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MEET OUR SALES TE AM

Lisa Picone Love Sales Manager 830-7248 Lisa@myneworleans.com

Samantha Shiff Senior Account Executive 830-7226 Samantha@myneworleanscom

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 1


CO N T E N T S

Features

On the Cover

Photographed by Jeffery Johnston

Now that Carnival has passed, it’s time to renew our homes to better fit our needs. From spring-cleaning to embarking on a full-scale kitchen renovation, begin by learning from local experts, starting on pg. 49.

41

OnStage New Orleans’ Guide to the Performing Arts BY KATHY FINN

49

Renewal Resources Springing into action to update your home BY KELCY WILBURN PHOTOGRAPHED BY MIKE LIRETTE

Wills Hover, Senior Project Manager at The Lemoine Company; Co-Chairs Karey Haslauer and Lisa Ballay; William Lemoine, VP East Market: New Orleans + Healthcare at The Lemoine Company; and President and CEO of Children’s Hospital John R. Nickens IV for Children’s Hospital’s 2019 “Sugarplum Ball: Puttin’ on the Glitz.”

This year’s 38th annual black-tie “Sugarplum Ball” benefiting Children’s Hospital will take place on March 23, 7-11 p.m. at the Sugar Mill, and will feature the band Karma, and fabulous food and libations from some of our best restaurants. The event will provide funding to help create a Pediatric Simulation Training Center at Children’s Hospital where their healthcare providers will have the oppor tunity to hone their craft in critical lifesaving procedures, such as hear t and lung bypass (ECMO). The simulators utilize dynamic facial expressions, movement and speech to mimic typical patient interactions. The creation of the new simulation center will allow healthcare providers to improve communication, refine critical thinking skills and enhance clinical training To learn more and to purchase tickets, call 896-9375. Special thanks to Caroline Jacobs, Special Events Coordinator of Children’s Hospital, for her invaluable assistance.

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CO N T E N T S

In Every Issue

20 8 & 10 EDITORS’ NOTES

12 MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Community Sailing New Orleans, Inc.: Bringing sailing to all

14 KIDS PLAY

“Fête Française”: The 20th anniversary will look to the future

16 WHAT’S HOT

Home Décor

18 ON THE MENU

Decadent Delight: Broussard’s Executive Chef Jimi Setchim shares its Crawfish Omelet Mornay

20 THE DISH

Que Rico!: Authentic Cuban restaurant relocates to Magazine Street

58 ENTERTAINING WITH BEV

Let the World Be Their Oyster: An elegant fundraiser benefiting The Choice Foundation Held at a historic Garden District home.

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22

PHILANTHROPIC FUN

65 60 WITH THIS RING

Lyons – Reily Museum Magnificence The New Orleans Museum of Art welcomed 550 patrons to “Odyssey 2018.” 22 Starry Night Ochsner Cancer Institute raised $1.7 million with a moon and starlit gala in the MercedesBenz Superdome. 24 Fruit of the Earth Guests wined and dined at the lush, world-renowned wine auction “Carnivale du Vin.” 26 For Our Freedom The National WWII Museum hosted Victory Ball over Veterans Day Weekend to honor those who serve. 28 Love for the Library An outdoor fundraiser on the Milton H. Latter Memorial Library grounds bolstered the library’s beautification initiatives. 30

A Safe House Eden House continues to support victims of human trafficking with new programs and a second residence. 32

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A Fine Philanthropist Philanthropist Mary Keller Zervigon received the United Way of Southeast Louisiana Alexis de Tocqueville Award 2018. 34

STUDENT ACTIVIST

All for One and One for All STAIR ensures the success of its reading programs to students in need. 36

Susan Wormser & Katie McNulty: Sales & Marketing Director and Director of Business Development, The Event Glossary 


Viva Las Vegas! Allan Bissinger was bestowed with the 2018 Judah Touro Society award for his outstanding contributions to the welfare of Touro. 38 Kingsley Cultural Connections Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses honored its generous Circle Level members with its annual fall gala. 40

YOUNG BLOODS

Paul Roach: Illustrator, From A to Zoot

63 Michael Baquet III: Archbishop Rummel High School

64 SHOP TALK

65 SHOP TALK

Kristin Malone Johnson: Owner, Home Malone

66 SNAPSHOTS 68 ONSTAGE CALENDAR 68 DEBUTANTE SNAPSHOTS 80 NOSTALGIA Movie Magic Memories: The bygone pleasure of drive-in theaters


MARCH 2019 VOL. 23 ISSUE 10 Editorial

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Bev Church EDITOR Morgan Packard Griffith ART DIRECTOR Ali Sullivan CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mirella Cameran SOCIETY COLUMNIST Catherine Freeman FOOD & DINING COLUMNIST Jyl Benson WEB EDITOR Kelly Massicot EVENT PHOTO COORDINATOR Jeff Strout

Advertising

VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan (504) 830-7241, Colleen@MyNewOrleans.com SALES MANAGER Lisa Picone Love

(504) 830-7248, Lisa@MyNewOrleans.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Samantha Shiff (504) 830-7226, Samantha@MyNewOrleans.com

Marketing

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS

Cheryl Lemoine

EVENT COORDINATOR Abbie Dugruise DIGITAL MEDIA ASSOCIATE Mallary Matherne

For event information call (504) 830-7264

Production

PRODUCTION MANAGER Emily Andras PRODUCTION DESIGNERS

Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney

TRAFFIC COORDINATOR Lane Brocato

Administration

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Todd Matherne PRESIDENT Alan Campell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/EDITOR-INCHIEF Errol Laborde VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan OFFICE MANAGER Mallary Matherne DISTRIBUTION MANAGER John Holzer SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER Brittanie Bryant

For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

A Publication of Renaissance Publishing, LLC 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, © 2019 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. St. Charles Avenue is not responsible for photos or artwork and assumes that all releases have been cleared upon submission to the magazine. St. Charles Avenue is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, La. 70005, (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $17.95, two year $31, three year $43 — foreign rates vary call for pricing. It is the policy of this magazine to employ people on the basis of their qualifications and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap.

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B E V ' S N OT E

Can you believe that “Sugarplum Ball,” one of the most prestigious fundraising events benefiting Children’s Hospital, is 38 years old and is as important as ever? Thanks so much to Co-Chairs Lisa Ballay and Karey Haslauer; John R. Nickens IV, President and CEO of Children’s Hospital; William Lemoine,Vice President of East Market: New Orleans and Healthcare at The Lemoine Company and Wills Hover, Senior Project Manager at The Lemoine Company for gracing our cover! Lisa and Karey have come up with the theme “Putting on the Glitz” and promise a night of fun featuring the band Karma, fabulous food and libations from some of our best restaurants, including Desi Vegas Steak House, Galatoire’s, Pascal Manale’s, Superior Restaurant Group and more. Save the date for March 23rd at the Sugar Mill, and be sure to get your tickets now by calling 504-896-9375! This year, they are raising money to create a Pediatric Simulation Training Center at Children’s Hospital!

I am not sure what it is about the new year, but we all want to spruce up our houses, so check out our feature “Renewal Resources,” where six local experts give advice on how to spring into action and update your home. Also, our What’s Hot for Home Décor will help you with the best pieces to add to bring your home up to date! Our favorite Debutante Snapshots will give you a glimpse into some of the best debutante parties that were held in the summer and fall, as well as over the holidays. This is a year they won’t forget, and one that their parents have worked so hard on to make sure they are presented at some of our most prestigious balls! Mardi Gras is March 5th, and the Riverwalk will host Lundi Gras on the 4th at the newly renovated Spanish Plaza. This event is free and open to the public, and features live music from performers like Darcy Malone and the Tangle; Rockin’ Doopsie and The Zydego Twisters; Cowboy Mouth; and most importantly the arrival of Rex the King of Carnival and Zulu! The Mayor hands the keys of the City to Rex and the ceremony ends with fireworks over the Mississippi River!

Once Mardi Gras is over, get ready for The Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival March 27-31. The festival will return to the French Quarter for its 33rd annual celebration of contemporary literature, culture, theatre and the works of Tennessee Williams. The first day will have a diverse range of speakers and performers: Dorothy Allison, Jami Attenberg, Bryan Batt, Roy Blount, Jr. and more. This beloved festival is a don’t miss! I will be a featured speaker in Mobile Alabama for the “Festival of Flowers” on March 23rd at 11a.m. and hope that some of you will make the trip! It is an amazing festival that benefits Providence Hospital Foundation. This year the festival is featuring the famous Dutch Gardens of Amsterdam complete with a canal featuring a working water wheel. There will be landscaped gardens, art in the garden, tables by design and featured lectures and demonstrations. Visit FestivalOfFlowers.com for tickets and information. Be happy and Safe for Mardi Gras!

Beverly Reese Church

What a treat to feature “Harvest at Home” with Co-Chair Jennifer Heebe, Honorary Chairman Gayle Benson, Co-Chair Skylene Montgomery and Hostess Rupa Jolly. “Harvest at Home” is a two-part initiative, and is so needed by our most vulnerable families in our city and South Louisiana! The Patron Party will be March 21st at Rupa and Tarun Jolly’s, featuring chefs Kristen Essig and Michael Stoltzfus of Coquette. An “at home” component encourages support with delivery of a “Harvest at Home” gift bag and yard sign. Funds raised support Second Harvest’s programs, which offer hope to some of the most “in need” in the community and ensure that meals make it to the dinner tables of families struggling with hunger across South Louisiana! Call 7292820 or visit No-Hunger.org/HarvestAtHome to donate and get involved today!

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M O R G A N ' S N OT E

I just had a conversation with my best friend about feeling silenced and finding ways to speak out – even to your best friends – without starting a fight and before slights fester and become larger issues. (This is momentarily funny because I don’t currently have a literal voice, and what sounds I can make I’m saving for when my son wakes up from his nap.) But feeling like you can’t speak out can be frustrating and even scary. Finding one’s voice comes in many forms. One of these can be summed up in the old adage: Put your money where your

mouth is. And one of the most fun ways of doing that is going to nonprofit galas. As you recover from Carnival, look down and choose three events you’ve never attended and add them to your calendar. March and April are full of events that support a wide range of groups that are helping our city, so let’s speak out in our support of them. While most magazines started talking about updating our homes for spring back in January, we know to wait until after Mardi Gras. Lent (whether you’re a practicing Catholic or just like meat-free Fridays) is a great time to shed what no longer serves us and prepare our homes to better reflect ourselves. From a new side table to a whole new closet, look to our feature “Renewal Recourses” our What’s Hot for Home Décor to find what you need and need to know before you start.

As a former deb, though from Dallas, I love reading about the beautiful parties our honorees’ parents throw each year. If you do, too, look to pg. 65 for three of this year’s show stoppers. As always, if you have a nonprofit event coming up and you don’t see it in out calendar, go online and fill out our form today: MyNewOrleans.com/CharitableEvent. And don’t forget to look for our annual Courts of Carnival, this year as a stand-alone publication, coming soon! Happy Mardi Gras and St. Patrick’s Day!

Morgan Packard Griffith

March 9-10 “Soul Fest,” benefiting Audubon Nature Institute, 581-4629, AudubonNatureInstitute.org

21 “Jazzin’ on Jackson,” benefiting Mercy Endeavors Senior Center, 568-0607

23 “The Hike: Tunes, Tales and Trails Festival,” benefiting Friends of Lafitte Greenway, 702-6778

15 40th annual “Lark in the Park,” benefiting Friends of City Park, 483-9376

22 36th annual “French Quarter Festival Gala,” benefiting French Quarter Festivals, Inc., 522-5730

15 17th annual “Next Generation Golf Tournament,” benefiting Next Generation, 885-0980

22 “2019 Drafts for Crafts,” benefiting The National WWII Museum, 528-1944, extension 330, DraftsForCrafts.org

23 “Tribute to the Starts of New Orleans Blues and Jazz,” benefiting the Health and Education Alliance of Louisiana, Heal-No.org

16 20th anniversary “Soul Revival,” benefiting Legacy Donor Foundation, 558-8900, OrganAwareness.com/Soul-Revival 16 “Temple Sinai Gala,” 861-3693 16 “UNCF Mayor’s Masked Ball,” benefiting United Negro College Fund, Inc., 581-3794 16 “New Orleans Film Society’s 30th Anniversary Gala,” 309-6633 19 35th annual “Mad Hatter’s Luncheon,” benefiting Women’s Guild of the New Orleans Opera Guild Association, 529-2278 21 “2019 Goldring-Woldenberg Major Donor Dinner,” benefiting Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans, 780-5601 21 10th annual “Harvest at Home,” benefiting Second Harvest Food Bank, 729-2820

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23 “Harry Thompson Center Gala: Harry Says Aloha!” 501Auctions. com/htc, HarryThompsonCenter.org

29-30 11th annual “Hogs for a Cause,” HogsForTheCause.org 29-31 16th annual “Saints & Sinners Literary Festival,” 581-1144 29 “Amazing Grapes Wine Auction,” benefiting HermannGrima + Gallier Historic Houses, 274-0744 29 “Go Red For Women Luncheon,” benefiting American Heart Association, 872-3491

22 “Crimestoppers Annual Awards Luncheon,” benefiting Crimestoppers GNO, 837-8477

23 20th annual “Fête Française” benefiting Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle Orléans, FeteFrancaise.com

23-24 “Annual Shotgun House Tour,” benefiting Preservation Resource Center, 581-7032, PRCNO.org

24 “YEP Fest,” benefiting Youth Empowerment Project, 522-1316, YEPFest.org

29 10th annual “Paint the Town Green,” benefiting Raintree Children and Family Services, 899-9045

24 “Beauregard-Keyes House Annual Spring Gala,” benefiting Beauregard-Keyes House & Garden, 523-7257

30 Eighth annual “Jewish Roots Gala,” benefiting Jewish Children’s Regional Service, (800) 729-5277, JCRS.org

27-30 33rd annual “Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literacy Festival,” 581-1144, TennesseeWilliams.net

30 “A Night Under the Stars,” benefiting Cabrini High School, 483-8684

23 “Art & Soul,” benefiting NOCCA Institute, NOCCAInstitute.com/ artandsoul 23 “2019 Opus Ball: A Tribute to Fats Domino,” benefiting Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, 523-3593 23 “Keeping Our Promises Gala,” benefiting Daughters of Charity Foundation of New Orleans, 212-9544 23 38th annual “Sugarplum Ball,” benefiting Children’s Hospital, 896-9375, CHNola.org/Sugarplum

27-31 “Art in Bloom 2019 | Illuminations: Looking Within and Beyond,” benefiting New Orleans Museum of Art, 658-4106 28 “Celebration for Children’s Rights,” benefiting Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights, 658-6862

30 “Notre Dame Seminary Gala,” 866-7426, extension 375, NDS.edu 31 “Parkway Promenade XXVIII: An Evening in Monte Carlo,” benefiting Jefferson Beautification, Inc., 737-7583


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MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Community Sailing New Orleans, Inc. Bringing sailing to all By Catherine Freeman

Being born into generations of sailors and living on the coast, it was assumed I would spend my childhood summers learning to sail at our local yacht club. Eventually I became a respectable sailor, but I recall spending more time in the water from capsizing than winning races! Now it’s for me to understand why my parents encouraged me to continue sailing despite my lack of talent: Sailing teaches valuable skills in teamwork, communication, leadership and self-confidence, and allows for a unique discovery of the environment and importance of environmental stewardship. With the documented benefits gained through sailing and the asset of being situated on Lake Pontchartrain, you’d imagine New Orleans would offer sailing programs galore, but the unsettling truth is that in our city – and many other U.S. cities – unless one has access to a yacht club it’s almost impossible to participate in the sport. Fortunately, change is on the horizon. Hurricane Katrina brought West End to its knees, but gave birth to a focus on rebuilding with broadened public access. President of the City’s Municipal Yacht Harbor Management Corporation and lifelong boater John Manard decided, with a small group of individuals, that the time was ripe for a parallel private initiative to expand public benefit by following the example of 400 successful community sailing centers around the country. Countless volunteer hours were spent planning, gathering information from other community sailing programs and developing a diverse, experienced board of directors to ensure a feasible and sustainable building and operating plan. With a purpose to open Lake Pontchartrain and sailing to the whole population of our area, focusing particularly on those who have not had that opportunity previously – inner city youth, people of all ages with disabilities and adults precluded by

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economic obstacles – Community Sailing New Orleans Inc. (CSNO) became a 501(c) (3) non-profit in 2010 and subsequently negotiated a half-acre site lease with the City of New Orleans in 2014. Following extensive fundraising over several years, CSNO recently built and equipped the base facility in West End at a cost of $1.6 million. They are now moving forward in raising the necessary $550,000 to present their programs by fall 2020. This includes a fleet of boats to accommodate a range of skill levels and ages, equipment for safety and training, adaptive sailing set-ups, temporary buildings and an Executive Director followed by additional fundraising of $2 million for a permanent building. CSNO will have the ability to introduce sailing to over a thousand children each year through partnerships with existing area youth outreach programs and schools. And because the program will be scaled to an ability to pay, it will help remove the historical economic barriers to sailing. Also enhancing the CSNO experience, STEM

programming for students based upon U.S. Sailing’s REACH curriculum and environmental education in coordination with the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation will be provided. In addition to area youth, community members of all ages with disabilities, cognitive or physical, and their families will have the opportunity to sail through the use of specialized accessible boats, transfer equipment and trained staff. With passionate supporters like John Manard it’s no surprise the vision of “sailing for all” is on the brink of reality. “Now, after a decade long effort,” Manard says, “we have arrived at the crucial moment, when just that final increment of financial support will throw the doors open to hundreds, enrich their lives and improve our community.” n

A little more … For more information or to make a contribution to CSNO, visit NolaCommunitySailing.org or call 229-0722.


