheese and asparagus. It’s wrapped in soy paper, breaded in panko, fried and served with ponzu and tsurai sauces. With sake selections that include many draft, hot and cold varieties, an extensive specialty cocktail list and lessthan-common offerings in beer, red and white wine, and champagne, the libations list is as vibrant and sexy as the rest of the Tsunami experience. u

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kitchen gourmet

Cream of the Crop Mascarpone, cream and crème anglaise are top-of-the-list toppings for berries BY STANLEY DRY PHOTO & STYLING BY EUGENIA UHL

You will likely have some of the mascarpone cream left over; try it on toast or biscuits or with other fruits and berries.

24 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017


T

his is the time of year when both crawfish and berries are in season. I’m already anticipating a weekend lunch of boiled crawfish followed by a bowl of Louisiana strawberries. In the past, I would have put cream on my berries, but recently I discovered the joy of mascarpone combined with cream and a little sugar. Now I’m too spoiled for plain old cream. Mascarpone is a soft, Italian cream cheese best known for its starring role in tiramisu, but it can be enjoyed in many other ways. It won’t be long before we have local blackberries and blueberries, and mascarpone is also delicious with them. If you’re near a pick-yourown berry farm, a trip there with family or friends is a delightful way to spend a few hours. Feel free to sample a few of those luscious blueberries while you pick them, but beware that a purple mouth will give you away if you gobble more than your fair share from the field. One time a friend was eating so many she was afraid she might be arrested. If your conscience bothers you, you can always fess up and offer to pay extra. Blackberries can be had gratis from roadside ditches and bayou banks. A boat, canoe or kayak will let you get to blackberries that are only accessible by water, and often that is where you can find the biggest hauls. The hitch is that if you know where there are plentiful berries, you can be sure that other people know, as do the animals and birds. To get your share, you have to monitor the site and strike at the right time. It’s such a letdown to get there after the berries are gone.

Strawberries With Mascarpone and Cream I have always loved strawberries with cream or whipped cream, but this combination is even better. 16 ounces strawberries ¼ cup sugar, or to taste 8 ounces mascarpone ¾ cup heavy cream mint leaves (optional) 1. Hull and wash strawberries. 2. Slice berries and combine

with 2 tablespoons sugar, or to taste.

3. Combine mascarpone, cream and 2 tablespoons sugar in a small mixing bowl. Beat with an electric mixer until smooth. 4. Serve strawberries in

individual bowls with a generous amount of the mascarpone cream. Garnish, if desired, with mint leaves.

Makes 4 servings.

As much as we all love to eat berries out of hand, we also crave desserts such as strawberry shortcake, blackberry cobbler, blueberry muffins, pancakes and pies. Then there are the ice creams, sorbets, jams and jellies berries can yield. Fresh berries can also be incorporated in salads and enjoyed in less obvious ways. Try strawberries with balsamic vinegar and freshly ground back pepper, for example. The recipes this month are all built around berries. A bread pudding is lightened for spring with a mixture of berries and a crème anglaise (English custard cream) sauce. A blackberry coffee cake is a cinch to make and will be a great accompaniment to your coffee or tea. Strawberries with mascarpone and cream are like the essence of spring in a bowl. What about strawberry ice cream? Strawberry ice cream speaks for itself. u

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recipes Mixed Berry Bread Pudding Use any combination of blueberries, blackberries and raspberries, but avoid strawberries, which give off too much water. 4 cups French or Italian bread torn into small pieces

An easy and quick treat to enjoy with your morning coffee or afternoon tea. ½ pound butter, softened 1¼ cups light brown sugar 4 large eggs

¼ cup melted butter

1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

2 large eggs

¼ teaspoon salt

½ cup sugar

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 cups whole milk

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

¼ cup plain yogurt

2 cups berries (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries)

2 cups blackberries

1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Butter

1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Butter a 9-inch by 9-inch pan.

a 9-inch by 9-inch pan. Add bread and drizzle with melted butter. 2. In a mixing bowl, add eggs,

sugar, milk and vanilla, then whisk until smooth. Transfer bread to bowl and press down to saturate. Fold in berries.

powdered sugar

2. Using an electric mixer, beat

the rest of the butter until creamy. Add sugar and beat until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add vanilla.

3. Pour mixture into pan, smooth top and bake in preheated oven until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 30 minutes.

3. Combine salt, baking soda and

4. Remove to a rack to cool.

batter into prepared pan and smooth top with a rubber spatula.

Serve room temperature or cold with crème anglaise (recipe follows).

Makes 6-8 servings.

Crème Anglaise If you would like alcohol in the sauce, add a small amount at the end in place of the vanilla. A fruit-based liqueur would probably work best with the berries.

flour. Add flour mixture to batter in two additions, alternating with the yogurt. Do not over-mix.

4. Fold in blackberries. Turn

5. Bake in preheated oven until

a tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 40 to 50 minutes. Remove pan from oven and place on a rack for about 10 minutes, then invert on another rack. When cake is cool, dust with powdered sugar.

Makes about 8 servings.

Strawberry Ice Cream

6 egg yolks

There’s just enough orange liqueur in this recipe to accent the flavor of the berries.

¼ cup sugar

16 ounces strawberries

1

¾ cup sugar

2 cups whole milk

teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1. In a heavy saucepan, bring milk

1 cup milk

to a boil.

1 cup heavy cream

2. In a mixing bowl, beat egg

2 tablespoons orange liqueur, such as Cointreau

yolks and sugar until creamy and slowly add hot milk while whisking.

3. Return mixture to saucepan. Cook over low heat, while stirring constantly, until mixture thickens and coats the back of the spoon. Strain into a bowl. 4. Add vanilla and place the bowl

26 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

Blackberry Coffee Cake

1. Hull, wash and slice strawberries. Place strawberries, sugar and milk in blender and puree until smooth. Add cream and orange liqueur. 2. Refrigerate until cold, then

process in ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.

in a larger bowl filled with ice and water. Stir until sauce cools. Cover and refrigerate.

3. Transfer to plastic container(s) and freeze until firm.

Makes a little more than 2 cups.

Makes about 1¼ quarts.


home

Back at the Ranch Christina Graci Javanmardi uses timeless design to update a 1955 Baton Rouge ranch home for a growing family By Lee Cutrone Photos by Craig Macaluso

W

hen built in 1955, the Baton Rouge house that Sarah and Robert Heroman now own was a classic ranch with a single story, low ceilings and a brick surround fireplace. Fifty-five years later, its large lot and prime location 28 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

next to the Baton Rouge Country Club remained appealing, but its architecture was dated. The Heromans (Robert is a third generation owner of his family’s well-known Baton Rouge horticulture business) purchased the house in 2010

with the intention of renovating it for their growing family and turned to designer Christina Graci Javanmardi of Graci Interiors for help with the transformation. “She knew who to call,” says Javanmardi, who is one of Sarah’s closest friends.


Above The Heromans knocked out a wall

between what is now the family room and living room and raised the ceiling. Rustic beams and heart pine floors (made with wood from an Amish barn in Wisconsin) add a sense of age. Traditional furnishings and a neutral palette accented with shades of celadon and pink connect the house to the past and present. Top Right Antique arm chairs flank the fireplace now topped with a simple wooden mantle that mimics the overhead beams. Built-in book shelves were added during the remodel. Bottom Right Javanmardi chose a pair of painted metal lamps to bring in color and echo the sepia tones of the framed architectural drawings grouped above the sofa.

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“There wasn’t any question.” In addition to being simpatico friends, Sarah and Javanmardi were on the same page design-wise. Sarah wanted what Javanmardi describes as “Southern, traditional, casual,” while Javanmardi and her brother Chad Graci are known for what Javanmardi calls “traditional with a fresh take.” In 2014, Traditional Home magazine named the partners “New Traditional Designers to Watch.” “Nothing is overly done, everything is based off of classical design,” says Javanmardi. The Heromans and Javanmardi agreed on a plan for gutting the house and imbuing it with a more timeless feel. That meant knocking out walls, carving out higher ceilings where possible, adding traditional elements such as beams, pine floors, moldings and built-in bookshelves, and updating the interior finishes and furniture with touches of contemporary design and references to the house’s Louisiana setting. Antiques, painted pieces and rustic woods impart a European patina and a sense of age. Homeowners and designer also agreed on a foundation of neutrals with a quiet palette of pinks, celadons and pale blues woven in through the art, drapery, pillows, lamps and other accessories. “We were conscientious about where we put the color and how bold it was,” says Javanmardi. Opening the house for a more spacious flow was key to the success of the remodel. In the living area, the ceilings were raised the maximum amount. In other areas, such as the dining room and master bedroom where the original roofline is lower, tray ceilings were created for extra height. The kitchen retained its minimal galleystyle footprint, but Javanmardi’s clever use of a window seat paired with a small table enabled the owners to check off an important item on their family-friendly wish list — an eat-in kitchen. Javanmardi also focused on family needs when decorating the nursery for the couple’s daughter, Claire. She chose gender-neutral colors and prints so that few changes would be required for a boy. When the couples’ second child, John Robert, came along, only two adjustments were

30 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

made. A bell-jar lantern now occupies the spot where Claire’s floral toile fixture hung and the liner in a basket was changed. “Sarah grew up in a very traditional house and wanted a younger, fresher, lighter take,” says Javanmardi. “But when you do a major renovation, you want things to age well. This house will carry them for a long time.” u

Top Left A vignette that includes an abstract by Javanmardi and Blue Delft pottery typifies the house’s mix of old and new. Top Right Homeowners Sarah and Robert Heroman Bottom Left The kitchen retained its gallery footprint but Javanmardi designed a window seat paired with a small table and chairs for eating. Travertine counters, subway tiles and white cabinetry lighten the narrow space. Right The English Regency style drop leaf dining table belonged to Robert’s mother. A pickled French Provincial style cabinet houses the couple’s china.


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art

Baton Rouge and the Visual Arts The city’s architecture and museums provide a host of cultural options By John R. Kemp

B

aton Rouge owes its start to the visual arts — a painted pole decorated with fish bones. The story goes something like this: In 1699 the French Canadian explorers Pierre Le Moyne, Sieur d’Iberville, and his younger brother Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, led an expedition to the lower Mississippi River to establish France’s claim to the territory. While exploring the area that would later become Baton Rouge, they noticed a tall, red pole standing high on a bluff. Inquiring among the local Native Americans, the explorers learned that the pole marked the boundary between Houmas and Bayagoula hunting grounds. Eventually, the area became known as “Baton Rouge,” French for red stick. In modern art parlance, Baton Rouge began as an abstract conceptual installation piece — a painted red pole with applied fish bones. Over the next 100-plus years, Baton Rouge muddled along as it passed from the French to the British and then to the Spanish. For a brief period in 1810, the town was part of the independent Republic of West Florida before being annexed by the United States later that same year. In 1846 the state legislature decided to move the capital from New Orleans to Baton Rouge. This relocation launched the city’s first public art program. The state hired New York architect James Dakin to design a new capitol building. Rather than copy the then-favored dome-style design in Washington, D.C., Dakin’s plan called for a massive neo-Gothic building, which he described as “castellated Gothic,” to be perched high on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi. It

32 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

was an age when public aesthetics were as important as function. Constructed between 1847 and 1852, the Old State Capitol with its crenulated parapets, massive cast-iron interior spiral staircase, stained glass rooftop skylight, and faux-bois woodwork is still an architectural masterpiece. Not everyone was happy with Dakin’s castle, now home to the Louisiana Museum

of Political History. Mark Twain, writing in his 1883 book “Life on the Mississippi,” described the landmark as a “pathetic... whitewashed castle” an “architectural falsehood” that should be dynamited. Nevertheless, the building dominated the Baton Rouge skyline until 1932 when Huey Long decided to build a new capitol to portray the glories of Louisiana history, art, industry and himself. The architects

old state capitol photos by Sheldon Anderson, Courtesy Louisiana Secretary of State


OPPOSITE PAGE Old State Capitol interior Top left Old State Capitol exterior top right

“Patriots” by Lorado Taft at the Louisiana state Capitol Bottom “Pioneers” by Lorado Taft at the Louisiana State Capitol

designed a modern art deco skyscraper and hired the state’s leading artists to decorate the interior and exterior with bas-relief sculptures and paintings to memorialize historical figures and events. Like Dakin’s earlier building, the new Capitol was a visual and architectural marvel for its time. Long’s body is buried in the beautifully landscaped park just outside the building. An imposing 12-foot bronze statue of Long made by New York sculptor Charles Keck stands over Long’s grave with his arms outstretched facing the Capitol. (Editor’s Note: To read more about the building, read the Traveler column on page 36.)

state capitol statues courtesy louisiana office of tourism

Next door to the Capitol sits the Louisiana Capitol Annex, built in 1938 by the Depression-era New Deal Public Works Administration. In the foyer are four large Conrad Albrizio murals, depicting the industrial, public health and social welfare achievements of Governor Richard Leche’s ill-fated administration. A more contemporary and stunning addition to the city’s skyline is the Shaw Center for the Arts at 100 Lafayette St. The center’s ultramodern design, with its translucent glass exterior, forms a stark visual and historical contrast to Dakin’s neo-Gothic “castle” directly across the

street. Opened in 2005, the 125,000square-foot, multi-story center is home to the LSU Museum of Art, the LSU School of Art Glassell Gallery and the Manship Theater. The LSU Museum of Art and the Glassell Gallery regularly feature art by regional and international artists. Located just down the street from the Shaw Center is the Louisiana Art and Science Museum, 100 River Road South. Housed in the 1925 classical revival Illinois Central Railroad depot building, the center keeps an ambitious schedule of art shows, featuring international and Louisiana artists. It also has a growing permanent collection of Louisiana and American art. The museum’s Ancient Egypt Gallery and planetarium shows are popular with fidgety school groups. The nearby Capitol Park Museum at 660 N. Fourth St. has a few historical Louisiana works of art included in broader exhibitions focusing on Louisiana history and culture. Across town, the Louisiana State Archives at 3851 Essen Lane, has the Baton Rouge Art League’s impressive collection of Louisiana art, including a number of Great Depression-era Works Progress Administration pieces created by noted artists working in Louisiana during the 1930s. The archive also has an extensive collection of World War I posters that were created to inspire popular support for the war effort. On the north side of Baton Rouge, Southern University’s impressive art museum focuses on the African diaspora. Opened in 2001, the museum collects and displays works created by African-American artists, especially Louisiana artists, and by

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artists in various regions of Africa. Many of these artists were shunned by museums and galleries at one time but continued to explore their art and culture. Other important arts venues in Baton Rouge include the LSU School of Art, which has turned out many of the state’s leading artists since the 1930s, and the nonprofit Baton Rouge Gallery, located in City Park. Reportedly the oldest artistcooperative in the nation, the gallery has been an important art venue for over 50 years. Like most cosmopolitan cities,

34 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

Baton Rouge has a number of commercial art galleries, featuring pieces ranging from 19th century landscapes to contemporary photography and paintings. While the business of Baton Rouge may be politics, the state also supports the visual arts thanks to the Percent for Art law passed in 1999. The measure requires that one percent of all state construction or renovation projects costing over $2 million be spent on works of art for public spaces in those buildings. Since 2004, the Louisiana Division of the Arts has

purchased approximately 130 works of art for new and renovated state buildings in Baton Rouge alone. Looking back over the last two centuries, the visual arts have indeed had a prominent place in the city’s landscape. u

Left “Knowledge Wins,” WWI Poster top right “Saturday Afternoon” by Clarence Millet (1936) middle Southern University Museum of Art, Baton Rouge bottom Shaw Center for the

Arts, Baton Rouge

wwi posters Courtesy Louisiana State Archives, Office of Secretary of State Tom Schedler


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traveler

Quiet Times at the Capitol Pomp, circumstance, history and tragedy punctuate ths iconic building BY Paul F. Stahls Jr.

T

Albrizio just inside the 1938 Capitol Annex Building. Bring binoculars and pause at Long’s statue and grave in the formal gardens to view the topmost details of the Capitol, with its four-story angels (Philosophy, Art, Law and Science) seeming to support the great beacon and 27th-floor observation deck. Closer up, details of the frieze

36 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

features scenes of Louisiana’s exploration and settlement era. To see the entire frieze (plus bas-relief profiles of 22 historic figures on the east and west facades), bring folding chairs and sack lunches. Kids like to find their states’ names engraved (by order of annexation) on the broad steps that rise to the main entrance, stopping along their climb to

view The Patriots, a cluster of sculptures representing protection of and by the state, and The Pioneers, a second set of sculptures featuring Robert de La Salle, Hernando DeSoto and the immigrants who followed. The 50-foot doorway rises between bas-relief scenes while large figures above the portal represent the inhabiting of Louisiana by original natives or,

photos by Jeff Stephens

he best introduction to any state is a visit to its capitol. That’s particularly true of Louisiana’s, the famed skyscraper where we can see the state’s story cast in metal and etched in stone, on a tour that doubles as a crash course on one of the most interesting eras of American art and design. The regular legislative session begins April 10 and adjourns no later than June 8 (but certain to be followed in this financially troubled year by a special session or two), so folks planning a tour must decide whether to enjoy the frenzy of a session or visit during quieter times. When Huey Long proposed a new capitol, he and his architects chose a blend of styles (art deco and beaux arts with elements of classic revival) that had eased America from Greek revival and into the 20th century — symbolically perfect for the era when FDR’s New Deal and Huey’s Share Our Wealth were promising change. Started in December 1930 and built in 15 months, the monument was unveiled as part of the inauguration of Gov. O.K. Allen. Park on the riverside of the Capitol for views of the 1825 Pentagon Barracks and four WPA-era frescoes by Conrad


“The Patriots” Memorial Hall

as in the case of France, Spain, the Confederacy and the United States, the ruling of the region. A short hallway, which served the original governor’s office, was once the scene of a

harrowing episode. On Sept. 8, 1935, Sen. Long was emerging when Dr. Carl Weiss stepped forward and fired a shot. A barrage of bullets from the bodyguards began instantly as

Long fled, holding his abdomen and staggering down the fourtiered, Senate-side stairway to the aboveground basement, there hailing a friend who drove him to (then) nearby Our Lady of the Lake hospital. He died two days later. Step into the elevator and pause on the second-floor balcony to view Memorial Hall from above. On the governor’s fourth floor, request a peek at the WPA-era Albrizio in the pressroom and 1880s George Mugnier photographs in the halls. Further up, you’ll find the observation deck, which is 350 feet high and offers lofty views of Baton Rouge and the winding river. It’s another ideal moment for binoculars and photographs — some folks buy postcards in the souvenir shop to be taken back down to the basement’s tiny post office for Capitol Station postmarks.

DETOURS Who killed Huey?

There’s that bullet hole in the marble column, of course, but also of great interest at the assassination site is the original painting of the scene by Louisiana’s great John McCrady (commissioned for the June 1939 cover of Life magazine and on loan to the Capitol by Keith and Millie Marshall of New Orleans). Was Long’s wound inflicted by Weiss or by Huey’s, shall we say, enthusiastic bodyguards? Those captivated by that mystery should go straight from the Capitol to Capitol Park Museum (beyond the Capitol Gardens on Fourth Street) to see an exhibit of Tommy guns of the type used by the bodyguards, and thereafter to the Huey Long exhibit room in the Old State Capitol (River Road at North Boulevard) to see the .32-caliber pistol carried by Weiss, but whose ballistic tests don’t quite match up. Hmmm. (louisianastatemuseum.org, 225-342-5428 and louisianaoldstatecapitol.org, 225-342-0500)

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The bronze doors of the Senate wing

Observation Deck view of the Old Arsenal

Most visitors who follow those footsteps linger down there to peruse the Louisiana crafts exhibit and visit the diner for burgers or daily specials. Walkways from the basement’s east exit lead past a Native American mound, the vintage artillery and Capitol Rose Garden to the Old Arsenal Museum, which is an 1835 powder magazine with four-foot-thick walls, Civil War graffiti and stacks of (stageprop) powder kegs rise to the vaulted ceiling. u Open 10 to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday 225-342-0401 sos.la.gov/HistoricalResources/ VisitMuseums u

38 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

DETOURS CAPITOL CUISINE

When hunger overtakes explorers in the Capitol Park area, it’s good to know that 10 or so sources of take-along snacks and sit-down meals are clustered in the Main Street Market, corner of Main and North Fourth (breada.org/ markets). Alongside the market’s coffee shops and confectioners, small restaurants spill out to double as sidewalk cafes, some with dramatic views of our newest state office towers — the LaSalle, Iberville, Bienville and Galvez Buildings.


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by Will Kalec photographs by Scott Mohrman

Waterscapes

IN

South Louisiana, there is a complicated duality in our waterways, a bit of a giveand-take that’s not always easy to understand. On one hand, they sustain us — twisting, winding economic pistons that shimmer when the sun goes to sleep. On the other, they make us scatter, intruding (albeit with warning) on our way of life and the literal shape of our region. On a spring weekend, Louisiana’s waterways are a welcome escape from the innocuous fluorescent-light din of Corporate America. On an insufferable late summer evening, those same waterways are unwelcome guests, as we all stay glued to the TV storm trackers. In the Sportsman’s Paradise, we revel in the natural splendor and raw untamed power of these vital fresh- and salt-water neighbors.

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Lake Pontchartrain The sky above Lake Pontchartrain, when the summer sun is taking its last breath for the day, is our very own box of crayons. Pinks next to purples. Teals next to deep reds. Wispy whites hugging the clouds’ silver lining. It’s cotton candy that only our pupils can taste. Covering more than 600 square miles and touching parts of six parishes (Orleans, Jefferson, St. Tammany, St. John the Baptist, St. Charles and Tangipahoa for those scoring at home), Lake Pontchartrain is arguably the most popular inland watery playground. Whether it’s sailing, fishing or sipping something cold on the patio of New Orleans’ Southern Yacht Club, Lake Pontchartrain is the perfect setting for all of that and more. The southern shore of the lake frames the Lakeview and Gentilly neighborhoods of New Orleans while the upper shores touch the southernmost portions of the Northshore — Mandeville and Slidell, specifically.

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The Bonnet Carre Spillway The man-made majesty of The Bonnet Carre Spillway, constructed in 1931, is both awe-inspiring and essential to the well being of South Louisiana. Nestled 12 miles west of New Orleans, the flood control operation diverts excess water from the Mississippi River into Lake Pontchartrain. With that said, the Spillway — as far as a flood control device — usually remains non-operational. In fact, officials opened the Spillway for just the 11th time in history in January of 2016, after downpours in states like Illinois and Missouri swelled the water level of the river. Initially, the Corps of Engineers opened 20 bays of the Spillway, allowing 12,000 cubic feet of water to pass through per second.

Lake Pontchartrain at Breakwater Park Breakwater Park in New Orleans is like a peninsula jetting out from another peninsula; a topographical anomaly easily submerged during massive storms, producing pastel sunsets worthy of a breakroom motivational poster when it’s nice out. Those that come out with a picnic in tow are often treated to locals fishing the fertile waters and sailboats racing off in the distance. Later that same evening, the stars above put on their own show. A strong-armed pebble throw from Lakeshore Drive, Breakwater Park truly comes to life on summer Saturdays and Sundays as it’s the perfect spot for recreation and relaxation.

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Shell Beach For both recreational and commercial boating, Shell Beach in St. Bernard Parish is a popular launch point and a key artery for Louisiana’s renowned seafood industry. Because of its geography, Shell Beach has often been on the front lines of violent weather. In the decade since Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita deliverd a punch to the region, the resilience of the natural landscape and the dependence of Louisianans on the bounty found in the waters at Shell Beach has become clear.

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Hurricane Katrina Memorial A haunting morning fog from Mother Nature casts a fitting sense of reverence on this sacred spot, as pelicans perch near the Katrina Memorial at Shell Beach. Beside this iron cross with the face of Jesus attached are the names of everyone from St. Bernard Parish who died in the storm. On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina engulfed South Louisiana, fluctuating between a weak Category 4 and strong Category 3 storm upon landfall. Winds of roughly 125 miles per hour overwhelmed communities like Buras and Port Sulphur near the tip of the boot. Twelve-foot storm surges coupled with 8 to 10 inches of rain compromised the integrity of dozens of levees as damage estimates creeped into the tens of billions. More than 900,000 Louisiana residences lost power. In St. Bernard Parish, 81 percent of the houses were severely damaged, according to government reports. Major levee failures in New Orleans left 80 percent of the city flooded and made the Interestate-10 Twin Span unpassable.

Lake Martin At times, the images of Lake Martin appear to be lifted from a Hollywood set or an accomplished illustrator’s canvas — the quintessential Cajun swamp scene. Alligators stalk the mostly silent waters. Snakes tangle around tree branches and occasionally dangle from them. Bullfrogs, gluttonous mosquitos and other critters conduct an unwritten symphony that, at all hours of the night, reminds us that this lake is alive. Protected by the Nature Conservatory, Lake Martin stretches through the heart of Acadiana and is the setting for some of the best bird watching anywhere in the world. White ibis. Snowy egret. Tricolored heron. They’re all here and all accessible via pirogue or while walking along a 2.5-mile levee trail that’s open most of the year.

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Oyster Knives To open oysters, you need an oyster knife. There are dozens of different designs to choose from — a Boston knife, a Chesapeake knife, a Galveston knife and so on. I have four versions, and my favorite is the New Haven style, which has a slightly bent point that affords increased leverage.

Broiled oysters: There are two ways to execute this dish. The oysters can be broiled on the half shell, but that necessitates opening oysters, which is not part of everyone’s skill set. Alternately, you can buy shucked oysters and broil them in small ramekins, which greatly simplifies the process.

By Stanley Dry Photography by Eugenia Uhl

Briny, sweet and packed with vitamins and minerals, Gulf oysters are a beloved Louisiana food. Whether they are broiled, chargrilled, stewed or fried, belly up to the bivalve for a heaping helping.

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Broiled Oysters Makes 4 servings an appetizer

The shallots called for in the recipe are the small brownskinned bulbs, not green onions, which are frequently called shallots in Louisiana. Provide plenty of French bread for soaking up the juices.

Oysters are as much a part of Louisiana life and lore as gumbo or Mardi Gras. The raw oysters, fried oysters and oyster poor boys we take for granted as regular features of our diet are a source of wonderment for outsiders, particularly those from the inland states where fresh oysters are usually not available. Many a visitor has eaten his or her first oyster on a trip to Louisiana. It’s likely that even if you know little or nothing about New Orleans cuisine, you’ve heard of Oysters Rockefeller and that the dish was created at Antoine’s. Louisiana is celebrated for its variety of oyster dishes, which no other section of the country can match. Part of the reason for our large oyster repertoire is undoubtedly the great bounty from the Gulf. Louisiana harvests more oysters than any other state, currently 34 percent of the national total. In addition to those served on the half-shell or fried, oysters are enjoyed in gumbos, stews, soups, baked, broiled, in oyster stuffing for turkey and in myriad other ways, limited only by the cook’s imagination.

