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MEET OUR SALES TE AM

Lisa Picone Love Sales Manager 830-7248 Lisa@myneworleans.com

Samantha Shiff Account Executive 830-7226 Samantha@myneworleanscom

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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CO N T E N T S

Features

On the Cover

Photographed by Jeffery Johnston Co-Chairs (seated) Kaylea and Hunter Hill and Sheldon and Michael Schmidt and (seated) Founding Families Chair Allison Berger Tiller for the 20th “CHAIRish the Children” benefiting the Louisiana Children’s Museum. Fresh bites and cool drinks are the perfect antidote to the hot and humid weather, like the Dulce Humo and Stress Reliever with Burrata Tartine pictured here from The Country Club. Find your new favorite places to enjoy restorative happy hours, starting on pg. 45.

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Pampering Yourself Achieving that summer glow BY KELCY WILBURN | PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHERYL GERBER

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Sip-sational Summer Happy Hours A guide to nine of the most refreshing spots in town BY SARAH RAVITS | PHOTOGRAPHED BY MIKE LIRETTE

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The Louisiana Children’s Museum will open its big blue doors for the 20th annual “CHAIRish the Children” fundraising event, Saturday, August 25. This year’s event will feature gourmet cuisine and spirits, live entertainment, live and silent auctions and what everyone looks forward to each year, one-of-a-kind chairs. The Patron Party starts at 7 p.m. with the gala following at 8. Individual Patron tickets start at $175, and general admission is $75 per person. This year’s gala will be the last at the iconic 420 Julia St. building, before the museum moves to its new and expanded City Park location. Proceeds from the annual event support the museum’s educational programs and exhibits that “engage children’s potential and make that potential visible through play, shared explorations and in dialogue with adults.” To learn more and to purchase tickets, call 266-2415 or visit LCM.org.


CO N T E N T S

In Every Issue

18 6&8 EDITORS’ NOTES

10 MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Green Light New Orleans: Rain barrel and backyard garden initiatives

12 KIDS PLAY

Lafreniere Park: Offering cool fun for hot weather

14 WHAT’S HOT

Summer Style

16 ON THE MENU

Chill Out: Tito’s Ceviche & Pisco shares its Scallop Ceviche

18 THE DISH

Perfect Pairings: Join me for dinner and wine

28

PHILANTHROPIC FUN Learning to Grow ESYNOLA’s “An Edible Evening” demonstrated the connection between food and the natural world. 22

Rebuilding Together “Julia Jump 2018” supported preservation, restoration and revitalization. 32

Serving the Future The “Goldring-Woldenberg Major Donor Dinner” celebrated significant supporters of JFGNO. 24

“Hoggyshack” Hogs for the Cause hosted a gala dinner playing on puns from Caddyshack with a lineup of star chefs. 34

Films and Flowers The New Orleans Film Society hosted a garden fête fundraiser. 26

Inspired Giving DCFNO honored four individuals with the Inspired Cross Award. 36

Access to Higher Education The 2018 UNCF “Mayor’s Masked Ball” honored former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu. 28

Pontchartrain Party The Leukemia Cup Regatta raised funds for research and development. 38

Southern Elegance Approximately 360 guests attended “Parkway Promenade XXVII” to support parish beautification. 30

Sipping With a Story The Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses hosted a garden party benefit with sips, eats and historic home tours. 40

63 56 ENTERTAINING WITH BEV

Flamingo Fun: A party for our new neighbors

58 WITH THIS RING

Henican – Simon

60 ONSTAGE CALENDAR 61 YOUNG BLOODS

Austin McCann: Founder & CEO, Open Thread

62 STUDENT ACTIVIST

Cecelia & Catherine Zimmermann: St. Mary’s Dominican High School

62 SHOP TALK

Eve Rutledge: Owner & Designer, Mystic Blue Signs

63 SHOP TALK

David Perlis: Owner, Perlis

64 SNAPSHOTS 72 NOSTALGIA

New Orleans Lawn Tennis Club: History, sport and society

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CO N T R I B U TO R S

JULY 2018 VOL. 23 ISSUE 2 Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR Bev Church EDITOR Morgan Packard Griffith ART DIRECTOR Ali Sullivan CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mirella Cameran SOCIETY COLUMNIST Catherine Freeman FOOD & DINING COLUMNIST Jyl Benson WEB EDITOR Kelly Massicot EVENT PHOTO COORDINATOR Jeff Strout

Cheryl Gerber Cheryl Gerber is a documentary photographer working in her native New Orleans. She has been a regular contributor to The New York Times, the Associated Press, New Orleans Magazine and Gambit Weekly for more than 25 years. Her book New Orleans: Life and Death in the Big Easy by UL Press is in its second edition. Today, she lives in the Marigny Triangle with her musician husband Mark McGrain, her trumpet playing nephew who goes to NOCCA and her howl-at-the-sirens black lab Louise.

Advertising VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan

(504) 830-7241, Colleen@MyNewOrleans.com SALES MANAGER Lisa Picone Love (504) 830-7248, Lisa@MyNewOrleans.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Samantha Shiff (504) 830-7226, Samantha@MyNewOrleans.com

Marketing DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS Cheryl Lemoine EVENT COORDINATOR Whitney Weathers DIGITAL MEDIA ASSOCIATE Mallary Matherne

For event information call (504) 830-7264

Production PRODUCTION MANAGER Jessica DeBold SENIOR PRODUCTION DESIGNER Demi Schaffer PRODUCTION DESIGNER Emily Andras TRAFFIC MANAGER Topher Balfer

Administration CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Todd Matherne PRESIDENT Alan Campell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Errol Laborde VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan OFFICE MANAGER Mallary Matherne DISTRIBUTION MANAGER John Holzer SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER Brittanie Bryant

Mike Lirette Mike Lirette was born roughly 60 miles outside of the city, but now calls New Orleans home. He has been living and working as a photographer in New Orleans for more than 10 years. He has a degree in visual communications from Delgado, where he met his wife, Ali Sullivan, who was also working towards the same degree. In his free time, he can be found trying new coffee shops and strolling through City Park.

For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

Fritz Esker A Publication of Renaissance Publishing, LLC 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380

The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, © 2018 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. St. Charles Avenue is not responsible for photos or artwork and assumes that all releases have been cleared upon submission to the magazine. St. Charles Avenue is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, La. 70005, (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $17.95, two year $31, three year $43 — foreign rates vary call for pricing. It is the policy of this magazine to employ people on the basis of their qualifications and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap.

Fritz Esker is a Metairie native and has worked in journalism since 2004. He is a movie nerd, travel junkie, compulsive reader of mystery novels and passionate supporter of New Orleans sports teams (this includes his nieces’ and nephews’ soccer and baseball teams).

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B E V ' S N OT E

If you take a ride out to City Park, you’ll see the new Children’s Museum coming to life – and it’s all been made possible by so many volunteers, like Anne Milling, Peggy Laborde and the late Nancy Marsiglia. If you attend the 20th annual “CHAIRish the Children” gala on August 25, you’ll get to go through the Julia Street museum’s big blue doors for the last gala at that location. Gracing our cover this month are Co-Chairs Kaylea and Hunter Hill and Sheldon and Michael Schmidt, and Founding Families Chair Allison Berger Tiller. They promise to treat partygoers to a fun and festive event featuring gourmet cuisine and spirits, silent and live auctions, whimsical one-of-a-kind chairs, live entertainment and more! Do not miss the last party held on Julia Street, because the new museum will open in the summer of 2019. Get your tickets now by calling 266-2415. All proceeds this year will support the museum’s educational programs and exhibits that engage the potential of our city and state’s greatest assets: our children! Be sure to check out What’s Hot for Summer Style to get ideas for adding some sizzle to your style from a portable grill and the perfect wine chiller to a hat to top it all off. Now that you have a little time with summer upon us, why not take out time to pamper yourself? Our feature presents amazing local ways to achieve your summer glow. While you’re pampering your body, splurge a little with festive drinks and hors d’oeuvres. Find the latest information on nine of the most refreshing happy hours around town in our feature. Al Copeland Jr., Chairman of the Board and CEO of the Al Copeland Foundation, promised his dad that they would find a cure for cancer; he has teamed up with LSUHSC/Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center and they’ve already started on trials that have been proven to work. Their goal for the “Chicken Jam” (learn more about this event and how to purchase tickets in the photo and caption) is $100,000 – but that’s just a start. Al and Liz Copeland have commissioned artist Luis Colmenares to design a poster for the “Chicken Jam” that will be auctioned off at the event, and then they will sell signed and numbered prints at and after the party. The Al Copeland Foundation is a 501[c][3] tax exempt public charity. Al Copeland Sr. was diagnosed with Merkel Cell Carcinoma, a rare form of cancer in 2007. He lost his battle at the age of 64 and his family’s mission has been to “Change the Course of Cancer” to fight cancer through improved research. Please attend the event or donate to this amazing cause! Have a great summer and enjoy getting out to bike, sail and swim. Be careful and have fun!

Beverly Reese Church

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The third annual “Chicken Jam” will be held Friday, July 6, 5-10 p.m. at the Lakefront Arena (6801 Franklin Ave.). The event will feature performances by Rockin’ Dopsie Jr., Bag of Doughnuts, Me and My Friends and Ashley and Maria, as well local vendors, fried chicken, a cash bar and a Kids Area sponsored by Kids

and Family New Orleans. “Chicken Jam” is sponsored by Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, and all proceeds will go to the Al Copeland Foundation to save lives and end cancer right here in Louisiana. For tickets and more information, visit AlCopelandFoundation.org call 620-3727.


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M O R G A N ' S N OT E

July is a big month for my family: Our son turns 1 the first week of the month! At this moment he’s “helping” me write this column while we practice throwing a ball back and forth, standing and pushing buttons with a turtle that plays classical music and teaches the different sections of the orchestra. It has taken me over an hour to write just this much – and I wouldn’t have it any other way. Though I wouldn’t trade the time I get to spend with him for anything, making time for myself is also important. I loved reading our feature, “Pampering Yourself: Achieving that summer glow” for ideas on how to make the most of the time I set aside for myself. My husband and I also make sure to find time for the two of us, though our date nights have definitely changed! Happy hours are wonderful ways to fit in a date or reconnect with a group of friends that feel like a splurge, but are reasonably priced and get us home before our new, much earlier, bedtime. Our feature on “Summer Happy Hours” highlights nine of the most refreshing around town. Starting this month I’m adding a new section to my note! Inspired by one of my favorite podcasts, Pop Culture Happy Hour, each month I’m going to share “what’s making me happy,” and to kick things off I’m featuring two! Seersucker Gin seems made for New Orleans summers, and believe me when I tell you that the following recipe for a Frozen Cherry Limeade (courtesy of Seersucker’s Founder and Master Distiller of Trey Azar) is an incredibly tasty adult way to cool off! Add 2 ounces Seersucker Southern Style Gin Limeade (which you can find at Grande Krewe and Prytania Wine & Spirits, among others), ½-ounce grenadine, ½-ounce lime juice, 4 ounces water and 8 ounces ice to a blender and blend until smooth. Garnish with a lime wedge and a Maraschino cherry (or 4, if you’re like me) and enjoy! The Seersucker Gin company shared a sample with me (enough for two of these cocktails) and I wanted to share this with you. After learning about my sensitive skin (I think if you look at my neck wrong I break out in a rash), Whitney Wilcox, Co-Founder of locally made Bombshell Organics (BombshellOrganics.com), shared her story and some of her products with me. Handmade in small batches, all of her products are 100 percent organic and unrefined, and made without water fillers, parabens, petroleum, waxes or synthetic vitamins. I encourage you to visit their website and talk to Whitney and her sister with questions and concerns about your skin. Their Liquid Gold serum has revitalized the skin around my eyes and neck, and the texture of their Vita-Body Butter is unlike anything else I’ve ever tried. Stay cool and enjoy your summer!

Morgan Packard Griffith

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JULY 6 “Opening Night Party: Macbeth,” benefiting New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane, 865-5106 6 “Chicken Jam,” benefiting the Al Copeland Foundation, 620-3727 14 “Mr. Legs XVIII,” benefiting Bridge House/Grace House, 821-7134 8 “Rock, Ride and Rescue,” benefiting SPCA & multiple animal groups, 453-3048 26 “You Night Cancer Survivor Runway Show & Celebration,” benefiting You Night Events, (877) 591-5936, extension 3

AUGUST 3-5 “2018 New Orleans Antiques Forum,” benefiting Historic New Orleans Collection, 523-4662 4 “Hancock Whitney White Linen Night™,” benefiting the Contemporary Arts Center, 528-3805, CACNO.org/hwwln2018 10 17th annual “Summer Cure Chefs Wine Dinner,” benefiting SUSAN G. Komen New Orleans, 455-7310 11 Sixth annual “Mom’s Night Out,” benefiting New Orleans Moms Blog, NewOrleansMomsBlog.com 25 Seventh annual “Senior Moments,” benefiting Jefferson Council on Aging, 207-4691 25 20th annual “CHAIRish the Children,” benefiting Louisiana Children’s Museum, 266-2415, LCM.org


MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Green Light New Orleans Rain barrel and backyard garden initiatives By Catherine Freeman

Last month I attended a speech by an inspirational scientist who’s dedicated to exploring, explaining and sustaining life on Earth through solving global environmental problems, such as changes in ecosystems, land use, climate, food security and resource sustainability. Understandably his talk highlighted the doom and gloom of damage humans have made to our planet, but he also provided tremendous hope based on research that we can make positive environmental change through education, individual accountability and action. The lecture made me wonder: Can New Orleanians participate individually and collectively in this effort, and who can be the catalyst to encourage this? I was pleasantly surprised after some time on Google to discover many local organizations with these goals but there was one group that really caught my attention: Green Light New Orleans. It is a fairly simple yet highly impactful model Founder Andreas Hoffmann developed as his environmental contribution to 2006 post-Hurricane Katrina rebuilding. Green Light’s mission recognizes three major environmental issues – energy, food and water – and in response offers three solutions they strive to make accessible to all: CFL’s (compact florescent light bulbs), rain barrels and backyard gardens. Fortunately, New Orleanians are enthusiastically participating in all three facets and volunteers are plentiful. However, the free programs are in high demand, making funding a constant challenge. In the early stages, Green Light focused heavily on the CFL program, and to date has installed free light bulbs in over 27,000 households as well as provided education on the energy saving benefits of CFL’s (they use about 75 percent less energy than an incandescent light bulb and last about 10 times 10 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018

longer). But as Andreas ultimately recognized, their work was more complex, “Changing light bulbs gave a glimpse into the many different cultures of our city and opened my eyes to the power of volunteering in building community.” Green Light embarked on program expansion and has discovered the rain barrel and backyard garden initiatives equally powerful educational and environmental tools. Conserving water for gardening and managing storm water through rain barrel usage, participating homeowners are saving money, helping with stormwater management and also reducing New Orleans’ carbon footprint. But Green Light’s rain barrels aren’t just the run of the mill barrels. Each one is a unique, handpainted work of art created by local volunteers and artists. At an installation I observed in the Broadmoor neighborhood, the couple said deciding to participate in Green Light’s rain barrel program was easy, but agreeing on which barrel was a huge challenge! Green Light’s goal for our city’s Tricentennial year is to install 300 barrels and they’re making progress, boasting 127 installations through May.

