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Lisa Picone Love Sales Manager 830-7248 Lisa@myneworleans.com

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Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 1


CO N T E N T S

Features

On the Cover

Photographed by Jeffery Johnston BRAVO President Stephanie Burks of the New Orleans Ballet Association; Literary Manager and lead actress of upcoming A Doll’s House, Part 2, Jessica Podewell of Southern Rep; Artistic Director Maxwell Williams (holding Sock) of Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré; Associate Concertmaster Benjamin Hart of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra; and Emeritus Board Member Juan Barona of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane

Check out our Guide to Entertaining, starting on pg. 45, for tips, tricks and ideas for your next event, including dishes from Ralph Brennan Catering, like this pan roasted redfish entrée.

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Fashionable & Friendly Metairie Road shopping BY KELCY WILBURN | PHOTOGRAPHED BY FRANK AYMAMI

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Guide to Entertaining Tips and tricks for to-dos to toasts BY SARAH RAVITS | PHOTOGRAPHED BY MIKE LIRETTE

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Our city is filled with opportunities to see live theater, music and performances, but there are a few treasures that we wanted to remind you to partake in before the year is up. The events below are only through the end of the year; in 2019, all of these groups will be offering exciting outreach programming, including Shakespeare Festival’s 23rd annual Performance for the Schools (a remounting of the summer’s Macbeth production January 9-18 as a field trip for schools) and NOBA will be celebrating its 50th anniversary! Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré (616 St. Peter St., 522-2081, LePetitTheatre.com) will be offering Satchmo at the Waldorf (October 5-21) and A Christmas Carol (December 7-23). Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra (venues change so please check website, 523-6530, LPOMusic.com) has the largest offerings through the end of the year, with 10 offerings in New Orleans alone: Beethoven’s Ninth with Schubert’s “Unfinished” (September 13 and 15), “A Symphony is Born” with music by Gabrieli & Hayden (September 20), “Halloween Spooktacular” (October 7), Chris Pell Plays Nielsen’s Clarinet Concerto with Brahms 4 (October 12), “Play Dat!” (October 13), Mozart’s “Jupiter Symphony” featuring Violinist Jennifer Koh (October 18), The Music of Led Zeppelin (November 3), Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 (November 15), “Pictures At An Exhibition” with

Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto (November 29) and “Holiday Spectacular” (December 8). New Orleans Ballet Association (performances at the Mahalia Jackson Theater, 1419 Basin St., 522-0996, NOBADance.com) will be kicking off their 2018-2019 Season of Dance with DIAVOLO | Architecture in Motion (September 22) and Dance Theatre of Harlem (October 20). Southern Rep is finally at its new location (2541 Bayou Road, 522-6545, SouthernRep.com) and will be offering A Doll’s House, Part 2 (October 3-21) and Mandatory Merriment: An Untitled Holiday Musical (December 5-23). Unable to be pictured: New Orleans Opera (NewOrleansOpera.org, 529-3000) will be offering Puccini’s Turandot (September 28 & 30) and Rameau’s Pygmalion (November 8-11). Special thanks to Miriam Taylor, External Affairs Manager, Newcomb Art Museum of Tulane University, for expediting our covershoot at Woodward Way at the Newcomb Art Museum of Tulane University. “EMPIRE,” on view through December 22, 2019, is an art installation celebrating the New Orleans tricentennial by Los Angeles-based artists Fallen Fruit commissioned and presented by Newcomb Art Museum, A Studio in the Woods and Pelican Bomb. A fall reception on September 6, 6:30 p.m., is free and open to the public.


CO N T E N T S

In Every Issue

20 8 & 10 EDITORS’ NOTES

12 MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Children of Promise: Volunteers of America work to provide stable relationships for children of incarcerated parents

14 KIDS PLAY

BYOB(aby): The Broad Street Theater caters to the small ones (and their families)

16 WHAT’S HOT

Sports & Spirit

18 ON THE MENU

Especially Seafood: Chef de Cuisine Devan Giddix shares Bourbon House’s Seafood Muffuletta

20 THE DISH

Healing Around a Table: Family, food and more food

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24

PHILANTHROPIC FUN

69 62 ENTERTAINING WITH BEV

Fish Faced: A picnic with a theme carried home

Creative Caps The inaugural “Heart of the Park Hat Luncheon” offered a festive fête for supporters of City Park. 24

Be Our Guest Kingsley House invited patrons to get a close look at their work at its ninth annual luncheon. 34

A Fest of Talent Some of New Orleans’ finest chefs gathered for a benefit for Second Harvest Food Bank. 26

Southern Hospitality Two hundred forty guests attended the jazz brunch to support Catholic Charities and honor U.S. Representative Steve Scalise. 36

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Green for the Greater Good Raintree Children and Services raised more than $150,000 at its annual benefit supporting at-risk foster children. 38

Caroline Elizabeth MacLaren: Ursuline Academy High School

Exemplary Entrepreneurs Albert Lepage Center gala honored recipients of the 2018 Tulane University Entrepreneurs Leadership Awards. 40

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Fabulous Fanshionistas The 2018 Prix d’Elegance Award Recipients were honored at a luncheon combining fashion and art. 28 Eradicating an Epidemic CADA honored individuals whose work aids their focus on ending substance abuse. 30 Tri-colored Tricentennial “Cochon Cotillion XXII” celebrated the New Orleans Tricentennial with a whimsical Mardi Gras ball. 32

Disco Inferno WYES transformed into a bustling nightclub for a disco party. 42

64 WITH THIS RING

Logan – Williams YOUNG BLOODS

Diana Meyers: Director of Mission and Wellness, Anna’s Place

67 STUDENT ACTIVIST

68 SHOP TALK

Jeanne Monet Roberson: Owner, Lily New Orleans (LNO) SHOP TALK

Matt Schwartz: Principal, The Domain Companies & Developer, The Standard at South Market

70 SNAPSHOTS 76 ONSTAGE CALENDAR 80 NOSTALGIA Pool Pleasures: The history of the Whitney Young Pool


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AUGUST 2018 VOL. 23 ISSUE 3 Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR Bev Church EDITOR Morgan Packard Griffith ART DIRECTOR Ali Sullivan CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mirella Cameran SOCIETY COLUMNIST Catherine Freeman FOOD & DINING COLUMNIST Jyl Benson WEB EDITOR Kelly Massicot EVENT PHOTO COORDINATOR Jeff Strout

Advertising VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan

(504) 830-7241, Colleen@MyNewOrleans.com SALES MANAGER Lisa Picone Love (504) 830-7248, Lisa@MyNewOrleans.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Samantha Shiff (504) 830-7226, Samantha@MyNewOrleans.com

Marketing DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS

Cheryl Lemoine EVENT COORDINATOR Whitney Weathers DIGITAL MEDIA ASSOCIATE Mallary Matherne

For event information call (504) 830-7264

Production PRODUCTION MANAGER Jessica DeBold PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Emily Andras,

Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney TRAFFIC MANAGER Topher Balfer

Administration CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Todd Matherne PRESIDENT Alan Campell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Errol Laborde VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan OFFICE MANAGER Mallary Matherne DISTRIBUTION MANAGER John Holzer SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER Brittanie Bryant

For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

A Publication of Renaissance Publishing, LLC 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, © 2018 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. St. Charles Avenue is not responsible for photos or artwork and assumes that all releases have been cleared upon submission to the magazine. St. Charles Avenue is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, La. 70005, (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $17.95, two year $31, three year $43 — foreign rates vary call for pricing. It is the policy of this magazine to employ people on the basis of their qualifications and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap.


