Page 1


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 1


CO N T E N T S

Features

On the Cover

Photographed by Jeffery Johnston 2018 American Spirit Medallion Recipient Archie Manning, Hancock Whitney Bank President Joe Exnicios, 2018 American Spirit Medallion Recipient Susan Hess and President & CEO at The National WWII Museum Stephen J. Watson for The National WWII Museum’s 2018 “American Spirit Awards.”

From intimate dinners to lavish black-tie galas, read about the top New Orleans’ nonprofit fundraisers of the past year and our annual “bests list,” starting on pg. 52.

52

Encore! The past social season in review BY DANA HANSEL

61

Taking the Kids 11+ ways to entertain this summer BY KELCY WILBURN | ILLUSTRATED BY DEMI SCHAFFER

2 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

The “American Spirit Awards” gala celebrates “individuals and organizations whose work reflects the values and spirit of those who served our country during the World War II years.” Each year The National WWII Museum honors people who inspire others through their own acts of service, generosity and courage, particularly through their leadership and service to their country and community. Myriad awards will be given out at the event. The 2018 Spirit Award Recipients are actor and humanitarian Gary Sinise; Philanthropist and Chairman and CEO of C.V. Starr & Co. Inc. Maurice Greenberg; and Senator John McCain. This year’s American Spirit Medallion Recipients are our own Archie Manning and Susan Hess, as well as First Lady of El Paso, Texas, author and Presidential Citizens Award Recipient Adair Margo. This year’s Silver Service Medallion Recipients are: Lt. General Victor “Brute” Krulak USMC (Ret.), Gen. Charles C. Krulak USMC (Ret.) and Bernice “Bee” Falk Haydu. In addition, the Billy Michal Student Leadership Award will be presented to “one student from each state and the District of Columbia who demonstrates the American Spirit in his or her community.” . The gala’s proceeds will support educational programming at the museum, as well as online experiences that bring the museum and its resources to students around the world. This year’s events will take place at the museum starting Thursday, June 7 with a Patron Reception, with the “American Spirit Awards Luncheon and Leadership Forum” on Friday, June 8, and the gala itself that evening. The gala will feature food by five different chefs and entertainment by The Temptations Review with Special Guest Theo Peoples. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 528-1944 or visit NationalWW2Museum.org/American-Spirit-Awards.


CO N T E N T S

In Every Issue

20 8 & 10 EDITORS’ NOTES

12 MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Trinity Educational Enrichment Program: Summer camp with a purpose

14 KIDS PLAY

Jaguar Jungle: The latest kid-friendly expansions at Audubon Zoo

16 WHAT’S HOT

Children’s Chic

18 ON THE MENU

Sun-kissed Shrimp: Lead Cook Clarence Polk shares Riccobono’s Peppermill’s Shrimp With Artichoke Hearts, Mushrooms and Sundried Tomatoes

20 THE DISH

Loving Luvi: Going bonkers over a new Uptown destination

24

PHILANTHROPIC FUN Bountiful Blooms “Art in Bloom” was bursting with fantastic floral arrangements in celebration of the season. 24 Street Fair Festivities YEP hosted a street festival benefit with local music, entertainment, food and drink for all. 26 Soulful Under the Stars Legacy Donor Foundation celebrated lives saved by organ donation. 28 Party in the Park Friends of City Park hosted an outdoor gala to restore the historic Casino Building. 30 Keeping the Community Safe The “Crimestoppers Awards Luncheon” honored individuals in law enforcement and those committed to a safer region. 32

Fête for Francophones The Alliance Française raised a glass to Honoree Nell Nolan Young. 34 Charged for a Bright Future NCJW New Orleans hosted a fun evening to engage the community. 36 Dancing through the Decades Temple Sinai honored the Benjamins, Haspels and Steegs for their community activism. 38 Topped with Whimsy Creativity abounded at the annual “Mad Hatters Luncheon” in support of the Opera Guild Association. 40 A Tribute for Fats Antoine’s opened its doors to 500 patrons for the French Quarter Fest kickoff event. 42

69 64 VINTAGE WEDDING

Carol Vidacovich Weds John Wilton Hall: January 27, 1968

66 YOUNG BLOODS

Lisa Hernandez: Executive Assistant & Liaison to CEO Blonka Mack, Blonka Movement

67 STUDENT ACTIVIST

Colin Joseph Accardo: Archbishop Rummel High School

68 SHOP TALK

Bessie Papazis & Effie Boihem: Owners, FeBe

69 SHOP TALK

Elizabeth E. Riggs DDS: Owner, Elizabeth Riggs Dentistry

70 SNAPSHOTS

72 SCHOOLDAYS

76 ONSTAGE CALENDAR

80 NOSTALGIA

No Expense Spared: The story of L’Escale 4 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


CO N T R I B U TO R S

Brittany Kennedy

JUNE 2018

A native New Orleanian, Brittany Kennedy left the city with a small car in 2003 for grad school and came back in 2007 with a 23-foot moving truck and a husband. She now occupies a Victorian side-hall in the Irish Channel that she’ll never finish renovating along with said husband, an active son, as well as a cantankerous cat and neurotic border collie that will do anything to convince you that they don’t like each other (even though they do). She is also a Senior Professor of Practice in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane University and can be found riding a yellow bicycle across Uptown.

VOL. 23 ISSUE 1 Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR Bev Church EDITOR Morgan Packard Griffith ART DIRECTOR Ali Sullivan CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mirella Cameran SOCIETY COLUMNIST Catherine Freeman FOOD & DINING COLUMNIST Jyl Benson WEB EDITOR Kelly Massicot EVENT PHOTO COORDINATOR Jeff Strout

Advertising VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan

Jyl Benson Jyl Benson began her editorial career in 1990 with The TimesPicayune and served as a regional reporter covering the southeastern United States for both The New York Times and Time magazine. She wrote Galatoire’s Cookbook: Recipes & Family History from the Time-Honored New Orleans Restaurant (Random House 2005) as well as several cultural, historical and architectural guides to New Orleans. She served as Editor-In-Chief of Louisiana Cookin’ magazine 2009 to 2011 and founded Louisiana Kitchen & Culture magazine in 2012. She has also worked as an independent publicist and marketing consultant since 1996 with a specialty in Louisiana culinary and hospitality oriented businesses, and was instrumental in conceptualizing and executing “The Galatoire’s Auctions.” Jyl is now a dining columnist for St. Charles Avenue, Acadiana Profile and Louisiana Life magazines, a frequent contributor to New Orleans Magazine, and the author of Fun Funky, Fabulous: New Orleans Casual Restaurant Recipes (2015, Pelican Publishing) and Louisiana’s Tables (2017, Savory House Press).

(504) 830-7241, Colleen@MyNewOrleans.com SALES MANAGER Lisa Picone Love (504) 830-7248, Lisa@MyNewOrleans.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Samantha Shiff (504) 830-7226, Samantha@MyNewOrleans.com

Marketing DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS

Cheryl Lemoine EVENT COORDINATOR Whitney Weathers DIGITAL MEDIA ASSOCIATE Mallary Matherne

For event information call (504) 830-7264

Production PRODUCTION MANAGER Jessica DeBold SENIOR PRODUCTION DESIGNER Demi Schaffer PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Emily Andras,

Kendall Woods TRAFFIC MANAGER Topher Balfer

Administration CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Todd Matherne PRESIDENT Alan Campell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Errol Laborde VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan OFFICE MANAGER Mallary Matherne DISTRIBUTION MANAGER John Holzer SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER Brittanie Bryant

Seale Paterson Seale Paterson grew up in Southwest Florida. After graduating from Florida State University she moved to New Orleans in 1997 and hasn’t ever looked back. She started working for the New Orleans Public Library the same year and received her Master’s Degree in Library Science in 2004 from Louisiana State University. She has been the managing librarian at the Cita Dennis Hubbell Library in beautiful Algiers Point since 2006. She also worked as a copy editor for various publications for many years. She enjoys delving into old newspapers and books in her searches for the most interesting bits of the always interesting history of New Orleans.

6 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

A Publication of Renaissance Publishing, LLC 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380

The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, © 2018 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. St. Charles Avenue is not responsible for photos or artwork and assumes that all releases have been cleared upon submission to the magazine. St. Charles Avenue is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, La. 70005, (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $17.95, two year $31, three year $43 — foreign rates vary call for pricing. It is the policy of this magazine to employ people on the basis of their qualifications and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap.


MEET OUR SALES TE AM

Lisa Picone Love Sales Manager 830-7248 Lisa@myneworleans.com

Samantha Shiff Account Executive 830-7226 Samantha@myneworleanscom

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 7


B E V ' S N OT E

If you talk to anyone about why they’re most proud of New Orleans, they’ll probably mention our National WWII Museum! We are so proud to present the 2018 “American Spirit Awards” presented by The National WWII Museum, which will be held June 7-8. Thanks to 2018 American Spirit Medallion Recipient Archie Manning, Hancock Whitney Bank President Joe Exnicios, 2018 American Spirit Medallion Recipient Susan Hess and President & CEO at The National WWII Museum Stephen J. Watson for gracing our cover. The “American Spirit Awards” is a gala that celebrates the values and spirit of the “Greatest Generation” with recipients of three Spirit Awards, three American Spirit Medallions, three Silver Service Medallions and 51 Billy Michal Student Leadership Awards being honored. This year’s proceeds will support educational programming at the museum, including development of classroom materials for schools all over the world. The gala will feature food by five different chefs and entertainment by The Temptations Review with Special Guest Theo Peoples. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 528-1944 or visit NationalWW2Museum.org/American-Spirit-Awards. FestiGals is back June 21-24 inspiring, connecting and celebrating women while supporting causes important to their wellbeing. This year’s program features an à la carte menu including a Tricentennial Women’s Day with sessions on fashion, wellness, empowerment and sexual advances in the workplace, plus the exciting “Step Up Second-Line Parade” shining a light on domestic violence and raising funds for the New Orleans Family Justice Center. Visit  FestiGals.org to pick your passion and sign up. Now that school is out, you can visit the National WWII Museum or go to our feature, “Taking the Kids,” which will give you over 10 local ideas for what to do with your kiddos and grandchildren as the temperatures heat up. If those ideas aren’t enough, look to the Kids Play column to learn what’s new at Audubon Zoo, and What’s Hot for “Children’s Chic,” because while traveling around town, you’ll want your children to look their best! A new store on Magazine Street, Lily New Orleans (3649 Magazine St.), is offering a party every single day with a collection of new items from $5 T-shirts to $1,000 Zimmerman dresses, fabulous accessories, local designers, Gucci and more. They also offer top-quality consignment for fashion-forward women for all sizes from 000 to 16, including Mardi Gras gowns and jewelry. Owner Jeanne Roberson says to come on in – they have wine and champagne every day and even doggie treats and water for your favorite companions! Dana Hansel, community volunteer extraordinaire, once again brings us her annual “Encore!” feature. She spotlights the past social season in review including “the bests” list. You don’t want to miss this! Have a wonderful summer and be safe on your travels or vacationing at home in our incredible city!

Beverly Reese Church

8 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

The miniature train at City Park’s Carousel Gardens Amusement Park has a new 45-minute historical tour featuring a trio of singing tour guides, a bite-size version of the park’s early history and catchy songs you’ll be humming for weeks! The Historical Musical Train Tour runs through November on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. All aboard!


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 9


M O R G A N ' S N OT E

June Events For some reason I always think that the deep summer months – June through August – will be slower. The higher temperatures and humidity would seem to suggest that time itself should move in a more relaxed manner. I find however, especially as I watch my friends with school-aged children, the exact opposite seems to be the truth. Music festivals, beach trips, seafood boils, summer camps and, let’s not forget, snowballs all add up to days filled with fun and frivolity – or days that need to be filled with such. If you have kids – or kids at heart – with schedules that need padding, look no further than our annual “Taking the Kids” feature. If you haven’t visited our award-winning Audubon Zoo recently, now is the time; beyond the beautiful animals, the Cool Zoo is the perfect place to spend an afternoon and our Kids Play column on Jaguar Jungle and the new expansions will give you tips on how to navigate them. This issue is also graced with our fifth annual “Encore! The social season in review,” written by the incomparable Dana Hansel, who’s no stranger to philanthropic fundraisers or what makes a good one better. She outlines some of the most amazing and exciting events, as well as ones you might not have heard enough about and gives her “bests list” to boot! Though the temperatures are high, that doesn’t mean that nonprofit events in New Orleans take a break. Just look to the right! If I’m missing any for June, or you have an event coming up in July or August that you’re worried I might have overlooked, please make certain you’ve filled out our events form found at MyNewOrleans.com/CharitableEvent and email me at Morgan@MyNewOrleans.com. Put on some sunscreen and enjoy this month!