With a 10-year goal to establish 10,000 backyard gardens and 550 built by Green Light over the last few years, New Orleans is becoming a healthier, more sustainable city. “I am excited about my own garden and very grateful” says Ella Monroe. “In hard times it always helps to get a little extra help to put good food on my plate.” Individuals receive the benefit of access to fresh food but everyone receives the benefit of reduced carbon emissions associated with transportation of fruits and vegetables from long distances to local grocery stores. What started as a purely environmental cause by one individual, Green Light has blossomed into a community building effort of many inspiring New Orleanians to take individual action so that together we can be better stewards of our Earth. n

A little more … Support Green Light New Orleans’ mission and projects by donating online: GreenLightNewOrleans.org/greendonate.


K I DS P L AY

Lafreniere Park Offering cool fun for hot weather By Brittany Kennedy

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free. The space can also be rented for parties (the weekend slots are already almost booked) by calling the main office, and it’s a popular place for day camps to visit during the week. The Spray Park will remain open through August, then will go back to weekends only once kids are back in school and close sometime in September (weather permitting). Near the Spray Park is the Carousel, which boasts 30 moving horses, a tiger, a zebra and two chariots (one of which is handicap accessible). Following the same calendar and hours as the Spray Park, the Carousel can also be rented for private events. Also nearby is another playground that, with the addition of a picnic lunch, rounds out a busy and fun-filled day at the park. If cooling off in the water and riding the carousel aren’t enough to scratch your summertime-fun itch, the park will also host its annual Uncle Sam Jam on July 3. The event boasts a concert (musical act to be determined) and a fireworks display all designed to get your Fourth of July holiday started. Food vendors and concessions will be available,

and park officials encourage people to bring their lawn chairs and enjoy everything the park has to offer. While no doubt a place for summer fun, Lafreniere Park is also an expansive green space that was developed as a park when Hurricane Betsy destroyed the Jefferson Downs Race Track in 1965. It opens at 5:45 a.m. every day and, besides the above amenities, also has a disc golf course, a dog park and exercise tracks. Although we aren’t at all lacking in green space in New Orleans proper, our neighbors in Jefferson Parish have developed a unique set of features that make the short trip to Metairie worth the effort. n

Just the Facts ... Lafreniere Park: 3000 Downs Blvd. Metairie, LA 70003 838-4389 LafrenierePark.org Spray Park: Open noon-7 p.m. daily for summer. Children (10 and under) are $5 Carousel: Open noon-7 p.m. daily for summer. Rides are $1.

P H OTO B Y PETER FOREST

While we had a lovely spring this year, it seems as if we turned the corner toward summer at a fast and furious pace. Temperatures have been climbing steadily, and, as our air conditioners hum and our daily pace slows down, we’re already looking for ways to beat the heat. Meanwhile, before most summer camps begin, it’s always good to remember that our public parks are still great places to enjoy the time off, and Lafreniere Park has options that can keep us cool in summer too. In 2012, the park opened its Spray Park, a 4,000 square-foot splash pad that pours 135 gallons of water per minute, trying to convince us – if only for a moment – that summers in New Orleans aren’t akin to living on the surface of the sun. In all seriousness, the Spray Pad is one of many offerings at the Metairie park and no doubt one of the most attractive ones come June. The splash pad boasts multiple hoses and sprinklers. Meanwhile, it adeptly divides spaces that will attract older and younger kids, meaning that collisions should be a rare occurrence. Water guns and buckets of water that drop randomly are particular highlights that should keep kids entertained as they cool off. While only open weekends until Memorial Day, the Spray Park will be open noon to 7 p.m. daily, weather permitting. Children (under 10) are $5 each for admission while chaperones are


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W H AT ' S H OT

Summer Style By Amy Gabriel

If you can’t beat the heat, you might as well put some sizzle in your style. For your fun in the summertime gallivanting, liven things up with frolicfriendly wardrobe additions, embellished and oversized accessories and picnic-perfect playthings that take you from sunrise to golden hour.

� �

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SE LEC T PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER


W H AT ' S H OT

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�� 1. He will have the most appeal at the pool party in a banana camp cotton shirt with actual coconut buttons from David Hart. Friend, 600 Carondelet St., 342-2162, FriendNewOrleans.com

4. A twist on a classic, a pair of Tom Ford sunnies in blonde are a ray of sunshine. FeBe, 474 Metairie Road, 835-5250, FeBeClothing.com

2. Perfectly flirty, the blush ombre Justyne earrings from Kendra Scott will make a sensational statement. Wildflower Boutique, 2700 Metairie Road, 218-8996

5. A zipper mule with a block heel embellished in rock candy inspired beads and stones is the sweetest way to step into summer. Elizabeth’s, 204 Metairie Road, 833-3717

3. The best way to rosé, keeping wine cold is a cinch with a chic Vinglacé stainless steel chiller. Vinglacé, Vinglace.com

6. Tote your poolside essentials in an oversized, rounded straw beach bag with leather details. She, 2561 Metairie Road, 644-4273

7. You will be the belle of the brunch in a lovely and feminine silk dress with vintage-inspired button detail. Lily New Orleans (LNO), 3469 Magazine St., (713) 373-2299, LilyNewOrleans.com 8. A wide fringey sun hat from Yestadt Millinery strewn with light blue beading is the most festive way to stay shaded. FREDA, 600 Carondelet St., inside The Ace Hotel, 309-7515, Shop-Freda.com

9. Poolside time will be mighty fine atop an oversized, tassel-trimmed, terry cloth monstera leaf towel. Bando, Bando.com 10. A traveling picnic, the portable tabletop barbecue, shaped like a briefcase, will be a real conversation starter. Modern Market, 1200 Annunciation St., 896-2206, ModernMarketLifestyle.com STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 15


ON THE MENU

Chill Out Tito’s Ceviche & Pisco shares its Scallop Ceviche

INGREDIENTS 3 large sea scallops, cut into ¼-inch pieces 2 ounces lime juice 1 ounce Aji Amarillo Paste 2 teaspoons red onions, diced 1 teaspoon red bell pepper, diced 1 teaspoon yellow bell pepper, diced ½ teaspoon cilantro, chopped Salt and pepper to taste  MIX all ingredients in a large bowl. SERVE on a cold plate.

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PHOTOS BY JE FFERY J OHNSTON

TITO’S CEVICHE & PISCO 5015 Magazine St., 267-7612 TitosCevichePisco.com


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THE DISH

Perfect Pairings Join me for dinner and wine By Jyl Benson

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P H O T O B Y A L L I CH E A T W O O D

In January, Karla Kilgore, an internationally celebrated sommelier and New Orleans native, opened Barrel Wine Bar in Covington offering tastes, flights, by-the-glass and bottles of over 50 wines from all over the world. Small-plates include savory cheese and charcuterie boards, baked brie, buttery escargot and addictive baconwrapped dates. A small selection of desserts changes frequently. “People on the Northshore are sophisticated and welltraveled,” Kilgore says. “There is enough interest for them to support a diverse wine portfolio that spans the globe and reaches all price points.” Starting in the 1990s, she built her expertise in the San Francisco when the California wine scene was really coming into its own. “We are now in a period where wines of incredible quality are being made by families dedicated to their craft. However, because they have such limited production, you may not have heard of them or had an opportunity to try their wines. At Barrel I’m specializing in introducing just these types of wines to our customers most effortlessly through our weekly wine flights where four small portions of wine are tasted in a group with a theme.” She

Bacon-wrapped dates and wine at Barrel Wine Bar


continues, “First week of every month is focused on wines from California, third week on wines from the Pacific Northwest, other weeks we offer international or mixed flights to keep things rotating and fresh. We also have wine socials every other Wednesday and we support local artists with a gallery wall which rotates monthly and occasional live music.” In May she launched a monthly wine dinner series with the intention of hosting a different guest chef or cook from outside of the Northshore community. For each five-course dinner Kilgore will provide wine pairings. The series, offered for the extremely reasonable price of $65 per dinner, kicked off with New Orleans chef Adolfo Garcia (of La Bocca, High Hat Café and Ancora). As humbling as it feels to follow that act, on July 19 I’ll be the one in the kitchen. The offerings for the evening come from the various cookbooks I’ve written as well as my menu for the in-house catering operation at the Southern Food & Beverage Museum. I will be serving edamame, fresh corn,and heirloom tomato salad with fresh herbs; fried potato “tots” stuffed with andouille from Wayne Jacob’s Smokehouse and Manchego cheese with a Romanesco dipping sauce; Gulf shrimp in pimenton de la vera cream; fresh sausage, cumin and cilantro hand pies with pickled carrot ribbons and citrus crème fraiche; and fresh, seasonal berry clafoutis. Join us. We will be celebrating my, yikes, 50th birthday. n

Try This: So dear to my heart, the Southern Food & Beverage Museum (SoFab) recently named chef Serigne “Love” Mbaye, 24, the second recipient of the McIlhenny Family Culinary Entrepreneurship Scholarship. Born in New York and raised in his family’s native Senegal, Mbaye currently serves as a sous chef at Cafe Adelaide and previously worked at Commander’s Palace as a senior line cook. His personal mission, one shared by those of us at SoFab (where I’m Director of Culinary Programming) is to draw attention to the culinary contributions the enslaved West African people made to the culinary traditions of the American South. Put a bowl of West African soupoukandia next to one of New Orleans’ seafood gumbo and there will be no doubt as to the root of our most defining dish. Throughout the next year, Mbaye will be hosting frequent pop-up dinners with wine pairings provided by sommelier Karla Kilgore at SoFab. His menus frequently include Akra (black-eye pea fritters with smothered onions sauce); a salad of funio (a gluten-free African grain) tomatoes, sweet potatoes, pickled red onions and lemon vinaigrette; Yassa (seared Gulf fish simmered in a sauce of citrus and onions with Senegalese spices); and a dessert with seasonal fruit. You will often find me washing dishes in the kitchen for such affairs. I do get all the glory! Check out SouthernFood.org for information on upcoming events with chef Mbaye.

BARREL WINE BAR 69305 Highway 21, Covington, (985) 272-8485, BarrelWineBar.com CHEF SERIGNE MBAYE AT SOFAB 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-0405, SouthernFood.org


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Philanthropic Fun Each month St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans’ definitive social magazine, highlights recent nonprofit fundraisers. In the following pages we acknowledge the people, social activism and lifestyles that make our city exceptional. Event profiles by Shelby Simon

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Learning to Grow

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ESYNOLA’s “An Edible Evening” demonstrated the connection between food and the natural world. Under the stars in the Langston Hughes Academy Dreamkeeper Garden, a production garden of herbs, fruits, chickens and pygmy goats in the schoolyard of the Langston Hughes Academy, 1,000 patrons attended Edible Schoolyard New Orleans’ premiere annual benefit. Seguenon Kone welcomed guests to the venue with his signature balaphone tones, and Otis and Friends, The Light Set, Love Evolution and the Brian Quezergue Trio carried guests into the night. Both the Patron Party and gala exclusively served Presqu’ile Wines, from a small, family-run winery located in Santa Maria, California, whose owners, the Murphy family, have deep roots in New Orleans.The Murphy Foundation is a lead sponsor of “An Edible Evening.”This year’s culinary host for the Patron Party was chef Michael Gulotta’s MoPho + Maypop, who served Sugar Snap Pea Som Tam Salad and Braised Collards in Coconut Pot Liquor with Fields Peas and Ham Hock. 37 additional local restaurants and food purveyors provided sumptuous tastings at the party, in addition to a beer garden and cocktails. The ESYNOLA Market Table showcased garden and kitchen products created by ESYNOLA middle school students across four FirstLine Pre-K through eighth grade schools. A DIY station allowed guests to sample Edible Schoolyard-style experiential education with hands-on activities like creating herbal tea bags, making herb sachets, experiencing a worm bin, writing “Good Luck on the LEAP test” to FirstLine students and making clay food jewelry or fridge magnets with artist Remy of Remy Diamond Jewelry. Co-Chairs were Catherine Hales and Ann Heslin. With sponsorships, patron and raffle donations, general admission ticket sales and an expansive silent auction, this year’s event reached its fundraising goal of $200,000 for the ESYNOLA program at all four PK-8 schools. Friend and Company donated a stunning jewelry package of diamond earrings and fleur de lis cufflinks, and British Airways donated round trip tickets for two to London. A late wave of new food and hot music mixed up by DJ Brice Nice ended the evening. A plant sale featuring annual or perennial plant starts grown by ESYNOLA students and beautiful Kokedama plants provided by Luna Botanicals allowed guests to take home a bit of the natural world n