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 2 teaspoons minced shallots 1 tablespoon chopped parsley large pinch coarse salt ⅛ teaspoon cayenne ⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ cup freshly grated Italian Parmesan, divided 2 tablespoons breadcrumbs 24-32 oysters, depending on size In a mixing bowl, combine butter, shallots, parsley, salt, cayenne, black pepper, lemon juice and ¼ cup of the Parmesan. Whisk or mix ingredients until well combined. In a small bowl combine ¼ cup Parmesan with the breadcrumbs. (This can be done ahead of time and refrigerated until needed.)

Oyster Farming

Preheat broiler and place 4 small ramekins on a baking sheet. Divide oysters among the ramekins. Divide the compound butter among the ramekins. Top with the breadcrumb and Parmesan mixture. Place baking sheet and ramekins under the broiler and broil until mixture bubbles and top is browned.

Off-bottom oyster cultivation is a method of raising oysters in floating cages or baskets that protect them from predators. It also produces oysters that do not spawn and that maintain their flavor in summer months. Several producers have adopted this laborintensive method in the waters off Grand Isle.


Oyster Stew Makes 4 servings

If there is an easier recipe for a satisfying dish, I don’t know what it is. I used to enjoy sitting at the bar in New York’s Grand Central Oyster Bar and watching the chefs make oysterstew-to-order in their small steam-jacketed kettles. All you need to make it yourself is a stove and a pot.

3 cups whole milk 1 cup heavy cream 24-32 oysters, depending on size coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper cayenne paprika In a pot, heat milk, cream and oysters almost to the boiling point. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Divide oysters and broth among the 4 hot bowls. Top with a dash of cayenne and a dash of paprika.

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Oyster Beignets Makes about 20 beignets

This dish is not seen much these days, but at least one of Louisiana’s earliest cookbooks contains a recipe for oyster beignets. These make delicious little appetizers. oil for frying 1 cup flour 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup milk 1 egg, separated ½ teaspoon grated lemon zest ½ cup chopped, drained oysters In a pot, pour about two inches of oil and heat on the stovetop. In a bowl, whisk dry ingredients to combine. Add milk, egg yolk and lemon zest; stir to combine. Chop enough oysters to yield ½ cup; place in strainer to drain. Add drained oysters to batter and stir to combine. Whip egg white until stiff, then fold into batter. When oil reaches 375 F on a deep-fry thermometer, drop batter by the spoonful into oil. When beignet is brown on one side, flip to brown the other side. Remove cooked beignets with slotted spoon and drain on absorbent paper.

Oysters With Names Increasingly, Louisiana oysters will be marketed by place or proprietary names, as are East and West Coast oysters. That was once the case, and it is now being revived as off-bottom cultivation results in distinctive flavor profiles. Caminada Bay, Champagne Bay and Triple N are three current examples.


Orzo With Oysters Makes 4 servings

A variety of pasta dishes include oysters, sometimes in a cream sauce, other times in a red sauce. This version bears a resemblance to linguine with white clam sauce. Other pastas such as linguine can be used, but I’m partial to orzo, the rice-shaped pasta. 2 cups orzo 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced ½ cup white wine large pinch crushed red pepper 2 tablespoons butter 40-48 oysters, depending on size coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon chopped parsley Cook orzo al dente according to package instructions. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, cook garlic in olive oil until softened. Add wine and crushed red pepper. Add butter and oysters and cook briefly to firm oysters. Drain orzo, reserving some of the cooking water. Add orzo to skillet and stir. Add a little of the cooking water and season to taste with salt and pepper. Divide the orzo and oysters among 4 shallow bowls and sprinkle with chopped parsley.


Oyster Festival The New Orleans Oyster Festival is at Woldenberg Park in New Orleans, June 3 and 4. It features oyster preparations (including an Oyster Rockefeller Po-Boy) from some of the city’s finest restaurants, as well as a shucking contest, cooking demonstrations and an oyster eating contest.

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Spinach Salad With Oysters & Bacon Makes 4 servings

Oysters are wrapped in bacon and broiled in a dish called Angels on Horseback. Anyone who has tasted that combination knows that it is an inspired pairing. Here, oysters and bacon are included in a spinach salad with a mustard vinaigrette.

Oyster & Fennel Soup Makes 4 servings

This is an exceedingly quick soup to make. Assuming you don’t have to shuck the oysters, you can have dinner on the table in under 10 minutes. Round out the meal with salad, a good loaf of bread, wine and fruit.

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup diced fennel 4 cups chicken stock or broth ¼ cup white wine 2 tablespoons anise liqueur, such as Herbsaint or Pernod 2 teaspoons ground dried shrimp ⅛ teaspoon saffron, crumbled ½ cup chopped tomato 24 oysters cayenne freshly ground black pepper fennel fronds In a medium-sized pot, simmer garlic and fennel in olive oil for a minute or two until fragrant. Add chicken stock, wine, anise liqueur, ground dried shrimp, saffron and tomato. Boil for a few minutes, then add oysters and simmer only until oysters begin to curl. Season to taste with cayenne and black pepper and garnish with fennel fronds.

4 slices thick bacon 8 cups baby spinach ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 4 teaspoons Dijon mustard 4 teaspoons white wine vinegar coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper oil for frying corn flour for breading 24 oysters In a pan, fry bacon until crisp, then drain on absorbent paper. Meanwhile, wash and dry spinach, discarding any bruised or wilted leaves. In a bowl, whisk olive oil, mustard and vinegar together until emulsified, then toss with spinach. Season with salt and pepper. Divide salad among four plates. Cut bacon into bite-sized pieces and place atop salads. In the same pan used for frying, add oil to a depth of about 2 inches and heat until the temperature reaches 375 F on a deep-fry thermometer. Place corn flour in a shallow pan or dish. Dredge oysters in corn flour and fry, in batches, until crisp. Drain cooked oysters on absorbent paper. Sprinkle with salt. Keep oysters warm in a low oven until all are cooked. Divide oysters among the four salads.


The Building of the Louisiana State Capitol 900 N 3rd St. In 1932, no one had seen the likes of a sky scraping, 450-foot state Capitol in Louisiana’s capital city, but no one had seen the likes of Huey P. Long either. Long spared no expense in building this monument to Louisiana, with the finest finishes from lava floors to ton-sized chandeliers, down to the walls made of marble that would forever bear the bullet holes from his death. A Capitol so grand, every man who visits, feels like a king.

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Baton Rouge

A Rolling River Town Where Culture Runs Deep By Teresa Day

While early records of the city’s existence date back more than 300 hundred years, Baton Rouge celebrates its 200th year as an incorporated city in 2017. As the state’s capital for around 170 years, Baton Rouge has come to represent every major influence of Louisiana culture in one iconic city. Just as the mighty Mississippi River twists, turns and broadens shaping the city, the history and culture of Baton Rouge flows with it. The area on the banks of the Mississippi was first called, “Istrouma” by the Native Americans who lived and hunted there, hanging their kill on a stick to mark their territory. Translated in French to “Baton Rouge” by Pierre Le Moyne D’Ibberville, ultimately means “red stick” in English, a moniker that’s used throughout the city today. To pretend Baton Rouge hasn’t been through turbulence however, would be to dismiss the things that make it beautiful — and unbreakable.

In 2016, this city used to being fiercely independent, where big decisions are made and so much Louisiana history was born, suddenly felt ordinary and small. As waters rose during the floods tenacious Baton Rouge residents pulled up their bootstraps and reached deep into their communities to begin to heal and strengthen the heart of Louisiana. Today, Baton Rouge has never been more welcoming or felt more like home. As Louisiana’s capital eases into its 200th year, you’ll find a rising city that encourages the success of local business owners, that learns and develops new ways to live and work, and celebrates cuisine, art, music and culture every day. On this auspicious anniversary, we offer up a celebration of Baton Rouge that highlights what to eat, drink, see and do, both old and new.


The Chimes 3357 Highland Road 225-383-1754 thechimes.com

The Chimes on Highland has been a campus hangout for Louisiana State University students and professors for generations. The original location’s restaurant and

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taproom harbors more than classic comfort foods and cold craft brews, its walls hold more than 30 years of memories. From its Abita Root Beerglazed pork chops

to its blackened alligator, and with its 80 beer taps, there is something for everyone and everything is distinctively Louisiana influenced.


Eat There is never a shortage of unique fine dining and locally sourced comfort food in Baton Rouge. Lately, the city’s culinary scene has heartened relationships with regional farmers and fishers to bring the freshest seasonal foods in to focus for everyone. In Mid-City, get a taste of Tuscany with authentic Italian sandwiches and homemade pasta dishes at Anthony’s Italian Deli. Downtown, study the difference in oysters cultivated from coast to coast at Jolie Pearl Oyster Bar. In the Perkins Road overpass area, feast on unique takes on the traditional at The Overpass Merchant. By Louisiana State University, fill up on classic Louisiana comfort food and wash it down from the extensive tap selection of local and craft brews at The Chimes. For the finest fried chicken, try the same recipe enjoyed by Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington at Delpit’s Chicken Shack, a classic since 1937.

Drink Speaking of taps, Baton Rouge is now home to two craft breweries, Tin Roof Brewing Company and Southern Craft Brewing Company, that have taprooms to sample locally brewed and inspired beer. You can also find craft cocktails at Olive or Twist and fine wines at Bin 77. For the richest coffees, sit outside at Magpie Cafe, sip your brew from Strands Cafe by the river, or catch up with friends at Garden District Coffee.

Blend Wine Bar 304 Laurel St #1B 225-757-5645 blendbr.com For a simple after work happy hour, a night out with the girls or a romantic evening, Blend has a sophisticated atmosphere and equally sophisticated selection of wine and cocktails. The menu of small plates was created by its chefs to complement the restaurant’s extensive wine offerings. Blend’s interior design highlights much of the original architecture of an historic downtown building with modern accents, rounding out the vibe of a decadent evening in the heart of the city.

See Take a walk in Huey P. Long’s shoes and learn about the spirited history of Louisiana politics as you stroll from the Old Governor’s Mansion to the Old State Capital and end up at the current, 34-story Louisiana State Capitol building (the tallest in the U.S.) used today. A short walk from there is the interactive Capital Park Museum that is chock full of Louisiana state history and culture. Back by the river, see what it’s like to be a sailor on the U.S.S. Kidd and explore space, sculpture and more at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum and the LSU Museum of Art. For more mediums, check out fine art exhibits at the Baton Rouge Gallery and see captivating wildlife photography at C.C. Lockwood’s Gallery in the Backpacker store for outdoor gear and apparel.


Red Stick Farmer’s Market 501 N 5th St. 225-267-5060 breada.org

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What started out as a thesis project now has a huge influence in where local home cooks and chefs get the freshest foods for their tables. Red Stick Farmers Market on North and Main Street downtown is the cornerstone of the Big River

Economic & Agricultural Development Alliance. This group and its farmers markets connect citizens to farm fresh, locally grown food at sites throughout the city almost every day of the week.


Do Start your Saturday with shopping for fresh fruit, vegetables and regionally raised proteins at the Red Stick Farmers Market downtown or visit any of the weekday markets set up across the city. Spend the afternoon exploring Baton Rouge’s version of Central Park, a 440-arce expanse of land, trails, gardens and rural village at Burden Museum and Gardens. Then take in an evening show at Theatre Baton Rouge or the Manship Theatre, or ballet at the Baton Rouge Ballet Theatre.

Burden Museum and Gardens 4560 Essen Lane 225-763-3990 lsuagcenter.com Set in the middle of Baton Rouge’s metropolitan area is a 440-arce parcel that preserves history and promotes modern day study. Owned and protected by Louisiana State University, Burden Museum and Gardens includes an expanse of walking trails, lush gardens, a full scale village of structures depicting rural life in Louisiana hundreds of years ago, as well as a state-of-the-art agricultural testing ground, just to name a few attractions in this one spot.

Shopping Find eco-friendly and socially responsible gifts and more at Noelie Harmon. Before you hit the town, ladies will find the perfect outfits at Soiree, from casual to formal and everything in between. Fellas can find local favorite styles and a few gifts, too at Pierre Crawdeaux Company. For gifts of all ages, shop The Royal Standard’s multi-vendor one-stop shop for any occasion. Source unusual antiques and locally crafted artwork at The Market at Circa 1857. Each month, the Red Stick Farmers Market hosts local artisans. For international guests, Baton Rouge offers tax-free shopping.

Louisiana Science and Art Museum and Irene W. Pennington Planetarium 100 S. River Road 225-344-5272 lasm.org The Louisiana Art and Science Museum is housed in an historic, 1925 railway station on the banks of the Mississippi River. From browsing fine-art galleries to finding star formations, visitors of all ages can find something to pique their interests in the interactive museum and its adjoining Irene W. Pennington Planetarium. This 60-foot dome theater is the largest planetarium in Louisiana. Daily shows range from astronomy and other scientific subjects to alternative rock music.


Wearin’ of the Green St. Patrick’s Parade March 18 While St. Patrick’s Day parades have been a tradition in Baton Rouge dating back to 1906, the 32nd annual Wearin’ of the Green Parade will roll through the Garden District area on Saturday, March 18. What started out as a small neighborhood parade, has now grown to be one of Baton Rouge’s most beloved spectacles. Start your morning off with a Bloody Mary then catch your weight in green beads and more along the route.

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Third Street Songwriter’s Festival

Hear

April 21-23

Listen to a variety of bands in an intimate setting at the Varsity Theatre, or catch bigger shows at L’auberge Casino and Hotel Baton Rouge. For the best live outdoor music, bring your blanket and settle in for the Baton Rouge Blues Festival (April 8 and 9), the oldest blues festival in the U.S. More outdoor concert series come in waves across the city at Live after Five, Rock-n-Rowe and Sundays in the Park during both the spring and fall seasons

Say you heard it first at the Third Street Songwriter’s Festival, a three-day festival that draws songwriters from all over the country to share their original work on and around Third Street in Baton Rouge. Throughout the festival, songwriters will have the chance to perform in front Nashville songwriting organizations and publishing companies. Music lovers can spend festival evenings listening to live performances of original music performed by successful Nashville songwriters as well as local songwriters hoping to make it big.

party Spring is Baton Rouge’s most celebrated season. Start with quaint, and some satirical, Mardi Gras parades (Feb. 11-25) then feel the luck of the Irish at the Wearin’ of the Green St. Patrick’s Day Parade (March 18). In April, celebrate the capital region’s cultural, economic and ecological connection to the Mississippi River at the Ebb and Flow Festival (April 1 and 2) and Louisiana Earth Day (April 23) with festivities downtown.

Baton Rouge Blues Festival April 8 and 9 The Baton Rouge Blues Festival has been celebrating the blues in the Red Stick for more than 35 years. As the oldest blues festival in America, the Baton Rouge Blues Festival has honored local, national and international blues artists in an impressive lineup each year. This year’s festival will feature The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Kenny Neal & the Neal Family Band, Marc Broussard and many more. The Baton Rouge Blues Festival will run April 8 and 9 in downtown Baton Rouge.

Live Baton Rouge residents make themselves at home in sprawling suburbs or in walkable living areas where they can live, play and work within walking distance. Homey neighborhoods with plenty to see and do within a short distance include the downtown area, Spanish Town, Beauregard Town, Mid-City/Capital Heights, Perkins Road overpass and Perkins Rowe areas.


The awe-inspiring diversity of Louisiana is easily taken for granted. A quick survey of the state’s spring festivals — Louisiana is home to more annual festivals than there are days in the year — is an apt reminder that there’s no place like the state that we call home. Here are a few of Louisiana’s best festivals for mingling with the locals, dancing like you’re not on Facebook or connecting with your roots — whether they’re in Senegal or By Chris Jay Sicily.

Where: New Iberia Historic District Tickets: Many events are free, other events $15-$60 More Info: daverobicheauxliteraryfestival.com

One of Louisiana’s newest festivals celebrates fictional detective Dave Robicheaux, the rule-breaking Cajun sheriff’s deputy who appears in numerous novels by best-selling author James Lee Burke. Dave Robicheaux’s Hometown Literary Festival, launched in 2016, invites fans of Burke’s detective novels to explore the character’s hometown haunts like Shadows-on-the-Teche and Victor’s Cafeteria during guided bus tours. There’s also an academic symposium on Burke’s life and career, a book fair with author appearances and book signings, and even a Cajun bourré tournament. This being New Iberia, there are plenty of opportunities to sample local food (including a cochon de lait) and dance to Cajun and zydeco music while enjoying scenic views of Bayou Teche. Burke, who spent summers in New Iberia as a child, did not attend the festival in its first year — but hundreds of his fans did.

Dave Robicheaux’s Hometown Literary Festival

March 31-April 2

Scottish Tartan Festival Shreveport

Youth Art Month Festival Alexandria

Dave Robicheaux’s Hometown Literary Festival New Iberia

Wild Beast Feast Lake Charles

Iowa Rabbit Festival Lake Charles

Cajun Chili Fest Youngsville

Annual Black Heritage Festival Lake Charles

Louisiana Winter Beer Festival Lake Charles

Spring Fiesta New Orleans

Taco Fest New Orleans

Tennessee Williams Literary Festival New Orleans

Congo Square New World Rhythms Festival New Orleans

Buku Music and Art Project New Orleans

New Orleans Wine & Food Experience New Orleans

Covington Antiques and Uniques Festival Covington

Lake Arthur Regatta Lake Arthur FestiGals New Orleans

Grand Isle Migratory Bird Festival Grand Isle

Jeff Fish Fest & Rodeo River Ridge

Riverboat Festival Columbia

Marion Mayhaw Festival Marion

Jambalaya Festival Gonzales

Greek Festival New Orleans New Orleans

Mudbug Madness Shreveport

Cochon de Lait Festival Mansura

Starks Mayhaw Festival Starks

Flea Fest: Flea Market Lake Charles

Westlake Family Fun & Food Festival Westlake

Southern Garden Festival Lafayette

Downtown Lake Charles Crawfish Festival Lake Charles

Louisiana Railroad Days Festival DeQuincy

Dave Robicheaux’s Hometown Literary Festival New Iberia

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival New Orleans

Contraband Days-Louisiana Pirate Festival Lake Charles

Mid-City Bayou Boogaloo New Orleans

French Quarter Festival New Orleans

Abita Springs Busker Festival Abita Springs

Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival Breaux Bridge

Taste of Covington Festival Covington

THROUGH 2017


Where: Downtown Vivian Tickets: Free admission More info: laredbud.com

Where: Festival Plaza, Downtown Shreveport Tickets: $15 More info: arklatexambassadors.com

Where: Riverwalk, Downtown Monroe Tickets: $35 More info: domobrewfest.com

Launched in 2015 as a fundraiser benefiting the Downtown Monroe Alliance, DoMo Brewfest is an afternoon-long beer tasting featuring more than 150 beers. Expect the beer list to highlight local brews from Flying Tiger Brewery and Ouachita Brewing Company as well as lots of other regional breweries. Beer lovers who make the trip should plan to spend some time at the incredible Flying Tiger Brewery tasting room, which opened in 2016 and features a replica of the shark-faced nose art of a P-40 Warhawk fighter suspended above the bar.

A 30-foot tall inflatable hog welcomes visitors to Grillin’ for Grads, a barbecue cookoff and college scholarship fundraiser attracting competition barbecue teams from throughout the region to downtown Shreveport. Teams arrive and get cooking on Friday, which includes a public live music showcase and a VIP tent party. On Saturday, festival attendees can enjoy a kids cook off, mechanical bull rides, a rib-eating contest and more. The main attraction of this event is Saturday’s barbecue showdown. Attendees can sample and vote on dishes in several categories, bestowing a coveted People’s Choice token to their overall favorite dish. Serious barbecue aficionados should plan to arrive in time to be among the first wave of People’s Choice voters to work their way through Festival Plaza sampling smokey brisket, spicy ribs and juicy smoked chicken during what amounts to an all-youcan-eat buffet prepared by trophy-toting pitmasters.

Small-town festivals don’t come much more charming than the Louisiana Redbud Festival in Vivian. There’s the Ruby Collins Memorial Redbud Treasure Hunt — which whips locals into a frenzy as they search for a $300 prize hidden somewhere within city limits — as well as the annual pancake breakfast, carnival rides, arts and crafts vendors and live music. The Redbud Parade, now in its 53rd year, will roll at 2 p.m., and the festival will conclude with an oldfashioned street dance on the town square.

DoMo Brewfest

Grillin’ for Grads

Louisiana Redbud Festival

JUNE 3

APRIL 7-8

MARCH 18

Where: Frog Festival Pavilion, Rayne Tickets: Free on Thursday, $5 for adults on Friday and Saturday More Info: raynefrogfestival.com

It may be easier to list the things that you can’t do with frogs at the Rayne Frog Festival, which will celebrate its 45th year this spring, but it’s more fun to list activities such as frog racing, frog eating contests, frog cook offs, a frog kissing booth, frog dress-up contests and frog jumping competitions. Don’t have a frog of your own? No problem! You can rent a frog for the day. All of this takes place, naturally, in the “Frog Capital of the World.”

Rayne Frog Festival

May 10-13

Where: Thibodaux Fire Department Fairgrounds, Thibodeaux Tickets: Free admission More info: firemensfair.com

Thibodaux is home to the largest volunteer fire department fundraiser in the United States: The Thibodaux Firemen’s Fair. Going stronger than ever after an unbelievable 134 years, the event netted more than $750,000 in funds for the Thibodaux Volunteer Fire Department in 2016, despite heavy rain. A huge live-music stage, carnival rides, Cajun food and a live raffle drawing for $10,000 cash are just a few of the main attractions. The Firemen’s Parade, held annually on the Sunday of the festival at 11 a.m., is one of the oldest parades in Louisiana and a crowd favorite.

Thibodaux Firemen’s Fair

May 4-7

Jane Austen Literary Festival Mandeville

FoodFest New Orleans

Spring Fiesta New Orleans

Zapp’s International Beer Festival Baton Rouge

Boggy Bayou Festival Pine Prairie

NOLA Pyrate Week New Orleans

Kite Fest Louisiane Port Allen

Saints and Sinners Literary Festival New Orleans

Fête Française New Orleans

Amite Oyster Festival Amite

NOLA Pyrate Week New Orleans

Merryville Heritage Festival Merryville

Sacred Music Festival New Orleans

Plaquemines Parish Seafood Festival Belle Chasse

Zwolle Loggers and Forestry Festival Zwolle

Bayou Country Superfest New Orleans

Thibodaux Firemen’s Fair Thibodaux

Mayfest Leesville

Sunset Herb and Garden Festival Sunset

Greater New Orleans International Dragon Boat Festival Madisonville

Melrose Arts Festival Melrose

Scott Boudin Festival Scott

Festival International de Louisiane Lafayette

Ponchatoula Strawberry Festival Ponchatoula

Louisiana Railroad Days Festival DeQuincy

Italian Festival Tickfaw

Baton Rouge Blues Festival Baton Rouge

Bayou Teche Black Bear and Birding Festival Franklin

Lagniappe Dulcimer Festival Baton Rouge Louisiana Crawfish Festival Chalmette

Franklin Parish Catfish Festival Winnsboro

Louisiana Redbud Festival Vivian

Running of the Bulls New Orleans

Cajun Music & Food Festival Lake Charles

Tales of the Cocktail New Orleans

Oilman’s Fishing Invitational Houma

Essence Festival New Orleans

Louisiana Cajun-Zydeco Festival New Orleans

Smoked Meat Festival Ville Platte

Let the Good Times Roll Festival Shreveport

Louisiana Corn Festival Bunkie

The Day the War Stopped St. Francisville

Beauregard Watermelon Festival DeRidder

Louisiana Peach Festival Ruston

New Orleans Oyster Festival New Orleans

Cajun Heritage Festival Larose

Wednesdays on the Point New Orleans (Algiers)

Louisiana Catfish Festival Des Allemands

Bon Mangé Festival Gheens


On paper, the Louisiana Forest Festival reads like the description of a fever dream. There are professional lumberjack competitions, bed races, karate demonstrations and a meetand-greet with Smokey the Bear. There’s even the perfectly named Run, Forest, Run 5K. Festivalgoers who need a break from the ax-tossing action should head into town for a visit to the Louisiana Political Museum and Hall of Fame. This gem of a museum is packed with artifacts from the lives of Louisiana’s most colorful political figures including Winnfield natives Huey P. Long, Earl Long and O.K. Allen.

For more than 30 years, the Cotile Trade Days have been organized as an annual fundraiser benefiting the Lions Club of Alexandria. Vendor booths sell everything from arts and crafts to tools, antiques, “junk” and jewelry. (A promotional flyer reads: “If it’s legal, you can sell it.”) Food and non-alcoholic beverages are available for purchase on food row and organizers have recently added a children’s activity area featuring a climbing wall and inflatable slides. Cotile Lake Recreation Park is located 20 miles west of Alexandria via LA-496.

Where: Winnfield Fairgrounds Tickets: Free admission More info: laforestfestival.com

Louisiana Forest Festival

Cotile Trade Days

Where: Cotile Lake Recreation Park, Boyce Tickets: Walk-in admission $1, children ages 6 and younger free More info: cotiletradedays.org

APRIL 21-22

MARCH 25-26

Where: Alexandria Ampitheater Tickets: Free admission More info: alexandriapinevillela.com/ littlewalter

Since launching the event in 2013, festival organizers have demonstrated impeccable tastes in curating a blues showcase featuring regional, national and international talent. Past performers have included Shemekia Copeland, Chubby Carrier and Japanese blues guitarist Nacomi Tanaka.

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and Marksville native Little Walter – who learned to play the harmonica while living in Alexandria and went on to become the preferred sideman of Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley and others – is celebrated annually at this startup blues festival on the banks of the Red River. Serious students of the blues can sit in on workshops, lectures and jam sessions or visit the site of Little Walter’s home at 2331 Lee Street.