CO N T R I B U TO R S

Marie Simoneaux Marie Simoneaux is a New Orleans-based journalist and freelance writer originally from a small town in rural New Hampshire. In her spare time she enjoys doing puzzles, roller skating, reading in the sun and drinking tea. She is a proud mom of many house plants and finds joy in their daily growth.

Shelby Simon Shelby Simon has called New Orleans home all her life, despite living in many other places. Though she currently resides in New York City, she cherishes her Southern roots and maintains contact with the social and philanthropic happenings of the Crescent City. Passionate about media and entrepreneurship, she’s constantly seeking opportunities to stay connected and contribute to a stronger community. Her other passions include traversing the streets and parks of NYC on foot, exercising at the barre and making friends with all the neighborhood dogs.

Catherine Freeman Raised in coastal North Carolina, Catherine Freeman is a graduate of Sweet Briar College in Virginia who lived in New York City and Atlanta before settling in New Orleans as a newlywed in 1995. The majority of her professional career has been spent either working for nonprofits or philanthropic foundations, but she has also found time to volunteer on numerous boards and chair many fundraisers for a variety of local organizations. Her greatest joy is spending time with her family – husband Peter and their three college-age children – but she also enjoys playing tennis, traveling, cooking, walking their dog Olive in Audubon Park and savoring every aspect of living in New Orleans. STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 7


B E V ' S N OT E

We are so excited about our cover this month celebrating the arts. As we all know, the arts are the very fabric that makes our city strong, diverse and vibrant! Thanks to Stephanie Burks, BRAVO President of the New Orleans Ballet Association; Literary Manager and lead actress of upcoming A Doll’s House, Part 2, Jessica Podewell of Southern Rep; Artistic Director Maxwell Williams and Sock of Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré; Associate Concertmaster Benjamin Hart of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra; and Emeritus Board Member Juan Barona of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane for gracing our cover! Look to pg. 76 for the schedule of upcoming performances through the end of 2018 (including that of the New Orleans Opera, which wasn’t able to be on our photo) and add them all to your schedule! Now that we’re in the middle of summer, we’re all looking forward to cheering on our favorite teams. Be sure to check out What’s Hot for Sports & Spirit for the best addition to your game, whether you’re watching or playing. Check out what’s new and reacquaint yourself with perennial favorites along Metairie Road in our feature that shines a light on businesses and boutiques that supply residents with not only goods and services, but friendship and fellowship as well. Be sure to check out Art Vue at the ACE. It is an inaugural fundraiser dedicated to supporting art and art education at Longue Vue House & Garden. Celebrate the arts with Longue Vue on Saturday, August 25, 7 to 11 p.m., at the ACE Hotel (600 Carondelet St.). Join the fun for fun, food, cocktails and music by Randi and the Lo-Fi Soul and, of course, art! Call 293-4725 for more information. Fidelity Bank has an exciting new program to help women in business called P.O.W.E.R. [Potential of Women Entrepreneurs Realized]. The program is highlighted in our new “Ladies Who Launch” promotional section. This is how it works: All you have to do is open a checking account or any other account at Fidelity and you can be a P.O.W.E.R. member. There is a website that has a members-only directory with your photo, business information, contact information and more.You are encouraged to go to P.O.W.E.R. Hours, which are small events at the different branches where women collaborate and help each other. This sounds so great for someone just starting a business or one who’s established and looking to network. For more information, visit FidelityBankPower.com. Be sure to check out my column on Fishing and picnics. I know it’s hot, but if you wait until late afternoon in between rain showers, it works!! It could also be for an early dinner. Of course you’ll have to do “catch and release”. Be sure to take a picture to document your fishing experience! Have a great rest of the summer, and don’t forget to check me out on Instagram and Facebook!

Beverly Reese Church

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Spencer Shilstone and Miles Mumford owners of MilesStone Pictures, a new film company that specializes in event and promotional videos, are Co-Chairing the next fundraiser for Latter Library! These two entrepreneurs who are in their 20s decided the library is important to them and their friends, and want to raise awareness of this local treasure! Six years ago the grounds of Latter were in a sad state, but thanks to Landscape Images (who donated the

master plan) and countless others including The New Orleans Town Gardeners, the city and many volunteers, the grounds are beautiful again. This fundraiser will help with maintenance and provide funds for completing the master plan.

Jennie Morton, Dr. Patrick Gannon, Dr. Mark Seton, James Blake and Bethany Bultman are pictured on July 1, when the Musicians’ Clinic’s Co-Founding Director, Bethany Bultman, presented a call to action about the growing suicide epidemic in the creative community at the annual international Performing Arts Medicine Association (PAMA) symposium. The panel, named after the You Got This mental health initiative, featured Dr. Mark Seton, one of the authors of the Australian study

on creatives and mental health; Jennie Morton, the British author of numerous books on performance wellness; Dr. Patrick Gannon, San Francisco psychologist and You Got This advisor, and renowned musician and songwriter James Blake spoke out about this crisis. The You Got This panel addressed what many studies suggest is an underreported epidemic of mental health issues among working musicians. Learn more by visiting NOMAF.ORG/YGT.

I am so excited to see that these young New Orleanians and their friends are making a difference and are saving a New Orleans landmark that we all love. Show your support for Latter Library this fall!


M O R G A N ' S N OT E

Oh, August ... when we’re tired of sweating the moment we leave the house and cooler weather seems like it will never arrive. But students are headed back to school by the end of the month and though our Septembers aren’t usually what the rest of the country would call “cool,” fall really is on its way. With that in mind, look to this month’s What’s Hot for Sports & Spirit for the perfect accessory to add to your cheering section. And to our feature on Metairie Road for air conditioned places that will keep you cool as your shopping heats up – both new and perennial favorites. In addition, as you plan for fall, our Guide to Entertaining has the best tips from local experts that will help you throw the perfect back-to-school bash, block dinner party or even black-tie event!. Our September issue as always will include our Registry of Charitable Events for September through December 2018. If you haven’t done so, please submit your event now and I’ll do my best to include it! All you have to do is fill out our online charitable events form as completely as possible: MyNewOrleans.com/ CharitableEvent. If you have any questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to email me: Morgan@MyNewOrleans.com. What is making me happy this month (to continue what I started last month in this column) is swimming. I love swimming – in any body of water – and I’ve been really enjoying passing that love on to my son. Though he’s just barley one year old he already can kick, climb out of the pool and doesn’t mind putting his head under water. Soon he’ll be starting classes in order to teach him how to roll on his back and float. I encourage any one of any age who doesn’t know how to swim to take classes; water doesn’t have to be scary, it can be amazingly therapeutic – especially in our heat! If you don’t have access to a swim instructor, check out LoveSwimming.com and the New Orleans Jewish Community Center (NOJCC.org) today. Though grocery shopping isn’t my bag (so to speak) I absolutely love going to the Crescent City Farmers Market in Uptown Square (200 Broadway St. at the river) every Tuesday morning. I put a cooler and reusable bags in my car, and my husband and I take separate cars to the market so that we can spend as much time as we can talking to the sellers and picking out the perfect tomato, pepper or peach (all in season at the moment). My son and I then take the amazing produce (and beef or goat, eggs, cheese, flowers and more) home, then prep and go through them together talking about colors and taking taste tests. Everything tastes amazing and I feel good buying directly from people I can speak to about their products – and the prices are great, too! Enjoy the heat as much as you can, because we’ll all be bundling up soon enough!