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Event at a Glance

1. Co-Chairs Ann Heslin and Catherine Hales 2. Dr. Stephen and Nancy Hales with Gretchen and Edgar Chase IV 3. Ben and Allison Tiller with Cathy and Hunter Pierson 4. Carol Starr and Michael Murphy 5. Jay Altman, Ramona Luke and Greg St. Etienne 6. Katie Pedroza, Alicia Higginbotham and Casey Zainey

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “An Edible Evening,” benefiting Edible Schoolyard New Orleans WHEN: Thursday, March 22 WHERE: Langston Hughes Academy Dreamkeeper Garden


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Serving the Future

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The "Goldring-Woldenberg Major Donor Dinner" celebrated significant supporters of JFGNO. The eighth annual “Goldring-Woldenberg Major Donor Dinner” fêted major donors to the Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans’ 2018 Annual Campaign; 57 major donors were in attendance. Darryl and Louellen Berger and the Windsor Court Hotel were the generous underwriters and hosts of the black-tie affair, which took place at the Windsor Court Hotel. The event featured an open bar and passed hors d’oeuvres. Guests enjoyed a three-course meal in the ballroom, enhanced by elegant salmon pink roses atop ivory linens, featuring a salad course, baked grouper and a dessert of pecan pie. Entertainment was provided by Matt Lemmler. Richard and Vivian Cahn and Fred and Amanda Herman served as the 2018 Goldring-Woldenberg Major Donor Dinner Co-Chairs. The Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans was additionally proud to host William Goldring and Julie Breeden, Henry A. Miller, Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Jewish Federation of New Orleans, with wife Jan Miller, Jewish Federation of GNO CEO, Arnie Fielkow, with wife Dr. Susan Fielkow, the 2018 Jewish Federation of GNO Annual Campaign Co-Chairs David Radlauer and Julie Schwartz, Morris and Cathy Bart, Maury Herman and Cristina Wysoki, Alan and Diane Franco, and Julie Wise Oreck and her mother, Carol Wise. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Morris and Cathy Bart with Co-Chairs Vivian and Richard Cahn 2. Maury Herman and Cristina Wysocki with Co-Chairs Amanda and Fred Herman 3. Annual Campaign Co-Chairs David Radlauer and Julie Schwartz 4. Julie Wise Oreck and Carol Wise 5. CEO Arnie and Dr. Susan Fielkow with Jan and Board of Trustees President Henry Miller 6. Russ and Sandra Herman with Julie Breeden and Bill Goldring

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PHO TOG RAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “2018 Goldring-Woldenberg Major Donor Dinner,” benefiting the Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans WHEN: Thursday, March 22 WHERE: Windsor Court Hotel


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

Films and Flowers The New Orleans Film Society hosted a garden fête fundraiser. The gardens of Wilkinson-Bruno home served as the backdrop of New Orleans Film Society’s annual Patron Party and gala. Decor courtesy of Lovegood Event Rentals and Mardi Gras Productions, with flowers reviving the garden courtesy of Dunn & Sonnier Antiques • Flowers • Gifts, set the slate for the Midnight in the Garden theme. Celebrities in attendance included actress and producer Lynn Whitfield, actress Tina Lifford and makeup artist Nikoletta Skarlatos. Musical entertainment was provided by cellist Helen Gillet and DJ MUSA. Featured food purveyors and restaurants included Acme Oyster House, Cajun Caviar, Chais Delachaise, Dat Dog, Dickie Brennan and Co., Galatoire’s, Marcello’s, Southern Hospitality Catering, Sucré and Sylvain. Twelve film-connoisseur auction items are all sold for a total of $31.5K. Adam Marcus served as auctioneer. The event hosted approximately 300 patrons and raised $125,000. NOFS Gala Co-Chairs Martine Chaisson, Nicelle Herrington and Elisabeth Sereda served alongside venue hosts and honorary chairs Stephanie and Joseph Bruno. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Gregory Morey, Co-Chair Elisabeth Sereda, Co-Chair Martine Chaisson and Scott James 2. Jonathan Boulangeat, Stephanie Bruno, Co-Chair Nicelle Herrington and T.G. Herrington 3. Board of Directors President Valerie Grubb and Executive Director Fallon Young 4. Gary Solomon Jr. and Seth Bloom 5. Tracie Ashe, Sayde Finkel and Laura Ashley 6. Charles Urstadt and David Bernard

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY GILL RUBMAN

WHAT: “New Orleans Film Society’s 2018 Midnight in the Garden Gala,” benefiting NOFS WHEN: Sunday, March 18 WHERE: Wilkinson-Bruno home


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Access to Higher Education

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The 2018 UNCF “Mayor’s Masked Ball” honored former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu. This year marked the fifth anniversary of the UNCF New Orleans “Mayor’s Masked Ball.” Mayor Mitch Landrieu received the UNCF MASKED Award for his commitment to higher education and support of minority children getting to attend college. In a special tribute, students from Xavier and Dillard universities walked into the gala with candles to the song “Rise Up” performed by Dillard student Keith Tillman, while old and current photos projected on a screen showed the transition of education on their campuses throughout the years. Dr. Michael L. Lomax, President and CEO of UNCF, greeted guests; award-winning journalist Tamron Hall served as the evening’s Mistress of Ceremony, as well as comedian Jonathan Slocumb. Guests were treated to a delectable meal prepared by celebrity chefs. The first course, prepared by chef Bill Jones, featured shrimp remoulade with butter lettuce and English peas. The second course, prepared by chef Leah Chase, offered asparagus soup with lemon herb crème fraiche. Chef Stephen Stryjewski served a main course of beef short ribs with baby lima beans, artichokes, olives and spring onions. Chef Maggie Scales prepared dessert: a dark chocolate tart with chocolate crust and salted caramel Chantilly, with a UNCF sugared logo placed on top. First floor piano music was provided by the talented students of Dillard University. During the evening there was a performance by the Royal Boys Choir and dinner entertainment was provided by Stephanie Jordan. The evening headline entertainment was the grand performance of the O’Jays. Guests participated in the silent auction to win jewelry, sports memorabilia, artwork and vacation getaways; there was also a live auction that included a chance to attend a taping of the show “The Voice,” and one winner took home a VIP package for the Zurich Classic. An exciting raffle item got guests to their feet: a 2018 Nissan Rogue SL, donated by Supreme Automotive. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Dr. C. Reynold Verret, UNCF President and CEO Dr. Michael L. Lomax, Bill Goldring and David Archer Kerstein 2. Warner Thomas, Mistress of Ceremony Tamron Hall and Chair Michael O. Smith 3. James Perez, Shimica Gaskins and Shirelle and Chair Joel Vilmenay 4. Wil Holmes, Quentin Roach, LaJuana Chenier and Darrien Pinkman 5. Jonathan Slocumb, Therese Badon and Dr. Walter Kimbrough 6. David and Millie Gaines

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: Fifth annual “New Orleans Mayor’s Masked Ball,” benefiting United Negro College Fund WHEN: Saturday, March 17 WHERE: Hyatt Regency New Orleans


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

Southern Elegance Approximately 360 guests attended “Parkway Promenade XXVII” to support parish beautification. At this year’s “Parkway Promenade,” Jefferson Beautification, Inc. presented the Frederick Law Olmsted Award, accepted by Marilyn Charvet for her husband, the late Carol Vincent Charvet. The award is given to an individual who has assisted Jefferson Beautification, Inc. in fulfilling its mission. Mildred Zorick-Congemi served as Event Chairman, and Michele Shane L’Hoste served as Event Corporate Chairman. Honorary Chairman was James Michalopoulos, who donated live auction items: a giclée titled “Spezia” and a “1718 Tricentennial Blend” bottle of rum from his Old New Orleans Rum Distillery. Chateau Country Club provided delicious Southern cuisine, featuring grilled red snapper and praline pecan pie paired with wine. Music for dining and dancing was provided by “The Get Back Band.” Also included in the festivities were a silent and gift certificate raffle. Funds raised for Jefferson Beautification, Inc. support the organization’s mission to provide for tree planting and environmental education in Jefferson Parish. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Frank Dutreil, Event Corporate Chairman Michele Shane L’Hoste, Event Chairman Mildred Zorick- Congemi and Ronnie Schmitt 2. Mario Henderson, CEO Joy Shane, President Sharon Hannahar and George Gomez 3. Tatianna Marchione and Honorary Chairman James Michalopoulos

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KENN Y MART IN EZ

WHAT: “Parkway Promenade XXVII,” benefiting Jefferson Beautification, Inc. WHEN: Sunday, March 25 WHERE: Chateau Country Club


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

Rebuilding Together “Julia Jump 2018” supported preservation, restoration and revitalization. The New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts served two roles: as the venue for this year’s “Julia Jump” and as a fantastic example of the adaptive reuse of a historic building, underlining one of the PRC’s key goals. In keeping with the 1920s Art Deco theme of the event, vintage attire was encouraged and worn by the attendees, numbering approximately 350. NOCCA music students provided entertainment for the Patron Party. For the main event, New Orleans band Bon Bon Vivant played original bawdy gypsy swing music – and the dancing didn’t stop! The Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group provided Patron Party cuisine. The “2018 Julia Jump restaurant” donors included: 5 Happiness Restaurant, Green Fork, Jack Dempsey’s, LA 23 BBQ in Belle Chasse, Leidenheimer Baking Company, Nesbit’s Market Poeyfarre Street, Nothing Bundt Cakes on Prytania, Pigéon Catering and Events, The Praline Connection Restaurant, Pralines by Jean…and Cupcakes too!, Reginelli’s Pizzeria, Tsunami Sushi and Two Tony’s. Auction highlights included a week-long stay on Kiawah Island; a signed Anthony Davis jersey; tickets to Jazz Fest and the IBERIABANK hospitality tent; a party at F&M’s Patio Bar; artwork by Alex Beard; and donated talent, services and creations from local artisans and businesses. Melissa Eversmeyer and Shon Cowan Baker served as Event Chairs. Proceeds from the event advocate for the protection, restoration and education of historic homes in New Orleans. n

WHAT: “Julia Jump,” benefiting Preservation Resource Center WHEN: Friday, March 16 WHERE: New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts

1. Co-Chairs Shon Cowan Baker and Melissa Eversmeyer 2. Ben and Sweet Dupuy with Adele and Graham Ralston 3. Foster and Shaun Duncan with Elizabeth and Tim Soslow

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAVID PUNCH

Event at a Glance

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

“Hoggyshack” Hogs for the Cause hosted a gala dinner playing on puns from Caddyshack with a lineup of star chefs. “Hogs for the Cause” transformed the UNO Lakefront Arena into “Hogusta National” with a “Hoggyshack”-themed Gala Dinner benefit, attended by 350 patrons. Partygoers enjoyed a four-course “I’m Alright” meal, which included an appetizer course of “My Dinghy is Bigger than your Boat” Seafood Platter, a salad course, a prime rib course and a “No Respect” dessert box to finish. Participating chefs included Stephen Stryjewski, Ryan Prewitt, Rebecca Wilcomb, Billy Jones, Mason Hereford, Marcus Jacobs, Andy Ticer, Michael Hudman, Donald Link and Maggie Scales. Neal Bodenheimer, Kirk Estopinal, and Nick Detrich of Cure and Co. provided cocktails at the cocktail hour. Wines were provided courtesy of Neat Wines and Max and Vicki Loubiere. Becker Hall and Rene Louapre, Hogs for the Cause Co-Founders, were in attendance, as well as Board Members Zandy Rainold and Kirsten Finley. Mark Romig of the NOTMC served as emcee. The event committee included Alex Layfield, Jessica Magnum, Kate Gilly, Heather Lolley of the Link Restaurant Group, Katie LaCour and Claire Thriffiley and Nikki Stoumen. Currently, Hogs for the Cause operates as the premier fundraising source for pediatric brain cancer outreach services in the United States, and has given grants to more than 600 families in need. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Emcee Mark Romig and Co-Founder Rene Louapre 2. Brittany and Co-Founder Becker Hall with Chelsea Cusimano 3. Chefs Rebecca Wilcomb, Maggie Scales, Donald Link, Ryan Prewitt and Stephen Stryjewski

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “Hogs for the Cause Gala Dinner,” benefiting Hogs for the Cause WHEN: Thursday, March 22 WHERE: UNO Lakefront Arena


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

Inspired Giving DCFNO honored four individuals with the Inspired Cross Award. Daughters of Charity Foundation of New Orleans held its seventh annual “Keeping Our Promises Gala” inside the elegant Messina’s at the Terminal at the Lakefront Airport on March 23. The Patron Party preceded the gala, which included the presentation of the Inspired Cross Awards, a live fundraiser and a silent auction. The four individuals honored with the Inspired Cross Award were: Dr. Donald Erwin, CEO at St. Thomas Community Health Center; Dr. Robert Post, Chief Medical Officer at Daughters of Charity Services of New Orleans; Dr. Sandra Robinson, pediatrician at Daughters of Charity Services of New Orleans; and Dr. Gary Wiltz, CEO and Chief Health Officer at Teche Action Clinic in Franklin. This year’s Co-Chairs were Dr. Robert and Joanne Marier. Dr. Corey Hebert and Alanah Odoms Hebert led a live auction. Gala entertainment was provided by the Royal Essence Band. A silent auction included artwork from notable New Orleanians, sports memorabilia and gift packages, such as a private chef dinner at Dooky Chase Restaurant, Southwest Airline tickets, a George Rodrigue Blue Dog print titled “We Art Marching Again,” signed prints by Terrance Osborne and an autographed Alvin Kamara jersey. n

