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Page 1

The

King’s

New Look Royal Artists at work on Rex

Is the hotel industry missing out on

$93 Billion? Kenneth Purcell, founder/CEO of iSeatz says it is, and he wants to help. p. 44

Best lawyers

756 Individuals in 114 Specialities P. 55

Home Brew Dixie Brewing’s Return P. 80

february 2020 bizneworleans.com

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Biz New Orleans

february 2020


February Volume 06 Issue 05

EVERY ISSUE

features

perspectives

from the lens

10 Editor’s note 11 publisher’s note 12 Calendar 14 industry news 16 recent openings

maritime + ports . . ... 36

in the biz dining..........................20

A look at the birth — and constant re-birth — of the beloved beignet

Members of the maritime industry share the dangers and business challenges of a mightier than usual Mississippi.

tourism. . .....................22

Connect2Black app brings tourists and local businesses together sports .. ......................24

At 41, Saints QB Drew Brees still has enough to win it all entertainment.. ......26

Renowned New Orleans performer LadyBEAST is also a businesswoman dedicated to celebrating and supporting the unique artists that call this city home.

marketing.................32

Brand laddering can move customer feelings for your brand from “like” to “love.”

why didn’t i think of that?. . .....................................82

Open barely a year, NOLA Craft Culture is capitalizing on New Orleans’ year-round passion to create. making a match: businesses + nonprofits. . .....84

The New Orleans Women & Children’s Shelter needs your company’s help to keep families off the streets.

entrepreneur.........28

etiquette. . .................30

Dixie Brewing Company returns to New Orleans with a state-of-the art brewery, taproom and beer garden in New Orleans East.

In honor of Heart Health Month, Biz New Orleans shares some tips from Dr. Christopher Paris, interventional cardiologist with the Cardiovascular Institute of the South

44 50 55

Recent Tulane study quantifies the entrepreneurial landscape What to do when a coworker only has eyes for you

great workspaces.........................................................80

healthcare................ 40

education.. .................. 42

Q+A

Century-old universities in the region are meeting today’s workforce demands by introducing new programs.

iSeatz founder and CEO Kenneth Purcell has a multi-billion-dollar opportunity for hotels.

The Royal Touch

Best Lawyers

After 45 years building floats for some of Carnival’s oldest parades, Royal Artists has finally captured the King.

756 Individuals in 114 Specialities + 5 Lawyers Share Their Toughest Cases

on the job..........................................................................88

Known for its design work for the New Orleans Saints and Pelicans, Crystal Clear Creative’s latest project was crafting the Dixie Brewery Museum.

on the cover Kenneth Purcell, founder and CEO of iSeatz Photograph by Greg Miles


Publisher Todd Matherne

Editorial Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Kimberley Singletary Art Director Sarah George Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Associate News Editor Rich Collins Contributors Julia Carcamo, Rich Collins, Rebecca Friedman, Jennifer Larino, Keith Loria, Pamela Marquis, Ashley McLellan, Chris Price, Jessica Rosgaard, Jennifer Gibson Schecter, James Sebastien, Melanie Warner Spencer, Poppy Tooker, Keith Twitchell Advertising Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan (504) 830-7215 Colleen@BizNewOrleans.com Sales Manager Caitlin Sistrunk (504) 830-7252 Caitlin@BizNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Brennan Manale (504) 830-7298 Brennan@BizNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Jessica Jaycox (504) 830-7255 JessicaJ@BizNewOrleans.com Marketing Director of Marketing & Events Jeanel Luquette Event Coordinator Abbie Dugruise digital Digital Operations Manager Sarah Duckert Production Traffic Coordinator Lane Brocato Traffic Assistant Jeremiah Michel Production Manager Emily Andras Production Designers Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney Administration Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Office Manager Mallary Matherne Distribution Manager John Holzer Audience Development Claire Sargent For subscriptions, call (504) 830-7231

2016 Bronze: Best Feature Layout 2017 Bronze: Best Daily Email 2017 Silver: Best Recurring Feature 2018 Gold: Most Improved Publication 2018 Silver: Best Recurring Feature 2019 Gold: Best Recurring Feature 2019 Gold: Best Explanatory Journalism

110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123 • Metairie, LA 70005 • (504) 828-1380 Biz New Orleans is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $24.95, two year $39.95, three year $49.95—foreign rates vary call for pricing. Postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional mailing entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Biz New Orleans, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2020 Biz New Orleans. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark Biz New Orleans is registered. Biz New Orleans is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork, even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in Biz New Orleans are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the magazine or owner.

bizneworleans.com

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meet the sales team

Caitlin Sistrunk Sales Manager

(504) 830-7252 Caitlin@BizNewOrleans.com

Brennan Manale

Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7298 Brennan@BizNewOrleans.com

Jessica Jaycox

Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7255 JessicaJ@BizNewOrleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales

(504) 830-7215 Colleen@BizNewOrleans.com 8

Biz New Orleans

february 2020


bizneworleans.com

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editor’s note ADVERTISEMENT

FIDELITY BANK’S P.O.W.E.R.FUL

WOMAN OF THE MONTH

It’s Finally Back February is here and, really, how can anyone think about anything

ALLISON COPELAND DONNELLY Al Copeland Investments

Vice President, Al Copeland Investments Restaurant Division Based in Metairie, LA

WHAT IS THE BEST ADVICE YOU EVER RECEIVED? In Jim Sullivan’s Fundamentals, “Tough on standards, easy on people.”

WHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST BENEFIT OF BEING A POWER MEMBER? The connectivity of being surrounded by people that get it! While we’re all in different businesses, the personal strength, sacrifice, and heart that goes into what we do--its’s relatable.

but Carnival? You can’t. So, let’s just go with it. When Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde and I sit down to talk about this issue, it can be kind of a challenge. In just five years in print, Biz has covered a lot about the business side of Southeast Louisiana’s favorite time of year. In 2015, Biz profiled Staci Rosenberg, the founder and captain of Muses, along with Orpheus Captain Sonny Borey and looked at the business of throws. In year two, we had a chat with Endymion Captain Ed Muniz and looked specifically at the business of the ever-popular plush throw, followed by an April cover feature on Kern Studios and its new float building robot. In 2017, we looked at the rich history of gay krewes and how they have embraced a new economic model. Over the past two years, however, the January and February issues have been taken over by our announcements of CEO and Executives of the Year, along with our annual Best Lawyers list. But this year, I’m happy to say we’ve returned to Carnival with a wonderful feature by Jennifer Larino that looks at the biggest player you’ve probably never heard of: Royal Artists. After 45 years in business, this float builder surprised everyone by signing a five-year contract with Rex, King of Carnival. Who is this company? How and why have they flown under the radar for so long? What made them so appealing to Rex? We’re happy to share these answers. Of course, being Carnival, this is a HUGE time for hotels, who have been battling the rise of sites like Home Away and Airbnb. How can they gain much-needed revenue? According to iSeatz Founder and CEO Kenneth Purcell, the same way airlines did a dozen years ago — through ancillaries. Finally, if you happen to attend the Krewe of Freret parade this year, you may recognize one of the NOLA Chorus Girls sassing her way down the street for the first time in full ‘20s gear. All I can say is here’s to a year of new adventures! Happy Carnival!

WHAT DOES POWER MEAN TO YOU? Power to me means I have the joy of influencing people. I have had the privilege to help, share, inspire, and watch people come in at entry levels of our company and then take over restaurants, run department, and continuously professionally and personally grow. Their families become our family.

FIDELITYBANKPOWER.COM HERE FOR POWERFUL BUSINESS 10

Biz New Orleans

february 2020

Kimberley Singletary, Managing Editor


publisher’s note

12 Days Have you noticed business organizations in

the region are skipping January and squeezing in all their annual and first quarter meetings after the Super Bowl but before Mardi Gras? I’m not sure if their thinking was that the Saints would have a longer run in the playoffs so it would be best to just wait avoid January altogether, but there are 12 real solid business days this month and it seems every business group is making the most of it. Feb. 4 The St. Tammany Chamber,

Installation and Awards Luncheon

Feb. 6 The Jefferson Chamber,

Annual Meeting Breakfast

Feb. 7 GNO, Inc.,

Annual Meeting Luncheon

Feb. 18 New Orleans & Co.,

Annual Meeting Luncheon

Feb. 19 New Orleans Chamber,

First Quarter Luncheon

This year, Mardi Gras is February 25, but outside the first weekend, the action starts with a full load of parades every night from Wednesday, Feb. 19, until Fat Tuesday, or Mardi Gras Day. Mardi Gras consumes a whole week, and then winter vacations kick in, with families often taking the rest of Mardi Gras week off. All you can do as a business owner in New Orleans is embrace the culture, enjoy the fun and kick it into high gear for those dozen days this month. Happy Mardi Gras! See you on the streets. Todd Matherne

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calendar

February 4 New Orleans Chamber of Commerce Power Breakfast 8 to 9:30 a.m. 1515 Poydras St. 5th Floor Auditorium NewOrleansChamber.org 5 The Funding Seed Engaging Your Board Members in Fundraising Work 3 to 4:30 p.m. Ashe Power House Theater 1731 Baronne St., New Orleans TheFundingSeed.com

11 St. Bernard Chamber of Commerce Women’s Professional Network: King Cake Party 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tabary & Borne 3 Courthouse Square, Chalmette StBernardChamber.org 12 New Orleans Chamber of Commerce Chamber After 5 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Embassy Suites by Hilton 315 Julia St. NewOrleansChamber.org

6 Jefferson Chamber of Commerce Annual Meeting — Engage 2020 8 to 11 a.m. Crowne Plaza New Orleans Airport 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner JeffersonChamber.org

13 ABWA Crescent City Connections February Monthly Luncheon 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Forum 3131 Veterans Blvd. ABWANewOrleans.org

6 New Orleans Chamber of Commerce Women’s Business Alliance 5 to 7 p.m. Ruth’s Chris Steak House 525 Fulton Street, inside Harrah’s Hotel NewOrleansChamber.org

18 New Orleans Regional Black Chamber of Commerce New Members Orientation 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Orleans Tower 1340 Poydras St., Suite 100 NORBChamber.org

7 GNO Inc. Annual Luncheon 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hyatt Regency New Orleans 601 Loyola Ave. GNOInc.org

19 New Orleans Chamber of Commerce 1st Quarter Luncheon: Legislative Issues Update 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Roosevelt Hotel Roosevelt Ballroom, Mezzanine Level 130 Roosevelt Way NewOrleansChamber.org

11 St. Tammany Chamber of Commerce Smarter Business Series: Protecting Your Intellectual Property 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Northshore Technical Community College 65556 Centerpoint Blvd., Lacombe StTammanyChamber.org

19 Jefferson Chamber of Commerce Prosper Jefferson 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. JEDCO Conference Center 701A Churchill Pkwy., Avondale JeffersonChamber.org

For a more complete list of events, visit BizNewOrleans.com. We’d love to include your business-related event in next month’s calendar. Please email details to Editorial@BizNewOrleans.com.

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Biz New Orleans

february 2020


industry news

New Board Announced for New Orleans & Company

RANKINGS

Louisiana Ranks 41st for Retiring Early

New Orleans & Company has inducted key leaders in the city’s tourism industry to serve on its 2020 Board of Directors, which will provide guidance and direction for New Orleans’ $9.1 billion tourism industry and advance the interests of the more than 1,100 members of New Orleans & Company.

If you’re looking to retire early, you may want to consider a move according to a study released by TheSeniorList. com on the Best and Worst States to Retire Early. The study used the most recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and the Journal of the American Medical Association, among others, to look at issues such as life expectancy, income, housing costs, income tax rates, insurance premiums, consumer spending and average temperatures to determine the state rankings. Key findings from the study on Louisiana include: Median household income: $47,905 (No. 5 lowest in the country) Average health insurance premium: $181.93 Median monthly housing cost: $806 (No. 9 lowest in the country) Average temperature: 67.8 (No. 3 highest in the country) Median life expectancy from birth: 75.6 (No. 4 lowest in the country) Here are key national findings:

NOMA Awarded $1 Million Grant The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) a $1 million grant to support the establishment of the only photography conservation program for much of the Southeastern United States. The grant will also enable the creation of two new museum positions in object conservation, including outdoor sculpture and photography conservation. NOMA’s comprehensive photography collection of more than 14,000 works includes some of the rarest examples and most significant achievements in photography from the 1840s to the present.

5 best states to retire early: Texas, South Dakota, Florida, Nevada, Wyoming.

Enjoy India With Chef Nina Compton

5 worst states to retire early: West Virginia, D.C., Minnesota, Connecticut, Missouri.

Looking for a fall getaway? From Oct. 16-27 James Beard Award-winning chef Nina Compton will be leading a 12-day trip through India through a company called Modern Adventure. A native of the Caribbean Island of St. Lucia, Compton said she’s excited to explore the spices of India in a trip that will include high-end accommodations, a wildlife safari and various other adventures through New Delhi, Jodhpur, Chanod, Udaipur, Mumbai and Jamtara. The trip is priced from $10,000 per person based on double occupancy. For more information, visit ModernAdventure.com.

Nine states don’t have a state income tax or don’t levy it on wages. Insurance premiums are highest in DC ($447) and lowest in Mississippi ($76.08).

The Lotus Temple, New Delhi, India

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february 2020

“With key leadership in place for 2020, led by Amy Reimer Sileo, we are looking forward to implementing new and innovative strategies for growing visitation and expanding our economic impact through sales, marketing, public relations and customer service,” said Stephen Perry, president and CEO of New Orleans & Company in a press release announcing the board. “We are continuing to focus on enhancing and managing our brand, building a solid, growing base of meeting and group business, attacking need periods with new sales and incentives, as well as stimulating major growth and job creation across the city. The 2020 Board of Directors Executive Committee: Amy Reimer Sileo (Chairman of the Board) David Bilbe, Omni Royal Orleans (Chair-Elect) Steve Caputo, Hotel Monteleone (Past Chair) Steve Pettus, Dickie Brennan & Company (Treasurer) Darryl Berger, The Berger Company (Secretary) Jim Cook, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel (Assistant Secretary) Ron Forman, Audubon Nature Institute Doug Thornton, ASM Global

Louisiana has not had a maternal fetal medicine fellowship since Hurricane Katrina. This program is a significant investment by Ochsner both in the next generation of healthcare professionals and the wellbeing of mothers and babies in our state.” Joseph R. Biggio, Jr., MD, system co-chair for Women’s Services and system chair for Maternal Fetal Medicine, Ochsner Health System. Ochsner is currently training its first MFM fellow for the new three-year program and will welcome its second fellow this July. Louisiana ranks second-highest in the country for pre-term births, behind Mississippi.

Hispanic Chamber Receives $100,000 for Workforce Initiatives Verizon will present a $100,000 grant to the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana (HCCL) to support workforce and enrichment programs in New Orleans and throughout the state. The company has joined forces with HCCL to help build programming focused on digital literacy, technology workforce development and STEM education to prepare more people for meaningful careers in a digitized workforce. Verizon’s vision is that such partnerships will help to reduce social disadvantages, increase economic equity for all and offer opportunities for program participants to improve their financial lives and those of generations to come.


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recent openings

Q Clothier and Rye 51 Side-by-side retail men’s stores Q Clothier and Rye 51 opened December 27 in South Market at 1001 Julia Street, at The Standard condominiums. The 2,500-square-foot space houses the two stores — connected by a complimentary whiskey bar —which specialize in custom men’s wear and feature professional clothiers. Q Clothier and Rye 51 were created by parent company Q51, a family-owned company with more than 50 years of experience in the clothing business. Q Clothier opened its first store in Dallas in 2003.

Residence Inn by Marriott Featuring a 170-foot-long balcony with six 80-inch televisions overlooking the St. Charles streetcar line, the 231-suite Residence Inn by Marriott at 360 St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans officially opened on December 10. The pet-friendly, all-suite hotel offers studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom suites, with eight third-floor suites featuring private balconies with views of downtown New Orleans. The hotel also includes a business library, fitness center and 5,075 square feet of meeting space with balcony access and convenient parking.

Eustis Mortgage Company

Medline Industries Medline Industries Inc. — the largest privately held manufacturer and distributor of medical supplies in the U.S. — announced in December that it plans to build an 800,000-square-foot distribution center to replace its current distribution center, located between Covington and Goodbee. The $53 million medical supply facility will be built on the north side of Interstate 12 at La. 21 and is expected to create more than 460 new direct jobs and 611 new indirect jobs in St. Tammany Parish. Fully developed, the distribution center could eventually support up to 700 jobs. 

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Biz New Orleans

Ampirical Solutions

Eustis Mortgage has moved its headquarters into The Standard at South Market at 798 S. Rampart St. in New Orleans. The company worked with building contractor Perrier Esquerré Contractors, LLC, to create an open, ground floor workplace that “facilitates a free and flexible environment for in-office and remote employees to utilize.” Eustis Mortgage has served New Orleans borrowers from Downtown for more than 60 years.

february 2020

J Collection January 6 marked the official launch of the J Collection, a collection of 19 unique, locally owned and operated hotels and resorts situated in New Orleans and the surrounding region. This new brand brings the New Orleans Hotel Collection and the French Quarter Hotel Collection – previously two separate hotel groups — under the same umbrella. The J Collection was founded in New Orleans by Jaeger in 2015 as a part of the MCC Group, a multi-unit real estate development organization dedicated to real estate projects that spur meaningful economic and community development. Hotel Mazarin

Ampirical Solutions LLC — a national company specializing in electrical infrastructure engineering, design and construction management — will build its 78,000-square-foot corporate headquarters near Covington, Louisiana, and consolidate its existing St. Tammany Parish locations into the new office building. Louisiana Economic Development estimates the project — which includes a $20 million capital investment — will result in 244 new indirect jobs, for a total of 644 new jobs in Southeast Louisiana. Founded in Mandeville, Louisiana, in 2006, Ampirical specializes in the design and construction of electrical substations and switchyards, protective relays and controls, transmission lines, distributions lines and related infrastructure.


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At Renaissance Publishing, we’ve told hundreds of stories for dozens of companies, organizations and industries.

Now, let us tell your story. To discuss your own custom publication, contact Topher@MyNewOrleans.com

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In The Biz

AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Biz columnists speak out

dining Beignets

tourism

Connect2Black

sports Drew Brees

entertainment

entrepreneur

LadyBEAST

Startup Scene

etiquette Unwanted

Advances

marketing Branding

Ladder


in the biz dining

Good Things Come in Threes A look at the birth — and constant re-birth — of the beloved beignet. by Poppy Tooker

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Biz New Orleans

february 2020

i l lu st r at i o n by T o n y H e a l e y

A native New Orleanian, Poppy Tooker has spent her life devoted to the cultural essence that food brings to Louisiana, a topic she explores weekly on her NPR-affiliated radio show, Louisiana Eats! From farmers markets to the homes and restaurants where our culinary traditions are revered and renewed, Poppy lends the voice of an insider to interested readers everywhere.