Morgan Packard Griffith

10 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

1 “Innocence Project New Orleans 17th Anniversary Gala,” 943-1902

9 “Magnolia Ball,” benefiting Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 539-9616

1 “Juleps In June,” benefiting One Book One New Orleans, (205) 310-8537

11 “Men In Kilts, the Coronation Celebration,” benefiting Ronald McDonald House Charities of South Louisiana, 486-6668

2 & 3 and 9 & 10 “Parade of Homes” presented by the Home Builders Association of Greater New Orleans, benefiting The New Orleans Education League of the Construction Industry and its program, Jefferson Joining Forces, NolaPoh.org 3 “Made in Louisiana,” benefiting Southern Food & Beverage Museum, 569-0405 3 “Big Easy Brunch,” benefiting National Kidney Foundation of Louisiana, 861-4500 3 “Bowl-a-Palooza,” benefiting National Boys Town Louisiana, 293-7900, BoysTown.org/ Louisiana 7 “Soiree de Lumiere,” benefiting Lighthouse Louisiana, 899-4501, extension 257 7 “Mid Mod NOLA,” benefiting Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, 581-7032 7-8 “American Spirit Awards,” benefiting The National World War II Museum, 528-1944, NationalWW2Museum.org/american-spirit-awards

14 “The Man & Woman of the Year Grand Finale Gala,” benefiting the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 758-3210 16 “Heart & Soul Gala,” benefiting American Heart Association, 830-2300 16 & 30 “JA Bowl-A-Thon,” benefiting Junior Achievement of Greater New Orleans, 569-8657 21-24 “FestiGals Women’s Weekend Experience,” benefiting FestiGals, festigalsnola@gmail. com, FestiGals.org 22 “Welcome Back to School,” benefiting Apostolate of the Archdiocese of New Orleans, 881-7645 23 “NOMMS Mission Possible Gala,” benefiting Orleans Medical Mission Services, Inc., 392-1934 23 “NAMI’s 40th Anniversary Celebration,” benefiting the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 896-2345, NAMINewOrleans.org/40th


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 11


MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Trinity Educational Enrichment Program Summer camp with a purpose By Catherine Freeman

“She was able to thrive with other students and improve her presentation skill.” “His experience helped enhance his academic knowledge and also his social relationships.” “He was full of questions and anxious to learn about all the lessons and recreation activities.” “She learned the importance of art as a creative way to express an individual’s perspective.” At first glance most would assume comments like these would be found on a school report card, but in actuality the accolades about campers were shared by teachers and counselors at one of New Orleans’ longest running and most impactful summer camps: Trinity Educational Enrichment Program. Since 1966, TEEP has been offering a tuition free six-week summer learning experience for underserved youth. What began by Trinity Church and School to help fill a void of summer programs for African-American children in the nearby Irish Channel and Central City neighborhoods has grown into a highly sought after camp that provides educational and enrichment opportunities to 85 children annually from Orleans Parish Schools. Rising fifth and sixth graders are recommended by their school principals as potential campers and then, with their parents, participate in an interview process. Once accepted, students and their parents

12 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

are asked to sign a contract outlining expectations of full commitment and engagement. A typical TEEP day doesn’t start in the classroom, because learning doesn’t just occur there. As the children unload from busses Director Alvin Edinburgh (In his 42nd year!) greets each one with a firm handshake. The campers are expected to adhere to the cornerstone of the program he helped develop – the five Rs: Respect, Responsibility, Reciprocity, Restraint and Redemption. A healthy breakfast is then served before they tackle academic classes taught by certified teachers in reading, science and mathematics, where students receive individual attention in an intentionally small classroom setting. After lunch, campers spend the afternoon with student and adult volunteers enjoying creative activities in dance, art and music. Twice a week, swimming at a NORD pool and field trips to local attractions, such as the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, IMAX Theater, and Global Wildlife Center, offer special outings to campers – many for the first time. A much anticipated Saturday trip takes small groups to Land O’ Pines in Covington for a day of exploration outdoors including hiking, tubing, playing in creek beds and barbecuing. The TEEP session concludes each summer with a family picnic at the Solomon Retreat Center in Robert,

Louisiana, and a “TEEP Sunday” celebration at Trinity Church for campers, their families, teachers and counselors. Now a model for programs around the country, TEEP is proud to have a second generation of campers participating in the program, as well as many alumna serving as counselors, including current Assistant Director and educator Romaine McCarthy. Funded completely through the generosity of Trinity Church parishioners and local foundations, the camp strives annually to reach financial goals in order to maintain the high program standards while also working toward goals of expansion to reach all ages. In 2017, TEEP was thrilled to be able to offer a Pre-K program again for the first time since Hurricane Katrina. TEEP is helping children realize their potential academically, socially and spiritually through providing a nurturing structure, positive role models and a fun summer camp environment for learning academics and invaluable life skills. n

A little more … Tax deductible donations may be made online at TrinityNola.com/teep-donate or mailed to Trinity Church: attn. TEEP, 1329 Jackson Ave., New Orleans, LA 70130.


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 13


K I DS P L AY

Jaguar Jungle The latest kid-friendly expansions at Audubon Zoo By Brittany Kennedy

14 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

While the Jaguar Jungle is another bright spot in the zoo’s offerings, it’s also a reminder of how Audubon, like so many zoos in the United States, has shifted away from a darker past when they featured a collection of random animals in various – usually small – enclosures to creating multi-faceted exhibits and large habitats that aim to educate young and old about not just the animals on display, but the nature and cultures that surround them. Throughout the entire Jaguar Jungle, there are large sculptures, signs in Spanish and information about the importance of jaguars – and bats – to Mayan Culture. Also featured are the modern-day Maya and the role they have in contemporary Latin-American culture. The new Jaguar Jungle not only builds upon the dream of a former Audubon Board Member, but also reinforces the strong connection between our city and Latin America. Doris Zemurray Stone, who co-founded Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American studies at Tulane University with her husband, Robert Thayer Stone, and was president of the Zemurray Foundation for much of her life was a major

visionary behind the Jaguar Jungle, and both of these organizations contributed to the exhibits. An anthropologist raised in New Orleans and daughter of infamous Cuyamel Fruit Company (later sold to United Fruit Company) founder Samuel Zemurray, Stone did significant research and made major contributions to Middle American studies, which is apparent throughout the Jaguar Jungle. Meanwhile it offers an excellent example of how a darker version of our past can be reborn into a vision that offers a crosscultural experience for folks looking to either find out more about Mayan culture or simply see some jaguars and “criaturas de la noche.” n

Just the Facts ... Audubon Zoo Hours (summer): Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Admission: $19.95 for adults; $14.95 for seniors and children Jaguar Jungle: The Southeast corner or back left corner as you go through the Main Entrance, next to the Louisiana Swamp

P H OTO B Y S U S A N P O A G P H OTO G R A P H Y

Blessed with glorious weather this year and – well, let’s be honest – an actual spring, the Audubon Zoo has been packed with kids dropping in with parents and family or on a field trip with friends. In turn our everexpanding zoo has more space – and a newly expanded Jaguar Jungle exhibit – to welcome them, offering a glimpse to an ancient Mayan culture that seems far off but that, in fact, has ties closer to us than we may realize. On March 23, the zoo opened Phase II of the Jaguar Jungle exhibit complete with a “Criaturas de la Noche” (“Creatures of the Night”) house, alpacas, a new play structure and a Maya Village Plaza with restrooms and a much-needed quiet place take a break in a farther corner of the zoo. The night house is no doubt the star of the new expansion. Entering the darkened building immerses you into a mysterious world with more than 200 Seba’s bats as well as Nancy Ma’s night owl monkeys. Younger kids may be hesitant (for reference, it’s a tighter space than the reptile house), but the diversity of “criaturas” makes for a great game of night-time, Mayan-inspired “I spy.” Another new feature of the exhibit is a large play structure that mirrors many of the stone statues meant to resemble Mayan relics and temples. While there are warnings that you’ll “anger the gods” if you climb the statues, the play structure has stairs and slides that will keep older kids occupied while parents take a break with smaller ones in the Maya Village. (Mom’s Note: The large stones used to build the “temple” may be too tempting for toddlers to climb, which signs politely ask you not to do.)


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 15


W H AT ' S H OT

Children’s Chic By Amy Gabriel

From art workshops at NOMA and visits to the Audubon Zoo, to streetcar rides to scoop up sweet treats, the summertime scene for kids in the Crescent City is a true playground. Dress up your littles in outfits and accessories that will have them looking stylish throughout the sunny season.

� 3. A pink-and-white striped swimsuit with pompom embellishment is the sassiest way to splash. Mignon for Kids, 2727 Prytania St. No. 2, 891-2374, MignonNola.com

2. Your little guy will be strutting his stuff at the pool in a pair of flamingo swim trunks. Banbury Cross, 100 Atherton Drive, 837-0447

4. Your little girl will want to twirl the day away in an organic cotton snowball dress. NolaTawk, 487-0044, NolaTawk.com

16 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

5. Nothing could be sweeter than a petal pink beignet sundress with adjustable ties on the shoulders. Bon Temps Children’s & Gift Boutique, 603 1/2 Metairie Road, 571-5259, BonTempsBoutique.com

6. Protect baby from spills while looking stylish with an Alimrose scallop floral bib in liberty blue. Relish, 600 Metairie Road, 309-3336, RelishNewOrleans.com 7. She will be the cutest thing at the picnic in a pair of Sun San Sea Wee sandals in gold. Pippen Lane, 2930 Magazine St., 269-0106, PippenLane.com

SE LEC T PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

1. A play date at the park calls for a crawfish logo crew neck in stripe or solid, available in a variety of colors. Perlis, 6070 Magazine St., 895-8661; 600 Decatur St., 523-6681; Perlis.com


W H AT ' S H OT

� �

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 17


ON THE MENU

Sun-kissed Shrimp Lead Cook Clarence Polk shares Riccobono’s Peppermill’s Shrimp With Artichoke Hearts, Mushrooms and Sundried Tomatoes

INGREDIENTS ½ pound linguini, cooked al dente ¾ pound large shrimp peeled and deveined 2 Tablespoons olive oil 2 Tablespoons butter Salt and pepper to season shrimp to taste 6 cloves garlic minced 2 green onions, chopped ½ cup sundried tomatoes, julienned 1 cup quartered artichoke hearts 1 cup dry white wine Salt and pepper to taste HEAT a skillet and add 1 Tablespoon olive oil and 1 Tablespoon butter. Add garlic. Add seasoned shrimp and cook for approximately 2 minutes per side. Once cooked set aside. ADD remaining olive oil and butter to skillet (watch garlic to not burn). Add artichoke hearts, mushrooms, green onions and sundried tomatoes, stir together for 3-4 minutes on medium-high heat. ADD wine and cook down for 5 minutes to let flavors concentrate. Add shrimp back to pan.  Add salt and pepper to taste. TOSS together with linguini. Plate and garnish with sprinkle of Romano and fresh parsley. Serves 4

18 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOS BY J EFFERY J OHNSTON

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie 455-2266 RiccobonosPeppermill.com


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 19


THE DISH

Loving Luvi Going bonkers over a new Uptown destination By Jyl Benson

20 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

Snow White, Mama’s Dumplings and Afternoon Kampai at Luvi

PHOTO BY MIKE LIRETTE

I loved everything about Luvi the first time I set foot in the cozy, Technicolor space at the corner of Tchoupitoulas and Bellecastle streets. I love the way the loud wallpaper that looks like undulating snow-capped mountains rendered in Batik contrasts with the screamingly bright floral patterns on the sleek slipper chairs and the small wooden dresser that has been repurposed into a wait station. None of these things should be in the same space but, like a shimmery fairy dust, the energy, passion and pure thrift that brought these disparate elements together renders them perfect, the only acceptable backdrop for chef Hao Gong’s exotic, playful Asian hybrid cuisine that draws on elements of his Shanghai upbringing, stints at restaurants around the U.S. and his decade-long career as the head sushi chef at Sake Cafe. Some dishes, such as spicy Szechuan Dan Dan noodles and Mala Holla (razor thin slices of beef shank in ghost chili oil) hearken to Asian traditions. Others, like the Monkey Snack (raw salmon, sesamecrusted banana and a spicy-sweet sauce) are his own mischievous creations. It is apropos that Gong named this bright culinary play spot for his young children, Lulu and Violet. His core belief that we feast first with our eyes is evidenced on the plate in bright pops of color, patterns and layers. The dim sum-sized Snow White from the raw bar brilliantly combines cubes of creamy whitefish ceviche with fried garlic, paper thin slices of cucumber,