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Event at a Glance

1. President and CEO Michael Griffin with Honorees Dr. Donald Erwin, Dr. Sandra Robinson and Dr. Robert Post 2. Co-Chairs Dr. Robert and Joanne Marier 3. Rep. Jimmy Harris, Lauren Ryan and Dr. Corey Hebert and Alanah Odoms Hebert

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF STROUT

WHAT: “Keeping Our Promises Gala,” benefiting Daughters of Charity Foundation of New Orleans WHEN: Friday, March 23 WHERE: Messina’s at the Terminal


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Pontchartrain Party

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The Leukemia Cup Regatta raised funds for research and development. A nautical “Party on Lake Pontchartrain” offered a fun and festive way for 300 partygoers to give back to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. The event honored 8-year-old Daniel Wedge IV, Honored Hero, who’s now in remission from T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. James C. Wade served as Event Chair, and Guy Brierre served as Commodore of SYC, Master of Ceremonies. Ryan DeToro, GM of Porsche New Orleans, event title sponsor, delivered remarks. Prior to the main event, the VIP Party, entitled “Cocktails with the Commodore,” featured an open bar and a special pin for those in attendance. A special auction featured a bottle of Family Reserve Goslings Old Rum, which was won by Michael Tubre, whose son was diagnosed with leukemia when he was 3. Rinear Coulter, a member of the Goslings family, provided background and history on Goslings Rum. Fifteen local New Orleans restaurants, including Galatoire's, The Court of Two Sisters, Mellow Mushroom, Drago's, Acme Oyster House, Jacques Imo’s and more, lined the South wall of the dining room. Table centerpieces included two candles and a glass “message in a bottle” that had a replica of a burgee flag sticking out of the top. The Accidentals provided musical entertainment, new to the gala this year. A live auction featured prizes such as two Bermuda trips, donated by Goslings Rum, an Ireland trip, a Bahamas trip, a painting by Mariana Canu, a football signed by Archie, Peyton and Eli Manning and more. A highlight included two black chickens, referred to as the Ayam Cemani chickens, that are said to be “the Lamborghini of poultry,” worth $2,500 each. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Daniel Wedge III, Honoree Daniel Wedge IV and Michelle Wedge 2. Ryan and Kristin DeToro, Joy and Event Chair James C. Wade 3. Rinear Coulter, Commodore of SYC Guy and Pam Brierre and Katie Triplett

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “Party on Lake Pontchartrain – Leukemia Cup Regatta,” benefiting Leukemia & Lymphoma Society WHEN: Saturday, April 7 WHERE: Southern Yacht Club


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Sipping With a Story

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The Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses hosted a garden party benefit with sips, eats and historic home tours. A quintessential New Orleans evening set the stage for “Amazing Grapes 2018:” string lights overhead, jazz music wafting through the air and the historic garden in bloom. The event benefits the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses in the ongoing challenge of preservation of the two 19th century historic houses: Hermann-Grima House, built in 1830, and Gallier House, built in 1861. The Patron Party featured Veuve Clicquot donated by the Chart Room Bar and Woodford Reserve Bourbon donated by Brown Forman. Cava Restaurant also donated delicious wines. The signature cocktail of the evening comes with a story. A letter from between the Grima brothers from September of 1857 was discovered, where one brother requests the other to bring certain ingredients for a drink. He also says that he’s taking the Creole from Bay St. Louis to New Orleans and wants the ingredients for the weekend. They are similar to a French 75 (champagne, cognac, lemons and ice), so the drink earned the title the Grima 57 as the event’s signature cocktail, which was served out of the home’s historic wine room. At the gala, the New Orleans Jazz Trio, led by board member Julie Simpson’s father, Ronald Simpson, played on the balcony. Broussard’s was the exclusive caterer, with selections including Angus beef tenderloin, pan-roasted Gulf fish, a Mediterranean table and more. Food was served out of the Hermann-Grima House open-hearth kitchen, the French Quarter’s oldest original open-hearth kitchen still in operation. Auction items were displayed in the back gallery of the house, which was open for docent-led tours during the party. Top prizes included a staycation package at the Omni, a Rip Van Winkle 12-year Bourbon, a getaway to Perdido Beach, Florida and a keg party at F&M. Lori Paige and Katherine Raymond served as Event Chairs. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Executive Director Megan Koza Mitchell with Co-Chairs Lori Paige and Katherine Raymond 2. Caroline Ferguson with John and 2017-2018 TWE President Holly Nieset 3. Dr.Scott and Julie Habetz

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “Amazing Grapes Wine Auction,” benefiting Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses WHEN: Friday, March 16 WHERE: Hermann-Grima House


(Pampering Yourself) BY KELCY WILBURN | PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHERYL GERBER

ACHIEVING THAT SUMMER GLOW Everything about summer lends itself to an excuse to indulge in a little self-pampering. With its skin-revealing clothing and shoes, skin- and hairdamaging sun rays and a designation as the vacation and staycation time of year, the season makes a visit to the spa, salon or clinic a no-brainer. If you’re looking for ways to renew your look and feel,

THE DOLL HOUSE HAIR & BEAUTY SALON

you’ll find endless options across the metro area in summer – everything from hair and skin treatments to massage, manicures and pedicures, waxes, spray tanning and more. Not sure what would best suit your pampering style? Local professionals have a number of tips on what services to get, what results to expect, and how to find what you’re looking for.

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SOUTHERN SWINGS NAIL BAR & DAY SPA

At Southern Swings Nail Bar & Day Spa, owner Brandi Holstead aims to bring new meaning to the term southern hospitality, where they serve up pedicures to guests being pampered from porch swings. With rustic, southern farmhouse décor, the nail bar claims to be the only place you can swing while receiving a pedicure. A summer top-seller at Southern Swings is the hydrating Honey & Goat Milk pedicure. “The antioxidants, nutrients, enzymes and other healing components found in honey combine to create a fantastic pampering and beauty treatment. Honey is also a natural moisturizer, perfect for those tired and dry toes,” says Holstead. In addition to manicures and pedicures, other services offered at Southern Swings include haircuts, blowouts, brows, waxing and airbrush tanning. In July and August, the day spa

common problem, and there’s nothing worse than spending time on the perfect hairdo just to walk outside and have it turn into a wiry mess. At Blo Blow Dry Bar, stylists are on hand to help sculpt a stylish, weather-resistant ’do while recommending products that can help from home. “We do not do haircuts or coloring; our main focus is blow outs – a washing and styling treatment. After a thorough shampoo and blow out, we create whatever look our guests want, from beautiful volume, beachy waves and sleek, straight locks to something as simple as pony tails,” says Owner Roy Lacoste. Blo uses and sells Color Wow and Unite hair products, many of which they reference as a “must” for summer. One such product is Color Wow’s Dream Coat, an anti-humidity

will offer 10 percent off of any waxing service, which includes a full menu of waxing options. Hair can be a constant struggle during the humid summer months, and local salons are familiar with the drill. Frizz is a

hair seal that acts as a raincoat for your hair and lasts three to four shampoos, according to Lacoste. At The Doll House Hair and Beauty Salon keratin treatments see a big uptick in summer. According to owner and

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hairstylist Liz Duboue, the treatments can help tame frizz four to six weeks or even up to three to five months depending on what the client wants. Haircuts and hair color are the specialty at The Doll House, which opened in 2011. “It is important to pamper yourself because when you look good, you feel good. Sometimes something as small as a haircut can give you that extra push of confidence you need for a big date or job interview,” says Duboue. Transparency is important at The Doll House, which offers free consultations before a service to go over client goals and any required home maintenance or return visits. “The goal is always to make the client feel comfortable and confident in whatever services they’re having done,” says Duboue. While looking good in order to feel good is one approach to pampering, actually feeling good to feel good is another, hence the massage. “One hour of massage is equivalent to eight hours of sleep. Overall health and performance is proven to be better when we take care of ourselves and take periodic breaks from our hectic lifestyles,” says Erin Warner, Owner of The Woodhouse Day Spa New Orleans, Slidell and Baton Rouge. According to Warner, massage is the top service at The Woodhouse, as stress relief is sought year-round. In summer, the spa sees a rise in exfoliating body scrubs performed in its Vichy shower. Also popular is The Woodhouse Day Spa’s HydraFacial, which exfoliates with non-invasive glycolic and salicylic acid and nourishes with antioxidants, peptides, and hyaluronic acid. “The HydraFacial shows immediate results,” says Warner. For the 4th of July, The Woodhouse Day Spa will feature its twiceyearly “7 for 5 Special:” seven treatments for the price of five. Belladonna has made a few changes recently, receiving a

renovation and beginning its first-ever membership program, which includes a monthly massage, facial or manipedi, and other perks, such as access to the spa’s salons, private lounges, saunas, showers and tea garden. “During the summer months, everyone is trying to escape the heat and prep for increased sun exposure,” says General Manager Emily Fevrier. Refreshing body treatments like salt scrubs and seaweed wraps are some of the most sought services to combat the sun’s negative effects. “Body scrubs allow your skin to better absorb daily moisturizers, which are crucial in keeping skin hydrated during the sunny summer months,” says Fevrier. Fevrier recommends taking advantage of New Orleans’ slow summer pace by fitting in the self-care we often neglect in busier months. To that end, the full-service day spa offers full- and half-day wellness retreats for relaxation and rejuvenation. On-demand services are becoming standard in this era of convenience and advanced technology, THE WOODHOUSE DAY SPA and the beauty industry is seeing benefits. Whereas Uber brings you a ride and Waitr brings you dinner, Spafoo is the latest app to bring you beauty services when and where you need them. “Pampering isn’t having to go out into the heat to get your beauty on,” says Co-Founder Alicia Reynaud. Simply download the app, register, select a service and send a request. Once a service provider accepts your request, you’ll have a licensed, professional stylist, manicurist, makeup artist, men’s groomer, massage therapist or even personal trainer headed your way. “Spafoo is a convenient service for busy professionals, stay-at-home parents and staycationers/vacationers who want pampering without the hassle,” says Reynaud. Services can even be provided at your office or hotel. In addition to nails, hair and relaxation, another way people

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SPAFOO

like to treat themselves is with products, treatments and procedures that reverse the signs of aging. At Facial Plastic Surgery, Dr. Sean Weiss is sought by those looking for balance and proportion through facial aesthetic enhancements. “During the summer months, low downtime procedures are most popular for those who are on the go. This includes non-surgical sculpting of the neck and jawline with therapies such as ThermiTight, microneedling and Kybella,” says Dr. Weiss. Other popular treatments include injectable fillers such as Juvederm, Restylane, Sculptra and Radiesse for enhancing the cheeks, eyelids, brows and even the nose. Wrinkle reduction through Botox Cosmetic, Dysport or Xeomin is also popular for self-pamperers. During July, Dr. Weiss is offering St. Charles Avenue readers special discounts on services with details at SeanWeissMD.com/StCharlesAvenue. Note: St. Charles Avenue magazine doesn’t advocate plastic surgery except under certain conditions. Please consult your doctor before undertaking any medical procedure.

Belladonna 2900 Magazine St. 891-4393, BelladonnaDaySpa.com Blo 5530 Magazine St. 570-6101, BloMeDry.com The Doll House Hair & Beauty Salon 516 Veterans Blvd., Suite 200, Metairie 835-7474, MetairieSalon.com Southern Swings Nail Bar & Day Spa 4422 Magazine St. 372-3485, SouthernSwingsNailBar.com Spafoo Spafoo.com Dr. Sean Weiss – Facial Plastic Surgery 2201 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 408, Metairie 814-FACE (3223), SeanWeissMD.com The Woodhouse Day Spa 4030 Canal St. 482-6652, WoodhouseSpas.com

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Sip-Sational Summer Happy Hours

Frozen Bananas Foster cocktail, the Mardi Gras Mambo and the Puerto Rican Delicacy from the Black Duck Bar in

By Sarah Ravits Photographed by Mike Lirette

Palace Cafe

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A gu i d e to 9 o f t h e m o st r e fr es h i n g sp ots

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i n to w n Tennessee Williams once wrote, “Liquor goes fast in hot weather” and he was definitely onto something. Refreshing summer cocktails are one way to make our humid summers a little more tolerable. The following hotspots, bars and restaurants have updated their menus just in time to help us all beat the heat.