Morgan Packard Griffith

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August 3-5 “2018 New Orleans Antiques Forum,” benefiting Historic New Orleans Collection, 523-4662 4 “Hancock Whitney White Linen Night™,” benefiting the Contemporary Arts Center, 528-3805, CACNO.org/hwwln2018 10 17th annual “Summer Cure Chefs Wine Dinner,” benefiting Susan G. Komen New Orleans, 455-7310 11 Sixth annual “Mom’s Night Out,” benefiting New Orleans Moms Blog, NewOrleansMomsBlog.com 18 “An August Night at Antoine’s,” benefiting Symphony Chorus of New Orleans, 289-0633, SymphonyChorus.com 25 Seventh annual “Senior Moments,” benefiting Jefferson Council on Aging, 207-4691 25 20th annual “CHAIRish the Children,” benefiting Louisiana Children’s Museum, 266-2415, LCM.org 25 “ArtVue,” benefiting Longue Vue House & Garden, 293-4725


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MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Children of Promise Volunteers of America work to provide stable relationships for children of incarcerated parents By Catherine Freeman

The African proverb “it takes a village to raise a child” has definitely been overused, but I believe it’s still relevant. Reflect a moment on your own upbringing to recall all those you turned to when you needed support or advice. It may have been a coach, a teacher, a friend or a grandparent, but more often I’ll bet a parent was your primary go-to. Sadly, 1 in 55 adults in Louisiana is serving time in prison, meaning thousands of children are growing up with at least one parent unable to be actively involved in their lives. In response to this epidemic, Volunteers of America developed the Mentoring Children of Promise program to provide stable relationships with caring adults to children of incarcerated parents – once again proving the necessity and value of the “village”. “I know he’s supportive and he’s there for me, but he’s not physically there,” says teenager Reign, whose father is serving time at Angola State Penitentiary. Reign and her sister Region were paired with Dominique, a Mentoring Children of Promise volunteer, and have developed a strong bond with her over the last year. Dominique’s father is also at Angola, giving her the unique understanding of the emotional struggles the girls face as they deal with the heartbreak of their absent father. Mentors such as Dominique don’t replace a parent but they’re able to provide a positive role model through their support, guidance and friendship that may ease some of the fear, anger and sadness the youth experience. “She listens to what we have to say and gives us a different perspective,” says Reign. Matched with children ages 4 to 18 through collaboration with over 20 12 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

community organizations and Volunteers of America, mentors are generous individuals who care about young people and want to make a difference in the lives of at-risk local youth. Following interviews, orientations and trainings, mentors make a minimum one year commitment to spend time with their mentee for at least eight hours a month, but 40 percent of relationships continue much longer than required. Bashon, a previously troubled teenager in the program, says, “I enjoy hanging out with my mentor. He has been more than a volunteer; he has been my friend and now a part of my family as a big brother. I look up to my mentor because he cares for me … he has made a difference in my life for the past three years.” By modeling their own good character, emotional stability and responsible lifestyle, adult mentors are capable of positively encouraging the youth they mentor to grow in developing their own life-skills of self-esteem, academic success and moral values. Nationally, 70 percent of the children

with a parent in prison will one day find themselves behind bars. This disturbing statistic combined with the sky high adult incarceration figures for Louisiana only reinforce the dire need for intervention programs such as these. Innocent children in need of a dependable, trusting relationship deserve hope they can break the cycle, and Volunteers of America’s Mentoring Children of Promise initiative is making that happen. n

A little more … Louisiana is 2nd in the nation in the number of people incarcerated per capita. Almost a third (31.5%) of Louisiana’s adult inmate population and almost half (41.3%) of the juvenile inmate population come from Orleans and Jefferson Parishes. 97% of children under 12 state they enjoy spending time with their mentor. 98% of teenagers state that the mentor is making a positive influence in their life. For more information or to become a mentor, call Program Manager Sherlyn Hughes at 836-8701


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K I DS P L AY

BYOB(aby) The Broad Street Theater caters to the small ones (and their families) By Brittany Kennedy

To say that there is no greater life change than having a baby is like saying it’s hot in the summer, and for any woman who has been pregnant or had a young infant during summer in New Orleans, both of these truths are almost too real to face. Getting out of the house with a baby when it feels like you’re living on the surface of the sun becomes almost a Herculean effort, but The Broad Street Theater is now offering moms and dads a chance to get to the movies and, even more importantly, take advantage of a heavily air-conditioned space. Once upon a time, in an era long before the huge metroplexes that we know and love today, movie theaters were neighborhood spots that had only one or two screens, and matinees were reserved for dropping off children for a cartoon and a movie. Most of these old theaters also had glass rooms with sound piped in so parents of young babies could catch the show without bothering other guests. Despite the penitential feel, it was at least an option for people with young babies to get to the movies. The Broad Theater, like its Uptown neighbor the Prytania, hearkens back to that earlier time while taking advantage of modern conveniences. In addition to four screens and the usual movie fare, parents can also enjoy their kitchen’s offerings or an adult beverage from their full bar (the theater politely asks that children not approach or sit at the bar per state law). You can also purchase tickets ahead online and skip the wait at the theater.

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Of particular interest to those trapped inside with new babies this summer is the theater’s Bring Your Own Baby, or BYOB(aby), event. Instead of a glass room with crying babies, the theater opens one screen for a Thursday matinee of one of their current features. If you’re lucky enough to have a morning napper, you can watch a movie without the worry of having to leave if your little one wakes up. The theater even offers the option to purchase a sushi lunch from Asuka (there are four options and sushi is ordered promptly at 11 a.m.). If not bringing your little one for sushi and a film, the kitchen features movietheater favorites that have grown up a bit. While kids can still get nachos, hot dogs and, of course, popcorn, there are also grab-and-go options from St. James Cheese company and flavored popcorn, including herbed and garlic brown butter or soy with Korean chili and fish sauce. Four screens means that there’s almost always something for everyone to see, even if they don’t agree, and the theater has been featuring local and art-house films for the budding cinephile in your household.

The Broad Theater is the site of the old Movie Pitchers, the quirky eclectic independent movie theater that was much beloved for those that remember it. The building is also one of the few examples of Spanish Mission-style architecture in the city. Since opening, the theater has been plagued by flooding both last summer and more recently in May. However, for many, the Broad Theater is a welcome addition to an increasingly vibrant community in Mid-City. At the very least, for a few new parents this summer it will also be an air-conditioned refuge where you can eat sushi in the dark and escape into a cinematic world without anyone being the wiser. n

Just the Facts ... The Broad Theater 636 N. Broad St. 218-1008 TheBroadTheater.com Tickets: $8 for Matinee, $10 for evening (adults); $8 for children BYOB(aby): Every Thursday at 11 a.m.


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W H AT ' S H OT

Sports & Spirit By Amy Gabriel

Your commitment to game day is tried and true. Put the fan in fanatic when you dress the part of a loyal follower. From geaux cups and leather koozies to the best of black and gold accessories, you’ll be set from tailgate to touchdown.