Little Walter Music Festival

MAY 26-27

Where: UNO Lakefront Arena Grounds, New Orleans Tickets: $25-$310 More info: hogsforthecause.org

2017 will be a big year for Hogs for the Cause, a charity barbecue cook off and music festival benefiting pediatric patients with brain cancer. Rapid growth has pushed organizers to move the event from City Park to the University of New Orleans Lakefront Arena Grounds, where the 2017 festival will welcome barbecue teams from across the U.S. as well as local and national music acts including The Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Fruit Bats and George Porter Jr. Competitive barbecue events can sometimes offer little for the non-competing public to enjoy, but Hogs for the Cause has evolved over the years into the kind of party where there’s always something to do, whether that means visiting the dedicated gin and tonic bar, catching a live music set or wandering the festival grounds spotting celebrity chefs. Regardless of who takes top honors in 2017, the real winners are families fighting pediatric brain cancer — Hogs organizers recently announced that they have donated over $1 million to fight the disease since launching the festival just nine years ago.

Hogs for the Cause

March 31-April 1

Le Cajun Music Awards and Festival Lafayette

Arts & Crabs Fest Lake Charles

Gueydan Duck Festival Gueydan

Red Dress Run New Orleans

Satchmo SummerFest New Orleans

Whitney White Linen Night New Orleans

Dirty Linen Night New Orleans

Grand Isle Tarpon Rodeo Grand Isle

Slidell Heritage Festival Slidell

Essence Festival New Orleans

Natchitoches/ NSU Folk Festival Natchitoches

Louisiana Watermelon Festival Farmerville

Erath Fourth of July Celebration Erath

Bayou BBQ Bash – “Morgan City Under the Bridge” Morgan City

Cake and Ice Cream Festival Abbeville

Bucktown Bash Metairie

Old Farmers Day Festival Loranger

International Rice Festival Crowley

Yellow Leaf Arts Festival St. Francisville

Red River Revel Shreveport

Ponderosa Stomp Festival New Orleans

Bridge City Gumbo Festival Bridge City

Louisiana Gumbo Festival of Chackbay Chackbay/ Thibodaux

Oktoberfest Kenner

Harvest Festival on False River New Roads

Louisiana Cattle Festival Abbeville

Voice of the Wetlands Houma

Andouille Festival LaPlace

State Fair of Louisiana Shreveport

Ragley Heritage & Timber Festival Ragley

French Market’s Boo Carré New Orleans

Rougarou Festival Houma

St. Tammany Crab Festival Lacombe

Sabine Free State Festival Florien

Mirliton Festival New Orleans

Louisiana Renaissance Festival Hammond

Giant Omelette Celebration Abbeville

Louisiana Swine Festival Basile

Atchafalaya Basin Festival Henderson

Words & Music Festival: A Literary Feast in New Orleans New Orleans

Sugar Day Festival Alexandria

Three Rivers Art Festival Covington

Louisiana Pecan Festival Colfax

Louisiana Indian Heritage Association Pow Wow Gonzales

State Fair of Louisiana Shreveport

Greater Baton Rouge State Fair Baton Rouge

Oak Street Po-Boy Festival New Orleans

Voodoo Music + Art Experience New Orleans


The Angola Prison Rodeo, the longestrunning prison rodeo in the U.S., can be an intense experience. During the rodeo program, inmates dubbed the “Angola Rough Riders” ride broncos bareback, attempt to milk running cows and stare down raging bulls as part of a spectacle that typically sells out weeks in advance. In stark contrast to to the rodeo, there is a large arts and crafts fair — referred to as Hobby Craft — where minimum security prisoners are allowed to sell their art to patrons. Inmates sell everything from paintings and furniture to handcrafted leather goods, using the proceeds to support themselves and purchase art supplies.

If you’ve ever wandered among the food vendors at a festival, driven to despair by banal rows of corn dogs, curly fries and turkey legs, the Independence Sicilian Heritage Festival may be an event more to your liking. Popular foods sold by vendors at this festival include stuffed artichokes, eggplant casserole, lasagna and cannolis. There’s also live music, Sicilian folk dancing and a children’s meatball toss. (“Kids can throw meatballs to one another,” an online commercial for the festival says.) Festivalgoers of Italian descent should stop by the Independence Italian Cultural Museum for a fascinating exploration of Italian life in Louisiana.

Where: Louisiana State Penitentiary, Angola Tickets: Rodeo $20, Hobby Craft $10 More info: angolarodeo.com

Angola Prison Spring Rodeo

Independence Sicilian Heritage Festival

Where: Independence Tickets: Free admission More info: indysicilianfest.com

April 22-23

March 10-12

Where: Irma Boulevard, Gonzales Tickets: Free admission More info: jambalayafestival.org

The music and dance of Africa, the Caribbean and the American Gulf South Region are celebrated in this two-day, family-friendly festival held in Louis Armstrong Park. What the music lineup may lack in pop appeal it makes up for with authenticity, vibrance and the raw, soul-stirring power of some of the greatest rhythm makers on earth. Highlights of the 2017 schedule include Rebirth Brass Band, DJ Soul Sister and the annual Mardi Gras Indian battle.

The Gonzales Jambalaya Festival, chartered in 1967 by the local Lions Club as a means to promote the city, will turn 50 in 2017. Where many food-themed festivals only use their namesake dish for marketing purposes, the Gonzales Jambalaya Festival takes jambalaya seriously. More than 100 jambalaya cooks are whittled down through various heats until only 12 remain. Black pots simmer over wood fires throughout the weekend as returning champions face off against newcomers. In addition to the annual championship, there is the Champ of Champs cook off — which pits past champions against one another — as well as an absurd competition called the Mini-Pot, which demands that competitors prepare a jambalaya in a tiny pot. Past editions of the festival have reported selling more than 10,000 plates of jambalaya. There are also carnival rides, three stages of live music (including one indoor stage), a car show and a 5K run.

Where: Bayou St. John, from Dumain to Conti streets Tickets: Free admission, donations accepted More info: thebayouboogaloo.com

For a free festival, the Mid-City Bayou Boogaloo sure has a lot to offer: three stages of live music featuring national touring acts as well as Louisiana legends, an art market, hip food vendors and local craft beer stations are just a few of the main attractions. There’s also the possibility of spotting a reallife pirate ship — the chosen method of transport for one group of festival goers in 2016. What makes the Bayou Boogaloo unique is the Bayou St. John itself, the site of a rowdy flotilla of boats, floaties, canoes and kayaks during the fest.

Mid-City Bayou Boogaloo

May 19-21

Where: Louis Armstrong Park, New Orleans Tickets: Free admission More info: jazzandheritage.org

Congo Square New World Rhythms Festival

March 18-19

Gonzales Jambalaya Festival

May 26-28

St. Tammany Parish Fair Covington Louisiana Book Festival Baton Rouge

St. Tammany Crab Festival Lacombe

West Louisiana Forestry Festival & Fair Leesville

Rapides Parish Fair Alexandria

Louisiana Tournoi Ville Platte

October Fete Kaplan

Violet Oyster Festival Violet

Louisiana Art and Folk Festival Columbia

Fesitivals Acadiens et Créoles Lafayette

Louisiana Cotton Festival Ville Platte

Madisonville Wooden Boat Festival Madisonville

Roberts Cove Germanfest Rayne (Roberts Cove)

Crescent City Blues & BBQ Festival New Orleans

Gretna Heritage Festival Gretna

Blues in da Parish Festival Violet

French Food Festival Larose

Greater Baton Rouge State Fair Baton Rouge

Louisiana Seafood Festival New Orleans

Louisiana Chicken Festival Dubach

Downriver Festival at the French Market New Orleans

St. Martinville Kiwanis Pepper Festival St. Martinville

Alligator Festival Luling

New Orleans Burlesque Festival New Orleans

Louisiana Sugar Cane Festival New Iberia

Bogalusa Blues & Heritage Festival Bogalusa

Louisiana Shrimp & Petroleum Festival Morgan City

Best of the Bayou Houma

Southern Decadence New Orleans

Louisiana Zydeco Music Festival Opelousas (Plaisance)

Red River Revel Shreveport

Southern Decadence New Orleans

Christmas Festival of Lights Natchitoches

Delcambre Christmas Boat Parade Delcambre

Celebration in the Oaks New Orleans

Noel Acadien au Village Lafayette

Fire and Water Rural Arts Celebration (Le Feu et L’Eau) Arnaudville

Christmas on the River Monroe-West Monroe

Fall Harvest Festival Grant

Reflections of the Season Port Allen

Bon Fest Port Allen

Christmas Under the Oaks Sulphur

Festival of the Bonfires Lutcher

Treme Creole Gumbo Festival New Orleans


66 | Louisiana Life march/april 2016


S P E C I A L ADV ERTIS ING S ECTION

Excellence IN PRACTICE

LOUISIANA 2017

the annual list of

TOP LAWYERS PEER-INFLUENCED. THIRD-PARTY VALIDATED. highly credentialed.

SUPERLAWYERS.COM


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

Meet Louisiana’s Medical Malpractice Pioneer

Injured patients are incredibly vulnerable. Someone has to stand up for them when they’re wronged.

J

ohn Hammons was fresh out of law school in the late 1970s when two clients approached him needing medical malpractice representation. He didn’t practice in that area, but he felt led to undertake the challenge. “I took the cases because I felt strongly they deserved representation,” Hammons recalls. Both cases resolved favorably, and attorneys from across the state began referring medical malpractice cases to him. “I wasn’t an expert, but I had done two more successful cases than virtually anyone else in Louisiana,” he says. Within three years, Hammons’ caseload was substantial enough for him to focus exclusively on medical malpractice law. Thirty-five years later, he still feels “thankful, blessed, and excited” to do this work every day.

Higher Calling For Hammons, practicing medical malpractice law isn’t just a job; it’s a ministry. “Injured patients are incredibly vulnerable and outgunned against the Louisiana healthcare legal system,” he says. “Someone has to stand up for them, and I believe God has called me to do this work.” However noble, the path isn’t easy. Louisiana medical legislation offers significantly more protection for the medical community than other states. Regardless of a patient’s injury, general damages can never exceed $500,000. “Under these statutes, none of my clients can ever be fairly compensated,

John L. Hammons but it’s worth exposing the truth and even influencing stricter statutes going forward,” Hammons says. Such was the case when a patient with hypertension died from a stroke after a root canal because the dentist didn’t monitor his post-operative blood pressure. Hammons’ work led to the implementation of new post-operative monitoring standards in the Louisiana dental community. In another case, when Hammons was suspicious of a hospital’s documentation claiming that a fluke heart attack caused a woman’s death following a triple bypass surgery, he fought to exhume the body for an autopsy—which revealed that the surgical team had cut a major artery at the

beginning of the surgery and the woman had bled to death within minutes. Hammons has taken hundreds more cases like these. Every one, he says, has been worth the challenge: “It’s an uphill battle because our media portrays the medical community as heroes— which, usually, they are—so it’s hard to convince a jury when a doctor is at fault for unacceptable care.” Ironically, he notes, his closest friends are doctors: “When I first started, I actually received threats from the medical community, but I’ve built a good reputation over the years by never pursuing a case that didn’t have sound medical and scientific evidence.”

Nelson & Hammons A PROFESSIONAL LAW CORPORATION

705 Milam St. | Shreveport, LA | 315 South College Road, Suite 146 | Lafayette, LA | 800-619-6444

nelsonhammonslaw.com S-2 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LUNDY, LUNDY, SOILEAU & SOUTH, LLP Houston Middleton

Hunter Lundy*

Daniel Kramer Kristie Hightower**

Matt Lundy* Rudie Soileau

Jackey South

Nicholas Kohrs

Max Guthrie

*CHOSEN TO 2017 SUPER LAWYERS **CHOSEN TO 2017 RISING STARS

Lundy, Lundy, Soileau & South, LLP accepts the challenges others refuse. The firm fights for those harmed by another’s negligence and has prevailed against some of the largest and most powerful corporations in the world, making it one of the premier catastrophic and serious personal injury firms. Experienced and fearless in trial, Lundy, Lundy, Soileau & South attorneys often achieve settlements and verdicts in excess of $1 million for clients—more than $1 billion in total. The firm has been trial counsel in some of the largest verdicts and settlements to date and has amassed extraordinary experience and success in many areas, including wrongful death, dangerous drugs, pipeline explosions, products liability, dangerous highways, and automobile and trucking accidents. The needs of injured victims can be overwhelming, and the lawyers at Lundy, Lundy, Soileau & South are united in putting people first. Serving individuals and families across the United States, they stand with their clients from beginning to end, helping victims of personal injury through difficult times and fighting for the justice they deserve.

PUTTING PEOPLE FIRST

501 BROAD ST., LAKE CHARLES, LA 70601 PH: (337) 439-0707 | FX: (337) 439-1029

lundylawllp.com

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-3


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

SELECTION PROCESS Super Lawyers selects attorneys using a patented, multiphase selection process. Super Lawyers selects attorneys using a patented, multiphase selection process. Peer nominations and evaluations are combined with independent research. Each candidate is evaluated on 12 indicators of peer recognition and professional achievement. Selections are made on an annual, state-by-state basis. The objective is to create a credible, comprehensive and diverse listing of outstanding attorneys that can be used as a resource for attorneys and consumers searching for legal counsel. Since Super Lawyers is intended to be used as an aid in selecting a lawyer, we limit the lawyer ratings to those who can be hired and retained by the public, i.e., lawyers in private practice and Legal Aid attorneys. The Super Lawyers selection process involves the steps outlined in the graphic below.

U.S. Pat. No. 8,412,564 ȕ 4ZTUFNBOENFUIPE for identifying excellence within a profession ȕ "QSJM 

LEARN MORE

QUESTIONS?

SuperLawyers.com/SelectionProcess

SL-Research@thomsonreuters.com

visit SuperLawyers.com Search for an attorney by practice area and location, and read features on attorneys selected to our lists.

DISCLAIMER: The information presented in Super Lawyers is not legal advice, nor is Super Lawyers a legal referral service. We strive to maintain a high degree of accuracy in the information provided, but make no claim, promise or guarantee about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information contained in this special section or linked to SuperLawyers.com and its associated sites. The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be solely based upon advertising or the listings in this special section. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services performed by the attorneys listed in this special section will be greater than that of other licensed attorneys. Super Lawyers is an independent publisher that has developed its own selection methodology. Super Lawyers is not affiliated with any state or regulatory body, and its listings do not certify or designate an attorney as a specialist. State required disclaimers can be found on the respective state pages on superlawyers.com. ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER: Super Lawyers is not a title or a moniker conferred on individual lawyers, and it is not intended to communicate that lawyers selected necessarily achieve better results.

© 2017 Super Lawyers, part of Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.

S-4 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

10 YEARS

LARRY CURTIS “MY MISSION IS SIMPLE: TO OBTAIN AN OUTSTANDING RESULT—WITHOUT EXCEPTION—FOR EVERY CLIENT” Larry Curtis is recognized as one of Louisiana’s preeminent personal injury lawyers. For over 35 years, Curtis has successfully represented maritime workers of all types—drill rig and platform workers, service hands, and offshore construction workers, as well as commercial divers, dredge crew and fishermen—in cases involving serious injury or death. “My mission is simple: to obtain an outstanding result—without exception—for every client,” says Curtis. EXPERIENCE AND EXPERTISE Curtis is a seasoned trial lawyer with a national reputation in maritime personal injury cases. Over and over, Curtis has won multimillion-dollar verdicts and settlements for his clients. “I am always motivated to provide the best possible representation to my clients, because I know that they are counting on me to help them through a very difficult time in their life,” he says. He believes his three decades of trial experience give his clients a decided advantage in the courtroom. “In complex, high-stakes cases, there is no substitute for experience—none,” says Curtis. “And experience teaches that, among other things, careful preparation wins cases.”

SELECTED TO

He recalls an early lesson he learned Super Lawyers as a young law student. “I read an interview of one of the country’s top trial lawyers,” he says. “In speaking about trial preparation, he remarked that if you ever see a lawyer pull a rabbit out of a hat, the lawyer probably had 10 rabbits and 10 hats. I believed that statement to be true when I first read it and my own courtroom experience has confirmed its validity.” RECOGNIZED AND HONORED In 2014 and again this year, Curtis was named “Lawyer of the Year” by the Woodward/White publication known simply as Best Lawyers in the practice area of Personal Injury Litigation – Plaintiffs for Lafayette, Louisiana. He has also been listed to Super Lawyers since its inaugural issue in 2007 and the Top 50 attorneys in Louisiana from 2012-2014. Curtis also holds the highest rating, AV Preeminent, given by the Martindale-Hubbell® Law Directory. More than a decade ago, St. John’s University honored Curtis with its Alumni Outstanding Achievement Medal. In the summer of 2005, Curtis was invited to join the Academy of Trial Advocacy, an exclusive group of some of the country’s most experienced and accomplished trial lawyers. He is also a founding member of the Aletheia Institute, a national invitation-only organization of lawyers committed to promoting truth in advocacy, full disclosure in discovery and a fair measure of justice to all litigants. SERVICE TO THE PROFESSION AND COMMUNITY Curtis is a member of the American, Federal, Louisiana and Lafayette Bar Associations, The Maritime Law Association of the United States, as well as the American and Louisiana Associations for Justice. He has served as a member of the Louisiana Association for Justice’s President’s Advisory Council, the Board of Governors and the Council of Directors. Curtis is an Emeritus Member and currently serves as President of The American Inn of Court of Acadiana. Curtis served on the Board of the Lafayette Parish Bar Association and as its President in 2011-2012. He has been asked to speak at local, state and national professional meetings about federal trial practice and maritime law. Community involvement is important to him as well: For five years, he served as the host of a monthly TV program about Catholic social teaching. He is a member of, and serves as an officer of, the Knights of Columbus Council 7275.

300 Rue Beauregard, Bldg. “C” Post Office Box 80247, Lafayette, LA 70508 PH: (337) 235-1825 • (800) 528-1825 • FX: (337) 237-0241

www.larrycurtis.com PHOTO BY ALLEN BREAUX STUDIO & GALLERY

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-5


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS

TOP 50

AN ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF THE LAWYERS WHO RANKED TOP OF THE LIST IN THE 2017 LOUISIANA SUPER LAWYERS NOMINATION, RESEARCH AND BLUE RIBBON REVIEW PROCESS

Adams, Marguerite L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Ashe, Barry W., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Barriere, Brent B., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Boren, James E., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Cahill, Jr., Elwood F., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Cerone, Rudy J., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Cheatwood, Roy C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Colvin, R. Keith, Jones Walker, New Orleans David, Robert J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Degan, Nancy Scott, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Eagan, Jr., Ewell (Tim) E., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Fendler, S. Gene, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Flanagan, Harold J., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Flanagan, Thomas M., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Garner, James M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Goodier, Glenn G., Jones Walker, New Orleans Griffith, Jr., Steven F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Guidry, Gregory, Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, Lafayette Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Herman, Russ M., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Herman, Stephen J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Irwin, James B., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Kupperman, Stephen H., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

Lee, Wayne J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Luker, Lynn, Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Mason, W. Brett, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, Baton Rouge Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Perry, Jr., John W., Perry Balhoff Mengis & Burns, Baton Rouge Philips, Jr., Harry J., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Puente, Denise C., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Pyburn, Jr., Keith M., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Ralston, Christopher K., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Rubin, Michael H., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Shapiro, Howard, Proskauer Rose, New Orleans Shaw, Danny G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville Sher, Leopold Z., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Shreves, H. Bruce, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Simon, Jr., Lawrence P., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Stanley, Richard C., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Stern, Martin A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Unglesby, Lewis, Unglesby Law Firm, Baton Rouge Vance, R. Patrick, Jones Walker, New Orleans Walters, Jr., Edward J., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge Warshauer, Irving J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Wegmann, Edward D., Jones Walker, New Orleans Willis, Sterling Scott, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Wittmann, Phillip A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

TOP

10

BARRASSO, JUDY Y. Ŧ3BOLFE/VNCFS0OFŦ Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans BOREN, JAMES E. Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

HAYDEN, JAN M. Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans HERMAN, RUSS M. Ŧ3BOLFE/VNCFS5XPŦ Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans IRWIN, JAMES B. Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans LEE, WAYNE J. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans SHAPIRO, HOWARD Proskauer Rose, New Orleans SHER, LEOPOLD Z. Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans TALLEY, SUSAN G. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans WITTMANN, PHILLIP A. Ŧ3BOLFE/VNCFS5ISFFŦ Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

TOP 25 WOMEN

AN ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF THE WOMEN LAWYERS WHO RANKED TOP OF THE LIST IN THE 2017 LOUISIANA SUPER LAWYERS NOMINATION, RESEARCH AND BLUE RIBBON REVIEW PROCESS

Adams, Marguerite L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Alessandra, M. Nan, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Baumgartner, Adrianne L., Porteous Hainkel & Johnson, Covington Bertaut, Carmelite M., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Calhoun, Jaye A., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Cancienne, Phyllis G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge de Lisle, Victoria M., Locke Lord, New Orleans

S-6 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

Degan, Nancy Scott, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Futrell, Elizabeth (Lisa) J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Hardin, Pauline F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Jacobs, Darleen M., Jacobs Sarrat Lovelace & Harris, New Orleans Johnson, Mary S., Johnson Gray McNamara, Mandeville Krebs, Patricia A., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans Livaudais, Julie D., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Luker, Lynn, Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans

McKeithen, Marjorie A., Jones Walker, New Orleans Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Plunkett, Laura Walker, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Puente, Denise C., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Schnabel, Marta-Ann, O’Bryon & Schnabel, New Orleans Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Thorne, René E., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

10 YEARS

SELECTED TO Super Lawyers Leopold Z. Sher James M. Garner Elwood F. Cahill Jr. Richard P. Richter Steven I. Klein Marie A. Moore Neal J. Kling Joshua S. Force Deborah J. Moench

Seated (L to R): James M. Garner*†, Leopold Z. Sher*†‡ Standing: Joshua P. Clayton**, Richard P. Richter*, Steven I. Klein*, Peter L. Hilbert Jr.*, Kevin M. McGlone*, Debra J. Fischman*, Jonathan B. Cerise**, Marie A. Moore*, Martha Young Curtis*, Elwood F. Cahill Jr.* †, John T. Balhoff II*, Neal J. Kling*, Ashley Gremillion Coker**, Ryan O. Luminais**, Joshua S. Force*, Deborah J. Moench*, Chad P. Morrow**

*Selected to Super Lawyers **Selected to Rising Stars † Top 50 Louisiana & New Orleans ‡Top 10

SHER GARNER CAHILL RICHTER KLEIN & HILBERT, L.L.C. SOPHISTICATED LEGAL SERVICES FOR YOUR BUSINESS MATTERS Based in New Orleans, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. is a business firm nationally recognized for commercial litigation and transactions. Sher Garner is on the cutting edge, delivering sophisticated legal representation to clients through hand-selected, integrated teams of experienced transactional and litigation lawyers to provide the most efficient service. There are no false barriers; the firm operates as one. Clients receive the benefits of the firm’s proficiency across all disciplines, as well as the determination and passion for protecting their rights. The firm recently received a judgment of $5 million in damages for a client in an expropriation case involving the VA project. The firm also effectively represented a property management company in a trial against a tenant who acted in bad faith by providing fraudulent financial statements, resulting in a judge approving a petition to evict the tenant. The firm continues to represent Texas Brine in a bet-the-company sinkhole case, as well as claimants against BP.

The firm is regularly asked to handle major commercial real estate transactions of all kinds, including leases, office buildings, agricultural properties, mineral interests, shopping centers, apartment complexes, manufacturing facilities, health-care structures, entertainment venues, retail operations, and public and private developments. This year, 19 Sher Garner attorneys are selected to the Super Lawyers or Rising Stars lists; nine of these Super Lawyers honorees have been named to the list for 10 or more years. Additionally, Leopold Z. Sher is recognized to the Top 10 Louisiana list and joins James M. Garner and Elwood F. Cahill Jr. on the Top 50 New Orleans list and Top 50 Louisiana list.

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

SHER GARNER CAHILL RICHTER KLEIN & HILBERT, L.L.C. 909 Poydras Street, Suite 2800 New Orleans, LA 70112 PH: (504) 299-2100 | FX: (504) 299-2300 shergarner.com

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-7


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS

TOP 50 NEW ORLEANS AREA

AN ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF THE NEW ORLEANS AREA LAWYERS WHO RANKED TOP OF THE LIST IN THE 2017 LOUISIANA SUPER LAWYERS NOMINATION, RESEARCH AND BLUE RIBBON REVIEW PROCESS

Adams, Marguerite L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Ashe, Barry W., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Barriere, Brent B., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Cahill, Jr., Elwood F., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Cerone, Rudy J., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Cheatwood, Roy C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Colvin, R. Keith, Jones Walker, New Orleans David, Robert J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Degan, Nancy Scott, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Draper, Douglas S., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Dabney, New Orleans Eagan, Jr., Ewell (Tim) E., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Fendler, S. Gene, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Flanagan, Harold J., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Flanagan, Thomas M., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Garner, James M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Goodier, Glenn G., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Griffith, Jr., Steven F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Hardin, Pauline F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Herman, Russ M., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Herman, Stephen J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Irwin, James B., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Kohnke, IV, Edward F., Preis, New Orleans Krebs, Patricia A., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans Kupperman, Stephen H., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Lambert, Kent A., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Lee, Wayne J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Luker, Lynn, Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Pitre, Jr., Loulan J., Kelly Hart & Pitre, New Orleans Plunkett, Laura Walker, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Puente, Denise C., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

How can I be certain the attorney I hire is credible?

S-8 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

Pyburn, Jr., Keith M., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Ralston, Christopher K., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Rodriguez, Antonio J., Fowler Rodriguez, New Orleans Shapiro, Howard, Proskauer Rose, New Orleans Shaw, Danny G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville Sher, Leopold Z., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Shreves, H. Bruce, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Stanley, Richard C., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Stern, Martin A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Urquhart, Jr., Quentin F., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Vance, R. Patrick, Jones Walker, New Orleans Warshauer, Irving J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Wegmann, Edward D., Jones Walker, New Orleans Willis, Sterling Scott, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Wittmann, Phillip A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

The answer is Super Lawyers The Super Lawyers list is comprised of the top 5% of attorneys in each state selected via a patented process that includes independent research, peer nominations and evaluation.