Arnaud’s French 75 Bar In the French Quarter, Arn-

Brennan’s Brennan’s, the self-pro-

Margaritas, house wines for $5 and $3 beers. Appetizers and small plates in this price range

aud’s French 75 Bar hosts hap-

claimed “Champagne House of

py hour from 3-5:30 p.m., when

the South” offers a “Bubbles at

guests can sip select wines by

Brennan’s happy hour,” which

the glass for half the regular

features discounted bottles of

price and enjoy a selection of

bubbly, champagne cocktails

classic and creative cocktails.

and bar bites, such as BBQ

And don’t forget to raise a toast

shrimp potstickers; Parmesan

to head bartender Chris Han-

pommes frites and sliders in

nah, who’s responsible for the

the Roost Bar and Courtyard

restaurant’s 2017 James Beard

2-7 p.m., Mondays-Thursdays,

award for its overall outstand-

and 9 a.m.-7 p.m. on Fridays

ing bar program. If you need

(including 9 a.m.-2 p.m. happy

another excuse to celebrate,

hour in the dining room as well)

The Country Club underwent a

Arnaud’s is celebrating its 100th

and 5 p.m. champagne saber-

renovation last year and now

anniversary this year, coincid-

ing in the courtyard to usher in

features hand-painted walls, a

ing with the city’s tricentennial.

the weekend. One particular

butterfly lounge and a luxurious

Arnaud’s French 75 Bar will

highlight on the menu is the Mr.

bar where guests can sip $3 well

also offer a refreshing spritz for

Funk, named after the former

drinks during its daily happy

$6, with flavors changing on a

cellar-master, featuring cran-

hour, 4-7 p.m. Outside, the

weekly basis, as well as a $5 Old

berry juice, peach Schnapps

Country Club has a swimming

Fashioned.

and sparkling wine.

pool and hot tub as well as an

Arnaud’s, 813 Bienville St., 5235433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com

include Prince Edward Island Mussels in a white wine sauce; rosemary pommes frites with housemade aioli; and Brussels sprouts topped with bleu cheese crumble. Briquette, 701 S. Peters St., 302-7496, Briquette-Nola.com

The Country Club Tucked away in Bywater,

Brennan’s, 417 Royal St., 525-

outdoor bar, and lounge chairs

9711, BrennansNewORleans.com

and tables to catch some rays. Some of the summer cock-

Apolline Hosting a generous happy

Briquette Briquette is situated in a

tails gracing its menu include Dulce Humo, made with mezcal,

hour Tuesdays-Fridays, Apol-

converted former molasses

pama, lemon and habanero

line offers half-priced beer,

factory, with repurposed wood

syrup, and the Stress Reliever,

$5 house wines by the glass,

and a glass-encased kitchen.

made with spiced rum, coconut

$20 bottles of house wine and

Owner Anna Tusa refers to the

cream, pineapple, mint, basil,

$2 classic cocktails. General

bar area as the “living room”

cinnamon and honey. The bar

manager Frank Phillips says

because it offers a communal,

and restaurant also offer a small

that Amanda Thomas, the bar

sociable atmosphere. The

plates menu during happy hour

director, is a real master of her

summer happy hour menu

that includes crawfish beignets;

craft; she makes her own spirits,

consists of the Briquette 75:

mussels with saffron butter

liqueurs and cordials in-house.

an original take on the classic

and red chilis; grilled oysters;

One standout cocktail this

French 75, with Bouvet Spar-

polenta cake; and arancini with

Summer cocktails

summer is a boozy version of a

kling Rosé and Boodles Gin.

kalamata olives, smoked gouda,

Dulce Humo and the

snowball, which is sure to help

There is also the refreshing

basil tomato and Fontina creme.

Stress Reliever from

New Orleanians beat the heat.

South Peters Mojito and the

Another tip: The Country Club

Apolline also has a fine selection

District Smash, which is “light,

hosts a drag brunch on Satur-

of happy hour fare, including

refreshing and a little sweet,”

days, with a Bloody Mary bar

chargrilled oysters, shrimp and

says Tusa.

and bottomless mimosas.

The Country Club with Burrata Tartine

grits, fried boudin and burgers. Apolline, 4729 Magazine St., 894-8881, ApollineRestaurant.com

Additionally, this summer

The Country Club, 634

Briquette offers several $5

Louisa St., 945-0742,

cocktails, including Refinery

TheCountryClubNewOrleans.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 47


Rosemary pommes frites with housemade aioli; Prince Edward Island mussels in a white wine sauce; and Brussels sprouts topped with bleu cheese crumble from Briquette

48 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018


selection of house-pickled veg-

Palace CafE

etables. Another summer special

Throughout the summer, the

is the Country Ham Plate; for $8

restaurants under the Dickie

it includes Landrauchshinnken

Brennan management (Palace

smoked ham, house-made juni-

Café, Dickie Brennan’s Steak-

per mustard and pickled collard

house, Bourbon House and

greens, all served with country

Tableau) have been running a “$5

loaf from Bellegarde Bakery.

after 5” promotion, 5-7 p.m. At

Additionally, the Warehouse

Palace Café, the happy hour menu

District location features Friday

features a range of cocktails,

Night Flights, consisting of three

including a classic lime daiquiri;

cheeses paired with three beers

the Mardi Gras Mambo (a blend

from a specific brewer that ro-

of Bayou Silver rum, Luxardo

tates each month.

cherry juice, coconut, lemon and

St. James Cheese Co., 641

pineapple); and the Puerto Rican

Tchoupitoulas St., 304-1485;

Delicacy, made of Caliche white

5004 Prytania St., 899-4737;

rum, sweet potato purée, pine-

StJamesCheese.com

apple, orange and lemon. Another highlight is its

Tsunami

decadent, frozen Bananas Foster cocktail: an ice cream-based drink

This sleek sushi spot in the

that pays tribute to the traditional

Central Business District boasts

dessert. Andrew Bates, lead bar-

delicious cocktails this summer

tender at the Black Duck Bar, is

with a happy hour 3-6 p.m. dur-

the brains behind these afore-

ing the week. On Tuesdays happy

mentioned specialty cocktails.

hour is extended until 10 p.m. On the menu are $5 house martinis,

Palace Café’s happy hour also offers fried duck wings with

cosmos, apple-tinis and lemon

satsuma Steen’s syrup, ginger

drops; $4 house wine and beers;

glaze and toasted sesame seeds, while lighter fare includes a trio of hummus with black eyed peas and truffle oil; edamame with

Mr. Funk, named after the former cellar-master, featuring cranberry juice, peach Schnapps and sparkling wine from Brennan’s

pickled okra with pepper jelly. Palace Café, 605 Canal St., 5231661, PalaceCafe.com

Ralph’s On the Park Ralph’s On the Park’s, the

well liquors and hot sake. To cool off after a long day, check out the Honey Dew Me Martini made with Bacardi Limon, melon

ginger; chickpeas with sundried tomatoes and pine nuts; and fried

and $3 domestic bottle beers,

glass and $3 local craft beers.

On Thursdays, Fridays and

and a hint of ginger along with

Saturdays, 5-8 p.m., the Uptown

an in-house special blend of fruit

900 City Park Ave., 488-

location serves $10 three-item

juices and macerated honey

1000, RalphsOnThePark.com

cheese boards, with $1 off wines

dew. Another standout is the

and beers and $4 discounts

Japanese Magnolia: a refresh-

on bottles of wine. Over on

ing classic that has been on the

Tchoupitoulas Street, Mondays-

menu since its early days. “It is

Ralph’s On the Park,

St. James Cheese Co. With a carefully curated list

farm-to-table destination

of wines and beers, St. James

Saturdays, the staff serves $10

a true sushi bar classic cocktail,

overlooking City Park, offers

Cheese Co. now has a second lo-

three-item cheese boards, $1

made with sake and plum wine,”

global spins on locally sourced

cation in the Warehouse District

off wines and beers and $4

says Partner Michele Ezell. It’s

seafood, meats and vegetables.

on Tchoupitoulas Street, in addi-

discounts on wine bottles.

“something sweet, light and easy

Happy hour is Mondays-Fridays,

tion to its original Uptown home.

Foodwise, Heiligman also

to drink for a summer cocktail.”

3-7 p.m. in the bar with $5 dips

“We try to feature natural,

recommends the “pickle plate”

Tsunami, Pan American Life

and snacks, $15 pitchers for 4,

funky wines,” notes business

in the Warehouse District for

Center, 601 Poydras St., Suite B,

$5 daily featured wines by the

manager Rachel Heiligman.

$5, which features an assorted

608-3474, ServingSushi.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 49


ADVERTISING SECTION

gallery insider Within this section you’ll find a directory of more than 70 art galleries in New Orleans and on the Northshore. Find your favorite new artist or rediscover an old master; travel down a frequently walked street and discover a new treasure; or simply enjoy the experience of taking in beautiful artworks – all of this and more can be found within GALLERY INSIDER. This edition of GALLERY INSIDER will have supplementary distribution at “White Linen Night”, “Dirty Linen Night” and “Art for Arts Sake.” If you would like to have the St. Charles Avenue GALLERY INSIDER to display at your upcoming exhibition or show, please call 504.830.7248.

ALGIERS POINT Rosetree Blown Glass Studio 446 Vallette Street 504.366.3602 rosetreegallery.com ARABI Studio Inferno 6601 St. Claude Avenue 504.945.1878 FB: Studio Inferno

Dr. Bob Folk Art 3027 Chartres Street 504.945.2225 drbobart.net

Saladino Gallery 409 E. Boston Street 504.236.8827 saladinogallery.com

Good Children Gallery 4037 St. Claude Avenue 504.975.1557 goodchildrengallery.com

Tripolo Gallery 323 N. Columbia Street 985.789.4073 tripologallery.com

The Front 4100 St. Claude Avenue nolafront.org

FAUBOURG LAFAYETTE

Adorn 610 Royal Street 504.680.0133 FB: Le Jardin / Adorn

Ashé Cultural Arts Center 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard 504.603.6394 ashecac.org

Angela King Gallery 241 Royal Street 504.524.8211 angelakinggallery.com

Matthew Clayton Brown 1724 St. Andrew Street 504.522.5058 mclaytonbrown.com

Antieau Gallery 927 Royal Street 504.304.0849 antieaugallery.com

BYWATER

COVINGTON

Antenna Gallery 3718 St. Claude Avenue 504.298.3161 antenna.works

Impastato Gallery & Art Therapy 1901 US 190, Suite 28 985.778.5338 impastatogallery.com

50 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018

FRENCH QUARTER A Gallery for Fine Photography 241 Chartres Street 504.568.1313 agallery.com


ADVERTISING SECTION

ANGELA KING GALLERY

HEMMERLING GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART

“During these 40 years, I have exhibited over 200 artists and held over 500events open to the public. At this time, the gallery shows around 25 accomplished artists, working in a wide variety of media, including oil, acrylic, fiberglass, aluminum, lenticular photography, glass, bronze, steel and clay. We continue to present a range of styles for our collectors: abstraction, realism, fantasy, surrealism, pop, expressionism and some that defy categorization.” – Angela King, Gallery Director

This painting was in the movie “Girls Trip” with Queen Latifa. Do you know a teacher? We have a free program to encourage random acts of kindness. Be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud. What a great way to start the school year! Send an email to carol@hemmerlingart.com for information on how to register your school. Become a part of the movement.

MODERNIST CUISINE GALLERY

MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES

See food as you’ve never seen it before, from a gravity-defying cheeseburger with levitating toppings to falling glasses of wine frozen in a spectacular embrace. Acclaimed photographer Nathan Myhrvold uses new techniques and equipment to produce limited-edition artwork only available at Modernist Cuisine Gallery. Myhrvold’s latest collection of cocktail photographs debuts at the gallery in July. All artwork can be framed and shipped worldwide.

“Martin Lawrence Galleries is located on Royal Street among the French Quarter’s crown jewel’s in terms of elegance, decorum and culture, which makes it the perfect location for our flagship New Orleans Gallery. It boasts the largest collection of original works by 20th century masters Picasso, Chagall, Warhol and Erté as well as contemporary artists including Deyber and Murakami. Locals and out-of-towners delight in our comprehensive showcase of original paintings, sculpture and limited edition graphics. We make art personal.” – Mary Coxe, Gallery Director

FRENCH QUARTER 241 Royal Street 504-524-8211, angelakinggallery.com

FRENCH QUARTER 305 Royal Street 504-571-5157 modernistcuisinegallery.com

FRENCH QUARTER 733 Royal Street 504-524-0909, hemmerlingart.com

FRENCH QUARTER 433 Royal Street 504-299-9055, martinlawrence.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 51


ADVERTISING SECTION

DR. BOB FOLK ART

3027 Chartres Street BYWATER

504-945-2225 drbobart.net Most well known for making “Be Nice or Leave!” part of the New Orleans vernacular, Dr. Bob is a self-taught visionary artist who has occupied his 9th Ward studio since 1991. His paintings, carvings,and assemblages celebrating flora, fauna, architecture, food, music and people can also be found in the Smithsonian, the Brooks Museum of Memphis and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art House of Blues collection. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Parking on site.