“Ours is a special sourdough formula every culture, starting with the ancient that provides leavening and a unique flavor,” Romans who can claim the “original” fried Hennessey said. Fans will be thrilled to learn dough creation with their scriblita, and that Morning Call will be back sometime in continuing to the Italian zeppole and the 2020, conveniently located in a new developMexican sopapilla of today. ment at the corner of Canal Boulevard and New Orleans is famous for many foods, but City Park Avenue in Mid-City. few compare to the city’s own fried dough, the beignet. “Beignet” is French for fritter, and Café Beignet Offers Variety of Settings while it’s unclear how and when the unique, “There’s more than one way to beignet,” claims square doughnuts originally developed in Donna Shay, general manager of Café Beignet. New Orleans, they have been a fixture at the It’s been 21 years since the beignet upstart opened its first location on Royal Street. With French Market since the mid-19th century. a fifth location on Canal Street slated for early One French Market, 2020, each downtown spot has been carefully Two Beignet Options curated to offer guests something uniquely For Jay Roman, third generation of Café du charming. On notorious Bourbon Street, Monde’s Fernandez family, the beignet is “a Café Beignet provides a safe, family-friendly calling, more than a job.” With 11 locations haven with live jazz music from 8 a.m. to 10 and a food truck to manage, Café du Monde is p.m. daily. There’s also a Café Beignet in the the dominant player in New Orleans’ beignet historic Jax Brewery on Decatur. Following in scene. According to Fernandez family history, the 125-year tradition of the Coffee Pot on St. the original Café du Monde stand dates back Peter Street, Café Beignet serves traditional to 1862, and Roman’s grandfather, Hubert calas at that location, in addition to handFernandez, purchased the French Market rolled, made-to-order beignets. business in 1942. At that time, beignets were generally called “French Market doughnuts,” The Newcomer something Fernandez rectified in 1958 when In 2013, when the French Market board of he rebranded them “beignets.” Asked why directors mentioned they were looking for beignets are always served in threes, Roman additional beignet options for the market, had a very simple explanation: “My grandfather Loretta Harrison, of Loretta’s Authentic always sold them in threes, so that is what Pralines, said, “I can do that!” we still do today.” Using puff pastry instead of the traditional Café du Monde was not the only beignet choux paste, Harrison developed a lighter, source in the French Market. In 1870, Austrian crispier product that she serves stuffed with immigrant Joseph Jurisich opened Morning crabmeat, chocolate and praline fillings. All Call just a few blocks down from Café du three versions are popular offerings at the Monde. Morning Call featured a smaller annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. seating area than its competitor, but once the At both Harrison’s North Rampart Street café automobile was introduced, the company’s and her French Quarter stall, she’s expanded curbside service became a late-night favorite her beignet menu to include hamburger of New Orleanians with pajama-clad kids in beignets, along with other fillings like shrimp the backseat. salad, barbecued chicken, peanut butter and In 1974, during extensive renovations to jelly, and for breakfast, bacon, eggs and cheese. the French Market, Morning Call owners What about you? How do you beignet? n (and brothers) Alvin and Eddie Jurisich closed the original location and moved the business to Metairie. In recent years, Alvin’s step-grandsons, brothers Bob and Mike Hennessey, have managed the family operation. Lease issues caused them to close the Metairie location in 2018, and at this time last year they lost their lease in City Park, ending a 149-year run in the city. Beignet aficionados wax eloquent about the currently elusive Morning Call doughnut. Catch Poppy Tooker on her radio show, Bob and Mike Hennessey claim the secret is “Louisiana Eats!” Saturdays at 3 p.m. and Mondays at 8 p.m. on WWNO 89.9 FM. in the dough. The concept of fried dough pervades


in the bi z tourism

‘There’s an App for That’ Connect2Black app brings tourists and local businesses together By Jennifer Gibson Schecter

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Biz New Orleans

february 2020

the southern region, but also to cater to all of those national and international destinations.” Connect2Black is also a tool for businessto-business (B2B) transactions. Martin said many of the app’s users are conventioneers — such as with the Urban League or National Conference of Black Lawyers — who are looking to procure black business services or products in a B2B exchange for conventions and events geared toward African American participants. To reach those businesses, Connect2Black is using several marketing strategies. Martin is contacting the leadership of several national organizations and asking them to promote Connect2Black to their thousands of members. He is also working with social media influencers to get the app in front of their audiences and noted he has a robust marketing budget that will include traditional media buys in television, radio, bus signs and billboards. “I’m happy and thrilled and excited about seeing this happen for the African American community,” said Martin. “We have an opportunity to put value on our own experiences and our own companies. It will also provide a comprehensive data resource for African American businesses.” Martin cites data that the consumer dollar only stays in the black community for six hours, and sees a vast disparity between the dollar retention in the African American business community and other communities. “Success will look like that dollar being retained in our community for even one day longer,” said Martin. “A major goal is to create generational wealth within the African American community so businesses can sustain themselves.” Connect2Black is free for businesses to create a listing, and free for users to download. Apple, Android and Windows support the app and it can be downloaded at connect2black.com. n

i l lu st r at i o n by T o n y H e a l e y

Jennifer Gibson Schecter was once a tourist in New Orleans herself and is now proud to call NOLA home. She also writes the Wednesday Tourism Blog on BizNewOrleans.com.

One of the biggest challenges travelers

can face is gaining access to information. Sure, Google is a verb and in the palm of nearly everyone’s hands, but real-time, locationspecific information can still be a struggle, especially when trying to find local businesses at an unfamiliar destination. New Orleans publisher, marketer and entrepreneur Lawrence Martin saw this need and created a new smartphone app called Connect2Black. The app is a multiplatform resource for tourists, particularly those looking to support black-owned businesses while visiting New Orleans. The app is far from Martin’s first venture. He publishes Boulevard Magazine, a quarterly publication that covers issues impacting African American residents in the New Orleans region, and founded NOLA.TV, an internet-based news network that tells the story of the African American community. To recognize the contributions of African American New Orleanians, he also created the Asante Foundation, which has been honoring community members since 2008. The Connect2Black app launched in the New Orleans market with eight primary business categories. Beyond the tourist attractions, restaurants and nightclubs, the app was designed to meet the variety of services a traveler may need — from hair services to church services. The app is currently being redeveloped for growth. “Categories are going to be comprehensive and include everything under the sun,” said Martin. “A platform that can have millions of names and listings is just a matter of how robust we build up and build out.” Martin says the app is also being redeveloped to create a holistic interaction for the user. Capabilities such as video and push notifications, and the ability to connect to social media and geofencing are being fine-tuned. Beyond improvements to the technology itself, Martin is also looking to scale beyond the New Orleans tourism market. “Connect2Black’s primary goal is to have a national and international presence,” he said. “That’s what we’re shooting for. Out of 23 major tourist destinations for African Americans, 12 to 13 of them are in the South, and regardless of the destination, those travelers are having the same problem. In nine to 18 months, we’ll scale beyond New Orleans. “Everyone has an appreciation of their own community,” he added. “The African American community has the same problem with not being able to find where those businesses are. We seek to be successful in New Orleans and


in the biz sports

Brees’ Last Handoff At 41, Saints QB Drew Brees still has enough to win it all by chris price

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Biz New Orleans

february 2020

suffered devastating last-minute playoff losses just to show up again, hungrier, the next year. But this team is at a crossroads. All three QBs are free agents, and their future depends on Brees’ decision. No one could fault Brees for choosing to hang up his gear, spend time with his family, and look forward to life after football. If he feels like he’s ready to move on, so be it. Succession plans are in place. But seeing is believing. Brees is still one of the NFL’s best — even if he’s no longer in his prime. Yes, he had a bad game against Minnesota, but look at the entirety of the season. He’s the best QB on the roster. Brees should consider pulling that outstretched ball back to his side and windup for one more deep ball to the end zone. This team is loaded with talent on both sides of the ball. It will take some financial Jiu Jitsu to re-sign Brees and get the roster under the salary cap, but, as we’ve seen this season, he’s played some of the best football of his career. His tank isn’t empty. If he feels like he can do it, Brees owes it to himself — and the guys he fought so hard with — to make one more attempt to reach the pinnacle. Of course, if Brees stays, it’s likely that Teddy Bridgewater will try for the opportunity to be a starter with another team. That will cause the dynamic with Taysom Hill to change because the Saints don’t want to injure their backup QB. It’s going to be an interesting offseason with lots of moving, interconnected parts. The ball’s in your hands, Drew. Make the right call.n

i l lu st r at i o n by T o n y H e a l e y

Chris Price is an award-winning journalist and public relations principal. When he’s not writing, he’s avid about music, the outdoors, and Saints, Ole Miss and Chelsea football. Price also authors the Friday Sports Column at BizNewOrleans.com.

Drew Brees is 41. In the world of NFL

quarterbacks, he’s ancient. But he remains one of the league’s best. Brees holds multiple career and individual records, is a Super Bowl champion, surely a first-ballot Hall-of-Famer, and, arguably, the savior of the franchise that kept New Orleans an NFL city. There’s not much more that can be said or written about the caliber of player he is or the man he is away from the gridiron. But the quarterback is at a crossroads in his illustrious career. Figuratively, he’s got his team lined up in the I-formation. The defense can’t zero in on a run or a pass, because either play could come. Will he call a handoff to another player to make the next gain, or will he pull the ball back and go for one more strike downfield? That’s the question facing Brees, the New Orleans Saints, the Who Dat Nation, and, ultimately, the rest of the NFL. Brees has earned all of the major accolades a professional football player could hope for, minus one — NFL MVP. He is the NFL’s all-time leader in career touchdown passes, passing yards, and completion percentage in both a single game and over the course of a full season; he’s won a Super Bowl; made several Pro Bowls, and, maybe most amazingly, transformed a down-on-its-luck franchise into a perennial playoff contender. Brees came to the Big Easy in 2006, broken and recovering after suffering a career-threatening injury to his throwing shoulder. His surgically-repaired rotator cuff scared off every quarterback-needy team in the league, except for one: the one that needed a quarterback to take a chance on them. His new city, too, was recovering, reeling from the effects of the near citywide flood after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast region. Together, they leaned on each other for support, strength and a resilient comeback. In their first year together, general manager Mickey Loomis, new head coach Sean Payton, and Brees led the Saints to an improbable NFC Championship Game appearance. The city fed off the Saints’ success. If the team could make such an amazing comeback — from orphans playing “home games” in New York, Baton Rouge and San Antonio in 2005 to creating some of the franchise’s apex moments in 2006 — the city could and would rebound, too. The team went on to win its first Super Bowl after the 2009 season, has appeared in three conference championships, had two of its best three-year runs in franchise history, and


in the biz entertainment

The Ultimate Balancing Act Renowned New Orleans performer LadyBEAST is also a businesswoman dedicated to celebrating and supporting the unique artists that call this city home. by Kim Singletary

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rehearsals, marketing and all the business and organizational efforts — in her case with artists from around the country — to also create unique shows, another aspect of LadyBEAST Productions. LadyBEAST has produced shows at all of the major venues in New Orleans — with her latest to be held at the Marigny Opera House Feb. 21, 23 and 24. “This is the sixth year of our Vaude d’Gras show — a vaudeville meets Mardi Gras show where this year’s concept is an opulent dinner party during Carnival that’s set in the Baroque era and filled with interesting aristocrats,” she said. “Of course, the dinner party goes awry and there’s whip cracking, burlesque and full group dance ensembles, all set to live music. We’ve got a cellist, a harpist and someone playing a baby grand. It’s going to be amazing.” Tickets for Vaude d’Gras are priced at $25 and $45 and costumes are encouraged. For tickets, visit LadyBeastProductions.com. Outside of productions like Vaude d’Gras and using her skills to bring a real wow factor to private events, LadyBEAST says 2020 will hopefully be the year she secures a new home for her national company. “We’re looking for an operations and rehearsal space right now, but it’s not easy,” she said. “For one, we need ceilings that are 30 feet or higher. It’s going to be a challenge.” Luckily, LadyBEAST is a woman who happens to thrive on challenges — whether that be bottle walking on top of three balanced chairs or balancing a business of freewheeling freelancers spread across the country — and she wouldn’t have it any other way or be doing it in any other city on earth. “People talk about running away to join the circus,” she said, “but I’m lucky, I didn’t have to run away. I stayed right here.” n

i l lu st r at i o n by T o n y H e a l e y

Kimberley Singletary is the managing editor of Biz New Orleans magazine. A 20-year Southern California veteran, she has been surrounded by the film industry for most of her life.

Two years ago, at Burning Man, a New

Orleanian known only as LadyBEAST became the first woman to escape from a straight jacket while hanging upside down 100 feet in the air from a hot air balloon. With that performance, LadyBEAST grabbed the attention of Ripley’s Believe It or Not, who signed her as one of their featured artists. The recognition was akin to an animator getting a job with Disney or Pixar. “It’s a really big deal,” said LadyBEAST in a conversation with me recently. “Ripley’s wants to make sure they can prove the uniqueness behind artists and acts, so once you’ve made it with them it’s really proof that you are, in fact, unique.” Uniqueness is everything in the world of contemporary circus performers who consistently fuse art with athleticism in acts that can include aura rendering photography, lasso and bullwhip tricks and crossbow contortion — all of which are just a few of the options available for hire through LadyBEAST Productions, a company LadyBEAST formed in New Orleans in 2013. “We work on corporate events, weddings, and everything in between,” said LadyBEAST, “providing unique creative concepts for events and then taking that concept and developing a narrative, handling costuming, finding the artists, and ultimately, transforming attendees or audience members into another world.” A native of Philadelphia, LadyBEAST came to New Orleans 10 years ago and has since become a part of what she describes as a small, tight-knit community of performers in the city. “Many years ago, New Orleans was home to incredible vaudeville and circus acts,” said LadyBEAST. “And then it just kinda died out. But in the past two years things have really picked up, I think. The underground counter-culture movement is really picking up and so is business.” On a personal level, LadyBEAST said she’s found her passion and niche in what she calls “old world acts that have died away.” In addition to illusions, aerial and fire work, LadyBeast is known for bottle walking, which is exactly what it sounds like — walking atop standing glass bottles. “Bottle walking started as a dustbowl circus act,” she said. “Then it died away and you’d maybe see it every now and then in a European circus.” LadyBEAST is a balancing artist, or equilibrist, and, just like her fellow artists, is deeply dedicated to her work, training her body typically four to six hours a day. Then there’s


in the biz entrepreneur

Startup Status Recent Tulane study quantifies the entrepreneurial landscape by keith twitchell

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i l lu st r at i o n by T o n y H e a l e y

Keith Twitchell spent 16 years running his own business before becoming president of the Committee for a Better New Orleans. He has observed, supported and participated in entrepreneurial ventures at the street, neighborhood, nonprofit, micro- and macro-business levels.

The New Orleans startup scene has A major purpose of the study was to received much national acclaim and high gather information to inform public policyrankings, with data generally indicating a making, and here, Lalka had some specific strong entrepreneurial sector. Overall, though, recommendations. our collective sense of the landscape is more “We need more low-interest loans and anecdotal than truly informed. outright grants, directly to small businesses Stepping into this void last fall was the and also to the entrepreneurial incubators,” Tulane University Albert Lepage Center for he said. “We also need to examine where Entrepreneurship and Innovation, which local private sector investment really is going, conducted the first-ever large-scale study of and what we can do to direct more of it to the entrepreneurial ecosystem in our region. startups,” he added, noting that real estate The study’s findings mostly support the is currently the largest area of investment. optimistic view of local entrepreneurism, “We need to ask how we can get more money albeit with one major issue that could seriously flowing into the entrepreneurial stream, and threaten continued growth. We’ll get to that what policies and incentives will support that. momentarily, but in the meantime, some We still have a lot of people in our city who other very interesting information emerged. still don’t have access to opportunity.” According to the study: The Lepage Center plans to conduct • Health care is the top industry, representing similar studies on an annual basis as a way 17% of the region’s startups, followed by to track whether the entrepreneurial climate food and beverage (10%), hospitality (10%), is improving, stagnating or declining. One media (10%), marketing (8%) and real estate interesting aspect of the methodology is that, (8%). However, the energy and finance along with the quantifiable data are profiles of sectors, though not among the top fields, individual entrepreneurs. Future studies will project the most revenue growth. also follow them and their businesses. This • Nearly two-thirds of the region’s startups will provide more personal and subjective (defined as companies in existence for fewer information to augment the objective data. than five years, with less than $60 million Sustaining and growing the entrepreneurial in revenues) are small businesses. About ecosystem is essential to the economic future 54% have two employees or fewer, and of our region. This kind of data enables us to another 18% have three to five employees. define the opportunities and the challenges, Fewer than 4% have 50 employees or more. and this will help allow us to be successful in • Similarly, almost two-thirds of the more keeping greater New Orleans at the forefront than 200 startups surveyed were founded of innovation and entrepreneurship. n by millennials. This certainly rebukes the notion of millennials as apathetic and is even more striking given how many in this age group emerge from college with heavy student loan debt. • Our local startups are optimistic, with 81% planning to hire at least one more employee in the next year. This last item is crucial. In speaking with Rob Lalka, the Lepage Center’s executive director, he pointed out that data from the Ewing Kauffman Foundation suggests “all net new jobs come from startup companies, and these are well-salaried jobs.” Consequently, the thought is that “this should drive city and state economic policy.” Which leads us to that one major issue identified in the study: Access to venture capital for startup businesses is a significant challenge. According to Lalka, “nearly 80% of startup businesses are depending on their own resources,” meaning they put up their own capital, are depending on revenues to survive and grow, or both. He suggested that “we need much more early-stage risk capital, from both the private and public sectors.”


in the biz e tique tte

Unwanted Advances What to do when a coworker only has eyes for you by Melanie Warner Spencer

A few years ago in this column, we

explored the do’s and don’ts of navigating workplace romances. When a spark is ignited between two people, it’s often irresistible, and many a happily couple have met at work. That’s all well and good, but what about when the feeling is not mutual? Unwanted attention from a coworker is awkward at best and at worst can turn into sexual harassment. For this installment, we’re going to focus on the awkward end of the spectrum, since for the other scenario there are fail-safes in place via human resources departments and the law. So, what should you do if someone is flirting with you, but you aren’t interested?

Do your best to determine if the other party is simply a shameless flirt, or if attention and compliments are being reserved specifically for you. If he or she flirts with everyone in the office, you can probably chalk it up to a personality quirk and rule out the chance that they are hoping to date you. Either way, if it makes you uncomfortable, you are well within your rights to draw your boundaries.

1. Investigate.

Co-workers, of course, often socialize over lunch, happy hour or dinner, so set a few ground rules for those occasions. For example, perhaps you could agree only to lunch in groups, but decline happy hours and dinners. The former can help you avoid getting into potentially tricky, tipsy territory in which inhibitions may be lowered and people may not be on their best behavior.

In addition to the above, be sure to document the behavior, including dates, times, context, other parties present and a summary of the exchange. Any time a comment or action feels “off,” write it down. This is especially important if the behavior continues after you make it clear that you aren’t interested in anything other than a working relationship. If you have a close friend at work that you can confide in, share the incidents with them in real time, so that you have support and a person who, if it ever escalates, can corroborate your side of the story. 4. Document:

5. Report: If you’ve done all of the above and the behavior hasn’t ceased, you are being harassed and it’s time to report it to your superiors or human resources.

Always go with your intuition and be firm about your boundaries, and usually, the problem will be solved without drama. The office should be a place where you feel safe and comfortable, allowing the focus to remain on work and not concerns over whether or not that guy or gal from accounting is going to swing by your desk — again. n

2. Set Rules:

If you are married or in a committed relationship, often bringing up your significant other can curb the behavior. That said, not everyone can take a hint; besides, some people don’t consider that a deal-breaker, and will continue the pursuit. This means, it’s important to be crystal clear and assertive about the fact that you are not interested. At the same time, tact and professionalism are key, because you will still have to work together. You could say something like, “I’ve noticed that you visit my office a lot, compliment my appearance and frequently ask me to lunch and happy hour. It’s possible that I’m misreading the situation, but if not, I don’t want to lead you on. I enjoy working with you, but I’m not interested in dating.” If you have a significant other, you could also say, “I enjoy working with you, but I’m in a committed relationship.” Finally, and only if it’s true, tell them, “I enjoy working with you, but I don’t date people from work.” 3. Communicate:

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i l lu st r at i o n by T o n y H e a l e y

Melanie Warner Spencer is editor of New Orleans Bride and New Orleans Homes & Lifestyles and managing editor of Louisiana Life and Acadiana Profile. Spencer’s ever-expanding library of etiquette books is rivaled only by her ever-ready stash of blank thank-you notes. Submit business etiquette questions to Melanie@MyNewOrleans.com.


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in the biz marke ting

This Valentine’s Day Create an Emotional Connection Brand laddering can move customer feelings for your brand from “like” to “love.” By Julia Carcamo

Shifting from being a good marketer to

a great one could be as simple as reframing your point of view from one of representing your brand to the customer, to representing your customer to the brand. Making that shift will enable you to create a brand that customers will love, not just buy. This is where brand laddering comes in. Starting with the features, moving up to the benefits (of those features), and ultimately the emotional value customers gain, the process connects attributes to emotional motivations in order to elevate the brand from a collection of benefits to an emotional connection that puts your brand above all others. If you ever studied Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, you’ll find this process very familiar. While Maslow divided the hierarchy into the general categories of basic needs, psychological needs, and self-fulfillment, brand ladders are divided by the rungs of attributes, functional benefits and emotional benefit. Some also add social. Attributes are self-explanatory as the features of the product. Functional benefits are why you’re differentiated in the market and consumer’s mind (or your unique selling proposition). Benefits can be emotional or stature related. Emotional benefits provide customers with a sense of purpose, while social benefits relate to the stature customers possess in the eyes of their social circle. 5 Thoughts on Laddering Your Brand 1. Define your audience. Determine your ideal customer by examining any research or customer contact stories.