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K I DS P L AY

“Fête Française” The 20th anniversary will look to the future By Brittany Kennedy

In a city and state where we seem to have a festival for just about everything, it makes sense that there would be one dedicated to our French Heritage. The “Fête Française,” hosted by the Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle Orléans is marking 20 years of hosting the original event that celebrates French culture and heritage in New Orleans. The fête will take place March 23, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at the school’s main campus on General Pershing Street just off Magazine (appropriately near La Petite Grocery). While the fête often boasts a wide array of musical acts, food vendors and kid’s events, this year’s milestone marks a bigger fête that’s helping them make way for a bigger school. This year’s theme is “Tour de France” and, like the famous bicycle race, the festival site will be divided into different sections that all represent a different region of France, according to Robyn Cook, Director of Advancement at Ecole Bilingue. The kid’s area will feature a lot of carnival games ranging from spin art to a balloon pop prize reveal. Not only are there plenty of activities for both younger and older children, the students at the school run most of these events (with parental help), which makes the entire event feel less like a commercial festival and more a neighborhood block party. Face painting and kids dancing to music while they admire macarons and pastries are a common sight at this familyfriendly event.

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French Macarons

While the fête does have more of a neighborhood feel than your average festival, that doesn’t mean it’s just another school fair. Meanwhile, given they’re in their 20th year, they have also booked two Grammy-nominated headliners for their two musical stages. Ch-wa and Michot’s Melody Makers (a spinoff of the Lost Bayou Ramblers) will lead the way for other acts during the day, including Panorama Jazz Band, Bon Bon Vivant and The Tin Men. For the parents attending the fête, new this year will be a VIP tent that will have a wine and cheese tasting that highlights the various and diverse regions of France. While participants will not be transported by bicycle per se – following the theme – they’ll get to travel metaphorically around France via its two most beloved exports. While there’s a complete list of food vendors on their website, the majority of New Orleanians make a stop by the fête for one thing only: the moules frites. Les Deux Papas, a dad-duo that began when the fête was a much smaller affair near Audubon Park, will undoubtedly be back with their famous mussels steamed in

white wine and French fries. This booth often has the longest lines, but just about everyone will tell you it’s worth the wait as their name, “the two fathers,” means they’re just that: two dads helping out their kids’ school at this event only. If you want moules, you have to go to the fête. While the “Fête Française” has been a fairly major event the in New Orleans Spring festival lineup, this year’s event marks a growth not just for the event, but for the school as well. “Our school has really grown in the last couple of years. We have more than 300 students now and just acquired a property on Magazine Street to expand our campus and build an Arts and Athletic Center. It’s a great time for us and for the fête,” said Cook. n

Just the Facts ... “Fête Française” March 23, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 821 General Pershing St. Admission is free and tickets will be sold for games, food and drink. FeteFrancaise.com


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W H AT ' S H OT

Home Décor By Amy Gabriel

In New Orleans we approach our home decor just as we approach dressing, celebrating and festing– more is more. If you plan to give your home a refresh for spring, consider incorporating pieces that have dynamic details in texture, print and quirkiness.

� �

2. A side table is turned into a showpiece to flock to thanks to a team of golden flamingos proudly propping up the glass top. Z Gallerie, Lakeside Shopping

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Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 249-7938, ZGallerie.com 3. The sheerness, scalloped sides and blossom embroidery on the Olivia curtain panels from Bella Notte is a lovely way to let the light in. Sold individually. Relish, 600 Metairie Road, 3093336, RelishNewOrleans.com 4. For your next jambalaya party, impress guests with an over-

sized, hand-crafted ceramic oyster serving spoon. Home Malone, 629 N. Carrollton Ave., 324-8352, HomeMaloneNola.com 5. Give a flat Roman Shade extra personality with a chic and eclectic print that’s lined and interlined in blackout to darken a room and keep the true color of the fabric. Wren’s Tontine Shade and Design, 1533 Prytania St., 525-7409, WrensTontine.com

6. The mix of marble rectangle panels paired with brass gives the Alabaster light fixture dimension and style. Elan Studio Design, 1509 Metairie Road, 2672792, ElanStudioDesign.com 7. Toast your love of bottled poetry with the mixed media piece “Soft Still Life” by Mary Hongsize. Shard Shop, 3138 Magazine St., 3092581, ShardShop.com

SELECT PHOTOS BY CHERYL G ERBER

1. The five-tiered Aloha fringe chandelier with brushed brass detail is a fanciful conversation piece for any room. Anthropologie, Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 5929972, Anthropologie.com


W H AT ' S H OT

� �

8. Even a cozy day at home is an artistic interlude when relaxing beneath a lush blanket featuring an exclusive view of New Orleans; ca. 1851 from the archive of THNOC. The Historic New Orleans Collection (The Shop), 533 Royal St., 523-4662, HNOC.org 9. Pretty pulls add instant style points to a three-door credenza finished in alabaster and featuring mother-of-pearl inlay backplates. Eclectic Home, 8211 Oak St., 866-6654, EclecticHome.net

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ON THE MENU

Decadent Delight Broussard’s Executive Chef Jimi Setchim shares its Crawfish Omelet Mornay Crawfish Omelet Mornay 1 ounce unsalted butter, divided 2½ ounces Louisiana crawfish tails (Chef’s Note: If crawfish aren’t in season, or you’re unable to find them, you can substitute equal portions of Louisiana blue crabmeat and/or Gulf shrimp) 2 ounces artichoke hearts, halved ½ teaspoon fresh garlic, thinly sliced 1 pinch Creole or Cajun Seasoning 3 eggs, cracked and whisked 1 pinch Kosher salt 1 pinch black pepper, fresh cracked ¼ cup Gruyere cheese, shredded Lyonnaise Potatoes (*recipe below) Gruyere Mornay (*recipe below)

SWEAT garlic in half of the

butter over medium heat. Once fragrant, add artichoke hearts, crawfish tails, seasoning and warm through. While crawfish are warming heat an 8-inch non-stick skillet over medium flame. ADD remaining butter to skillet and swirl to coat the pan. Add eggs to skillet and cook until they begin to set. Using a wooden spoon or rubber spatula, gently stir to allow remaining egg to cook. Once eggs are about 90 percent cooked, use the spoon or spatula to flip the omelet. TOP omelet with cheese and

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(Chef’s Note: Traditional Mornays are made with a butter roux, using flour to thicken the milk and cream. We prefer to use a cornstarch slurry so that the dish can remain glutenfree.) 1 teaspoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon lukewarm water 3 Tablespoons white wine 1 teaspoon garlic, minced 1 teaspoon shallots, minced ½ cup heavy cream ½ cup Gruyere cheese, shredded To taste Kosher salt and white pepper

WHISK together cornstarch and

water; reserve. SIMMER garlic and shallots in white wine over medium heat. Once almost all of the wine is cooked out, add cream and bring to a boil. STIR in cornstarch mixture and

reduce to a simmer. Add cheese and stir until melted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. REMOVE from heat and hold warm if using immediately, or transfer to a container to cool.

YIELDS 1 CUP

Lyonnaise Potatoes 1 large potato, baked and sliced ⅛-inch thick. (Chef’s Note: I like to use Yukon Golds for the rich and creamy flavor, but any potato will work.) 1 sweet or red onion, julienned 1 red bell pepper, julienned 2 cloves fresh garlic, thinly sliced 2 ounces unsalted butter, cubed 1 pinch Kosher salt 1 pinch black pepper, fresh cracked

and Lyonnaise Potatoes to a plate and top with Gruyere Mornay; garnish with snipped chives or fresh herbs.

COOK butter until bubbling over medium-high heat. Add garlic, onions and peppers, and quickly sauté. Add potatoes and sauté until hot. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste.

SERVES 1

SERVES 2

TO PLATE: Transfer filled omelet

PH OT OS BY J EFFERY J OHNST ON

BROUSSARD’S 819 Conti St. 581-3866 Broussards.com

remove from heat. Spoon crawfish mixture over on half of the omelet and fold the remaining omelet over the crawfish.

Gruyere Mornay


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THE DISH

Que Rico! Authentic Cuban restaurant relocates to Magazine Street

Lechon Asado at Que Rico!

By Jyl Benson

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PHOTO BY MIK E LIR E T TE

From 1960 to 1979, hundreds of thousands of Cuban people f led the Communist regime of Fidel Castro and began new lives in the United States. Iderlin Carillo Rivera’s parents were among those who settled in the New Orleans area, and for nine years she welcomed with both fear and conf idence immigrants of her parents’ and grandparents’ generations to Que Rico!, her humble Cuban restaurant in an Old Town Slidell strip mall. Until recently last year’s loss of her lease on the Slidell building, following a painstakingly self-f inanced renovation no less, felt like misfortune. Then one of the many Uptown New Orleans-based customers who frequently made the trek to the other side of the lake to enjoy her exceptional Cuban cuisine intervened and helped negotiate a reasonable lease on a small building in a bustling block of Magazine Street, an area that Rivera and her husband and kitchen partner, Richard, had long aspired to serve. She painted the interior of the space a pale shade of aqua, adorned the walls in giltframed works from Cuban artists and opened to overnight success, driven by her strong existing customer and an


enthusiastic welcome from New Orleans’ sizeable population of persons of Cuban heritage or descent. “It still kind of scares me sometimes when these old, old Cuban men come in,” Rivera says. “They’ll look around and ask ‘Is this real Cuban? Give me a colada (Cuban coffee); we shall see.’” She holds her breath, lets it out. “It happens every time: They sip their coffee, nod and tell me to feed them.” She usually starts them off with either ham or chicken croquetas and green plantain tostones before she moves on to the entrée. Sometimes she brings them her Lechon Asado: 12-hour slow-roasted pork topped with grilled sweet onions and her special Mojo sauce. Sometimes it’s a Media Noche (Midnight Special) sandwich that’s stuffed with roasted pork, ham, Swiss cheese and tangy pickles stuffed between two pieces of vaguely sweet egg bread before she presses it to crisp perfection. Sometimes it’s traditional beef ropa vieja; others it’s a garlic and spice-rubbed Cuban-style steak, tamales, black beans, picadillo or a traditional Cuban sandwich. “They eat and eat, real slow, thinking about every bite. Sometimes they just smile and nod when they are done. But the best is when they smile, nod and say ‘This food? This is like my mother used to make.’ That just f ills my heart with such pride. It brings such joy to my life to be able to remind those old men of their mothers.” n

Try This: If your personal early spring practice includes abstaining from meat for Lent you won’t miss it a bit at Good Karma Plant Based Cuisine & Coffee, a colorful, soothing retreat located on the Canal Street campus of the atmospheric Swan River Yoga School. Each day brings fresh interpretations of Prasad, food offered to God with loving intention. The practice is based in Ahimsa, the principle of nonviolence that is the foundation of the Hare Krishna community in which brothers and co-owners Goshi and Deshi Berg were raised. Superfoods and botanicals are in heavy use in the kitchen and the menu is replete with tempting, colorful juice blends like Enlightened (kale, parsley, cucumber, mint, lemon and ginger) and smoothies like Heart Chakra (beet, apple, turmeric, strawberry, peach, blueberry, banana, walnuts, agave and coconut milk). Breakfast includes Upma, a traditional, spicy, savory Southeast Indian porridge served with fresh coconut chutney. The Malaysian curry bowl combines cauliflower, sweet and golden potatoes, carrots and soy protein stewed in a coconut sauce kissed with lemongrass and ginger and served atop brown or Basmati rice with a finish of crushed peanuts. For an excellent grab-and-go option try the Avocado Sandwich combining slices of perfectly ripe avocado, tomato, vegan mayonnaise, cucumber, fresh lettuce and almond spread on toasted Bellegarde Bakery bread.