Art in Bloom Gallery and Studio 830 Chartres Street 504.495.8635 artinbloomgallery.com Bee Galleries 319 Chartres Street 504.587.7117 beegalleries.com Bruce Brice Gallery 2611 Chartres Street 504.949.4294 brucebrice.com Caliche & Pao Gallery 312 Royal Street 504.588.2846 calicheandpao.com Callan Fine Art 240 Chartres Street 504.524.0025 callanfineart.com Claire Elizabeth Gallery 131 Decatur Street 504.309.4063 claireelizabethgallery.com Craig Tracy Gallery 827 Royal Street 504.592.9886 craigtracy.com

NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE 1111 St. Mary Street LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT 504-513-8030, neworleansphotoalliance.org, photonola.org Balancing Cultures is a family history project that bears witness to the tolerance and subsequent acceptance of a paradoxical dilemma. The images serve as a reminder of the injustices that can result from hysteria, racism, and economic exploitation. Jerry Takigawa is the recipient of NOPA’s 2017 Clarence John Laughlin Award. Takigawa uses historical artifacts and family photographs with a Japanese American design sensibility. NOPA is a volunteer run 501c3 with a mission to encourage the understanding and appreciation of photography through exhibitions, opportunities, and educational programs. Jerry Takigawa: Balancing Cultures will be on display from June 16-August 16 52 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018

Gallery Rinard 611 Royal Street 504.522.6536 galleryrinard.com Gallery Two 831 Royal Street 504.513.8312 gallerytwonola.com George Rodrigue Studios 730 Royal Street 504.581.4244 georgerodrigue.com Graphite Galleries 936 Royal Street 505.577.7873 graphitenola.com Great Artists’ Collective 815 Royal Street 504.525.8190 greatartistscollective.com Hall-Barnett Gallery 237 Chartres Street 504.522.5657 hallbarnett.com Harouni Gallery 933 Royal Street 504.299.4393 harouni.com

Creason’s Fine Art Gallery 831 Chartres Street 504.345.2243 creasonsfineartgallery.com

Hemmerling Gallery of Southern Art 733 Royal Street 504.524.0909 hemmerlingart.com

Dutch Alley Artist’s Co-Op 912 N. Peters Street 504.412.9220 dutchalleyartistsco-op.com

Kako Gallery 536 Royal Street 504.565.5445 kakogallery.com

Elliott Gallery 540 Royal Street 504.523.3554 elliottgallery.com

Kezic Gallery 343 Royal Street 504.298.1096 kezicgallery.com

Fredrick Guess Studio 906 Royal Street 504.251.4644 fredrickguessstudio.com

Kurt E. Schon, Ltd. Fine Paintings 510 St. Louis Street 504.524.5462 kurteschonltd.com

Galerie Rue Royale 541 Royal Street 504.581.6925 frenchart.net Gallery Burguieres 736 Royal Street 240.994.0851 galleryburguieres.com Gallery Orange 819 Royal Street 504.875.4006 gallery-orange.com

La Belle Galerie 1737 Esplanade Avenue 504.529.3080 FB: La Belle Galerie, The Showroom Le Jardin 612 Royal Street 504.680.0133 FB: Le Jardin / Adorn


ADVERTISING SECTION

Lozano & Barbuti Gallery 313 Royal Street 504.581.2428 lozanoandbarbutigallery.com

Steve Jarrett Gallery 618 Royal Street 504.495.8042 stevejarrettgallery.com

M.S. Rau Antiques 630 Royal Street 888.223.5258 rauantiques.com

Sutton Galleries 519 Royal Street 504.581.1914 suttonsgalleries.com

Mann Gallery 305 Royal Street  504.523.2342 vincentmanngallery.com

Tanner Gallery and Studio 830 Royal Street 504.524.8266 tannergallery.com

Martin Lawrence Galleries 433 Royal Street 504.299.9055 martinlawrence.com

The Jamie Hayes Gallery 617 Chartres Street 504.596.2344 jamiehayes.com

Martin Welch Art 223 Dauphine Street 504.388.4240 martinwelchart.com

Vieux Carre Fine Art Gallery 507 St. Ann Street 504.522.2900 vieuxcarregallery.com

Michalopoulos Gallery 617 Bienville Street 504.558.0505 michalopoulos.com

Windsor Fine Art 221 Royal Street 504.586.0202 windsorfineart.com

Modernist Cuisine Gallery 305 Royal Street 504.571.5157 modernistcuisinegallery.com

GARDEN DISTRICT

Msaniart Gallery 823 Royal Street 504.529.1640 msaniartgallery.com Off the Beaten Way 1029 Royal Street 504.586.0180 offthebeatenway.net Oleander on Royal 1000 Royal Street 504.561.8860 oleanderonroyal.com O’Neill Studios 721 Royal Street 504.527.0703 oneillgallery.com Pennington / O’Neill Fine Art 829 Royal Street 985.789.5547 penningtonart.com Red Truck Gallery 940 Royal Street 504.522.3630 redtruckgallery.com Scene by Rhys Art Gallery 708 Toulouse Street 504.258.5842 scenebyrhys.com

Anton Haardt Gallery 2858 Magazine Street 504.891.9080 antonart.com Gallery B. Fos 2138 Magazine Street 504.444.2967 beckyfos.com

KEVIN GILLENTINE GALLERY UPTOWN 3917 Magazine Street 504-891-0509, kevingillentine.com

The Kevin Gillentine Gallery is known for its relaxed atmosphere and personable yet professional service. Kevin Gillentine’s large-scale ethereal landscapes are collected by celebrities, used regularly by some of the country’s top interior designers and can be found in homes and businesses all over the world. The gallery also offers framing services by Vincent Bergeal and his staff of master framers, who offer clients unsurpassed service and selection when it comes to museum and heirloom quality custom framing.

Rhino Contemporary Crafts Co. 2028 Magazine Street 504.523.7945 rhinocrafts.com Terrance Osborne Gallery 3029 Magazine Street 504.232.7530 terranceosborne.com GRETNA Art by Christy Gallery 603 Lafayette Street 504.366.3736 artbychristy.com LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT

NEWCOMB ART MUSEUM OF TULANE UNIVERSITY

Coup d’Oeil Art Gallery 2033 Magazine Street 504.722.0876 coupdoeilartconsortium.com

UPTOWN 6823 St. Charles Avenue 504-865-5328, newcombartmuseum.tulane.edu

Newcomb Art Museum, located on Tulane University’s Uptown campus, builds on the legacy of Newcomb College by presenting original exhibitions that highlight the work of women, explore socially engaged art, civic dialogue and community transformation. From August 21 through December 22, the museum presents “EMPIRE,” a unique art installation by Fallen Fruit that celebrates the city’s tricentennial by telling the story of New Orleans through the art and artifacts from the diverse archives of Tulane.

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 53


ADVERTISING SECTION

David Spielman Gallery 1332 Washington Avenue 504.899.7670 davidspielman.com Ellen Macomber Fine Arts 1516 Magazine Street 504.314.9414 ellenmacomber.com New Orleans Photo Alliance 1111 St. Mary Street 504.513-8030 neworleansphotoalliance.org Studio Amanda Talley 1382 Magazine Street 504.595.3136 amandatalley.com MARIGNY Barrister’s Gallery 2331 St. Claude Avenue 504.710.4506 barristersgallery.com Byrdie’s 2402A St. Claude Avenue byrdiespottery.org

M CONTEMPORARY

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT 612 Julia Street 504-830-7226, mcontemporary.com

M Contemporary is moving from Royal Street to Julia Row. “After 25 years in Santa Fe, I returned home to New Orleans; my strong cultural ties and a new vibrancy were irresistible. My roster is a diverse group of regionally and nationally recognized artists; their work is united by complex color, technical excellence and a strong point of view. I feature both figurative and abstract imagery, sculpture and ceramics.” – Michael Matassa, Owner. A very select collection of Tribal art assembled in Santa Fe is also offered. Image “Three Girls,” James Strombotne, 30”x 24”

LEMIEUX GALLERIES 332 Julia Street

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

504-522-5988 lemieuxgalleries.com LeMieux Galleries is located at the gateway of the Arts District of New Orleans near the Contemporary Arts Center and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Since 1983, the mission of LeMieux Galleries has been to unite seasoned collectors and new art enthusiasts with artists who are committed to their vision. In 2017 long time employees Christy Wood and Jordan Blanton purchased the gallery, expanding their roster to include more emerging artists from the South. Image: “La Peppermint” by Emily Wilson, carved wood, welded steel 16”x19”x5 1/2”

54 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018

Parse NOLA 819 Marigny Street 504.224.6814 parsenola.org Scott Edwards Photography Studio & Gallery 2111 Decatur Street 504.610.0581 scottedwardsgallery.com Second Story Gallery 2372 St. Claude Avenue, Suite 251 504.427.2719 neworleanshealingcenter.org Skimmer Studios by Ross Lunz 1241 Frenchman Street 504.450.0484 rosslunz.com Staple Goods 1340 St. Roch Avenue 504.908.7331 staplegoods.org UNO St. Claude Art Gallery 2429 St. Claude Avenue 504.948.6939 finearts.uno.edu Venusian Gardens 2601 Chartres Street 504.943.7446 venusiangardens.com

MID-CITY New Orleans Museum of Art 1 Collins C Diboll Circle 504.658.4100 noma.org UPTOWN Alex Beard Studio 3926 Magazine Street 504.309.0394 alexbeardstudio.com Alexis Walter Art 5702 Magazine Street 504.568.0316 alexiswalter.com Ashley Longshore Gallery 4537 Magazine Street 504.333.6951 ashleylongshore.com Carol Robinson Gallery 840 Napoleon Avenue 504.895.6130 carolrobinsongallery.net Cole Pratt Gallery 3800 Magazine Street 504.891.6789 coleprattgallery.com Davis Gallery 904 Louisiana Avenue 504.895.5206 davisafricanart.com Dee Dee Martin Gallery 3426 Magazine Street 504.516.2212 deedeemartin.com Esom Gallery 3935 Magazine Street 225.202.6406 esomart.com Frenchy 8319 Oak Street 504.861.7595 frenchylive.com Guthrie Contemporary Gallery 3815 Magazine Street 504.897.2688 guthriecontemporary.com Kevin Gillentine Gallery 3917 Magazine Street 504.891.0509 kevingillentine.com Newcomb Art Gallery Tulane University Woldenberg Art Center 504.865.5328 newcombartgallery.tulane.edu


ADVERTISING SECTION

New Orleans Academy of Fine Arts 5256 Magazine Street 504.899.8111 noafa.com Pollack Glass Studio 4132 Magazine Street 504.875.3267 pollackglassnola.com Studio Solitario 4531 Magazine Street 504.905.4175 billysolitario.com Tami Curtis Gallery 5523 Magazine Street 985.789.2214 tamicurtisstudios.com Ten Gallery 4432 Magazine Street 504.214.3589 tengallerynola.com WAREHOUSE ARTS DISTRICT Ariodante Contemporary Craft Gallery 535 Julia Street 504.524.3233 ariodantegallery.com

Gallery 600 Julia 600 Julia Street 504.895.7375 gallery600julia.com George Schmidt Gallery 626 Julia Street 504.592.0206 georgeschmidt.com Jonathan Ferrara Gallery 400a Julia Street 504.522.5471 jonathanferraragallery.com LeMieux Galleries 332 Julia Street 504.522.5988 lemieuxgalleries.com M Contemporary 612 Julia Street 504.523.2022 mcontemporary.com Martine Chaisson Gallery 727 Camp Street 504.302.7942 martinechaissongallery.com

Octavia Art Gallery 454 Julia Street 504.309.4249 octaviaartgallery.com

Beata Sasik Gallery 541 Julia Street 504.322.5055 sasikart.com

Ogden Museum of Southern Art 925 Camp Street 504.539.9650 ogdenmuseum.org

Brand New Orleans Art Gallery 646 Tchoupitoulas Street 504.509.6598 brandneworleansartgallery.com Bükaty 841 Carondelet Street 504.533.8858 johnbukaty.com Callan Contemporary 518 Julia Street 504.525.0518 callancontemporary.com Contemporary Arts Center 900 Camp Street 504.528.3805 cacno.org

artsdistrictneworleans.com

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

The Arts District of New Orleans (ADNO) invites everyone to enjoy the lavish offerings of their hospitable art galleries, museums, performance spaces, bars, restaurants and hotels. First Saturday Gallery Openings are held every first Saturday of the month down and around Julia Street, beginning at 6 p.m. This community is rich in character and looks to promote all aspects of this architecturally distinctive historic district of New Orleans and its businesses.

New Orleans Glassworks & Printmaking Studio 727 Magazine Street neworleansglassworks.com

Arthur Roger Gallery 432 Julia Street 504.522.1999 arthurrogergallery.com

Boyd | Satellite 440 Julia Street 504.581.2440 boydsatellitegallery.com

THE ARTS DISTRICT OF NEW ORLEANS

Søren Christensen Gallery 400 Julia Street 504.569.9501 sorengallery.com Stella Jones Gallery 201 St. Charles Avenue, #132 504.568.9050 stellajonesgallery.com Steve Martin Fine Art 624 Julia Street 504.566.1390 stevemartinfineart.com ONLINE GALLERIES Brad Thompson Fine Art 985.640.2354 bradthompsongalleries.com Melissa Bonin 337.380.6927 melissabonin.com

SØREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY WAREHOUSE DISTRICT 400 Julia Street 504-569-9501, sorengallery.com

Søren Christensen is located on Julia Street in the heart of the New Orleans Arts District. It features contemporary paintings, sculpture and photography by artists from the region and beyond. The gallery offers complimentary consultation services to the trade, corporate and private collectors, including space planning/design and collection curation. They have a large inventory of work in a variety of price points, mediums and styles, and offer digital renderings to aid in the selection process. Artwork by: Rose Thome Casterline STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 55


E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V

Flamingo Fun A party for our new neighbors By Bev Church

56 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018

collected flamingo glasses, trays, lights, head bobbers and backpacks, and I even found a flamingo light at Dillard’s. Everyone came at 4:30 p.m. so they could swim and have snacks and popsicles. Then a few games, including riding on a peacock float, obviously a friend of our flamingos. After

swimming and playing games, we served mini pizzas and chips. The hit for the girls were light up butterfly rings and Weston loved the water balloons! Welcome to the neighborhood! We have another new neighbor who’s a famous artist so I’m working on her party; stay tuned. n

PHOTOS BY LINDA REESE BJ ORK

We have adorable new neighbors who just moved in, and to welcome them we decided to have a pool party for the children: Weston, Ann Colin and Kate! We already have several flamingos in our garden, as well as in the pool, so I decided to center the theme on them. After trips to Party City and Hobby Lobby, I