Rice Krispies and brightened with the tang of yuzu sauce. He does his mama proud with the dumpling soup he named for her complete with elegant origami-like pillows filled with pork, ginger and cabbage floating in a complex soy broth. For $45 there’s the Feed Me. You get elements that capture the chef ’s attention and inspire him at any given moment. Though I have yet to experience it, I’m definitely looking forward to the trip. In addition to an atmosphere, an attitude and a menu that lands Luvi solidly on the list of “My Extreme Happy Places,” there’s the inventive and daring wine and cocktail list that blasts it off the charts. David Goldberg is the man behind the bar and he comes packing close to a decade of restaurant, bartending and brewery knowledge, most recently at Tin Roof Brewery in Baton Rouge. “Having an entrepreneurial mindset I always look for opportunities that meet with an exciting challenge,” Goldberg says. “I really bought into chef Hao’s concept and vision. Spending long hours studying the art of Japanese cocktails has given me a whole

AMERICAN SECTOR RESTAURANT & BAR The National WWII Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1940, NationalWW2Museum.org LUVI 5236 Tchoupitoulas St., 605-3340, LuviRestaurant.com WILLA JEAN 611 O’Keefe Ave., 509-7334, WillaJean.com

Try This: The American Sector Restaurant & Bar at The National WWII Museum recently completed an eight-month renovation and rolled out a new Victory Garden-to-Table menu that furthers the focus on contemporary American cuisine with throwback touches. A weekend brunch has also been added.

new inspiration behind the bar. His dishes definitely lead you on journey of complexity, whether it’s umami- or citrus-driven. Studying his flavor combinations has also been a great prerequisite to creating cocktails. My goal is to have a menu that is different than most Asian restaurants: Not just hitting the sweet side of your palate.” The Blue Uzumaki, Afternoon Kanpai and Senseition are simply brilliant, and I was blown away by the presence of Gruner Veltliner (a light, bright Austrian wine I keep at home) by the glass. Austrian wine on an Asian menu? This takes stones. On a very different day, I recently treated a delighted, grateful friend to breakfast at Willa Jean. Though an appetizer starter with breakfast may seem ridiculous, allow me to insist that you definitely go there. The Artichoke Dip starter arrives in a crock, hot, gooey and topped with loads of browned and chewy “cheese business” and a pile of toasted shards of crostini upon which to slather said artichoke and cheese business. It set the stage for a beautiful day. n

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 21


22 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


Philanthropic Fun Each month St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans’ definitive social magazine, highlights recent nonprofit fundraisers. In the following pages we acknowledge the people, social activism and lifestyles that make our city exceptional. Event profiles by Shelby Simon

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 23


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Bountiful Blooms

1

“Art in Bloom” was bursting with fantastic floral arrangements in celebration of the season. This year, the New Orleans Museum of Art celebrates 30 years of “Art in Bloom.” This springtime event was themed "Queen of Arts: Celebrating 30 Years of Art in Bloom." In collaboration with The Garden Study Club, the event featured vibrant floral designs created by more than 75 exhibitors, which remained on display throughout the five-day program. Event categories included: Movers and Shakers, Ikebana, Tablescapes, Creative Designs, Professional Designs, Young Artists and Exterior Designs. More than 30 local restaurants provided catering. The Patron and Preview Party featured more than 1,100 attendees. One of the distinguishing elements of the Patron Party is the silent auction, which featured an online component, allowing art enthusiasts to bid on the unique pieces. A highlight was a piece by George Dunbar, whose works and career were recently celebrated in a comprehensive retrospective at NOMA, titled “George Dunbar: Elements of Chance.” Kohlmeyer and Co. provided musical entertainment. The popular “Art in Bloom” lecture series and the annual “Art in Bloom” luncheon and fashion show featured lecturers Charles Masson, GM of French fine-dining spot Majorelle in New York City’s Upper East Side, and American fashion designer Lela Rose. Leslie Gottsegen of the NOMA Volunteer Committee and Courtney Le Clercq of The Garden Study Club served as Co-Chairs. Proceeds benefit educational projects and exhibitions at NOMA, and community projects of the Garden Study Club of New Orleans. Recipients of Garden Study Club grants include the New Orleans Botanical Garden, Long Vue House and Gardens, the historic parterre garden at the Beauregard-Keyes House, rain gardens at City Park and the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Brad and Co-Chair Leslie Gottsegen, and Co-Chair Courtney and Ted Le Clercq 2. Board Member Jimmy and Pixie Reiss with Guest Speaker Charles Masson 3. Christian and Kia Brown, Louisette Brown and artist George Dunbar 4. Franco and Nancy Valobra 5. Karl and Lisa Hoefer 6. An example of the floral art on display

24 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY KENN Y MARTIN EZ

WHAT: “Art in Bloom,” benefiting New Orleans Museum of Art WHEN: Wednesday, March 14-Sunday, March 18 WHERE: New Orleans Museum of Art


4

5

6

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 25


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Street Fair Festivities

1

YEP hosted a street festival benefit with local music, entertainment, food and drink for all. The second annual fundraiser for the organization, “YEP Fest” raised over $100,000 that will help provide educational, mentoring, enrichment and employment services to over 1,200 young people this year. The fun, festive street party – which took place during a torrential downpour – featured flags representing the event sponsors and racing teams, and featured food trucks for the 500 guests to peruse. Purveyors of food and beverages included Afrodisiac, Clesi’s Restaurant and Catering, Crêpes à la Cart, Diva Dawg, Royal Street Courtyard and Urban South Brewery. A VIP Party was catered by Scot Craig/Katie’s Restaurant and hosted in the courtyard of Gulf Coast Housing Partnership. Local music and entertainment included Sweet Crude, Water Seed, New Creations Brass Band, Big Freedia,  Krewe of the Rolling Elvi, Camel Toe Lady Steppers and YEP’s After School Program Drumline. The Event Chairs were Julie Livaudais George, Semmes Walmsley and Erica Woodley. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Christine Albert, Co-Chair Julie Livaudais George, Meg LaBumbard, Natasha Haynes 2. Nan Galloway, Jim Mounger and Suzanne Rusovich 3. Lindsey Comeaux, Jake Webster and Jennifer Barrett 4. Melissa Sawyer, Peter Gold and Caroline Cunningham 5. Christine Jordan, Rachael Waters, Dan Falstad, Kenneth Polite and Raechelle Munna 6. Mike Edgeworth, Anne Teague Landis and Sarah Busch

26 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “YEP Fest,” benefiting Youth Empowerment Project WHEN: Sunday, March 11 WHERE: Youth Empowerment Project


4

5

6

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 27


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Soulful Under the Stars

1

Legacy Donor Foundation celebrated lives saved by organ donation. All about celebrating life, this year’s 19th annual “Soul Revival” event showcased the impact of support for organ, eye and tissue donation and awareness on all generations. Champions of the cause, the Brown families – Joey and Buzzy Brown, and Elizabeth and Christian Brown – Co-Chaired this year’s event. Signs hand-painted with sayings including “Life is good, giving is better” and “Register Now – We Will Show You How” inspired guests, and sponsors were listed on large hand-painted wooden signs displayed on the house. Third Street was converted into a block party with bistro lights and butcher-block tables. Guests enjoyed the al fresco evening and conversations about supporting life through organ, eye and tissue donation continued. For the Patron Party, Dickie Brennan & Co. Catering provided a beautiful charcuterie display for the patron party guests along with wines from Chateau St. Michelle and libations from Sazerac Companies. “Soul Revival” featured food stations from Jacques-Imo’s, Miss Linda, Sylvain, La Cocinita and Crêpes à la Cart. Mini Tabasco bottles with custom labels decorated each station. Every year “Soul Revival” has begun with a gospel choir to pay tribute to those who have saved lives through organ donation. This year’s event maintained tradition and featured the gospel choir of Progressive Baptist Church, the church to which LDF Board Member Rev. Willie Gable belongs. Additional entertainment included the Jenn Howard Band played followed by DJ Rob Nice. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Co-Chairs Elizabeth and Christian Brown and Buzzy and Joey Brown 2. Executive Director Nicole Labadot and Board Chair Casey Pellerin Westguard 3. Board Members Betsy Thibaut LaBorde, Pat Browne III and Leigh Ellen Puckett 4. Brennan Brower, Host George Brower and George Brower Jr. 5. Board Members Dr. Mara Haseltine and Dr. Carol Meyer 6. Board Members Scott Tucker and Clint Smith with William Prieur

28 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY KE NNY MARTINEZ

WHAT: “Soul Revival,” benefiting Legacy Donor Foundation WHEN: Saturday, March 3 WHERE: Third Street


4

5

6

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 29


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Party in the Park

1

Friends of City Park hosted an outdoor gala to restore the historic Casino Building. “Lark in the Park 2018” proceeds will benefit the restoration of the Casino Building, a 105-year-old building that houses Morning Call and the event venue, Parkview Terrace. Annually, over 50 special events, from weddings to corporate meetings, are held in the Casino Building, along with it being the first stop in the park to more than 1,500 tour buses filled with visitors from all over the world! Chairpersons this year included the Lupo Family: Robert E. Smith Lupo, Dr. Mary P. Lupo, R. Tom Lupo, Abby G. Lupo and Francesca Lupo. The VIP Party took place in the Peristyle and was catered by Dickie Brennan & Co. family of restaurants. Entertainment was provided by Paul Soniat and special guests from Friends of City Park’s upcoming Historical Musical Train Tour. The Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn featured lounge areas outfitted by Lovegood Wedding and Event Rentals, Distressed Rentals and Revival and West Elm. Savory delectables from more than 35 restaurants included Antoine’s, Ralph’s on the Park, Acme Oyster House, Rizzuto’s, Andy’s Bistro, Central City BBQ, Flamingo A-Go-Go and many more. Guests enjoyed etouffée nachos from the Diva Dawg food truck when leaving the party. Republic National Distributing Company provided premium libations and three specialty cocktails, and Three B’s served up frosé. Sweet Crude entertained guests until the programming portion of the evening. Auctioneers Friends of City Park Board President Leigh Morgan Thorpe and City Park Improvement Association Board President Steve Pettus got the crowd excited for the six one-of-a kind packages. After the Live Auction, AFX Pro, LLC put on a fireworks show that concluded with a performance from Casa Samba. DJ Ann Glaviano – HEATWAVE! then took the stage to spin vinyl records into the evening. Raffles included a 2018 Bryan Subaru Forester generously donated by Bryan Subaru. It is $75 a chance with only 750 tickets to be sold, and the drawing is to take place on July 18, 2018. Pulled the evening of “Lark in the Park” was a hand-carved coral bracelet inlaid with diamonds in 18 karat gold, donated by Valobra Master Jewelers. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Committee Member Lindsey Wands, Friends of City Park Board President Leigh Morgan Thorpe and Board Member Robin Borne 2. City Park Improvement Association Board President Steve Pettus and Treasurer Tania Hahn 3. Morris and Cathy Bart with JoAnn and President Elect Larry Katz 4. Joshua Alarcon, Board Member Jackie Palumbo and Terry Alarcon 5. Morgan Falterman and William Bryan 6. Vincent Giardina and Lisa Romano

30 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY KE NNY MARTINEZ

WHAT: “Lark in the Park,” benefiting Friends of City Park WHEN: Friday, March 9 WHERE: City Park