Julia Carcamo is president and chief brand strategist at J Carcamo & Associates, specializing in brand and marketing strategy. She is also the co-founder of espNOLA, a Hispanic marketing and engagement agency. Learn more at jcarcamoassociates.com and espnola.com.

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3. see things through the consumer’s eyes. Try not to reach for abstract emotional

benefits or what Brandgym founder Davit

4. climb that ladder. Laddering can aid in

determining the most compelling messages and imagery for your brand. By exploring your brand’s ladder, you connect with customers in ways that can lead to loyalty, profitability, and (in some cases) investor confidence. Much like physical ladders can aid you in reaching higher, so can a brand ladder.

5. find the functional benefits. Laddering can also aid in the introduction of new concepts or products. In 1975, no one knew what a dryer sheet was or how it would revolutionize everyday home laundry. Procter & Gamble underwent the laddering process to understand how to introduce the product and create this new category. The company started with the ingredient and an easy-to-use sheet as their attributes. They then identified the functional benefit (of those attributes), which was wrinklefree clothes. The functional benefit was their doorway into the shopping cart. As the product gained acceptance, the messaging moved up the ladder to continue placing the product higher in the customer’s minds through more substantial benefits. In their case, it was the benefit of attractive clothes (because they are wrinkle-free) and finally up to the highest emotional benefit of “feeling pretty.” As the messaging moved up the ladder, Bounce could move its messaging away from the attributes that could (and were) easily copied to own a space in the consumer’s heart. n

i l lu st r at i o n by T o n y H e a l e y

Brainstorm all possible brand attributes and features, but focus on the ones you believe give you a competitive advantage. Take care to build that list of attributes and benefits from your customer’s perspective rather than your own. This list will provide you with the framework for focus group research. LISTEN and take note of the words customers use, features they are mentioning, and how they feel they benefit. Keep challenging the benefits until you can move into a rich zone of emotional space you can win with and own. The goal is to find your unique place in the mind of the customer. 2. solidify your strenthgs.

Taylor calls “brand ego-tripping.” The nowfamous Dove Campaign for Real Beauty fell into this trap early on. When the company initially developed a campaign to get women to stop judging themselves harshly, women were unimpressed. They found the campaign patronizing. The trap the brand fell into was its top-down approach taking the theory of beauty and wrapping it in the product. When they looked from the outside (consumer) in, they were able to reach the emotional elements. They started with the product and its benefits but subsequently followed the ladder up to the emotions.


Perspectives hot topics in southeast Louisiana industries

maritime + ports The dangers and business challenges of a high Mississippi River

healthcare Heart health tips from interventional cardiologist Dr. Christopher Paris

education Historic universities meeting today’s workforce demands


perspectives mari t ime + p orts

High River Members of the maritime industry share the dangers and business challenges of a mightier than usual Mississippi. By James Sebastien

The height of the Mississippi River in

New Orleans is always a concern when it reaches the high water line of 8 feet, but whenever it nears the flood stage line of 17 feet, that concern rightfully grows into an all-encompassing fear felt throughout the whole city. “This time last year (mid-January), the river was at 13.37 feet; today it’s at 10.37 feet,” said Kristopher Calkins, general manager at New Orleans Terminal. “But on Feburary 28, 2019, it went to 16.78 feet and pretty much stayed there until July 15. So it’s not that high with all things considered.” That said, the river is still over 2 feet above the high water line, so concern is warranted. Especially when you take into account that high water usually comes in the winter or spring and can last through June. The Cause

The short answer is heavy rain. The unusually high, sustained rainfall of 2019 resulted in historic high levels for the mighty Mississippi. Warning Signs “High river began for us on the Lower One of the ways to stay aware of river condiMississippi River in December of 2018 and tions is through The U.S. Army Corps of we didn’t get out of high river conditions until Engineers, which provides stakeholders mid-August 2019; this length is unheard of,” with a 28-day forecast of the river levels at said Erik Cooper, executive director at Cooper numerous locations along the river. Consolidated. “This year’s flooding duration It makes it more “This is used to forecast sudden rises and exceeded that of the Great Flood of 1927.” possible duration of the rise, says Kettenring. difficult for Other factors that contributed included everyone to do “This is a very helpful tool, but all is subject wet soil conditions, elevated levels in rivers to further rain and snow events (rain has a and lakes connected to the Mississippi, and their job and much greater impact) in the Mississippi and snowpack on the upper Mississippi and puts upward Ohio valleys.” pressure on Ohio valleys. Following the amount of rain in the heart“This region is vulnerable to flooding into the price of land is a key indicator of how and when to the spring due to rainfall and thunderstorm goods at the prepare for high water conditions in the events,” says Keith Kettenring, executive VP end of the day. Greater New Orleans area. and COO at Crescent Towing. “The magnitude “In our industry, we are definitely weather of future flooding will be dependent on how Erik Cooper, executive watchers,” said Cooper. “We have to be. and when the snow water melts along with director at Cooper Whether it’s monitoring hurricanes in the future rainfall.” Consolidated Gulf or heavy rainfall in the Midwest we

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keep an eye on what may impact us here on the Lower Mississippi River. “When we hear about torrential rainfall in Oklahoma, declared states of emergency and March bomb cyclones in the plains and Midwest, we know that the water will eventually make it to us in the coming weeks or months (in the case of snowmelt),” Cooper said, adding, “It can take more than a month for water runoff from heavy rains in the middle of the country to hit the Mississippi River Delta.” Potential Problems

Several issues arise during high water levels in the river, especially for workers who make their living in the inland waterway space. “First and foremost, a high river stage results in swift currents and reduced visibility of obstacles, which places mariners and equip-


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ment at greater risk for incident,” said Ryan Peters, director of Gulf-Inland Crew Management and HR Business Partner at Marquette Transportation Co. Additionally, when river stages increase, the U.S. Coast Guard limits the number of barges a towboat can push. As many towboat organizations operate within an economy of scale, high river stages result in inefficiencies and underutilization.” The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is charged with the difficult challenge of keeping the channel navigable. To accomplish the task, additional assets are hired to maintain the channel by dredging the silt and sediment. “Often the Corps and their assets can’t keep up, and the channel draft is lowered which causes problems for ships that have been loaded prior and are now restricted to either sail to their next port or are stranded outside waiting to discharge at one of our terminals along the river,” said Kettenring. “In both instances, ships and their cargoes are held up, waiting on the dredges to catch up and the restriction to be lifted. “If the river level rises high enough, the Corps will open one and sometimes two spillways. We have seen even with these extraordinary measures that the river level will overtake some berths and they will have to cease cargo operations until the river falls.” The Cost

In addition to transportation companies, local businesses are also strained by high water conditions. “It makes it more difficult for everyone to do their job and puts upward pressure on the price of goods at the end of the day,” said Cooper. “Most affected businesses incur higher operating expenses (usually starting at 35% more) and don’t get ‘made whole’ for these additional expenditures. “Most years, a high river period is expected and even built into a company’s operating plan. But when it goes on for nearly a year, that can really hurt, since it’s so unexpected and unprecedented in scope.” Managing the Issue

Periods of high water could be managed more efficiently with additional funds, particularly for Corps operations and maintenance of the river. But, even with more funding the challenge will endure. “The Mississippi River has more than 250 rivers that feed into it,” said Cooper. “It’s constantly evolving. These changes continue to happen despite the best efforts of many, including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ flood control measures. When we see that in the last 10 years the river system has flooded more frequently and violently than in the previous 20-plus years, we may want to reevaluate the way we manage the flood control infrastructure and its processes. “There isn’t a silver bullet to completely stop flooding, but we can change alongside the river by potentially injecting newer technologies into old (or new) infrastructures and continuing to heavily invest in maintenance and repair of key infrastructure. A great start would be a comprehensive reevaluation of the flood control systems and processes instead of locally or regionally driven plans that only move water problems into someone else’s ‘backyard’ in a game of levee wars.” n 38

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This region is vulnerable to flooding into the spring due to rainfall and thunderstorm events. The magnitude of future flooding will be dependent on how and when the snow water melts, along with future rainfall. Keith Kettenring, executive VP and COO of Crescent Towing


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perspectives he althc are

Practicing Heart Health During Carnival: Is It Possible? In honor of Heart Health Month, Biz New Orleans shares some tips from Dr. Christopher Paris, interventional cardiologist with the Cardiovascular Institute of the South By Rich Collins

Pardon the pun, but cardiovascular

doctors in Louisiana have their work cut out for them. The emphasis on good food and good times in New Orleans and South Louisiana means people eat, drink and smoke a lot of things that are bad for them. The problem couldn’t be made more obvious than it is every February. As the National Institutes of Health promotes “Heart Health Month,” Louisiana residents are celebrating the climax of Carnival season by eating on the parade route, drinking alcohol, smoking and generally not getting very much exercise … unless you count jumping up and down and stretching out your arms to catch beads. Not surprisingly, Louisiana is one of the worst states in the country for heart disease. Sixteen percent of people over the age of 65 in Louisiana have heart disease — the national average is 11%. For those under the age of 65, Louisianans are at 7% versus 4% nationally. (Thank you Tennessee, Mississippi and West Virginia for saving us from being in last place.) Dr. Christopher Paris, an interventional cardiologist at the Cardiovascular Institute of the South, deals with these challenges every day. Paris said the No. 1 contributing factor Exercise and is the Louisiana diet — which is rich in salt, activity are the sugar and fat. Or to put it another way: too best weapons against heart much crawfish, king cake and poor boys. “Every food that tastes great in our restau- disease. rants has way more sodium than we should have in a day,” said Paris. “You’re never going Dr. Christopher to have a restaurant that serves bland food Paris, interventional because no one [would] go back when you’ve cardiologist 40

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got 100 others around that serve amazing heart attacks in their 20s and 30s. I’ve put food. If you’re a visitor, it’s OK to splurge at multiple stents into people in their 30s. It Commander’s or Brennan’s, but if you live here used to be a 20-year-old would come in and do it weekly, it’s gonna catch up to you.” complaining of chest pains and we’d send them home. Now they come in and we’d Another major factor in our high ranking better do a full work-up.” for heart disease is lack of exercise. “Exercise and activity are the best weapons But what about those hardy Europeans who against heart disease,” said Paris. “But we drink wine and eat buttery foods without ill put cuisine and good times before exercise. consequence? “Europeans do a lot of portion control. Their What makes us a great place to be hurts us meals are extremely small,” said Paris. “They in the heart health world. That’s why people have one croissant with butter or two glasses who visit are exhausted after. This is Vegas on steroids … with crème brûlée on the side.” of wine over four hours. Over here, it’s a whole A related problem is there’s a tendency tub of butter, six pieces of bread, steak and for people to reward healthy behaviors with dessert on top of three or four bottles of wine. “Here, the portions are gigantic, and it’s unhealthy ones.  seldom you don’t see a clean plate,” he said. “You can do a marathon — and then they hand you a beer when you finish,” said Paris.  “In fancy European restaurants they give you tasters and then a pretty presentation with a One challenge that Louisiana shares with bite or two of meat, while we order a cowboy the rest of the country is that heart disease is striking people at younger ages than before. T-bone and see who eat can eat the most of it.” Diabetes is also on the rise among young people You don’t have to avoid all fun in order to and Paris thinks it’s because social media is make a big difference on your heart health, making them more sedentary; kids are looking but Paris does suggest making at least one big at their phones instead of being active. change — stop smoking cigarettes or vaping. Both, he noted, cause coronary disease, lung Nationally, the number of cases of type 2 diabetes — the biggest risk factor for coronary disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease and heart disease — is on the rise. According the cancer, among others.  CDC, 90 to 95% of people with diabetes have Another good step would be to learn to type 2, and between 1990 and 2010, the number enjoy things in moderation. It’s OK to have a of diabetes cases tripled. In 2015, 9.4% of the piece of king cake. It’s not OK to have an entire U.S. population had diabetes. king cake. The same goes for drinking. Your The disease is also being diagnosed earlier. body can handle everything in moderation Teenagers are now more commonly diagnosed, as long as you also exercise in moderation. rather than solely those in their 40s or above. “Live a balanced life and that’s the most “That’s why we can’t call it ‘adult onset’ help you can give yourself,” said Paris. “Even anymore,” said Paris. “And people are having before any medicine.” n


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perspectives educ ation

Tradition Meets 2020 Century-old universities in the region are meeting today’s workforce demands by introducing new programs. By Jessica Rosgaard

Southeast Louisiana is home to a number

of colleges and universities that have been in operation for a century — or longer. These institutions of higher education boast a rich history and deep traditions. But while time-honored traditions may not change, the schools have had to adapt to the changing education and professional landscape in order to meet workforce demands. The following are some of their program offerings for 2020. Delgado Community College

Looking forward to celebrating its centennial in 2021, Delgado Community College is continuing to develop industry partnerships that are key to curriculum planning and development. Tony Cook, director of communications and marketing at Delgado, said the college has a history of offering educational programs tied to workforce needs in the New Orleans region. “We are the market leader in educating the workforce for nursing and allied health professions,” he said. “Those jobs pay top salaries, and because Delgado offers affordable tuition and fees, [the jobs] are within the reach of any student who qualifies academically and is dedicated to doing the hard work of Louisiana learning valuable professional skills.” To that end, Delgado is offering a new Health property Coach Certificate program — the only one of owners and its kind in New Orleans. The program prepares developers students to work as a member of a patient’s will be excited healthcare team, or at insurance companies, to know that nursing facilities, nonprofit agencies, or as the changes to self-employed entrepreneurs. the Act make it The Health Coach Certificate program is easier to have a partnership between Delgado Community an expired lien College and LSU Health Sciences Center. removed. Delgado is also focusing on technology needs for the future workforce, offering career- Kelly E. Theard, focused training in computer networking partner with Deutsch for entry-level students. The program offers Kerrigan, L.L.P.

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training for A+, Network + and Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technicians — qualifying students for jobs in tech support, IT operations, management of wired and wireless networks, and network security. Xavier University

As Xavier University celebrates its 95th anniversary, the private, historically black Catholic university is offering 16 new programs including bioinformatics, data science, neuroscience, criminal and social justice, and jazz studies. Xavier’s teaching is a combination of traditional classroom study, hands-on research, service-learning opportunities and experiential education designed to help students meet the demands of today’s evolving workforce. Xavier University President Reynold Verret, said the school has historically been a leader in sciences and social sciences, and they’re leveraging that strength as they move forward. “We’ve been intentional about the expansion of our liberal arts-based programs in business, education, psychology and political science,” he said, “as well as recent additions such as our

newly announced physician assistant program in partnership with Ochsner Health Systems.” University of Holy Cross

Healthcare jobs have evolved a lot since University of Holy Cross was founded in 1916. Technological advances, and the need for a trained workforce in this field is always high. As part of its commitment to health sciences education, the University of Holy Cross opened a new Health Sciences Center in January. The Health Sciences Center will be the hub for popular undergrad programs in nursing, health sciences/biology, neuro-diagnostic technology and radiologic technology. The state-of-the-art facility features innovative classroom spaces, including four lab classrooms with patient exam tables. Students will have access to some of the latest technology, including an Anatomage table — a technologically advanced anatomy visualization system that uses 3D technology to aid in studying human anatomy. The university is also offering new and expanded graduate programs, including


master’s of science programs in management, counseling, education and biomedical sciences, as well as a master’s of arts in humanities. Louisiana State University

Established in 1860, LSU is increasing its online degree programs to meet the needs of today’s working professionals. From bachelor’s degree programs to an MBA, students can earn an LSU degree online — with instruction from LSU faculty — through programs that fit their lifestyle. Designed with continuous learning in mind, MicroCred® (or, micro-credential) offers short-form programs aimed at working professionals who want to sharpen their skills or explore new ones in an online format. Made up of a series of high-quality LSU courses, the program is specifically developed to close the skills gap in today’s modern workplace. LSU is also offering a new “Online Focused MBA” program boasting traditional standards in a condensed format — with only 36 credit hours required for completion. They’ve also introduced a series of online undergraduate degree programs, focused on full-time workers who want to finish their bachelor’s degrees. Finally, LSU has developed a program of “Academic Fast Tracks.” Designed to save students time and money, these programs offer multiple and advanced degrees in one package. The fast track programs include environmental public health, engineering and law — and the make these LSU graduates more marketable to prospective employers. Dillard University

Celebrating 150 years in New Orleans, Dillard University has three degree-granting colleges: Business, Arts & Sciences, and Nursing. With an ongoing and growing demand for nurses, Dillard’s College of Nursing remains popular; the nursing program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in nursing. One of Dillard’s newest offerings is a minor in food studies, focusing on the governance, planning, history and business implementation of food systems in rural and urban areas. Looking at modern challenges facing many urban communities, Dillard is also offering a major in Urban Studies & Public Policy with a certification in Urban Water Management. This program is particularly applicable as cities like New Orleans, Miami and others are reexamining how to live with water. A historically black university, Dillard continues to have a successful physics program, which is one of the nation’s leading physics programs for African Americans. Additionally, the school’s pre-law program boasts an award-winning mock trial team that competes nationally, helping to prepare students for success in law school. n

bizneworleans.com

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But

Wait,

There’s

More! 10 years ago, iSeatz enabled the first U.S. airline to sell something other than a flight on its website. With airline ancillaries now representing $93 billion in sales globally, iSeatz founder and CEO Kenneth Purcell says it’s time for hotels to get in on the action. B y K i m S i n g l e t a r y P o r t r ai t s b y G r e g M i l e s


Around 2003 you transformed again to a different business model, this time working with airlines.

LOG ON

to the website of any airline and you’ll find more than just flights; you’ll have the opportunity to book a whole vacation with just a few clicks. Need a rental car? They’ve got it. A deal on a hotel? Covered. Want to upgrade your seat? Easy. And hey, looking for a gift idea? How about a travel gift card? What you may not know is that it was a New Orleans-based tech company that led this nowmulti-billion-dollar market change. Lafayette native Kenneth Purcell’s company, iSeatz, was the first to enable a U.S. carrier, Delta airlines, to sell something other than air in their booking engine. Now, fresh off its 20th year in business, the approximately 100-employees-strong company is helping clients like IHG Hotels and Wyndham Hotels battle a market that’s been disrupted by newcomers like Airbnb by following the airlines’ example and breaking into the lucrative ancillary market. iSeatz’s trademarked OneView Platform — the world’s first global ancillary management system — launched in September 2018 and has since processed more than $3 billion in transactions, and 150 billion loyalty points. According to a 2019 report on hotel ancillaries published by iSeatz and global travel research company Skift, however, these billions are barely scratching the surface of what’s possible for hotels.

r A Man With a History of Dis upting Markets

Yeah. We realized that, first of all, our venture money was running out completely, and so we asked ourselves, “What else can we facilitate with our booking engine?” And the first thing that we started doing was pre-selling meals like brunch at Court of Two Sisters, breakfast at Brennan’s, dinner at Tavern on the Green. Instead of making a dollar a person per reservation, we were making a percentage of every meal that we pre-sold, so the net transaction value was significantly enhanced. For the consumer, they locked in a spot at Tavern on the Green for dinner, let’s say, and price fixed menu that they couldn’t get elsewhere. People were pre-purchasing meals through our booking engine instead of just booking a table. Then we said, “What else can we enable people to pre-purchase through our booking engine?” We started to white label our technology and power ... and actually at one point we powered all of the major online travel agencies. Back then, there were four: Priceline, Orbit, Expedia and Travelocity. That really began our pivot into the travel tech space. What were you doing with the online travel agencies? We were working with them, selling restaurant

packages. They said, “What else can you do with your booking engine?” We said, “Well, we could probably sell activities and ground transportation and airport parking.” This was probably in 2004; we started pre-selling things to do and shuttle service and airport parking and such. Again, on a prepaid basis making good commissions per transaction. And now as travelers, any time you book an airline, a flight, you’re getting cross-sold something. Whether it’s a bag, a seat, a car rental, a hotel room, an activity, you’re being sold something that doesn’t necessarily count as the core seat on the airline. So, you did that for five years and then came another switch. Yes, we got into the loyalty space. In

2012, what we found out was not only could we enable customers to pay with their credit cards to buy these ancillary products, we also realized frankly a very large market for this was also in the point redemption space. We launched American Express Travel — the company’s U.S. point of sale for basically all card holders that want to book travel through the AmEx website. Whether you use points or cash or a combination thereof, you can book air, car, hotel — but interestingly enough, not things to do — through the American Express travel site. That relationship is still ongoing.