1. Touchdowns will look twice as nice through a set of handmade shades with animal-print detail from small batch eyewear designer, Jacques Marie Mage. Art and Eyes, 3708 Magazine St. 891-4494, ArtAndEyesNewOrleansLA.com

� �

2. Count down the minutes to game time with a minimalist CLUSE Minuit watch with a gold leather band. Mignon Faget, 3801 Magazine St., 891-2005; 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 835-2244; 333 Canal St., 5242973, MignonFaget.com 3. Slip in a little extra spirit with a pair of NOLA X socks, a collaboration design with Dirty Coast. Bonfolk, Bonfolk.com

� SE LEC T PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

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W H AT ' S H OT

4. Bring out the animal inside with a haircalf handbag, the ideal pregame brunch bag. Ballin’s, 721 Dante St., 866-4367; 2917 Magazine St., 891-4502, BallinsLTD.com

5. Take your vino on the go with a pack of six plastic stemless 12 ounce wine glasses that come gift-ready in a ribbon-tied bag. Party Cup Express, PartyCupExpress.com 6. Add a little femininity to your winning wardrobe in a wrap dress with a ruffled sleeve and hem. Marigny House Boutique, 4513 Magazine St., 321-1320, MarignyHouse.com 7. Keep your canned drinks cold and looking extra cool in a 100 percent hand-stitched needlepoint leather koozie. Perlis, 6070 Magazine St., 898661; Decatur St., 523-6681, Perlis.com 8. If you can’t make it to the game, listen online in a pair of polished stingray leather headphones with gold trim. We Are Friends, WeAreFrends.com 9. Step stylishly into the Superdome in a pair of blush gold studded mules. Lucy Rose, 3318 Magazine St., 895-0444; 534 Chartres St., 267-0305, ShopLucyRose.com

� � �

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ON THE MENU

Especially Seafood Chef de Cuisine Devan Giddix shares Bourbon House’s Seafood Muffuletta Muffuletta INGREDIENTS 2 loaves of Muffuletta bread (We get ours from Liedenheimer Bakery; it’s a round Italian bread with sesame seeds) 1½ cup Olive Salad* (recipe below) 4 slices provolone cheese 6 ounces thick-sliced potato chips (We make our own, but Zapp’s work well) 6 Tablespoons unsalted butter softened ¼ cup diced yellow onion ½ cup sliced white button mushrooms Juice from 1 lemon 2 Tablespoons Crystal Hot Sauce 4 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce 1 Tablespoons garlic, chopped 2 teaspoons rosemary, chopped 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 teaspoons Creole seasoning 2 Tablespoons cold butter Kosher salt to taste ½ pound 40/50 peeled Gulf shrimp 6 ounces lump crab meat SLICE loaves of bread in half horizontally. Butter both sides and toast on a griddle or under broiler until golden brown. Flip over and toast top and bottom quickly to toast the sesame seeds.

BOURBON HOUSE 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111 BourbonHouse.com

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ADD shrimp and season with Creole seasoning. Cook the shrimp ¾ of the way and add crab, lemon juice, rosemary, hot sauce, Worcestershire and

When mixture has heated fully through, and the lemon juice, hot sauce and Worcestershire have reduced, REMOVE from heat and swirl the last 2 Tablespoons of cold butter into the mix to emulsify. DIVIDE the seafood mix equally between the two muffuletta loaves. Cover with two slices of Provolone cheese each and broil to quickly melt the cheese. DIVIDE the Olive Salad mix between the two sandwiches on top of the cheese. Top the sandwich with the top bread. SLICE in half. Plate one half on each plate between four plates and serve with chips. Serves 4

Olive Salad INGREDIENTS 1 cup pitted brined black olives, such as Nicoise, sliced 1 cup large pimento-stuffed green olives, sliced ½ cup extra virgin olive oil 2 Tablespoons shallots, minced 2 Tablespoons celery, finely minced 2 Tablespoons capers 2 Tablespoons fresh flat leaf parsley, minced ½ cup small roasted red peppers, diced 2 teaspoons garlic, minced 1½ teaspoons freshly ground black pepper In a bowl, COMBINE all ingredients and mix well. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Can be refrigerated for up to 1 week. Makes approximately 3 cups

PHOTOS BY JE FFERY J OHNSTON

MELT remaining butter in a sauté pan until it starts to foam. Add onions and mushrooms and cook until soft, then add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 2 more minutes.

black pepper.


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THE DISH

Healing Around a Table

Avo’s soft shell crab with Parmesan aioli, asparagus and prosciutto

Family, food and more food By Jyl Benson

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P H O T O B Y MI K E L IR E T T E

I was born in 1968 when my sister, Beth, was 13. She was pretty and graceful, able to dance en pointe under the tutelage of Tony Bevinetto, the Broadway dance legend who retired to New Orleans to coax the inner dancers from little girls. He suggested to our mother that Beth pursue a career in dance. Years later when I flopped into his brilliant, gleaming white studio on Metairie Road he advised my mother to save her money. Beth and I were and remain different in most ways, sharing in common only the scars we bear for having survived our childhoods (another story). In 1984, Beth moved to Chicago and started a veterinary practice. Young, petulant and self-absorbed, I didn’t think too much of her going. We weren’t very close. I grew up thinking everyone sustained themselves on crawfish boils, sun-soaked festivals and chanting, wild men in feathered suits. I was a street rat with a fake ID sneaking into Tipitina’s and the Rose Tatoo to suck up music and Dixie long necks. Eventually my sister started to long for the oddities of New Orleans and sought an escape


route. After 31 years in Chicago she made her way home at the end of 2015, settling into a cottage on Octavia Street just two blocks from my own home in the neighborhood where our great grandparents settled when they immigrated from Sweden in 1894. We were thrilled, both having longed for what we witnessed between other sisters. I think each of us secretly, idealistically, thought the other had the power to heal old wounds. The reality was very different. The 13-year chasm, vastly different life experiences and polarized political ideologies came screaming into focus. It was a disaster. Whatever Band-Aids either of us had used to hold ourselves together were ripped off. By the middle of 2017 we had scraped the relationship and each avoided the other’s routes within the same neighborhood. Long story short, I believe it was a mutual friend’s determined prayers to Buddha, Ganesha, the Goddess and other deities she keeps in her arsenal that healed my relationship with my sister. At the end of this past, particularly brutal winter Beth showed up with a salve for the most persistent and deeply rooted of my wounds. We began to heal, but we had to find more than biology and pain in common. So, we started with dinner. My daughter Cecilia joined us at Avo. It was a sparkling, rain-drenched evening made all the more exciting by a beautifully assembled menu that made decisions nearly impossible. So we ordered pretty much everything. Chef Nick Lama’s pan-fried squash blossoms were stuffed mozzarella and puffed

Try This: Saba is well deserving of its hype and the effort needed to score a reservation. The service is attentive and cheerful, executed by proud, well-compensated and cared-for employees. The environment provides a chic, though comfortable backdrop for beautifully executed fare that hits all price points from couscous with dried cherries and Persian lime butter ($8) to foie gras with date honey and Marcona almonds ($30). If this sweltering heat ever passes, enjoy your meal of the front patio while taking in the scene on Magazine Street.

grains atop a sauce of zucchini purée; meatballs of pork and beef were laced Fontina fonduta and a spicy tomato sauce. Cecilia’s scallops were paired daringly with apple, olives and cauliflower and sauced with Romanesco sauce and brown butter. My soft shell crab was fried shatter-crisp, lightly sauced with Parmesan aioli and served with asparagus and prosciutto. Beth’s Halibut was set atop a celery root purée dotted with minced tomato and capers with a side of fiddle head ferns in a gloss of brown butter, berries, rhubarb and sumac. We shared a portion of creamy cheese cake finished with lemon curd and fresh berries and toasted a new beginning with cups of chamomile tea and sweet liqueur. n AVO 5908 Magazine St. 509-6550 RestaurantAvo.com SABA 5757 Magazine St. 324-7770 EatWithSaba.com