GOOD KARMA CAFE, 2940 Canal St., 401-4698, GoodKarmaNola.com QUE RICO! CUBAN CAFE, 4200 Magazine St., 827-1398

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Museum Magnificence

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The New Orleans Museum of Art welcomed 550 patrons to “Odyssey 2018.” By Shelby Simon

“Odyssey 2018: All That Glitters” offered a scintillating gala for patrons of the arts. In support of the New Orleans Museum of Art, the annual program celebrates and enhances the museum by raising the funds necessary to support NOMA’s nationally-recognized exhibitions and educational programs, which bring more than 290,000 annual visitors to the museum and Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. Robyn and Andrew Schwarz, Allison and Ben Tiller, and Nancy and Franco Valobra served as Chairs. Event design was created by Susan Zackin of Z Event Company and featured flowers by Roland Monteleagre with Urban Earth. Launched by AFX Pro, the 2018 Tricentennial Committee underwrote a spectacular fireworks presentation. 1718 Catering and Events of the New Orleans Hyatt Regency prepared a menu of sushi, coq au vin, risotto, a French breakfast station and French pastries. Entertainment was produced and sponsored by Elan Artists, which featured Boyband and DJ Valida. An auction hosted an array of prizes including a hot commodity: artwork by George Dunbar. Approximately 550 attended the gala. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Chairs Andrew and Robyn Schwarz with Chairs Allison and Ben Tiller 2. Chairs Franco and Nancy Valobra with NOMA Director Susan Taylor and Tommy Westervelt 3. Anne Redd, Mike Siegel and Sponsorship Chair Cherie Moore 4. Alejandra Rosales and Margaret Villere 5. Marigny Ernst with Louis and Nairne Lupin 6. Karl Hoefer and Joe Caruso

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY TH OMAS KEIFER

WHAT: “Odyssey 2018: All That Glitters,” in partnership with IBERIABANK, benefiting the New Orleans Museum of Art WHEN: Saturday, November 10 WHERE: New Orleans Museum of Art


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Starry Night

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Ochsner Cancer Institute raised $1.7 million with a moon and starlit gala in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. By Shelby Simon

Event at a Glance WHAT: “Moonlight & Miracles,” benefiting Ochsner Health System WHEN: Friday, November 9 WHERE: Mercedes-Benz Superdome 1. Inaugural Co-Chair Lollie Rozas, Event Chair Gayle Benson, Inaugural Co-Chair Celia Ward and Ochsner Health System CEO Warner Thomas 2. Honoree Norris Smith and Dr. John Cole 3. Dr. Lock Ochsner, Mary Lou Ochsner, Brook Ochsner and Lori Ochsner 4. Donna and Paul Flower 5. Dr. Leo Seoane, Stephanie November and Bill Oliver 6. Father Tim Hedrick, Jennifer and Dennis Lauscha and Miles Clements

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PHOTOG RAPHED BY THOMAS KEIF ER (E XCEPT 01, COURTESY OF OCHSN ER HEALTH IN STITUTE)

Stars and a crescent moon hung from the ceiling of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome to herald the annual “Moonlight & Miracles,” which raises funds for the Ochsner Cancer Institute, the organization that offers comprehensive cancer services, access to cancer research and new cancer treatment development across the Gulf South. The 2018 Miracle Makers of the Year were Norris Smith, Lupo Williams and Dr. Troy Scroggins. The evening opened with cocktail hour music and dinner entertainment by violinist SPAGS, who roamed the room serenading guests with her iconic electric violin music. Following was the presentation of colors and the national anthem, featuring U.S. Navy Color Guard Naval Air Station and Joint Reserve Base Belle Chasse and Navy Counselor, Petty Officer First Class Sarah Prather, USN. Heavy construction equipment rigged the turf, bringing together the expansion and construction theme. The Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center is currently undergoing a $48 million expansion, expected to be open in early 2020. Approximately 2,000 attendees were seated at the 200 tables festooned with custom black and silver geometrical and architectural design tablecloths, adorned with centerpieces of golden yellow roses and white lilies. Catering was by Executive Chef Lenny Martinsen of Centerplate. A “Blueprint for Greatness” video including several cancer patients/survivors and providers was played. A featured patient video of Michelle Defrisco closed the presentation portion of the event. A raffle featured a grand prize of a 2019 White C-Class Mercedes-Benz. After-dinner dancing commenced under the Gala Moon with musical entertainment by 14-piece dance band with DJ,The Wedded. “2018 Moonlight & Miracles” Inaugural Co-Chairs were Lollie Rozas and Celia Ward. n


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Fruit of the Earth

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Guests wined and dined at the lush, world-renowned wine auction “Carnivale du Vin.” By Shelby Simon

“Carnivale du Vin,” the nationally-recognized charity wine auction that took place on November 10, 2018 as part of Emeril Lagasse Foundation’s two-night signature fundraising weekend, brought 600 patrons to wine and dine following the food and music festival “Boudin, Bourbon & Beer.” Patrons were welcomed by a grand entryway swagged in green silken drapes with a boxwood hedge welcome sign with the “Carnivale du Vin” logo in fresh herbs, flanked with colorful purple, white and green florals. This year’s theme was “At the Roots,” enhanced by elaborate floral centerpieces by Johnny Lopez of Perfect Presentations, which featured coral peonies with fresh purple and white kale, basil, rosemary and purple dahlias. The Bacchus Reception entertainment was provided by the Gregory Agid Quartet. The menu featured tastings from guest chefs Masaharu Morimoto, David Kinch and Traci Des Jardins paired with wines from Honorary Bacchus Barbara Banke of Jackson Family Wines. The Krewe du Vin menu featured five courses paired with fine wines. Trombone Shorty entertained with a lively concert. The auction display featured 200 items ranging from Salmanazar bottles (nine liter bottles of wine) to a custom art drum kit. Among all the fabulously displayed bottles of wine, to complement the theme, the tables featured fresh vegetable décor such as eggplants, sloshes and gourds with fresh cut green asparagus. Flanking the Bacchus winemaker station, concrete columns were wrapped in curly willow with golden lemonleaf and basil leaf to create lifelike trees. Live auction highlights included a vacation to South Africa with Travel Sommelier, an exclusive trip through Napa with retired race car driver and winemaker Danica Patrick and private dinner at Emeril’s home paired with wines from Dan Kosta. n

WHAT: “Carnivale du Vin,” benefiting Emeril Lagasse Foundation WHEN: Saturday, November 10 WHERE: Hilton New Orleans Riverside 1. Brian Kish, Gary Solomon, Chef and Host Emeril Lagasse and Paul Frank 2. Jim Clendenen and Mark Romig 3. Suzanne Pride, Dan Costa and Katie Clatty 4. Mark Lagasse, Antonia Keller and Tommy Moore 5. Bridget Harrell and Rick Burgess 6. Tom Matthews, Sara Matthews, Mike Thompson and Bob Cabral

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PHO TO GRAPHED BY CHERY L GERBER

Event at a Glance

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

For Our Freedom

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The National WWII Museum hosted Victory Ball over Veterans Day Weekend to honor those who serve. By Shelby Simon

The National WWII Museum celebrated Victory Ball on the weekend of Veterans Day to salute the men and women who have and continue to dedicate their lives to our freedom. The 2018 Victory Ball reception honored featured guest, Medal of Honor Recipient Lt. Col. Charles Hagemeister, U.S. Army (Ret.). The gala featured live music, entertainment and dancing, as well as unlimited access to the Museum’s pavilions and exhibit galleries throughout the evening. La Flowers provided tropical greenery with white f lorals and mini calla lilies. The Patron Party hosted The Greg Agid Trio featuring Gabriella Cavassa. The Victory Swing Orchestra performed at the Victory Ball, which also featured a Salute to Service by the Museum’s Victory Belles. The St. Rochettes Dance Krewe gave a brief performance of Andrew Sisters’ “Rum and Coca-Cola.” Libations included full bars throughout the museum, with the “Midway Mule” as the specialty cocktail. American Sector Restaurant and Bar provided a menu including a Wagyu beef caving station, chicken sauce piquant and vegetable jambalaya, stuffed bella mushrooms, barbecue shrimp and grits and a farm and garden cheese and charcuterie display. More than 750 patrons attended the gala. Proceeds from the Victory Ball support public programming and ongoing preservation efforts at The National WWII Museum. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Al and Penny Baumer, Jennifer Heebe and Dr. Mary Lupo 2. Partricia and Vernon Brinson 3. Gov. Pete and Gayle Wilson with Paulette and Frank Stewart 4. Bobbi Jennings, Frank Raterman and Cherry Whitley 5. Paul Hilliard and Ray Brandt 6. Barbara and Honoree Chuck Hagemeister and Cathy Metcalf

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF STROUT

WHAT: "Victory Ball," benefiting The National WWII Museum WHEN: Saturday, November 10 WHERE: The National WWII Museum


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Love for the Library

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An outdoor fundraiser on the Milton H. Latter Memorial Library grounds bolstered the library’s beautification initiatives. By Shelby Simon

“Growing Partnerships with Latter Library,” benefited the Latter Library Garden Conservancy, which is in charge of the ongoing beautification of the grounds of the Milton H. Latter Memorial Library on St. Charles Avenue. This year, the event surpassed its fundraising goal and raised $15,500. Miles Mumford and Spencer Shilstone, founders of MileStone Pictures LLC, served as Event Chairs. Marianne Mumford, Miles and Spencer delivered remarks to the 100 guests. The lively outdoor event featured music and activities for the whole family to enjoy. Table arrangements and decorations were created by Beverly Church. Landscape Images tailored the landscaping for the gala. The Wine Cellar provided libations to pair with tacos cooked by La Cocinita and Asi Pop-up Kitchen making delicious crepes. Local rock band, The Bummers, provided evening entertainment. Fait Nola brought their eclectic collection of plants in their mobile greenhouse pop-up, handing out terrariums and smiles with their French Bulldog. Kids’ activities included a plant-themed crafts table, cornhole and a fire pit for s’mores. The auction offered prizes such as a getaway to private homes in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and Minocqua, Wisconsin. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Co-Chairs Miles Mumford and Spencer Shilstone 2. Co-Chairs John Bland and Nicole Kniffen 3. Karen Giger, Garden Conservancy Coordinator Marianne Mumford, Library Manager Missy Abbott and Alan Mumford

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KEN N Y MARTINEZ

WHAT: “Growing Partnerships with Latter Library,” benefiting Milton H. Latter Memorial Library WHEN: Thursday, November 8 WHERE: Milton H. Latter Memorial Library


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

A Safe House Eden House continues to support victims of human trafficking with new programs and a second residence. By Shelby Simon

The seventh annual “Evening in the Garden of Eden” proved to be Eden House’s largest-ever benefit with 375 attendees in attendance. The gala supports the movement to eradicate human trafficking, and proceeds from this year’s fundraiser go directly towards recovery services for victims, the acquisition of a second Eden House residence and an expansion of the prevention education program, R.E.A.L. Choices. Event Chairs Lisa and Karl Hoefer were honored for their outstanding volunteer service to Eden House over the last few years. They received an award designed by Juli Juneau. Speakers at the event included U.S. Attorney Peter G. Strasser, Special Agent in Charge Eric J. Rommal and an Eden House resident. The festive Audubon Tea Room provided small plates and an open bar. Table decorations consisted of Especially Eden gift baskets. The Greg Agid Quartet played before the event. A film by David Rae Morris was shown during the main program. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Co-Chairs and Co-Honorees Karl and Lisa Hoefer 2. Peggy Laborde, Daryl Byrd and Co-Founder Kara Van de Carr 3. Treasurer Gina Rachel, Board Member Kara McQueen Borden, Co-Founder Katherine Green and Board Member Peggy Babin Indest

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KEN N Y MARTINEZ

WHAT: “An Evening in the Garden of Eden 2018,” benefiting Eden House WHEN: Wednesday, November 7 WHERE: Audubon Tea Room


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

A Fine Philanthropist

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Philanthropist Mary Keller Zervigon received the United Way of Southeast Louisiana Alexis de Tocqueville Award 2018. By Shelby Simon

Each year, the Alexis de Tocqueville Society of United Way of Southeast Louisiana presents its highest award for exemplary leadership in community volunteerism and philanthropy. The 2018 award was conferred upon Mary Keller Zervigon – philanthropist, public servant and volunteer. The program commemorated the fifth anniversary of United Way of Southeast Louisiana’s Public Policy Committee and honored our 2018 Legislative Champions. The lineup of speakers included Cathy McRae, Tocqueville Cabinet Chair of UWSELA; Robert Kimbro, Board of Trustees Chair of UWSELA; Michael Williamson, President & CEO of UWSELA; Florence Schornstein, Tocqueville Society Chair of UWSELA; Mary Keller Zervigon, the recipient of the UWSELA Alexis de Tocqueville Award 2018; Kim Sport, Public Policy Chair of UWSELA; and Charmaine Caccioppi, Executive Vice President & COO of UWSELA. The Ritz-Carlton ballroom was decked in traditional Tocqueville Society blue and gold, enhanced with floral arrangements of red roses, blue hydrangeas, pincushion proteas and safflowers from The Plant Gallery. Mary Keller Zervigon’s corsage featured white roses with a red feather, a nod to United Way’s past Red Feather campaigns. Gala guests were treated to a menu of poached pear and goat cheese salad, burgundy braised short rib with truffle grits and a chocolate vanilla mousse. Music was provided by a Loyola University Jazz Quartet and Kayla Lewis, Soprano, performing “Sovra II Sen La Man Mi Posa” from La Sonnambula accompanied by Albinas Prizgintas. Musicians were selected to represent Mary Keller Zervigon’s connections to both Loyola and Xavier. Congratulatory videos featured Mary’s family, Governor John Bel Edwards and First Lady Donna Edwards, former Governor Edwin Edwards, Dr. Norman Francis, Barbara Kaplinsky, Madalyn Schenk and Caroline Roemer, among others. Approximately 240 guests attended the gala. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Bob Kimbro, Honoree Mary Zervigon and Michael Williamson 2. Carlos Sanchez, Tocqueville Society Chair Flo Schornstein and David Fennelly 3. Paulette and Frank Stewart

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF STROUT

WHAT: “Alexis de Tocqueville Awards Gala,” benefiting United Way of Southeast Louisiana WHEN: Thursday, November 1 WHERE: The Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

All For One and One For All

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STAIR ensures the success of its reading programs to students in need. By Shelby Simon

Guests arrived to the beautiful Garden District home of Honorary Chairs Anna Beth and John Goodman dressed for the “Masquerade for The Three Musketeers”-themed gala for Start The Adventure In Reading (STAIR). The benefit supports the ongoing community work of STAIR: free one-on-one tutoring to lower elementary children so they have a chance for success. As partygoers flowed inside and outside the home, they enjoyed delicious bites from 33 New Orleans restaurants and the sounds of Moses Eder Trio performing on the front lawn. Catering was provided by Bayona, Boucherie, GW Fins, Jack Rose Restaurant, Liberty’s Kitchen, Midway Pizza, Mr. John’s Steakhouse, The Court of Two Sisters, Upperline, Reginelli’s, Olive Blue Catering, Raising Cane’s and Nothing Bundt Cakes. Cocktails, wine and beer were provided by Urban South Brewery, Sazerac/Republic National Distributing, Barefoot Wine & Bubbly, Crescent City Cola-Cola Bottling Company and E&J, along with late-night coffee from PJ’s Coffee of New Orleans. A specialty cocktail chocolate martini cocktail complemented the theme. Author Thomas Cole was on hand to autograph his book, Standing in the Shadows: New Orleans in Focus. A portion of the proceeds were donated to STAIR. The top auction items included an amazing strand of pearls from Beje Fine Jewelry, books from authors from around the world and the “Endangered Species List” art by Alex Beard, which included a gift certificate for framing from Alltmont’s Fine Custom Framing. Guests also took a chance to win a charcuterie basket for 12 provided by D’Artagnan food. In attendance were STAIR’s new Executive Director Shannon McCloskey Able, Board President Bart and Kay Dornier,Vice President Franklin “Tad” Jones and Cynthia Vonn Bell of the Saints, Board Members and dedicated STAIR tutors and supporters. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Board President Bart Dornier, Honorary Chair Anna Beth Goodman, Executive Director Shannon McCloskey Able 2. Darryl and Louellen Berger with Sandy and Mackie Shiltone 3. Greg and Carroll Feiling with Vice President Franklin “Tad” Jones

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF STROUT

WHAT: “STAIR Affair 2018,” benefiting Start The Adventure In Reading WHEN: Tuesday, November 6 WHERE: Home of Anna Beth and John Goodman


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Viva Las Vegas!