Twenty years ago, not long out of college and looking to start a business, Purcell was living with his parents in New Orleans when he partnered with another family member, his aunt, who owned Where magazine to create a CD-ROM that would play at hotel concierge desks. The CD entertained guests with local tourist options while they waited for the concierge to book them a table at a restaurant. And then three years ago came the move to hotels. Recognizing the bigger opportunity of the situation, Purcell used his tech knowledge to Yes. It occurred to me that no major hotel brand create a way for the public to make restaurant reservations online. Thousands of miles away, was offering any ancillary cross-selling in their Open Table was doing the same thing. purchase pass. None. Live Events “We didn’t know about Open Table, and they didn’t know about us,” he said. “We raised For years, the hotel industry, we would call are the Bigventure funding here in New Orleans in 1999 through the early 2000s, and we were off. For them and say, “Hey, why don’t you sell an activity gest Moneymany, many years, we cornered the New Orleans restaurant reservations market.” maker along with your room? The margins are great.” They’re the iSeatz became the first company to enable Galatoire’s to take reservations online. Other big And they were not interested. Many people outside names like Antione’s soon followed, with iSeatz making $1 a person per confirmed reservation. most lucrative the industry don’t realize this, but the money that type of ancilA few years later, around 2003, Purcell was again moved to think bigger. companies like Expedia and Priceline generate is lary a hotel can offer, and not from air transactions. Air transactions make 71% of travelup more actual units of booking than hotels, but ers book them pound for pound, hotels are just 10 times more before they lucrative to book. travel.

bizneworleans.com

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a little bit

More about

Kenneth Purcell

$93 Billion the value of the ancillary market for airlines globally $28 Billion value of the market in the U.S.

Favorite book? There are so many. Currently, my leadership is reading “Switch” by Chip and Dan Heath. It focuses on the psychology around why people feel change is hard. Favorite TV show? With four kids under 10, a puppy, and a growing business, I rarely have time to watch TV. Who do you look up to? Aside from my team there are a few folks I really admire. Arne Sorenson of Marriott really “gets” the customer, and I think he is a visionary when it comes to truly delighting guests. Herb Kelleher, the founder of Southwest, is a legend. His personality set the tone for how that company operates today. Biggest life lesson learned? Learn how to fail fast. Best advice ever received? Getting good at hiring is one of the best things any entrepreneur can do for

their business. You can’t do it alone. Finding really great people to support your vision is crucial. Hobbies? I enjoy working out. It’s a great stress reliever and I think staying in shape is important for long-term health. I also love fishing (I am from Louisiana, after all!). I’m looking forward to more fishing trips once my sons get a little bit older. Daily habits? I wake up around 4:30 or 5 a.m. and spend time with my wife, kids and dog. I take my kids to school and then head to the gym. I usually get into the office around 9 a.m. Pet peeve(s)? The idea that you have to sacrifice speed for quality, or quality for speed. As a scaling business, we need to be better and faster than anyone else in our space. What are you most looking forward to in the next year? Continuing to grow iSeatz. We consistently win awards for being one of the best places to work in New Orleans, and I want to see that continue. We are also going to be launching some exciting new products for the financial services industry to help them drive loyalty and engagement. So, I’m excited to see those come to life and continue to transform the industry.

Sarge


So the OTAs, the online travel agencies, and travel agencies in general, basically they’ll facilitate an air booking for you, but really what they want to do is sell you a hotel room. So for many years, the hotels were making so much money and no one could touch them. The economy was growing. [Hotels] didn’t need to fool with generating income from non-core sources. Their rooms were lucrative enough.

Give Them What They Want. Nearly 1/3 of travelers prefer to purchase travel packages from a hotel vs. an online travel agency or airline.

But then came Airbnb. Yes. With the onset of Airbnb and Home Away and Vrbo, the hotel industry got disrupted pretty big time. All of a sudden, they started to say, “Hey, what else can we do with our traffic that’s coming to our website?” That’s where this ancillary trend in the hotel space is coming from. It’s frankly because of the disruption in their business from players like Airbnb. That was about three years ago you saw that?

Three to four years ago, maybe a little bit more.

Within that, you’re also seeing the rise of social media, the focus on experiences and documenting those experiences and sharing those experiences.

It’s all about FOMO [fear of missing out], right? It’s them creating FOMO or them actually experiencing FOMO because of a picture that someone else posted, something that someone else wrote about their experience. We have this two-pronged disruptive thing that happened to the hotel industry. Yes, it’s wonderful to stay at a luxurious hotel in the French Quarter and take a picture of yourself at the pool, yes that checks the box. But your friend could be doing that at someone’s private house, or an apartment complex. This whole peer-to-peer economy or ecosystem coupled with the Airbnb availability of rooms in people’s houses or houses really presents some challenges for the lodging industry. So the answer, you’re saying, lies in ancillaries, like with airlines. Ancillaries for us aren’t just a way

to generate revenue, it’s also a way to give a guest a relevant and targeted — but also relatively unique — set of options that they can experience during their stay. Yes, a flight is expensive, but people spend most of their money while they’re in the destination, not necessarily on the flight. So how can hotels who have the best grasp of the local assets and all the amazingness that we have Play the here in New Orleans, how do they Cards. The most leverage that knowledge and leverage common technology to lock people’s dollars into ancillary the things that that hotel wants you to product currently do during your stay? offered by hotels loyalty programs is points for gift cards — most commonly Amazon.

The report notes an advantage to offering ancillaries like experiences on a hotel’s website is that doing so increases an individual’s time on the site, but also creates a link from the hotel to whatever experience they choose — whether that’s a meal or an all-day tour. Can you talk a bit about that? Don’t hotel concierges do that already? Why use technology? What we see with the large hotel brands

we’ve worked with is, inevitably, whatever people book through you, they associate that experience directly to their stay with you.

This means if your hotel concierge is making recommendations to things, and that guest has a bad time, it’s not necessarily, “Oh, I had a bad time at this particular restaurant,” it’s, “Hey, my stay wasn’t good. They didn’t know where to send me. I didn’t have a good meal when I was in New Orleans.” They associate that bad experience back to your brand. Hotels are getting the benefit — and possible detriments — of doing this now but maybe not doing it in a formal way. But if you engage formally, you can probably make money from this and also benefit by having a better level of quality assurance on the things It’s All that you’re actually recommending About the people do. Experience. Hotels need to do this to maintain The average trip involves competitive status with the Airbnbs four times and the like, that are now offering more experiences. searches for experiences

On the report it estimates the than hotels. ancillary market for hotels is estimated at $93 billion worldwide ($28 billion domestically). Where did those numbers come from? Non-core products in the airline

industry amounted to $28 billion in the U.S. alone for just the top 10 carriers in 2018. If you go to airlines, there are whole departments of people that are focused on creation of ancillary revenue and what we call non-core products. We look at the airline industry as a comp, and a parallel to what the hotel industry should be able to net from this space, if not more, because travelers tend to spend a whole lot more money in a hotel room than on an airplane. The report notes a 36% drop in hotels offering room service since 2014, but isn’t room service a moneymaker for hotels? Room service has

historically been a dissatisfier for guests and a loss leader for hotel operators, so the idea we’ve trademarked is Room Service Spas Are Reimagined, which is really dining Healthy for delivery enabled through room service. Hotels. By leveraging companies like Door The wellness Dash or Uber Eats or Grubhub, not industry is now worth only do you not have to worry about $4.2 trillion, all the things that you’re serving to almost as your guests and losing money on, but much as the instead of two pages of offerings, guests entire travel industry. are seeing maybe 100 restaurants in the area, with full menus. You’ve listed off some big names, but do you work with smaller hotels, like individual hotels? No, we

don’t. We’re a loyalty tech company that focuses on point bank integrations and travel and lifestyle bookings. We enable travel and lifestyle bookings, and we do that by enabling people to use their points to do that. The other thing is, our solutions are not built for a single operator. We’re an enterprise class software provider. It’s not cost effective for hotels to leverage something on a one-off solution. So if they’re part of a larger corporate entity, it would make sense. But not on a one on one basis.

According to the report, live events are the most lucrative ancillary product. Yes. There’s a

lot of margin in live events, right? In particular, in the secondary market. Plus, live events actually stimulate

travel. People will make a trip to New Orleans, for example, to see Elton John perform. If a hotel partners with some of the secondary market providers for live events, there are commissions they can generate, and those ticket prices are pretty big. Hotels need to be working in advance to say, “Book this class of room and you will get access to our block of tickets,” which they can facilitate through ticket brokers. For example, Jazz Fest does it the other way. You can book a trip with Jazz Fest and there’s destination companies that do this. But a boutique property could just as easily go and secure access to a major event and offer that access as part of what they’re doing to promote their rooms. Long term, what does the future look like for hoteliers? I think long term, [three to five years] the

missing piece is personalization — not necessarily oneto-one personalization, but let’s call it broader or more targeted segmentation, where you know generally what kind of customer is looking at your website, so you can offer them a more relevant room and ancillary combo than the one-size-fits-all offerings of today. The post-click experience is terrible in the travel industry. So I’ve lured you to my website by showing you New Orleans hotels, or by showing you a unique property, but then you drop on my property’s page that I’ve just spent money on getting you to drop on, and there’s nothing contextualized for me whatsoever. My user experience is going to be no different than yours, than my friend’s down the street, or than my mom’s. As far as I’m concerned, we are nowhere near personalization in the travel industry. That’s something that you think iSeatz will be positioned to help with? Say Goodbye to the $27 Cold Cheeseburger. Since 2014, the percentage of hotels offering room service has dropped 36%. Instead, two of the top five largest hotel chains have embraced food delivery. In November 2017, Intercontinental Hotel Group (IHG) was the first hotel brand to launch a food delivery partnership, allowing members to earn IHG points for food delivery with Grubhub. In April 2019, Wyndham Hotels & Resorts launched a similar partnership with DoorDash as a way to facilitate in-room dining at their limitedservice hotels, which make up approximately 80% of the hotel group’s portfolio.

Absolutely. The challenge that we’re going to face, though, is with the advent of GDPR [General Data Protection Regulation], CCPA [California Consumer Privacy Act], and a bunch of these consumer data privacy acts. For iSeatz, as a third party, getting access to the information that is there is tricky, but as we embed ourselves in loyalty programs, what we know is that the most valuable loyalty customers and the most frequent travelers do want, and expect, a personalized experience when they drop on a website. They’re not creeped out by it. As a matter of fact, it makes their life easier. I think that we’re going to be enabling personalization and segmentation because when you’re a loyal customer, you’re much more willing to fill out things that you like, things that you don’t like, things that you want to see, and you’re willing to embed that in your loyalty profile. You’re willing to enable someone to use that to better serve you. That’s why I think we’re uniquely positioned: because of our focus on the loyalty space to enable personalization. n

fast facts source: State of Loyalty 2019 Hotel Ancillary Report — authored by iSeatz and Skift. bizneworleans.com

49


The Royal Touch After 45 years building floats for some of Carnival’s oldest parades, Royal Artists has finally captured the King.

n the boisterous world of Carnival parades, Royal Artists Inc. is perhaps the biggest player you’ve never heard of, but it hasn’t slowed them down one bit. This season, the 45-year-old firm realizes its highest-profile role yet: float builder for Rex, King of Carnival. On a gray afternoon in early January, Royal Artists owner Richard Valadie worked alongside his team in the Rex warehouse on Claiborne Avenue, cutting plywood for a float designed to carry Aurora, the Roman goddess of dawn, on Mardi Gras morning. Aurora herself, a 12-foot papier mâché sculpture painted in the fiery palette of a sunrise, stood watch nearby. The whine of a saw sliced through the otherwise quiet focus of the artists. Piles of hand-painted flowers and flames fanned out on the concrete floor waiting to decorate finished works. The scene is a familiar one for the team at Royal Artists, who have spent the past 44 Carnival seasons building floats for New Orleans parades. This worksite, however, was history in the making. Last year, the Rex Organization announced it would end its nearly 70-year partnership with Kern Studios, opting instead to work with the smaller and lesser-known Royal Artists to craft its century-old rolling tableau floats. The exact reason for the split remains unknown, but a statement from leaders with Rex and Kern said the decision to part ways was reached mutually. This year, Rex, King of Carnival, will be accompanied by 20 floats hand-crafted by Royal Artists. Valadie said Royal Artists founder Herbert Jahncke, who died in 2007, aspired to count among his clientele. “It was always his dream to get it,” said Valadie, a long-time Royal Artists manager who took the helm in 2011. “I know he’d be very proud of us.”

By Jennifer Larino photos by Cheryl Gerber


Royal Artists Meets Rex : By the Numbers Royal Artists, founded in 1975, succeeded Kern Studios as float builder for the Rex Organization after the two decided to end a nearly 70-year partnership in 2019.

1872

The year Rex was founded, making this Mardi Gras its 148th.

20

The number of people employed at Royal Artists Inc. That compares with more than 100 at competitor, Kern Studios.

45

The number of years Royal Artists, founded in 1975, has been in business.

5

The length in years of Royal Artists’ initial contract with the Rex Organization, starting with Mardi Gras 2020.

3

The number of new parades Royal Artists Inc. has added in Mobile, Alabama, in recent years. The firm does Mardi Gras work in New Orleans and Mobile.

151

The total number of floats the team at Royal Artists will build for parades during the 2020 Carnival season, including for clients in Mobile.

28

The number of floats in the Rex parade. Twenty of those will be designed and built by Royal Artists. The remaining eight are signature floats, including the “Boeuf Gras” and the Butterfly King float.

400

The number of Rex members who ride in the parade on Mardi Gras Day. Rex has about 750 members total.

The share of Rex cup throws that will be made out of aluminum in 2020, part of the krewe’s efforts to be more environmentally sustainable.

Shining in the Sun

As Royal Artists’ work on Rex marks the company’s first appearance on Mardi Gras Day. The daytime Rex parade is a change of pace for the float builder, which built its reputation on flambeaux-lit night parades like Proteus and Chaos. Float designer and Carnival historian Henri Schindler and Royal Artists float painter Caroline Thomas worked closely over the past year to find the right tone and color palette for the daytime parade. (The theme for this year’s Rex parade is “Omens and Auguries,” a fantastical homage to visions and soothsayers both historical and fictional.) Stephen W. Hales, a New Orleans pediatrician and Rex historian and archivist, noted Rex floats are being built inside the krewe’s den for the first time in decades. In the past, float sculptures were built at Kern Studios and transported to the den. “I’ve enjoyed watching Royal Artists working from sketches, starting with wooden armatures and building up sculptures using papier mâché and using techniques that would have been essentially the same as float builders in the Rex den would have used 150 years ago,” Hales said. “It is an old art form. It’s lovely to watch it play out day after day, week after week, month after month.” Hales acknowledged Mardi Gras in New Orleans is constantly evolving and that Rex sees itself as the “historic anchor” for the celebration. A key part of that role, he added, is preserving an aesthetic “true to the Golden Age of Carnival,” including float design, themes and materials that would have been fashionable in the late 19th century. Royal Artists’ experience working on old-line parades, Hales said, made it a fit for the Rex organization. “It is such a unique artist studio to year-round be able to walk in and see these rolling works of art in various stages of transformation from last year’s parade to the new parade,” Hales said. “It is a year’s work consuming the time and talents of dozens of wonderful artists. We let it on the streets for a few hours and then start over again. It’s an odd art form, but it’s what we do.”

own their own fleets. The firm has an Uptown warehouse off Bordeaux Street, but its artists do much of their work onsite at each krewe’s den. Valadie noted the practice allows Royal Artists to devote more time to the artistic aspects of the work rather than logistics. The true strength of Royal Artists rests in the technical skill behind its creations. While tradition drew Jahncke to float building, Valadie entered the industry by way of art school. Growing up in New Orleans, he had always been awestruck by Carnival parades. He studied graphic design and sculpture at Louisiana State University, and joined Royal Artists as a float builder in 1998. “I was drawn to Mardi Gras because it’s a reason to make art and it’s always renewing itself,” Valadie said. “That appealed to me.” Valadie and his team relish the delicate details of the sculptures. He points to their cut-out flowers, formed with wire and paper and then hand-painted. At the Rex den, finished work ranged from pink peonies with flecks of gold foil to a curving yellow-orange angel’s trumpet. One float had large pink passion flowers with painted cable ties forming a whimsical halo of filaments. “It’s that attention to detail,” Valadie said, “[It’s] a lot more customization and art.” The company’s creative skill isn’t limited to paper flowers. Valadie recalled a late-in-the-season decision to overhaul the float designs for the 2006 Krewe d’Etat parade after the levee failures caused by Hurricane Katrina. The krewe’s den had flooded, with several feet of water damaging completed floats. Royal Artists dried out the damaged floats and repainted around the water lines to make it look like the designs were melting away in water. It was tough work, and Valadie said he wasn’t sure how many paradegoers even noticed the paint effects on the nighttime route, but he said it felt worthwhile, especially in 2006 when so much was uncertain. “We made it through,” he added.