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS

PRACTICE AREA INDEX Alternative Dispute Resolution ............... S-10 Antitrust Litigation ................................... S-10 Appellate .................................................. S-10 Banking..................................................... S-10 Bankruptcy: Business ............................... S-10 Bankruptcy: Consumer............................. S-10 Business Litigation ................................... S-10 Business/Corporate ..................................S-13 Civil Litigation: Defense ............................S-13 Class Action/Mass Torts ...........................S-13 Construction Litigation .............................S-14 Consumer Law...........................................S-14 Creditor Debtor Rights ..............................S-14 Criminal Defense .......................................S-14 Criminal Defense: DUI/DWI......................S-14 Criminal Defense: White Collar ................S-14 Elder Law ...................................................S-14 Employee Benefits.....................................S-14 Employment & Labor ................................S-14 Employment Litigation: Defense ..............S-15 Energy & Natural Resources .....................S-15 Environmental ...........................................S-16 Environmental Litigation ..........................S-16 Estate & Trust Litigation ...........................S-16 Estate Planning & Probate .......................S-16 Family Law.................................................S-16 Gaming ......................................................S-16 General Litigation......................................S-16 Health Care................................................S-16 Insurance Coverage...................................S-17 Intellectual Property .................................S-17 International ..............................................S-17 Media & Advertising ..................................S-17 Mergers & Acquisitions .............................S-17 Personal Injury General: Defense .............S-17 Personal Injury General: Plaintiff..............S-17 Personal Injury Medical Malpractice: Defense ...................................................S-18 Personal Injury Medical Malpractice: Plaintiff....................................................S-18 Personal Injury Products: Defense ...........S-18 Personal Injury Products: Plaintiff ............S-19 Professional Liability: Defense .................S-19 Professional Liability: Plaintiff ..................S-19 Real Estate ................................................S-19 Securities & Corporate Finance ................S-19 Securities Litigation...................................S-19 Surety .........................................................S-19 Tax..............................................................S-19 Transportation/Maritime .........................S-20 Utilities .......................................................S-21 Workers’ Compensation............................S-21

THE LIST BY PRIMARY AREA OF PRACTICE The list was finalized as of July 13, 2016. Any updates to the list (for example, status changes or disqualifying events) will be reflected on superlawyers.com. Names and page numbers in RED indicate a profile on the specified page. Phone numbers are included only for attorneys with paid Super Lawyers print advertisements. Only attorneys who data verified with Super Lawyers for the current year are included on this list. All current selections are reflected on superlawyers.com profiles.

Y

Attorneys with this icon have a featured Super Lawyers video that may be viewed on their online profile. Visit video.superlawyers.com and enter the unique code in the box towards the top, right corner of the screen to view the attorney’s videos. If you are viewing this magazine in a digital format, simply click the icon.

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION Broussard, Terrel J., Broussard Dispute Solutions, New Orleans Dampf, Robert S., Stockwell Sievert Viccellio Clements & Shaddock, Lake Charles Juneau, Sr., Thomas R., Juneau David, Lafayette McKay, Michael W., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, Baton Rouge Perry, Jr., John W., Perry Balhoff Mengis & Burns, Baton Rouge Pg. S-6 Shreves, H. Bruce, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

ANTITRUST LITIGATION Cunningham, Mark A., Jones Walker, New Orleans McIntyre, Jr., Alexander M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Radlauer, David G., Jones Walker, New Orleans

APPELLATE Grundmeyer, Douglas L., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Johnson, III, H. Alston, Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge LaCour, Jr., Louis C., Adams and Reese, New Orleans McReynolds, Joseph L., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Norman, Joe B., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Rubin, Michael H., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Pg. S-6 Stern, Martin A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Ward, Raymond P., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Henry, W. Craig, Hudson Potts & Bernstein, Monroe Stuckey, James A., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Thibeaux, Robert P., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Willenzik, David S., Jones Walker, New Orleans

BANKRUPTCY: BUSINESS Aguillard, H. Kent, Attorney at Law, Eunice Bendana, Alicia M., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Caplinger, Christopher T., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Cerone, Rudy J., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Cheatham, Robin B., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Draper, Douglas S., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Dabney, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Drell, Bradley L., Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria Duck, John M., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Forsyth, J. David, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Futrell, Elizabeth (Lisa) J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-6 Johnson, Jr., Patrick, Akerman, New Orleans Laudumiey, IV, Fernand L., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Manthey, Tristan Edwards, Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Dabney, New Orleans McKenzie, Gary K., Steffes Vingiello & McKenzie, Baton Rouge Messina, David J., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Patrick, III, William H., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Dabney, New Orleans Peck, Stewart F., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Phillips, Louis M., Kelly Hart & Pitre, Baton Rouge Steffes, William E., Steffes Vingiello & McKenzie, Baton Rouge Stewart, Jr., Paul Douglas, Stewart Robbins & Brown, Baton Rouge Strohschein, Stephen P., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Waguespack, David F., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Williamson, Stephen L., Montgomery Barnett, New Orleans

BANKRUPTCY: CONSUMER Willson, Thomas R., The Law Firm of Rocky Willson, Alexandria, 318-442-8658

BUSINESS LITIGATION BANKING Claverie, Sr., Philip deV., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Cromwell, L. David, Pettiette Armand Dunkelman Woodley Byrd & Cromwell, Shreveport Furr, Brett P., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

S-10 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

Aaron, Jr., William D., Aaron & Gianna, New Orleans Adams, W. Michael, Blanchard Walker O’Quin & Roberts, Shreveport Aguilar, Ricardo A. “Richard”, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans CONTINUED ON PAGE S-12

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

J. Neale deGravelles 2017 SUPER LAWYERS HONOREE

DEGRAVELLES LAW OFFICES BATON ROUGE

A CHAMPION FOR THE INJURED J. Neale deGravelles has an impressive track record of success in representing injured individuals and their families in auto accidents, maritime, products liability, toxic torts, business litigation, complex litigation, medical malpractice, and general tort litigation. RESPECTED PROFESSIONAL deGravelles’s depth and breadth of personal injury knowledge has earned him the respect of colleagues, opponents and judges before whom he has appeared. That mutual respect has forged many long-lasting relationships with referring attorneys who routinely rely on J. Neale deGravelles for legal and financial support with complex injury cases. CLIENT ADVOCATE He is a true client advocate, always putting clients first when strategizing his approach to their cases. His clients’ satisfaction has resulted in success for the firm and a steady stream of new referrals. LEGAL LEADER deGravelles’s leadership and reputation is demonstrated by his election to a leadership role in the admiralty section of a national lawyers’ organization. He is a sought-after legal resource who speaks nationally and publishes frequently in academic and professional journals.

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

618 Main St. Baton Rouge, LA 70801 PH: (225) 344-3735 FX: (225) 336-1146

degravelles.com

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-11


S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS BUSINESS LITIGATION CONT’D FROM PAGE S-10

Alltmont, Jack M., Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Allweiss, Michael R., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Anjier, John C., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Arceneaux, M. Thomas, Blanchard Walker O’Quin & Roberts, Shreveport Ashe, Barry W., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Barriere, Brent B., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Garner, James M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2102 Pg. S-6, S-7, S-8 Geary, Covert J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Goodman, Alan H., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Griffin, Samantha P., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Griffith, Jr., Steven F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Patterson, Michael A., Long Law Firm, Baton Rouge Percy, James C., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge Person, John C., Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, Metairie Ralston, Christopher K., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Reasonover, Kirk, Reasonover & Associates, New Orleans, 504-526-2921

Guerry, David L., Long Law Firm, Baton Rouge

Redfearn, Robert L., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Gulotta, Jr., James C., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Richard, Jr., Herschel E., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport

Hardin, III, Harry S., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Riviere, Christopher H., Christopher H. Riviere, Thibodaux, 985-447-7440

Bartlett, Tad, Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans

Hensgens, Scott N., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Beebe, Mark R., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Herman, Fred, Fred Herman Law Firm, New Orleans

Scandurro, Timothy D., Scandurro & Layrisson, New Orleans, 504-522-7100

Holtzman, Shannon S., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Schewe, Bruce V., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Beh, Thomas M., Elkins, New Orleans Belleau, Ashley L., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Benjamin, Thomas M., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Bergin, Edward H., Jones Walker, New Orleans Blunt, Shelton Dennis, Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Brown, Galen S., Sullivan Stolier & Knight, New Orleans Brown, James A., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Browne, David L., BrowneLaw, New Orleans, 504-648-0171 Burvant, Robert J., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans Cheatwood, Roy C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Johnson, Bernard S., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Joyce, John W., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Kanner, Allan, Kanner & Whiteley, New Orleans, 504-524-5777

Sinor, Jr., Howard E., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Kupperman, Stephen H., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Spansel, Mark J., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Kutcher, Robert A., Wagar Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais, Metairie

Landis, John M., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Cortazzo, Thomas J., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Landrieu, Martin E., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Cullens, Jr., J.E., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge

Lasky, Catherine E., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans

Degan, Nancy Scott, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Lee, Andrew R., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Denegre, Jr., George, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Lee, Wayne J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Dumestre, Mary L., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Lipsey, Christine, McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

Durio, Steven G. “Buzz�, Durio McGoffin Stagg & Ackermann, Lafayette, 337-233-0300 Pg. S-21

Luker, Lynn, Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Evans, Joelle Flannigan, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans Farley, Matt J., Krebs Farley, New Orleans Feldman, Jr., Larry, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Fendler, S. Gene, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Ferachi, Michael D., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Flanagan, Thomas M., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

S-12 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

Simon, Jr., Lawrence P., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Pg. S-6

Krebs, Patricia A., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Copley, Steven W., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

www.dmsfirm.com

Schonekas, Kyle, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans

Simonson, Eric J., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

Lambert, Kent A., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-8

STEVEN G. “BUZZ� DURIO

Schnabel, Marta-Ann, O’Bryon & Schnabel, New Orleans Pg. S-6

King, Henry A., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans

Conroy, Stephen K., Conroy Law Firm, Metairie

DURIO, MCGOFFIN, STAGGÂ & ACKERMANN -BGBZFUUF`Č•

Rosenberg, Harry, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Lutkewitte, Thomas J., Favret Demarest Russo ,Lutkewitte & Schaumburg, New Orleans Masinter, Paul J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Mason, Omar K., Aaron & Gianna, New Orleans McGlone, Kevin M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2133 Pg. S-7 Miller, Sr., Allen C., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Morrison, Corinne A., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Orlansky, C. Lawrence, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Owen, Jr., Thomas P., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Patron, David L., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Stakelum III, P.J., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Stanley, Richard C., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Stern, Jr., Charles L., Steeg Law Firm, New Orleans Swanson, James R., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Swanson, Lynn E., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans Thompson, Jr., Walter C., Barkley & Thompson, New Orleans Thornton, Jennifer L., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Treeby, William D., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Tulley, Fredrick R., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Usdin, Steven W., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Vance, R. Patrick, Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Veron, J. Michael, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles, 337-310-1600 Waters, Jr., John W., Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon, New Orleans Wegmann, Edward D., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Wimberly, Jr., Gerard E., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Wise, Jon W., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Wittmann, Phillip A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Woolf, Matthew A., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS BUSINESS/CORPORATE

Kuchler, Deborah D., Kuchler Polk Schell Weiner & Richeson, New Orleans

Coco-Ewing, Celeste R., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

Africk, Lisa M., Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, New Orleans

Leche, Charles E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Davis, Leonard A., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Aguilar, Jr., Rodolfo J., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

Marionneaux, F. Barry, F. Barry Marionneaux, Plaquemine

Bennett, Wm. Blake, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Nalley, Jr., George J., Nalley & Dew, Metairie

Davidson, III, James J., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette, 337-237-1660

Temple, Jr., Thomas R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Eckstein, Michael L., Eckstein Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-527-0701 Grodner, R. Marshall, McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Hines, William H., Jones Walker, New Orleans Kling, Neal J., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2112 Pg. S-7 Leefe, Richard K., Leefe Gibbs Sullivan & Dupre, Metairie

Walker, Jr., Frank M., Plauché Smith & Nieset, Lake Charles

CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS Arsenault, Richard J., Neblett Beard & Arsenault, Alexandria

Eagan, Jr., Ewell (Tim) E., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Gaudet, William B., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Glago, Mark P., Glago Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-599-8666 Herman, Russ M., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Herman, Stephen J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Irpino, Anthony, Irpino Law Firm, New Orleans

Barrios, Dawn M., Barrios Kingsdorf & Casteix, New Orleans

Lundy, Matthew E., Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, Lake Charles, 337-439-0707 Pg. S-3

Bencomo, Raul R., Bencomo & Associates, New Orleans

Massey, Donald C., Couhig Partners, New Orleans

Berniard, Jeffrey P., Berniard Law, New Orleans

McCowan, Jr., Charles S., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

Mayhall, Jr., Van R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Bickford, Scott R., Martzell Bickford & Centola, New Orleans, 504-581-9065

Meunier, Gerald E., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans

Reso, Jr., Jerome J., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Bienvenu, Jr., David M., Bienvenu Bonnecaze Foco Viator & Holinga, Baton Rouge

Mince, Loretta G., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Sherman, David R., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie

Bohrer, Philip, Bohrer Brady, Baton Rouge

Madden, Timothy S., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans

Stein, Mark S., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Welborn Weinstock, Marion, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Casey, Jr., Thomas A., Jones Walker, New Orleans Centola, Larry J., Martzell Bickford & Centola, New Orleans, 504-581-9065

Murray, Jr., Stephen B., Murray Law Firm, New Orleans Myers, Stephen G.A., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans CONTINUED ON PAGE S-14

CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE Abbott, Charles H., Cotten Schmidt & Abbott, New Orleans Bienvenu, David F., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Braun, Andrew A., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans Caverlee, Samuel W., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Degan, III, Sidney W., Degan Blanchard & Nash, New Orleans deLaup, Mickey S., Mickey S. deLaup, Metairie Drennan, George C., Plauché Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans Gianna, Dominic J., Aaron & Gianna, New Orleans Glas, John Jerry, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Grimsal, A. Gregory, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Hanna, Mark E., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Hardy, Sidney J., McCranie Sistrunk Anzelmo Hardy McDaniel & Welch, New Orleans Hayes, III, Thomas M., Hayes Harkey Smith & Cascio, Monroe Horn, Warren, Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Dabney, New Orleans Hoychick, Jr., John, Cotton Bolton Hoychick & Doughty, Rayville Ieyoub, Christopher P., Plauché Smith & Nieset, Lake Charles

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

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S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS CONT’D FROM PAGE S-13

Paulsen, III, Dwight C., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Pendley, Patrick W., Pendley Baudin & Coffin, Plaquemine Price, Andrea Mahady, Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Richardson, Jeffrey E., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Rollo, Jr., Anthony J., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Ryan, Elizabeth Haecker, Coats Rose, New Orleans Sensenbrenner, E. Paige, Adams and Reese, New Orleans

CONSUMER LAW

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: DUI/DWI

Sterbcow, Marx D., Sterbcow Law Group, New Orleans, 504-523-4930

Calmes, Jr., John P., Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge

MARX D. STERBCOW

STERBCOW LAW GROUP, LLC /FX0SMFBOT`Č•

www.respaattorneys.com

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE COLLAR Becker, Jr., Walter F., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Capitelli, Brian J., Capitelli & Wicker, New Orleans Capitelli, Ralph, Capitelli & Wicker, New Orleans

CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS Finn, William T., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Grodsky, Barry H., Taggart Morton, New Orleans Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Castaing, Jr., Edward J., Crull Castaing & Lilly, New Orleans Habans, Jr., Robert N., Habans & Carriere, Baton Rouge Hardin, Pauline F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Larson, Herbert, The Law Offices of Herbert V. Larson Jr., New Orleans

Whaley, John Randall, Whaley Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-302-8810

Jones, Jr., Philip K., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Rubin, David S., Kantrow Spaht Weaver & Blitzer, Baton Rouge

Magner, Michael W., Jones Walker, New Orleans

CONSTRUCTION LITIGATION

Wheelis, Stephen D., Wheelis & Rozanski, Alexandria, 318-445-5600

Murray, Jr., Julian R., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie

Bergeron, Keith J., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Botnick, Michael E., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Castex, Jr., Jimmy A., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans D’Arcy, Adrian A., Shields Mott, New Orleans Franco, Philip A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Frilot, Mark W., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville Hunt, Michael D., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge King, Richard E., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans Kingsmill, Marguerite K., Kingsmill Riess, New Orleans Krebs, David J., Krebs Farley, New Orleans

STEPHEN D. WHEELIS

WHEELISÂ & ROZANSKI, APLC "MFYBOESJB`Č•

www.wheelis-rozanski.com

Meche, Timothy A., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Petersen, Glen R., Hymel Davis & Petersen, Baton Rouge Simmons, Jr., Richard (Rick) T., Hailey McNamara Hall Larmann & Papale, Metairie Skinner, Michael D., Skinner Law Firm, Lafayette

CRIMINAL DEFENSE BÊlanger, AndrÊ Robert, Manasseh Gill Knipe & BÊlanger, Baton Rouge, 225-383-9703 Boren, James E., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge Pg. S-6 Bourland, J. David, Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge Boustany, II, Alfred F., Boustany Law Firm, Lafayette Cazayoux, Jr., Donald J., Cazayoux Ewing, Baton Rouge

Small, J. Michael, Law Offices of J. Michael Small, Alexandria Stockstill, J. Kevin, Glenn Armentor Law, Lafayette Stroud, M. Allyn, Wiener Weiss & Madison, Shreveport Thomson, Peter M., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Washington, Donald W., Jones Walker, Lafayette Whalen, Jr., Ralph S., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Damico, Thomas C., Damico & Stockstill Attorneys at Law, Baton Rouge

ELDER LAW

Lund, III, Daniel, Coats Rose, New Orleans

DiGiulio, John E., Manasseh Gill Knipe & BÊlanger, Baton Rouge, 225-383-9703

Losavio, Jr., Peter J., Losavio and DeJean, Baton Rouge

Melchiode, Gerald A., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans

Gibbens, Billy, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans

Prokop, Jr., Joseph A., Joseph A. Prokop Jr., Baton Rouge

Long, Charles B., Degan Blanchard & Nash, New Orleans

Mercante, Mark W., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville Nelson, David K., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

Gill, William Robert, Manasseh Gill Knipe & BÊlanger, Baton Rouge, 225-383-9703 HÊbert, Stephen, Stephen D. HÊbert, New Orleans

Prattini, Jeffrey K., Shields Mott, New Orleans

Lorenzi, Thomas L., Lorenzi & Barnatt, Lake Charles

Puente, Denise C., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

McLindon, John S., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge

Richard, Thomas M., Wagar Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais, Metairie

Moore, Steven J., Law Office of Steven J. Moore, Baton Rouge

Rouse, Gary J., Couhig Partners, New Orleans

Sanchez, Walter Marshall, The Sanchez Law Firm, Lake Charles

Seemann, Jr., Charles F., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Smith, Jr., Kenneth Craig, Smith & John, Shreveport

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Armstrong, Jane E., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Brechtel, Timothy P., Jones Walker, New Orleans Chambers, Susan K., Jones Walker, New Orleans Conklin, Katherine, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Littauer, Dwayne O., The Kullman Firm, New Orleans Morris, Christopher G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge Rachal, Robert W., Proskauer Rose, New Orleans

Shaw, Danny G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville Pg. S-6, S-8

Toale, Robert S., The Law Office of Robert S. Toale, Gretna

Shapiro, Howard, Proskauer Rose, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Shields, Lloyd N., Shields Mott, New Orleans

Vamvoras, Glen D., Vamvoras Schwartzberg & Associates, Lake Charles

Thorne, RenÊ E., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-6

Sinnott, John W., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Tyler, Richard J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Vale, Richard S., Blue Williams, Metairie

S-14 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

Walsh, Michael S., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Ward, Jr., Samuel C. “Chuck�, Samuel C. Ward Jr. & Associates, Baton Rouge, 225-330-6677

EMPLOYMENT & LABOR Adams, H. Mark, Jones Walker, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS Alessandra, M. Nan, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Pg. S-6

Livaudais, Julie D., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Pg. S-6

Kornick, Cheryl Mollere, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Anderson, Jennifer L., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

Roussel, Elizabeth A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Marshall, Jr., Charles D., Milling Benson Woodward, New Orleans

Van Meerveld, Janis, Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Mascari, Pamela Roman, Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

White, Christine M., Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, New Orleans

Masur, Samuel E., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, Lafayette

Wisdom, Rachel Wendt, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

McGlone, Michael A., Kean Miller, New Orleans

ENERGY & NATURAL RESOURCES

McNamara, Mark L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Carver, M. Hampton, Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

McNeal, Robert B., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Babineaux, Joel P., Babineaux Poché Anthony & Slavich, Lafayette Beiser, Stephen P., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Bush, H. Michael, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Cancienne, Phyllis G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge Pg. S-6 Crochet, Vicki M., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Currault, Donna Phillips, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Cook, Jonathan R., Wall Bullington & Cook, New Orleans

Desmond, Susan Fahey, Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

Daigle, Susan A., Daigle Rayburn, Lafayette

Duncan, III, Brooke, Adams and Reese, New Orleans Foster, III, Murphy J., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Furr, Susan W., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Guidry, Gregory, Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, Lafayette Pg. S-6 Hymowitz, Steve, Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, New Orleans Jacob, III, Clyde H., Coats Rose, New Orleans Kiggans, Thomas H., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge

McKeithen, Marjorie A., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-6

Murchison, Malcolm S., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, Shreveport Nicholson, Cynthia A., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Darden, M. Taylor, Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

O’Connor, Scott A., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Hayne, Jr., C. Peck, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Pearce, John Y., Montgomery Barnett, New Orleans

Hebert, Aimee W., Kelly Hart & Pitre, New Orleans

Rosenblum, Carl D., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Hunter, Jonathan A., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Shea, Jr., Joseph L., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, Shreveport

Jarrott, Colleen Carr, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Smelley, David L., Hargrove Smelley Strickland & Langley, Shreveport

Jurgens, III, George B., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans

Zuckerman, Adam, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Klemm, Kenneth M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

CONTINUED ON PAGE S-16

Koch, Amelia Williams, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Koretzky, I. Harold, Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Lanusse, Leslie A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

CAMERON R. WADDELL

Lewis, V, Sidney F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Malone, Jr., Ernest R., The Kullman Firm, New Orleans

WADDELL ANDERMAN L.L.C.

Masinter, Eve B., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans

2222 Eastgate Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70816

Mitchell, Michael S., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans

PH: (225) 636-5639 • FX: (225) 636-5209 cwaddell@waddellanderman.com

Moore, Christopher E., Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, New Orleans

waddellanderman.com

Murov, Ellis B., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Myers, Sarah Voorhies, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Pyburn, Jr., Keith M., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Robein, Louis L., Robein Urann Spencer Picard & Cangemi, Metairie Schwartz, Jeffrey A., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans Scott, Timothy H., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Shuler, III, G. Phillip, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Tusa, Jr., Michael T., Sutton Alker & Rather, Mandeville

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: DEFENSE

MESOTHELIOMA AND ASBESTOS Cameron Waddell has successfully fought and won cases against some of the world’s largest corporations. For more than twenty years Mr. Waddell has successfully tried cases involving all asbestos-related disease including mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis, non-malignant pleural disease and other cancers such as colon and laryngeal. Mr. Waddell has won more verdicts in Louisiana asbestos cases than any other lawyer. His verdicts have resulted in many of the landmark decisions involving Louisiana’s workplaces. Mr. Waddell knows that justice does not happen by accident but comes through diligently preparing each case for trial. In addition to asbestos cases, Mr. Waddell has handled other occupational disease and injury cases including hearing loss, benzene and coal tar pitch exposure cases.