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Philanthropic Fun Each month St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans’ definitive social magazine, highlights recent nonprofit fundraisers. In the following pages we acknowledge the people, social activism and lifestyles that make our city exceptional. Event profiles by Shelby Simon

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Creative Caps

1

The inaugural “Heart of the Park Hat Luncheon” offered a festive fête for supporters of City Park. A total of 386 guests filled the Arbor Room for the inaugural “Heart of the Park Hat Luncheon” held on Wednesday, April 11, at the Arbor Room at Popp Fountain in City Park. Chairmen Susan Brennan, Ashley Bright, Pam Bryan and Bev Church hosted a fast-paced and fun fête where guests donned their most festive and creative hats. The New Orleans Town Gardeners, Inc. in conjunction with Friends of City Park raised over $275,000 to benefit the management and protection of City Park’s magnificent trees, as well as community projects of the Town Gardeners, such as the Edible Schoolyard, Grow Dat Youth Farm in City Park and more. Guests arrived to the party in decorated golf carts donated by Bayou Oaks Golf Course, which were driven by King Milling, Dr. John Church, Hilton Bell, John Hope, Peyton Bush, Alan Philipson, Edgar Bright, Philip Woollam, John Hopper, Jay Bryan and Clancy Dubos. The Patron Party began with hat bedecked guests treated to Moët & Chandon Champagne, music by The St. Augustine High School Brass Band, New Orleans Mounted Policemen and even Henri Hall riding in on an Equest Stable horse, to give a proclamation to Gayle Benson. Johnny Parker and his band led a second-line parade to a fabulous lunch prepared by City Park Catering, which included creme vichyssoise, lobster salad and a fruit tart accompanied by Smoke Tree Rose. Caroline Reily and Tina Kern created the spectacular oak tree centerpieces accented with flowers from Flora French’s country house gardens. Prizes won included a $1,000 gift certificate from Yvonne LaFleur and incredible paintings by Auseklis Ozols and Alex Harvie, auctioned by Morgan Packard Griffith. Barbara Bush, Margo Dubos and Juli Miller-Hart served as Patron Chairs with Gayle and the late Tom Benson as Honorary Chairmen. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Co-Chairs Ashley Bright and Pam Bryan with Tommy Westervelt and Co-Chair Bev Church 2. Honorary Chair Gayle Benson with David Kerstein and Stephanie Feoli 3. Anne and King Milling 4. Barbara Bush, Tina Kern and Caroline Reily 5. Gary Lorio, Cathy Cary, Lynne White and Auseklis Ozols 6. Juli Miller Hart, Bob Becker and Margo Dubos

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF STROUT

WHAT: “The Heart of the Park Hat Luncheon,” benefiting New Orleans City Park/New Orleans Town Gardeners WHEN: Wednesday, April 11 WHERE: Arbor Room and Popp Fountain in City Park


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

A Feast of Talent Some of New Orleans’ finest chefs gathered for a benefit for Second Harvest Food Bank. Alon Shaya was the featured chef at this year’s “Harvest at Home,” the annual fundraiser for Second Harvest Food Bank. The beautiful evening reception hosted 150 attendees for a taste of delicious selections from several of New Orleans’ finest culinary talents. Chefs and culinary selections included: Frank Brigtsen with crawfish sauté, Alon Shaya with tomato soup with rice, Tory McPhail with grilled Black Angus skirt steak and heirloom tomato salad, Susan Spicer with mini grilled fish sandwiches, Rebecca Wilcomb with mussels with white beans, Sue Zemanick with tamarind glazed beef short rib, and desserts from Maggie Scales of La Boulangerie. A Wheatley vodka strawberry basil lemonade pleased as the featured cocktail. Susu Stall and Erin Romney-Cazes served as Event Chairs. The Xavier Molina Standards Trio provided entertainment. n

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Event at a Glance WHAT: Ninth annual “Harvest at Home” featuring Chef Alon Shaya, benefiting Second Harvest Food Bank WHEN: Thursday, April 12 WHERE: The home of Walton & Jeffrey Goldring

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1. Andrew Stall and Co-Chair Susu Stall with Walton and Jeffrey Goldring 2. Tarun and Rupa Jolly with Co-Chair Erin RomneyCazes and Hunter Cazes 3. Chef Susan Spicer, Phillip May and Second Harvest Food Bank President and CEO Natalie Jayroe 4. Pumpkin Parker, Melanie Loomis, Chef Alon Shaya and Alecia Holinga 5. Fred and Jennifer Heebe with Stephanie and Joe Bruno 6. Kathy Zetzmann with Billy and Carro Gardner


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Fabulous Fashionistas

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The 2018 Prix d’Elegance Award Recipients were honored at a luncheon combining fashion and art. For more than a decade, the memberships of Men & Women of Fashion have worked alongside NOBA’s staff and board and the members of BRAVO (Ballet Resource And Volunteer Organization) led by President Sandra Chaisson to benefit the nationally award-winning education and scholarship programs of the New Orleans Ballet Association. This year’s “Prix d’Elegance Luncheon” honored the 2018 Prix d’Elegance Award Recipients, Hall of Fame Honorees Henry Shane and Mary Katherine Lonatro-Tusa. The Honorees’ Cocktail Reception was generously hosted by the Ritz-Carlton New Orleans. Presenting at the luncheon were Master of Ceremonies Richard Buchsbaum and Mistress of Ceremonies Angela Hill. Marilyn V. Dittmann and Carol V. Hall served as Luncheon Chairs. Jeff Chouest of Jeff ’s Haberdashery and Rebecca Nordgren of Chatta Box presented the runway Fashion Show for this year’s event, an annual highlight. Auctioneers Brett and Cheryl Baumann led the live auction of two items: a private dinner for 12 with the ballroom donated by Martine Chaisson Gallery and catering donated by Dakota Restaurant & Grand Events; and a unique art caftan featuring ballet legend Baryshinikov donated by Ellen Macomber Fine Art and Textiles. A raffle awarded prizes of a $2,500 Shopping Spree from Kenny Rubenstein & Rubensteins and an exquisite sterling silver and diamond David Yurman Confetti Cuff bracelet donated by Chad Berg & Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry. The champagne pull sold nearly 40 bottles of champagne donated by members. n

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Event at a Glance WHAT: “Prix d’Elegance Luncheon & Fashion Show,” benefiting Men & Women of Fashion WHEN: Wednesday, April 18 WHERE: Hilton New Orleans Riverside

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1. Luncheon Chair Carol V. Hall, Hall of Fame Honorees Mary Katherine Lonatro-Tusa and Henry Shane and Luncheon Chair Marilyn V. Dittmann 2. Sharon Marchand, Donnell Zeringue, Juan Barona and Martine Chaisson Linares 3. Honorees Virginia Eckholdt, Diane Hollis, Carol Short and Jean Rice 4. Jamie Moreau, Kenny Rubenstein, Honoree Kathy Singleton and Kathleen Mix 5. Joey DiFatta, Melanie Cannatella, Honoree Lena Torres and Kay McArdle 6. Lee Giorgio, Debbie Alciatore-Empey, Jeff Chouest and Rebecca Nordgren