Preserving the Artistry

Planning for the Future

Founded in 1975, Royal Artists has carved a relatively low-key niche in the otherwise bustling and extravagant business of Carnival. Jahncke, the son of a prominent New Orleans-area shipbuilding family, grew up steeped in Mardi Gras tradition. His grandfather was Rex in 1915, as was his father in 1966. With Royal Artists, he sought to preserve late-19th-century Carnival float design at a time when parades were trending larger and glitzier. “We complemented each other, because you need the old, which [Jahncke] was presenting, and the brassy, which I was doing,” Blaine Kern, owner of the competing Kern Studios, told The Times-Picayune in 2007. “He turned out to be a doggone good float painter and sculptor, and more importantly, a wonderful competitor and a straight shooter.” Royal Artists counted Carnival’s oldest parading organizations as clients, including the Krewe of Proteus, the Knights of Momus and the Mistick Krewe of Comus. (Momus and Comus withdrew from parading in 1991 after the New Orleans City Council passed a controversial public accommodations ordinance.) In the 1990s, Royal Artists expanded to Mobile, Alabama, designing parade floats for Carnival celebrations in that city. Today, it is one of the only firms with a toehold in the Carnival tradition of both cities. Its client list in Mobile includes the Mystics of Time, Conde Cavaliers, Order of Mystic Magnolias and Neptune’s Daughters organizations, as well as Le Krewe d’Etat and Knights of Chaos in New Orleans. Royal Artists has done some contemporary-style work in Mobile, but Valadie said its focus on traditional parades is what continues to set the company apart. This year, Valadie leads a 20-person team tasked with building 151 floats for nine parading organizations. Four of those parades are in New Orleans. “Every parade has its own personality. I always try to pay attention to the personality of the parade,” Valadie said. “Everything they do in Mobile, everything they do in New Orleans — they all have their own different personalities. It’s our job to do what they want and not try to force what we want on them.” Unlike some float builders, Royal Artists doesn’t own or rent out floats, which means the bulk of its clientele are established krewes that

Early January is one of the busiest times of year for Royal Artists, when the unforgiving deadline of Mardi Gras looms largest, and the artists tasked with bringing the season’s parades to life bring all hands to deck. At the Rex den, artists scaled ladders to install plywood pieces on float frames and dabbed paint on remaining float details. Valadie still spends hours in the studio sculpting and painting, in addition to the time spent working on payroll and books at home and planning for future business. He noted the company is already working with clients to develop concepts for 2021 and beyond. Is there still room for a traditional float builder in 2020? Valadie thinks so. Royal Artists has succeeded in striking a balance between old and new, he noted, both preserving the history of the city’s oldest parades, while also helping keep them fresh through theme, color and craft. When not building traditional floats, Valadie lends his time and talent to newer parades like Krewe du Vieux and the sci-fi themed Chewbacchus. Modern Carnival, he said, brings it all together — old and new, traditional and non-traditional. “That’s one of the great things about Mardi Gras,” Valadie said. “There are so many different ways to participate in it and to see it and to present it.” Valadie noted Royal Artists is a small, family-run shop, and he intends to keep it that way. (“The people that need to know who we are, know who we are,” he said.) That said, he sees room to grow in New Orleans. Among other goals, he would like to rekindle relationships with a few former Royal Artists clients, including the Krewe of Hermes and Knights of Babylon. For now, though, he and his team look forward to savoring their first Mardi Gras Day as the creators of the Rex parade. Valadie will be riding the route in a company truck. He and his wife plan on handing out the company’s discarded paint brushes spruced up with gold paint and faux jewels as a custom throw. You can bet he’ll be grinning. “I couldn’t really imagine things being any other way or living anywhere else,” Valadie said. “I’m a part of the fabric of the city.” n


2020

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756 Individuals in 114 Specialities + 5 Lawyers Share Their Toughest Cases


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About The List Credit The Best Lawyers in America© is published by BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC, Augusta, GA. and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call 803-648-0300; write 801 Broad Street Suite 950, Augusta GA 30901;email info@bestlawyers.com; or visit bestlawyers.com. An online subscription to Best Lawyers® is available at bestlawyers.com. Disclaimer and Copyright BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of July 1, 2019, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar association for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney. Copyright 2020 by BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC, Augusta, GA All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “The Best Lawyers in America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC. Methodology for Best Lawyers® This list is excerpted from the 2020 edition of The Best Lawyers in America©, the pre-eminent referral guide to the legal profession in the United States. Published since 1983, Best Lawyers lists attorneys in 146 specialties, representing all 50 states, who have been chosen through an exhaustive survey in which thousands of the nation’s top lawyers confidentially evaluate their professional peers. The 2020 edition of Best Lawyers is based on 8.3 million evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers. The method used to compile Best Lawyers remains unchanged since

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the first edition was compiled almost 40 years ago. Lawyers are chosen for inclusion based solely on the vote of their peers. Listings cannot be bought, and no purchase is required to be included. In this regard, Best Lawyers remains the gold standard of reliability and integrity in lawyer ratings. The nomination pool for the 2020 edition consisted of all lawyers whose names appeared in the previous edition of Best Lawyers, lawyers who were nominated since the previous survey, and new nominees solicited from listed attorneys. In general, lawyers were asked to vote only on nominees in their own specialty in their own jurisdiction. Lawyers in closely related specialties were asked to vote across specialties, as were lawyers in smaller jurisdictions. Where specialties are national or international in nature, lawyers were asked to vote nationally as well as locally. Voting lawyers were also given an opportunity to offer more detailed comments on nominees. Each year, half of the voting pool receives fax or email ballots; the other half is polled by phone. Voting lawyers were provided this general guideline for determining if a nominee should be listed among “the best”: “If you had a close friend or relative who needed a real estate lawyer (for example), and you could not handle the case yourself, to whom would you refer them?” All votes and comments were solicited with a guarantee of confidentiality — a critical factor in the viability and validity of Best Lawyers’ surveys. To ensure the rigor of the selection process, lawyers were urged to use only their highest standards when voting, and to evaluate each nominee based only on his or her individual merits. The additional comments were used to make more accurate comparisons between voting patterns and weight votes accordingly. Best Lawyers uses various methodological tools to identify and correct for anomalies in both the nomination and voting process. Ultimately, of course, a lawyer’s inclusion is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow attorneys. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, the breadth of the survey, the candor of the respondents, and the sophistication of the polling methodology largely correct for any biases. For all these reasons, Best Lawyers lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate and useful guide to the best lawyers in the United States available anywhere.

february 2020

Philip O. Bergeron Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Victor J. Franckiewicz Butler Snow 504-299-7700 David A. Marcello Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Admiralty and Maritime Law Donald R. Abaunza Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Robert B. Acomb Johnson, Yacoubian & Paysse 504-528-3001 Michael H. Bagot Wagner, Bagot & Rayer 504-525-2141 Robert J. Barbier Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 E. Gregg Barrios Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Francis J. Barry Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Richard D. Bertram Jones Walker 504-582-8000 John A. Bolles Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 504-595-3000 John J. Broders Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Philip S. Brooks Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Michael M. Butterworth Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 David L. Carrigee Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Bertrand M. Cass Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Charles A. Cerise Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Kathleen K. Charvet Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Miles P. Clements Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Stanley J. Cohn Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Laurence R. DeBuys Patrick Miller 504-527-5400 Scott E. Delacroix Delacroix Law Firm 985-630-8040 Thomas P. Diaz Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Johnny L. Domiano Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 J. Kelly Duncan Jones Walker 504-582-8000 S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Delos E. Flint Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Thomas D. Forbes Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 George J. Fowler Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Glenn G. Goodier Jones Walker 504-582-8000 A. Gordon Grant Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Christopher M. Hannan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Michael Harowski Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker 504-702-1710 Don K. Haycraft Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Gary A. Hemphill Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Russ M. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Peter L. Hilbert Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker 504-582-8000 R. Keith Jarrett Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 George B. Jurgens King & Jurgens 504-582-3800

Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Neal J. Kling Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Edward J. Koehl Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Edwin C. Laizer Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Kevin J. LaVie Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 David B. Lawton Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 J. Dwight LeBlanc Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Frilot 504-599-8000 Edward F. LeBreton Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Charles E. Leche Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Walter J. Leger Leger & Shaw 504-588-9043 Robert T. Lemon Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Francis V. Liantonio Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Walter P. Maestri Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Kevin A. Marks Melchiode Marks King 504-336-2880 Robert P. McCleskey Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Micheal A. McGlone Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Evans Martin Mcleod Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Thomas Kent Morrison Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Devin C. Reid Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 David L. Reisman Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 William J. Riviere Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Antonio J. Rodriguez Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker 504-702-1710 James T. Rogers Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

Kent B. Ryan The Miller Law Firm 504-684-5044 Kelly T. Scalise Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Benjamin O. Schupp McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 William B. Schwartz Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 David B. Sharpe Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 James R. Silverstein Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Stephanie D. Skinner The Miller Law Firm 504-684-5044 Mark J. Spansel Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Robert J. Stefani King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Paul M. Sterbcow Lewis, Kullman, Sterbcow & Abramson 504-608-4061 Norman C. Sullivan Frilot 504-599-8000 Dean A. Sutherland Jeansonne & Remondet 504-524-7333 Charles R. Talley Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Jefferson R. Tillery Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Brian D. Wallace Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Rodger Wheaton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Conrad S.P. Williams Lewis, Kullman, Sterbcow & Abramson 504-608-4061 Jon W. Wise Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Brett D. Wise Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 James E. Wright Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Antitrust Law Craig L. Caesar Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200


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My to u gh e s t c a s e

Danielle Trostorff This healthcare law veteran was part of the team that handled the first sale of a private, nonprofit hospital to a public entity — the sale of Hotel Dieu to Charity Hospital.

T

he conversation around healthcare and the healthcare industry has always been a hot topic. Thanks to ever-changing laws, it has become particularly tricky for hospitals over recent years. Danielle Trostorff has practiced healthcare law for over 40 years and currently operates as a sort of one-stop shop for care providers looking to ensure they are minding their p’s and q’s with the government. A graduate of Cornell University and Washington University in St. Louis, Trostorff credits wanderlust with bringing her to New Orleans after working in litigation in New York and Washington D.C. When she first moved to New Orleans in the early ’80s and began practicing in healthcare law, it wasn’t a popular field — only a handful of lawyers were practicing, and those were exclusively on a national basis. Since her first few healthcare cases in New Orleans, Trostorff, who also dabbles in white collar crime, noted that laws and regulations in the healthcare sector have grown exponentially and change more often than tax laws. Trostorff has covered many areas of healthcare, but one of her more interesting cases involved the once-thriving Charity Hospital. Trostorff was part of a legal team composed of two local law firms representing the state in a transaction that involved the first time a private, nonprofit hospital was sold to a public entity. The private hospital in question was Hotel Dieu. Hotel Dieu was originally opened in New Orleans in in the 1800s by the Daughters of Charity near Charity Hospital. Charity Hospital — a public entity run by the state of Louisiana — was attempting to acquire Hotel Dieu to expand their campus and allow for Tulane University and Louisiana State University to use the facility as a teaching hospital. The first obstacle the case faced was finding a way around public bid laws that required the sale to go up for bid instead of being transferred directly to the state. Trostorff and team worked closely with

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Attorney General Edwin Edwards’ office for governor exceptions to the public bid law. All of the contracts held by Hotel Dieu then had to be assumed by the public entity, which included employees, benefits, services, etc., and the interior rid of religious artifacts and relics. The entire process — which involved the Hotel Dieu personnel, their counsel, the Louisiana Department of Hospitals, the attorney general and the governor — surprisingly took only six months in total. — By Kelly Massicot

STATS Specialty Healthcare Company Degan, Blanchard & Nash Experience 40 years in practice Education Cornell University; Washington University St. Louis, Joint Degree Masters in Social Work and Law


Appellate Practice Kim M. Boyle Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 Michael R. Fontham Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Harry Simms Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Russ M. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Stephen H. Kupperman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Patrick S. McGoey Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin 504-680-6050 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Christopher K. Ralston Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Jeffrey E. Richardson Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Isaac H. Ryan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Martin A. Stern Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

Arbitration E. Phelps Gay Christovich & Kearney 504-561-5700 Corinne A. Morrison Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000

William R. Pitts William R. Pitts 504-831-5050 Ronald J. Sholes Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030

Banking and Finance Law Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Bart C. Bacigalupi Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 J. Patrick Beauchamp McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 William Blake Bennett Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Roy E. Blossman Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Susanne Cambre Dwyer, Cambre & Suffern 504-838-9090 Robin B. Cheatham Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Philip deV. Claverie Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Anthony Dunbar Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 William T. Finn Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 William H. Hines Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Henry A. King King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Alvin C. Miester Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Randy Opotowsky Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 J. Marshall Page Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Daniel T. Pancamo Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Leon J. Reymond Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Robert J. Stefani King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Frank A. Tessier Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Robert Paul Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Sterling Scott Willis Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 John D. Wogan Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Benjamin Woodruff Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law Ricardo A. Aguilar McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Edward H. Arnold Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Brent B. Barriere Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Ashley Belleau Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Alicia M. Bendana Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 504-517-8160 Christopher T. Caplinger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Rudy J. Cerone McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Robin B. Cheatham Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Douglas S. Draper Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 John M. Duck Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 William T. Finn Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800

J. David Forsyth Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 Elizabeth J. Futrell Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Jan M. Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Lisa Merz Hedrick Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Sessions Ault Hootsell Butler Snow 504-299-7700 Patrick Johnson Akerman 504-586-1241 Philip K. Jones Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Marguerite K. Kingsmill Riess LeMieux 504-581-3300 Omer F. Kuebel Locke Lord 504-558-5100 Fernand L. Laudumiey Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Tristan E. Manthey Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 R. Lewis McHenry Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David J. Messina Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Mark A. Mintz Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Cherie Nobles Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 William H. Patrick Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Patrick M. Shelby Kelly Hart & Hallman 504-522-1812 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David F. Waguespack Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Michael Q. Walshe Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Bet-the-Company Litigation Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Brent B. Barriere Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Edward Hart Bergin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Ewell E. Eagan Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Larry Feldman McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 George C. Freeman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Harry Simms Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker 504-582-8000 201 Saint Charles Avenue New Orleans Stephen H. Kupperman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Daniel Lund Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Joseph Maselli Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142

John Wilson Reed Glass & Reed 504-581-9083 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Kyle Schonekas Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin 504-680-6050 Danny G. Shaw ShawADR 985-789-0701 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Charles L. Stern Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 James R. Swanson Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Walter C. Thompson Barkley & Thompson 504-595-3350 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker 504-582-8000 John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Biotechnology and Life Sciences Practice Daniel T. Pancamo Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Business Organizations (including LLCs and Partnerships) E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Michael L. Eckstein Eckstein Law Firm 504-527-0701 Edward N. George Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Jerome J. Reso Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Andrew Sullivan Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900

best lawyers®

Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Alexander M. McIntyre Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 David G. Radlauer Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Benjamin Woodruff Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Closely Held Companies and Family Businesses Law Michael L. Eckstein Eckstein Law Firm 504-527-0701 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert A. Kutcher Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais 504-830-3838 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Jerome J. Reso Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Matthew A. Treuting Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900

Commercial Finance Law Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Benjamin Woodruff Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Commercial Litigation Ryan Acomb Porteous, Hainkel & Johnson 504-581-3838 Ricardo A. Aguilar McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 W. Raley Alford Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Jack M. Alltmont Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979

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Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 John T. Balhoff Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert E. Barkley Barkley & Thompson 504-595-3350 Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Brent B. Barriere Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Walter F. Becker Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Mark R. Beebe Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Edward Hart Bergin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David F. Bienvenu Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Kim M. Boyle Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 C. Wm. Bradley Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Sean P. Brady Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Jason W. Burge Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Judy Burnthorn Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Peter J. Butler Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Craig L. Caesar Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 David L. Carrigee Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Daniel J. Caruso Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Thomas A. Casey Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Charles A. Cerise Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

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Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Stanley J. Cohn Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Steven W. Copley Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Thomas J. Cortazzo Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith 504-322-4100 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Energy Centre, Suite 2300 New Orleans Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Robert Daigre Burgos & Associates 504-488-3722 M. Taylor Darden Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Leonard A. Davis Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Lawrence R. DeMarcay Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 George Denegre Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Johnny L. Domiano Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Richard G. Duplantier Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Ewell E. Eagan Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Matt J. Farley Krebs Farley & Dry 504-299-3570 John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Larry Feldman McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200

february 2020

William T. Finn Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Madeleine Fischer Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 Delos E. Flint Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 George J. Fowler Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Philip A. Franco Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 George C. Freeman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Covert J. Geary Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Edward N. George Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Richard A. Goins Sutterfield & Webb 504-598-2715 Tim Gray Forman Watkins & Krutz 504-799-4383 Steven F. Griffith Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 A. Gregory Grimsal Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 James C. Gulotta Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Alida C. Hainkel Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Harry Simms Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Fred L. Herman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes 504-217-2006 Maury A. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Peter L. Hilbert Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker 504-582-8000 James K. Irvin Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Craig Isenberg Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 John W. Joyce Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 McNeil Kemmerly Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500 Robert E. Kerrigan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Keith A. Kornman Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 David J. Krebs Krebs Farley & Dry 504-299-3570 Stephen H. Kupperman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Robert A. Kutcher Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais 504-830-3838 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Kent A. Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Martin E. Landrieu Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Katie E. Lasky Lasky Murphy 504-603-1500 Andrew R. Lee Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Joseph J. Lowenthal Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Lynn M. Luker Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Daniel Lund Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Thomas J. Lutkewitte Favret, Demarest, Russo, Lutkewitte & Schaumburg 504-561-1006 Charles D. Marshall Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Joseph Maselli Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Donald C. Massey Couhig Partners 504-588-1288 Ryan M. McCabe Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Lance C. McCardle Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Patrick S. McGoey Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin 504-680-6050 Don S. McKinney Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Allen C. Miller Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Loretta G. Mince Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Corinne A. Morrison Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Leann Opotowsky Moses Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Sean P. Mount Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Philip D. Nizialek Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Eric R Nowak Harrell Nowak 504-522-7885 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Thomas P. Owen Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580

G. Bruce Parkerson Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 David L. Patrón Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Dwight C. Paulsen Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Joseph C. Peiffer Peiffer Wolf Carr & Kane 504-523-2434 Maura Z. Pelleteri Pugh Accardo 504-799-4500 H. Minor Pipes Pipes Miles Beckman 504-322-7070 Andrea Mahady Price Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Denise C. Puente Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Christopher K. Ralston Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Kirk Reasonover Reasonover & Berg 504-613-4941 Robert L. Redfearn Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 David E. Redmann Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Carol W. Reisman Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Stephen W. Rider McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Antonio J. Rodriguez Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker 504-702-1710 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 William M. Ross Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Gregory F. Rouchell Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Deborah B. Rouen Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Elizabeth A. Roussel Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Isaac H. Ryan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141

Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Ellie T. Schilling Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin 504-680-6050 Kyle Schonekas Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin 504-680-6050 Danny G. Shaw ShawADR 985-789-0701 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Howard E. Sinor Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Benjamin Slater Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Randall A. Smith Smith & Fawer 504-525-2200 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Robert S. Stassi Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Charles L. Stern Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Mark C. Surprenant Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 James R. Swanson Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Lynn E. Swanson Jones, Swanson, Huddell & Garrison 504-523-2500 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Walter C. Thompson Barkley & Thompson 504-595-3350 Jennifer L. Thornton Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 William D. Treeby Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David F. Waguespack Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Edward Dirk Wegmann Jones Walker 504-582-8000


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My to u gh e s t c a s e

Frank P. Tranchina Jr. Working with a high-income family with a “Hollywood-style” life far beyond the typical, this family law specialist negotiated one of the highest child support settlements ever awarded in Louisiana.

I

n his 40 years practicing family law, Frank P. Tranchina Jr. has not only been a litigator in contentious matters related to divorce, marital property division and child custody, he has also taken pride in his role as a counselor to clients in their most vulnerable times, as well as an educator and mentor within the legal community. Tranchina was born and raised in New Orleans and attended Jesuit High School. Following his graduation from Loyola University with an accounting degree, Tranchina received his law degree from Loyola Law School and has been practicing ever since. Tranchina is a board-certified family law specialist and helps shape Louisiana law related to family law through his work on the Marriage Persons Committee for the Louisiana State Law Institute, which drafts and makes recommendations regarding revisions to Louisiana laws that are presented to the state legislature yearly. In addition to seeking victories on behalf of his clients, Tranchina also takes pride in his education and mentorship of young attorneys, as he devotes much of his time to developing and teaching continuing education courses every year, both at large, statewide conferences and in smaller classes throughout Louisiana. Divorce litigation is, by nature, a contentious field, and Tranchina said his toughest case was one in which he represented the wife of a prominent New Orleans businessman in the early ’90s in the couple’s divorce. “The most contentious issue was the quantification of the monthly child support payment that was owed to my client,” said Tranchina. “Ordinarily, child support is determined by guidelines similar to a tax table, where the amount is determined by a formula based upon the parties’ incomes. However, in this case, because of the wealth of the husband, the spouses essentially lived a ‘Hollywood’ lifestyle that the child support guidelines were ill-equipped to quantify.”