E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 57


WITH THIS RING

Henican– Simon By Mirella Cameran

When Margaret Anne Henican and Cameron Lawrence Simon met at a family friend’s crawfish boil sparks flew immediately; the couple’s first date to Cameron’s favorite Tex-Mex restaurant, El Patio in Houston, Texas was the start of a romance to last a lifetime. To ask for Meg’s hand in marriage, Cameron invited both families for dinner in the Wine Room at Commander’s Palace, a restaurant where the Henicans have made many special memories. Privately, before dinner, Cameron got on one knee and asked for Meg’s hand. Hiding the ring, Meg and Cameron waited for everyone to arrive before sharing the news with a glass of champagne. The couple had wanted a destination wedding from the start, and decided Paris, as the City of Love, would be the perfect venue. Neither one of them had ever been to Paris, but the obvious connections to New Orleans and Meg’s alma mater, Notre Dame, made the selection a natural one. The reception venue was an easy choice, as nothing quite represents iconic Parisian elegance like Hotel George V on the Champs-Élysées. The night before the wedding, guests enjoyed a cruise on the Seine aboard a private yacht where they took in the spectacular views of the city. A sumptuous supper included Ibérico ham, assorted aged cheeses, tuna Tataki, sea scallop carpaccio, quinoa veggie bowl and sliders of beef cheek burger with foie gras. On Saturday, May 5, 2018, Rev. M. Haddad married Meg and Cameron at the American Cathedral in Paris. Ceremony music was Pachelbel’s “Canon in D” and “Ave Maria” both played by a string quartet, and “Trumpet Voluntary” by Clark played by the cathedral organist. The bride wore a long-sleeved Chantilly lace bateau neck overlay with a silk

58 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018

charmeuse gown with a sweetheart neckline, trumpet skirt and an open back. The wedding reception was held at the Four Seasons Hotel George V where Executive Chef Christian Le Squer oversaw the catering, including the wedding cake. The style and décor of the reception was the epitome of classic French style with a stunning floral décor of white roses and hydrangeas complementing the Versace tableware. The wedding cocktail was, fittingly, a French 75. The menu included a tomato, avocado and crabmeat napoleon with vanilla oil; lobster cooked over coarse salt with noilly, civet sauce and fennel with orange; paired with Pouilly-Fuissé, Domaine Saumaize, 2016; and filet of beef draped with

mozzarella, sundried tomato and basil paired with Margaux Brio de Cantenac, 2006. Guests took to the custom monogrammed dance floor to the tunes of Midnight in Paris, and the couple enjoyed their first dance to “Come and Get Your Love” by Redbone. The couple had already spent 10 days before the wedding in Paris, exploring and falling in love with the city with family and friends. Following the wedding they made their way to Côte d’Azur after a brief stop in Provence, traveling via train through the French countryside. Meg and Cameron now live in Houston, Texas, where Cameron is a Vice President of Stallion Oilfield Services and Meg is a Senior Sales Representative for Medtronic. n


WITH THIS RING

Bridesmaids’ Dresses: Bespoke dresses by Yvonne Counce Groom’s Attire: Bespoke tuxedo by Tom James Groomsmen’s Attire: Classic black tuxedo Engagement Ring: Custom modified cushion cut set in a pavé band Bride’s Wedding Band: Vintage diamond wedding band from Friend & Company Groom’s Wedding Band: Deutch and Deutch Jewelers, Houston, Texas Coordinator: Heather Jerue, Rendez-vous, Paris, France Florist: Jeff Leatham, Artistic Director, Four Seasons George V Favor: Embroidered French linen tote filled with macarons, champagne, baguette and patisserie cookies. Invitation: Maria Helena Photographer & Videographer: John Nassari, London, England Hair & Makeup: Jason Le Carrour, Director, Dessange Paris

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 59


PERFORMING ARTS

July By Fritz Esker

5-8

12-29

17

The ESSENCE Fest returns to New Orleans with conferences, speakers and, of course, fantastic music featuring artists like Janet Jackson, Mary J. Blige and The Roots. Mercedes-Benz Superdome, 1500 Sugar Bowl Drive, 587-3663, Essence.com

Disney’s heartwarming musical about the love story between Belle and The Beast takes the stage at Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts in a night of fun for the whole family. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., 461-9475, RivertownTheaters.com

Grammy and Oscar-winning pop star Sam Smith brings his world tour to the Smoothie King Center for one night only. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com

ESSENCE FESTIVAL

6-22

MACBETH

Shakespeare’s timeless tragedy of Lord Macbeth’s thirst for power that leads to his downfall hits the stage as part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Tulane’s Lupin Theater, 150 Dixon Hall Annex, 865-5106, NewOrleansShakespeare.org 6

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS COMEDY SHOW

Comedic rising stars Majah Hype and Kerwin Claiborne join forces for an unforgettable night of laughter. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 10

PARAMORE WITH FOSTER THE PEOPLE AND JAY SOM

Following their massively successful “Tour Two,” Paramore returns to touring in support of their fifth studio album, After Laughter. Champions Square, LaSalle St., 587-3663, Champions-Square.com 12

ORPHEUM SUMMER FILM SERIES – THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG

The Princess and the Frog, Disney’s modern classic set in New Orleans, plays in the old-time splendor of the Orpheum Theater. Free admission. Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com

60 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JULY 2018

DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

13

ALLISON KRAUSS

Grammy-winning Bluegrass legend Allison Krauss visits the Saenger in support of her latest solo album, Windy City. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 14 & 28

DINE AND DANCE WITH THE VICTORY SWING ORCHESTRA

Dance the night away as the National World War II Museum’s own Victory Swing Orchestra celebrates the music of the WWII era. BB’s Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944, NationalWW2Museum.org 18

BY ANY SCENES NECESSARY

This hilarious collaboration between the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane and the NOLA Project features a theatre/improv hybrid of Julius Caesar that recreates Shakespeare’s play without a script. Tulane’s Lupin Theater, 150 Dixon Hall Annex, 865-5106, NewOrleansShakespeare.org

SAM SMITH – “THE THRILL OF IT ALL TOUR”

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DEBAUCHERY!

New Orleans’ live, ongoing soap opera continues as sisters Chanel and Cartier continue their outrageous adventures. Church of Yoga NOLA, 1480 N. Rocheblave St., 522-6545, SouthernRep.com 21

CHEAP TRICK

1970s and 1980s rock gods Cheap Trick of “Surrender” and “I Want You to Want Me” fame bring their classic rock to the Saenger. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 22

EDUCARE PRESENTS THE BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA

Educare New Orleans’ second annual benefit concert features gospel superstars The Blind Boys of Alabama, along with openers The Legends of New Orleans (featuring Cyril Neville and Irma Thomas). Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com 26

ORPHEUM SUMMER FILM SERIES – MARY POPPINS

Walt Disney’s beloved classic about everyone’s favorite flying nanny plays in the old-time splendor of the Orpheum Theater. Free admission. Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com


YO U N G B LO O DS

Austin McCann Founder & CEO, Open Thread

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

By Lindsay Mack

Can a designer sock company help alleviate some of the issues associated with homelessness? Austin McCann, Founder and CEO of Open Thread, thinks so. After coming up with the idea for a graduate school project at Loyola University New Orleans, McCann decided to turn his business marketing homework into a reality. Now Open Thread is already making a big impact in the real world. For every pair of designer socks purchased through Open Thread, a thick pair of socks is donated to a homeless shelter. Because socks are regularly one of the most-needed items in a homeless shelter, this company provides a necessary service. At this time, shelters in New Orleans, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco

receive bi-annual donations from Open Thread, and McCann hopes to expand that reach tremendously in the near future. The ultimate goal is to provide every homeless person in America with a pair of warm socks, and then expand into outreach for other parts of the world. Plus, the designs available through Open Thread are both fashionable and meaningful. For the World Traveler collection, McCann designed socks to represent the Americas, Australia, Africa, Europe and Asia, as well as a Unity sock that represents the entire globe. The designs are seriously cool, featuring dragons, lions and even Greek gods. In addition, all of the socks are manufactured in America, at a company in North Carolina.

Although it’s still a new company, Open Thread has already received some serious buzz. New Orleans Saints players Cameron Jordan and Craig Robertson; Pelicans player Darius Miller; and individuals from over 15 states have purchased and publicly supported the mission of Open Thread. In fact, McCann’s original post on Facebook received over 500 likes and 175 shares. “The response was amazing because so many people love our mission,” says McCann. Shopping at OTSocks.com and spreading the word (visit them on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @ OpenThreadSocks) about the organization’s mission just might help make the world a little better for someone else. n

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STUDENT ACTIVIST

S H O P TA L K

Cecelia & Catherine Zimmermann

Eve Rutledge

St. Mary’s Dominican High School

Owner & Designer, Mystic Blue Signs By Mirella Cameran

By Mallory Lindsly

62 ST. CHARLES AVENUE JUNE 2018

How did Mystic Blue Signs start? Mystic Blue Signs began when I moved to New Orleans from San Francisco at the end of 1995. With New Orleans’ strong appreciation of its architectural history, I thought I could paint traditional signs here. My husband, Vince Mitchell, joined the company in 2003. How did you come into designing signs? I learned in a small sign shop in 1973, but signs are just one side of my 45-year history with lettering. I also have studied and worked in typography, commissioned calligraphy, logo design, book design and hand engraving. Vince learned on the job at Mystic Blue, and expanded our portfolio to include metal letters and welded sculptural elements. Tell us about your customers. Our customers are both locals and travelers. Tourists like small signs perfect for souvenirs, like: “If I’m not in New Orleans, I’m in exile.” For locals, gold leaf is a favorite; we do the gold addresses on glass door transoms, all by hand, with sheets of 23 karat gold – the traditional way.

What are some of your favorite signs you’ve created? The first logo Mystic Blue designed in New Orleans was for Aunt Sally’s Pralines. We also did La Petite Grocery on Magazine Street. Tell us something about your company we wouldn’t know? We teach lettering and handwriting classes and workshops in our shop, and at Loyola’s graphic design department. What makes Mystic Blue unique? We are the only shop in New Orleans that doesn’t use computers for designing or making signs; everything is done by hand. Is there anything exciting you would like to share? In our gallery space, we sell posters, prints, local art and periodically host art shows. n

MYSTIC BLUE SIGNS 2212 Magazine St., 525-469, MysticBlueSigns.com

PHOTO BY J EFFERY J OH NSTON

“Activism is more about a sense of belonging and adding value to the community. I feel that by working together something has been accomplished,” says Cecelia Zimmermann. “It isn’t all about oneself but it’s really about others and the community as a whole,” says Catherine Zimmermann The sisters attend St. Mary’s Dominican High School, where Cecelia is a junior and Catherine is a sophomore. Their mother, Louise Zimmermann, a pediatric physical therapist who treats special needs kids, inspired them to become student activists. They say their mother is always there for them and shows up for every aspect of their lives. “We watch [our mother] with her special needs kids, and she treats them like she treats us. It makes us feel proud when we can watch her make those special kids smile or walk,” says Cecelia. The sisters have done rewarding work in dance with

special needs kids. Cecelia and Catherine have been dancing since they were very young and competed in many national competitions. One of their mother’s patients saw the sisters dancing, and said that she, too, wanted to dance. Louise started a special needs dancing school and rehab facility called LBZ Believe Rehab and Dance Therapy, and her daughters helped teach the new students to dance. “After the first year, we went to a national competition and that first student got on stage with us and competed as if her disability never existed. It was an absolute amazing feeling to see her get out of her wheelchair and dance like everyone else,” says Catherine. Each year, the Zimmermann sisters dance with the special needs students and see the students compete as if they don’t have any disabilities. “I feel that being a part of the community is a way for me to really express myself. When I think of all the gifts that I have been given, I realize how important it is for me to share these gifts with others,” says Cecelia. Cecelia is exploring opportunities at different universities and is considering studying biology with a career in the medical field. Catherine doesn’t know where she wants to go to college, but she would like to study marine biology or become a veterinarian. n


S H O P TA L K

David Perlis Owner, Perlis By Mirella Cameran

PH OTO BY J EFFERY JOHNSTO N

How did Perlis start? My grandmother convinced my grandfather to start the business with the promise to marry him if he did. That was in 1939, and he worked seven days a week in the early years. My father and I both joined the business while in our 20s. Retail faces so many challenges yet you continue to thrive, what’s your secret? I believe it’s a number of things. First off, people talk about customer service; but we aren’t talking about customer service for one purchase, we’re talking about it for a lifetime. We genuinely care about our customers and want to be a lifelong partner helping them to create their style, build their closets and meet their lifestyles’ needs. Our alteration service is also key; we can turn things around quickly, but we also ensure that all our customers feel good and enjoy a proper fit. We also have a unique relationship with our staff; they definitely feel like a family. Many

of our employees have been with us a long time and we enjoy lots of different personalities in the store. Don’t forget we’re a true family business where each generation has been hands-on in every way. How do you pick your merchandise? We sell high quality, well-made clothes from the best brands in the world that will stand the test of time. What are your favorite items in store? Obviously our Crawfish logo is special and we’re excited to introduce an improved shirt, with added stretch in the fabric, this July. Faherty and Johnnie-O are new men’s brands and we’ll launch Samuelsohn this fall. For ladies, I really like Velvet, Ecru and Shoshanna. n

PERLIS (800) 725-6070, Perlis.com

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S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 1