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Eradicating an Epidemic

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CADA honored individuals whose work aids their focus on ending substance abuse. The “Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse’s 21st Annual Awards Luncheon” recognized Alcohol Awareness Month and honored professionals who prevent or reduce substance abuse in New Orleans. This year’s Keynote Speaker was Dr. José CalderónAbbo, Chief Medical Officer for Optum/United Health Care for Louisiana, who focuses on public health initiatives for integration of behavioral health with primary care, the substance abuse epidemic and addressing social determinants of health. Steven Lassalle, New Orleans District Administrator of Adult Probation and Parole was honored as this year’s NCADD Bronze Award recipient. This year’s other honorees were Dr. Joseph Kanter, City of New Orleans Health Department for Community Leadership; Tulane University President Michael A. Fitts for Excellence in Prevention; Leigh Ann de Monredon from Odyssey House Louisiana and Kerri Corcoran from Plaquemines Community CARE Center Foundation, Inc. for Excellence in Treatment. Lee Zurik, WVUE Chief Investigative Reporter and his team also received this year’s Media Award honors for their “Licensed to Pill” series. Harrah’s event staff and catering went above and beyond for CADA, honorees and guests this year, providing a four-course meal capped with banana Foster cheesecake. Decorations included live small plant centerpieces and seasonal flowers at the dining tables. Guests also enjoyed speaking with CADA youth addiction prevention educators at the interactive substance abuse education table and getting more information about partnering community agencies that treat individuals with mental health and substance abuse disorders. Each guest, upon check-in, entered for a chance to win one of five door prizes, including gift certificates to restaurants within the Creole Cuisine restaurant group, Southern Candymakers, Bayou Oaks Filmore in the Oaks restaurant and an Edward Jones “Office Swag” gift basket. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Honorees Steven Lassalle and Dr. Joseph Kanter with Noel Twilbeck 2. Michelle Hamrick and Honoree Kerri Corcoran with Else Pedersen and Honoree Leigh Ann de Mondredon 3. Eric Odom, Joyce Bracey, Rev. Lisa Fitzpatrick and Keynote Speaker José CalderónAbbo 4. Ed Carlson, Dr. Arwen Podesta and Morris Hawkins 5. Esteban Gershanik, Carlos Ponce and Ana and Dr. Juan Gershanik 6. Stella DelBianco, Betty Speyer, Yakelis Anzola and Beverly Matheney

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WHAT: “CADA’s 21st Annual Awards Luncheon,” benefiting the Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse WHEN: Thursday, April 19 WHERE: Harrah’s New Orleans


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Tri-colored Tricentennial

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“Cochon Cotillion XXII” celebrated the New Orleans Tricentennial with a whimsical Mardi Gras ball. Coinciding with the King and Queen’s costume decree for members of their court to join them in celebrating the New Orleans Tricentennial, court members and attendees attired festively for Bridge House/Grace House’s 22nd annual “Cochon Cotillion.” The ball honored King Bill Mimeles and Queen Betsie Gambel; each delivered remarks of recognition for the services Bridge House/ Grace House has provided the community for more than 60 years. Zea Rotisserie & Bar was featured at the Court and Patron Party, serving Pilled Pork Sliders and a DIY Grit Bar. Mike Morris and the Double-Step Cloggers performed and provided live entertainment. Guests received gifts upon arrival, including umbrellas, each uniquely decorated by the “Cochon Cotillion” Committee Members, along with printed napkins for the second-line entrance into the main event; champagne glasses with the King & Queen’s names on them for the champagne toast led by Bridge House/Grace House CEO Else Pedersen and Emcee Bruce Katz; and LED light up beads with the “Cochon Cotillion XXI” logo in purple, green and gold. As the doors opened and guests began arriving, dancers from Muggivan School of Irish Dance performed. The Double-Step Cloggers and the King and Queen led a second-line entrance into the ballroom, followed by the Court and Patron Party guests and dancers. The Pussyfooters also performed during the band’s set break. Event Chairs were Arlene Rome, Tiffany Truxillo and Rosemary Tunstall. Thirty local restaurants provided dishes such as pork belly tacos from Gulf Tacos, corn and crab bisque from Bourbon House and peppermint ice cream sundaes from Cold Stone Creamery. The ELS Show Band performed in the main ballroom and Mike Morris continued to perform in the Bienville Room. A raffle prize for a three-night all-inclusive stay at AMResort’s Breathless Punta Cana was awarded in addition to 50 silent auction packages available for bidding. n

WHAT: “Cochon Cotillion XXII,” benefiting Bridge House / Grace House WHEN: Tuesday, March 6 WHERE: Blaine Kern’s Mardi Gras World

1. Billy Smith, Queen Betsie Gambel and Mark LeBlanc 2. Co-Chairs Arlene Rome, Rosemary Tunstall and Tiffany Truxillo 3. CEO Else Pedersen, Executive Director of Development Kevin Gardere and Executive Director of Clinical Services Michelle Gaiennie Hamrick

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Event at a Glance

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

Be Our Guest Kingsley House invited patrons to get a close look at their work at its ninth annual luncheon. Kingsley House hosted its ninth annual “Friendraising Luncheon,” which also served as an opportunity to invite friends, supporters and new guests to Kingsley House to directly see what the organization does and how it makes a daily impact strengthening families and building community through early learning, adult day health and community service programs. Inspired by Beauty and the Beast’s “Be Our Guest,” the stage backdrop featured scenes and characters from the Disney film by the same name, created by artist and Kingsley House Preschool teacher Karen Hansell. Kinglsey House Preschool children welcomed guests by singing the song “Be Our Guest” and handing out roses. Three hundred fifty patrons attended the luncheon. Chef Donald Link and chef Stephen Stryjewski provided a delicious lunch of smothered beef short ribs, rice, glazed carrots, green salad and lemon pie for dessert. Tables were adorned with Tiffany blue linens, gold cherub candelabras with red roses and clear glass domes with a single rose, true to the movie, designed by Urban Earth Studios. WGNO’s LBJ Served as Master of Ceremonies. Event Chairs were LaVerne Toombs and Arnel Cosey, Ph.D. Zwila Martinez, a Kingsley House parent, and Marques Celestine, whose father attended their Adult Day Healthcare program, spoke about the impact Kingsley House has had on their families. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Dr. Kya Robottom with Co-Chairs LaVerne Toombs and Arnel Cosey Ph.D. 2. Chimene Grant Saloy and Rev. Kit McLean 3. Bill Hammack, Jamice Parmele and Pam and Barry Kirk

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WHAT: Ninth annual “Friendraising Luncheon,” benefiting Kingsley House WHEN: Thursday, April 12 WHERE: Kingsley House Historic Gymnasium


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN 1

Southern Hospitality Two hundred forty guests attended the jazz brunch to support Catholic Charities and honor U.S. Representative Steve Scalise. This year’s “ACCESS Jazz Brunch” benefiting Catholic Charities featured an award presentation honoring U.S. Representative Steve Scalise as the 2018 “ACCESS Pro-Life Champion” for his work and dedication to pro-life issues. On behalf of the ACCESS board, founding member Sharon Rodi presented the award, saying “Representative Scalise has always been a champion of pro-life issues, as a State Legislator, in the halls of Congress and currently as Majority Whip.” Rodi thanked Scalise for all he has done in constant support of the pro-life movement, noting that he’s always responsive to their needs. Scalise delivered special remarks to guests, expressing his gratitude for their support. Catholic Charities Pro-Life Services Director Michelle Black welcomed attendees, and Catholic Charities President and CEO Sister Marjorie Hebert served as the Featured Speaker. Charming Southern “Belles” Noelle and Erin Toups welcomed guests as they entered the Audubon Tea Room. Dressed in period gowns complete with hoop skirts, the Mademoiselles showcased the event’s “Southern Hospitality” theme. Also highlighting this year’s Southern style, guests were greeted with refreshing mint juleps. Co-Chaired by Sheila Spring and Jean Mitchell, this year’s silent auction provided over 130 local items, while guests could take chances to win one of the over 20 prizes. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Lisa Baynham, Madge Schexnaydre, Co-Chair Jean Mitchell and Lois Cambre 2. Gayle Gaubert, Honoree U.S. Representative Steve Scalise, Karen McGoey and Sharon Rodi 3. Stephen Schonberg, Celeste Schonberg and Gloria Woods