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Tranchina’s undergraduate accounting background came in handy, as he had to piece together and quantify the day-to-day lifestyle of the couple based solely on trial testimony. “The trial was almost a ‘day in the life of a Hollywood couple,’ because we didn’t have all the financial records, so I had my client describe the lifestyle and the amount of money they spent, and make an argument to the judge to quantify child support based on that.” The painstaking effort was successful, as the resulting child support award stands to this day as one of the highest ever awarded in Louisiana. — By Topher Balfer

STATS Specialty Family Law Company Tranchina & Mansfield, LLC Experience 40 years in practice Education BA Loyola University; JD Loyola University Law School


Commercial Transactions / UCC Law Edward H. Arnold Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Susanne Cambre Dwyer, Cambre & Suffern 504-838-9090 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Anthony Dunbar Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 M. Claire Durio Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Stephen I. Dwyer Dwyer, Cambre & Suffern 504-838-9090 Michael L. Eckstein Eckstein Law Firm 504-527-0701 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Richard B. Montgomery Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Randy Opotowsky Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Edward T. Suffern Dwyer, Cambre & Suffern 504-838-9090

Construction Law Keith J. Bergeron Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Michael S. Blackwell Riess LeMieux 504-581-3300

Michael E. Botnick Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Robert J. Burvant King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Jimmy A. Castex Castex Esnard 504-262-9880 Adrian A. D’Arcy Shields Mott 504-581-4445 Jessica R. Derenbecker Shields Mott 504-581-4445 John M. Dubreuil Daigle Fisse & Kessenich 985-871-0800 Richard G. Duplantier Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Matt Emmons Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 985-819-8400 Mark W. Frilot Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 985-819-8400 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Elizabeth L. Gordon Shields Mott 504-581-4445 Benjamin R. Grau Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Matthew C. Guy Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Jay H. Kern Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 David Kurtz Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Keith M. Landry Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Christopher K. LeMieux Riess LeMieux 504-581-3300 Daniel Lund Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode Marks King 504-336-2880 Mark W. Mercante Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 985-819-8400 Paul L. Peyronnin Paul L. Peyronnin 504-895-3143

Denise C. Puente Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Gary J. Rouse Couhig Partners 504-588-1288 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Charles F. Seemann Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Danny G. Shaw ShawADR 985-789-0701 Lloyd N. Shields Shields Mott 504-581-4445 H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Howard E. Sinor Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Kelly E. Theard Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Richard J. Tyler Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Andrew G. Vicknair Shields Mott 504-581-4445 Douglass Wynne Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030

Consumer Protection Law Allan Kanner Kanner & Whiteley 504-524-5777

Copyright Law Charles C. Garvey Garvey, Smith & Nehrbass, Patent Attorneys 504-835-2000

Corporate Compliance Law Walter F. Becker Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 F. Rivers Lelong Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Michael W. Magner Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Corporate Governance Law F. Rivers Lelong Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Corporate Law Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 William R. Bishop Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Anthony M. DiLeo Anthony M. DiLeo 504-274-0087 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Edward N. George Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker 504-582-8000 William H. Hines Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 F. Rivers Lelong Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker 504-582-8000 J. Marshall Page Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Leon J. Reymond Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Steven C. Serio Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199

Robert M. Walmsley Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 John D. Wogan Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979

Criminal Defense: General Practice Robert S. Glass Glass & Reed 504-581-9083 John Wilson Reed Glass & Reed 504-581-9083 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Richard T. Simmons Hailey McNamara Hall Larmann & Papale 504-836-6500

Elder Law Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes 985-269-7220 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900

Electronic Discovery and Information Management Law Jimmy Irwin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 400 Poydras Street, Suite 2700 New Orleans

Criminal Defense: White-Collar

Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law

Walter F. Becker Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 William Gibbens Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin 504-680-6050 Robert S. Glass Glass & Reed 504-581-9083 Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 John Wilson Reed Glass & Reed 504-581-9083 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Richard T. Simmons Hailey McNamara Hall Larmann & Papale 504-836-6500 Jason Rogers Williams Jason Rogers Williams & Associates 504-585-1413

James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

DUI/DWI Defense Martin E. Regan Regan Law 504-522-7260

Economic Development Law Christopher J. Kane Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Lee C. Reid Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

Education Law James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law Jane E. Armstrong Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Timothy P. Brechtel Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Susan K. Chambers Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Katherine Conklin McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Michael E. Guarisco Guarisco, Cordes & Lala 504-587-7007 Seale Pylate Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Robert W. Rachal Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Charles F. Seemann Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Randye C. Snyder Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 René E. Thorne Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755

Employment Law Individuals Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 I. Harold Koretzky Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Robert B. Landry Robert B. Landry III 504-345-1220 William H. Reinhardt Blue Williams 504-831-4091 Louis L. Robein Robein, Urann, Spencer, Picard & Cangemi 504-885-9994 David M. Whitaker Kean Miller 504-585-3050

Employment Law Management H. Mark Adams Jones Walker 504-582-8000 M. Nan Alessandra Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Stephen P. Beiser McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Magdalen Blessey Bickford McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Kim M. Boyle Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Walter W. Christy Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Susan Fahey Desmond Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Anthony M. DiLeo Anthony M. DiLeo 504-274-0087 Monique Gougisha Doucette Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Brooke Duncan Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Steven F. Griffith Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Greg Guidry Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840

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John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Gerard Wimberly Akerman 504-586-1241 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Anne Derbes Wittmann Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Matthew A. Woolf Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 William E. Wright Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141


best lawyers®

Edward F. Harold Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Steven Hymowitz Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Clyde H. Jacob Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Tracy E. Kern Jones Walker 504-582-8000 S. Mark Klyza The Kullman Firm 504-524-4162 Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 I. Harold Koretzky Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Leslie A. Lanusse Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Joseph F. Lavigne Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Frederic Theodore Le Clercq Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Sidney F. Lewis Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Mark N. Mallery Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Ernest R. Malone The Kullman Firm 504-524-4162 Thomas J. McGoey Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Christopher E. Moore Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Ellis B. Murov Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Sarah Voorhies Myers Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Foster P. Nash Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 Keith M. Pyburn Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 William H. Reinhardt Blue Williams 504-831-4091 Joanne Rinardo Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Elizabeth A. Roussel Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Timothy H. Scott Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303

Charles F. Seemann Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Howard Shapiro Proskauer Rose 504-310-4088 G. Phillip Shuler Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Robert F. Spencer The Kullman Firm 504-524-4162 René E. Thorne Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 David M. Whitaker Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Christine M. White Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Energy Law Kelly Brechtel Becker Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Miles P. Clements Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Ewell E. Eagan Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Ernest L. Edwards Ernest L. Edwards Jr., Attorney at Law 504-450-4226 Matthew J. Fantaci Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Michael R. Fontham Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 C. Peck Hayne Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Aimee W. Hebert Kelly Hart & Hallman 504-522-1812 Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 James E. Lapeze Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Francis V. Liantonio Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Walter P. Maestri Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Charles D. Marshall Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Cynthia A. Nicholson Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111

Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Edward B. Poitevent Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Jane C. Raiford Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Gerald F. Slattery Slattery, Marino & Roberts 504-585-7800 Alan C. Wolf Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Adam Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200

Energy Regulatory Law W. Raley Alford Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Daniel T. Pancamo Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Entertainment Law Motion Pictures and Television Suzette Toledano Toledano Entertainment & Arts Law 504-525-2552

Entertainment Law Music Suzette Toledano Toledano Entertainment & Arts Law 504-525-2552

Environmental Law Tad Bartlett Jones, Swanson, Huddell & Garrison 504-523-2500 Louis E. Buatt Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Bessie Antin Daschbach Jones, Swanson, Huddell & Garrison 504-523-2500 Eric E. Jarrell King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Mary S. Johnson Johnson Gray McNamara 985-246-6544 Greg L. Johnson Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979

Terrence K. Knister Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Stanley A. Millan Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Chad J. Mollere Johnson Gray McNamara 504-525-4649 Jane C. Raiford Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Ronald J. Sholes Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Mark C. Surprenant Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Patrick A. Talley Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Equipment Finance Law Edward H. Arnold Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Robert Paul Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Sterling Scott Willis Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252

Ethics and Professional Responsibility Law William M. Ross Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580

Family Law Jeffrey M. Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 504-517-8160 Steven J. Lane Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Robert C. Lowe Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 504-517-8160 Mark J. Mansfield Tranchina & Mansfield 985-892-1313

David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 504-517-8160 Philip R. Riegel Mr. Philip Riegel Jr., Attorney at Law 504-834-5345 Kermit L. Roux Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Frank P. Tranchina Tranchina & Mansfield 985-892-1313

Family Law Arbitration Mark J. Mansfield Tranchina & Mansfield 985-892-1313

Family Law Mediation Mark J. Mansfield Tranchina & Mansfield 985-892-1313

Financial Services Regulation Law Roy E. Blossman Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Robin B. Cheatham Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Frank A. Tessier Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Robert Paul Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800

Franchise Law Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Gaming Law William Blake Bennett Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 J. Kelly Duncan Jones Walker 504-582-8000 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Brian D. Wallace Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Government Relations Practice Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

Health Care Law Philip O. Bergeron Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Anthony M. DiLeo Anthony M. DiLeo 504-274-0087 Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Cecile L. Gordon Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Normand F. Pizza Milling Benson Woodward 985-871-3924 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Margaret M. Silverstein Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Peter E. Sperling Frilot 504-599-8000 1100 Poydras Street, Suite 3700 New Orleans Jack M. Stolier Sullivan Stolier & Schulze 504-561-1044 909 Poydras Street, Suite 2600 New Orleans Danielle Trostorff Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 Texaco Center, Suite 2600 New Orleans

Immigration Law Malvern C. Burnett Law Offices of Malvern C. Burnett 504-586-1922 David A.M. Ware Ware Immigration 504-830-5900

Insurance Law Michael H. Bagot Wagner, Bagot & Rayer 504-525-2141 Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Doris T. Bobadilla Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802

Martha Young Curtis Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Sidney W. Degan Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 Elia Diaz-Yaeger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Richard N. Dicharry Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Céleste D. Elliott Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Leah Nunn Engelhardt Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 George D. Fagan Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500 Madeleine Fischer Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Darryl J. Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Jason P. Franco Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Gus A. Fritchie Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 A. Kirk Gasperecz Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 James W. Hailey Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith 504-322-4100 George B. Hall Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Stephen P. Hall Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Lambert J. Hassinger Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 William H. Hines Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 James K. Irvin Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Katherine Karam Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Keith A. Kornman Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 Leslie A. Lanusse Adams and Reese 504-581-3234


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best lawyers®

My to u gh e s t c a s e

Kelly E. Theard With only 48 hours to prepare for a two-week trial involving 24 witnesses, this construction lawyer learned to work fast and smart.

G

rowing up with a father who practiced law, Kelly Theard always knew she wanted to be a lawyer too. She had worked in broadcast journalism as an assignment editor for several years before deciding to obtain her law degree with the hopes of returning to the media industry as a news station director. After graduating from LSU Law School, however, an opportunity arose with Deutsch Kerrigan that would require her to focus her practice on construction law. She now believes that “working in the construction department with some of the best trial attorneys in the state has been the best thing that ever happened to me.” Theard’s toughest case arose when she was representing the excess insurer in a case in which the plaintiff claimed she’d suffered a traumatic brain injury. “At 5:05 p.m. on the Friday before trial, the primary insurer reached a Gasquet settlement which got the insured released below and above our client’s policy,” Theard said. “Suddenly, we had two days to prepare for all 24 witnesses and a two-week trial in which the plaintiff was demanding millions.” In Louisiana, a Gasquet settlement allows the plaintiff to dismiss a suit against one insurer, relinquishing the ability to seek any additional judgements against them while maintaining the right to move forward with suits against other liability insurers. Theard realized that with such a constrained timeline, it would be all too easy to get lost in the details — so that weekend, she tore apart the case file. “Knowing that limited prep time was our biggest challenge, we forced ourselves to focus only on the big picture and identify only what the jury absolutely needed to know. It was legal triage, and we quickly realized how much of the litigation was unnecessary or unproductive. It changed the way I look at litigation and prepare matters for trial.” Theard and her team streamlined the case, emphasizing that the plaintiff did not sustain a traumatic brain injury, despite what the plaintiff’s experts alleged.

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“On day five of the jury trial, the plaintiff attorney leaned over and said, ‘This is your last chance to settle.’ When we politely declined, the plaintiff attorney stood up and notified the court that the plaintiff had instructed him to dismiss the case — and never call again. It was a surreal moment.” Theard said facing the case’s challenges strengthened her abilities as a lawyer, and she has learned to love the challenge. “Since that case, I have had to parachute into cases at the last minute after discovery is completed or shortly before trial,” she said. “It is always exhilarating.” — By Topher Balfer

STATS Specialty Construction Law Company Deutsch Kerrigan LLP Experience 16 years in practice Education BA University of New Orleans; BCL Louisiana State University; JD Louisiana State University


International Arbitration Commercial Thomas K. Foutz TomFoutzADR 504-237-3183

International Arbitration Governmental Thomas K. Foutz TomFoutzADR 504-237-3183

International Mergers & Acquisitions John M. Duck Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

International Trade and Finance Law William H. Hines Jones Walker 504-582-8000 J. Marshall Page Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Scott T. Zander Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Labor Law Management H. Mark Adams Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Stephen P. Beiser McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Magdalen Blessey Bickford McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Walter W. Christy Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Susan Fahey Desmond Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Brooke Duncan Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Greg Guidry Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Edward F. Harold Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Thomas P. Hubert Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Steven Hymowitz Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Clyde H. Jacob Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 S. Mark Klyza The Kullman Firm 504-524-4162 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 I. Harold Koretzky Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Sidney F. Lewis Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000

Mark N. Mallery Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Ernest R. Malone The Kullman Firm 504-524-4162 Eve B. Masinter Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Thomas J. McGoey Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Christopher E. Moore Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Ellis B. Murov Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Keith M. Pyburn Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 William H. Reinhardt Blue Williams 504-831-4091 Elizabeth A. Roussel Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Timothy H. Scott Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Charles F. Seemann Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 G. Phillip Shuler Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Robert F. Spencer The Kullman Firm 504-524-4162 David M. Whitaker Kean Miller 504-585-3050

Labor Law - Union I. Harold Koretzky Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 David M. Whitaker Kean Miller 504-585-3050

Land Use and Zoning Law Richard Cortizas Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David J. Halpern Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Karen T. Holzenthal Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 David A. Marcello Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Marie A. Moore Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Legal Malpractice Law - Defendants

Litigation - Banking and Finance

W. Paul Andersson Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 David S. Daly Frilot 504-599-8000 Gus A. Fritchie Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Daniel Lund Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 William E. Wright Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141

Ricardo A. Aguilar McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Robert B. Bieck Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 William T. Finn Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 A. Gregory Grimsal Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Frank A. Tessier Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Edward Dirk Wegmann Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Leisure and Hospitality Law Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Litigation - Antitrust Mark R. Beebe Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Craig L. Caesar Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Alexander M. McIntyre Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 David G. Radlauer Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580

Litigation Bankruptcy Ricardo A. Aguilar McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Edward H. Arnold Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Alicia M. Bendana Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 504-517-8160 Christopher T. Caplinger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Matt J. Farley Krebs Farley & Dry 504-299-3570 J. David Forsyth Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 Elizabeth J. Futrell Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800

Jan M. Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Sessions Ault Hootsell Butler Snow 504-299-7700 Patrick Johnson Akerman 504-586-1241 Philip K. Jones Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Tristan E. Manthey Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 Cherie Nobles Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 William H. Patrick Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Patrick M. Shelby Kelly Hart & Hallman 504-522-1812 Charles L. Stern Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David F. Waguespack Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800

Litigation Construction W. Raley Alford Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Michael H. Bagot Wagner, Bagot & Rayer 504-525-2141 Keith J. Bergeron Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Michael S. Blackwell Riess LeMieux 504-581-3300 David S. Bland Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani 504-528-3088 Darnell Bludworth Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Daniel J. Caruso Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Jimmy A. Castex Castex Esnard 504-262-9880

Leonard A. Davis Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 Mark W. Frilot Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 985-819-8400 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Elizabeth L. Gordon Shields Mott 504-581-4445 Benjamin R. Grau Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Steven F. Griffith Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Lambert J. Hassinger Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Peter L. Hilbert Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Brian D. Katz Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Jay H. Kern Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 David J. Krebs Krebs Farley & Dry 504-299-3570 David Kurtz Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Christopher K. LeMieux Riess LeMieux 504-581-3300 Daniel Lund Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode Marks King 504-336-2880 Mark W. Mercante Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 985-819-8400 Maura Z. Pelleteri Pugh Accardo 504-799-4500 Paul L. Peyronnin Paul L. Peyronnin 504-895-3143 H. Minor Pipes Pipes Miles Beckman 504-322-7070 Jeffrey K. Prattini Shields Mott 504-581-4445 Denise C. Puente Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 bizneworleans.com

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best lawyers®

Edward F. LeBreton Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Lisa L. Maher Couhig Partners 504-588-1288 Kim E. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Philip D. Nizialek Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 David W. O’Quinn Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 H. Minor Pipes Pipes Miles Beckman 504-322-7070 Andrew L. Plauché Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 James A. Prather Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 985-674-6680 Marshall M. Redmon Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Kermit L. Roux Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Shaundra Schudmak Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Jay Russell Sever Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 David A. Strauss King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Dean A. Sutherland Jeansonne & Remondet 504-524-7333 Quentin F. Urquhart Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Matthew A. Woolf Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200


best lawyers®

Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Gary J. Rouse Couhig Partners 504-588-1288 Charles F. Seemann Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Danny G. Shaw ShawADR 985-789-0701 Lloyd N. Shields Shields Mott 504-581-4445 H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Howard E. Sinor Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Kelly E. Theard Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Richard J. Tyler Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Richard Vale Blue Williams 504-831-4091 John W. Waters Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 504-322-1375 Edward Dirk Wegmann Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Douglass Wynne Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030

Litigation Environmental Charles A. Cerise Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Miles P. Clements Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Bessie Antin Daschbach Jones, Swanson, Huddell & Garrison 504-523-2500 Leonard A. Davis Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Scott E. Delacroix Delacroix Law Firm 985-630-8040 Kathleen F. Drew Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 James C. Gulotta Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Peter L. Hilbert Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

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Kevin E. Huddell Jones, Swanson, Huddell & Garrison 504-523-2500 Mary S. Johnson Johnson Gray McNamara 985-246-6544 Greg L. Johnson Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Robert E. Kerrigan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Kerry J. Miller Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Glen M. Pilié Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Loulan J. Pitre Kelly Hart & Hallman 504-522-1812 Andrew L. Plauché Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Jane C. Raiford Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Elizabeth Haecker Ryan Coats Rose 504-299-3070 Howard E. Sinor Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Benjamin Slater Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Mark J. Spansel Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 A. Wendel Stout Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Mark C. Surprenant Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Patrick A. Talley Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 William D. Treeby Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Quentin F. Urquhart Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Litigation - ERISA Stacey C. S. Cerrone Proskauer Rose 504-310-4088 Nicole A. Eichberger Proskauer Rose 504-310-4088 Covert J. Geary Jones Walker 504-582-8000

february 2020

Keith M. Pyburn Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Robert W. Rachal Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Howard Shapiro Proskauer Rose 504-310-4088 René E. Thorne Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755

Litigation - First Amendment Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 James R. Swanson Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252

Litigation - Health Care Don S. McKinney Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

Litigation - Insurance Ryan Acomb Porteous, Hainkel & Johnson 504-581-3838 Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 David F. Bienvenu Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Robert L. Bonnaffons Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500 Jaimmé A. Collins Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Sidney W. Degan Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 Leah Nunn Engelhardt Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Pablo Gonzalez Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 George B. Hall Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Stephen P. Hall Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 John W. Joyce Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Katherine Karam Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Deirdre C. McGlinchey McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200

Joseph B. Morton Mitchell & Associates 504-291-3364 Sean P. Mount Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 James R. Nieset Porteous, Hainkel & Johnson 504-581-3838 Seth A. Schmeeckle Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Robert I. Siegel Gieger, Laborde & Laperouse 504-561-0400 Quentin F. Urquhart Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700

Litigation Intellectual Property Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Len R. Brignac King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Harry Simms Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David L. Patrón Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Litigation - Labor and Employment H. Mark Adams Jones Walker 504-582-8000 M. Nan Alessandra Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Stephen P. Beiser McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Magdalen Blessey Bickford McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Kim M. Boyle Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Walter W. Christy Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303

Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Brandon Davis Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Susan Fahey Desmond Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Leslie W. Ehret Frilot 504-599-8000 George D. Fagan Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500 Steven F. Griffith Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Greg Guidry Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Edward F. Harold Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Thomas P. Hubert Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Steven Hymowitz Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Clyde H. Jacob Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Tracy E. Kern Jones Walker 504-582-8000 S. Mark Klyza The Kullman Firm 504-524-4162 Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 I. Harold Koretzky Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 David M. Korn Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Leslie A. Lanusse Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Frederic Theodore Le Clercq Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Eve B. Masinter Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Thomas J. McGoey Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Christopher E. Moore Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart 504-648-3840 Ellis B. Murov Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141

Sarah Voorhies Myers Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Maura Z. Pelleteri Pugh Accardo 504-799-4500 Kathlyn Perez Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Keith M. Pyburn Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 William H. Reinhardt Blue Williams 504-831-4091 Timothy H. Scott Fisher Phillips 504-522-3303 Charles F. Seemann Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 Howard Shapiro Proskauer Rose 504-310-4088 G. Phillip Shuler Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 René E. Thorne Jackson Lewis 504-208-1755 David M. Whitaker Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Christopher Williams Williams Litigation 504-308-1438 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Litigation - Land Use and Zoning Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Litigation - Mergers and Acquisitions Ricardo A. Aguilar McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Robert B. Bieck Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Litigation - Municipal William D. Aaron Aaron & Gianna 504-569-1800 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 James R. Swanson Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252

Litigation - Patent Seth M. Nehrbass Garvey, Smith & Nehrbass, Patent Attorneys 504-835-2000

Litigation - Real Estate Ricardo A. Aguilar McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Ashley Belleau Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Elwood F. Cahill Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Philip A. Franco Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 A. Gregory Grimsal Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Harry Simms Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Neal J. Kling Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert A. Kutcher Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais 504-830-3838 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Alvin C. Miester Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Randy Opotowsky Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Charles L. Stern Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199


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BEST LAWYERS®

MY TOUGHEST CASE

Madeleine Fischer In the midst of the Chinese drywall problems, this insurance coverage expert’s efforts resulted in a settlement that released more than 30 contractors from claims.