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Allan Bissinger was bestowed with the 2018 Judah Touro Society award for his outstanding contributions to the welfare of Touro. By Shelby Simon

The annual “Touro Infirmary Foundation Gala” honored Allan Bissinger as the 2018 Judah Touro Society Award recipient. The gala was cocktail event and featured a Patron Party, seated dinner, award ceremony and After Party reception geared towards Touro Tomorrow, the Touro Foundation’s young professionals group and Touro Employees. Funds raised at the gala were designated for use to improve Women’s Services and the Family Birthing Center at Touro. Vintage Las Vegas was the theme of this year’s gala, and included the tagline “Touro, Baby” as a nod to the fundraising initiative for this year’s event, as well as “Celebrating a Game Changer.” In that theme, the atmosphere included an Elvis impersonator, Vegas-style fan girls and gaming tables. The Patron Party, which preceded the gala festivities, was held in the Mansion Room and upstairs space overlooking the Mississippi River at Mardi Gras World. Passed hors d’oeuvres and cocktails were served. The evening included live musical entertainment by Little Coquette Jazz Band. A menu provided by 1718 Catering featured a salad course, entree options of red fish or bavette of beer and a dessert of Mississippi Mud Pie. The After Party featured a Speakeasy theme, which included Roaring 1920s decor such as a bourbon barrel table, velvet antique lounge furniture and mug shots of famous Prohibition Era personalities. DJ Twiggy played festive music into the night. The party also featured signature cocktails created by the staff members of Touro Employees in a competition for additional donations to their service line. Additionally, guests could pose in a photo booth with props and participate in casino games for a chance to win raffle prizes. The Grand Prize was a trip to Las Vegas, which included a hotel stay, dinner, a Las Vegas show and an airfare voucher. n

WHAT: “Touro Infirmary Foundation Gala,” benefiting Touro Infirmary Foundation WHEN: Saturday, November 10 WHERE: Mardi Gras World

1. Honoree Allan Bissinger, Susan Andrews and Greg Feirn 2. Stephen Kupperman, Nancy Timm, Joy Braun and Tom Oelsner 3. Brook Bissinger, Paul Du Treil and Nicole Miles

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Cultural Connections

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Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses honored its generous Circle Level members with its annual fall gala. By Shelby Simon

The Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses Board of Managers honored its most generous supporters with a reception and dinner to celebrate the Circle Level members of the Historic Houses Society. This year’s “Historic Houses Gala” was held at the recently renovated and impeccably decorated home of Anne and Sandy Villere. Stunning centerpieces from Mitch’s Flowers were used in the dining areas and fresh flowers and greens from the Villeres' own garden were used throughout. Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group set up an impressive spread throughout the home with live action food stations, including Ralph’s on the Park making tuna tartare, a bistro table by Ralph Brennan Catering, Napoleon House with pork tenderloin, RBCE Pastry Team with an array of mini desserts and Brennan’s making bananas Foster on the pool deck. Music was performed by Telthorse Studio Youth String Ensembles, made up of local high schoolers. As favors, guests took home a copy of Creole Cookery, the 1885 cookbook published by The Christian Woman’s Exchange and one of the oldest cookbooks published in New Orleans, as well as a copy of Luxury, Inequity & Yellow Fever, which outlines the histories of both the Hermann-Grima House and the Gallier House with stunning photography. Betsy Nalty and Kit Fritchie served as Event Chairs. Sarah Young serves as President of The Women’s Exchange Board 2018-2019. Joining the Historic Houses Society directly supports the mission of preserving New Orleans’ architectural and cultural heritage for future generations, as well as funds the museum’s growing array of important exhibitions and educational programming. This year, $115,000 was raised for these causes. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Hosts Anne and Sandy Villere 2. Event Chair Kit Fritchie, Ralph Brennan and Event Chair Betsy Nalty 3. Holly Nieset, Betsey Todd, Executive Director Megan Koza Mitchell and Sarah Young

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY THOMAS KEIFER

WHAT: “Historic Houses Society Gala,” benefiting Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses WHEN: Thursday, November 15 WHERE: Home of Anne and Sandy Villere


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ONSTAGE FRONT & CENTER

SAENGER SNAGS A BLOCKBUSTER More than two years after premiering on Broadway, the show is still one of the toughest tickets to get in New York, with shows sold out months in advance and tickets selling for over $1,000 on secondary markets. But access to the smash hit “Hamilton” has eased up thanks to the launch of a U.S. tour spanning dozens of cities, including a March run at the Saenger Theatre. Written by Broadway breakout star Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Hamilton” re-imagines the story of Alexander Hamilton and his role among the Founding Fathers. With an ethnically diverse cast and a hip hop-inspired soundtrack, the show is one of the most critically and commercially successful Broadway musicals in history. The production that snagged a Tony Award, Grammy and Pulitzer Prize will have 23 performances at the Saenger, Mar. 12-31, as part of the Broadway in New Orleans series. David Skinner, general manager of the Saenger, sees it as a landmark event for the city. “The season of ‘Hamilton’ is finally here, and we could not be more delighted to present the extraordinary story and unforgettable music of this production to New Orleans audiences,” he said in announcing the schedule. Big shows set to follow “Hamilton” at the Saenger include Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella,” “Come from Away,” “Kinky Boots” and “Wicked.”

EPISODIC HUMOR Sometimes the name says it all, and playwright Pat Bourgeois put it all upfront when she named her live soap opera “Debauchery!” Now in its eighth season, the city’s only live soap keeps audiences coming back to Southern Rep Theatre on Bayou Road for the ongoing hilarity. Regulars have come to love sisters Chanel and Cartier, who flounce and fight their way through a maze of outrageous exploits. Enjoy a

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based on Nealand’s album, “KindHumanKind.” The live performance (March 28-31) at the Contemporary Arts Center will present a visual world that showcases Nealand’s talents as a storyteller and musician, and brings to life her virtuosic musical world. The performance will also feature New Orleans musicians Free Feral, Tiffany Lamson (The Givers), and Alexis Marceaux (Sweet Crude). Goat in the Road Productions is a performance ensemble dedicated to the production of original and bold new works of theatre, dance, performance art and educational programming. The group is led by innovators Shannon Flaherty, Chris Kaminstein and Mary Guiteras.

SUMMER CAMP FOR CREATIVES

Photo for KindHumanKind courtesy of Goat in the Road Productions

new episode every month – always accompanied by cocktails. All performances are at 7:30 p.m., one Wednesday each month. See the Southern Rep website for up-to-date details. Bourgeois is a member of the Big Easy Theatre Nominating Committee and the Big Easy Theatre Advisory Committee. Her play “The Housewives of Oblivious Lane,” was accepted into Limelight: NYC’S “Go-Green” PlayFest 2014, and she writes every episode of “Debauchery!”

A TWIST ON CLUBBING Arts-centered, community-driven programming is the breadand-butter of Art Klub Nola, and its current lineup of offerings continues the mission. The March schedule, alone, features a host of opportunities for community members to come together in artistic expression. Weekly company dance classes explore styles from hip hop to ballet; monthly playwright meet-and-greets present live readings followed by audience feedback; resident playwright Reese Johanson offers a set of immersive works; and sprinkled throughout the schedule are innovative performances by a range of professional artists. See artklub.org for details of all upcoming events.

NO SHEEP IN THIS FLOCK Stories and music come together this month as critically acclaimed New Orleans musician Aurora Nealand teams up with Goat in the Road Productions to create a concert

It’s not too early to think about summer learning opportunities for kids with theatre leanings. Anthony Bean’s Community Theatre and Acting School is planning its nineweek summer program for kids 7 to 17 years of age. Stage veteran Bean says the camp is not just a training ground for the arts, but a safe and nurturing environment where children can develop creative skills as they discover more about themselves. The camp features full-day theater experiences, and no previous theater experience is required. Breakfast and lunch are provided on site. Workshops emphasize teamwork and community involvement, and cover play writing, performance, production, costuming, lighting and set building. Each Friday brings a talent show that puts the kids on stage to get the feel of performing and expressing themselves before an audience. The camp will culminate in a performance of the hip hop musical play “504,” written and directed by Anthony Bean. Call 504-862-7529 for more information.


ONSTAGE

DRAMA ON THE LAKEFRONT

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scenium lab and outdoor arena or some local theatre goers for public performances. Scene who frequent stages in or near and costume shops and rehearsal the city’s core, one of the most rooms provide full support for important live-performance hubs the on-campus productions may not even be on their radar. which can range from ShakeMany theatre pros, however regard speare to original student scripts. the drama and film programs at David Hoover The theatre department presUniversity of New Orleans, on the ents two main-stage and two lakefront, as crucial resources that lab productions each year, plus dark-night have long supported the growth of local talent. original script readings that let playwrights UNO is the only university in the country test their work on a stage. to have won two American College Theatre The program also collaborates regularly Festival National Play-writing Awards, as with the American Film Institute in conductwell as two National Irene Ryan Acting ing workshops in line with a parallel mission Awards. The theatre arts program, known of the department – to develop film producas one of the most demanding of its kind, tion expertise in the local community. is accredited by the National Association of The Nims Center Studios house one Schools of Theatre. of the f inest production and perforA big force behind the success of the mance centers in the city. The nearly program is David Hoover, a theatre pro who 100,000-square foot facility sports f ive chairs the department and directs the perstages totaling more than 50,000 square formance master’s degree program. Hoover’s feet, four green screens, 45 production directorial credits encompass dozens of off ices, editing suites, a mixing room and local productions and a host of local and state-of-the-art sound and f ilm equipment. national awards. His work and a number of It is home to Cineworks, the only full-serhis students have snagged invitations to the vice f ilm processing lab in Louisiana and regional Kennedy Center American College the only post-production studio offering a Theatre Festival and to the Kennedy Center full range of digital processing services. itself. Hoover has served as an adjudicator The film arts degree program prepares in London, lectured at the Université de students to enter the fields of film, theatre Sorbonne in Paris and taught extensively in and creative writing, with courses in film Italy and Mexico. aesthetics, digital technology, film history The academic programs overseen by and script analysis, as well electives such as Hoover include courses in acting, technical documentary production, cinematography, production, script analysis, play-writing, editing and sound design. The program and the study of modern and contemporary aims to shape complete, independent filmtheatrical production. Hoover is widely makers who are ready to step into a highly respected for sharing the talent and skills technical and competitive profession, for developed at UNO with the community and which there is a growing local demand. educational organizations. In addition to these human resources, UNO theatre students and members of the SUMMER IS THEATRE SEASON AT TULANE theatre-going public have access to one of An Uptown New Orleans university that the area’s f inest drama facilities in the Robalso supports dramatic talent development ert E. Nims Center. The 225-seat Thrust is Tulane University, where summer brings Theatre is augmented with a 65-seat proseparate, annual celebrations of both musi-

cal theatre and Shakespeare. The coming 26th season of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane will feature two of the Bard’s best as Artistic Director Martin Sachs and Managing Director Clare Moncrief present “Much Ado About Nothing” and “Hamlet.” Audiences can expect polished performances by seasoned actors, surrounded by excellent supporting casts and behind-the-scenes professionals. Meanwhile, Summer Lyric Theatre at Tulane, now in its 51st season, soon will again delight summer audiences with musical theatre at its best. “Pirates of Penzance in Concert” is slated for a June staging, with the ultimate show-biz musical, “42nd Street,” scheduled a few weeks later. The productions are among the top musical shows on tap in the city and are sure to be a hot ticket during the summer months. Also scheduled by Summer Lyric, in July and August, are “She Loves Me” and “Matilda.” Top-notch musical talent from throughout the city and beyond bring energy and passion to these performances, making sell-outs likely. So check the Tulane website for scheduling and details for ordering tickets early.

Nims Center Studios

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 43


ONSTAGE

STAGE AS COMMUNITY CENTER

Azul

W

hen Southern Rep Theatre made its recent move into a renovated church on Bayou Road in Treme, it also assumed a stronger-than-ever role as a resource for community improvement and well-being. That commitment is evident in the lineup of community-focused programming now on tap. “By increasing the number of seats at our theatre-making table, we start to cultivate and grow long-term community relationships,” Artistic Director Aimée Hayes said of the array of programs Southern Rep has scheduled. She described this new “community table” as a forum for conversation and art-making. “We work to include a diverse representation of our community to plan and design the most nutritious and enriching offerings,” she said. The community table lineup includes: • Second Saturdays – monthly free story time performances by Southern Rep Theatre Acting Company members. The experience may involve a great story, craft-making, snacks and even a dance party. The events are designed for families, particularly those with kids 2-12 years old, and they take place on the Lagniappe Stage. • Play dates – free two-hour community art-making events held on Saturdays and overseen by local professional artists. • Community-powered events – These will be high-quality works of participatory theatre that aim to draw in anyone interested in exploring stage drama. Whether it’s your first time on stage or you live and breathe theatre, you are invited to join in. • Radical solutions conversations – Designed as a platform for community-led problem solving and dialogue, these conversations encourage the community to engage with a diverse panel of civic leaders on ways to strengthen and improve the community. • Mondays Are A Drag – Southern Rep’s night to let local drag

44 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

artists of all kinds have the Lagniappe stage all to themselves to curate their heart’s desire. Glitz, glamour and racy delights are sure to ensue. In addition to the community table lineup, Southern Rep has launched Care for Creatives, a partnership with the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic that enlists mental health practitioners to promote resilience through workshops and events. The activities center around personal development, psychological education and healing through music, drama, visual art, movement, guided relaxation and other expressive forms. Well-being workshops, for instance, include sessions such as Metamodern Psychodrama and Paint with Passion. “Healing power hours” invite walk-ins to join in meditation sessions, yoga and autogenic hypnosis relaxation training. Sunday Brunch talks, meanwhile, combine live music with brunch and include the sharing of personal stories of hope. Further demonstrating how the theatre is embracing its new home, Southern Rep has commissioned Louisiana playwright Pamela DavisNoland to lead a team of artists, neighbors and vendors from the historic Bayou Road area to create an interactive, multi-disciplinary play that will premiere as part of the company’s 2019-20 season. The work will use stories collected through personal interviews and discussions along with research into the history of Bayou Road, which encompasses generations of indigenous peoples including the Natchez, Tunica, Tensas, Houma, Chitimacha,

Washa, and Atakapa tribes. Southern Rep invites its neighbors to be part of the process of implementing ideas as they develop from page to stage. Once a month, theatre audiences and fellow artists will be invited to join Davis-Noland in examining the process of new play development. This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

SPRINGTIME DRAMA It is definitely a rite of spring at Southern Rep Theatre: When March rolls around, it’s a sure bet that the theatre is at work on a play to be featured at the Tennessee Williams New Orleans Literary Festival. The festival has for many years brought hundreds of writers, actors and other creative types to New Orleans for several days of discussion, workshops, readings and performances. This year Southern Rep’s contribution to the festival is the world premiere of New Orleans native and playwright Christina Quintana’s evocative new play “Azul,” directed by Estefanía Fadul. Facing the loss of her Cuban-born mother, Zelia digs into her legacy and learns of her great-aunt who remained in Cuba for the love of another woman. Echoes of the past inform Zelia’s own relationship with her wife and her struggle to place herself between worlds. This production is in partnership with Saints+Sinners LGBTQ Literary Festival, which is a project of the Tennessee Williams fest. See either the Southern Rep or the festival website for scheduling details.


ONSTAGE PROFILES

SOUTHERN REPERTORY THEATRE

RIVERTOWN THEATERS FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

LE PETIT THÉÂTRE DU VIEUX CARRÉ

2541 BAYOU ROAD, NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.522.6545 WWW.SOUTHERNREP.COM

325 MINOR ST., KENNER 504-461-9475 WWW.RIVERTOWNTHEATERS.COM

616 ST. PETER ST., NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504-522-2081 WWW.LEPETITTHEATRE.COM

Housed in a beautifully renovated former church, Southern Rep offers a full slate of performances annually in its main stage season, as well as staged readings, special events and educational shows. See the lineup below and check the website for up-to-date details about scheduled performances.

From Broadway musicals and comedy classics to new local works, artistic directors Gary Rucker and Kelly Fouchi keep the high-energy entertainment coming.

In offering a full season of contemporary and classic dramas, comedies, musicals, and children’s productions, as well as master classes and special events, Le Petit embraces the work of the city’s professional artists, both onstage and backstage. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Maxwell Williams and Executive Director Don-Scott Cooper, the theatre aims to entertain and educate the region’s diverse populace.

UPCOMING: “Azul” (March 27-April 14). In partnership with the Saints & Sinners Literary Festival, New Orleans native Christina Quintana’s debut play has New Yorker Zelia facing the loss of her Cuban-born mother and struggling to center herself. A world premiere. “Flowers for Halie” (May 8-26). Written by and starring New Orleans’ own Troi Bechet, this new celebration of the Queen of Gospel, Mahalia Jackson, illuminates the struggles and triumphs of an American icon, from her early days in a shotgun shack in New Orleans to her international success as a singer and civil rights leader. The New Play Development program called 4D brings dramatists, directors and dramaturgs together to create three new full-length plays every season. Upcoming “Lagniappe” offerings include: • “Care for Creatives” series, which offers practice in the art of being well and includes such sessions as “Metamodern Psychodrama” (Sundays, March 10-April 14) • “Paint with passion” (Mondays, March 11-April 15) • “Queer Identities” (Sundays, May 19-June 23) • Yoga and Ritual for the Creative Soul (March 12) • Autogenic hypnosis relaxation training (March 19) • Tai Chi (March 26). In April, look for Tuesday sessions on mindfulness, roles in relationships; slow yoga and meditation. Space is limited, so please register for each event by logging on to the website and clicking on “Care for Creatives.”