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WHAT: “ACCESS Jazz Brunch,” benefiting Catholic Charities WHEN: Sunday, April 15 WHERE: Audubon Tea Room


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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Green for the Greater Good

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Raintree Children and Services raised more than $150,000 at its annual benefit supporting at-risk foster children. Raintree Children and Services, which helps at-risk foster children and infants with disabilities, hosted 300 patrons at the annual “Paint the Town Green” benefit. Beautiful white gardenias in illuminated flower pots and jars decorated Generations Hall for the event. Event Chairs were Deborah Alciatore-Empey, Lana Duke and Cindy Paulin. Mr. Mike Hoss served as Emcee and the event honored Valero Energy. Ruth’s Chris Steak House provided delicious hors d’oeuvres for the Patron Party. The gala featured catering provided by 12 Seasons, Acme Oyster House, Antoine’s, Chateau Gold & Country Club, Dryades Public Market, Gordon Biersch, GW Fins, Haydel’s, La Louisiana, Marcello’s, Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House, Perrone & Sons, Sac-a-Lait, Superior Grill and The Royal Sonesta. Guests danced the night away to music by The Wise Guys in the main room and the John Doheny Quartet in the Patron room. The live auction included an all-inclusive trip to the Saints vs. Atlanta game in Atlanta, including a view of the game from a private suite, hotel and airfare. Additional highlights included an embellished giclée from James Michalopoulous entitled “Spiffed Up,” a charter fishing trip and a sapphire earring and necklace set from Anton’s. The silent auction featured a huge variety of items, including modern art, jewelry and numerous hotel and restaurant experiences. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Co-Chair Cindy Paulin with Vincent Giardina and Pat Starnes 2. Co-Chairs Debbie Alciatore-Empey and Lana Duke with Olivia Ventola 3. Executive Director Lashawna Schofield, President Kenny Malter

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WHAT: “Paint the Town Green,” benefiting Raintree Children and Family Services WHEN: Saturday, April 7 WHERE: Generations Hall


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Exemplary Entrepreneurs

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Albert Lepage Center gala honored recipients of the 2018 Tulane University Entrepreneurs Leadership Awards. Guests, honorees and Tulane students attending “The Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation 2018 Awards Gala” had the opportunity to network with some of the most successful and well respected entrepreneurs from around the region. The event began with a cocktail reception on the lovely patio, followed by a dinner program inside the beautiful Audubon Tea Room. The event was attended by 200 guests who were affiliates of the Freeman School of Business at Tulane University, including Dean Ira Solomon, Business School Council members, donors, judges for the Tulane Business Model Competition, faculty, staff, alumni, current students and guests of the honorees, who gathered to celebrate this year’s illustrious honorees of entrepreneurship. During the dinner, video presentations highlighted the accomplishments of Patrick B. Comer as the Tulane Distinguished Entrepreneur and Sandy Rosenthal as the Outstanding Social Entrepreneur. Cash Awards were presented to the 2018 Tulane Business Model Competition winners. These included: AssistENT from Johns Hopkins University, Uchooze Lunchbox from University of Arkansas and Boost Linguistics from Drexel University. The competition, now in its 18th year, offers tens of thousands of dollars in startup funds to student ventures. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Honoree Patrick and Christina Comer with Rev. Judith Comer and Rev. Fletcher Comer 2. Stanford Rosenthal, Mark Rosenthal, Honoree Sandy and Stephen Rosenthal 3. Finalists Talia Kirschbaum and Pooja Nair

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WHAT: “The Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation 2018 Awards Gala” WHEN: Thursday, April 19 WHERE: Audubon Tea Room


PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Disco Inferno

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WYES transformed into a bustling nightclub for a disco party. WYES departed from its normal decor to become a hot club scene for one night only, complete with an illuminated red carpet welcoming guests to the “WYES Studio 12 Gala” Presented by Eugenie and Joseph Jones Family Foundation. The Charlie & Janette Kornman Performance Studio transformed with modular seating, a live band stage, roving disco lighting and even cage dancing! Proceeds from this event support WYES’ mission of providing educational, entertaining and enlightening programming to the region. A special club lounge was created off the studio, draped in all white fabrics from floor to ceiling, which displayed a draped petal fabric. Ann Glaviano of HEATWAVE! started the party off with her DJ stylings. Partygoers – donning 1970s-inspired attire ranging from Andy Warhol to bellbottoms, sequins, beads and fringe – enjoyed posing “disco-style” at a photo booth with novelty props. Food was passed and generously displayed throughout the station. The Patron Oyster Bar from Felix’s Restaurant & Oyster Bar was a hit, and the cuisine from Celebrate! Special Events by Windsor Court hailed the highest compliments from attendees. Patrons were greeted with offerings of champagne, wine or the specialty “Disco Mule” cocktail served in copper mugs in addition to the full bars. Libations were provided courtesy of Goldring Family Foundation and Sazerac Company. The live and silent auctions featured prizes such as Pelicans playoff tickets and a basketball autographed by Anthony Davis; a charter fishing trip followed by dinner at Bourbon House; and digital advertising from Outfront Media. Security guards flanked Charlotte Carrere, modeling the diamond earrings from Valobra Jewelry & Antiques, also an auction prize. Later into the evening, The Phunky Monkeys took to the stage and amped up the dancing. Attendees who stayed through the late night enjoyed DJ Mannie Fresh. Event Chairs included Pepper Baumer, Julie Comrade, Mary Clare and Danny Conwill and Susan and Jimmy Gundlach. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Allan Pizzato with Co-Chairs Julie Comrade and Pepper Baumer 2. Co-Chairs Danny Conwill, Susan Gundlach, Mary Clare Conwill and Jimmy Gundlach 3. Bill Hines with Kaylea and Hunter Hill

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WHAT: “WYES Studio 12 Gala,” benefiting WYES WHEN: Friday, April 20 WHERE: WYES


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fashionable & friendly

Lilly & Co.

Optical Shoppe

By Kelcy Wilburn Photographed by Frank Aymami

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Old Metairie

Bon Temps Boutique

is one of Greater New Orleans’ most vibrant neighborhoods, quietly thriving out of the limelight in a city that prioritizes tourism. Located just outside

of Orleans Parish and the tourist-heavy areas of the city, Old Metairie is a place that fosters community by maintaining its family-oriented atmosphere. Metairie Road provides a charming oak-shaded drive through the area and serves as the main lifeline of the neighborhood, lined with the businesses and boutiques that supply residents with not only goods and services, but friendship and fellowship as well. A look in to the various shops offers a glimpse into the lifestyle and atmosphere of this fashionable family destination.

Boudreaux’s Jewelers is a stalwart of the neighborhood, arriving in

1985 from its original location on the first block of Baronne Street. During the 1980s, as downtown business gradually moved from the Canal Street corridor deeper into the CBD, Boudreaux’s eyed a change, choosing to serve its clientele from a more convenient location as one of the first retail tenants of the Old Metairie Village shopping center. “Getting into the Metairie Club Gardens area with a fine retail space was key. My grandfather lived out here at the time, and we found that there was a need in the Old Metairie market here,” says Brandon Boudreaux, Lead Designer and fourth generation of Boudreaux family jewelers. During this time of year, Boudreaux’s is excited to be introducing the 2019 line of Omega watches while also bringing in a new line of fine designer jewelry, Jude Frances. Another longtime occupant, with roots in New Orleans that go back 35

years, Elizabeth’s opened its Metairie Road boutique 15 years ago.