M

adeleine Fischer has notched several successes over the course of her career: She has deftly handled cases involving class actions, toxic torts, products liability and insurance litigation. Fischer has authored more than a dozen articles on insurance coverage and has been recognized as a top Louisiana lawyer by Super Lawyers every year since 2007, in addition to serving as a past chair of the Insurance Coverage Section of the New Orleans Bar Association. But her most significant challenge arose in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, when a shortage of American-made drywall led Chinese manufacturers to supply a majority of the materials necessary to repair damaged homes. “As time went by, residents of the repaired homes began noticing unpleasant odors and deterioration of wiring in walls and appliances,” Fischer said. “Thus was born the tsunami of lawsuits that was eventually consolidated in federal court in New Orleans as the Chinese Drywall Multi-District Litigation.” These lawsuits were not solely aimed at the Chinese manufacturers of the faulty drywall, many sought damages from U.S. suppliers, distributors, contractors and insurance companies who’d worked with overseas manufacturers to facilitate repairs. With more than 20,000 pleadings from thousands of claimants and hundreds of defendants, an immediate need arose for attorneys with a thorough understanding of insurance coverage, and Fischer’s background positioned her to take the helm. “I represented an insurance company that insured more than 30 contractors who had used drywall in repairing homes from Louisiana to Florida,” Fischer said. “Insurance law is state-based; therefore, the state where a particular plaintiff’s home was built or repaired determined what law applied to that plaintiff’s claim. To tackle the complex insurance issues, I assembled a team of lawyers from various Jones Walker offices in the affected states. I managed the team for all locations and took on the state of Louisiana, the most affected state, myself.”

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FEBRUARY 2020

Litigation began in 2009, and with Judge Eldon Fallon helping to steer parties toward a fair resolution, most cases were settled in 2013. For Fischer’s client, the settlement released more than 30 contractors from any claims involving Chinese drywall. Considering the vast amount of pleadings and affected parties, the challenge might have been intimidating for some attorneys — but for Fischer, such cases are a welcome test of her leadership and expertise. “I enjoy the challenge of complex litigation,” she said, “particularly when insurance coverage issues are involved.” — By Topher Balfer

STATS Specialty Insurance Coverage Company Jones Walker LLP Experience 40 years in practice Education Harvard College; Tulane Law School


Litigation Regulatory Enforcement (SEC, Telecom, Energy) Edward Hart Bergin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Robert B. Bieck Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200

Litigation - Securities John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Hancock Whitney Mark R. Beebe Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Robert B. Bieck Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 George Denegre Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 George C. Freeman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Stephen H. Kupperman Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Lance C. McCardle Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Kirk Reasonover Reasonover & Berg 504-613-4941 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 James R. Swanson Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252

Litigation - Trusts and Estates

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Defendants

Hirschel T. Abbott Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

W. Raley Alford Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Barbara L. Arras Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Kay Baxter Foley & Mansfield 504-302-4800 C. Wm. Bradley Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Scott E. Delacroix Delacroix Law Firm 985-630-8040 Mark C. Dodart Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Robert S. Emmett Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Madeleine Fischer Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Darryl J. Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 William B. Gaudet Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 John Jerry Glas Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Tim Gray Forman Watkins & Krutz 504-799-4383 James C. Gulotta Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 William C. Harrison Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey 504-299-3300 James B. Irwin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Craig Isenberg Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Mary S. Johnson Johnson Gray McNamara 985-246-6544 Susan B. Kohn Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030

Ricardo A. Aguilar McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 David F. Edwards Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Miriam Wogan Henry Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 F. Kelleher Riess Hickey & Riess, Attorneys at Law 504-525-1120 Edward Dirk Wegmann Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Litigation and Controversy - Tax Jesse R. Adams Jones Walker 504-582-8000 William M. Backstrom Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Andre B. Burvant Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Jaye A. Calhoun Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Michael E. Guarisco Guarisco, Cordes & Lala 504-587-7007 James K. Irvin Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 F. Kelleher Riess Hickey & Riess, Attorneys at Law 504-525-1120 Paul H. Waldman Paul H. Waldman, Attorney at Law 504-220-2576 Edward Dirk Wegmann Jones Walker 504-582-8000 John J. Weiler Weiler & Rees 504-524-2944

Keith A. Kornman Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 Allen J. Krouse Frilot 504-599-8000 Kent A. Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Francis V. Liantonio Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Jill T. Losch Johnson Gray McNamara 985-246-6544 Lynn M. Luker Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Chris O. Massenburg Manning Gross + Massenburg 504-535-2880 Kerry J. Miller Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Chad J. Mollere Johnson Gray McNamara 504-525-4649 Kim E. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Joseph B. Morton Mitchell & Associates 504-291-3364 Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 James K. Ordeneaux Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Thomas P. Owen Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Dwight C. Paulsen Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Maura Z. Pelleteri Pugh Accardo 504-799-4500 Michael R. Phillips Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Charles M. Pisano Roedel Parsons Koch Blache Balhoff & McCollister 504-566-1801 David E. Redmann Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Jeffrey E. Richardson Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Jeanette S. Riggins Manning Gross + Massenburg 504-535-2880

Peter J. Rotolo Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Isaac H. Ryan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Seth A. Schmeeckle Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Ronald J. Sholes Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Robert I. Siegel Gieger, Laborde & Laperouse 504-561-0400 Lea Ann Smith Butler Snow 504-299-7700 Martin A. Stern Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 A. Wendel Stout Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Max Swetman Manning Gross + Massenburg 504-535-2880 Patrick A. Talley Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Quentin F. Urquhart Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Roland M. Vandenweghe Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 John W. Waters Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 504-322-1375 David M. Whitaker Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Forrest Ren Wilkes Cosmich Simmons & Brown 504-262-0040 Charles B. Wilmore Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Plaintiffs John T. Balhoff Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates 504-618-1581 Christopher T. Chocheles Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert E. Couhig Couhig Partners 504-588-1288

Leonard A. Davis Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Ernest L. Edwards Ernest L. Edwards Jr., Attorney at Law 504-450-4226 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 M. H. Gertler Gertler Law Firm 504-581-6411 Soren E. Gisleson Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Russ M. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Stephen J. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Anthony D. Irpino Irpino Law Firm 504-525-1500 Gladstone N. Jones Jones, Swanson, Huddell & Garrison 504-523-2500 Gerald E. Meunier Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304 Benjamin Slater Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000

Media Law Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Mediation M. Nan Alessandra Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 J. Gregg Collins Gregg Collins Mediation Arbitration 504-616-7535 Thomas K. Foutz TomFoutzADR 504-237-3183 E. Phelps Gay Christovich & Kearney 504-561-5700 Charles J. Murray Charles J. Murray, Attorney at Law 504-723-6719 William R. Pitts William R. Pitts 504-831-5050 H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants Kurt S. Blankenship Blue Williams 504-831-4091 C. Wm. Bradley Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300

Joy Goldberg Braun Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 Kathryn M. Caraway Caraway LeBlanc 504-566-1912 Richard S. Crisler Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Guy C. Curry Curry, Caviness & Webb 504-524-8556 Charles F. Gay Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Guice A. Giambrone Blue Williams 504-831-4091 Stephen M. Pizzo Blue Williams 504-831-4091 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Peter E. Sperling Frilot 504-599-8000 Lydia Toso Adams Hoefer Holwadel 504-619-1800

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates 504-618-1581 Robert J. David Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304 Michael J. Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304 Richard Gallagher Gallagher & Westholz 504-887-2220 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 James C. Klick Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Jeffrey A. Mitchell Cochran Firm Metairie 504-309-5000 Nelson Wagar Wagar Hickman Law 985-888-8740 Harry T. Widmann Harry T. Widmann & Associates 504-834-2799

Mergers and Acquisitions Law Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

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Robert Paul Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Edward Dirk Wegmann Jones Walker 504-582-8000


best lawyers®

Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Leon J. Reymond Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900

Mining Law John Y. Pearce Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111

Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law John T. Balhoff Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Municipal Law William D. Aaron Aaron & Gianna 504-569-1800 David A. Marcello Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Natural Resources Law Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Charles D. Marshall Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 John Y. Pearce Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111

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Nonprofit / Charities Law Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 Jerome J. Reso Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Leon H. Rittenberg Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

Oil and Gas Law M. Hampton Carver Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Katharine R. Colletta Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 M. Taylor Darden Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Nancy Scott Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Ernest L. Edwards Ernest L. Edwards Jr., Attorney at Law 504-450-4226 Matthew J. Fantaci Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners 504-569-0235 C. Peck Hayne Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Aimee W. Hebert Kelly Hart & Hallman 504-522-1812 Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Charles D. Marshall Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979

february 2020

Cynthia A. Nicholson Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Robert B. Nolan Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Scott A. O’Connor Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 David L. Patrón Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 John Y. Pearce Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Loulan J. Pitre Kelly Hart & Hallman 504-522-1812 Edward B. Poitevent Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Carl D. Rosenblum Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Gerald F. Slattery Slattery, Marino & Roberts 504-585-7800 Charles R. Talley Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Patrick A. Talley Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Adam Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200

Patent Law Charles C. Garvey Garvey, Smith & Nehrbass, Patent Attorneys 504-835-2000 Seth M. Nehrbass Garvey, Smith & Nehrbass, Patent Attorneys 504-835-2000

Personal Injury Litigation Defendants Ryan Acomb Porteous, Hainkel & Johnson 504-581-3838 W. Raley Alford Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Michael R. Allweiss Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 504-517-8160 John G. Alsobrook Ostendorf, Tate, Barnett, & Wells 504-324-2244

W. Paul Andersson Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500 Adrianne L. Baumgartner Porteous, Hainkel & Johnson 985-893-4790 Bradley R. Belsome Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 David F. Bienvenu Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Mark N. Bodin McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Frederick R. Bott Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 C. Wm. Bradley Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Bertrand M. Cass Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Kathleen K. Charvet Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Stanley J. Cohn Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Thomas Louis Colletta Thomas Louis Colleta, Jr. 504-615-3350 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Sidney W. Degan Degan, Blanchard & Nash 504-529-3333 Ewell E. Eagan Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Richard B. Eason Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Debra J. Fischman Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Darryl J. Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Gus A. Fritchie Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 William B. Gaudet Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Charles F. Gay Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Terry Christovich Gay Christovich & Kearney 504-561-5700

John Jerry Glas Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Matthew C. Guy Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 William C. Harrison Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Don K. Haycraft Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Peter L. Hilbert Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker 504-582-8000 James B. Irwin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Mary S. Johnson Johnson Gray McNamara 985-246-6544 C. Gordon Johnson Porteous, Hainkel & Johnson 504-581-3838 George B. Jurgens King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Robert E. Kerrigan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Susan B. Kohn Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Edwin C. Laizer Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Charles E. Leche Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Raymond C. Lewis Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Jill T. Losch Johnson Gray McNamara 985-246-6544 Daniel Lund Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Janet L. MacDonell Janet L. MacDonell 985-867-9971 21452 Lowe Davis Road Covington Walter P. Maestri Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 S. Suzanne Mahoney Johnson Gray McNamara 504-525-4649 Kathleen A. Manning McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141

Joseph Maselli Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Robert B. Nolan Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Colvin Norwood McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 James K. Ordeneaux Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Erin Fury Parkinson McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Dwight C. Paulsen Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 David E. Redmann Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Edward J. Rice Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Jeffrey E. Richardson Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Deborah B. Rouen Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Isaac H. Ryan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Kent B. Ryan The Miller Law Firm 504-684-5044 Seth A. Schmeeckle Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 William B. Schwartz Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Charles F. Seemann Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Scott C. Seiler Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Ronald J. Sholes Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Benjamin Slater Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Mark C. Surprenant Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Kristopher T. Wilson Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 Quentin F. Urquhart Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Roland M. Vandenweghe Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

David E. Walle Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 504-322-1375 Charles B. Wilmore Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Marc J. Yellin Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141

Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs John T. Balhoff Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Craig D. Ball Craig D. Ball 713-320-6066 Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates 504-618-1581 Darnell Bludworth Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Loyd J. Bourgeois Loyd J. Bourgeois 985-441-3448 Charles C. Bourque St. Martin & Bourque 985-876-3891 Joseph E. Cain Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Kathleen K. Charvet Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Christopher T. Chocheles Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Martha Young Curtis Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert J. David Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304 Stevan C. Dittman Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304 Michael J. Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304 Debra J. Fischman Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Joshua S. Force Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Thomas A. Gennusa Thomas A Gennusa, Attorney at Law 504-455-0442


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My to u gh e s t c a s e

Wayne J. Lee Representing Schwegmann Brothers Giant Super Market and Wholesale Liquor, this commercial litigation expert took on the liquor industry in a fight for fair competition.

M

ost lawyers can recall a specific case or court ruling that set the tone for them as litigators. For Wayne Lee, that case came early in his career while working as an associate at Stone Pigman. The St. Augustine High School alum had just graduated from law school at Tulane University when the Schwegmann Bros. company hired Stone Pigman to represent them in what was a huge case for the moderately sized firm. The firm filed an anti-trust case on behalf of Schwegmann Brothers Giant Super Markets and Schwegmann Brothers Wholesale Liquor Company. The allegation, Lee explained, was a conspiracy to prevent competition that was causing the wholesale liquor company to pay higher prices. “We were the plaintiffs,” said Lee. “The suit was against the liquor industry. It consisted of most of the manufacturers and distillers of alcoholic beverages in the country, as well as the wholesale dealers of alcoholic beverages in the state of Louisiana. There were about 50-plus defendants.” Defendants were represented by lawyers from across the country, along with major law firms from around New Orleans. Due to the size of the case, a young associate, Lee, was brought on to provide assistance. He participated in motion practice and deposition discovery. “To me, it was a tremendous learning opportunity, and a confidence builder in helping me understand how to analyze issues, brief issues and how to manage a case and organize it to move it forward,” said Lee. “[I also learned how] to interact with the court, and to interact with experienced opposing people. For me, it was a phenomenal experience that often young lawyers don’t get.” The case lasted many years, reaching agreements with each of the defendants one by one.

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“The suit was for damages, primarily,” he said. “We were able to get compensation for the client and reach a settlement. It was a tremendous experience.” Lee said the case taught him the basics of commercial litigation and how cases like this are managed. It was also, he added, “a tremendous aid in gaining confidence in what I was doing and understanding,” and helped him reach the point that he knew this was something he wanted to do for a career.— By Kelly Massicot

STATS Specialty Commercial Litigation Company Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann Experience 45 Years in the Practice Education Tulane University Law School


Jason Rogers Williams Jason Rogers Williams & Associates 504-585-1413

Product Liability Litigation Defendants Michael H. Abraham Forman Watkins & Krutz 504-799-4383 Francis Philip Accardo Pugh Accardo 504-799-4500 Jennifer Adams Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Kay Baxter Foley & Mansfield 504-302-4800 C. Wm. Bradley Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Joy Goldberg Braun Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 Kelly E. Brilleaux Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Camala E. Capodice Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 David L. Carrigee Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Charles A. Cerise Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Darrell K. Cherry Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Steven W. Copley Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 Bruce A. Cranner Talley, Anthony, Hughes & Knight 985-624-5010 Richard S. Crisler Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Scott E. Delacroix Delacroix Law Firm 985-630-8040 Kathleen F. Drew Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Richard G. Duplantier Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802

Richard B. Eason Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Robert S. Emmett Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Madeleine Fischer Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Darryl J. Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Charles F. Gay Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Terry Christovich Gay Christovich & Kearney 504-561-5700 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 William C. Harrison Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 James B. Irwin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Craig Isenberg Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Kelly G. Juneau Rookard Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Robert E. Kerrigan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Edwin C. Laizer Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Arthur W. Landry Arthur W. Landry and Jeanne Andry Landry 504-581-4334 Charles E. Leche Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Michael D. Lonegrass Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Lynn M. Luker Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Janet L. MacDonell Janet L. MacDonell 985-867-9971 Kathleen A. Manning McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141

Joseph Maselli Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 David M. Melancon Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Kim E. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Robert B. Nolan Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Colvin Norwood McGlinchey Stafford 504-586-1200 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 David W. O’Quinn Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Barbara Ormsby Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 G. Bruce Parkerson Plauché Maselli Parkerson 504-582-1142 Dwight C. Paulsen Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 David E. Redmann Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford 504-523-1580 Edward J. Rice Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Peter J. Rotolo Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Deborah B. Rouen Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Elizabeth Haecker Ryan Coats Rose 504-299-3070 Isaac H. Ryan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver 504-589-9700 Scott C. Seiler Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Tyson B. Shofstahl Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Stanton E. Shuler Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500

James R. Silverstein Kean Miller 504-585-3050 John W. Sinnott Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Benjamin Slater Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Meera U. Sossamon Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Norman C. Sullivan Frilot 504-599-8000 Mark C. Surprenant Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Max Swetman Manning Gross + Massenburg 504-535-2880 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Quentin F. Urquhart Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Nelson Wagar Wagar Hickman Law 985-888-8740

Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs Helen Babin Gertler Law Firm 504-581-6411 Emile Bagneris Bagneris Law Firm 504-810-3995 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Louis L. Gertler Gertler Law Firm 504-581-6411 M. H. Gertler Gertler Law Firm 504-581-6411 Stephen J. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Louis L. Plotkin Plotkin, Vincent & Jaffe 855-473-1833 John W. Redmann Law Office of John W. Redmann 504-500-5000 Rodney P. Vincent Plotkin, Vincent & Jaffe 855-473-1833

Professional Malpractice Law Defendants Keith J. Bergeron Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 C. Wm. Bradley Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea 504-596-6300 Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979

Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Richard G. Duplantier Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 504-525-6802 Gus A. Fritchie Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Karen Holland Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Frederic Theodore Le Clercq Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Melissa M. Lessell Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Marshall M. Redmon Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Elizabeth Haecker Ryan Coats Rose 504-299-3070 Danny G. Shaw ShawADR 985-789-0701 John Stewart Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Edward W. Trapolin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 William E. Wright Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141

Professional Malpractice Law Plaintiffs Donald E. McKay Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500 Stephen R. Rue Stephen Rue & Associates 504-475-6695

Project Finance Law E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 William H. Hines Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Public Finance Law Lisa E. Maurer Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Susan Weeks Foley & Judell 504-568-1249 David M. Wolf Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

Railroad Law Blake G. Arata Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly 504-522-9980 Thomas Louis Colletta Thomas Louis Colleta, Jr. 504-615-3350 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore 504-310-2100 Harry Simms Hardin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Joseph M. Miller Davis, Saunders & Miller 985-612-3070 C. Perrin Rome Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly 504-522-9980 Benjamin B. Saunders Davis, Saunders & Miller 985-612-3070 Benjamin Slater Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Patrick A. Talley Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Real Estate Law Marguerite L. Adams Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Roy E. Blossman Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 James L. Breaux Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Elwood F. Cahill Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Susanne Cambre Dwyer, Cambre & Suffern 504-838-9090 Philip deV. Claverie Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 R. Keith Colvin Jones Walker 504-582-8000 James R. Conway James R Conway III, Attorney at Law 504-838-0093

best lawyers®

Louis L. Gertler Gertler Law Firm 504-581-6411 M. H. Gertler Gertler Law Firm 504-581-6411 Soren E. Gisleson Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Mark P. Glago Glago Williams 504-599-8666 Fred L. Herman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes 504-217-2006 Russ M. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Maury A. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Stephen J. Herman Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Peter L. Hilbert Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Anthony D. Irpino Irpino Law Firm 504-525-1500 Brian D. Katz Herman Herman & Katz 504-581-4892 Megan C. Kiefer Kiefer & Kiefer 504-828-3313 Frank E. Lamothe Lamothe Law Firm 504-291-8146 Ryan O. Luminais Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Thomas J. Madigan Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Richard M. Martin Lamothe Law Firm 504-291-8146 Kevin M. McGlone Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Glenn McGovern Glenn C. McGovern 504-456-3610 Gerald E. Meunier Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304 Stephen B. Murray Murray Law Firm 504-525-8100 Louis L. Plotkin Plotkin, Vincent & Jaffe 855-473-1833 Amanda Russo Schenck Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Jeremy Z. Soso The Lambert Firm 504-581-1750 Rodney P. Vincent Plotkin, Vincent & Jaffe 855-473-1833 Irving J. Warshauer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 504-522-2304


best lawyers®

E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Victoria M. de Lisle Locke Lord 504-558-5100 Anthony Dunbar Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 James T. Dunne Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 M. Claire Durio Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn 504-569-2030 Stephen I. Dwyer Dwyer, Cambre & Suffern 504-838-9090 Gary J. Elkins Elkins 504-529-3600 Lillian E. Eyrich Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 William H. Hines Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Karen T. Holzenthal Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Brian R. Johnson Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Paul C. Kitziger Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Neal J. Kling Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 504-568-1990 F. Rivers Lelong Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Jon F. Leyens Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 A. Kelton Longwell Coats Rose 504-299-3070 Tyler Marquette Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 David A. Martinez Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 R. Lewis McHenry Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes 504-217-2006 Alvin C. Miester Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100