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1. Sarah Harding, Ed Hardin, Maria Daigle, Corey Wax and Jennifer Suare attend “A Patriotic Affair for Tomorrow’s Military Leaders, the 2017 All Service Academies Ball” in December. The event was held in the National World War II Museum as an evening to honor the men and women from across Louisiana who will serve as future officers in the armed forces. 2. The current Louisiana Appointees of U.S. Service Academies come together for an annual military ball, “A Patriotic Affair for Tomorrow’s Military Leaders” at the National World War II Museum. Retired USMC Colonel Walt Green spoke at the event, and guests were treated to traditional military rituals, such as the Parading of the Beef. 3. New Orleans Artists Against Hunger and Homelessness President Pierre Hilzim, President Emeritus Sr. Jane F. Remson O. Carm., Marcia Ball and Ed White of White Oak Productions at NOAAHH’s “Legacy of Caring” concert in January. The fundraiser was held on what would have been NOAAHH’s co-founder, Allen Toussaint’s 80th birthday and featured live music and auction. 4. Phillip Manuel and Sister Jane Briseno RSM, share a smile at the sixth annual “Jazzin’ on Jackson” fundraiser to benefit Mercy Endeavors in March. The theme, “Get on the Bus,” highlighted the event’s goal: to raise $50,000 for a new bus. (Photo by Andrew J. Cochon) 5. Brandy Lane, Mary Beth Hymel, Amanda Nolan, Rachel Roubion, Lori Wynne and Ashley Steudlein attend “Jazzin’ on Jackson” at the Mercy Endeavors Senior Center in the Irish Channel. This year’s annual fundraiser benefited Mercy Endeavor’s purchase of a new bus to bring their seniors to and from recreational activities, medical appointments, case manager services and more. (Photo by Andrew J. Cochon) 6. Sadie Butler (middle) poses with Lillian Lang (left) and Joseph Butler at her 102nd birthday party, hosted by the Kingsley House in March. Butler celebrated her birthday alongside another Kingsley House Adult Services participant, Dorothy J. Lewis, who also turned 102 in March. Julius Feltus, Senior Advisor for Mayor Latoya Cantrell, presented both women with City Proclamations on the behalf of both Cantrell and then-Mayor Mitch Landrieu


S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 7

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7. (Bottom Row) David Lewis Evans, Dorothy Lewis and Malcolm O. Ben. (Top Row) Linda Lewis Washington, Kingsley House CEO Keith Liederman and Taylor A. Ben celebrate Lewis and Butler’s 102nd birthdays at the Kingsley House. The birthday ladies were given gifts from Kendra Scott and Urban Earth Studios, as well as homemade cards and a birthday song from the Kingsley House preschoolers. 8. GolfStar Classic sponsor Jay Trusheim, (third from right) presents a check to President and CEO of Volunteers of America Southeast Louisiana James LeBlanc, Geoffrey Artigues, Howley Connis and Chanel Lagarde. Linny Waguespack (far left) and Aimee Gautreau (far right) helped Trusheim present the check at the 26th annual “GolfStar Classic.” 9. Volunteers of America society and board member Chuck Viator Sr., and Ben Bourdreaux at 26th annual “GolfStar Classic.” The fundraiser benefits the VOA’s Adoption and Maternity Program, which for the past 76 years has worked to unite families. Over 130 golfers participated in the March event, and families with children adopted through VOA joined in during the festivities. 10. Renee LeBoeuf, Danielle Marshall and David Bienvenu attend the Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights’ annual event, “Celebration for Children’s Rights.” The fundraiser benefits LCCR and the work it does to help vulnerable children in the juvenile justice system. 11. John Guenard and LCCR Board Chair Marsha Levick at “Celebration for Children’s Rights,” which was hosted in March at The Building on Oretha Castle Boulevard, which is considered the “birthplace” of New Orleans’ juvenile justice reform movement. The event featured food from chef Marlon Alexander of Mangé Catering and drinks from NOLA Brewing and NOLA Distilling. 12. Tina Totorico and Albion Sumrell of Breakthrough New Orleans, and Kara van de Carr and Susanne Dietzel of the Eden House, accept donations from Melvin Rodrigue on behalf of the Galatoire Foundation. The Galatoire Foundation raised $100,000 for the two community partners through their annual Christmas and Mardi Gras table auctions.


ADVERTISING SECTION

SUMMER TRENDS BEAUT Y

BLO BLOW DRY BAR 5530 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-570-6101, BloMeDry.com Color Wow Dream Coat – This incredible product has a one-of-a-kind antihumidity seal that acts as a raincoat for your hair, keeping your hair perfectly tamed no matter how hot and humid the weather gets. The seal lasts 3-4 shampoos so it’s perfect for that fun weekend getaway!

CHERRY BLOW DRY BAR 210 Veterans Blvd., Ste. B, Metairie 504-372-3094, CherryBlowDryBar.com/Metairie Their team of highly trained, talented stylists work with all types of hair to give you the best blowout and glam services at affordable prices! They provide hair blowouts, extensions, make-up services and treatments. They use the best brands, including Blowpro and Pureology hair care. From Straight to Waves, Beachy or Braids, Cherry Blow Dry Bar gives you style.

DR. SEAN WEISS FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY 2201 Veterans Blvd., #408, Metairie 504-814-3223 (FACE) SeanWeissMD.com Dr. Sean Weiss is double board certified in Facial Plastic Surgery and Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery. We focus on comprehensive surgical and nonsurgical facial aesthetics. Since facial aging is a continuous process, Dr. Weiss takes pride in building long term relationships with his patients to achieve the best results over the years. Find exclusive offers for St. Charles Avenue readers at seanweissmd.com/ saintcharlesavenue.

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SPAFOO By Appointment Spafoo.com Local entrepreneur and beauty expert Alicia Reynaud created Spafoo, a beauty app that’s revolutionizing how we do beauty. A team of over 30 licensed and professional providers are a tap away on your smartphone providing hair, makeup, nails, massage and personal training when you want and where you want – home, office and hotel.


ADVERTISING SECTION

ENTERTAINMENT

DICKIE BRENNAN & CO. FrenchQuarter-Dining.com Temperature Lunch at Palace Café returns, celebrating its 24th year (two courses for yesterday’s high temp) and $5 after 5 p.m. is back! Steamy nights are cooled down with a classic rum cocktail and fried duck wings at Palace Café; or a Manhattan and petit Wellington at Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse. Dive into the smoked redfish dip at Bourbon House or the Red Bean Hummus at Tableau. These items and more are $5 between 5-7 p.m. on weekdays!

HAMPTON INN & SUITES NEW ORLEANS CONVENTION CENTER 1201 Convention Center Blvd., New Orleans 504-566-9990, NewOrleansHamptonInns.com Stay with the Hampton Inn & Suites and be close to the Tricentennial celebration action! This year they’re offering a discount on room rates as well as a New Orleans themed welcome basket. Use the code “TRI” when calling or booking online.

LOVE SWIMMING 5221 S. Front St., New Orleans 504-891-4662 LoveSwimming.com

Photo by Jeff Strout LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 420 Julia St., New Orleans 504-523-1357, LCM.org

What better time for swim lessons than this summer? Stop in Love Swimming and sign up for one of their many weekly classes. Let the Swim Experts of New Orleans take care of you this summer!

Celebrate the many Asian influences on New Orleans during Dragon Day! Go on a Vietnamese word find scavenger hunt (to earn a red envelope prize), learn how to write your name in Chinese calligraphy, sample flaky moon cakes and steamed buns, and enjoy a lion dance performance by the Rising Dragon Lion Dance Team!

MAX WELL 6101 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-301-0510, MaxWellNewOrleans.com Max Well is creating a menu that heals and satisfies. Their nutritionally dense whole foods are often in their raw form. They follow current evidence on cooking and preparing methods, and offer you transparent information about what you are eating and where it came from.

PAINTING WITH A TWIST 4931 W. Esplanade Ave., Ste. D, Metairie 504-832-5536, PaintingWithATwist.com/Metairie Summer Art Camp July 9-13! During “Going On Safari” campers will learn about safari animals and complete 16”x20” paintings, wood cutouts and a 24“x36” selfportrait. Snacks and a camp T-shirt are provided. Art show after the last class Friday! Register now at PaintingWithATwist.com/Metairie. Space is limited!

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ADVERTISING SECTION

ENTERTAINMENT RALPH’S ON THE PARK 900 City Park Ave., New Orleans 504-488-1000 RalphonthePark.com Ralph’s on the Park is reviving their annual summer special of 3 Appetizers + a Glass of Wine for $33. Now through the end of September, sip and snack on Chef Chip Flanagan’s delectable menu of over 15 items like Tempura Fried Shrimp, Crab & Avocado Toast, Tuna Tartare and Watermelon Feta Salad. For reservations, call 504-488-1000!

SHARD SHOP 3138 Magazine St., Ste. C, Metairie 504-309-2581, ShardShop.com Looking for the hottest place to cool off with your friends, family or kids this summer? Try ShardWorx art and learn how to cut, shape, and artfully place glass shards on a pre-painted canvas to create your own work of art. Great for parties, girls night out, date night or creative time with the kids. We offer classes 7 days a week!

FASHION

FEBE 474 Metairie Rd., #103, Metairie 504-835-5250 FebeClothing.com The new Star and Moon Collection from Sennod Jewelry Design. Celestial inspired pendants with diamond accents on fine gold chains with subtle silver details. The simple design can be worn every day, but the beautiful details make it perfect for special occasions.

SHE 2561 Metairie Rd., Ste. 2, Metairie 504-644-4273 Instagram: @she_metairie Facebook: She Metairie Edge up any summer outfit with a cute hat! By the pool, out for lunch, on the beach or heading to dinner— they are our favorite accessory! Come check out our hat wall display at SHE on Metairie Road.

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PERLIS 6070 Magazine Street, New Orleans 600 Decatur, French Quarter 1281 N Causeway Blvd, Mandeville 8366 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge 504-895-8661 Perlis.com The 100% silk handmade crawfish club tie comes in a variety of different color combinations. The iconic PERLIS crawfish logo ties and bow ties complement any white linen or seersucker suit making a perfect dressy outfit for any summer event. Also..a great gift!

THE LINEN REGISTRY 200 Metairie Rd., #102, Metairie 504-831-8228 TheLinenRegistry.com The Deerly Robe $140. 100% super fine Prima Cotton Voile light weight robe, knee-length with side pockets, piped at the collar and cuffs.


ADVERTISING SECTION

FASHION

WILDFLOWER 2700 Metairie Rd., Ste. C, Metairie 504-218-8996 Instagram @WearWildflower They’re fun, can be colorful or neutral, and always lightweight – you’re sure to find a pair of earrings suitable for your style! Featured here is a studded pair by Bauble Bar available at Wildflower NOLA.

PRADA, DITA and KREWE THE OPTICAL SHOPPE 800 Metairie Rd., Metairie 504-301-1726, OpticalShoppeBR.com Are you wondering where to get the most amazing sunglasses in the New Orleans area? Shop the latest trends and designer collections at The Optical Shoppe. Whether you are looking for sunglasses or prescription eyewear, their expert opticians will help you to find the pair that frame your face just right! Visit or call to find out about summer specials!

HOME

LOUISIANA CUSTOM CLOSETS 504-885-3188 985-871-0810 LouisianaCustomClosets.com

WREN’S TONTINE SHADE AND DESIGN 1533 Prytania St., New Orleans 504-525-7409, WrensTontine.com

Louisiana Custom Closets represents the pinnacle of quality design, materials and service for all of your home and office organizational and storage needs. They manufacture their products, which provides endless solutions for home storage.

Dual Roller Shade gives you “the best of both worlds!” It has solar shade for UV protection while maintaining your view of the outdoors and a room darkening shade to block the light, all in one window treatment. It offers a minimal yet sophisticated look with light control, color, and style and is available in hundreds of fabric choices.

THE STANDARD AT SOUTH MARKET 1001 Julia St., New Orleans 504-517-9500, standardnola.com, @standardneworleans

SELECT STONE 733 Distributors Row, Harahan 504-216-0110, SelectStonellc.com

The Standard at South Market is now open for move-in! Designed by renowned architect Morris Adjmi, The Standard offers luxury condominiums in Downtown New Orleans. The building features elegant residences, skyline views, custom finishes and fixtures, and a full suite of amenities and services. Experience the best of Downtown living.

Let us help you create the outdoor kitchen of your dreams this Summer! We have a diverse selection of stones, including Taj Mahal leather finish featured here. Visit our showroom conveniently located on Distributors Row in Harahan or visit us online at SelectStonellc.com.


PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Ace and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

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PREMIER


PROPERTIES

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N OS TA LG I A

New Orleans Lawn Tennis Club History, sport and society By Seale Paterson

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grass), a 15,000-square-foot clubhouse with covered balcony space and a larger swimming pool. Social events continued along with the tennis, including their yearly anniversary party with fun themes, delicious buffets and live music provided by local sensations like Irma Thomas and Alvin Alcorn, among others. n

The March 1984 front cover of Lobbing It, the New Orleans Lawn Tennis Club newsletter. Pictured on the cover are the 1984 Board Members. Inside pages included “Pro Tips” and health advice for better tennis play, photos of members at social events, tournament news, court condition updates and sales at the Pro Shop.

IMAGE PROVIDED COURTESY OF TH E LOUISIAN A DIVISION, NEW ORLEAN S PUBLIC LIBRARY

Founded in 1876, the New Orleans Lawn Tennis Club is the oldest tennis club in the United States. The founding members were mostly English, working in the cotton business in New Orleans. Over their first decade as a club, they moved their courts to several different locations in or near the Garden District. In February of 1898, they moved into a full tennis club on Saratoga Street with a clubhouse and multiple grass tennis courts. Ladies were admitted on equal terms as the gentlemen, and the more than 150 members celebrated their new home with a fashionable afternoon tea to open the season. The club quickly became known for its full schedules of tournaments: singles, doubles, mixed doubles, veterans, interclub and the annual Gulf States championships. In 1924, the club started converting some of its courts to clay, but still maintained four grass courts, which were some of the only ones in the South, as the humidity and popularity of tennis (and subsequent high rate of play) made them expensive and difficult to maintain. In 1935, the club debuted a city tournament, open to all New Orleanians. To be completely accurate in naming a true champion, a women’s singles bracket was introduced for the first time at an NOLTC tournament. The club was represented on the society pages as frequently as the sports pages. The 1950s and 1960 were full of poolside debutante and engagement parties, costume parties and cocktail dances in the reception room and Mardi Gras royalty dinners in the dining rooms. The NOLTC moved into its new (and current) location at 5353 Laurel St. in 1973. The modern facility provided members with 12 courts (none of them


St. Charles Avenue July 2018  
St. Charles Avenue July 2018