Fischman, Debra J., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2109 Pg. S-7 Harold, Edward F., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Le Clercq, Frederic Theodore “Ted”, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-15


S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS ENVIRONMENTAL

Coleman, J. Grant, King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans

Hebert, Jr., Paul M., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Courington, Kaye N., Courington Kiefer & Sommers, New Orleans

Edwards, David F., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Hoffman, Mitchell J., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450

Harrison, Jr., Andrew J., Harrison Law, Baton Rouge Holden, Robert E., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Johnson, Greg L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Levine, Steven J., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Nazareth, Neil F., Martzell Bickford & Centola, New Orleans, 504-581-9065

ENVIRONMENTAL LITIGATION Boudreaux, Jr., Bernard E., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, Baton Rouge

Hayes, Steven E., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Henry, Miriam W., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Lane, Steven J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Hester, Mary C., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

Lowe, Robert C., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450

Ladouceur, Raymond P., Ladouceur & Ladouceur, Abita Springs

Madere, Barbara Volk, Barbara Volk Madere, Gretna

Lehmann, Lawrence M., Lehmann Norman & Marcus, New Orleans

Mansfield, Mark J., Tranchina & Mansfield, Covington

Medlin, W. Deryl, McMichael Medlin D’Anna Wedgeworth & Lafargue, Shreveport

Morris, Edith H., Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans

Mendler, Joel A., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Prados, David M., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Riegel, Jr., Philip, Attorney at Law, Metairie

Drew, Kathleen F., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Mengis, Joseph W., Perry Balhoff Mengis & Burns, Baton Rouge

Gray, Patrick W., Johnson Gray McNamara, Lafayette

Meyer, IV, Conrad, Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie

Hand, Jr., Albert M., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport

Nathan, Jr., Max, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans

Wasserman, Lynne W., Lynne W. Wasserman, Metairie

Isenberg, Craig R., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Wolff, Bennett, Wolff & Wolff, Metairie

Johnson, Mary S., Johnson Gray McNamara, Mandeville Pg. S-6 Jones, III, Gladstone N., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans Knister, Terrence K., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans LeBlanc, IV, J. Burton, Baron & Budd, Baton Rouge Losch, Jill T., Johnson Gray McNamara, Mandeville Neuner, Jr., Francis X., NeunerPate, Lafayette Nieset, James R., PlauchÊ Smith & Nieset, Lake Charles Palermo, III, J. Rock, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles, 337-310-1600 Pilie, Glen M., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Pitre, Jr., Loulan J., Kelly Hart & Pitre, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Swetman, Max, Manion Gaynor & Manning, New Orleans Zwain, Gary M., Duplass Zwain Bourgeois Pfister & Weinstock, Metairie

ESTATE & TRUST LITIGATION

Perez, Robert L., Perez McDaniel Faust & Adams, New Orleans Plunkett, Laura Walker, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Reso, Patrick K., Seale & Ross, Hammond Riess, F. Kelleher, Hickey & Riess, New Orleans Rittenberg, Jr., Leon H., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Rouchell, John A., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Sherry, Jr., Mettery I., Sherry & Denton, Metairie Shreves, John F., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Bayard, III, Alton E., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge Blackman, IV, John C., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge Blitzer, Jr., Sidney M., Kantrow Spaht Weaver & Blitzer, Baton Rouge

S-16 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

Duncan, J. Kelly, Jones Walker, New Orleans West, Paul S., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

GENERAL LITIGATION Abaunza, Donald R., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Anzelmo, Sr., Thomas P., McCranie Sistrunk Anzelmo Hardy McDaniel & Welch, New Orleans

Burnthorn, Judy L., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Villarrubia, Todd M., Wealth Planning Law Group, New Orleans

Cohn, Stanley J., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Weems, III, Charles S., Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria

Hebert, Paul J., Ottinger Hebert, Lafayette

Weiss, Kenneth A., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

Howard, III, William H., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

FAMILY LAW

Kerrigan, Jr., Robert E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Anderson, Ernest S., Anderson & Anderson, Slidell

Bice, Jamie B., Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles, 337-310-1600

Abbott, Jr., Hirschel T., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

GAMING

Spizer, David “Bruce�, Bruce Spizer, New Orleans

M. JANICE VILLARRUBIA

ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE

Ziv, Barbara J., Barbara J. Ziv, New Orleans

Benjamin, Jr., Jack C., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans

Bayle, Suzanne Ecuyer, Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans

www.villarrubia-law.com

Salley, Laurel A., Salley & Salley, Metairie

Sigler, David L., Sigler & Raglin, Lake Charles

Villarrubia, M. Janice, Law Office of M. Janice Villarrubia, Baton Rouge, 225-381-7800 Pg. S-22 LAW OFFICE OF M. JANICE VILLARRUBIA, LLC #BUPO3PVHF`ȕ

Rue, Stephen R., Stephen Rue & Associates, Kenner, 504-529-5000

Cabral, H. Craig, Attorney at Law, Metairie de Blanc, Jennifer Carter, de Blanc Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-304-7299 Felder, Bradford H., Huval Veazey Felder & Renegar, Lafayette, 337-234-5350

BRADFORD H. FELDER

HUVAL VEAZEY FELDER & RENEGAR LLC -BGBZFUUF`ȕ

www.hvfr-law.com

Hubert, Thomas P., Jones Walker, New Orleans

MacDonald, Ian A., Jones Walker, Lafayette Patrick, Patrick H., Patrick Miller, New Orleans Perrier, Guy D., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans Philips, Jr., Harry J., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Pg. S-6 Williams, James M., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Williams, Sharonda R., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

HEALTH CARE Atkinson, Robert L., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Franz, Patricia M., Pat M. Franz & Associates, Metairie

Caesar, Craig L., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Hale, Steven W., Hale Law Firm, Lake Charles

de la Houssaye, Nadia, Jones Walker, Lafayette

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS Fraiche, Donna D., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

INTERNATIONAL

Frois, Monica A., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Fowler, III, George J., Fowler Rodriguez, New Orleans

King, Jr., Errol J., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

MEDIA & ADVERTISING

McKinney, Don S., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Roy, Mary Ellen, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Spears, Kenneth R., Spears Gary, Lake Charles, 337-513-4333 Pg. S-22

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

Thibodeaux, Terry, The Thibodeaux Law Firm, Lake Charles

Pizzo, Stephen M., Blue Williams, Metairie Staub, Jr., Perry R., Taggart Morton, New Orleans Trostorff, Danielle, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

INSURANCE COVERAGE Baumgartner, Adrianne L., Porteous Hainkel & Johnson, Covington Pg. S-6 Curtis, Martha Y., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2111 Pg. S-7 Dicharry, Richard N., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Elliott, CÊleste D., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Fischer, Madeleine, Jones Walker, New Orleans Flanagan, Harold J., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Giarrusso, Catherine Fornias, Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Gonzalez, Pablo, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Guichet, Joseph P., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Hall, Jr., George B., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Homza, Brian A., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport McKenzie, W. Shelby, Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Miles, Stephen L., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans O’Bannon, Ernest L., Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon, New Orleans Pelleteri, Maura Z., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans Pipes, III, H. Minor, Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans PlauchÊ, Jr., Andrew L., PlauchÊ Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

Bowsher, Robert T., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Caverly, Joseph L., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Fullmer, Mark A., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Hearn, Curtis R., Jones Walker, New Orleans Kantrow, Lee C., Kantrow Spaht Weaver & Blitzer, Baton Rouge Norton, William N., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Page, III, J. Marshall, Jones Walker, New Orleans Stubbs, Jr., William P., Stubbs Law Firm, Lafayette, 337-233-9755

WILLIAM P. STUBBS, JR. STUBBS LAW FIRM, LLC -BGBZFUUF`Č•

www.stubbslawfirm.com Whittaker, Scott T., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: DEFENSE Acomb, Ryan, Porteous Hainkel & Johnson, New Orleans Andersson, W. Paul, Leake & Andersson, New Orleans Bailey, Matthew W., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, Baton Rouge Bezet, Gary A., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF Abramson, David Alan, Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans, 504-588-1500 Alexander, Glenn W., Glenn W. Alexander, Lake Charles Anderson, Jr., Bennett Boyd, Anderson Dozier Blanda & Saltzman, Lafayette Andrews, B. Scott, DuÊ Guidry Piedrahita Andrews, Baton Rouge Armentor, Glenn J., Glenn Armentor Law, Lafayette Babcock, Stephen, Babcock Partners, Baton Rouge Bailey, Jr., Jack M., Jack Bailey Law, Shreveport, 318-222-5200

JACK M. BAILEY, JR. JACK BAILEY LAW CORPORATION 4ISFWFQPSU`Č•

www.jackbaileylaw.com Berger, Allan, Allan Berger & Associates, New Orleans, 504-526-2222 Blanda, Nicholas A., Anderson Dozier Blanda & Saltzman, Lafayette, 337-233-3366 Pg. S-21 Bravo, David D., Bravo Law Firm, New Orleans Broussard, Richard C., Broussard & David, Lafayette, 337-233-2323

DeRouen, Patrick D., DeRouen Law Firm, New Orleans

Bush, D. Wayne, Attorney at Law, Leesville

Forrester, David C., Forrester & Clark, Baton Rouge

Salley, David P., Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans

Galloway, John E., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans

Schmeeckle, Seth A., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Gideon, Kyle L., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette, 337-237-1660

Wilson, Kristopher T., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Schafer, Timothy G., Schafer & Schafer, New Orleans

Broussard, Steven, Broussard & Hart, Lake Charles

Redmon, Marshall M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Strauss, David A., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans

O’Bryon, Kevin C., O’Bryon & Schnabel, New Orleans

Cass, Jr., Bertrand M., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Fraser, David A., Fraser Wheeler & Bergstedt, Lake Charles

Sever, Jay Russell, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Murphy, Howard L., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Grace, III, Christopher T., Blue Williams, Metairie

Bruno, Stephen P., Bruno & Bruno, New Orleans Cain, Joseph E. “Jed�, Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Camel, Kevin L., Cox Cox Filo Camel & Wilson, Lake Charles Chopin, Richard A., The Chopin Law Firm, New Orleans Cossich, Jr., Philip F., Cossich Sumich Parsiola & Taylor, Belle Chasse

Hightower, Jr., Thomas R., Thomas R. Hightower Jr., Lafayette, 337-233-0555

Creed, Christian C., Creed & Creed, Monroe, 318-387-5800 Pg. S-21

Kay, III, Ped C., Broussard & Kay, Broussard

David, Blake R., Broussard & David, Lafayette, 337-233-2323

Kennedy, Jr., Robert, Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Latham, Mark D., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Bullock, Stephen G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Mascagni, Kenneth, Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport

Harrigan, Brad E., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Maselli, Jr., Joseph, PlauchÊ Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

deGravelles, J. Neale, deGravelles Palmintier Holthaus & FrugÊ, Baton Rouge, 225-344-3735 Pg. S-11 DiLeo, Gregory P., Law Offices of Gregory P. DiLeo, New Orleans CONTINUED ON PAGE S-18

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-17


S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS PI CONT’D FROM PAGE S-17

Domengeaux, James H., Domengeaux Wright Roy Edwards & Colomb, Lafayette, 337-233-3033

JAMES H. DOMENGEAUX

DOMENGEAUX WRIGHT ROY EDWARDS & COLOMB, LLC -BGBZFUUF`ȕ

www.wrightroy.com

Lamothe, III, Frank E., Lamothe Law Firm, New Orleans Loup, Terry B., Morris Bart, New Orleans McCall, Robert C., Baggett McCall Burgess Watson & Gaughan, Lake Charles McGovern, Glenn C., Attorney at Law, Metairie McKernan, Gordon J., Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys, Baton Rouge

Dunahoe, Jr., Edwin, Dunahoe Law Firm, Natchitoches

Morrow, Patrick C., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483

Exnicios, Val P., Liska Exnicios & Nungesser, New Orleans

Palmintier, Michael C., deGravelles Palmintier Holthaus & FrugÊ, Baton Rouge, 225-344-3735 Pg. S-11

Filo, Thomas A., Cox Cox Filo Camel & Wilson, Lake Charles Friedman, Jonathan P., Silbert Garon Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans Frischhertz, Lloyd N., Frischhertz Poulliard Frischhertz & Impastato, New Orleans

Papillion, Darrel J., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge Penton, Ronnie G., The Penton Law Firm, Bogalusa Perry, John B., Attorney at Law, Slidell

Gaar, Jr., Joseph F., The Gaar Law Firm, Lafayette

Piedrahita, Randolph A., DuÊ Guidry Piedrahita Andrews, Baton Rouge

Garon, R. Justin, Silbert Garon Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans

Redmann, John W., Law Office of John W. Redmann, Gretna, 504-433-5550

Geiger, Andrew J., Allan Berger & Associates, New Orleans, 504-526-2222

Roy, James P., Domengeaux Wright Roy Edwards & Colomb, Lafayette, 337-233-3033

Gertler, Meyer H. “Mikeâ€?, Gertler Law Firm, New Orleans Gisleson, Soren E., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Goforth, William H., Goforth & Lilley, Lafayette, 337-237-5777 Pg. S-21 Gregorio, Joseph A., Joseph A. Gregorio, Bossier City Gregorio, Sam N., Gregorio Chafin & Johnson, Shreveport Guidry, Kirk A., DuĂŠ Guidry Piedrahita Andrews, Baton Rouge Herman, Maury A., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Hoffoss, Jr., John Lee, Hoffoss Devall, Lake Charles Holthaus, C. Frank, deGravelles Palmintier Holthaus & FrugĂŠ, Baton Rouge, 225-344-3735 Pg. S-11 Hooks, III, Kenneth H., Dodson & Hooks, Baton Rouge Impastato, III, Dominick F., Frischhertz Poulliard Frischhertz & Impastato, New Orleans, 504-264-9915 Pg. S-21

DOMINICK F. IMPASTATO, III

FRISCHHERTZ, POULLIARD, FRISCHHERTZ, & IMPASTATO, LLC /FX0SMFBOT`Č•

www.frischhertzlaw.com

Jacobs, Darleen M., Jacobs Sarrat Lovelace & Harris, New Orleans, 504-522-0155 Pg. S-6, S-22

DARLEEN M. JACOBS

JACOBS, SARRAT, LOVELACEÂ & HARRIS /FX0SMFBOT`Č•

Jacobson, Tamara Kluger, Attorney at Law, New Orleans Jones, Jennifer Ann, Jones Law Firm, Cameron Klick, James C., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Lagarde, Ross F., Ross F. Lagarde, Slidell Lambert, James P., Jim Lambert Law Firm, Lafayette

S-18 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

JAMES P. ROY

DOMENGEAUX WRIGHT ROY EDWARDS & COLOMB, LLC -BGBZFUUF`ȕ

www.wrightroy.com

Saunders, Benjamin B., Davis Saunders Miller & Oden Law Firm, Mandeville Schwartzberg, Michael H., Vamvoras Schwartzberg & Associates, Lake Charles Silbert, Scott E., Silbert Garon Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: DEFENSE Blankenship, Kurt S., Blue Williams, Metairie Bradford, John S., Stockwell Sievert Viccellio Clements & Shaddock, Lake Charles Bradley Jr., C.Wm., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Crisler, Richard S., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Curry, Guy C., Curry & Friend, New Orleans Fontana, Karen M., Kean Miller, New Orleans Gibbs, Vance A., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Henning, Susan E., Curry & Friend, New Orleans Judice, Marc W., Judice & Adley, Lafayette, 337-235-2405 Pg. S-22 Pettiette, Jr., Lawrence W., Pettiette Armand Dunkelman Woodley Byrd & Cromwell, Shreveport Sobel, David R., Faircloth Melton & Sobel, Alexandria Sperling, Peter E., Frilot, New Orleans Sues, Eugene J., Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria Winters, Amy M., Jones Walker, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: PLAINTIFF Bowling, David A., The Bowling Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-586-5200 David, Robert J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Ecuyer, Michael J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans

Silvestri, Frank A., Silvestri & Savoie, New Orleans

Hammons, John L., Nelson & Hammons, Shreveport, 318-227-2401 Pg. S-2

Slack, Todd R., Huber Slack Thomas & Marcelle, New Orleans

Kullman, Lawrence S., Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans

Smith, IV, S. Christie, SmithAdvocates, Leesville

Mitchell, Jeffrey A., The Cochran Firm Metairie, Metairie

Tomeny, III, Frank, Tomeny Law Firm, Baton Rouge Townsley, Rex D., The Townsley Law Firm, Lake Charles, 337-377-0584 Pg. S-22 Unglesby, Lewis, Unglesby Law Firm, Baton Rouge Pg. S-6 Voorhies, III, Richard P., The Voorhies Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-875-2223

RICHARD P. VOORHIES, III THE VOORHIES LAWÂ FIRM /FX0SMFBOT`Č•

www.voorhieslaw.com

Orrill, Jr., R. Ray, Orrill & Beary, New Orleans Russell, III, Sera H., The Law Offices of Sera H. Russell III, Lafayette Samuels, Kara Hadican, Kara Hadican Samuels & Associates, New Orleans Schrumpf, Oliver “Jackson�, Schrumpf & Schrumpf, Sulphur, 337-625-9077 Townsley, Todd A., The Townsley Law Firm, Lake Charles Wagar, III, Nelson W. “Chip�, Wagar Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais, Metairie

Waddell, Cameron R., Waddell Anderman, Baton Rouge, 225-636-5639 Pg. S-15

Widmann, Harry T., Attorney at Law, Metairie

Walker, David O., Neblett Beard & Arsenault, Alexandria

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: DEFENSE

Walters, Jr., Edward J., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge Pg. S-6 Ward, Aub A., Naquin & Ward, Baton Rouge Wright, Bob F., Domengeaux Wright Roy Edwards & Colomb, Lafayette, 337-233-3033

BOB F. WRIGHT

DOMENGEAUX WRIGHT ROY EDWARDS & COLOMB, LLC -BGBZFUUF`ȕ

www.wrightroy.com

Accardo, Francis P., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans Arras, Barbara L., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Bertaut, Carmelite M., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-6 Capodice, Camala E., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Cook, Jr., Sidney E., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Daniels, Timothy F., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS Frohn, David R., Manion Gaynor & Manning, Lake Charles

Simmons, Gracella, Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge, 225-383-3796

Tessier, Frank A., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

Gay, Jr., Charles F., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Theard, Kelly E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Title, Peter S., Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans

Gieger, Jr., Ernest P., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans

Trapolin, Edward W., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Tyler, Susan M., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Wright, Jr., William E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Willis, Sterling Scott, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Irwin, James B., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY: PLAINTIFF

SECURITIES & CORPORATE FINANCE

Kohnke, IV, Edward F., Preis, New Orleans Pg. S-8

Kott, Joseph A., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Chenevert, Scott D., Fishman Haygood, Baton Rouge

Glass, Joseph G., Duplass Zwain Bourgeois Pfister & Weinstock, Metairie

Laborde, Kenneth H., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans Lavelle, Paul M., Cotten Schmidt & Abbott, New Orleans Manning, Kathleen A., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Massenburg, Christopher O., Manion Gaynor & Manning, New Orleans Melancon, David M., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Najder, Kenneth J., Jones Walker, New Orleans

REAL ESTATE Adams, Marguerite L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Balhoff, II, John T., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-7

Rieveschl, David, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Rooth, Robert S., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Rousseau, Dionne M., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge Walmsley, Jr., Robert M., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Cahill, Jr., Elwood F., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2103 Pg. S-6, S-7, S-8

SECURITIES LITIGATION

Carleton, Michael D., Chaffe McCall, Lake Charles

Bieck, Jr., Robert B., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Moore, Kim E., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Colvin, R. Keith, Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Freeman, III, George C., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

Norwood, Jr., Colvin G., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

Crosby, E. Howell, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

McCardle, Lance C., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Moore, Douglas J., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Olinde, John F., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

de Lisle, Victoria M., Locke Lord, New Orleans Pg. S-6

O’Quinn, David W., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Dwyer, Stephen I., Dwyer Cambre & Suffern, Metairie

Pugh, III, Lawrence G., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans

Elkins, Gary J., Elkins, New Orleans

Sarver, Richard E., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

SURETY

Hood, Ralph E., Kizer Hood & Morgan, Baton Rouge

Gordon, Elizabeth L., Shields Mott, New Orleans

Stout, III, A. Wendel, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Landry, Charles A., Fishman Haygood, Baton Rouge

Surprenant, Mark C., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

LeBreton, Rose McCabe, Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Talbot, Brent A., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Leyens, Jr., Jon F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Urquhart, Jr., Quentin F., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Pg. S-8

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: PLAINTIFF Kleinpeter, Robert E., Kleinpeter & Schwartzberg, Baton Rouge Lundy, Hunter W., Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, Lake Charles, 337-439-0707 Pg. S-3 Swarr, Frank J., Landry & Swarr, New Orleans

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY: DEFENSE Brennan, Terrence L., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Canada, Larry G., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans Clary, Albert D., Long Law Firm, Baton Rouge Fritchie, III, Gus A., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Gasperecz, A. Kirk, Adams and Reese, New Orleans

McHenry, R. Lewis, Jones Walker, New Orleans McMurray, Patricia B., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge Moench, Deborah Jean, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2117 Pg. S-7 Montgomery, III, Richard B., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Moore, Marie A., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2108 Pg. S-7

Kern, Jay H., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Sole, Emmett C., Stockwell Sievert Viccellio Clements & Shaddock, Lake Charles

TAX Ajubita, A. Albert, Ajubita Leftwich & Salzer, New Orleans Angelico, Robert S., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Antin, Jr., Walter “Bud”, Antin Law Firm, Hammond Backstrom, Jr., William M., Jones Walker, New Orleans Baringer, Dale R., The Baringer Law Firm, Baton Rouge

Morton, James R., Taggart Morton, New Orleans

Bell, Hilton S., Milling Benson Woodward, New Orleans

Reymond, Jr., Leon J., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Calhoun, Jaye A., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Pg. S-6

Richter, Richard P., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2104 Pg. S-7

Casey, Robert R., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

Roussel, Randy P., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge

Colbert, John W., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Schneider, Michael R., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Schott, Stephen P., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Lund, Daniel, Montgomery Barnett, New Orleans

Sher, Leopold Z., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2101 Pg. S-6, S-7, S-8

Marshall, Nancy J., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Steeg, Robert M., Steeg Law Firm, New Orleans

Ross, William M., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans

Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Gibson, James H., Allen & Gooch, Lafayette

Roberts, Thomas A., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Cassidy, David R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Guarisco, Michael E., Guarisco Cordes & Lala, New Orleans Kelly, David R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Klein, Steven I., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-7 Koch, David G., Koch Law Firm, Baton Rouge CONTINUED ON PAGE S-20

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-19


S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS TAX CONT’D FROM PAGE S-19

Mayhall, Michael A., The Mayhall Law Firm, Covington Meltzer, Donald M., Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge Ramelli, Rudolph R., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Curtis, Larry, Larry Curtis, Lafayette, 337-235-1825 Pg. S-5 Y FFPUYGG

LARRY CURTIS

LARRY CURTIS, APLC -BGBZFUUF`Č•

www.larrycurtis.com

Mason, W. Brett, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, Baton Rouge, 225-490-5812 Pg. S-6 Matthews, Douglas P., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans McAloon, III, Leo R., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans

Rittenberg III, Leon H., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Davis, Christopher O., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

McCleskey, Jr., Robert P., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Stutes, Jr., Russell J., Stutes & Lavergne, Lake Charles, 337-433-0022

Diaz, Thomas P., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

McElligott, Jr., John E., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette, 337-237-1660

Tarcza, Robert E., Tarcza & Associates, New Orleans Warren, Jr., J. Benjamin, Warren & Baker, Shreveport

Dittman, Stevan C., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Dodson, Richard J., Dodson & Hooks, Baton Rouge Dragna, Gerard J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

Weiler, John J., Weiler & Rees, New Orleans

Edwards, Dow Michael, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Williams, John R., Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport

Emory, C. William, Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

Zimmermann, Karl J., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Flint, Jr., Delos E., Fowler Rodriguez, New Orleans

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME Acomb, Jr., Robert B., Jones Walker, New Orleans Adley, Michael W., Judice & Adley, Lafayette Anseman, III, Norman E. “Skeet�, Jones Walker, Lafayette Arata, Jr., Blake G., Rome Arata Baxley & Stelly, New Orleans, 504-522-9980 Pg. S-21

McLeod, Evans Martin, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans McShane, Patrick J., Frilot, New Orleans Merchant, Kevin P., NeunerPate, Lafayette Mestayer, Michael J., Michael J. Mestayer, New Orleans Moroux, Marc D., Juneau David, Lafayette

Forbes, Thomas D., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Morrison, Thomas Kent L., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Force, Joshua S., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2130 Pg. S-7

Morrow, Jr., P. Craig, Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483

Goodier, Glenn G., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8

Mouledoux, Andre J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

Grant, Jr., A. Gordon, Montgomery Barnett, New Orleans

Parks, C. Michael, Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

Guy, Matthew C., Bland & Partners, New Orleans

Plunkett, Jr., Lawrence R., Reich Album & Plunkett, Metairie

Haas, III, Frederick T., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans Hassinger, Timothy W., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, Mandeville

Preis, Jr., Edwin G., Preis, Lafayette

Haycraft, Don K., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Riviere, William J., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Balart, L. Etienne, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Hemphill, Gary A., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Barbier, Robert J., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Hilbert, Jr., Peter L., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2107 Pg. S-7

Rodriguez, Antonio J., Fowler Rodriguez, New Orleans Pg. S-8

Arnold, III, Edward H. “Hank�, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Barry, Jr., Francis J., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Bertram, Richard D., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Hoerner, Daniel J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

Bolles, John A., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Hurley, Grady S., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Bourque, Jr., Charles C., St. Martin & Bourque, Houma, 985-876-3891 Broders, John J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Brooks, Jr., Philip S., Montgomery Barnett, New Orleans

Hymel, Richard J., Mahtook & LaFleur, Lafayette

Roussel, James H., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Schlotterer, Bradley J., Kean Miller, New Orleans Schwartz, William B., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Katz, Brian D., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Scofield, Bryan D., Scofield & Rivera, Lafayette

Kiefer, Scott B., Courington Kiefer & Sommers, New Orleans Koch, Jr., R. Joshua, Koch & Schmidt, New Orleans

Carrigee, David L., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Laizer, Edwin C., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Charvet, Kathleen K., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans

Rome, III, C. Perrin, Rome Arata Baxley & Stelly, New Orleans, 504-522-9980 Pg. S-22

Kallam, Robert M., Preis, Lafayette

Butterworth, Michael M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Cerise, Jr., Charles A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Rivera, James T., Scofield & Rivera, Lafayette

Koehl, Jr., Edward J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Lambert, Hugh P., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans, 504-581-1750 Larzelere, Stephen M., Larzelere Picou Wells Simpson Lonero, Metairie LaVie, Kevin J., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Sharpe, David B., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Silverstein, James R., Kean Miller, New Orleans Slater, III, Benjamin R., Akerman, New Orleans Soule, Scott A., Blue Williams, Mandeville Sterbcow, Paul M., Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans, 504-588-1500 Stevens, Jr., Elwood C., Domengeaux Wright Roy Edwards & Colomb, Lafayette, 337-233-3033

ELWOOD C. STEVENS, JR.

DOMENGEAUX WRIGHT ROY EDWARDS & COLOMB, LLC -BGBZFUUF`ȕ

Clotworthy, Robert C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Lawton, David B., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Colletta, Katharine R., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Legrand, Georges M., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

Tadros, Daniel A., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Lemoine, Michael G., Jones Walker, Lafayette

Talley, Jr., Patrick A., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Lemon, II, Robert T., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Theunissen, Randall K., Allen & Gooch, Lafayette

Colletta, Jr., Thomas Louis, Akerman, New Orleans Cozad, Richard A., McAlpine & Cozad, New Orleans

S-20 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

Lee III, Joseph E., Frilot, New Orleans

www.wrightroy.com

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS Tillery, Jefferson R., Jones Walker, New Orleans Truxillo, Douglas W., Onebane Law Firm, Lafayette Tynan, Joseph P., Montgomery Barnett, New Orleans Vance, Paul N., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Waguespack, Jason P., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans, 504-525-6802 Pg. S-22 Walker, Derek A., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Wallace, Brian D., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Warshauer, Irving J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Pg. S-6, S-8 Wheaton, Jr., Scott R., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Williams, III, Conrad S.P. (Duke), Williams Law Group, Houma, 985-876-7595

CONRAD S.P. (DUKE) WILLIAMS, III WILLIAMS LAW GROUP )PVNB`Č•

www.williamslawgroup.org

UTILITIES Fontham, Michael R., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Gilliam, Bobby S., Wilkinson Carmody & Gilliam, Shreveport Parkerson, G. Bruce, PlauchÊ Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

Wright, III, James E., Jones Walker, New Orleans Young, Timothy J., The Young Firm, New Orleans, 504-680-4100

TIMOTHY J. YOUNG THE YOUNGÂ FIRM /FX0SMFBOT`Č•

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION Brackett, Alan G., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Brewster, Arthur J., Arthur J. Brewster, Metairie Mandel, Jeffrey I., Juge Napolitano Guilbeau Ruli & Frieman, Metairie

www.theyoungfirm.com

SORTED ALPHABETICALLY

BLAKE G. ARATA, JR.