UPCOMING: “Into the Woods” (March 15-31). The Brothers Grimm hit the stage in an epic fairytale about wishes, family and hard choices we make. See what happens to your favorite, yet tragically flawed, fairytale characters, both before and after the words “happily ever after.” Gary Rucker directs this visually enchanting show. “Me & My Girl” (May 3-19). This awardwinning show whisks you back to the glittering 1930s, with rousing song-and-dance production numbers that complement the side-splitting comedy. “Mamma Mia!” (July 11-21). The hugely popular show brings along ABBA’s hits to help tell the story of a young woman’s search for her birth father in a Greek island paradise. “9 to 5” (Sept. 13-29). With music and lyrics by Dolly Parton, it’s the musical based on the seminal hit movie. In this hilarious 1970s story of friendship, three female coworkers concoct a plan to get even with the sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot they call their boss. Hey, a girl can scheme, can’t she? “November” (Oct. 25-Nov. 10). Meet the SOB who runs the USA! Written in 2008 and originally starring Nathan Lane, November is a manically funny political comedy by David Mamet. Whether you lean right or left as a voter, you’ll have a great time watching this one. “Scrooge in Rouge” (Nov. 29.-Dec. 15). Local favorites Ricky Graham, Varla Jean Merman, Yvette Hargis and Jefferson Turner star in the hugely popular musical that they created.

UPCOMING: “Baby Doll” (March 15-31). With the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, Le Petit presents a regional premiere based on one of Williams’ one-act plays. The dark comedy is set amid the desires, desperation and prejudices of two rival Mississippi cotton gin owners. Directed by Maxwell Williams. “The Pianist of Willesden Lane” (May 10-26). Grammy-nominated piano virtuoso Mona Golabek presents a show based on the true story of her mother’s journey and life as a young musician in London during the Blitz in World War II. Golabek performs music from Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and Rachmaninoff. Ivan Neville: Piano Sessions (May 2). An intimate evening celebrating a Neville brother’s 60th birthday. Ivan will present his Songbook, a journey through his musical history in words, songs, sounds and stories told through a performance with very special guests. Le Petit Theatre has a long tradition of welcoming children. Student matinees provide a unique, personal experience of the productions for hundreds of students. Each student matinee is followed by a talk-back during which the cast interacts with students during a brief Q&A session. Upcoming matinees are scheduled on March 22 and May 10.

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 45


ONSTAGE PROFILES

THE NOLA PROJECT

SAENGER THEATRE

NEW ORLEANS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL AT TULANE

900 CAMP ST., NEW ORLEANS 504-302-9117 NOLAPROJECT.COM

1111 CANAL ST., NEW ORLEANS 800-218-7469 WWW.SAENGERNOLA.COM

6823 ST. CHARLES AVE., 215 MCWILLIAMS HALL, NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504-865-5106 NEWORLEANSSHAKESPEARE.ORG

A vigorous troupe that has carved a must-see niche for itself during 15 seasons, the NOLA Project’s mission is to present works that “inspire and ignite the human imagination.” Check the website for up-to-date details of the dates and locations of productions.

Broadway is alive in New Orleans at the majestic tower theatre on Canal Street. Between the big musical shows, see big-name concerts and solo entertainers. Check the website for the full lineup.

UPCOMING: Spotlight Supper (March 28). We are honored to invite you to an exclusive and intimate evening with The NOLA Project at our Spotlight Supper inside the majestically renovated and revived Felicity Church, which was built in 1850. Over the course of the evening, you will be served a five-act meal, while connecting with the company members through storytelling, preview vignettes from the upcoming 2019-2020 season, and capping the evening off with the announcement of our 15th season. Directed by The NOLA Project, at Felicity Church, 1220 Felicity St., New Orleans. “The Henchman: A Shakespeare Story” (May 8-26). Set 15 years after “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Michael Aaron Santos’ exciting sequel reveals the true story of Jacob, the little changeling boy who Oberon and Titania quarreled over many years ago. In NOMA’s Besthoff Sculpture Garden. Also watch for the return of NOLA Project’s “Rough Draughts,” a monthly play-reading series held at various locations where brews are consumed. Check the website for details. The NOLA Project is an ensemble-driven theatre company that strives to challenge, entertain, and engage diverse New Orleans audiences through high-quality and innovative performances of relevant great works, the development and production of new plays, and comprehensive educational opportunities for aspiring theatre artists.

46 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

UPCOMING: “Hamilton” (March 12-31). Come see what all the excitement is about. Alexander Hamilton was an immigrant from the West Indies who became George Washington’s right-hand man during the Revolutionary War and was the new nation’s first Treasury Secretary. Featuring a score that blends hip-hop, jazz, blues, rap, R&B, and Broadway, this is the story of America then, as told by America now. “Cinderella” (April 12-14). Rodgers and Hammerstein’s rendering of the classic fairytale is as enchanting as the story itself. “Come from Away” (May 28-June 2). A new musical about the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded passengers and the small town in Newfoundland that welcomed them. Cultures clashed, but uneasiness turned into trust and music soared into the night. “Kinky Boots” (June 14-16). The hit musical brings Tony Award-winner Harvey Fierstein and Grammy-winning rock icon Cyndi Lauper together at the Saenger in a performance of the uplifting tale of a young man reluctantly taking over his family’s struggling shoe factory. “Wicked” (Oct. 2-20). The surprising and untold story of friendship between two women in the land of Oz. Meet the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good, long before Dorothy drops in. “Dear Evan Hansen” (Nov. 5-10). It’s the one everybody’s talking about. Evan Hansen is about to get the one thing he’s always wanted, a chance to finally fit in.

Professional, classical theatre with a primary focus on the works of William Shakespeare shapes the mission of this festival, now in its 26th season. Under the direction of artistic director and lighting designer Martin Sachs, and Managing Director Clare Moncrief, the festival has recently begun casting for its summer shows. Summer main stage performances are held in the Lupin Theater, located in the Dixon Hall Annex.

UPCOMING: “Much Ado About Nothing” (June 7-23). The Bard’s five-act comedy takes an ancient theme – that of a woman falsely accused of infidelity – to comedic heights. Directed by Burton Tedesco. “Hamlet” (July 12-28). The tragic story of the Prince of Denmark remains one of the most powerful works in world literature. Directed by Clare Moncrief. The festival has a history of outreach into area schools to support rising talent. In the spring, in collaboration with the New Orleans Chapter of The English Speaking Union, the festival hosts the National Shakespeare Competition, which awards the best presentation of a Shakespeare soliloquy and sonnet with an allexpense-paid trip to New York to compete in the national finals. Throughout the school year, Shakespeare on the Road visits schools throughout greater New Orleans. Laced with humor and action from more than a dozen of Shakespeare’s works, this program exposes students to theatre in an exciting and powerful way. Also, the Gavin Mahlie All Things Shakespeare Program offers future theatre artists a chance to spend their summers in intensive training, working under our professional artists and technicians.


ONSTAGE PROFILES

SUMMER LYRIC THEATRE AT TULANE UNIVERSITY

THE JOY THEATER

JEFFERSON PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY

104 DIXON HALL, TULANE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504-865-5269 SUMMERLYRIC.TULANE.EDU

1200 CANAL ST., NEW ORLEANS 504-528-9569 WWW.THEJOYTHEATER.COM

6400 AIRLINE DRIVE, METAIRIE BOX OFFICE: 504-885-2000. WWW.JPAS.ORG.

Now in its 51st season of producing high-quality musical entertainment, Summer Lyric Theatre exists to support and develop musicians, actors, singers, dancers, technical artists and most important, promising students. It employs the talents of paid and volunteer performers and behind-the-scenes specialists. Hundreds of individuals audition for an experience that many rank among the best theatrical opportunities in the Gulf South region.

The grand art deco theater regularly hosts hot bands and popular comedians at a location on the Canal Street streetcar line in downtown New Orleans. An entirely renovated 10,000-square-foot multipurpose venue, the Joy features live music concerts, comedy shows, theatrical productions, and offers spaces to host private parties or corporate events. With fully re-purposed sound and lighting systems, the space holds up to 1,200 guests with a flexible seating plan that can be configured in a variety of ways.

At home in the beautiful Jefferson Performing Arts Center, Artistic Director Dennis Assaf presents the center’s 41st season. Performances are also on tap at Westwego Performing Arts Theatre and Teatro Wego on the West Bank.

UPCOMING:

UPCOMING:

“Pirates of Penzance In Concert” (June 1-2). A fresh take on one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s most popular comic operas. Frederic, an apprentice pirate, wants to give up piracy and lead a blameless life. As he follows Frederic’s star-crossed journey, Gilbert manages to lampoon the army, the police and “respectability.”

Travis Greene (March 14). “See the Light Tour”

“42nd Street” (June 20-23). The ultimate show-biz musical celebrates Broadway, Times Square and the talent that is the foundation of musical theatre. “She Loves Me” (July 11-14). Memorable characters populate this story of romance with a twist. “Matilda” (July 31-Aug. 4.) A modern fairytale mixes hilarious humor with a magical message. For many years young people from throughout New Orleans have had the opportunity to experience musical theatre on the beautiful Tulane campus through Summer Lyric Theatre and its educational program, Little Lyric. This summer, SLT will expand its educational offerings to include Little Lyric (ages 8-12), Junior Lyric (ages 12-16) and High School Musical Theatre Intensive (ages 13-18). Summer shows will include “Aladdin Jr.” (June 28-29) and “Shrek Jr.” (July 26-27). See the website for registration information and program details.

Güd Vibrations (March 22-23). Presented by Buku Late X Nghtmre & Slander. New Orleans Grandslam Championship (March 28). Presented by The Moth. Puddles Pity Party (March 30). A Winter Circle Production

UPCOMING: “Once on This Island Jr.” (March 15-17). JPAS Theatre Kids! presents an adaptation of the celebrated Broadway musical, a Calypsoflavored tale that follows a small girl who finds love in a world of prejudice. Non-stop song and dance unfold at Westwego Performing Arts Theatre. The Irish Tenors (March 16). Since 1998, Finbar Wright, Anthony Kearns and Ronan Tynan have presented sold-out shows from New York to Sydney, Australia. Meet the tenors after the show at a champagne social. (See website for details.) At Jefferson Performing Arts Center.

San Holo (April 13). The album1 Tour. Phil Lesh and the Terrapin Family Band (April 25-26). A Winter Circle Production Iration – Live from Paradise! (April 30). Summer tour with Pepper, Fortunate Youth and Katastro. Rage!fest 2019 featuring Lettuce (May 2). With special guest Oteil Burbridge, The Soul Rebels. Mike Gordon (May 3). A Winter Circle production. Les Claypool’s Bastard Jazz (May 4). Featuring Mike Dillon, Stanton Moore and Skerik. Anders Osborne & Friends Birthday Bash (May 4). Very special guests to be announced. Jim James – Uniform Distortion (May 5). With Amo Amo. Lany (June 4). Live Nation Presents. RuFus du Sol (July 27). Solace Tour 2019 presented by Alt 92.3 and WCP.

“South Pacific” (April 5-14). The exotic Rogers and Hammerstein musical remains as entertaining today as it was decades ago as it intertwines themes of romance, duty and prejudice to create a story that’s funny, heartbreaking and thought-provoking. At Jefferson Performing Arts Center. “Coppelia” (May 17-19). A comic ballet based on stories by E.T.A. Hoffmann centers around a young man who becomes infatuated with a life-size dancing doll. “How to Kill a Diva, the Musical” (May 24-June 9). An insufferable soprano nearing the end of her career battles a young rival, an old lover and the homicidal chorus of a financially failing opera house. Watch for these productions by the JPAS Youth Musical Theatre Intensive: “The Little Mermaid Jr.” (June 3-23); “My Fair Lady, Student Edition” (July 8-28); and “Aladdin Jr.” (July 15-Aug. 4).

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ONSTAGE CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE PROFILES

LOUISIANA PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

NEW ORLEANS OPERA ASSOCIATION

NEW ORLEANS BALLET ASSOCIATION

1010 COMMON STREET AND ORPHEUM THEATRE, NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.523.6530 WWW.LPOMUSIC.ORG

935 GRAVIER ST., SUITE 1940, NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.529.3000, 800.881.4459 WWW.NEWORLEANSOPERA.ORG

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.522.0996 WWW.NOBADANCE.COM

Under director and principal conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto, the LPO is at home in the grand Orpheum Theater, while continuing to perform concerts at other venues. Check the website for details of all events.

Artistic Director Robert Lyall leads the opera in a 75th anniversary season filled with drama, grandeur and thrilling voices, performed in the Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts.

UPCOMING:

UPCOMING:

The Fantastical Imagination (March 14). Violinist Vladim Gluzman performs “The Infant Minstrel and His Peculiar Menagerie.”

Lera Auerbach’s “The Blind” (April 4-7). A unique 12-voice acapella opera is based on a haunting play of Flemish Symbolist writer Maurice Maeterlinck. An “immersive theater” production in which a group of 12 blind patients have been led into the forest by their priest, who guided them there to enjoy the last rays of sun before the winter. This fascinating opera holds more questions than answers. At Marigny Opera House.

St. John Passion (March 28). Bach is center stage, featuring tenor Frank Kelly, soprano Sarah Shafer, Mezzo-soprano Abigaile Nims and others. Adventures in Space (March 31). A family concert featuring Planets by Holst and Star Wars. Bring your light saber. Cirque Musica, Heroes & Villains (April 6). Featuring the story about a boy and avid comic fan who becomes lost in a fantasy world of superheroes and villains. His world comes to life through the incredible displays of circus and acrobatic talent from the Cirque Musica and great superhero and classical music. Beethoven Symphony No. 7 (April 11, 13). Cellist Julian Steckel in his first performance with the LPO shines in Prokofiev’s Sinfonia Concertante for Cello and Orchestra, as well as Beethoven’s seventh. Swing in the Oaks (April 16). Fidelity’s Concert in the Park unfolds on the Goldring Woldenberg Great Lawn in City Park. Prieto Conducts (May 9). The maestro presents Carlos Chavez’s Symphony No. 2, “Sinfonia India,” featuring Alexandra Soumm in a Leonard Bernstein composition. Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 6 ends the program with a blaze. The Rite of Spring (May 16, 18). Pianist Joyce Yang brings dazzling musicality to Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 3, followed by Stravinsky’s revolutionary masterwork.

48 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

Verdi’s “Rigoletto” (April 26, 28). The Duke of Mantua is the personification of the axiom that “absolute power corrupts absolutely.” The fast-paced drama leads us to a grimly tragic conclusion as it commands attention with the power of its drama and the richness of its music. At Mahalia Jackson Theater. Opéra Nouvelle concerts feature interactive experiences, live music from upcoming operas and free-flowing dialogue with the audience. Watch for these upcoming performances: Innovative Explorations (March 29). An evening of multimedia and sensory experiences at the Jazz Museum. Renaissance Revelry (April 18). At the Ogden Museum Patrick Taylor Library. Keep an eye out for the ever-popular Opera on Tap, with cast members of upcoming operas in casual performances at such locales as the Rusty Nail and the 4 Points Sheraton. Check the website for details of spring performances.

The central Gulf region’s premiere presenting organization dedicated to dance, the association offers a season of main stage and educational programs featuring world-class dance companies and artists.