4

5

6

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 31


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Keeping the Community Safe

1

The “Crimestoppers Awards Luncheon” honored individuals in law enforcement and those committed to a safer region. The 33rd annual “Crimestoppers Awards Luncheon” was held Thursday, March 15 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. The venue was adorned with flags representing supporting law enforcement agencies. A pre-luncheon hour began with networking and entertainment by a jazz trio. Throughout the luncheon, New Orleans Police Dept. Superintendent Michael Harrison served as Emcee. Bill Goldring, Dennis Lauscha and Gary Lorio served as Event Co-Chairs. The event began with the presentation of the colors by the St. Charles Parish Sheriff ’s Office, and the national anthem was performed by Pastor Tyrone Jefferson Jr. of the Abundant Life Tabernacle Church. Pastor Debora Morton of the Greater St. Stephens Full Gospel Baptist Church provided the invocation. Awards and honorees included: the James J. Coleman, Sr. Corporate Partner Award presented to John Georges of The Advocate; Sheriff Harry Lee Crimestoppers Criminal Justice Award presented to Sheriff Greg Champagne, St. Charles Parish Sheriff; the Crimestoppers Media Award presented to Sally-Ann Roberts, retired WWL-TV news anchor; the Award of Excellence in School Safety and Prevention presented to St. Tammany Parish Public Schools Superintendent W.L. “Trey” Folse III. The Law Enforcement Award was presented to Tim Lentz, Chief of Police for the City of Covington “Operation Angel;” and the Real Time Crime Center Crimestoppers Chairman’s Award was presented to Glenn Orgeron, Crimestoppers Board of Directors member. Awards were presented by Jay Batt, Chairman of the Crimestoppers Board of Trustees; The Honorable John L. Weimer, Associate Justice of the Supreme court of Louisiana; Sheriff Joseph Lopinto, Jefferson Parish; and Darlene Cusanza, President and CEO, Crimestoppers. More than 600 attended, and all money raised from the luncheon goes to fund Crimestoppers’ youth programs, including the Teen Ambassadors Against Crime and Safe School Hotline. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Co-Chair Dennis Lauscha, Tommy Fonseca, and Co-Chair Gary Lorio 2. Honoree John and Dathel Georges, Crimestoppers President and CEO Darlene Cusanza and New Orleans Police Dept. Superintendent Michael Harrison 3. Jefferson Parish Sheriff Joe Lopinto, Honoree Glenn Orgeron and Co-Chair Bill Goldring

32 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “Crimestoppers Annual Luncheon,” benefiting Crimestoppers GNO WHEN: Thursday, March 15 WHERE: Hyatt Regency Hotel


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 33


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Fête for Francophones

1

The Alliance Française raised a glass to Honoree Nell Nolan Young. This year’s annual gala for Alliance Française de la Nouvelle Orléans, themed “Le Bal Clandestin”, transported partygoers back in time to a dazzling night of cold drinks and hot dancing, accessible only to patrons with the password: “Bonsoir.” Founded 34 years ago, the Alliance Française promotes knowledge and appreciation of the French language and cultures, while playing a role in enhancing the lifestyle of New Orleans today. Entering the New Orleans Jazz Market guests were greeted by two greater-than-life lighted jazzmen silhouettes. Red and black plumes adorned tall pillar glass vases; metal jazz instruments, miniature street lamp lanterns and wine glass votive lamps contributed to the ambiance. Raphaël Bas with Harmonouche performed as guests dined on an array of French delectables by Olive Blue Catering. Savory bites included petit salmon croque messieurs, escargots with a Pernod and champagne beurre-blanc, an extravagant spread of charcuterie, bourride of halibut, chicken au Basque, boeuf Chateaubriand, cauliflower and goat cheese soufflé, barigoule of spring vegetables and finished with petites chocolate mousses, petites crème brulées and French macaroons. Auction highlights included a one-week stay at a beautiful home in the south of France; raffles included a Hermes silk scarf and the ever popular wine pull of favorite wines of the Board of Directors. Nell Nolan Young was the Honoree; Juli Miller Hart and Mark Romig served as Emcees; Vincent Sciama served as Honorary Chairman; and Dr. Terry Voorhies served as Chairperson with Co-Chairs Shauna Grissett, Norma Grace and Dessa Giffin. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Honorary Chairman French Counsul General Vincent Sciama and Yuan Yuan Sciama with Honoree Nell Nolan Young and Robert E. Young 2. Chairperson Dr. Terry Voorhies and Dr. Rand Voorhies with Debby Hirsch Wood 3. Alexandra Stafford with David and Co-Chair Dessa Giffin

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “Annual Gala 2018: ‘Le Bal Clandestin,’” benefiting Alliance Française de la Nouvelle Orléans WHEN: Saturday, March 3 WHERE: New Orleans Jazz Market


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 35


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Charged for a Bright Future

1

NCJW New Orleans hosted a fun evening to engage the community. Supporters of the National Council of Jewish Women Greater New Orleans Section hosted their annual gala at the newly renovated NOPSI Hotel on Saturday, March 10. The energy within the walls of the NOPSI Hotel was truly electrified with the supporters of NCJW. The Power of the National Council of Women and the mandate for social justice and individual rights for women and children was a positive current that charged through the evening. Event Chairs included Patty Barnett and June Leopold. The Patron Party was held in The Patio, an intimate outdoor courtyard with live piano, Chaired by Ina Weber Davis and Joyce Pulitzer. Guests were given flashing diamond rings in line with the evening’s theme. Later, guests assembled in the main ballroom where Rabbi Gabe Greenberg of Beth Israel gave the Invocation before the three-course meal. Master of Ceremonies David Bernard, Chief Meteorologist for WVUE Fox 8, entertained and guided guests throughout. After dinner, Kenneth Hoffman, Executive Director of the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience spoke. The museum is set to open in fall 2019 and will highlight the Jewish history of the South, including many NCJW stories. Throughout the evening, Colin Davis and Night People played New Orleans soul and funk music encouraging many guests to dance. The auction, Chaired by Sarah Covert, included an array of restaurants, jewelry and performing arts tickets to the symphony and theatre. The gala supported and created awareness for the programs of NCJW such as ACE (Alzheimer’s enrichment), Court Watch, Fox 8 Defenders, Girls on the Run and New Orleans Family Justice, amongst others. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Patron Party Chairs Ina Weber Davis and Joyce Pulitzer 2. Vice President of Development Barbara Greenberg with Co-Chairs June Leopold and Patty Barnett 3. Flo Schornstein, David Bernard and Susan Kierr

36 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: An Electrifying Event: The Power of NCJW benefiting National Council of Jewish Women New Orleans WHEN: Saturday, March 10 WHERE: NOPSI Hotel


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Dancing through the Decades

1

Temple Sinai honored the Benjamins, Haspels and Steegs for their community activism. Temple Sinai “dined and danced through the decades” in a festive gala honoring the philanthropic community contributions of Jennifer and Jack Benjamin Jr.; Amy Gainsburgh-Haspel and John Haspel; and Pamela and Robert Steeg. The evening benefited Temple Sinai and hosted more than 200 guests. Susan Hess served as Event Chair and David Bernard was the Emcee. The Patron Party was sponsored by Galatoire’s and Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, who provided catering along with contributions from Sue Barton. The seated dinner was provided by Marriott with arrangements made by Sue Singer. Musical instruments representing each decade, such as a 1940s saxophone or a guitar from the 1980s, decorated the dining tables, each set upon glass bowls or on pedestals. To set a festive tone, the room was adorned with curtains outlining each doorway and disco lighting. David Bernard led guests through a slideshow history of Temple Sinai in the 1940s through 1990s. Accompanying each decade, he changed wigs and costumes to introduce the music presentation, one song for each, and then a representative dance presentation. Following the recognition of the honorees, partygoers enjoyed a dessert bar, decade-related entertainment and dancing. Entertainment included performances by musician and puppeteer Harry Mayronne, internationally-touring jazz performer and top 50 American Idol finalist Angie Z and ballroom dancers Shane Lecocq and Fiona McDonald. Friend and Company generously donated a pair of diamond earrings for a raffle, and there was an exclusive silent auction. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Judge Robin Giarrusso with Bill and Event Chair Susan Hess 2. Honorees John Haspel and Amy Gainsburgh-Haspel with Honorees Jennifer and Jack Benjamin Jr. 3. Honorees Pamela and Robert Steeg with Barbara Greenberg

38 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “Temple Sinai Gala,” benefiting Temple Sinai WHEN: Saturday, March 3 WHERE: Temple Sinai’s Teal and Stephen Goldring Pavilion


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Topped with Whimsy

1

Creativity abounded at the annual “Mad Hatters Luncheon” in support of the Opera Guild Association. The 34th “Mad Hatters Luncheon” upheld its whimsical theme, incorporating a festive fashion show by Saks featuring designer Akris Punto and, true to form, a hat contest. This year’s theme reflected the 300th birthday of New Orleans. Opera Guild President Penny Baumer welcomed guests with a speech. Richard Buchsbaum served as Master of Ceremonies and Brother Gale Condit FSC delivered the invocation. Guests were treated to a delicious three-course luncheon ending with chocolate birthday cake. There was a Mad Hatter’s table, designed by Amy Carbonette. Several Alice in Wonderland characters also made an appearance: Russ Herman as the Mad Hatter, Lynn Abide as Alice, Dr. Jane Miller as the Queen of Hearts, Brian Monk as the White Rabbit and Margarita Bergen as the Caterpillar. The hat contest judges included Alexandra Cranford, Sandra Herman, Peggy Scott Laborde, Terrance Osborne, Anton Heine, the Honorable Jennifer Van Vranken and Julie Winn. Hat contest winners included: Most Whimsical, awarded to Suzie Capitelli and Debbie Evans from “Haute Dames” Couture Millinery; Most Glamorous, awarded to Susan Doty; Most Festive Fascinator, awarded to Gerri Valene; Best Ensemble, awarded to Joyce Laporte; Best Group, awarded to The Flagettes with “Flags over New Orleans,” a group of 10 members led by Joann Paulin; Best Original Theme, awarded to “Happy Birthday New Orleans,” a group with birthday cakes on their heads; and Mad Hatter’s Choice, awarded to Faith Peperone. The Hat Auction was Chaired by Carol Hall, Dr. Jane Miller and Carolyn Landwerlin. There was an additional silent auction, Chaired by Debbie Alciatore. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Hat Auction Co-Chair Carol Hall, Silent Auction Chair Debbie Alciatore-Empey, Lynn Abide as Alice and Hat Auction Co-Chair Carolyn Landwerlin 2. Brian Monk as White Rabbit, Queen of Hearts Dr. Jane Miller, Russ Herman as Mad Hatter and Margarita Bergen as Caterpillar 3. Fundraising Vice President Karen Villavaso, Opera Guild President Penny Baumer, Jean Rice and Co-Chair and “Mad Hatter’s Choice” Honoree Faith Peperone

40 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: 34th “Mad Hatters Luncheon,” benefiting Women’s Guild of the New Orleans Opera Guild Association WHEN: Thursday, March 8 WHERE: New Orleans Marriott


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

A Tribute for Fats

1

Antoine’s opened its doors to 500 patrons for the French Quarter Fest kickoff event. The French Quarter Festivals marked its 35th year with a benefit and tribute to the late Fats Domino. The gala took place at New Orleans’ oldest restaurant, Antoine’s, and featured a full dinner menu and an open bar courtesy of Abita Brewing Company and Brown-Forman. Guests enjoyed all of the restaurant’s famous rooms such the Mardi Gras-themed Rex, Proteus, and 12th Night Revelers rooms. The menu included oysters Foch, soufflé potatoes, creamed spinach, Creole andouille au gratin, shrimp remoulade, crabmeat ravigote, Gulf fish du jour amandine, beef tips Comeaux, oysters Rockefeller and baked Alaska. Patrons were treated to “A Taste of the Fest:” bite-sized versions of the festival’s most popular dishes throughout its history, including those from Lakeview Harbor, Mrs. Wheat’s Pies, Restaurant R’evolution, Wink’s Bakery, Rib Room and Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Mike Harvey’s Hot Club entertained at the Patron Party. During the gala, the organization additionally recognized talented and notable culture icons with Al “Lil’ Fats” Jackson’s Tribute to Fats. Special guests included Fats Domino’s grandson Chevis Brimmer, Roger Lewis (of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band and Fats Domino’s Band) and Charmaine Neville. Honorary Co-Chairs were Darryl and Louellen Berger, Sybil and Marc Morial, and Chevron Gulf of Mexico Vice President Mark Hatfield. n

2

3

Event at a Glance

1. Fabiola Tally, Lauren Leonard and Judge Monique Morial 2. Rick and Lauren Blount 3. Steve and Beth Conner with Leah Brown and Martin Irons

42 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAVID PUNCH

WHAT: “French Quarter Festival Gala,” benefiting French Quarter Festivals, Inc. WHEN: Thursday, March 15 WHERE: Antoine’s


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 45


46 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 47


48 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 49


50 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 51


Friends of City Park’s “Lark in the Park”

PHOTO BY KENNY MARTINEZ

THE PAST SOCIAL SEASON IN REVIEW By Dana Hansel

usy, busy, busy – that’s the New Orleans social season. There are plenty of parties in town to match everyone’s interests and passions. The word “parties” is used loosely to describe the gamut from black-tie affairs to numerous casual, funky, clever new ways to have a good time. Although most parties in town raise money for various needs and organizations, there are also many social events where people just gather for fun.