NICHOLAS A. BLANDA

Poydras Center 650 Poydras Street Suite 2017 New Orleans, LA 70130 Tel: 504-522-9980 Fax: 504-522-9971 barata@romearata.com www.romearata.com

2010 West Pinhook Road Lafayette, LA 70508 Tel: 337-233-3366 Fax: 337-233-3163 nicholas@andersondozier.com www.andersondozier.com

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: PLAINTIFF

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

Since 1984, Blake G. Arata, Jr. has been representing injured individuals for personal injury and wrongful death involving railroad accidents, maritime personal injury, and severe truck and vehicular accidents. He concentrates his practice on representing injured railroad employees and their families under the Federal Employers’ Liability Act (FELA) and offshore workers and seamen under the Jones Act and general maritime law. Mr.  Arata and his firm have used their vast resources and skills to successfully represent these individuals all over the United States. He has been awarded an AV rating by Martindale-Hubbell and is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum. Mr.  Arata graduated from Loyola Law School in New Orleans and is managing partner in the firm.

Mr. Blanda is a partner at Anderson, Dozier, Blanda & Saltzman and represents clients throughout the Gulf Coast, specializing in serious personal injury and wrongful death cases arising from trucking accidents, maritime accidents, automobile accidents, industrial accidents, product liability and premises defect. He obtained his undergraduate degree from LSU in 2000  and his J.D. from Loyola Law School in 2004. After completing a federal clerkship, he began private practice in 2005. Mr. Blanda is admitted to practice in Louisiana; the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals; the U.S. District Court, Western, Middle and Eastern Districts of Louisiana; and the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas.

Practice focuses on personal injury litigation, which includes cases dealing with automobile, 18-wheeler/trucking, and offshore accidents; wrongful death actions; and Social Security claims. Fourth Judicial Bar Association, past Executive Board member; American Bar Association; American Association of Justice; Louisiana Association of Justice, Executive Committee and past Board of Governors member; American Inns of Court, life member; Louisiana State University, B.A. degree; Loyola University, School of Law (New Orleans, LA), Moot Court Board and Moot Court National Team, and Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity.

STEVEN G. “BUZZ� DURIO

WILLIAM H. GOFORTH

DOMINICK F. IMPASTATO, III

ROME, ARATA, BAXLEYÂ & STELLY, LLC

DURIO, MCGOFFIN, STAGGÂ & ACKERMANN

ANDERSON DOZIER BLANDAÂ & SALTZMAN

GOFORTHÂ & LILLEY, APLC

CHRISTIAN C. CREED CREEDÂ & CREED

1805 Tower Drive Monroe, LA 71201 Tel: 318-387-5800 Fax: 318-362-8219 christian@creedlaw.com www.creedlaw.com

109 Stewart Street Lafayette, LA 70501 Tel: 337-237-5777 Fax: 337-232-0786 wgoforth@bellsouth.net www.goforthlilley.com

FRISCHHERTZ, POULLIARD, FRISCHHERTZ, & IMPASTATO, LLC

BUSINESS LITIGATION BANKING BUSINESS/CORPORATE

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

Founding partner of Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, Steven  G. “Buzz� Durio specializes in selected commercial business cases. With 37  years of legal proceedings in areas including business and commercial litigations, banking and financial institutions, business transactions, corporate business organization and counseling, corporate dissolution, mergers and acquisitions, and shareholder rights, he has conducted trials, appeals, arbitrations, mediations, review panels, and administrative hearings in city, parish, state, and federal trial and appellate courts. Evidenced by his extensive resume of legal experience, professional distinction, and community service, he has earned the respect of his peers, the state bar, and the community.

William H. Goforth is a managing partner in the firm of Goforth & Lilley, APLC and concentrates on personal injury, products liability, and litigation including car and commercial truck wrecks. He is a Board Certified Civil Trial Advocate by the National Board of Trial Advocacy and is Board Certified in Civil Pretrial Practice Advocacy by the National Board of Civil Pretrial Practice Advocacy. He is a member of the Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum. Bill is a Diplomat by the National College of Advocacy. He is a frequent speaker on trial tactics. Bill was selected as one of the Top 100  Trial Lawyers in Louisiana by the National Trial Lawyers Association. He is AV-rated by Martindale-Hubbell and selected to the Louisiana Super Lawyers list.

Dominick F. Impastato,  III has been the lead trial attorney in products liability, toxic tort, industrial equipment, commercial construction, insurance bad faith, and motor vehicle casualty trials since he was admitted to the bar in 2004. He has also served as liaison counsel in mass tort litigation in certain mass tort cases. Dominick takes particular pride in representing the proverbial little guy against parties of far greater resources and capabilities and achieving success for his clients, even when the odds may appear against them. Dominick graduated second in his class from Loyola Law School in 2004, served on the Loyola Law Review, and was named Best Oral Advocate in the seven-state region for the National Moot Court Competition.

220 Heymann Boulevard Lafayette, LA 70503 Tel: 337-233-0300 Fax: 337-233-0694 durio@dmsfirm.com www.dmsfirm.com

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

1130 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 Tel: 504-264-9915 Fax: 504-581-1670 dominick@fpfi-law.com www.frischhertzlaw.com

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-21


S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 SUPER LAWYERS

SORTED ALPHABETICALLY

DARLEEN M. JACOBS

MARC W. JUDICE

823 St. Louis Street New Orleans, LA 70112 Tel: 504-522-0155 Fax: 504-522-3819 dollyno@aol.com

926 Coolidge Boulevard Lafayette, LA 70503 Tel: 337-235-2405 Fax: 337-235-0965 mwj@judice-adley.com www.judice-adley.com

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: DEFENSE PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY: DEFENSE CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

Darleen M. Jacobs is the managing partner of her firm. Her offices are located in New Orleans and Violet. Her firm specializes in personal injury, general negligence, medical malpractice, maritime, Jones Act, and class action law. She is a member of the LTLA, NYSTLA, NBOTA, New Orleans Bar Association, St.  Bernard Bar Association, DCBAR, and the NYSBA. Darleen is AV-rated and was recognized as a preeminent lawyer by Martindale-Hubbell. In 2014  she was selected for the cover of Super Lawyers magazine in Louisiana. She is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum. She received over 71 judgments for $1 million or more and one judgment in excess of $3 billion dollars. She is admitted to practice law in the States of Louisiana and New York and in the District of Columbia.

Marc Judice, actively engaged in litigation since 1977, is a Certified Civil Trial Advocate by the National Board of Trial Advocacy. He is listed in Marquis’ Who’s Who in American Law. He is a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association. Judice & Adley has earned the highest rating (AV) from Martindale-Hubbell for skill and integrity, and Marc is listed in its Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers. Marc has been a seminar speaker for Louisiana Society of Orthopedic Surgeons, Louisiana Society of Neurosurgeons, Acadiana Pediatric Society, Acadiana Dental Association, LAMMICO, Medical Protective, National Business Institute, LSU School of Dentistry, and LSU Law School.

Perrin Rome is a senior partner in the New Orleans (and Houston) law firm of Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly where he handles significant litigation (primarily railroad litigation) throughout the United States. He is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell, and has handled jury trials in a wide variety of arenas, including trials in 14 different states and the District of Columbia. Mr. Rome serves as national designated counsel for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) for all commuter railroads, including Amtrak. Mr.  Rome has been recognized as a lifetime member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum, wherein membership is limited to trial lawyers whom have demonstrated exceptional skill, experience and excellence in advocacy by achieving several trial verdicts of one million dollars or greater.

KENNETH R. SPEARS

REX D. TOWNSLEY

M. JANICE VILLARRUBIA

1 Lakeshore Drive Suite 900 Lake Charles, LA 70629 Tel: 337-513-4333 Fax: 337-494-5584 kspears@law-sg.com www.spearsgary.com

3102 Enterprise Boulevard Lake Charles, LA 70601 Tel: 337-377-0584 Fax: 337-478-1577 rex@townsleylawfirm.com www.townsleylawfirm.com

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: DEFENSE CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: DEFENSE

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME WORKERS’ COMPENSATION

ESTATE & TRUST LITIGATION ELDER LAW ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE

Kenneth R. Spears, Louisiana State University (J.D., 1972), concentrates his practice on civil litigation, eminent domain, and toxic tort litigation. He is admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court; U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit; U.S. District Court, Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Louisiana; and U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Texas and by the Louisiana State Bar Association and State Bar of Texas. He is a member of the National Board of Trial Advocacy and Litigation Counsel of America.

Rex Townsley grew up in the piney woods at the Junction Community near Merryville, Louisiana. He was brought up and inspired by his mother, Gussie Townsley, who was a widow with five children. From an early age, Rex learned of the hardships created by the wrongful death of a loved one. This led him to an appreciation of the importance of hard work, commitment, and loyalty.

My interest in estate law and ultimately my law practice all began as a result of a difficult but successful litigation over my mother’s estate. I have a passion for the protection of heirs’ rights and “forced heirs” in particular. I received my Bachelor of Arts degree in international affairs from Florida State University and my Juris Doctor from Southern University Law Center. I am the past president of the Estate and Business Planners of Baton Rouge and have been an instructor for continuing legal education for the National Business Institute and Southern Law Center. Originally from Florida, I have lived in Louisiana for over 30 years and consider it home. I have one child, Evan, who lives in Dali, Yunnan, China with his wife, Yanzi and son Jackson. My interests outside of work are tennis, swimming, travel, and my British Lab Trudy.

JACOBS, SARRAT, LOVELACE & HARRIS

SPEARS GARY, L.L.C.

JUDICE & ADLEY

THE TOWNSLEY LAW FIRM

C. PERRIN ROME, III

ROME, ARATA, BAXLEY & STELLY, LLC Poydras Center 650 Poydras Street Suite 2017 New Orleans, LA 70130 Tel: 504-522-9980 Fax: 504-522-9971 prome@romearata.com www.romearata.com

LAW OFFICE OF M. JANICE VILLARRUBIA, LLC 341 St. Charles Street Baton Rouge, LA 70802 Tel: 225-381-7800 Fax: 225-361-8941 janice@villarrubia-law.com www.villarrubia-law.com

JASON P. WAGUESPACK GALLOWAY, JOHNSON, TOMPKINS, BURR & SMITH, APLC

One Shell Square, 40th Floor 701 Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70139 Tel: 504-525-6802 Fax: 504-525-2456 jwaguespack@gallowayjohnson.com www.gallowayjohnson.com TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME INTERNATIONAL GENERAL LITIGATION

Jason P. Waguespack is a recognized leader in the maritime and international legal fields. He currently serves as the Managing Director of Galloway Johnson, a Gulf South law firm with its headquarters in New Orleans. He maintains a regional practice based in New Orleans and Houston and specializes in the representation of maritime owners, charterers, operators, and insurers in all types of marine casualty losses. He serves as national counsel to several clients with ongoing international interests. He is also an Associate Professor of Law at Tulane University School of Law and Tulane University A.B. Freeman School of Business. He is active in the civic life of his community and serves as a vice president of the New Orleans Bar Association and chair of their Maritime Committee.

S-22 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

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S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 RISING STARS

THE LIST BY PRIMARY AREA OF PRACTICE The list was finalized as of July 13, 2016. Any updates to the list (for example, status changes or disqualifying events) will be reflected on superlawyers.com. Names and page numbers in RED indicate a profile on the specified page. Phone numbers are included only for attorneys with paid Super Lawyers print advertisements. Only attorneys who data verified with Super Lawyers for the current year are included on this list. All current selections are reflected on superlawyers.com profiles.

APPELLATE Dupre, Andy, Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Roth, Katherine Seegers, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

BANKING Crowson, Gabriel A., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Dysart, Katie L., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Ricci, Michael S., Ricci Partners, New Orleans Savoie, Robert, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

BANKRUPTCY: BUSINESS Ashley, Laura F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Kadden, Benjamin W., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans McCune, Patrick L., Adams and Reese, Baton Rouge Mintz, Mark A., Jones Walker, New Orleans Shelby, Rick M., Kelly Hart & Pitre, New Orleans Weema, Christopher J., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans

BANKRUPTCY: CONSUMER Abshier, Jenny, Big Easy Law Group, Metairie Sandler, Sharry I., The Law Office of Sharry I. Sandler, New Orleans

BUSINESS LITIGATION Abel, William, Christopher H. Riviere, Thibodaux Almon, Matthew S., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Anada, Tarak, Jones Walker, New Orleans Berger, Jamie L., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Bowdler, Bryan Edward, The Kullman Firm, New Orleans Brady, Sean P., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Briggett, Joe, Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Broussard, Maggie A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Broussard, Travis J., Durio McGoffin Stagg & Ackermann, Lafayette Burge, Jason W., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Busby, Patrick R., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Capell, Brian W., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Castoriano, Benjamin M., Frilot, New Orleans

Cheatham, Scott Robert, Adams and Reese, New Orleans Coons, David C., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Cotter, Patrick ‘Con’, Young Cotter & Meade, Lafayette Deethardt, Mark R., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Devillier, Jr., Carroll, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Ducros, Alex L.M., Orrill & Beary, New Orleans Easterly, Tom S., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Farris, Abigayle C., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans French, Ryan, Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Grabill, Jeremy T., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Grabill, Meredith Sue, Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Heilprin, Ashley J., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Hemken, David J., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Holden, Mirais, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Hoskins, Loretta O., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Janke, Benjamin West, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Juneau, Matthew C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Kane, Christopher J., Adams and Reese, New Orleans LaCour, Cliff, NeunerPate, Lafayette Latuso, Erin Wedge, Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans Lemaire, Justin P., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Lemoine, Stephanie Villagomez, Larzelere Picou Wells Simpson Lonero, Metairie Luder, David N., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Lutkewitte, Conor, Favret Demarest Russo ,Lutkewitte & Schaumburg, New Orleans Magee, Todd, Christopher H. Riviere, Thibodaux Marse, Randy, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans McCarty, Larry D., Hudson Potts & Bernstein, Monroe Mills, Alysson L., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Murphy, Kerry A., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans Pardee, Avery B., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pelleteri, Erin E., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Reeves, Lindsay, Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans Rosenbloom, D. Skylar, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Scelson, Michelle, Akerman, New Orleans Tettleton, Chase D., Babcock Partners, Baton Rouge Thriffiley, Jr, Peter S., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Tigchelaar, Brooke C., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Venn, Brett S., Jones Walker, New Orleans Wehlen, Nicholas J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Zerner, Charles-Theodore, Flanagan Partners, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO RISING STARS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

BUSINESS/CORPORATE Bishop, William R., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Breland, Quin, Breland Law, New Orleans Butler, Amanda, Business Law Group, New Orleans Davies, Victoria Gallo, Jones Walker, New Orleans Douthitt, Katherine Guidry, Blanchard Walker O’Quin & Roberts, Shreveport Friend, Asher J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Kantrow, Jacob M., Kantrow Spaht Weaver & Blitzer, Baton Rouge Kline, W. Bradley, Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Loupe, Jon N. (Blue), Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Moon, Ryan, Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Paine, Stephen J., Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport Schroeder, Logan, Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Sides, Brett M., Alexander Sides, Baton Rouge Spaht, W. Carlos, Alexander Sides, Baton Rouge Taylor, Natalie J., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans White, Victoria P., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Wood, Christie C., Faircloth Melton & Sobel, Alexandria Woodruff, Benjamin P., Jones Walker, New Orleans Wootten, Chris, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE Aiyegbusi, Denia S., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Albertine, III., James G., Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans Arnold, Nicholas P., Christovich & Kearney, New Orleans Aucoin, Jr., Ralph J., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans Austin, Elizabeth C., Brown Sims, Lafayette Bowling, Tori S., Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge Brian, Kelly M., Blue Williams, Mandeville Broom, Keelie, The Waltz Law Group, New Orleans Camelford, Jason A., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans Catalanotto, Rachael P., Talley Anthony Hughes & Knight, Mandeville Cefalu, III., Joseph J., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Centner, Dan, Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Coreil, Hallie, Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette, 337-237-1660 Cutaiar, Trevor, Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Edwards, Jerry, Blanchard Walker O’Quin & Roberts, Shreveport Emmerling, Victoria ‘Tori’, Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans Felder, Robert D., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette, 337-237-1660 Foster, Allison Colomb, Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport CONTINUED ON PAGE S-24

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-23


S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 RISING STARS CIVIL LITIGATION DEFENSE CONT’D FROM PAGE S-23

Getty, John C., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, Mandeville Giangrosso, Lena D., Provosty & Gankendorff, New Orleans Hebert, Carmen Tircuit, Carleton Loraso & Hebert, Baton Rouge Kennedy, Katy B., Daigle Fisse & Kessenich, Covington, 985-792-8116

Thibodeaux, Paul C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Chester, Matthew S., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

CONSTRUCTION LITIGATION

EMINENT DOMAIN

Aldrich, Bradley, Smiley Law Firm, New Orleans Blackwell, Michael S., Shields Mott, New Orleans

KATY B. KENNEDY

Casteix, Ryan, Leake & Andersson, New Orleans

www.daiglefisse.com

Emmons, Matthew R., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville

DAIGLE FISSEÂ & KESSENICH, PLC $PWJOHUPO`Č•

Linn, Jenna, Bankston & Associates, Baton Rouge Loraso III, Victor R., Carleton Loraso & Hebert, Baton Rouge Luminais, Jr., Bradley J., Wagar Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais, Metairie Mason, Christopher A., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Mathews, Kellen J., Adams and Reese, Baton Rouge Newsom, Amy E., Newsom Law Firm, Baton Rouge Ordeneaux, James K., PlauchÊ Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans Peterson, Megan S., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Preston, Cassie E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Rome, Curt Lucien, Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans Savant, R. Heath, Plauche Maselli Parkerson, Baton Rouge Senter, Meghan, Manion Gaynor & Manning, New Orleans Stein, David M., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Sternberg, Scott L., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Verlander, Hanna M., Brown Sims, New Orleans Williamson, Michael J., PlauchÊ Smith & Nieset, Lake Charles

CIVIL LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF Courtenay, James E., The King Firm, New Orleans, 504-909-5464 Pg. S-27 Hair, Galen M., Varadi Hair & Checki, New Orleans Jeffcott, Emily C., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans Morgain, Richard M., Lestelle & Lestelle, Metairie O’Boyle, Inemesit U., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Vogeltanz, Kevin, The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, New Orleans

CIVIL RIGHTS Cumming, Elizabeth C., Law Offices of Elizabeth Cumming, New Orleans

Derenbecker, Jessica R., Shields Mott, New Orleans

Forester, Jonathan S., Blue Williams, Metairie Funderburk, John C., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Grubb, Brian D., Coats Rose, New Orleans Hedlund, Scott J., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Pastorek, Jeffrey, Couhig Partners, New Orleans Prescott, III, James D., Bland & Partners, New Orleans Robinson, Ashley B., Shields Mott, New Orleans Smiley, Seth J., Smiley Law Firm, New Orleans Vicknair, David P., Scott Sevin & Vicknair, Metairie Wynne, Jr., Douglass F., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

CONSUMER LAW Dye, Bonnie E., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS Alexis, Heather LaSalle, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

CRIMINAL DEFENSE Antoon, Michael, Vamvoras Schwartzberg & Associates, Lake Charles, 337-433-1621 Atkinson, Ian L., Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans Borghardt, Franz N., Law Office of Steven J. Moore, Baton Rouge Carter, Gregory Q., The G.Carter Law Firm, New Orleans Cooper, Carolyn, King & Cooper Law, New Orleans, 504-581-9322

CAROLYN COOPER KING & COOPER LAW, LLC /FX0SMFBOT`Č•

www.kingandcooperlaw.com Daniels, III, Harry L., Daniels & Washington, Baton Rouge Ewing, Jr., J. Lane, Cazayoux Ewing, Baton Rouge

CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS

Johnson, Sara, Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Barr, Wesley G., The Olinde Firm, New Orleans Hightower, Kristie M., Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, Lake Charles, 337-439-0707 Pg. S-3 Hoekstra, Jennifer M., Neblett Beard & Arsenault, Alexandria Holinga, Lexi T., Bienvenu Bonnecaze Foco Viator & Holinga, Baton Rouge Roy, Michelle M., Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans

Kriksciun, Alex K., Law Office of Alex Kriksciun, New Orleans

S-24 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE COLLAR

Wool, Zachary L., Barrios Kingsdorf & Casteix, New Orleans

Magee, Tanner, Landry Magee, Houma Matthews, Jr., Jerome W., Law Firm of Jerome W. Matthews Jr., Gretna

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: DUI/DWI Landry, Robert J., Landry Magee, Houma

Coker, Ashley Gremillion, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-7 Hevron, Marshall A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS George, Tabatha L., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Glaser, Alex H., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Williams, Michael S., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

EMPLOYMENT & LABOR Credeur, Jacob C., Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, New Orleans Davis, Brandon E., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Huffstetler, Scott, Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Hugg, Joseph R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Jeanfreau, Rachael, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Kimbrough, Camalla, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Leatherman, M. Levy, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge London, Wm. Brian, Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans McArthur, Heather A., Frilot, New Orleans Moscona, Kelly Dugas, Jackson Lewis, New Orleans Murray, Bryce G., Big Easy Law Group, Metairie Roberts, MaryJo L., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Theard, David K., Jones Walker, New Orleans

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: DEFENSE Anderson, Michelle, Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Barro, Sarah Murphy, The Monson Law Firm, Mandeville Lungstrum-Macneill, Alison, Jones Walker, New Orleans McCluer, Matthew, Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, New Orleans

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF Williams, Christopher L., Williams Litigation, New Orleans

ENERGY & NATURAL RESOURCES Arvidson, Addie Danos, Looper Goodwine, New Orleans Bambrick, Erin, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Dicharry, Sarah Y., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Gautreaux, Amy Duplantis, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, Lafayette Gonski, Kathryn, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Halverson, Andrew J., Milling Benson Woodward, Lafayette Jardell, Julie Deshotels, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, Lafayette

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 RISING STARS Mouledoux, Taylor P., Looper Goodwine, New Orleans Occhipinti Thompson, Holly, Looper Goodwine, New Orleans Perrier, Kelly D., Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Rhorer, James D. “Doug”, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Rolen-Ogden, April L., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Rothenberg, Alex, Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Simone, Matthew, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Weidlich, Tyler L., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS Fischman, Martin A., Martin A. Fischman Attorney & Counselor at Law, New Orleans

ENVIRONMENTAL Roché, Elizabeth A., Burns Charest, New Orleans Toups, Robin P., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

ENVIRONMENTAL LITIGATION Barro, III, Jose L., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Brumby, Turner, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles, 337-310-1600 Cocus, Laura C., Curry & Friend, New Orleans Dysart, Daniel J., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Godshall, Lauren, Curry & Friend, New Orleans Hale DeShazo, Michele, Kuchler Polk Schell Weiner & Richeson, New Orleans Liuzza, Ashley, Smith Stag, New Orleans Malbrew, Penny Leonard, Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Poole, Leah C., Talbot Carmouche & Marcello, East Baton Rouge Salup, Brittany Buckley, Kean Miller, New Orleans Suane, Jr., Victor J., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Valentine, Sara C., Kuchler Polk Schell Weiner & Richeson, New Orleans

ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE Fine, Laura E., Lehmann Norman & Marcus, New Orleans Kriksciun, Erin E., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Rigterink, Jennifer, Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Robb, Brandon, Delaney Robb & Rubin Attorneys at Law, Metairie

FAMILY LAW Arnold, Robin Penzato, Winsberg & Arnold, New Orleans Bayard, James D., Onebane Law Firm, Lafayette Bethune, Jon G., The Law Office of Jon G. Bethune, New Orleans, 504-345-1318 Checki, Lauren E., Varadi Hair & Checki, New Orleans Coleman, George Read, Samuel & Coleman, Metairie

Daniels, Morgan S., Attorney at Law, New Orleans Epstein, Jacqueline, Epstein Law Firm, New Orleans Hoffman, Jeffrey M., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Marinello, M. Damian, Tusa & Richards, Covington Meneray, Elizabeth S., Meneray Family Law, New Orleans Miciotto, Mark, Mark J. Miciotto, Shreveport Nguyen, Kim Ngan, Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Perque, Richard G., Law Offices of Richard G. Perque, New Orleans Phillips, Sarah A., Phillips Law, New Orleans Swanson, Renee L., Renee Swanson, Gretna Treadaway, Kristyl Revelle, Treadaway Law, Metairie Vamvoras-Antoon, Alyson, Antoon Law Firm, Lake Charles, 337-564-6919 Weidner, Samantha, Attorney at Law, Metairie

Cheralla, Stephanie L., Degan Blanchard & Nash, New Orleans

FRANCHISE/DEALERSHIP

GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS

Sentell, III, William W., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans

Coreil, Jeffrey K., NeunerPate, Lafayette Glenn, Brodie, Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Hightower, III, Thomas R., Thomas R. Hightower Jr., Lafayette, 337-233-0555 Ludeau, Christopher, Fontenot & Ludeau, Ville Platte Luminais, Ryan O., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2106 Pg. S-7 Meador, Lindsay, Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, Lafayette Poe, Jason W., Jason W. Poe, Bossier City Pontier, Claire Easterling, Couhig Partners, New Orleans Thomas, Charles Marshall, Huber Slack Thomas & Marcelle, New Orleans

Eccles, Susan N., Dunlap Fiore, Baton Rouge

GENERAL LITIGATION

HEALTH CARE

Baer, Jason M., Pandit Law Firm, New Orleans Bourgeois, Blake, Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans

Amedee, Cindy M., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge CONTINUED ON PAGE S-26

STEPHEN M.