UPCOMING: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (March 22-23). Returning for the first time in almost a decade, the dancers celebrate 60 years of bringing the African American experience and dance traditions to the world’s stages. Directed by the charismatic choreographer Robert Battle, the dancers set the stage on fire. At Mahalia Jackson Theater. Bodytraffic (April 5-6). The Los Angelesbased company has blazed onto the international dance scene with a 10-member ensemble performing high-energy, humorous, jazzy and boldly theatrical performances. Co-presented with The NOCCA Institute at Freda Lupin Memorial Hall, NOCCA. NOBA supports the development of young talent through various annual programs, including a tuition-free Summer Intensive Program (by audition or invitation only) in June and July. Motivated students ages 8-18 receive opportunities to study with an exceptional faculty of visiting and local artists. Through the Pan-American Life Master Artist Series, NOBA will partner with premiere Latino dance organization Ballet Hispánico to offer a Celebration of Cuban Dance July 15–Aug. 2, 2019 which will include classes and choreography in Cuban ballet technique, Afro-Cuban and Salsa, culminating in an exciting concert. Multiple intensive sessions are also offered in June and July, with past guest artists representing top dance companies such as Dance Theatre of Harlem, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, The Joffrey Ballet and many more. The ballet also offers an Early Childhood Dance Program for children 3 to 5 years of age. Check the website for details about next year’s program.


RENEWAL RESOURCES Springing into action to update your home By Kelcy Wilburn

Organized Impressions, Home Staging & Organized Interiors Home of Ryan & Amie Lannes Scully, Old Metairie Photographed by Luke McCoy

Time to open the windows, dust off the pillows and welcome in spring. A busy time of year situated between the holidays and summer vacation, spring is the season many choose to make updates to the home. From taking stock of old inventory during spring-cleaning to embarking on a full-scale kitchen redo, the way you choose to renew your home may be minimal or more pronounced. Either way, a renewed home can bring on fun projects that help lift your spirits with a sense of organization and aesthetic appeal.

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 49


ORGANIZATION & SPRING CLEANING Spring cleaning is one way to renew the home and adding some organization to your life can be more than convenient – it can alter your entire outlook and improve your own efficiency as you navigate through life. Organization is the expertise of Nadine McCoy, founder of Organized Impressions, a full-service home organization and home staging company. Organization services include decluttering and organizing a space, and the company also offers a moving-in service of unpacking, organizing and styling a space. Their process includes an in-home consultation, followed by decluttering and categorizing, space planning and measuring and, finally, purchasing and implementing. The company recently helped a client with a problematic, gloomy laundry room that had become the home of everything from laundry supplies to garden tools and paints. “The client simply didn’t know how to get started and how to make the room not only less dark and dreary, but actually a room she would want to be in and get the laundry done,” says McCoy. “We came in, helped the client declutter and from there we decided on a better space plan and what type of storage was necessary to get the job done,” she says. Organized Impressions chose colors the client loved and added both a new light fixture and organized storage to create a beautiful, functioning space for washing, drying and ironing clothes. If you’re considering a renovation to the home and know you need better storage and organization, experts like Don Wise of Louisiana Custom Closets can help design a storage space unique to your needs, from master closets and pantries to laundry rooms and garages.

50 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

Organized Impressions, Home Staging & Organized Interiors Home of Ryan & Amie Lannes Scully, Old Metairie Photographed by Luke McCoy


RE SOU RCE S

Organized Impressions 421-2569 OrganizedImpressions.com

Louisiana Custom Closets 885-3188, (985) 871-0810 LouisianaCustomClosets.com

Liberto Cleaners 4814 Prytania St., 897-2161 LibertoCleaners.com

Crystallo quartzite countertop Fabricated by Pieri Tile & Marble Co., Inc. Home built by Sanderson Services Interior Design by Susie Sullivan Photographed by Mike Lirette

“By organizing storage spaces in your home, you can add space,

While organization is certainly a part of spring cleaning, let’s not

save time and cut down on stress,” says Wise. Whereas a jumbled

forget the actual cleaning part. Some items you clean all the time – we

stack of shoes on the floor can have you scrambling for those spring

hope – such as the daily dishes and laundry. But some items we let

flats, customized shoe shelving can show you all of your options,

sit for a while because, well, it’s complicated. Feather pillows, antique

well-lit and even at eye level.

quilts, special bedding and seasonal clothes like linen and seersucker

Organization experts note that it’s important to categorize your items and keep them together. With 16 years of experience in organization, Wise can help create proper storage for numerous categories

suits, may all get overlooked throughout the year. This is where cleaning experts like Liberto Cleaners come in handy. Liberto Cleaners runs a seasonal spring cleaning sale, a great

of items and supplies, whether clothes and fashion accessories, or

opportunity for addressing those household items that have been

cleaning supplies, pet supplies and pantry items. The company uses

sitting out or in storage a little too long, items such as tablecloths,

CAD software to draw and customize the design specific to your home.

napkins, sheets and pillows, duvet covers, comforters, quilts and

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 51


afghans. They offer a specialized feather down pillow cleaning service that emp-

the lighting of your room can alter the feel. Somers says it’s important to consider

and bath’s overall palette. According to Chevalier, if you tend towards a more

ties your pillow and delicately cleans the

proportion and when it’s appropriate

neutral palette, you’ll not be locked in to

feathers. The feathers are then placed in

to make a statement with an oversized

one décor style over time and you can

a new, clean casing.

piece. Trends in lighting and fixtures are

enjoy more flexibility with the rest of your

moving away from oil-rubbed bronze

accessories and fixtures.

“It’s like getting back a completely new

If you’re tiring of your granite and trav-

pillow,” says Lauren VanCamp, Manager

as the darker finish option and towards

and Owner of Liberto Cleaners. “Once

a matte black finish. The finish is seen

ertine, Chevalier notes a rise in marble,

you sleep on a clean pillow free of aller-

as both modern and traditional and can

quartz and quartzite as the trending

gens, you wake so refreshed,” she says.

work in a variety of spaces.

stones of choice.

According to VanCamp, the traditions

If you’re planning a big update, like a

“Being able to have the tile (floor and

of the city call for seasonal cleaning.

kitchen or bath overhaul, you’ll want to

wall) and stone slab (counter tops) selec-

When spring arrives, we pull out our

make sure time is on your side. Choos-

tions together in one showroom makes

white linen and our seersucker. Van-

ing and installing materials like tile and

final decisions a whole lot easier,” says

Camp recommends having your seasonal

stone, whether for flooring, a wall or a

Chevalier. She adds that using expert

clothes cleaned before you store them

countertop can take time to get right.

installers will also make the process

away, as sugars and food reside – that

From finalizing selections to ordering

smoother.

drop of wine or bourbon from your mint

materials and going on the install sched-

julep – will invite munching by the tiny,

ule, make sure you don’t rush any one

fied Kitchen Designer and Sales Manager

invisible creatures that exist in the home.

part of this important and often budget-

Chris Licciardi recommends narrow-

Avoid yellowed linens, stained fabrics

heavy process.

ing down your wants and needs before

At Marchand Creative Kitchens, Certi-

speaking with an expert. With online sites

and tiny holes by having them cleaned

“As experts, we’re diligent about each

right after their seasonal use, she says.

of these processes, which usually require

and apps like Pinterest and Houzz, it’s

more time than anticipated,” says Dina

easier than ever for homeowners to find

Chevalier, Manager at Pieri Tile & Marble.

examples of what they like and what they

When you’re ready to take on updat-

don’t. Armed with this information, your

ing your tile and stone finishes, keep in

process will go much faster.

HOME UPDATES & RENOVATIONS While cleaning and organizing a space will certainly make it more livable, you may have reached the point where

mind that they are often the more costly and permanent pieces of your kitchen

“The more you can choose beforehand, the more relaxed you’ll be as you

it’s just not that lovable anymore. The flooring or lighting is outdated, your countertops are too small, or you’ve got no room for the kitchen appliances that would up your cooking game exponentially. When your home has you sighing rather than smiling, it might be time for a little spring renewal that will set you up for years of satisfaction. “For existing spaces, changing your lighting can be one of the simplest and most affordable ways to update your space,” says Heather Somers, Owner and Lead Designer at Élan Studio Lighting and Élan Studio Design. “The right fixtures combined with the right color temperatures and placement can all greatly affect the outcome of your space,” she says. Lighting essentially completes the story of your design. Whether by a classic chandelier or more contemporary fixture,

52 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

Louisiana Custom Closets


RE SOU RCE S

Élan Studio Lighting 1509 Metairie Road, Metairie 267-2792 ElansSudioLighting.com

Pieri Tile & Marble 3622 Toulouse St. 488-1509 PieriTile.com

Marchand Creative Kitchens 3517 Division St., Metairie 888-0695 MCKitchens.com

go through and approach deadlines. You’ll be prepared for those things,” says Licciardi. Licciardi echoes the rise in quartz and quartzite countertops as homeowners are seeking more durable and less porous stones. With these stones, you can have the color of Carrera marble without worrying about stains from food and beverages. Licciardi says more people are updating their kitchen with the intent of not only making them more universal, open and user-friendly, but also making them suitable for aging in place with larger aisles and more countertop space. While technological updates tended to be TVs and computers in the past, we’re also entering a new wave of advanced or cutting-edge kitchen appliances, everything from smart refrigerators to steam ovens. If you’re updating a kitchen in this day and age, you’ll also want to consider the appliances that will give you the best bang for the buck. Licciardi recently replaced his microwave with a steam oven, and he’s enthusiastic about having this new versatile way of cooking and reheating food. Will renewing your leftovers with steam technology be part of your home renewal? Maybe, maybe not. But if you spring into action now, you might just have the new kitchen up, running and ready for preparing a feast by Easter Sunday.

Right: Iceberg silver calcite countertop Fabricated by Pieri Tile & Marble Co., Inc. Home built by Sanderson Services Interior Design by Susie Sullivan. Photographed by Mike Lirette

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 53


ADVERTISING SECTION

Prix d’ Elegance F Men and Women of fashion

photography by

J eff s trout

undraising makes a bold ‘ fashion statement ’ when the style - savvy

m en

and

w omen

of

f ashion

members are involved .

HALL OF FAME RECIPIENTS SANDRA STAGE CHAISSON AND SIDNEY TORRES, IV 54 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019


for

ADVERTISING SECTION

over

46

years ,

together these exceptional people have come

to continue

the tradition of

shining the light on others whose leadership , vision , and contributions to fashion and philanthropy are empowering our community .

MEN AND WOMEN OF FASHION BOARD CHAIRS R.K. HODDINOTT,III AND TERESA GUZZETTA

FOR OVER FOUR DECADES, these organizations have

TOP: MEN AND WOMEN OF FASHION BOARD PRESIDENTS LEON L. GIORGIO AND DEBORAH ALCIATORE EMPEY BOTTOM: PRIX D’ELEGANCE LUNCHEON CHAIRS DEBBIE BUCHLER AND KATHY PASTOREK

paid tribute to men and women in this community who pair style with substance, exhibiting excellence through business, civic and charitable endeavors that specifically better the community in which they live. On Tuesday, April 9, the 47th annual Prix d’Elegance Awards Luncheon & Fashion Show in the Grand Ballroom of the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel will showcase the Men and Women of Fashion’s commitment to both fashion and philanthropy by honoring 10 men and 10 women selected by the memberships at the sophisticated midday event. Additionally, two honorees, one man and one woman from the memberships of Men and Women of Fashion, will be inducted into the Hall of Fame, the highest honor awarded by the memberships which recognizes the recipients’ steadfast support of the organization and noteworthy civic engagement. This year’s luncheon will be co-chaired by Debbie Buchler and Kathy Pastorek, who are excited to build upon last year’s record-making success to fundraise for the New Orleans Ballet Association’s youth education programs: “We are honored and excited to help welcome the most fashion-minded men and women of New Orleans. This Luncheon showcases fashions not to miss from Chatta Box and Jeff ’s Haberdashery, in addition to special auction items and, of course, celebrating the ‘Best Dressed’ volunteers of the year!”

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 55


Upon arrival, guests will enjoy a reception with champagne donated by Brown-Forman, followed by a three-course lunch, an exclusive silent auction of contributions by area businesses and donors, a raffle pull for a set of 18k gold and Pavé diamond David Yurman starburst earrings from Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry and a Rubensteins shopping spree, and the opportunity to purchase beautiful table centerpieces donated by Dunn and Sonnier. Of course, the runway takes true center stage at the luncheon, where spring fashions are shown from Jeff ’s Haberdashery and Chatta Box Boutique, and the 2019 Men and Women of Fashion Honorees and Hall of Fame award recipients are presented to the audience. For Men of Fashion Board Chair R.K. Hoddinott III, the Hall of Fame induction showcases pillars among “a group of special individuals who continue to dedicate their time and their resources to make our city a better place to live. For over 46 years, these exceptional people have come together to continue the tradition of shining the light on others whose leadership, vision, and contributions to fashion and philanthropy are empowering our community.”

We

Want our young

enjoy dance and to strive dancers to have the ability to

to become dance artists

and successful professionals .

PRIX D’ELEGANCE AWARD RECIPIENTS ROGER JAVIER, ANN D. DUPLESSIS, ASHLEY STAGG, MICHAEL THOMAS 56 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

TOP: PRIX D’ELEGANCE AWARD RECIPIENTS GREG REGGIO, HON. VANESSA GUIDRY-WHIPPLE, JENNIFER AMEDEE, NICK KARL BOTTOM: PRIX D’ELEGANCE AWARD RECIPIENTS RALPH MAHANA, DOROTHY “DOTTIE” REESE, SHELLEY HODDINOTT RICHARDSON, HENSON DAVIS


In honor of its steadfast commitment

to our community’s youth, this year’s luncheon will again benefit BRAVO, the Ballet Resource and Volunteer Organization, which provides critical funds for the nationally award winning education programs and scholarship funds of the New Orleans Ballet Association (NOBA). Since its establishment in 1971, the Men of Fashion organization has upheld a philosophy of excellence in fashion and strength of character. For Men of Fashion President Lee Giorgio, that belief lends to a partnership between art and community and affirms BRAVO as a fitting choice for support. Giorgio further explains, “We are privileged to be able to appreciate the inherent beauty and true value of the Arts; to listen and to observe each distinctive talent so that we are able to learn perspective and respect for each person’s uniqueness. The Men and Women of Fashion are proud to embrace this richness of spirit and to continue our mission to aid in the growth of the artists in our community who are standing on the edge of meaningful accomplishment. As St. Francis of Assisi said, ‘For it is in giving that we receive.’” Chairs Buchler and Pastorek agree, stating the importance of the event to “make a difference in the lives of our children, giving them the opportunity to study dance when it may never have been an option otherwise.” “By supporting these programs,” says BRAVO President Stephanie Burks, “the Prix d’ Elegance Awards Luncheon is helping to ensure that the 600+ students of the over 5,000 dance classes can continue to provide youth and seniors of our community the access to quality tuition free programs and scholarships.” For 27 years, NOBA has partnered with area organizations in three parishes to host multiple summer programs and year round training programs with some of dance’s biggest names.

PRIX D’ELEGANCE AWARD RECIPIENTS BILLY GAUDET, MILLIE DAVIS KOHN, KAREN R. HUMPHREY, JOHNNY GIAVOTELLA

Of the beneficiary, Women of Fashion President Deborah Alciatore Empey remarks, “In my second year as president, I am proud that we remain a cornerstone of financial support for BRAVO’s dynamic and innovative programs. With a nearly fifteen year partnership, our commitment to BRAVO remains unwavering and strong as helping ensure the continuation of the youth-orientated, nationally recognized dance programs is of paramount importance to Men and Women of Fashion. The members feel privileged and honored to work alongside NOBA. We want our young dancers to have the ability to enjoy dance and to strive to become dance artists and successful professionals.” Women of Fashion Board Chair Teresa Guzzetta agrees, stating, “As members, we recognize the tremendous life-changing and lifelong community impact of NOBA’s programs. We are happy to help make dreams come true.” In addition to the luncheon, the 2019 award recipients and Hall of Fame honorees were treated to a photo shoot at the Ritz-Carlton New Orleans. The elegant hotel, which hosts a reception for all nominees of the Prix d’Elegance Award each fall, is known for its support of New Orleans arts and culture.