52 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


Summer

June, July & August

Although many leave New Orleans in the summer to escape the heat and humidity, what was striking last summer were the numerous well attended parties. We all enjoy travel and summer is the most popular time, but if you do find yourself in New Orleans, don’t worry, there is plenty to do and enjoy! The National World War II Museum (rated No. 2 both in the country and the world) held its “American Spirit Awards” presented by Whitney Bank. Those honored inspired others through their own acts of courage, sacrifice, initiative and generosity – particularly in the areas of leadership, service to country or community and education. Last June’s “American Spirit Awards” Honorees were David McCullough and David Rubenstein. The Silver Service Medallion Honorees were James Barksdale, Capt. James Lovell, Phyllis Taylor, John P. Laborde, Catherine Long, Sgt. Major Mike Mervosh, Dr. Billy Michael, Hon. Norman Mineta, David L. Oreck and Hon. Kaliste J. Saloom Jr. Famous NBC anchor Tom Brokaw was the Master of Ceremonies. Chef Tory McPhail provided a delicious meal to 600 guests who also enjoyed entertainment by The Midtown Men, four stars from the original cast of Broadway’s Jersey Boys. The Ogden Museum of Southern Art had its fourth annual “Magnolia Ball,” a festive summer evening of New Orleans’ chefs’ best,

hand-crafted Southern cocktails, featuring a full slate of auction items from emerging Southern artists. There was lots of music including entertainment by DJ G Cue, DJ Quickie Mart, DJ Lil’ Jodeci, DJ Kidd Love, the Showtime Brass Band and the Kevin Gullage Band, and a special appearance by Krewe des Fleurs. At the ball, attendees experienced the museum’s photography exhibitions, “The Colourful South: William Christenberry, Birney Imes, William Greiner, William Ferris and Alec Soth” and “William Eggleston: Troubled Waters, From the Collection of William Greiner.” It was a festive summer evening! “Louis ‘Satchmo’ Armstrong Summer Jazz Camp Benefit Concert” is in July each year at Little Gem Saloon. “Queen of Swing” Norma Miller was the Emcee for this benefit concert featuring performances by the artist-in-residence Cecil Bridgewater and the Jazz Camp Faculty and Alumni Band. In typical fashion, feet were tapping and many got out of their chairs to enjoy world famous jazz musicians. What a show!

The

Most List Most Active: St. Charles Avenue’s “Activists of the Year 2017” Most Artsy: Poydras Home’s “Celebratory Bicentennial Gala” Most Beer: Louisiana SPCA’s “NOLA on Tap” Most Champions: New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation’s “Stake Out for Justice” Most Creative: Prospect.4’s “Swamp Galaxy Gala” Most Dancing: Casa Argentina’s “Piazzolla: Maria de Buenos Aires” Most Dazzling: Ochsner Health System’s “Moonlight and Miracles Gala” Most Dreamy: French Quarter Citizens’ “Moonlight Magic at the Monastery”


The

Most List Most Elegant: NOMA’s 51st “Odyssey Ball: ‘L’Odyssée: A Celebration 300 Years in the Making’” Most Entertaining: Le Petit Théâtre’s “Curtain Call Ball”

David McCollough at the National WWII Museum’s “American Spirit Awards 2017”

Most Exciting: LPO performance at Carnegie Hall in NYC’s “Fete de Voyage” Most Fashionable: LPO Volunteers Encore Shop’s “Baubles and Bubbly for Beethoven” Most Festive: Ochsner Clinic Foundation’s “King Cake Festival” Most Edible: James Beard Foundation’s “Taste America: A Night of Culinary Stars” Most Glam: Friends of BIALA’s “Inaugural Dinner for Charter Members”

54 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

Leslie Castay; The Tempest played at Tulane’s Lupin Theater in the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane; and Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts showcased The Little Mermaid with lots of local school-aged children. The children’s talents were exceptional, and it’s always fun to see your friends’ kids taking lead roles.

Fall

September, October & November Many of you know Junior Achievement and its annual “Hall of Fame,” but in 2003 they added an annual “Rising Stars Soirée” in order to reach young professionals (under 40 years old) interested in JA’s mission. Presented in October by the Oscar J. Thomas Charitable Trust, the party features top restaurants and was catered by Windsor Court. It is great to see organizations include the young professionals in their future!

PHOTO BY J EFF STROUT

Most Glassy: “Just Say YAYA: Central to the City”

Throughout the summer numerous theaters were in full swing, including Tulane Summer Lyric Theater with its “Let’s Go On With the Show” 50th Anniversary Gala; Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré presented It’s Only a Play in conjunction with The NOLA Project. The comedic talents of Ricky Graham and Sean Patterson were complemented by


PHOTO BY KENN Y MARTINEZ

New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane

The National Council of Jewish Women Greater New Orleans hosted the 2017 “Hannah G. Solomon Award Luncheon” and honored Kim Sport. Co-Chairs were Mimi Schlesinger and Sue Singer. The award is given annually to a community leader who exemplifies the qualities of Hannah G. Solomon, founder of the organization. Each award winner has been a catalyst for social change. The past nine years award winners have included: Ana and Dr. Juan Gershanik; Julie Schwam Harris; Marjorie and Dr. Scott Cowen; Ruth Kullman; Mary Keller Zervigon; Joan Berenson; our beloved Nancy Marsiglia; Carol Wise; and Phyllis Taylor. Friends of Jefferson the Beautiful hosted its annual “Autumn Affair” at the home of Jackie and M.J. Wolfe. Green Fork and Bravo

Junior Achievement’s “City Stars Soirée”

provided the food and Martin Wine Cellar provided the wine. The party was partially outside and the weather cooperated with party planning. The group had a large silent auction as well as a live auction with auctioneer Ed Marshall. Bidding was fierce and lively. Friends of Jefferson the Beautiful presents free and open public education programs and initiatives, funds and manages various projects. Crimestoppers had “A Night of Blue” at Generations Hall to celebrate New Orleans’ First Responders. Music was nonstop with Bucktown AllStars, Charmaine Neville, Bruce “Sunpie” Barnes, Kermit Ruffins, Rockin’ Dopsie and James Andrews. Most of us know Crimestoppers’ information hotline that offers rewards, but the group does a lot more, specifically for our youth.

Proceeds support Crimestoppers’ Youth Crime Prevention Programs, which provide youth leadership training (over 199 graduates) and numerous safe school presentations reaching more than 35,000 students each year in seven parishes. WYES – Channel 12 hosted an inaugural event, “Shake, Rattle & Roll” with a 1950s theme. Pictures taken next to a vintage pink Cadillac owned by Penny and Al Baumer added a special gift. Patron Party music was provided by Marguerite Warren and The Big Easy Boys, with Sock Hop music by DJ by Jim Tapley. Chuck Mutz was the auctioneer for the live auction, along with a ring raffle of a beautiful pink diamond designed by Tom Mathis and donated by Symmetry. Celebrity Judges Becky Allen, Marshall Harris and Jason Gross picked the winners of the dance contest and costume contests.

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 55


The

Most List Most Green: A Studio in the Woods’ “FORESTival: A Celebration of Art and Nature” Most Hats: New Orleans City Park and New Orleans Town Gardeners’ “Heart of the Park Hat Luncheon”

Ogden Museum of Southern Art’s “Magnolia Ball”

Most Heartfelt: American Heart Association’s “Go Red for Women Luncheon” Most Historical: Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses’ “Historic Houses Society Gala” Most Humanitarian: New Orleans Council for Community and Justice’s 60th “Weiss Awards” Most Illuminating: New Orleans City Park’s “Celebration in the Oaks Preview Party” Most Impactful: St. Michael Special School’s “Blue Rose Ball”

56 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

organization offers a longterm residential program to survivors of trafficking. What connections do wine, 26 over-the-top table designs, local veterans and neighborhood improvement have? “Wine, Dine & Design” benefiting Bastion – a Community of Resilience. The Preview Party enables attendees to enjoy a preview of the fabulous table designs while bidding on special excursions and jewelry. The next day there is a luncheon that has sold out several years in a row. Both events were hosted by St. Charles Avenue, presented by Bryan Subaru and IberiaBank, held at the Audubon Tea Room and Co-Chaired by Celeste and Curtis Eustis and Lauren

PHOTO BY JEFF STROUT

Most Inspiring: WRBH Reading Radio’s “A Blind Taste”

“An Evening in the Garden of Eden” benefitting Eden House was chaired by Kara Van de Carr and Daryl Byrd. The Audubon Tea Room was packed with believers in this important cause who enjoyed table decorations made by the Eden House residents. The Greg Agid Quartet played before the event, Marcella Ratcliffe performed during the event and then the audience watched a film by David Rae Morris. Needless to say, there were plenty of heartfelt accolades for the group’s successes. Eden House is a leader in public policy support and advocacy, youth prevention programs and educating the community on human trafficking. The


Jack and Peggy Laborde with Lisa and Karl Hoefer at “An Evening in the Garden Of Eden”, benefiting Eden House

PH OTO BY G IL RUBMAN

and Bryan Fitzpatrick. Bastion, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, is an intentionally designed neighborhood in New Orleans for returning warriors and families. Through this powerful community model that incubates meaningful relationships that endure for a lifetime, our veterans enhance prospects for fuller recovery from the wounds of war. “Swamp Galaxy Gala” benefited Prospect.4: The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp. Prospect.4 is a citywide triennial of contemporary art. The Sugar Mill was transformed into the swamp – these decorations were over the top! Prospect.4 is led by Susan Brennan, an entrepreneur of many successful ventures. Co-Chairs included Abhi Bhansali, Colleen Connor, Sayde Finkel, Trevor Haynes and David Workman. The

St. Charles Avenue’s “Wine, Dine & Design” benefitting Bastion

Co-Chairs were helped by a large committee of dedicated volunteers who helped raise funds to assist the citywide art exhibition. Beyond these were many favorites each fall such as: Le Petit’s “Curtain Call Ball,” NOMA’s “LOVE in the Garden” and “Odyssey Ball,” Botanical Garden Foundation’s “Magic in the Moonlight” and list goes on!

Winter

December, January & February

Each winter St. Charles Avenue honors Activists of the Year; 2017 included: Stephanie and Terrance Osborne, Roland and Mary Von Kurnatowski and Linda and Tommy Westfeldt. Both as couples and as individuals, the group had long lists of accomplishments and contributions to our city. Shout out to community activists Robert Merrick and Arthur Roger who were selected as the honorees of the Anti-Defamation League’s 2017 A.I. Bornick Torch of Liberty Award at the Hyatt Regency. The annual event attracts over 600 attendees to support ADL’s cause. The winter social season is greatly impacted by the timing of Mardi Gras. This past year Mardi Gras came early: February 13. Grace, poise, charm and patience are all qualities necessary for a young debutante to carry out her duties. Lots of behind the

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 57


The

Most List Most Just: The Pro Bono Project’s “Justice for all Ball” Most LOVE: NOMA’s “LOVE in the Garden” Most Musical: Jefferson Performing Arts Center’s “Pasta & Puccini”

Teka Selman and Trevor Schoonmaker at “Swamp Galaxy Gala” benefitting Prospect.4 Photo courtesy Ylva Rouse

Most Paddles: Galatoire’s annual Christmas and Mardi Gras auctions Most Patriotic: The Salvation Army’s “SOUPer Bowl Gala” Most Pink: Breastoration’s “Galatoire’s Goes Pink” Most Retro: “WYES Studio 12 Gala” Most Royal: The Meeting of the Courts of Rex and Comus Most Soulful: Legacy Donor Foundation’s 19th annual “Soul Revival”

58 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

scenes work is involved before the debutantes ever take their special walks. New Orleanians are lucky to have the long-time traditions of Mardi Gras where family before you have engaged in the same ‘walk’. Whether you actually have the mother/daughter Mardi Gras experience, get to live it through family or f riends or if you are simply a witness to the pageantry of it all, New Orleans Mardi Gras season is special. “Une Affaire d’Avant Garde: En Blanc et Noir” benefited New Orleans Ballet Association – think Truman

Capote’s “Black and White Ball.” Attendees were dressed in their black-and-white formal wear and masked in ode to Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo’s contemporary staging of Romeo et Juliet. This night was the first time in over 10 years the company has come to New Orleans; we were the first stop of three on its North American tour, and it was a special tricentennial feature event. It was held at the Hyatt complete with food, drinks, entertainment by the Benchwarmers, a Lee Michael’s raffle, champagne pull and more. What a night of elegance!