ALEXANDER ALEXANDER LAW GROUP, LLC

CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS 8550 United Plaza Blvd., Suite 702 Baton Rouge, LA 70809 PH: (225) 922-4488 FX: (888) 670-7025 stephen@alexander.com

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO RISING STARS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-25


S P E C I AL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 RISING STARS IMMIGRATION

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION

Dees, Ashley Foret, Attorney at Law, Lake Charles

Madison, Tara Montgomery, Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

Gahagan, Michael W., The Immigration Law Firm of New Orleans, Metairie, 504-931-5355 Kimbrell, Elaine, Ware | Immigration, Metairie

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

Scott, Paul “Woody�, Scott Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-224-0510

Saulsbury, Albert O. “Chip�, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Silberstein, Daniella Genet, Jones Walker, New Orleans

INSURANCE COVERAGE Balascio, Michael A., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Baudouin, Richard E., Krebs Farley, New Orleans Burk, Lauren, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Coleman, Reed M., King Krebs & Jurgens, New Orleans Davidson, Jared A., Taylor Wellons Politz & Duhe, New Orleans deBarros, Michael J., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Harris Abel, Laura, The Monson Law Firm, Mandeville Jones, Marne A., Thompson Coe Cousins & Irons, New Orleans Kleeman, Douglas M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Latuso, Jr., Donald J., The Monson Law Firm, Mandeville Meyer, Daniel, Bruno & Bruno, New Orleans Mouledoux, Marcelle P., Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans Reeves, II, James J. (“J.J.�), Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans Sanchez, Jairo F., Gaudry Ranson Higgins & Gremillion, Gretna Schudmak, Shaundra M., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Showalter, Elizabeth R., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Soso, Jeremy Z., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans Stogner, Sarah, Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Therio, Erica A., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Tschirn, Robert W., Jeansonne & Tschirn, New Orleans Vorhaben, Tessa P., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Barras, Ian C., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Baxter, Pamela A., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge D’Souza, Vanessa M., Garvey Smith Nehrbass & North, Metairie Goudelocke, Ryan M., Durio McGoffin Stagg & Ackermann, Lafayette Mattappally, Jay M., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Miller, III, J. Matthew, Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Norton, Taylor, Attorney at Law and Registered Patent Attorney, Metairie Ricci, R. Devin, Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Vickers, Adam V., Cara Stone, New Orleans

S-26 | LOUISIANA LIFE MARCH/APRIL 2017

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: DEFENSE Buggs, Sara Rodrigue, NeunerPate, Lafayette Christie, Joshua, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Clayton, Joshua P., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-7 Davis, Ryan G., Talley Anthony Hughes & Knight, Mandeville Johnson, Jr., B. Slattery, Blanchard Walker O’Quin & Roberts, Shreveport Juneau Rookard, Kelly G., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Keller, Joshua G., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Kiefer, Megan C., Kiefer & Kiefer, Metairie Landry, Jr., Joseph Birrcher, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Ochs, Sara, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Pifko, Erzsebet, Pugh Accardo, New Orleans Popich, Robert N., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Prince, Thomas H., Preis, New Orleans Rainwater, Scott, Taylor Wellons Politz & Duhe, Baton Rouge Rodrigue, Jr., Michael H., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Simon, Mandy, Preis, Lafayette Trahan, Joshua K., Juneau David, Lafayette

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF Alexander, Stephen M., Alexander Law Group, Baton Rouge, 225-922-4488 Pg. S-25 Anderson, Leola M., Gertler Law Firm, New Orleans Bassett, Taylor J., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483 Broussard, Aaron, Broussard & Hart, Lake Charles Brown, Somer G., Cox Cox Filo Camel & Wilson, Lake Charles Campbell, Robert L., Williamson Fontenot Campbell & Whittington, Baton Rouge Chabert, Jr., Scotty E., Saunders & Chabert, Baton Rouge Chafin, Jr., Scott J., Gregorio Chafin & Johnson, Shreveport Chopin, Justin McCarthy, The Chopin Law Firm, New Orleans Corzo, Christopher J., Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys, Baton Rouge Creevy, John S., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Donahue, Roshawn Husband, Martzell Bickford & Centola, New Orleans, 504-581-9065

Dunahoe, Jared, Dunahoe Law Firm, Natchitoches Elam, Jason K., Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans Epstein, Jeremy, Jeremy Epstein Law, New Orleans Flinn, James, The Voorhies Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-875-2223

JAMES FLINN THE VOORHIES LAWÂ FIRM /FX0SMFBOT`Č•

www.jamesflinnlaw.com Guillory, Joshua S., The Law Office of Joshua S. Guillory, Lafayette Haik, Jr., Richard T., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483 Hale, Taylor, Hale Law Firm, Lake Charles Hemmer, Matthew, Morris Bart, New Orleans Hennen, Laura B., Hennen & Hennen, Monroe, 318-387-0184

LAURA B. HENNEN HENNENÂ & HENNEN .POSPF`Č•

www.hennenlaw.net Johnson, Julie Payne, Gregorio Chafin & Johnson, Shreveport Lambert, M. Palmer, Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Lillis, Michael, Sangisetty Law Firm, New Orleans Mahone, Jr., Michael A., The Mahone Firm, New Orleans Matthews, Brad R., Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys, Baton Rouge Mcgregor, George, Burgos & Associates, New Orleans Moore, Timothy B., The Law Office of Timothy B. Moore L.C., Gretna Moroux, Jerome H., Broussard & David, Lafayette, 337-233-2323 Roberts, Chaz H., Chaz Roberts Law, Lafayette Robin, Stephanie, Moore Thompson & Lee, Baton Rouge Salter, Hannah, Cardone Law Firm, New Orleans Sanders, Patrick B., Sanders and Ford, Metairie Saucier, Lauren, Neblett Beard & Arsenault, Alexandria Scallan, Vincent P., Vincent P. Scallan Law, New Orleans Smith, Dwazendra J., Doran & Cawthorne, Opelousas Stephens, Barrett, Lewis & Caplan, New Orleans Tauzier, Mark G., Yeager LaNasa Tauzier, Hammond Terrell, Matt N., Dudley DeBosier, Baton Rouge Thames, L. Adam, Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Thibodeaux, II, Luke J., Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys, Baton Rouge Tilly, John Wesley, Keaty & Tilly, Lafayette Tureau, Steven, Tureau & Tureau, Gonzales Washington, Christopher J., Daniels & Washington, Baton Rouge Zainey, Jr., Jay Christopher, Huber Slack Thomas & Marcelle, New Orleans Zimmerman, III, Richard F., Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys, Baton Rouge

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E C IAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2017 RISING STARS

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: DEFENSE Biller, Benjamin J., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Domreis, Crystal E., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Knight, Bryan J., Niles Bourque & Knight, New Orleans Sconzert, Elizabeth S., Blue Williams, Mandeville

Sherman, Philip B., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Watson, Jared L., Robichaux Mize Wadsack & Richardson, Lake Charles Woodruff, Jessica Kesler, Woodruff Law Firm, New Orleans

SECURITIES & CORPORATE FINANCE Layfield, Alexandra Clark, Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

SECURITIES LITIGATION PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: PLAINTIFF Christiansen, Zachary Ryan, The Bowling Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-613-4561 Rito, Kat, Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: DEFENSE Brilleaux, Kelly, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Lewis, Raymond C., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Sossamon, Meera, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Ziffer, Lee B., Kuchler Polk Schell Weiner & Richeson, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: PLAINTIFF Hoffman, Philip C., Landry & Swarr, New Orleans Pourciau, Damon R., Pourciau Law Firm, Kenner, 504-305-2375

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY: DEFENSE Barnett-Bernal, Brooke, Long Law Firm, Baton Rouge Lessell, Melissa, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

REAL ESTATE Bernard, G. Wogan, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Cerise, Jonathan B., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2131 Pg. S-7 Comer, S. Jason, Adams and Reese, New Orleans Dean, Benjamin B., Heck Law Firm, Monroe Dunne, Jr., James T., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Howenstine, Laurie W., Elkins, New Orleans Iverstine, Wade R., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge McCabe, Ryan M., Steeg Law Firm, New Orleans Morrow, Chad P., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-7 Mullins, Matthew L., Alexander Sides, Baton Rouge Piazza, Erik C., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Plaisance, Wesley M., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Riess, Megan C., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Scullin, Stephen P., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Serio, Steven C., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Berg, Nicholas, Reasonover & Associates, New Orleans, 504-526-2921 Palestina, Michael J., Kahn Swick & Foti, Madisonville Reichard, Benjamin D., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

STATE, LOCAL & MUNICIPAL Sims, Jennifer D., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

TAX Miller, Matthew P., Butler Snow, New Orleans Roth, III, Richard J., Roth Law Firm, New Orleans Simpson, Carli Beckett, Roth Law Firm, New Orleans Sullivan, Andrew, Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Walter, Daniel J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Wilson, B. Trevor, Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME Alexander, M. Benjamin, Preis, Lafayette Baldwin, William C., Jones Walker, New Orleans Blanque, Meredith W., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Bordelon, II., Craig R., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, Lafayette Cambre, Colin B., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Davis, Alan R., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Denny, Robert K., Hurley & Cot, New Orleans Everage, Tod J., Kean Miller, New Orleans Ferchmin, Adelaida J., Preis, New Orleans Fricker, Rowen A., Pusateri Barrios Guillot & Greenbaum, New Orleans Gardner, Jr., W. Jacob, Fowler Rodriguez, New Orleans Guillot, Gavin H., Pusateri Barrios Guillot & Greenbaum, New Orleans Hale, Paul D., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Hannan, Christopher M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Huete, Scott R., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans Kelly, Shannon A., Hurley & Cot, New Orleans Marino, III, Joseph B., Preis, New Orleans McLaughlin, Sean T., Kean Miller, New Orleans Peterson, Cayce C., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans Reid, Devin C., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Sanderson, Adam P., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO RISING STARS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Schepens, Patrick J., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, Mandeville Thomas, Miles C., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Tweedy, Jonathan A., Brown Sims, New Orleans Waid, Raymond T., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Woods, Jonathan L., Preis, Lafayette Wynne, Mallory, Bland & Partners, New Orleans Wynne, William Pitard, Jones Walker, New Orleans Zubic, R. Ethan, Montgomery Barnett, New Orleans

UTILITIES Comeaux, Francisca M., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Huntwork, Nathan G., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Kantrow, Kara B., Marionneaux Kantrow, Baton Rouge

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION Babin, Patrick J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Bernstein, Beth S., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Byars, Caitlin, Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9 Flint, Dustin G., Williamson Fontenot Campbell & Whittington, Baton Rouge Hess, Joshua O., Christovich & Kearney, New Orleans Hotard, Amy Dunn, Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans McLin, Virginia J., Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge O’Pry, II, Donovan J., O’Pry Law Firm, Lafayette Robinson, Jon B., Strongpoint Law Firm, Mandeville Walsh, Kelly F., Brown Sims, New Orleans Yoder, Simone H., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans, 504-595-3000 Pg. S-9

JAMES E. COURTENAY THE KING FIRM

2912 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70119 Tel: 504-909-5464 jimmy@kinginjuryfirm.com www.kinginjuryfirm.com

CIVIL LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME

James “Jimmy” Courtenay is a member of The King Firm, a civil litigation practice specializing in significant plaintiff personal injury. He joined the firm after spending over seven years defending trucking companies, insurance companies, corporations, and retail stores. Jimmy is seasoned in handling all facets of litigation stemming from insurance coverage, trucking and automobile accidents, premises and product liability, and plant explosions resulting in significant personal injury, property damage, and loss of use claims. He is rated AV Preeminent by Martindale-Hubbell, is a former member of TIDA, CLM, and Transportation Lawyers Association, is a current member of the New Orleans and Jefferson Parish Bar Associations, and was a member of the LSU 2003 National Championship Football Team.

LOUISIANALIFE.COM | S-27


around the state

NORTH BY jeanne frois

shreveport

Red River Wine Revel Cork, a Red River Revel Wine Event is a perfect way to spend a Saturday afternoon in early April. Restaurants from the Shreveport-Bossier area provide sumptuous food as you saunter through Festival Plaza sipping and tasting. Corks are popped on 80 varieties of fine wines from across the world, followed by an outflow of ruby or pale green-gold streams of wine splashing into waiting glasses. Live music accompanies the sipping and nibbling. Wine tasting seminars are conducted and cover the essentials of wine pairing, types of wine, how sparkling wine differs from champagne and choosing cheeses to accompany an assortment of wines. The event is sponsored by Eldorado Resort Casino and all proceeds benefit the Red River Revel Arts Festival.

Cork, a Red River Revel Wine Event April 1 Festival Plaza Shreveport corkwinefestival.com

Touring and Tasting One of the less difficult duties the Louisiana Legislature was tasked with two years ago was to sign into effect Resolution 88, officially and unanimously designating The Official Meal of North Louisiana. For consideration of this honor, Minden native, accomplished chef, and one of Louisiana Life’s recent Louisianians of the Year, Hardette Harris created and presented the Legislature with a

94 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

medley of traditional, down-home North Louisiana dinner dishes created by herself. Main course choices included barbecued chicken, smoked sausage, ribs, baked ham, crispy fried chicken or catfish. Cabbage, collard, turnip and mustard greens cooked with smoked neck bones and ham hocks comprised the vegetable choices. Traditional North Louisiana legumes — purple hull, black-eyed peas, pinto and butter beans (cooked with the aforementioned smoked neck bones and ham hocks) — were among

the many food choices served by Harris. Condiments included mayhaw and plum jelly, cane syrup and hot pepper sauce, while side dishes consisted of baked sweet potatoes, rice with gravy, potato salad and fried okra. Harris proudly promotes the cuisine of the North Louisiana culture in which she was raised, offering food tours, cooking demonstrations and tastings to expose people to the delicious food of the region. Greens swimming in smoky pot liquor, biscuits and

cornbread light as air and succulent fried chicken are a few menu choices you might create and taste with her help. Us Up North Food Tastings, Tours and Demonstrations is a perfect venue to enjoy another fine dimension of Louisiana’s diverse and supreme culinary heritage.

Us Up North Food Tastings, Tours and Demonstrations Chef Hardette Williams 318-639-0022 foodtourslouisiana.com

photos courtesy: cork, a red river revel wine event


around the state

central BY jeanne frois

Natchitoches

When Pasta Meets Gumbo Maglieaux’s on the Cane is a dining venue, that, in addition to an exquisite river view, offers a repertoire of dishes that pays perfect homage to two venerable dining cultures, Creole and Italian food. Appetizers like the Italian nachos — fried lasagna noodles served with black olives, Alfredo and meat sauces, Parmesan and mozzarella cheeses — are on the menu next to spicy mini meat pies accompanied by remoulade. Depending on what type of food you crave, you can choose the lasagna pappardelle in which hand cut pappardelle pasta coddles layers of tomato

meat sauce while buffalo mozzarella, fresh spinach, ricotta, Parmesan, black olives and fresh basil. If your taste requires a more Bayou State flavor, and you’ve already enjoyed a hearty bowl of hen and andouille gumbo, a plate of creamy crawfish étouffée with fried okra on the

side just might hit the spot as a follow-up. Or, opt for the shrimp and grits entree, which includes creamy garlic grits topped with velvety gratin and grilled Gulf shrimp accompanied by fried okra. Maglieaux’s on the Cane offers an exceptional variety of Italian and Creole cuisine, from

Alexandria

Glass Reflections Sitting in the basement, as it seems all really good bars in cities above sea level do, of the refurbished and historic Bentley Hotel, The Mirror Room, an upscale, but not snooty, bar offers signature cocktails, liquor, wines and beers. Seasonal vodkas and rums from exotic places are also on the menu. Complete with murals,

photos courtesy: maglieaux’s on the cane; the mirror room

Fried Chicken Salad

fried to seafood to cannelloni, with the occasional steak added for good measure that, taken as a whole, represents premium dining. u

Maglieaux’s on the Cane 805 Washington St., Natchitoches 337-354-7767 maglieuxs.com

leather-bound book spines, tin-plated ceilings and soft light, it is the perfect place in Alexandria to sip, tetea-tete, and unwind. Mirrors arise behind glass shelves filled with bottles of premium alcohol used for signature cocktails like the tangy Winter is Coming Cosmo, which is made by mixing 360 Sorrento lemon vodka, Fleur elderflower liqueur, white cranberry and lime juice. The Ginger Snap is a palate awakening, if somewhat

sense-dulling potion (in the most delightful way), made from Cathead vodka, Domaine de Canton (French ginger liqueur) and cinnamon syrup. Legend has it that Eisenhower and Patton imbibed in this historic bar.

The Mirror Room Hotel Bentley 200 DeSoto St. Alexandria 318-704-6111 historicbentley.com

LouisianaLife.com | 95


around the state

St. Francisville

Best in Pilgrimage At the very edge of Plantation Country lies the town of St. Francisville, a charming locale for the area’s cultural history. Each March when the nearby gardens of Afton Villa, The Myrtles, Rosedown, Grace Episcopal Church and Oakley blaze with riotous fuchsia azalea blossoms, curling purple wisteria vines, lilies and yellow daffodils, the town holds the Audubon Pilgrimage. This event honors John James Audubon who arrived at Oakley to teach art and beautifully the countless bird species of Louisiana in his spare time on canvas.

Plantation Country BY jeanne frois

New Roads

Hot Tails Outside of Baton Rouge, if you take a certain fork in the road that veers to right off of Highway 61, you’ll soon find yourself in the little town of New Roads, rising in tiers above the glassy False River. Hot Tails Restaurant is a local eatery offering crawfish bread, crabmeat croissants and a fried pork chop sandwich served on Texas toast among other items. It also has a distinctive cocktail

menu with a completely Louisiana flair. The Istrouma Buzz, made with juice from Louisiana navel oranges, strawberry fig preserves, lime, Creole bitters, candied ginger, Aperol, Dolin Rouge Vermouth and Oryza Gin, Swamp Pop Jean Lafitte Ginger Ale, B & B liqueur and dry champagne features a honeycomb garnish with raw sugarcane. It’s smooth and biting, sweet and sour all at the same time, and unforgettable. The Levee Break features Louisiana blackber-

96 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

ries doused with Hendricks gin shaken with simple syrup and lemon juice. Topped with champagne, it boasts a cognac floater. Decadent as all hell, the Morganza Mud-tini, named for the nearby spillway, is a rich little potable made with Godiva liqueur, marshmallow vodka, all shaken with cream and dusted with cocoa.

Hot Tails Restaurant 1113 Hospital Road New Roads 225-638-4676 hottailsrestaurant.com

Children dressed in period clothing dance around a maypole throughout St. Francisville. Living history features, tours of area plantations, gardens, graveyards, churches and the rustic pioneer skills demonstrated at the Rural Homestead are conducted. Candlelit strolls at dusk with fireflies beneath the oaks provide enchantment, as Light Up the Night — the Saturday evening soiree features music, dancing and dinner. Ladies, children and guides dressed in the Empire period style of the 1820s, when Audubon first arrived, provide ongoing stories and education in a loving community effort.

Audubon Pilgrimage March 17 to 19 West Feliciana Historical Society Box 338, St. Francisville 225-635-6330 or 225-635-4224 westfelicianahistoricalsociety.org.

Hot tails photo by denny culbert; photo courtesy audubon pilgrimage


around the state

Cajun Country

lake charles

Food Trucking In

BY jeanne frois

kaplan

scott

Crawfish Haven/Miss Rose’s Bed and Breakfast is a leap back in time to my childhood visits to the country during Easter vacation. This open and airy, sugar-white, century-old home with its wraparound porch surrounded by sprawling fields exudes peacefulness and Louisiana charm. One of the rooms is replete with a handmade cypress bed. If you’ve never had the pleasure of boiling fresh crawfish that just came from your own net, this B&B will be happy to show you how it’s done. Offering crawfish excursions in an area surrounded by ponds, their distince boat and guide will help you haul in filled with the crustaceans to be boiled for your own personal feast. Ask for Barry.

Somewhat unknown, Le Maison de Begnaud, flying under the radar, the town of Scott’s Visitor and Heritage Interpretive Center, is a charming microcosm of the rich cultural heritage of Cajuns and the Lafayette area. The free, Friday night Cajun music jam sessions are sure to have you dancing the two-step. CDs are available for purchase. This enriching enclave is located in the Boudin Capital of the World, with plenty of delicious Cajun links in nearby stores to savor and enjoy.

Crawfish Odyssey

Crawfish Haven/Miss Rose’s Bed and Breakfast 6807 LA Hwy 35, Kaplan (near Abbeville), 337-652-8870 btoups4692@gmail.com crawfishhaven.net

A Hidden Jewel

Le Maison de Begnaud 110 Benoit Patin Road, Scott 337-269-5155 begnaudhouse.com

photos courtesy: crawfish haven/miss rose’s bed and breakfast; le maison de begnaud; the sloppy taco

A self-described, “savory slop chariot,” The Sloppy Taco, one of the newest mobile eateries in the Lake Charles area is also considered one of the best. People line up to the window to order and relish items such as the chipotle shrimp taco. This dish is a divine marriage of chipotle simmered shrimp, fried green tomatoes, shredded cabbage and pico de gallo with the added dash of cilantro ranch dressing and queso fresco in a taco shell. There’s a bit of an Asian fusion going on here as well. This food truck offers extras like queso, guacamole or salsa (all homemade of course), with a serving of fried wontons instead of tortilla chips.

The Sloppy Taco Semi-permanently located at 2500 Kirkman St., (check website for locations and closures) Lake Charles 337-602-6364 sloppytacotruck.com

LouisianaLife.com | 97


around the state

Greater New Orleans BY jeanne frois

new orleans

Best in Pralines After enjoying a café au lait, its surge of caffeine pleasantly softened by warm foamy cream, and a hot, crisp beignet dusted with powdered sugar from Café du Monde on Decatur Street in the French Quarter, perhaps you’ve wandered next door to Aunt Sally’s Creole Praline Shop. In copper pots, praline masters stir the rich mixture of cream, butter, pecans, cane sugar, vanilla and other flavorings, creating a delightful epicurean fragrance. Poured from the kettle to harden on parchment paper atop a marble slab, these pecan studded delicacies come in a variety of flavors: Original Cream, Bananas Foster, Triple Chocolate and Café Au Lait. The lovely shop is a fascinating delight to explore, filled with books on Louisiana’s culture and cuisine, souvenirs, artwork and Louisiana music on CDs. If you can’t make it there in person, order your sweet fix online.

Aunt Sally’s Original Creole Pralines 800 Decatur St., New Orleans 800-642-7257 auntsallys.com

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arabi

40 Arpents of Beer on the Wall Duckweed, Delacroix, New Basin Stout, Copasaw and Red Bean Ale are among the craft brews rendered by 40 Arpent Brewing Co. on the banks of the Mississippi in Arabi. Interwoven into the name and flavor of each beer is the history and culture of Louisiana. New Basin Stout, a dark, sweet brew pays homage to the Irish immigrants who suffered through the merciless summers of New Orleans and yellow fever epidemics to dig the canal near Lake Pontchartrain. Duckweed, a light, pale ale with citrus and herb overtones was named because the hops thrown in the brew kettle looked like duckweed floating on a bayou. Delacroix, “of the cross,” was created to drink during Lent, a tribute to the Catholic Islenos of the Spanish Canary Islands, who settled on Delacroix Island. Recommended to drink with a plate of red beans and rice on Mondays, Red Bean Ale, a summer seasonal, is a traditional red Irish brew. Camellia red beans have been thrown in for a taste of New Orleans, giving it a Creole kind of earthiness.

40 Arpent Brewing Co. 6809 North Peters St., Arabi 504-444-3972 40arpentbrewery.com


direct destinations

New Orleans (MSY) to Memphis (LIT) on GLO Airlines

Nonstop Travel 5 direct destinations that are just one flight away from LA By Anne Roderique-Jones

I

t’s hard to imagine, but those lucky enough to reside in Louisiana might actually want to leave the state for a quick getaway. Fortunately, it has never been easier or more convenient thanks to plentiful nonstop flights to zip you from our home cities in Louisiana to vacation destinations across the United States. From standbys like American and Delta Airlines to newcomers like GLO and Copa Airlines, those looking to jet set can be out of town in less than two hours’ time. Be on the lookout for new international destinations in 2017 including New Orleans to London Heathrow on British Airways, four times per week in March and — come June — Condor Airlines will provide seasonal service to Frankfurt, Germany. Here are five nonstop flights for your next quick getaway. Wheels up!

Baton Rouge (BTR) to Atlanta (ATL) on Delta Airlines The 1.5-hour flight will take you from Baton Rouge straight to Atlanta. Post up in Buckhead, where you’ll find some of the city’s poshest hotels. You can’t

100 | Louisiana Life march/april 2017

Founded by Louisiana native Trey Fayard, GLO Airlines services the Gulf and Mid-South region, including a once-daily flight from New Orleans to Memphis where passengers receive complimentary PJ’s coffee and tea, Zapp’s potato chips and a copy of Louisiana Life, as well as one of its sister publications, Biz New Orleans. After the speedy 1.5-hour flight, visitors can now stay at The Guest House at Graceland — the largest hotel project to open in Memphis over the past 90 years. Don’t miss a visit to the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel, and — for music aficionados — Sun Studio, Stax Museum of American Soul Music, along with the Memphis Rock N’ Soul Museum. Stroll down Beale of course, but make a reservation at Hog & Hominy, the Italian-Southern culinary brainchild of Michael Hudman and Andrew Ticer. If you have one more meal, make it Earnestine & Hazel’s Juke Joint, a former brothel that serves nothing but Soul Burgers — and cheap booze for washing ‘em down.

go wrong at The Ritz-Carlton, the W, InterContinental or Mandarin Oriental. Here, there’s shopping to match the luxe accomodations with swanky stores like Hermes, La Perla, Billy Reid and Christian Louboutin. Get cultured at the High Museum of Art, visit the World of Coca-Cola and catch a show at Fox Theater.

New Orleans (MSY) to Panama City, Panama (PTY) on Copa Airlines Copa Airlines, the leading Latin American provider of cargo and passenger service, offers flights to Panama City, Panama four times per week. Complimentary meals, along with free wine and spirits are available on all flights; you’ll arrive to this bustling metropolis in time for lunch and an afternoon tour of the Panama Canal. Book a room at the American Trade Hotel, an Ace property situated in the Casco Viejo, a UNESCO World Heritage neighborhood. The 50-room property’s lobby is buzzing with beautiful people, a rooftop pool and jazz club. You’ll be in a prime location for touring the city’s best restaurants and close enough for a spin around Mercado de Mariscos, where outdoor cafes serve cups of fresh ceviche and ice-cold beers.

For the best bites, snag a table at Holeman & Fitch, known for the 10 p.m. burger rollout, this place also has a fantastic cocktail list, house charcuterie and an upscale Southern menu worth every bit of the buzz.