Sponsored by

PRIX D’ELEGANCE AWARD RECIPIENTS WES PALMISANO, LEEANNE LEOPOLD SAVOIE, ROSALYN “ROZ” DITTA, CHRISTIAN PENDLETON

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 57


E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V

Let the World Be Their Oyster An elegant fundraiser benefiting The Choice Foundation held at a historic Garden District home. By Bev Church

Give Kate Werner a few weeks and she and her board of The Choice Foundation, who operate Esperanza Charter School and Layfayette Academy, can pull off a fundraiser to benef it our elementary school children in a unique way! This event kicked off a campaign to raise $1.5 million dollars. The Choice Foundation says that: 98 percent of the 1,500 children in our public schools are minority and from disadvantaged populations, 100 percent qualify for free lunch, 17 percent have special needs, 20 percent are learning English and 17 percent are homeless. Thank goodness for the people in our city who care – for instance, Jim Huger founded the Choice Foundation!

58 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

First, Kate called her friends at IberiaBank, Hancock Whitney, Auto-Chlor Systems and Arnaud’s for sponsor donations. Katy Casbarian and chef Tommy DiGiovanni of Arnaud’s blew everyone away with shrimp Arnaud, lump crabmeat ravigote, filet and passed hors d’oeuvres, including crabmeat Prentiss. Gracious Bakery provided the desserts. And, Sazerac Company and Bizou Wines provided the libations. The hostess used her own china, silver, linen napkins and silver serving pieces to add an Old World feeling. Stephen Sonnier donated the exquisite flowers for the dining room table! There was a silent auction featuring Louisiana artists such as Gretchen Weller Howard, Phil Sandusky, Melissa Bonin, José-Maria Cundin, Ashley Longshore and more.

To carry through the oyster theme, Kate gathered oyster shells and tiny white lights to surround vases filled with white camellias from the garden. She also decorated the cocktail tables and created T-shirts with silk screened oysters to remind the children and the community to “Let the World Be Your Oyster!” Successful charter schools are one of the keys to having successful adults. The Choice Foundation will continue to provide the children of Esperanza Charter School and Layfayette Academy a strong education in safe, nurturing, stable environments and help realize a future promise for New Orleans. Join them by visiting ChoiceFoundation.org to learn more. n


E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V

Left: Chairmain Kate Werner and Katy Casbarian Above: Exquisite buffet donated by Arnaud’s; flowers by Stephen Sonnier of Dunn & Sonnier

Above: Artist Alex Beard and IberiaBank’s Tommy Westervelt Right: Oyster Shells, tiny white lights and camellias greeted guests as they ascended the stairs


WITH THIS RING

Lyons – Reily By Megan Holt

Elizabeth Ashley Lyons was living in Nashville and focusing on her country music career. She wasn’t particularly looking to meet anyone when she attended a fraternity party at Vanderbilt University, but William Boatner Reily V’s dance moves caught her eye. They had their official first date in July 2013, after their graduation from Vanderbilt. Four years later, in February 2017, Will planned a beautiful proposal in New York City, with Central Park serving as the backdrop for the big question. After Elizabeth enthusiastically said “Yes!,” the couple set to planning a four-day wedding celebration on Martha’s Vineyard. The tone for the big event was set months before, in a Save the Date created by Scriptura. Inspired by Elizabeth’s love for the East Coast, the design included an old map of Martha’s Vineyard that belonged to groom’s grandparents, a custom Compass Rose flanked with “W E,” and an anchor symbolizing the Vanderbilt Commodores with a star on top. Elements of this design would appear throughout the wedding weekend, beginning at the Reily family’s Edgartown oceanfront home with a Thursday night “musical clam bake” hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Hunter White III, Mr. and Mrs. Michael White, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bright and Mr. and Mrs. Barry Kern. In keeping with the nautical theme of the Save the Date, the navy blue tents were made of real sail cloths. In the center of the dance floor was the same Martha’s Vineyard map. Along with their clams and lobsters, guests sipped the “Green Hollow” cocktail as they got to know one another better. The festivities continued the next day with golf and tennis at the Vineyard Golf Club, followed by lunch on Chappaquiddick at the home of Pam and Jay Bryan. Later that evening, the rehearsal dinner took place at the Harborview Hotel, which offers a quintessential Vineyard view. With over 39 speeches, the rehearsal dinner was filled with love from the couple’s friends and family.

60 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

Elizabeth and Will added a special family touch to the flowers for the wedding ceremony. The very same florists who built Will’s grandparents’ terraced garden over 40 years ago filled Wendy’s Nantucket Baskets collection with Elizabeth’s favorite flower: hydrangeas in various shades of blue and white. The flowers set the tone for the blueand-white wedding décor, which looked perfectly placed to complement the sky on a crystal-clear, beautiful day. On September 29, 2018, Elizabeth walked down the aisle on a lawn overlooking the Edgartown Harbor wearing a Vera Wang dress with macramé detail. Will was waiting for her in a custom tie that featured the compass rose, anchor and star guests first saw in the Save the Date. After they said “I Do,” the celebration continued at a private home. To set a slightly more informal tone for

the reception, Elizabeth changed into a white beaded fringed Naeem Khan dress. Elizabeth’s love of country music was evident throughout the evening. She and Will shared their first dance to “Best Friend” by Tim McGraw before she took to the stage with members of her band. The bride wowed the crowd as she belted out “I’ve Never,” a song inspired by Will when they were at Vanderbilt. Even one of the specialty cocktails sounded like the title of a country music song: “Will You Whiskey Me Away!” The weekend concluded with a Sunday brunch, after which Will and Elizabeth “whiskeyed away” to a honeymoon to Norway, Sweden and Denmark. They had a great time exploring before returning to New Orleans, where they live in the Warehouse District. Elizabeth works full time as a country-pop recording artist, and Will works at his family’s business, Wm. B. Reily & Company. n


WITH THIS RING

Ceremony & Reception locations: Private Home on Martha’s Vineyard Reception Décor: Big Sky Tent Coordinator: KG Events and Design Celebrant: Margo Walters Ceremony Music: Boston String Quartet and a childhood friend of Elizabeth’s, Natalie Pelletier. Wedding Gown: Vera Wang, New York City Reception Dress: Naeem Khan Bridesmaids’ Dresses: Jenny Yoo, Chicago Groom’s & Groomsmen’s attire: Perlis, New Orleans; blue vests by Charles Tyrwhitt, London Custom Ties for Groom and Groomsmen: Vineyard Vines Florist: Donaromas Favor: Monogrammed napkins and boating gift bags filled with local apples, Chicago Mix from local Murdick’s Fudge, I’ve Never CD and Evamor water by Kitty Jackson with Nola Party Pieces Invitation: Scriptura Caterer: Jaime Hamlin and Sons Wedding & Groom’s cakes: Val’s Cake Photographers: Elizabeth Dondis & Larry Radloff Videographers: Adam Defrin & Louis Obioha Hair & Makeup: Sea Spa Salon Music: The Sultans of Swing

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 61


YO U N G B LO O DS

Paul Roach Illustrator, From A to Zoot By Lindsay Mack

62 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

gave him the job. “My favorite part about the entire project was being able to learn early on in my art career how to manage a large project and communicate ideas and thoughts with the authors of the book who hired me,” says Roach. Plus, children are already responding well to the book’s positive message. After the authors donated copies of the book to the Shriners Hospital in Shreveport, it was picked up for use in the hospital’s bibliotherapy program to help kids boost their self-esteem. Knowing that the book has already helped children in hospitals and schools across Louisiana has been an extremely rewarding part of the project for Roach. Drawing inspiration from surrealist painter Salvador Dali and New Orleans’ own Frenchy, Roach plans to keep honing

his skills in the art world, taking on different mediums such as painting and glassblowing. With the ultimate goal of owning his own warehouse or art gallery in the future, Roach is currently working on a solo gallery pop-up exhibition. Mural work is another passion, and he recently created one of Dr. John at the Elephant Collective in Mid-City. Plus, at an event put on by The American Cancer Society and Superior Seafood called “Shuck Cancer,” Roach collaborated with another mural artist to raise money for this incredible cause. n

Get Involved For more information on From A To Zoot, visit LandOfZoot.com. Follow Paul Roach on Instagram at Instagram.com/p_ro504; he’s currently taking muraling jobs.

PHOTO BY CHERYL G ERBER

For many people, contributing to a published book is a lifelong dream. However, few achieve it while still in college. For Loyola studio arts major Paul Kalil Roach, this dream is already a reality. Roach is a published illustrator for the children’s picture book From A to Zoot, released in October 2018 by Mascot Publishing. Now on sale at nationwide retailers such as Target, Amazon and Barnes & Noble, this book is already generating quite a buzz for the young and talented artist. For more than a year, authors Margaret David Laborde and Rebecca Doherty searched for an artist to illustrate From A To Zoot, their whimsical and positive children’s book. After receiving an email about their job opening, Roach submitted a drawing of an owl. They called within 15 minutes and


S H O P TA L K

Susan Wormser & Katie McNulty Sales & Marketing Director and Director of Business Development, The Event Glossary
 By Mirella Cameran

What is The Event Glossary? Susan Wormser: We are a web-based planning company. The website provides a resource for everything you need to plan an event, from venues and rentals to florals, catering, entertainment and more. Having all of these sources available on one website, with one point of contact is really helpful. What happens if you have questions? Katie McNulty: We have event concierges who guide you through the website to check availability, pricing and place your reservation and orders. Payment is made to us and you only have one point of contact to deal with.

What kind of brides would it be most helpful for?
 KM: The DIY or destination bride. Tell us about some of the things you can find from The Event Glossary? SW: Anything you can think of that you might need to plan a great event. There are sites that focus on brides, others on corporate hospitality; but our site has the resources you need for events of all shapes and sizes with experts on hand to guide you through the decision-making process. n THE EVENT GLOSSARY, EventGlossary.com

PHOTO BY J EFFERY JOHNST ON

Services like this already exist don’t they? SW: There are listing sites, but we offer a curated resource of trusted vendors put together by our owner Susan Zackin. Susan opened

Z Event Company in 2015 in New Orleans with 25 years of event and design experience. The Event Glossary puts you in touch with the experts you need through one interface, which makes throwing any kind of event in New Orleans easy for both the novice and professional planner alike.


S H O P TA L K

Kristin Malone Johnson Owner, Home Malone By Mirella Cameran

PHOTO BY J EF FERY JOHN STON

How did you start Home Malone? Home Malone began by refinishing furniture in my carport. While I had my tools and paint out, I began making rustic signs with New Orleans inspired art and sayings on them. I sold them at various regional art markets and local retailers. My focus eventually shifted to my artwork, and I was able to pursue it full-time. Today, I’m proud to curate and sell my art along with the work of over 100 other local makers in two charming New Orleans storefronts. What’s unique about Home Malone? We carry work that’s exclusively made in the Deep South. Our focus is to make sure products aren’t just being designed locally, but also being produced locally.

Who are your customers? We serve mostly locals who want to spend their money locally and prefer a quality product over mass-produced. We have the best customers whose support for New Orleans and its artists is unrelenting. What are your favorite pieces in the store right now? Our series of Southern-inspired dish towels and our festive New Orleans themed door hangers. We pride ourselves on being a spot where you can find a gift for just about anyone! Is there anything coming up that you’d like to tell readers about? We are thrilled that we just opened our second location in February at 4610 Magazine St.!

n

HOME MALONE, Mid-City: 629 N. Carrollton Ave., 324-8352; Uptown: 4610 Magazine St., 766-6148; HomeMaloneNola.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 65


S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 1

4

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1. UNCF Walk for Education participants at the start of the “2018 Walk for Education” 5K to support local students get to and through college. This year’s race raised over $100,000 to benefit UNCF’s mission to fund scholarships for students get scholarship for 37 private historically black colleges and universities 2. Mayor LaToya Cantrell stretches with the Xavier University team at UNCF’s 31st annual “Walk for Education” at Audubon Park in October 2018. 3. Jared Mason, Genevieve Vicini, Kayla Wilson, Jay Broadwell and Eric Sanchez attended the Made in New Orleans Foundation’s “Re•Birth Party” in October. The event raised celebrated MiNO’s new Executive Director and raised funds for their scholarship program to send New Orleans minority youth to culinary school at the International Culinary Center in New York City. 4. Scott Aertker, Lauren Darnell and chef Aaron Sanchez celebrated Darnell’s position as the new Executive Director of the MiNO Foundation and the group’s new branding, and benefited MiNO’s culinary program scholarship. 5. Local artist Paige DeBell and owner of GW Fins Gary Wollerman unveiled one of their three Little Free Libraries as part of a joint program with the NOPD. The effort is designed to forge a positive relationship between New Orleans’ youth and its police force through creating an enthusiasm for reading. 6. Nicole Allison, Holley Haag, Dawn Gallo and Cindi Shields attended “You Night,” St. Tammany’s annual fashion show and celebration of life for women who beat cancer and their loved ones.

66 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019


S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 7

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7. Victoria Vollentine Gilberti, Dr. Katherine Williams, Aimee Schwart and Ana DelRio at “You Night 2018.” The theme of this year’s program was Fierce Beauty Revolution, through which the 22 models/cancer survivors showcased their strength as they walked across the runway dressed as warriors. 8. Abbot Justin Brown O.S.B., Archbishop Gregory Aymond and Fr. Gregory Boquet O.S.B. are pictured at Saint Joseph Seminary College’s annual fundraising gala “Deo Gratis.” 9. Fr. Doug Brougher with Karen and Pierre Bezou at “Deo Gratis” in October 2018. Over 700 guests attended the event, which featured food by award-winning chef John Folse, desserts from Zoe’s Bakery and a silent auction, all held on the seminary’s beautiful grounds in Covington. 10. New Orleans Saints and Pelicans President Dennis Lausha posed with Phyllis Taylor and University of Holy Cross President Dr. David “Buck” M. Landry after giving the keynote address at the university’s annual prayer breakfast in November. 11. Reagan Charleston posed with Style Board members Anne Hingle, Ashley Wheat, Brianna Thomas and Natalie Tate, plus models Jared Carroll and Ashton Wright at the grand opening of Charleston’s first retail jewelry store, located on the second floor of One Canal Place. 12. Neha Desai and Francis Scire of O’Connor Capital celebrated the opening of Reagan Charleston’s retail store with Canal Place General Manager Lisa Manzella in October.