Elizabeth and Christian Brown with “Soul Revival” Co-Hosts Buzzy and Joey Brown

Legacy Donor Foundation’s “Soul Revival”

Spring

March, April & May

PHOT OS BY KEN NY MARTIN EZ

Legacy Donor Foundation hosted its 19th annual “Soul Revival” at the festive home of Lauren and George Brower, including their office across the street thus creating a block party. Event Co-Chairs Joey and Buzzy Brown and Elizabeth and Christian Brown lined up a full night of music: The Progressive Baptist Church choir followed by the bluesy rock sounds of the Jenn Howard Band and then DJ Rob Nice. Dickie Brennan & Co. Catering provided charcuterie for the Patron Party, and the gala had food from Jacques-Imo’s, Miss Linda, Sylvain as well as food trucks. Mini Tabasco bottles were on each food station for those who like it hot! Friends of City Park hosts “Lark in the Park” each year but this year was sold out! Congrats to the Lupo Family, Co-Chairs and Leigh Thorpe, President of Friends. Proceeds will help restore the Casino Building. The packed VIP Party was in the Peristyle and the gala was on the Goldring/ Woldenberg Great Lawn. A host of friends, plentiful food and

drink and lots of auction items, including the raffle of a car donated by Bryan Subaru with the drawing this summer, came together for a fantastic event. Each year NOMA’s “Art in Bloom” gets more beautiful. The sold-out events included the Patron Party, the lectures and the luncheon, where Saks showcased Lela Rose and the designer participated –

what a treat! With auction items of all types, sizes and prices, one can easily find that one special item you’ve been looking for. What makes the event special isn’t only the flower arrangements but also the latest designer dresses the attendees wear. Garden lovers also enjoyed an inaugural event, “Heart of the Park Hat Luncheon” benefiting New Orleans City Park. A Moët & Chandon champagne Patron Party was followed by a luncheon at the Arbor Room at Popp Fountain. Hats, hats, hats were lovely, creative, a bit crazy and more! Chaired by Susan Brennan, Ashley Bright, Pam Bryan and Bev Church along with Patron Chairs Barbara Bush, Margo DuBos and Julie Miller-Hart and Honorary Chair Gayle Benson helmed the event. The proceeds not only

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 59


The

Most List Most Stunning: Dress for Success’ inaugural “Fashion Gala – A Salute to Coco Chanel: The First Feminist of Fashion” Most Stylish: Longue Vue House & Garden’s “2017 Essence of Style Design Symposium” Most Tasty: Liberty’s Kitchen’s “Come Grow with Us Chef Showdown” Most Touching: New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation’s “Azúcar Ball” Most Visionary: Botanical Garden Foundation’s “Magic in the Moonlight” Most Wine: Emeril Lagasse Foundation’s “Carnivale du Vin” Most Youthful Musicians: The Roots of Music’s “ROOTS Road Trip New Orleans”

Patron Chair Barbara Bush with Tina Kern and Caroline Reily at “Heart of The Park Hat Luncheon” benefitting New Orleans City Park

helped maintain New Orleans City Park’s trees but also the New Orleans Town Gardeners’ community projects, such as Edible Schoolyard, Grow Dat Youth Farm in City Park and the grounds of Latter Library.

The Louisiana Museum Foundation celebrated first tricentennial event with

60 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

Audubon Institute’s “Whitney Zoo-To-Do” and “Zoo-To-Do for Kids” presented by Tulane Pediatrics are always festive times. This year’s events raised funds for the new lion exhibit. Ladies were in their new spring dresses and men brought out their white linen suits and colorful ties. Chaired by Stephanie Feoli, the party was a big hit!

PH OT O BY J EFF STROUT

Perfection: the one word to describe the spectacular evening at Walton and Jeffrey Goldring’s home for Harvest at Home, which supports Second Harvest Food Bank. The event, Co-Chaired by Erin Romney and Susu Stall, provided the perfect combination of beautiful weather, an elegant house and engaging guests who enjoyed food from some of New Orleans’ best chefs: Shaya, Compton, Brigtsen, Wilcomb, Zemanick, Spicer, McPhail and Link. Quite a line up!

the opening of “Recovered Memories.” The reception showcased the 7,000 square foot exhibition that features historic artifacts, documents, costumes and works of art from Spanish and United States museums. It tells the story of Spain’s influence on the development of New Orleans. The party and exhibition, both at the Cabildo, had Spanish-inspired cuisine, with tapas and sweets by Educated Palate and Galician Chef Andres Rodriguez.


11+ ways to entertain this summer

By Kelcy Wilburn

Taking the Kids Whether they’re eyes-wide 4-year-olds or too-cool-for-school pre-teens, kids and adolescents pack a lot of energy in their young minds and bodies. And when summer hits, that energy needs spending! Parents across New Orleans are fortunate to live in a city so rife with opportunities for family fun and when you’re looking for ways to entertain kids in the summer months, there’s plenty of local destinations that offer everything from the just-plain-silly to the outright educational.

The outdoors are meant for running around and they can also be helpful in ensuring a decent bedtime, as fun in the sun is a sure-fire way to wear you (and them) out. New Orleans City Park offers a world of ways to entertain kids, from City Putt, Carousel Gardens Amusement Park and Storyland to five playgrounds, sports fields, rentable bikes and boats and more. “Tree climbing is always fun and a rite of passage for any NOLA kid,” says Amanda Frentz, Assistant Director of PR at City Park. City Park also offers camps for kids, including its Botanical Garden Summer Camp throughout June with sessions centered around Health and Play, Louisiana’s Great Outdoors and Garden Exploration. For kids ages 6-10, the camp welcomes young explorers to experience gardening, crafting,

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 61


snack harvesting, scavenger hunts and more. On the opposite end of Esplanade Avenue is another outdoor gem for family fun: the French Market. Comprised of six French Quarter blocks and the new Crescent Park, the district offers boutique shopping, open-air cafés and eclectic Farmers and Flea markets. On the first Friday of each month, you can catch Johnette Downing, the Louisiana darling of children’s music, at the New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park (916 Decatur St.). The Creole Tomato Festival returns to the French Market on June 9-10 and features a Kid’s Zone full of activities located on the Barracks Street side of the New Orleans Jazz Museum at the Old U.S. Mint. The Kid’s Zone is open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. both days. The sweet and savory smells of The French Market are likely to draw you in, and confections like Aunt Sally’s pralines are likely to lure the noses of little ones. At Aunt Sally’s Praline Shop (810 Decatur St.), pralines are cooked every day right in the window in a giant copper pot over an open flame. “The pot boils furiously until just the right level of caramelization and then the pralines are hand-dipped onto sheets of parchment. To watch our cooking process is to watch a theatrical display of culinary history, which is enjoyed equally by people of all ages,” says Mary-Jo Webster, CEO. The store also offers local-interest books and gifts for kids. The Ogden Museum of Southern Art is entirely local-interest, sharing the visual arts and culture of the region through art exhibitions and educational programming. “New Orleans area families have a special relationship with the Ogden Museum because the work in our galleries is a reflection of the experiences and stories of those living in our region,” says Ellen Balkin, Education Manager. “Kids and parents alike easily connect with and are inspired by the art in our museum.” The Ogden is free for Louisiana residents on Thursdays. Additionally, the Ogden presents a series of small, specialized summer camps (grades two-12) allowing kids an opportunity to learn from professional artists in fashion design, photography, painting, printmaking, puppetry, mixed media and more. An obvious choice for kid-friendly fun is the Louisiana Children’s Museum (LCM), which offers 30,000 square feet of exhibit space and activities and programs that promote learning across many disciplines and through interactive play. Summer hours at the museum begin June 4 and run 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Saturday and 12-5 p.m. on Sundays. Throughout summer, LCM offers a number of diverse camps for area kids. In June, the LCM will celebrate New Orleans’ Caribbean influences in its Art Trek Studio as part of the museum’s yearlong Tricentennial focus. Kids can make and decorate their own drums and

62 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

milk-carton shotgun houses. From 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday, June 23, the LCM celebrates World Music Day with a Caribbean Party featuring Caribbean food, music and art. Another hit museum in the city is the National WWII Museum, currently ranked TripAdvisor’s No. 2 museum in the world. A cuttingedge educational institution and top destination for visitors to New Orleans, the museum offers a number of programs and events for kids and their families. Summer camps include a STEM Innovation Camp, Spy Camp and Theater Camp. This summer, on July 21, the National WWII Museum welcomes families with children aged 7-12 for a Family Overnight. The immersive experience includes hands-on activities throughout exhibits, films, games and a camp-out under a C-47. Tickets are on sale now. Summer camps are popular at museums across the city and a number of area schools also offer opportunities for fun and learning. Summer at McGehee, for girls in rising Kindergarten-seventh grades, consists of camp sessions running June 18-August 3. Morning rotations include sports, art, performance and STEAM, and campers can choose from over 30 options for their afternoon adventures. All sessions are led by McGehee teachers, alumnae and students. “From our all-girl rock band to our woodworking class, from water play to business building and from ceramics to Mess Fest, we really do have something for every girl,” says Julee LaPorte, Director of Summer Programs. Exploring creativity is what Lil’ Yats is all about, and the walk-in art and play studio is full of offerings for indoor summer fun; walk-in art and play hours are complemented by workshops, weekly classes, camps and parties. From June 22-July 23 (and on second Saturdays of the month), the studio will offer regular weekly walk-in play hours to help parents beat the summer heat. “Our Play Studio is set up to allow for open-ended pretend and interactive play. With a stage, puppet theater, busy wall, kitchen and outside play, a child is able to create freely. No matter how they play, it’s all art to us,” says Owner Christine Crosby. Lil’ Yats will offer weekly themed art camps this summer for ages 5 and up June 4-22 and July 23-August 10. In addition to snowball stands and ice cream stores, a favorite stop for kids when running errands or traveling to and from summer camp is, of course, the toy store and New Orleans has several. A mainstay of the Magazine Street shopping scene, Magic Box Toys offers unique specialty toys for newborns through early teens in addition to party games and puzzles for grown-ups. The store recently changed hands and welcomed guests to its grand re-opening in March. “We obviously wanted to change some things in order to make the store our own – make some space for those grown-ups, feature classic


toys that may be completely unknown to kids today and offer more high-end imported items – but we know what the store means to the neighborhood and we want everyone to know the Magic Box you know and love is here to stay,” says Owner Justin L. Nix. A renovation opened up the sales floor, giving kids ample room to run around and play. According to Nix, parents have fallen in love with the store’s new retro toy section, which allows them to wax nostalgic about childhood while introducing the classic toys to a new generation. For summer, glittery sunscreen, oversized inflatable balls and swim goggles are hot. Little Pnuts Toy Shoppe is planning for a two-block move to a new location this fall that will allow for new events and activities. Meanwhile, the Lakeview shop continues selling its line of products, including ecofriendly, natural and sustainable toys from around the world. “We have always focused on products that help children meet each milestone while learning through play,” says Owner Melissa Pia Bossola Beese. The store also offers party supplies, balloons and a helium tank as a one-stop shop for celebrations, in addition to gift baskets, gift cards, registries, drive-through pick-up and free gift-wrapping. This summer, travel games and water toys are popular in addition to mind games and to-go party games for vacationing teens and adults. After a long day of toy shopping or a weeklong summer camp, how about hitting the spa? Metairie’s Spoil Me Too Kids Spa offers kids the luxuries of being pampered like adults with manicures, pedicures and more. Created just for kids, the spa also offers party packages with tiaras, sparkling punch and pizza to accompany the spa day with friends. Weekday specials include BFF Wednesday (discounted treatments for two or three guests), Twinkle Toes Thursday (20 percent off pedicures) and Flower Power Friday (free flowers with a service). Owner Bridget Alexis recommends checking the website for summer hours and making an appointment. “If you want to reward your kid for a job well done, or just because they are the apple of your eye, come see us. Spoil Me Too Kids Spa affects all kids positively. It builds their self-esteem as well as awareness of self-pampering that will last a lifetime,” says Alexis.