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Richard B. Montgomery Deutsch Kerrigan 504-581-5141 Marie A. Moore Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Chad P. Morrow Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Robert Mouton Locke Lord 504-558-5100 Randy Opotowsky Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Anne E. Raymond Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Leon J. Reymond Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Megan C. Riess Coats Rose 504-299-3070 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Steven C. Serio Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Philip B. Sherman Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 Charles L. Stern Steeg Law Firm 504-582-1199 James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Robert Paul Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800 Peter S. Title Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 Suzette Toledano Toledano Entertainment & Arts Law 504-525-2552 Nicole S. Tygier Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais 504-830-3838 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Sabrina C. Vickers Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000

february 2020

Emile A. Wagner Law Offices of Emile A. Wagner, III 504-250-0895 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Sterling Scott Willis Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252

Reinsurance Law Pablo Gonzalez Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Marshall M. Redmon Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Securities / Capital Markets Law John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse and Wilson 504-619-1800 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Maureen Gershanik Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker 504-582-8000 David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 John D. Werner Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252

Securities Regulation Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Maureen Gershanik Fishman Haygood 504-586-5252 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker 504-582-8000

Securitization and Structured Finance Law Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Marion Welborn Weinstock Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111

Tax Law Jesse R. Adams Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Robert S. Angelico Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 William M. Backstrom Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward 504-569-7000 Timothy P. Brechtel Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Susan J. Burkenstock Elkins 504-529-3600 Andre B. Burvant Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Jaye A. Calhoun Kean Miller 504-585-3050 Susan K. Chambers Jones Walker 504-582-8000 John W. Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 J. Grant Coleman King & Jurgens 504-582-3800 Paul D. Cordes Guarisco, Cordes & Lala 504-587-7007 Gary J. Elkins Elkins 504-529-3600 Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 James C. Exnicios Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Mandy Mendoza Gagliardi Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Michael E. Guarisco Guarisco, Cordes & Lala 504-587-7007 Jonathan R. Katz Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 Caroline D. Lafourcade Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan 504-582-1111 William H. Langenstein Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000 Donald H. McDaniel Perez, McDaniel, Faust & Adams 504-309-3848 Robert L. Perez Perez, McDaniel, Faust & Adams 504-309-3848

Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Jerome J. Reso Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 F. Kelleher Riess Hickey & Riess, Attorneys at Law 504-525-1120 Richard J. Roth Roth Law Firm 504-525-7792 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes 504-217-2006 Carli Beckett Simpson Roth Law Firm 504-525-7792 Mark S. Stein Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver 504-517-8160 Andrew Sullivan Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Matthew A. Treuting Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 John J. Weiler Weiler & Rees 504-524-2944 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900

Technology Law Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux 504-585-3800

Trademark Law Keith M. Landry Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Greg Latham Intellectual Property Consulting 504-322-7166

Transportation Law Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Kenneth M. Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 504-566-5200 Benjamin Slater Chaffe McCall 504-585-7000

Trusts and Estates Hirschel T. Abbott Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Marguerite L. Adams Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979 David F. Edwards Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Gary J. Elkins Elkins 504-529-3600 Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Deborah C. Faust Perez, McDaniel, Faust & Adams 504-309-3848 Miriam Wogan Henry Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert 504-299-2100 Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 504-582-1500 Robert L. Perez Perez, McDaniel, Faust & Adams 504-309-3848 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Jerome J. Reso Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes 985-269-7220 F. Kelleher Riess Hickey & Riess, Attorneys at Law 504-525-1120 Leon H. Rittenberg Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 Brianne S. Rome Rome Law 504-432-9367 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer 504-569-2900 John D. Wogan Liskow & Lewis 504-581-7979

Utilities Law Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Dana Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Alan C. Wolf Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311

Venture Capital Law Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar 504-566-1311 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker 504-582-8000 J. Marshall Page Jones Walker 504-582-8000 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann 504-581-3200

Workers’ Compensation Law Claimants Richard B. Eason Adams and Reese 504-581-3234

Workers’ Compensation Law Employers Richard B. Eason Adams and Reese 504-581-3234 Donald E. McKay Leake & Andersson 504-585-7500


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From The Lens Southeast louisiana business in full color

workspaces Dixie Brewing Company

why didn’t i think of that NOLA Craft

Culture

nonprofit New Orleans Women and Children’s Shelter

on the job Crystal Clear Creative


from the lens gre at workspaces

The new Dixie Brewing Company brewery and taproom was designed and built by Woodward Design + Build, with the interior managed by FirstKey Consulting out of Canada. The 85,000-squarefoot brewery has an impressive 100,000-square-foot outdoor space that features a fire pit, covered seating and bocce ball area.

at a glance Business name

Dixie Brewing Company

Home Brew Dixie Brewing Company returns to New Orleans with a state-of-the art brewery, taproom and beer garden in New Orleans East. By Melanie Warner Spencer photos by sara essex bradley

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Location

Dixie Brewing Company was founded in

New Orleans in 1907 and brewed locally on Tulane Avenue until 2005 (except during a period in the 1920s after Prohibition-era raids uncovered “a little rule breaking,” according to dixiebeer.com). After Hurricane Katrina destroyed the brewery, Dixie Beer was contract brewed out of state. The late Tom Benson and wife, Gayle, bought a majority stake in the brewery in 2017, quickly announcing plans to bring brewing back to New Orleans. In 2019, their plan came to fruition: They returned brewing operations to

3501 Jourdan Road Date of opening

Jan. 25, 2020 Size

85,000 square feet Number of Employees

50 to start; adding headcount commensurate with demand Person in Charge

Jim Birch, general manager

New Orleans, built a new brewery and made plans for a host of new products. On Jan. 25, Dixie’s 85,000-square-foot facility opened to the public. Familiar elements from the old brewery combine with a new, modern design that includes a 5,000-square-foot tasting room and an over 100,000-squarefoot outdoor area. “[The] standout feature of the design is the Dixie Tower and Dome,” said Jim Birch, Dixie’s general manager. “It is lit up at night and is the first thing a guest sees upon entering the property or traveling on Interstate-10 across the high-rise. The Dixie Tower is so iconic to the brand and will take on additional significance with the new packaging we are about to introduce.” Checkerboard retail tiles and old neon Dixie Beer signs lend vintage flair to the extensive wood flooring, woodwork bar, modern metalwork, and modern woodand-metal tables and chairs in the taproom. The beer garden has a shaded area, as well as a bocce ball court and a fire pit. Birch says two of the company’s biggest challenges are “becoming a must-see destination for both New Orleanians and tourists — a bit outside the French Quarter,” and “educating our customers to expect Dixie Beer to be the freshest and high quality beer products we have ever produced.” While Birch says the primary focus is on lager beers (“Think German-inspired lagers, pilsners, helles, dunkels and bocks,” he says), in an effort to offer something different amidst the large and still growing New Orleans and Louisiana craft beer scene, the company also is brewing up a line of new suds under its Voodoo label. “In the early 1980s we were the sole surviving brewery and now we’re back to join an eclectic, fun and rapidly evolving local beer scene,” says Birch. “We are ecstatic. Dixie Blackened Voodoo is our inspiration and entryway into craft. We’re introducing Crimson Voodoo, a white ale with raspberries, Voodoo Queen, a hazy IPA, Voodoo Doll, a ‘li’l’ IPA, or session IPA, and Midnight Stout, [both] in cans and draft [in] January. Look for them in full distribution by the end of March.” The more than 112-year-old company has a long and storied legacy to uphold, and Birch attributes its success to the employees. “Mrs. Benson and [minority owners] Joseph and Kendra Bruno are strong advocates for making Dixie as successful as possible, while giving back to the community, investing


The 5,000-square-foot tasting and tap room is finished out with extensive wood flooring, woodwork bar surround, modern metalwork and modern wood and metal tables and chairs.

in training and development, and being faithful to continuing Dixie’s legacy for another 100 years,” says Birch. “We work hard together all week, we’re focused on safety and quality, and we’re making a product that is meant to be enjoyed with others to make more ‘Dixie Memories.’” “Our goal is very simple: to be the No. 1 selling beer brand in New Orleans once again, and to help lead the transformation of New Orleans East into an economic powerhouse for the city.” n

General Manager Jim Birch says two of the company’s biggest challenges are “becoming a must-see destination for both New Orleanians and tourists a bit outside the French Quarter,” and “educating our customers to expect Dixie Beer to be the freshest and highest quality beer products we have ever produced.”

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From The Lens why didn’ t i think of that ?

The Business of Bedazzling Open barely a year, NOLA Craft Culture is capitalizing on New Orleans’ yearround passion to create. By Ashley McLellan photos by sara essex bradley

For NOLA Craft Culture owners Lisette

Constantin, Nori Pritchard and Virginia Saussy, crafting, costuming and sewing fantastic creations is more than a hobby, it’s a way of life, and one that has proven to be profitable. With a year-round menu of classes, private party rental space and a retail shop filled with crafting tools for any project, NOLA Craft Culture — located just off Canal Street and Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City — has become a mecca for Carnival krewes, seamstresses, folk artists, costume enthusiasts and glitter lovers of all ages and abilities since opening just over a year ago — Jan. 4, 2019. “After closing our SBA loan the week of Thanksgiving, we moved fast to ensure we would be open in time for King’s Day,” Saussy said. “Opening right before Mardi Gras was like being shot out of a cannon.” It’s not surprising that New Orleans is home to multiple crafting businesses (i.e The Bead Shop, Broadway Bound Costumes, Jefferson Variety) but according to a 2018 report from Forbes, crafting is currently a $35 billion market nationally. And, bucking the online shopping trend, crafters make 90 percent of their purchases at brick-and-mortar stores. While one may picture grandmothers sewing and baking and crocheting, crafting culture continues to grow and generate revenue with an increasingly younger group of enthusiasts. The largest percentage of crafters today are millennials, age 18 to 34. Carnival krewes played a prominent role in the creation of NOLA Craft Culture. “We are all in krewes,” said Saussy of her fellow business owners, “but we also got advice from several fellow krewe members, as well as members of other sub-krewes, Mardi Gras Indian chiefs and queens, and different people in the NOLA costume culture community.”

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Left to Right: NOLA Craft Culture owners Lisette Constantin, Virginia Saussy and Nori Pritchard. Each brings unique strengths to the business. Pritchard is the glitter expert, Constantin is focused on feathers and headdresses and Saussy’s specialty is business aspects systems, website development, and more. All three women work the store and have contributed to purchasing. “The three of us each came to the concept independently and as luck would have it we found each other,” said Constantin.

We want to share the authentic NOLA craft culture with the visitors and teach them how much time and pride our community takes in what we present. Co-Founder Virginia Saussy

Saussy said the Krewe of Muses was particularly helpful. “One sister, a professor at Loyola, brought our business plan in for the business school students to do as a project,” she said. “That kicked us up a notch. Another Muse sister, Andrea Huseman, was our real estate agent who helped us find our amazing Mid-City Glitter Mansion. And, of course, Liz Broekman, also a Muse, is our banker. Sisterhood has

its privileges, but the women of Carnival all support each other, in every krewe.” While Carnival provided the initial inspiration for the business, NOLA Craft Culture has sustained interest well beyond Mardi Gras Day. “Immediately after Mardi Gras, people came in to get decorated up for St. Patrick’s Day and St. Joseph’s Day parades,” said Saussy. “We had people glittering fake cabbages and carrots and making adorable green glitter top


hats. We know we helped make the Easter parade bonnets better than ever.” Kentucky Derby hat-decorating parties in the spring, rainbow feather costumes and body glitter for Pride in the summer… “We mean it when we say that down here, crafting is not a hobby, it’s a way of life,” said Saussy. The company’s class workshop calendar is constantly updated, with a recent week featuring classes in resin jewelry-making, “Glittering 101,” knitting, headpiece creation and yoga. Wedding parties and bridesmaids can craft unique parasols for a second-line experience and group parties can learn how to create custom fascinators. “The glittering classes are by far the most popular,” said Saussy. “We live in a community that is ‘glitterally’ crazy these days, and Nori is a glitter-technique expert. She teaches the basics of glittering everything from shoes and purses to goblets, glasses, bottles, apples and pigs in hands-on workshops. We also offer popular classes in headdresses, resin and umbrella design.” Groups can also book their own workshops, with prices from $100 an hour for seven to 12 people, to $150 for up to 30, and special rates available for groups of more than 30. Party packages for children range from 90-minute-to-two-hour sessions for ages 8 to 14. Parties are $35 per child (supplies included) and an additional $55 is charged for a team member to assist large groups. Themes include: unicorn craft party, dragon’s egg creation, pirate craft party, slime party and shoebox float creation. Customized parties are also an option. In addition to parties for all ages, NOLA Craft Culture hosts free community workshops where adults are encouraged to BYOB and craft with friends. “Retail is the soul of the business, but it benefits from the classes,” said Saussy. “And the classes get discovered by the retail customers as well. We also sell glitter and confetti to crafters across the country because who knows how to sparkle better than New Orleans? We are the craftiest community in America.” For hardcore crafters who may not have room in their apartment or home — or just want to keep the glitter outside their house — NOLA Craft Culture also provides rental storage space. Word-of-mouth and a tight-knit crafting community have helped to grow the business online, on social media and across the region and beyond, according to Saussy. “We have been really surprised by people who found us on social media and traveled to New Orleans just to visit us and purchase

Did You Know? Glue Guns and Glitter = Big Business Crafting is a

$35 billion

market nationally

62%

of U.S. households participate in one crafting hobby and of those:

our glitter,” said Saussy. “We have had crafters come from Detroit and Chicago and Los Angeles just to visit NOLA Craft Culture. It’s humbling. They call our place the Glitter Mansion,” she said. Looking forward, the team plans to add more classes and continues to realize their business plan, with a more formal approach to customer outreach and advertising on the horizon. “[We are] looking for more opportunities and ways we can spread the craftiness

and keep reaching out to the community,” Saussy said. “As a young business, we are still learning, and our business plan is evolving and has not been fully achieved. We plan to start advertising to the tourism market a bit more, now that we are established. We want to share the authentic NOLA craft culture with the visitors and teach them how much time and pride out community takes in what we present. That has always been a big part of our strategy. The online business was unexpected but we want to grow that as well.” n

16%

engage in one craft,

39%

participate in 2-4 crafts, and

45%

are involved in 5 or more creative hobbies SOURCE: 2018 research from the Association for Creative Industries, according to a July 2018 article in Forbes

The top creative hobbies are: edible arts (17%); painting and drawing (16%); kids crafts (16%); sewing and fabric (11%) and paper crafts (11%) SOURCE: 2018 research from the Association for Creative Industries, according to a July 2018 article in Forbes

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From The Lens making a match: businesses and nonprofits

THE BASICS Mission

To enable families to transition from a life of homelessness and poverty to one of stability and self-sufficiency. Info

2020 S. Liberty St. (504) 522-9340 Annual Budget

$1.2 million Ongoing Partnerships

NOWCS currently has 50+ collaborators, including organizations like Dress For Success, NOWCS Outreach Program with LSU Health Sciences Center, Strive and Delgado Community College.

A Family Affair The New Orleans Women & Children’s Shelter needs your company’s help to keep families off the streets. By Pamela Marquis photos by cheryl gerber

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Imagine a small 3-year-old girl full

of hope and endless possibilities. Now, imagine that same child, due to hard luck and unforeseen circumstances, sleeping in a car and living on the streets of New Orleans. Statistics show she’ll be sick at twice the rate of other children and go hungry twice as often. She won’t have any privacy and scarcely any creature comforts. She won’t have a warm bed to dream in, a favorite chair to read in or a corner to feel safe in.

Her family’s daily routines, will be nearly impossible to maintain. Not surprisingly, the emotional problems of homeless children often impede learning: They have twice the rate of learning disabilities and experience mental issues more often than non-homeless children. The New Orleans Women and Children’s Shelter (NOWCS), now in its 12th year of service, has served more than 2,500 homeless adults and children.

Did You Know? Of the 130 various family members who are homeless every night in New Orleans, half are children. Source: January 2019 Point-inTime counts conducted by UNITY of Greater New Orleans


To meet the needs of vulnerable people in our community, NOWCS has a 21-person staff, two buildings with a combined 6,310-squarefeet of space. It is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and consistently operates at 90 percent capacity or higher. The organization traces its beginning to a simple women’s facility that opened immediately after Hurricane Katrina. When funding for that temporary facility ran out, Jackie Silverman and her husband, Dan, founded the New Orleans Women’s Shelter to provide a place for mothers with young children to go. NOWCS focuses on breaking the cycle of homelessness and keeping homeless families from returning to the streets. It provides a continuum of safe shelter, personalized case management, wraparound services and aftercare to homeless families – all at no cost to those they serve. “Our family parents are all loving and supportive and are really trying so hard,” says Melissa Tyler, NOWCS’ development director. “It’s debilitating for them not to be able to provide for their kids. As a mom, I feel connected to that. I know what hopes and dreams we all have for our children and how much we want to give that to them. I can’t imagine not being able to do that for my own daughter.” Tyler wants the community to know that NOWCS is a shelter for homeless families of any configuration. She thinks when people hear women’s shelter, they just automatically assume NOWCS is a domestic violence shelter. However, NOWCS serves single parents with children, grandparents with grandchildren, expectant mothers, single father-led families, people with disabilities and the elderly. “We once took in two sisters in their 70s,” Tyler said. “They had been living in their car for more than two years. We have helped homeless families with as many as 12 children and mothers with newborns. You never know what people are going through. Many of our clients are homeless for the first time in their lives. Homeless families are an unfortunate niche; these are not going to be the people you see panhandling under the bridge.” What Companies Can Do To Help

• Host a collection drive. • Current needs include cleaning supplies, gift cards, professional clothing, school supplies, winter coats and toys. • Sign up as a sponsor for “There’s No Place

More Than a Place to Stay NOWCS Programming is designed to benefit every aspect of work and family life, from education and employment to parenting and planning ahead.

Like Home,” a dinner and silent auction featuring live entertainment by Bag of Donuts set for March 19. This event generates critical funds for the shelter’s transitional homeless shelter operations and program support. • Invite NOWCS to speak to employees or take a tour of the organization’s facilities to help spread awareness.

• Get hands-on. Create a team to help with a landscaping project, repair some bikes or build a few bookshelves. All ideas are welcome. • For all giving opportunities, please contact Melissa Tyler, development director, at (504) 522-9340 ext. 206, mtyler@nowcs.org. n

In addition to shelter, NOWCS provides: Case management for parents and children; Parenting workshops; Adult educational assistance; Children’s educational and cultural enrichment programs; Employment programs; Financial literacy training; and Life skills training.

Development Director Melissa Tyler (in red) is part of a staff of 21 that make sure NOWCS can serve homeless families of all configurations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Ace and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

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From The Lens on the job

Adorning Dixie Known for its design work for the New Orleans Saints and Pelicans, Crystal Clear Creative’s latest project was crafting the Dixie Brewery Museum. photo by cheryl gerber

owner and chief creative officer of Crystal

Clear Creative, Kellie Mathas (left), worked alongside her lead project designer, Jared Carroll, and Tanya Birch, head of Dixie Retail Operations, to craft the new Dixie Brewery Museum. Located on the second floor of Dixie Brewery, which opened to the public Jan. 25, the museum is only the latest Benson project for the boutique design and events firm, which also designed the Saints’ locker room and organized the NBA All-Star Party, as well as all the Christams parties for both the Saints and Pelicans. CrystalClearCreative.net. n


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Biz New Orleans

february 2020

Profile for Renaissance Publishing

Biz New Orleans Magazine February 2020  

Biz New Orleans Magazine February 2020