Shreveport Regional Airport (SHV) to Las Vegas (LAS) on Allegiant Airlines Hop Allegiant’s budgetfriendly, no-frills airline and be high rolling in Sin City by cocktail hour. The twice-weekly flights often come in at less than a Benjamin for a one-way ticket, so you’ll have more to splurge on the fine food offerings in Vegas. Book a room at the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, originally built as condos, it’s the only hotel in the city with terraces, so it allows you to experience the famous Bellagio fountains with your own private view — many of them from the comfort of a Japanese soaking tub. The hotel has a mindboggling assortment of restaurants, but Rose. Rabbit. Lie. is the most fun and Vegas-like. Inspired by an old supper club, you can nosh on mini caviar-stuffed tacos to the tune of lounge singers or even break dancers. For something more old-school, make a reservation and don your fanciest dress at The Golden Steer. Yes, it’s in a strip mall, but the ambiance is straight-up Brat Pack.

Baton Rouge (BTR) to Dallas (DFW) on American Airlines A zippy flight from Baton Rouge will have you in Dallas in just 1.5 hours. Once you’ve hit the ground, book it to The Joule, a dramatic 1920s neo-Gothic landmark building in the central business district. This stunner of a hotel is home to CBD Provisions, a Texas brasserie beloved for the Berkshire pig’s head carnitas; the presentation alone is Instagram-worthy. Grab a post-dinner cocktail at Midnight Rambler, the hotel’s impossibly hip cocktail bar, where chic locals sip drinks late into the night. When you do leave the property, The Sixth Floor Museum, Dallas Museum of Art and Dallas Arboretum & Botanical Gardens are most certainly worth a visit. Even though this city is chock full of big buildings, the Katie Trail runs through the heart of Dallas, and provides the perfect backdrop for a jog or bike ride.

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Traveling Louisiana

AVOYELLES PARISH

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pring is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful seasons to spend in Louisiana, where the weather is warm but mild, the flowers and trees are in bloom, and outdoor activities and events multiply across the state. From pristinely manicured baseball diamonds to rollicking festivals showcasing local music and cuisine, destinations for enjoying family and community stretch from Cajun country up to the state’s northern hills. March and April represent two of the liveliest months of the year in Louisiana, and finding fun for your weekend, day-trip, or spring break should be an easy task. Add some color to your life and your home with a variety of arts events, from festivals and craft showcases to gallery and boutique shopping. Explore your competitive side with a college ball game, a round of golf at one of Louisiana’s renowned courses, or by exploring an old tradition of “knocking” eggs on Easter. From history buffs to foodies to outdoors enthusiasts, Louisiana has something for everyone in spring.

The inaugural Railroad Fest will be held Saturday, April 8, 2017, in Downtown Ruston. Make plans to attend the day-long festival celebrating local art and delicious food in beautiful historic Downtown Ruston. The exciting music line-up will be released soon! Follow along at Facebook.com/RailroadFest for updates and concert times. For more information on the area and upcoming events in Ruston and Lincoln Parish, visit experienceruston.com or call 800392-9032.

Louisiana Destinations & Events

Allons jouer aux Avoyelles, Louisiana’s Egg Knocking Capital, to pacque your Easter Eggs! Easter fun in Avoyelles Parish will begins Easter Saturday (April 15) in Cottonport with a full day of contests and shopping opportunities surrounding the famous “Egg Pacquing” competition that features

Spend some time in Ruston & Lincoln Parish this spring and experience all this bustling college town has to offer! The baseball seasons of Louisiana Tech University and Grambling State University are

in full swing. Join sports fans from across the state as they cheer on the LA Tech Bulldogs and GSU Tigers in a variety of events hosted by the universities. Ruston’s growing arts community is excited for a new event showcasing musicians, local artists, designers and makers of all kinds.

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different age groups knocking their own chicken or guinea eggs. Call 318-276-3485 for details. Ben Routh Recreational Park in Effie is the site for the 12th Anniversary of the Easter on the Red River Festival also being held on Saturday, April 15, and beginning at 11:00am with registrations for all contests: egg decorating, Easter bonnets or caps for men, cake walk, egg hunt, and egg knocking. Children’s competition begins at 12:30pm and is followed by the adult competition. Bring your own hardboiled eggs to play! Shop crafts, plants, jewelry, and more while feasting from various food booths. Call 318-613-2274 for information. The knocking continues on Easter Sunday morning in Marksville. Knocking on the Historic Courthouse Square begins


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with registration at 9:00am and competition follows with different age groups and categories of hardboiled chicken or guinea eggs (bring your own). Call 318-253-9500 for more information. Culture, history, and natural beauty combine at New Orleans City Park to make an exceptional locale for memorable occasions, private events, and weddings. What better way to say “I do” than beside the steadfast, ancient oaks of the country’s most magical city? New Orleans City Park offers a number of verdant and stately venues for a range of events, from simple ceremonies to grand affairs. From the budding flowers of the New Orleans Botanical Garden to the towering columns of the elegant Grecian-style Peristyle, City Park is infused with natural charm and awe-inspiring architecture and offers wedding-friendly locales spread across the expansive 1,300-acrem 160-yearold Park. Catering services provided by City Park Catering will ensure your seamless event is packed with flavor, whether through traditional New Orleans cuisine or elegant cocktail fare and hors d’oeuvres. For more information about City Park rentals and catering, contact City Park Sales at 504-488-2896 or e-mail cpsales@nocp.org. For photos, a sales brochure, and more, visit NewOrleansCityPark.com. Lafayette is at the heart of Louisiana’s Cajun & Creole Country, an area known as the Happiest City in America and it’s no mystery why. With their distinctive blend of food, music, and culture, it’s no wonder people from all over are heading down south with a smile on their face. One annual event bringing together all the elements that make Lafayette so unique is Festival International de Louisiane. The largest non-ticketed outdoor Francophone event in the U.S., Festival International highlights the connections between Acadiana and the Francophone world. Held Wednesday through Sunday, April 26-30, throughout Lafayette’s Downtown, Festival International hosts 500 performing and visual artists from 17 countries including Europe, Africa, Canada, the Caribbean and the Americas to share their talents across six stages with Lafayette’s artists, residents, and visitors.

west baton rouge Visit LafayetteTravel.com/ Festival-International for performance schedule, lodging, and travel information. River Oaks Square Arts Center is located in the heart of Alexandria’s historic downtown and is one of the South’s most unique arts centers. River Oaks hosts over 20 exhibitions annually, featuring over 200 contemporary visual artists. The center offers premier education components with featured presenters and houses studio space for over 40 working artists. River Oaks will host its 3rd Annual Dirty South Cup Competition from April 7 through May 27, featuring 125 unique beverage vessels from over 80 master ceramicists. Mugs, cups, yunomis, and whiskey bowls created by regionally and nationally renowned potters will be on display during the event. Mississippi-based master potter, Matt Long (Guest Juror) will conduct a two-day workshop on April 19 and 20. Local artist and educator Wangling Chou will be the featured demonstrator for Dirty South’s Demo Day on Friday, April 21. The opening reception will also be held April 21, 5:00-8:00pm, with day-long clay features. The event is sponsored by GAEDA and co-sponsored by Ugly Mug Marketing. For more information on River Oaks Square Arts Center, visit riveroaksartscenter.com and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For class enrollment, call 318-473-2670.

west baton rouge

Spring has sprung in “The Most Cajun Place on Earth,” also known as Vermilion Parish. Located minutes south of Lafayette and west of New Iberia in South Louisiana, the parish is alive with the music, language, cuisine, and scenery that define the Cajun cultural heritage. Beginning in March, farmers markets held throughout the parish bring fresh produce, handmade goods, and seafood to the public.

Music is alive this season, too, with Abbeville’s Sounds in the Square Spring Concert Series on Thursdays in March and April from 5:308:30pm. On the last Saturday of the month, the Kaplan Museum hosts Coffee & Music. Foodies will want to attend the 7th Annual Stir the Pot: Seafood Cook-off & Festival at Palmetto Island State Park on April 22. The park also plays host to Dutch Oven Cooking in the LouisianaLife.com | 103


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Campground every 2nd Saturday. In Abbeville on April 22 is Roots Squared at Magdalen Square, which celebrates the cultures that make Vermilion Parish special with music, food, games, arts and crafts. For more information, events, and ideas, visit MostCajun.com. The heart of plantation country, Iberville Parish is known for its serene landscapes, quiet swamps, and elegant history. Located between the diverse waterways of the Atchafalaya Basin and bustling Baton Rouge, Iberville Parish is home to magnificent antebellum homes, majestic churches, and fascinating historic sites. Explore Iberville online through a new interactive map at VisitIberville.com and plan your journey to the Parish. From attractions such as stately Nottoway Plantation and architectural gem St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church to rounds of golf at The Island and seafood at Roberto’s River Road Restaurant, Iberville Parish welcomes visitors craving an authentic South Louisiana adventure. Whether history beckons you to the Plaquemine Lock State Historic Site or the Hansen’s Disease Museum in Carville, or the beauty of the Atchafalaya National Heritage Area draws you in for fishing and bird watching, Iberville Parish promises an unforgettable escape, whether for a day, a weekend, or more. Rest, relax, eat, and explore along the winding Mississippi River. For more information and to plan your trip, go to VisitIberville.com. Surrounded by the waters of Bayou Teche, Atchafalaya River, and the Atchafalaya Swamp Basin, the Cajun Coast, in St. Mary Parish is known for its natural splendor and “road less traveled” atmosphere. There’s no better way to spend a fall day than exploring the Atchafalaya National Heritage Area or winding along the Bayou Teche Scenic Byway. Captain Ivy or Captain John take visitors through the Atchafalaya Basin, the largest overflow swamp in the U.S., or you can experience the wilderness by paddling through the Bayou Teche National Wildlife Refuge. Golfers won’t want to miss a chance to hit the Atchafalaya at Idlewild, which was rated the number one golf course in Louisiana by Golfweek Magazine in 2008 and 2009.

Lafayette

This spring, St. Mary Parish is alive with festivals and events including the Road to Third Street Songwriter’s Conference and Bayou Songwriter’s Retreat, (April 6-9), Bayou Teche Black Bear Festival (April 21-22), the Bayou Teche Wooden Boat Show (April 21-22) and Rhythms on the River every Friday for nine weeks beginning April 21st. For more information, visit cajuncoast.com. Whether it is football you crave, high-speed drag racing, historic plantation homes, scenic views of the Mighty Mississippi or a fun festival, West Baton Rouge Parish has it all. Travelers across South Louisiana this spring will not want to pass up West Baton Rouge Parish, known as the “Kite Capital of Louisiana.” The parish is also the home of “MOBEY,” a 13-foot, 760-lb. alligator located at the West Baton Rouge Tourist Center. Take I-10 Exit #151, and see him for yourself. Visit West Baton Rouge Parish April 1-2, 2017, and enjoy the award-winning Kite Fest Louisiane. See kites of all sizes and shapes— two- and four-line kites dance in the skies to music. Fest attendees can also make a kite, design a kite, enjoy BOL racing, candy drops, indoor kite flying, and plenty of Louisiana food. The festival is free and open to the public. For more information, or to view a short video of this

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event, destinations, and even day-trip itineraries, visit WestBatonRouge.net. The history of the Alexandria/ Pineville area can be traced back through its military roots: from Civil War to World War II. Forts Randolph & Buhlow State Historic Site is the site of earthen forts built to repel future Union attacks in the area. The site now includes a visitor center, two walking trails through the remaining ramparts of the forts, sample soldier encampments, and special events throughout the year to demonstrate the soldiers’ lives at the Forts. The Louisiana Maneuvers & Military Museum, located on Camp Beauregard in Pineville, is the perfect museum stop for military history buffs. Learn about the Louisiana Maneuvers and the war games that took place in central Louisiana prior to War World II. See the collection of military vehicles on site. Hear the stories of soldiers deployed overseas during WWII. To learn more about the military history in the Alexandria/Pineville area, visit AlexandriaPinevilleLA.com or call 800-551-9546. Ready! Set! Fête! Fête means “an elaborate festival, party, or celebration,” and that’s just what you will find in Alexandria

this May. Join the city for the 4th Annual AlexRiverFête and celebrate culture, community, and collaboration. The three-day festival takes place May 4-6, 2017, and brings thousands of people together for a weekend of fun set along the banks of the iconic Red River. Mark your calendars now and plan to be in Downtown Alexandria to celebrate the arts and heritage of Central Louisiana. Dinner on the Bricks, ArtWalk, the Louisiana Dragon Boat Races™, live entertainment from local and major musical acts, as well as great food and a popular children’s play area just scratch the surface of the fun on hand at AlexRiverFête. With so much to see and do, there’s something for everyone to enjoy at the Fête, so make time to join and enjoy the party! As always, AlexRiverFête, promises to be an unforgettable experience for the whole family. Learn more about the festival and lineup at CityofAlexandria.com/Fete. Regional Travel For some, discovering Ridgeland starts with the finest shopping in Mississippi. A wealth of independently owned boutiques, galleries, and stores are located from one end of the city to the other. Stroll the brick streets of the old world Renaissance at Colony Square, a true lifestyle center featuring fountains, lush landscaping, and high-end shops. As night falls, twinkling lights dance overhead and outdoor patios beckon you for drinks and dinner. A few miles away in Olde Towne Ridgeland the Jackson Street District is bustling with specialty shops and restaurants, spas, and bike shops. The renowned Mississippi Craft Center features treasures from over 400 artisans and is located just off the Natchez Trace Parkway, making it accessible by bike. More than 10 other malls, parks, promenades and squares are also found on the Ridgeland Retail Trail. The Ridgeland Fine Arts Festival returns this spring (April 1-2) and features nearly 100 artist booths, two music stages, wine tasting, demonstrations and more. For details, visit RidgelandArtsFest. com. For travel tips and more, go to VisitRidgeland.com.


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Signature Dish

AGING PARENTS F

inding ways to enjoy retirement shouldn’t be hard for those in its midst or their families—after all, people in retirement have spent a lifetime working their way there. Our older years should be just as fulfilling as any, and maintaining personal wellness or achieving new heights is completely possible. As needs change in older adults, making important decisions that impact wellness affect not only those adults, but their adult children or close friends and family as well. There are a number of resources available to help families as they face the changes that come with retirement. From where to live and how to socialize to what to do in a medical emergency, each consideration can make a world of difference in achieving a balance in health and overall wellness. As Sportsman’s paradise and the place where we let the good times roll, Louisiana offers a lovely locale for living well each and every year. The Oaks of Louisiana in Shreveport is the area’s premier life plan community, a vibrant neighborhood where senior adults enjoy a lifestyle of choice, opportunity, control, and peace of mind. The 312-acre gated campus features a range of residential options (independent living, assisted living, and skilled care) and services and amenities that allow residents to enjoy life doing what they want. The Oaks of Louisiana focuses on helping seniors achieve personal wellness in all dimensions through programs, classes, events and opportunities. Peace of mind comes from planning for the future and knowing that residents at The Oaks have access to health services at all levels as their needs change. With apartments starting at $1,563, The Oaks is an outstanding value for its distinctive location, extraordinary services, and exceptional maintenance-free lifestyle that includes housekeeping, dining options, 24-7 security, transportation, and more. Learn more at oaksofla.com.

Cravin’ Cajun Stuffed Bell Peppers INGREDIENTS 8 oz. Box Louisiana Fish Fry Products Dirty Rice Mix 6 medium sized bell peppers ½ lb. ground beef ½ lb. fresh shrimp (peeled, deveined and chopped) 2¼ cups water 8 oz. plain bread crumbs Shredded cheddar cheese DIRECTIONS Cut peppers in half, clean and parboil for 5 minutes. Plunge in ice water and drain. Brown ground beef in a saucepan until thoroughly cooked (165 F) and drain. Add water and Dirty Rice Mix. Stir and bring to a boil. Stir in shrimp, reduce heat and cook covered for 2025 minutes. Preheat oven to 350 F. Place 12 pepper halves in baking dish and stuff with rice mixture. Sprinkle tops liberally with bread crumbs. Bake 10-15 minutes. Remove from oven and cover each pepper with shredded cheddar cheese. Bake additional 5 minutes or until cheese is melted. Enjoy! Serves 6-8

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PROMOTIONAL SECTION


calendar

march/april Events Around the State BY kelly massicot

Greater New Orleans March 5. Southern Soul Assembly. New Orleans. orpheumnola.com March 7-12. Sun Belt Basketball Championship. New Orleans. sunbeltsports.org March 10-18. St. Patrick’s Day Parades. New Orleans. March 11. Northshore Gumbo Cook-Off. Slidell. facebook.com/northshoregumbocookOff March 16. Restoration Roadshow. Lacombe. crcl.org March 17-18. Northshore Garden and Plant Sale. Covington. 985-875-2635. March 19. Mardi Gras Indians Super Sunday. New Orleans. March 19. Chef Soiree. Covington. 985-8932570. chefsoiree.com March 31 - April 1. Hogs for the Cause. New Orleans. hogsforthecause.org

March 11-18. Shadows Plein Air Competition. New Iberia. 337-369-6446. shadowsontheteche.org March 12. Zydeco Marathon. Lafayette. info@ zydecomarathon.com. zydecomarathon.com March 15. International Film Night at the Museum. Lafayette. 337-482-2278. hilliardmuseum.org

April 5-May 17. Wednesday at the Square Concert Series. New Orleans. 504-585-1500. wednesdayatthesquare.com

March 17, 24, 31. Live at the Lakefront (Outdoor Concert Series). Lake Charles. 337-439-ARTS (2787). artsandhumanitiesswla.org

April 7-9. Abita Springs - En Plein Air Exhibition. Abita Springs.

March 24-25. Toughest Monster Truck tour. Lafayette. cajundome.com

facebook.com/abitaspringsenpleinair

March 25. Cajun Comic Relief. Lafayette. 337-298-9717. facebook.com/cajuncomicrelief

April 15. Crescent City Classic. New Orleans. ccc10k.com April 22. Crawfish Cookoff. Slidell. 985-6435470.

March 26. Annual World Championship Crawfish Etouffee Cook-off. Eunice. eunicechamber.com. facebook.com/crawfish.etouffee

April 24-30. Zurich Classic. New Orleans. 504-342-3000. zurichgolfclassic.com

April 3-9. Cajun Classique. Breaux Bridge. 337-366-0337.

Cajun Country March 4. Bayou Gourmet Cookbook Cook-Off. Houma. houmaciviccenter.com March 10. Monet: Method And Meaning. Lafayette. 337-482-2278. hilliardmuseum.org March 11. ZZ Top concert. Lake Charles. goldennugget.com/lakecharles

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Baton Rouge Bicentennial From Indian tribes to Spanish battles, a civil war and the civil rights movement — Baton Rouge, the “Red Stick” city by the River, has been at the center of American history and Louisiana for over 200 years. After Louisiana’s acceptance into the Union in 1812, Baton Rouge was officially incorporated in 1817. Since becoming the state’s capital city in 1849, Baton Rouge has grown into the second largest city in Louisiana and transformed from a small river town to a Southern metropolis. Baton Rouge is home to both Louisiana State University, as well as Southern University. It has an amazing music and food scene with eclectic tastes and sounds representing the rich culture of the area. The city blends its rich history and architecture seamlessly with its growing arts scene. Tour a plantation, take in an art show at a local gallery or experience the countless events dedicated to the city’s bicentennial. 2017 is shaping up to be the best year yet for our Louisiana capital. Check out our roundup of Baton Rouge 200 events on the opposite page.

April 4. Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles. Lafayette. 337-291-5555. heymanncenter.com April 7-9. CyPhaCon 2017. Lake Charles. cyphacon.org April 8. ReALLIEty Challenge Mud Run. Lake Charles. reallietychallenge.com/register April 8-13. Dewey Balfa Cajun & Creole Heritage Week. Lafayette. 337-234-8360. lafolkroots.org

April 19-23. Cycle Zydeco. Lafayette. 337-781-9416. cyclezydeco.org April 20-23. Fashion Week Lake Charles. Lake Charles. fashionweeklc.com April 28. Spring Art Walk. Lake Charles. 337-439-2787. artsandhumanitiesswla.org


North March 11. Gumbo Gladiators Cook-Off. Shreveport. 318-425-4413. gumbogladiators.com March 11. Polar Plunge for Special Olympics Louisiana. Shreveport. laso.org/polarplunge April 7-8. Ark-La-Tex Ambassadors BBQ Cook-Off. Shreveport. 318-865-5555. arklatexambassadors.com

Plantation Country April 8-9. Baton Rouge Blues Festival. Baton Rouge. batonrougebluesfestival.org April 15-16. Angola Prison Spring Rodeo. Saint Francisville. 225-655-2592. angolarodeo.com

Baton Rouge 200 - Events March Thru Dec. 31. River Capital. A History of Baton Rouge. Old State’s Capitol. March Thru Dec. 31. Old State Capitol to display Preserve Louisiana Collections from the Old Governor’s Mansion throughout 2017. 100 North Blvd. March 7. LATCo Improv Night. Baton Rouge. leatheraprontheatre.com March 11. TEDxLSU. Baton Rouge. 225-5787795 tedxlsu.com March 25. Dancin’ in the Streets. Baton Rouge. 225-766-8379 batonrougeballet. org/dancin-in-the-streets/ March 25-26. Mistletoe in March. Baton Rouge. 225-933-2617 facebook.com/ MistletoeMarketBR March 30. Iris’ Chef Show Off. Baton Rouge. stopdv.org April 8-9. Baton Rouge Blues Festival April Thru Dec. 31. River Capital. A History of Baton Rouge. Old State’s Capitol. April 1. Downtown Derby. Baton Rouge. 225-377-2029. operalouisiane.com/downtownderby April 7. Baton Rouge Ballet Theatre Presents “Rapunzel”. Baton Rouge. 225-766-8379. batonrougeballet.org

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Quirky Places

House Music Baton Rouge’s ‘listening room’ provides intimate space for musicians and fans By Megan Romer

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ew Orleans is one of the world’s most vibrant live music towns, and listeners from around the world regularly descend upon Lafayette to get a taste of the homegrown music scene there, but Baton Rouge, halfway between the two on I-10, doesn’t tend to have that same reputation. But if you, like so many others, underestimated the Red Stick’s live music scene before, it’s time to catch up. “Musicians are, more than ever, choosing to live in Baton Rouge and make music,” says native son John Burns, who opened Dyson House Listening Room with old friend Kevin Sweeney with a goal of highlighting this burgeoning field of artists. It’s a simple venue: an old house that served a spell as a gift shop. A low stage stands at the end of a large room, and there’s room for exactly 70 people to have a chair with a sight line. There’s no bar, no tables, no real space at the back to hover and chat. The name says it all: it’s a listening room, and that’s what patrons come to do. “It’s comfortable and it’s intimate,” says Burns. Listening rooms like this provide the ambience of a house concert in a cozy living room, but without the awkwardness of actually being in a stranger’s living room, or worse, “having a bunch of strangers in your house.” This warm, intimate environment is as special for the audience as it is for the musicians. The space between the songs that may get filled with rote stage banter or unheard filler at a festival or in a club becomes precious — it’s an opening for conversations and deeper explanations. “The audience is just so appreciative, and the musicians can really feel that,” says Burns, explaining that the two-way feedback makes for truly special shows. For Burns and Sweeney, that’s what it’s all about.

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“This isn’t a moneymaking venture for us,” says Burns. “We just try to make enough money to keep it open. We do this because we love the music.” Artists take home all of the proceeds of their shows, beyond the costs required to open the doors. This still may not add up to quite what they’d make in a more formal setting, but Burns explains that Dyson House’s reputation as a truly unique venue has put them on the radar of some bigger-name artists anyway. “Our focus is always going to be regional music, but we do have some great touring acts playing, also,” says Burns. “More often than not, they come to us. They want to play here because they’ve heard that it’s just such an appreciative audience.”

Recently, Grammy-winner Rhiannon Giddens, known for both her solo work and as a member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, got word from an associate that Dyson House was the place to play an intimate concert. While recording her new CD with producer and musician Dirk Powell, who lives and works across the Atchafalaya Basin in Breaux Bridge, she planned a concert. Burns tells the story of Powell and Giddens “rolling in in a Mazda 323, with their instruments in the trunk. They played a show that was just worldclass. Amazing.” Burns’s exuberance when speaking about these shows is palpable and magnetic; it’s no wonder his venue has become a destination for folks on both sides of the microphone. u

photo courtesy dyson house listening room facebook page


a louisiana life

Soldiering On Baton Rouge military-veteran-turned-doctor dedicates herself to saving people’s soles BY megan hill photo by romero & Romero

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r. Meredith Warner of Baton Rouge has made a name for herself from a flip-flop. Warner, an orthopedic surgeon, invented a therapeutic shoe called The Healing Sole, a flip-flop that treats foot pain for people with plantar fasciitis, inflammation of the ligament that connects the heel bone to the toes, a condition affecting millions of people. “You could either do nothing and people would just put up with it,” says Warner. “Or you could inject steroids, which is terrible for the foot, or you can do surgery, which often doesn’t make sense.” A few products on the market treated foot pain in limited ways, so Warner developed The Healing Sole to combat the problem with six pain-relieving components. “I made it a flip-flop because everybody wants flip-flops, and every doctor tells patients they can’t wear them with heel pain,” she says. Warner, who completed her orthopedic surgery residency at Tulane University and earned an MBA from LSU, combined her medical and business background to develop the shoe. The business degree has also served her well in her private practice, which she opened in 2013 in Baton Rouge. Warner is originally from Delaware. Hailing from a military family, Warner joined the Air Force, where she served as a combat physician in Iraq and Afghanistan. “I saw a gap in treatment and I wanted a product for it,” Warner says. “As a doctor, I want to have broader impact on this world than the 30 patients I see each day. It’s letting me scale my clinical impact. I can help people in their journey to foot health and wellness at a far greater scale than I ever could, even if I saw twice as many patients a day.” u

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What’s your favorite thing about living in Louisiana? The culture is so unique. The festivals and Mardi Gras are definitely part of what kept me here. What’s your favorite Baton Rouge restaurant? This one is tough because the city has an amazing culinary scene, but I’d say Ruffino’s is my favorite. What’s your top dayoff activity? I don’t have much of that these days, but I enjoy running and spending time improving The Healing Sole business.

“There really weren’t any models, templates or examples to follow. I relied mostly on the skills learned in the MBA program and the basics of running a good business — have a good product, test it and market it.”


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

Louisiana Life March-April 2017  

Louisiana Life March-April 2017