ILLUSTRATION BY DEMI SCHAFFER

New Orleans City Park

Summer at McGehee

5 Victory Ave.

2343 Prytania St.

483-9402

261-1224

NewOrleansCityPark.com

McGeheeSchool.com/summer

The French Market

Lil’ Yats Art & Play 

1100 N. Peters St.

202 West Harrison Ave.

636-6400

214-3442

FrenchMarket.org

LilYats.com

Aunt Sally’s Praline Shop

Magic Box Toys

810 Decatur St.  

5508 Magazine St.

524-3373

899-0117

AuntSallys.com

MagicBoxNola.com

Ogden Museum of Southern Art

Little Pnuts Toy Shoppe

925 Camp St.

209 Harrison Ave, C

539-9650

267-5083

OgdenMuseum.org

LittlePnuts.com

Louisiana Children’s Museum

Spoil Me Too Kids Spa

420 Julia St.

4521 W. Napoleon Ave., Suite B

523-1357

Metairie

LCM.org

324-6726 SpoilMeTooKidsSpa.com

National WWII Museum 945 Magazine St. 528-1944 NationalWW2Museum.org


V I N TA G E W E D D I N G

Carol Vidacovich Weds John Wilton Hall January 27, 1968 By Bev Church

Carol Vidacovich graduated from Loyola University with honors and worked at Touro as Assistant Chief Laboratory Manager in the Pathology Department. . John Wilton Hall had graduated from Mississippi State in accounting and worked in New Orleans at the U.S. Department of Agriculture as an auditor. John lived with four friends: Tom Smith, Jack Dent, Preston Wailes and Herbert Thigpen. They worked all week but came home on Friday nights where the “Friday Night Gang” would celebrate at famous steak houses like Tucker’s – no girls allowed! Carol and John went on a blind date for New Year’s Eve, set up by Jack Dent’s dad and Carol’s boss, Dr. Jack Dent. They had a ball and dated exclusively for about a year. John asked for Carol’s hand from her father and proposed to Carol on Valentine’s Day with a diamond ring from Adler’s. Of course she said yes, and

64 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

they were married a year later on January 27, 1968, at St. Raphael Catholic Church at 10 in the morning. Following the wedding, there was a reception for about 300 at the Metairie Country Club. Farley’s Florist did all of the flowers for the reception as well as Carol’s bouquet and bridesmaid’s bouquets. Orchids were abundant in the bouquets and flowers all over the club. Carol’s dress, custom designed in New York City and purchased through Kreeger’s on Canal Street, was of candlelight peau de soie with appliques of French Alençon lace on both the dress and the veil that were encrusted with seed pearls. Bridesmaids’ dresses came from Town & Country. The bridesmaids included Marilyn Dittman as matron of honor, Sherry Weidert, Lynne Hotstream and Babs Adams, and the groomsmen included the Friday Night Gang as well as other good friends. The reception

guests were treated to a beautiful luncheon and wedding cake by Mr. Wedding Cake himself, Lawerence Aiavolasiti. After the reception, Carol changed into her going away outfit and they were off to Atlanta at the brand new Regency Hyatt Hotel and then to Mobile, Alabama for their honeymoon. Everyone knows Carol from her volunteer work, including the opera, ballet, American Cancer Society, Longue Vue, the LPO, Men and Women of Fashion –which she just chaired with her sister, Marilyn Dittman – and so many others. Before her volunteer jobs she worked in sales and was the regional manager of the LabCorp Biomedical Lab for 27 years. John, her fearless partner, retired as the Director of the National Finance Center after an amazing career. They just celebrated their 50th anniversary! n


V I N TA G E W E D D I N G

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 65


YO U N G B LO O DS

Lisa Hernandez Executive Assistant & Liaison to CEO Blonka Mack, Blonka Movement By Lindsay Mack

66 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

these students,” says Hernandez. “Without these programs, they have a limited outlet.” In addition, the Blonka Movement uses its Reach One Teach One program to bring speakers such as CEOs, judges and other prominent members of the community to schools. Students get a firsthand account of the challenge and motivation it takes to achieve this level of success. When boil water advisories affect area schools, the Blonka Movement provides water free of charge. This prevents the need for shutting down the school and costing the students valuable education time. When she was still in school, Blonka served as co-captain of her dance team and participated in several other school organizations. She credits these extracurricular activities for her academic success.

The Blonka Movement has already achieved success in part because its founder is able to level with area students so well. “She’s only 26, and able to adapt to any environment,” says Hernandez. “She’s in tune with the discipline it takes to get to the next level, and the kids really listen.” n

Get Involved Community members who wish to help the Blonka Movement are welcome to donate clothing and canned goods at one of the organization’s events to provide food and clothing to the homeless population. At this time, the Blonka Movement is also in need of a transportation van to help volunteers get to the schools and service events. Visit BlonkaMovement.com for more information.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GE RBER

With her passion for service and philanthropy, Aireial “Blonka” Mack has created many different avenues to help serve the New Orleans community. With the formation of the Blonka Movement, she has placed a special focus on the importance of extracurricular activities for the city’s students. The organization creates a connection to an area school so the Blonka Movement team can work with the youth in a hands-on way. To learn more, I spoke with executive assistant Lisa Hernandez. A cornerstone of the Blonka Movement is its collection of after-school activities for area students. With its music program, for instance, students are given a safe place to learn different instruments, connect with their peers and develop skills that transfer to the classroom. “Music creates a bond for


STUDENT ACTIVIST

Colin Joseph Accardo Archbishop Rummel High School

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

By Mallory Lindsly

“I have been helping others almost all of my life and I love it, Being involved in my community has been very important in my life because it truly has molded me into who I am and brought me where I am today,” says Colin Joseph Accardo, a graduated senior for Archbishop Rummel High School. During summer, Accardo volunteers at Krewe De Camp, a week-long camp for children who have a variety of mental and physical challenges. Each of the attendants is assigned one camper. Last year, Accardo was assigned a young 18-year-old man named Shyriq who suffered from Autism. Shyriq was non-verbal, but he repeated the exact words any time Accardo would ask him a question. Each year, the police department comes to the camp with their motorcycles, cars and K9 dogs. Two years ago, Shyriq was afraid to pet dogs when the police department visited, but last year Accardo helped him overcome his fear and he was no longer afraid of the dogs. “There was never a day when I saw Shyriq without a smile on his face,” says Accardo. “Seeing this made me so proud of him and myself because I realized how much fun I made my camper’s week become.” During free time, the two bonded over basketball. If he could, Shyriq would play basketball all day long. The two would play on the court, shoot the basket and rebound every shot. “When he wasn’t shooting

the basketball he would never let go of my hand. I was very happy that he did that because that made me realize he was comfortable and wanted to be my friend,” says Accardo. Accardo has had many role models in his life, including three teachers: Kerri Hutchinson, Matthew Caire and Mark Firmin. These three teachers helped inspire Accardo to become involved with his community and school. While at Rummel, Accardo was involved as a Rummel Ambassador and a member of student council, Pro Club Life, Operation Headstart and Fishing Club, and was on the football team, baseball team and was a cheerleader. Within his community, Accardo participated in activities with Angel’s Pace, an organization for families with children diagnosed with lifethreatening diseases. Accardo graduated from Rummel this past May and is attending Louisiana State University majoring in Construction Management. n STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 67


S H O P TA L K

Bessie Papazis & Effie Boihem Owners, FeBe By Mirella Cameran

How did you come to open FeBe? Effie: After many years in retail management, we wanted to open our own store with an emphasis on customer service. At FeBe, we want each customer to feel they’re getting the expertise of a personal stylist. Our team can help you find the perfect dress for an event, the perfect jean for your body type or the best wardrobe staples for the season. Tell us about the lines you carry? Bessie: We offer everything from casual tops and jeans to cocktail dresses and shoes.

FEBE 474 Metairie Road, Suite 102, Metairie 835-5250, FeBeClothing.com

68 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

What are your favorite things in store right now? Effie: A beautiful collection of dresses from Milly, with feminine silhouettes in lightweight knits that are versatile and can be worn day or night. Is there anything exciting coming in? Bessie: We are adding ML Monique Lhuillier. Known for red carpet dresses, this will be the launch of her first full contemporary collection. The line has easy-towear tops and dresses in beautiful fabrics with exquisite details. FeBe will be the only retailer in the state with this line. n

PHOTO BY J EFFERY J OH NSTON

What are the trends right now? Effie: One of the biggest trends is denim in updated shapes with statement hems, such as unfinished, step, fringe or frayed. With so many styles and detail options, this trend can work for anyone.

What makes your store unique? Bessie: We offer more brands in more sizes than most boutiques. We receive new collections every day and add new brands each season.


S H O P TA L K

Elizabeth E. Riggs DDS Owner, Elizabeth Riggs Dentistry By Mirella Cameran

What makes your practice different? Our practice is different because of the way we treat our patients. Everyone is seen as a VIP and the entire staff goes above and beyond to make sure our patients are comfortable and relaxed. The office setting is serene and elegant, and doesn’t feel like a clinic. We diffuse lavender throughout the day to promote relaxation.

PH OTO BY J EFFERY JOHNSTO N

Tells us about your services? We offer a wide array of services including, but not limited to, smile design, veneers, crowns, implant restorations, full mouth reconstruction, sleep apnea appliances, in office bleaching and Invisalign. What’s it like being a dentist? I love what I do! The entire process, from design to delivery of life-changing smiles. I think the relationships with our patients is my favorite part of dentistry.

Tell us something we might not know about your practice? We provide Botox for neuromuscular problems and headaches. We also use Botox to enhance smiles and reduce frown lines around the mouth. We combine Botox with dermal fillers to reduce lines and we enjoy “framing” our beautiful smiles. What’s coming up that you are excited about? We are constantly attending continuing education courses. We enjoy staying current and we work to stay on the edge of relevant and exciting dental technology. Our entire team just traveled to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry annual meeting to learn about all the latest and greatest technology and procedures. We will be implementing some of these immediately. n

ELIZABETH RIGGS DENTISTRY 3442 Magazine St. 891-1115, SmilesByRiggs.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 69


S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 1

4

2

5

3

6

1. Thomas Harris Jr., Vice President of Pediatrics at Ochsner Hospital for Children, accepts a check from Trey Edwards, Regional Vice President of Winn-Dixie, on behalf of the Ochsner Hospital for Children. Dayja Davis, a liver and transplant survivor was invited to receive the check, which was raised through King Cakes sold through Winn-Dixie Gives. 2. Clare, Pam and Catherine Brierre pose with Commodore Guy Brierre at the 168th biennial “Commodore’s Ball” at the Southern Yacht Club. Guests enjoyed live entertainment by Deacon John and food by executive chef James Cullen. 3. Former Commodore Arthur D. Wynne Jr., Mrs. Joseph Sullivan and former Commodore Arthur Mann attend the Southern Yacht Club’s biennial ball, which celebrates the new commodore with a ceremonial transferring of the flags. 4. Judge Barbier poses with his clerks and former clerks at the Loyola University New Orleans College of Law’s 2018 “Law Alumni Luncheon” in February. Pictured are Soren Gisleson, Pam Strarnes, Chris Hannan, Jeff Gelpi, Brian Ballay, Amanda Ballay, Suzy Scalise, James Washington, Hope McDonald, Judge Carl Barbier, Ben Allums, Genevieve Dessommes, Rick Yelton, Mirais Holden, Hope Del Rio, Lindsey Chopin, David Moore, Sara Ochs and Blake Crohan. 5. The Rev. Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J. and Dean Madeleine M. Landrieu present Judge Carl Barbier with the 2018 St. Ives Award at the Loyola University New Orleans College of Law’s annual “Law Alumni Luncheon.” Every year the award is presented to alumni who have volunteered services to the university, maintained the highest standards of the profession and furthered the mission alumni association. 6. The former Queens of The Atlanteans gathered for their annual luncheon at Commander’s Palace in February: (standing) Katherine Barkley Rafferty, Virginia Logan Howcott, Yvette Young Semmes, Tatine Maginnis Frater, Lilo Simmons Ukrop, Rachel Tullis Gambel, Eleanor Bernard Carney, Regina Soniat Talton, Penelope Adair Brown, Eileen Eshleman Stewart, Adair Ewin Faust, Anne McIlhenny Gardiner, Kate Gardiner Tucker, Elizabeth Blathrae Gillin, Anne Fox Gillin and (seated) Emilie Alston Harrison Montgomery, Marynel Watters Arbaugh, Miriam Wogan Henry, Margaret Villere Wynn, Anne Flower Redd, Elizabeth Flower Redd, Eleanor Reid Bergin, Ginger Logan Smith, Lydia Williams Buckley and Eleanor Williams Hohnstein.