PERFORMING ARTS

D E B U TA N T E S N A P S H OT S

March

By Morgan Packard Griffith 1

By Fritz Esker

9

PJ MASKS LIVE: SAVE THE DAY The trio of superheroes from the hit TV series The PJ Masks fight to save the day from sneaky villains in an all-ages performance featuring brand new songs. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

9

ZAC BROWN BAND The multi-platinum, Grammy-winning country band visits New Orleans as a part of their “Down the Rabbit Hole Tour”. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com

14

THE FANTASTICAL IMAGINATION This mystical concert features a number of delightful pieces including Nathan Bates’ “Anthology of Fantastic Zoology” and Lera Auerbach’s “The Infant Minstrel and His Peculiar Menagerie.” Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com

12-31

HAMILTON Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Pulitzer Prizewinning musical about the life and times of Alexander Hamilton makes its New Orleans debut. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

15-31

BABY DOLL Based on Tennessee Williams’ one-act play 27 Wagons Full of Cotton, this is a dark cat-and-mouse comedy about two rival cotton gin owners’ attempts to seduce a young woman in 1950s Mississippi. Le Petit Théâtre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081, LePetitTheatre.com

15-17

ONCE ON THIS ISLAND JR. The Jefferson Performing Arts Society’s Theater Kids performs this Calypso-infused musical about a girl finding love in a world full of prejudice. Westwego Performing Arts Theater, 177 Sala Ave., 885-2000, JPAS.org

68 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

15-31

INTO THE WOODS Stephen Sondheim’s classic musical weaves the storylines of multiple beloved fairy tales into the same story. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., 461-9475, RivertownTheaters.com

16

THE IRISH TENORS Since 1998, Finbar Wright, Anthony Kearns and Ronan Tynan have been captivating audiences around the world. Join them at the Jefferson Performing Arts Center for a oncein-a-lifetime concert. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 6400 Airline Drive, 731-4700, JPAS.org

2

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AMOS LEE The American singer-songwriter comes to the Orpheum with his unique blend of rock, folk and soul. Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com

22-23

ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER Returning to New Orleans for the first time in almost 10 years, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater celebrates 60 years of bringing the African-American experience and dance traditions to the stage. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052, MahaliaJacksonTheater.com

3

March 27-April 14

AZUL After the death of her Cuban-born mother, New Yorker Zelia comes to terms with her heritage and learns of her great aunt who remained in Cuba out of love for another woman. The play was written by New Orleans native Christina Quintana. Southern Rep Theatre, 2541 Bayou Road, 523-9857, SouthernRep.com

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ST. JOHN’S PASSION The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra teams with world-renowned vocalists to bring audiences Bach’s musical interpretation of Christ’s Passion in the Gospel of St. John. Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com

1. Honorees Maggie Malone, Megan McGoey, Erin Tolar, Emily Hardie, Lucie Lanier and Lillie Kuhn are pictured at the party thrown in their honor by their parents at the Audubon Tea Room on June 15, 2018. The theme was “They All Asked for You.” 2. Some of the honorees and their mothers danced on stage with the band, Big Bling and the Funk Machine from Atlanta. The honorees wore outfits in various shades of pink, coral and red, inspired by the color of the flamingoes at the zoo, and the one featured on the invitation. Guests included family, friends and classmates from each of the girls’ colleges. 3. The décor of the event had a Palm Beach feel, complete with pink-and-green table linens and tropical floral arrangements by Meade Wenzel. A “Fizzy Flamingo” was the signature drink. Luminous Events provided lighting in the tented courtyard outside and soft pink lighting inside.


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D E B U TA N T E S N A P S H OT S By Morgan Packard Griffith 4

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4. Honorees Julia Plauché, Katherine Verlander, Madeleine Landry, Caroline Chunn, Chloe Pelitere, Elizabeth Toso, Shea Duckworth, Elizabeth Reed and Lauren Paysse are pictured at the party in their honor by their parents themed “Dancing In the Moonlight” on June 22, 2018 at The Mansion at Mardi Gras World. Honorees wore illuminated white floral wreaths on the dance floor as well as on stage with the band, The Bucktown Allstars. Guests received blinking rings and glow necklaces as festivities went on. The theme depicted on the invitation designed by Katie Rafferty (aunt of honoree Caroline Chunn), was carried through on souvenir party cups and Cookie Lady cookies, as well as in the GOBO projection on the night-sky ceiling of the Mansion at Mardi Gras World. 5. The thematic colors of silver, white and blue were highlighted by a large chandelier, string lights and large mercury glass lanterns at the entrance by Luminous Events. Huge luminous white balloons by NOLA Balloons with long silver streamers filled the foyer and entrance hall and lighted the way for guests as they passed black-and-white portraits of the honorees. Floral arrangements of white roses and hydrangeas decorated tables draped with silver linens throughout, and votive candles framed an expansive view of the Mississippi River from the Riverview Room. 6. 12 Seasons Catering provided tuna tataki; grilled flat iron steak; Caprese skewers; fried popcorn shrimp; spinach and artichoke dip; crabmeat Maenza; Creole charcuterie; seasonal fruit; a gourmet lobster mac and cheese bar; cochon de lait grits bar; a Steamship Round carving station; late-night Angus beef sliders; and shoestring fries. For dessert, moonlight-themed cookies inspired from images on the invitation were created by Joan Farrell (aka The Cookie Lady), along with petit fours from Swiss Confectionery and bundtinis (mini bundt cakes) by Nothing Bundt Cakes. The event’s signature drink was a Moonlight Martini chilled on an ice luge carved in the shape of a crescent moon and stars by Juliette and John R. Albrecht Ice Sculptures. 70 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019


D E B U TA N T E S N A P S H OT S By Morgan Packard Griffith 7

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7. Sam Joel, Matalin “Matty” Carville, Honoree Emerson Normand Carville, Mary Matalin and James Carville are pictured at a party honoring Emerson on December 15, 2018, thrown by her parents, based on a theme of the town of Carville, Louisiana. 8. The “butterfly ladies” – Emerson loves butterflies – were part of the décor created by Angle Events, which also featured large manzanita branches to turn the columns of the New Orleans Museum of Art into trees, and blue-and-green marbleized linens to give a camouflaged feeling. Guests entered into a champagne wall made of reclaimed wood, with Spanish moss and monarch butterflies. The main hall was transformed with a custom 20-foot-tall cypress tree adorned with Spanish moss. A pine cabin with a tin roof perched on the platform of the center stairs embellished with light projection of the marsh at sunset. The stage and backdrop was also made of reclaimed wood, on which played the Zydeco band Pine Leaf Boys followed by Atlanta Party Band. 9. Cocktails and raw oysters on the half-shell were served outside out of a pirogue, along with a charcuterie station complete with hogs head cheese, duck pastrami, alligator sausage and a smoked redfish pate. Passed hors d’oeuvres included crispy fried softshell shrimp with spicy satsuma marmalade; boneless quail poppers dipped in Steen’s Creole mustard sauce; red bean and rice boulettes with Comeback Sauce; cornmeal dusted fried oysters with Tabasco blue cheese dipping sauce; and Louisiana crawfish pies. Louisiana-inspired desserts included pralines, grasshoppers and chocolates with Cajun Crawtator Zapp’s potato chips. STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 71


ADVERTISING SECTION

Trust Your Face to a Facial Plastic Surgeon Specializing in plastic surgery of the face, head and neck, Dr. Sean Weiss is an expert in Facial Rejuvenation, Rhinoplasty, Eyelid Surgery, Facial Sculpting, Facelift and Neck Lift. Dr. Weiss is known throughout the New Orleans and Metairie area for his comprehensive approach to facial aesthetics and his attention to detail with both surgical and non-surgical procedures. Dr. Sean Weiss – Facial Plastic Surgery is happy to announce the addition of HydraFacial, Dermaplaning and RF Microneedling for enhanced skin tightening to our menu of services. For details and offers exclusive to St. Charles Avenue magazine readers visit SeanWeissMD.com/SaintCharlesAvenue or call 504-814-FACE (3223).

New Orleans Swim Experts

Children’s Hospital Shares Tips to Make Family Fitness a Priority! A child with healthy habits is more likely to grow into an adult with healthy habits. When physical activities are a family priority, they can help give children a great foundation for a healthy life. Physical activity can help kids and adults have healthier weights, less fat and stronger muscles and bones. These can also lessen feelings of depression and boost confidence. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) says that kids ages 17 and under should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity on most days of the week. Visit Children’s Connection Blog at CHNola.org for 10 fun ideas for family activity.

Compassionate In-Home Care Home Care Solutions specializes in compassionate in-home care, Alzheimer’s care and Aging Life Care Management™ services to help your elderly loved ones extend their independence at home. We are committed to providing the highest quality of care while giving families peace of mind. Caregivers are carefully matched to meet both your loved one’s needs and personality. Home Care Solutions Care Managers are experienced advocates with creative solutions for complex care concerns. Care Managers’ familiarity with local resources saves you time and often saves you money. Call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans. com to have Home Care Solutions assist your family in navigating elder care. 504-828-0900 | HomeCareNewOrleans.com

“Kids love Love Swimming because it’s fun; parents love us because we’re effective! At Love Swimming, it’s our philosophy and passion to provide the most effective, fun lessons for swimmers of all ages (starting at 6 months). In our indoor, warm, saltwater pools, we pride ourselves in teaching students the right skills at the right time –with safety always first. Our instructors are loving, trained professionals your kids will love and will learn so much from. Students often say that their lessons are high points of their week! 504-891-4662 | LoveSwimming.com


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Ingrid Rinck is the creator of Sensible Meals, the largest meal prep company in the country. She can relate to her clients’ battles with weight loss. In fact, her greatest success story is her own. “I was a binge eater for years. People aren’t just eating the wrong foods, they are eating too much of all foods! Portion control is key.” The program is affordable, offers live assistance 12 hours a day and Ingrid does monthly live chats. The meals are freshly prepared and free of preservatives. “I want to be an inspiration to my clients because I live it every day,” Ingrid says. “We’re all about being healthy, not perfect.” Sensible Meals EatSensibleMeals.com

Something for Everyone at the JCC Come take a spin in the cycling studio and a lap in the pool. Hit the basketball courts then relax with a massage. Work out with one of our experienced personal trainers or try our specialty small group training classes, which offer the individual attention of a certified trainer and the fun environment and camaraderie of a class. Between our two convenient locations, Uptown and Metairie, members have access to over 75 free group exercise classes. From TRX to Reformer and Mat Pilates, boot camps and boxing to aqua fitness and yoga, we have something for everyone at the JCC. New Orleans: 504-897-1403 Metairie: 504-887-5158 | NOJCC.org

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HOME

INTERIORS Liberto Cleaners is a family owned and operated dry cleaner that has been serving Uptown New Orleans since 1932. We bestow quality, care and concern for your clothes and fabric products. You can put your trust in Liberto Cleaners. We provide personal service and exceptional quality. Our unparalleled service, competitive prices and overall value are why our loyal customers won’t go anywhere else. Service is our business and your satisfaction is our goal. Stop by and see what we can do for you! Liberto Cleaners | 504.897.2161 | LibertoCleaners.com

These Top-Down/Bottom-Up Woven-Wood Roman Shades shades are perfect for rooms where privacy is important but natural sunlight is desired. The lifting system allows you to drop your shade from the top or raise it from the bottom. These Woven-Wood Roman Shades are lined in room darkening lining with edge banding. Wren’s Tontine is a design shop that specializes in window treatments. Wren’s Tontine Shade & Design | 504.525.7409 | WrensTontine.com

Want to spruce up your walls this spring? What if you could design a one-ofa-kind piece that is perfect for your home? You can at Shard Shop! We are a friendly Make-Your-Own-Art Boutique located off Magazine Street. Try a class and learn our unique style of ShardWorx art or plan your party with us! Shard Shop | 504.309.2581 | ShardShop.com/Nola

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Since 1930, Russell’s Cleaners has diversified over the years to incorporate stateof-the-art cleaning methods to provide the best cleaning results on your specialty items. Customers love our environmentally friendly “Green Clean” method, which uses less chemicals with beautiful results! Bring us you beaded gowns, furs, leathers and suedes and those items that need “special” handling. Cleaning area rugs, wall-to-wall carpet, upholstery, draperies and hard surfaces are handled through our Metairie location to freshen up and straighten out any home cleaning needs or problems. We offer pick up and delivery options for many services, call 504-832-1546 for more details. Russell’s Cleaning Services | 504.482.3153 | RusselsCleaning.com

At Vision Wood, we invite you to experience wood in new and exciting ways. We supply fine wood flooring, decking, interior and exterior paneling,and other wood architectural elements. Our curated collection includes specialty items, such as wide planks, herringbone, chevron and parquet patterns, stair accessories, timeless reclaimed woods, locally made furniture and wood decking options that last decades. We carry many different species, including sustainably managed, FSC-certified wood products. Vision Wood offers the right wood choices for any budget. Vision Wood | 504.265.8983 | VisionWood.com

Louisiana Custom Closets designs and installs custom storage solutions for closets, garages, pantries and utility rooms. Experienced professional designers, installation crews and office staff deliver their world-class service to every customer, all at an extremely competitive price. Customized designs are meticulously drawn using a state-of the-art-closet CAD program. The system is then custom built on-site in their Covington workshop. Their professional crew makes sure to protect and clean your home so that once the installation is complete, you are left to enjoy your new space. Are you ready to get started on your new custom storage solution? Call today for a free estimate. Louisiana Custom Closets 504.885.3188 | LouisianaCustomClosets.com

Organized Impressions is a luxury home organizing company whose mission it is to help you create personalized systems so you can better function in your day-to-day life, giving you more time for what really matters. As a leader in the home organization industry, their highly skilled organizers’ provide in-home organizing services including specialized offerings such as stress-free moving. In addition to their utmost attention to detail, well thought-out organizing solutions and Organized Impressions signature style, they also shop for recommended supplies, arrange appointments with other service providers and remove gently used donation items. Schedule your in-home project consult today!

Home of Ryan and Amie Lannes Scully, Old Metairie Photographer: Luke McCoy

Organized Impressions, Home Staging & Organized Interiors 504.421.2569 | OrganizedImpressions.com

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LUKKA BOUTIQUE | @LUKKANEWORLEANS

| 504.218.7113

BALLIN’S | BALLINSLTD.COM | 504.821.4000

Spring Fashion

FEET FIRST | FEETFIRSTSHOESTORES | 504.899.6800

76 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

PERLIS | PERLIS.COM | 504.895.8661


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PREMIER PROPERTIES

BRA GENIE | THEBRAGENIE.COM | 504.644.2500

FEBE | FEBECLOTHING.COM | 504.845.5250

ELIZABETH’S | @SHOPELIZABETHS

| 504.833.3717

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Ace and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

78 ST. CHARLES AVENUE FEBRUARY 2019

PREMIER


PROPERTIES

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N OS TA LG I A

Movie Magic Memories The bygone pleasure of drive-in theaters By Seale Paterson

80 ST. CHARLES AVENUE MARCH 2019

playgrounds and other entertainments to distract children. The family aspect was further encouraged by drive-ins like the Gretna Greens Drive-In, which promised free milk for little ones. Teenagers and courting couples were also frequent drive-in attendees, relishing the socializing as well as the privacy cars afforded them. The Airline Drive-In Theater opened in 1950 at 400 Airline Highway and was touted as the largest modern drive-in in the South, with a 70-foot-high screen. While the four-lane entrance promised to relieve congestion from cars entering the highway, its popularity and 900-car capacity still caused traffic back-ups. The Skyvue Drive-In located on Chef Menteur Highway in Gentilly opened in 1951 and was also very popular. Its large sign was blown over during a line of violent

thunderstorms in 1970, sinking four trucks parked next door deep into the mud. It was replaced with a larger sign, but the theater closed in 1979. The television era caused the end of the drive-ins. With VCRs and cable TV allowing film buffs to watch movies at home, fewer people ventured forth for the outdoor movie-viewing experience. By 1983, all the drive-ins in the New Orleans area had closed. n The Algiers Drive-In Theater opened in 1950, located just a few blocks from the Naval Station on General Meyer Blvd. It had an 800 car capacity and a large concession stand, but its most defining feature was its location: set in a bend of the Mississippi River, moviegoers were able to enjoy breezes off the water. It also served as the location for the yearly Miss Algiers Bathing Beauty Contest.

MAGE PROVIDED COURTESY OF: THE CHARLES L. FRANCK STUDIO COLLE CT ION AT THE HISTORIC N EW ORLEAN S COLLECTION. ACC NO. 1979.325.5849

The growing accessibility of automobiles after World War II changed American culture in many ways, including the rapid growth of the drive-in movie theater industry. Starting with the first one in 1940, by 1960 the Greater New Orleans area boasted 10 drive-in theaters. New Orleans’ climate meant that drive-ins could be open year-round, but it also meant that mosquito control was a regular concern. Before insect repellent coils could be burned at individual cars, theater employees would walk around the parking lot spraying repellent from a large can. Families loved drive-ins, as they could pile the whole family into their car, wear whatever they pleased and smoke and talk without concern for other moviegoers. The concessions stands provided easy dinners. Many drive-ins also provided


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

St. Charles Avenue Magazine March 2019  

St. Charles Avenue is the magazine of the city's social activist and society scene. The pictorial publication covers non-profit fundraisers...

St. Charles Avenue Magazine March 2019  

St. Charles Avenue is the magazine of the city's social activist and society scene. The pictorial publication covers non-profit fundraisers...