S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 7

10

8

11

9

12

7. Tristan Wilson, Nell Wilson, George Wilson, Betty Wilson Jeffery, Bert Wilson and Peter Wilson pose at the YMCA of Greater New Orleans’ annual meeting in January. At the event, George Wilson was honored with the C. Allen Favrot Humanitarian of the Year award. 8. Donna Hildebrand (center) celebrates with Johnny, Rachele, John and Patrick Hildebrand at the YMCA’s annual meeting, where Donna Hildebrand was presented with the Mildred Wild Volunteer of the Year Award. 9. The past queens of the Prophets of Persia met for their annual luncheon in the Board of Governor’s room at the New Orleans Country Club in February: (seated) Margaret Harbison, Pam Burck, Virginia Ernst, Madison Mikes, Carolyn Balmer, Ann Heslin and (standing) Debbie Reily, Marigny Ernst, Corrine Plough, Meg Farris, Elisabeth Gehl, Cindy Hebert, Adele Ralston, Virginia Mitts, Holly Snodgrass, Helen Gibert and Leslie Jacobs. 10. The Phunny Phorty Phellows gathered at the home of 2017 Queen Corinne Fox (center, red hat) for the Annual Queens’ Tea. Each year the krewe chooses their royalty on their annual streetcar ride kicking off the Mardi Gras season on January 6. They do this with the previous year’s royalty passing out king cake to members; whoever receives the “baby” becomes Queen and Boss, the historic name for this group’s King. 11. Queen Ann Burka and her son, Andy Burka, are pictured at Poydras Home 2018 Mardi Gras Ball in February. The annual ball is held a week before Mardi Gras and features a presentation of the court members and King and Queen, which includes a brief history of their lives. 12. King Hilton Duplanter is pictured with Kristen Merritt at the 2018 Poydras Home Mardi Gras Ball. After the court is introduced at the annual event, the Zulu Warriors perform at the ball.


S C H O O L D AY S

1

4

2

5

3

6

1. Rania Khodr, Country Day Headmaster Matt Neely and Kim Abramson attended Country Day’s “City Nights” annual fundraiser in March. This year’s theme was “Hollywood Nights” and the event benefited the school’s Parents’ Association. 2. John and Kathleen Kazour shared a smile with Sara and Ryan Gootee at Country Day’s “Hollywood Nights” fundraiser. The Patron Party was held at Raina and Hicham Khodr’s home, which was catered by Emeril Lagasse’s NOLA Restaurant, and the main event was held at the school after. 3. Yvonne Hrapmann Sr. Renee Kittelson and Jack Truxillo are pictured at Cabrini High School’s 2018 “Night of Green and Gold” in March. About 200 guests attended the event, which featured gourmet food and drinks, a live and silent auction, raffles and live music by Band Camp. 4. Mamie Gasperecz, Jennifer Nugent and Kirk Gasperecz (standing) pose with Errol and Peggy Scott Laborde (seated) at the “Night of Green and Gold.” Proceeds from the event benefit the students of Cabrini High School. 5. Charlotte and Jay Bourgeois with St. Mary’s Dominican High School President Dr. Cynthia A. Thomas at this year’s “Walking to Walmsley Gala.” Guests were treated to live entertainment by the Dominican Jazz Band and the Benchwarmers, as well as delicious food and multiple raffles and auctions. 6. Dominican Sisters of Peace Sr. Joan Arceneaux O.P., Sr. Janice Bachman O.P., Sr. Dot Trosclair,O.P., Sr. M. Dominic Savio Estorge and Sr. Angeline Magro. O.P. attend the annual “Walking to Walmsley Gala and Auction.” The evening’s prizes included a tuition raffle, a 50/50 drawing, grab bags, VIP tickets to Better Than Ezra concert, portrait sessions and more.

72 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


S C H O O L D AY S

7

10

8

11

9

12

7. Joan and Dr. Gerald Berenson attend the Jewish Community Day School’s annual gala as honored guests. The 2017 gala, “Enchanted Evening,” was held in November at the Jewish Community Center Campus in Metairie. 8. Susan Green, with daughter and son-in-law, Erika and Emory Nolan and Howard Green at the Jewish Community Day School’s “Enchanted Evening” gala. Guests were treated to a sit-down dinner and auction-style bidding pledge, which resulted in a record-breaking night of fundraising. 9. Christine Vinson at the Junior League of New Orleans sixth annual “Touch a Truck” event in November at the Pontchartrain Center. This year’s event included the first ever Field Trip Friday, which allowed 700 elementary school children to attend the event for free. 10. The 2017 “Touch A Truck” committee attended the annual event, which invited families to the interact with large vehicles ranging from construction equipment to first responders and learn about what they do to help the community. 11. Newman parent Jason Goodenough, Executive Chef and owner of Carrollton Market restaurant, pictured here with Machelle Payne and Fred Hill, catered Isidore Newman Parents Association’s “Lost N Shangri-La” held on Newman’s campus on Friday, April 20. Over 350 guests dined on Goodenough’s cuisine and desserts provided by Gracious Bakery. Urban Roots provided plants for the event backdrops, and as is tradition, many Newman parents’ own gardens provided greenery. Photo by Tracie Morris Schaefer 12. Melissa Rufty and Jodi Aamodt attended Newman’s “Lost N Shangri-La,” which included not only entertainment by DJ Q, but also by Carl Mack Productions, which helped the décor and plants come to life – literally, as stilt walkers camouflaged in tall palms and greenery moved around the party – as well as a small auction. Photo by Tracie Morris Schaefer STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 73


ADVERTISING SECTION

Treating The Kids Lil’ Yats Art Studio 504-214-3442 LilYats.com Give the gift of Art & Play to the Lil’ Yat(s) in your life! Gift cards can be purchased for a visit or in any nominal denomination.

Louisiana Children’s Museum 504-523-1357 LCM.org With a little imagination and our new line of knitted puppets, you can turn an ordinary summer day into a whimsical adventure. Playing with puppets has been shown to help kids improve their motor skills and build emotional development. Available now at the Museum Store, starting at $24.95.

74 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018


ADVERTISING SECTION

Love Swimming 504-891-4662 LoveSwimming.com The Mermaid™ monofin comes in three colors and is adjustable, it instantly transforms any swimmer into a mermaid. The Mermaid™ monofin encourages young explorers to experience the magic of swimming. Mermaid™ monofin teaches an equal use of up and down kicks allowing swimmers to gracefully glide like real mermaids.

Perlis Clothing 6070 Magazine St., 504 895-8661 600 Decatur St., French Quarter, 504 523-6681 1281 N. Causeway Blvd,, Mandeville, 985-674-1711 8366 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, 225-926-5909 Perlis.com The iconic Perlis crawfish logo shines on this genuine harness leather belt. Its dark brown finish goes with khakis, jeans and shorts and comes in sizes 22-30. Select belt a size up from pants size for the best fit.

Mignon For Children 504-891-2374 Instagram: @Mignon_Nola Come to Mignon for Children for all of your child’s needs! We have everything from this cute swimsuit to dresses and shoes.

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 75


PERFORMING ARTS

June By Fritz Esker

Through June 3

13

20

This play vividly depicts the tumultuous first year of Lyndon Baines Johnson’s presidency, when he threw himself into the passage of the Civil Rights Act while campaigning for his own re-election. Loyola University Marquette Theatre, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 522-6545, SouthernRep.com

New Orleans’ live, ongoing soap opera continues as sisters Chanel and Cartier continue their outrageous adventures. Church of Yoga NOLA, 1480 N. Rocheblave St., 522-6545, SouthernRep.com

One of America’s most commercially successful classic rock bands brings their Southern California sound to New Orleans. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com

ALL THE WAY

1-17

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL

A poor orphan and a handsome gentleman find love in Shakespeare’s classic comedy, presented as part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Tulane’s Lupin Theater, 150 Dixon Hall Annex, 865-5106, NewOrleansShakespeare.org 5

DEBAUCHERY!

14

21

Broadway and screen veteran Leslie Castay will debut a brand new cabaret featuring songs that pay homage to William Shakespeare. Tulane’s Lupin Theater, 150 Dixon Hall Annex, 865-5106, NewOrleansShakespeare.org

Yanni performs the set from his historic Acropolis concert on the 25th anniversary of that live album. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

THE FOOD OF LOVE

14-17

JOSEPH & THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT YOUTH CAMP PRODUCTION

Former Vice President Joe Biden hits New Orleans as a part of his speaking tour about finding hope in uncertain times. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts showcases its young performers with this junior adaptation of Joseph & the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., 461-9475, RivertownTheaters.com

10

14

“JOE BIDEN – AMERICAN PROMISE TOUR”

SHANIA TWAIN – NOW TOUR

The queen of country pop embarks on her first world tour since 2015 in support of her new album, Now. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com 12-17

WAITRESS

Inspired by the popular romantic comedy of the same title, this musical follows a waitress and pie maker who dreams her way out of a small town and a loveless marriage. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

76 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

EVENING WITH THE EAGLES

MAROON 5 WITH SPECIAL GUEST JULIA MICHAELS

Grammy Award-winning, multi-platinum pop stars Maroon 5 bring their Red Pill Blues Tour to New Orleans. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com 15

CROWNS

A young African-American woman explores her history and identity with the help of her grandmother after her brother’s death. Le Petit Théâtre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081, LePetitTheatre.com

YANNI – ACROPOLIS 25TH ANNIVERSARY

24

AN EVENING WITH DIANA KRALL – TURN UP THE QUIET TOUR

Multi-platinum and Grammy Awardwinning jazz vocalist Diana Krall visits New Orleans as a part of her latest world tour. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 28

HALL & OATES AND TRAIN

1980s legends Hall & Oates appear with 21st century pop stars Train in an unforgettable night of music. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com 30

CINEMA TWAIN WITH Q&A WITH VAL KILMER

Acclaimed actor Val Kilmer (Top Gun, Real Genius) presents Cinema Twain, a film of his one-man show about Mark Twain, with a Q&A to follow the screening. The Joy Theater, 1200 Canal St., 528-9569, TheJoyTheater.com


PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Ace and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

78 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

PREMIER


PROPERTIES

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 79


N OS TA LG I A

No Expense Spared The story of L’Escale By Seale Paterson

80 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

1982. Only 50 dinners per night were to be served, to ensure proper presentation of the dishes. The menu had only two prix fixe options: a $75 option of set selections, and the $95 option which offered more choices within the nine-course meal. The dishes were intricately arranged selections of high quality foods, often imported. Geometric constructions of potatoes came with the entrées, but the real showstopper was the appetizer Les Voyages Nordiques: An ice carving featuring a penguin and polar bear to serve a selection of seafood and caviar. The extravagant menu was New Orleans’ introduction to nouvelle cuisine, but not all diners were ready for it – or for the weighty price tag, which was the highest in New Orleans.

A year into service, in an effort to draw more diners – especially locals – the menu was revamped to make dining a more affordable experience, offering à la carte options. English descriptions were added to the previously French-only menu. A very affordable lunch service was added as well. Unfortunately, the changes were not enough to save the restaurant, which was still expensive in an economic downturn. L’Escale closed in the spring of 1985. n Referred to as “the city’s most elegant eatery,” L’Escale spared no expense in décor and ambiance. The waiters were dressed in white tails and gloves, and the silverware, glassware and china were top quality. Even the ashtrays were Limoges china. Designer James Elzey received a national award for his stunning design of L’Escale.

IMAGE PROVIDED BY CH RISTIAN ROMERO

The buzz about L’Escale, the French restaurant in the St. Louis Hotel in the French Quarter, started in the fall of 1981, six months before the restaurant opened. Much of the talk was about the chef being imported from France; Jean Louis Montestrucq was one of only three Meilleurs Ouvriers de France (a prestigious French chef honor) working in the United States. Prior to the official opening, private preview dinners drew local culinary notables to L’Escale. Mimi and Roy Guste Jr. of Antoine’s celebrated their fifth wedding anniversary there with Leon Galatoire; other gourmand visitors included Eileen and Herman Jeffer, John Schwegmann and Kit Wohl. L’Escale officially opened on March 22,


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

St. Charles Avenue June 2018  

St. Charles Avenue June 2018