“During the past 15 years, this area has flourished, and part of its vi-

brancy, I think, is the sense of boutique shopping, the destination where you come when you want to find that special outfit,” says Sal Trentacoste, Owner and Buyer. A women’s clothing boutique, Elizabeth’s caters to the woman who travels but wants the latest fashions right in their neighborhood, according to Trentacoste. This month, fall fashions are arriving. “Old Metairie is a neighborhood that values and supports small businesses and entrepreneurs. Part of the charm of the shops in this area is that they are specialized like Elizabeth’s,” he says. You won’t find many big box stores in Old Metairie, a testament to the customer service offered by its specialized, local stores.

The Linen Registry has been in Old Metairie since 1997, and while it

has always been a major thoroughfare, Owner Lee McKee says Metairie Road became a specialty shopping destination following Hurricane Katrina. “I grew up in Old Metairie, and when I moved back to New Orleans, I moved back to where I felt most at home,” says McKee, who specializes in high-end linens for bed, bath and table while also offering gifts, lingerie and a bridal registry. A safe and central location was important to McKee, who also notes that parking is less of a challenge in this area versus New Orleans’ Uptown or French Quarter neighborhoods. In late summer and fall, The Linen Registry is popular for back-to-school bedding, custom table linens and specialty gifts for the holiday and debut seasons.

FeBe is a shop that has grown with the neighborhood, initially opening along

Metairie Road in 2003 before quickly outgrowing its space and moving to its current location in 2005. Offering over 4,000 square feet of designer clothing and shoes, FeBe receives new merchandise every day. “Over the years, more and more shops and restaurants have opened, making Metairie Road its own shopping destination. We have been fortunate to be able to continue to grow each year as more people discover this area while still getting to see our loyal customers that have been with us since the beginning,” says Effie Boihem, Co-Owner. This month, shoppers can look forward to trunk shows for Sennod Jewelry Design, Finley and Cordani Shoes.

The growing nature of Old Metairie retail is what drew Lilly & Co. to the area.

Offering casual every day clothing, gifts, shoes and salon services, Lilly & Co. boutique and salon is enjoying being one of Metairie Road’s newest additions in just its first


Boudreaux’s Jewelers

10 months. The store welcomes shoppers this month for an early Labor Day summer sale (August 23-25) as they bring in new items for fall. The boutique also carries Supergoop! sunscreen, which continues to be necessary throughout late summer and fall here in the Gulf South. Shopping along Metairie road isn’t exclusively for the adults – a family-friendly

shopping destination means clothes for the kids, too, which is the focus at Bon

Temps Boutique. Featuring locally designed children’s clothing inspired by Southern culture and tradition, Bon Temps Boutique offers play wear from infant to tweens that is all locally screened. “We are the new kids on the block. After three years of pop ups, markets, and festivals, Bon Temps made its permanent home on Metairie Road,” says Laura McPhail, Owner and Designer. “The neighborhood and clientele have welcomed us warmly. We think it’s the perfect place for our loyal customer base and new shoppers, too.

McPhail characterizes Bon Temps Boutique’s newest addition to the line as dressier but still fun and practical. The shop is currently gearing up with back-to-school offerings in addition to Saints and LSU collections.

Along with Lilly & Co., Wildflower is a new addition to the end of Metairie

Road closer to Causeway Boulevard. Wildflower recently opened their location in October 2017. “This end of Metairie Road is really blossoming, which is incredibly

exciting for our business as well as all the other new businesses in the area.


Optical Shoppe

are like family,” says LaBorde. She also enjoys the fact that mostly small businesses populate the area and that many are woman-owned.

Optical Shoppe is another example,

and the locally owned designer eyewear and sunglasses boutique is nearing its second anniversary on Metairie Road,

though its Baton Rouge location has been in business for 35 years. Area residents and customers welcome the shop, especially as the end of summer arrives. “The end of summer brings in customers that need glasses before they head back to college and many sunglass customers that are ready for a new pair of shades,” says Sondra Berger, Owner. This month, the shop will offer a 20 percent discount on designer frames with the There’s a definite buzz on this end with all the new

and garden and now with her own store on the other

stores, restaurants, salons, and fitness studios open-

end of the neighborhood. A “lifestyle store,” Relish

ing up,” says Owner Danielle Conrad.

features unique items Harris selects on trips to

According to Conrad, Wildflower carries trendy

Europe, from fashion and jewelry to home goods such

clothing, shoes and accessories for women ages 16

as bedding and scented ceramics. With customers

to 60. The store is popular for its large jewelry selec-

of all ages, the store caters to anyone looking for

tion, which includes Bauble Bar and Kendra Scott.

something they don’t see everywhere else.

“My experience on Metairie Road has been even

“Metairie road has become like a little Magazine

better than I expected,” says Conrad. “The people

Street with the amount of stores that have opened.

in this area truly want to see you succeed, which is

And not just clothing, but more new restaurants, too

very inspiring.”

– you don’t have to leave Metairie now. Where I’m

Another new addition to this end of Metairie Road

is She, which aims to bring a little California, boho

style down to the Big Easy. Featuring free-spirited, edgy styles, She brings a different yet welcomed vibe

located along Metairie Road is like the heartbeat of the area,” says Harris. While most of the aforementioned establishments

purchase of prescription lenses. Planning a party? Metairie Road has

you covered there as well, where Z Event Planning offers full service event planning, design and production services. Z

Event Planning specializes in celebrations of all kinds, including corporate events and weddings. Milestone birthdays have been a big focus this year. The company also produces nonprofit galas and events designed to help market and brand local and national companies. “Since we have opened our office and showroom space, we’ve seen a lot of

are product-centered, Metairie road is of course also

changes on Metairie Road. There are won-

serves as a blowout-focused hair salon that also

all around us,” says Susan Zackin, Owner

full of service providers. BLEU, a Blowdry Bar

derful new places to eat, beautify and shop

fashions range from dressy to casual in all sizes,

offers dry styles, updos, makeup applications, hair

and Lead Designer. This month, party

as well as accessories, shoes, hats and home and

extensions, Keratin Express Treatments and on loca-

beauty products.

tion services for brides. BLEU turns five in September

to the neighborhood. According to Owner Ashley Corchiani, She’s

“All of the new businesses going up on this side of the road are so exciting. We’re beyond grateful to share a strip with Shipley Donuts and enjoy the sweet

and is gearing up this month with specials, giveaways and the promise of big news. A few years go, the blow-dry bar concept was

smells every single morning. We’re also super excited

still new to the area, and Owner and Proprietor

to be located next door to the new Main Squeeze

Emily LaBorde knew her location had to be locally

Juice Bar,” says Corchiani.

embraced to succeed.

Beth Harris, Owner of Relish, has worked along

Metairie Road for years, first with Garden Gate home 48 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

“I am so glad I chose Metairie Road to establish my brand. We seriously have the best clients ever – they

planners and shoppers can look forward to pop-up events showcasing various vendors in the Z Event Planning showroom. When you take an adventure down Metairie Road, visit with the shop owners and find out their favorite Metairie Road gems. Between the boutiques, restaurants, cafes and salons, you’ll find an extensive world for shopping and sharing a bite with friends and family.


Lilly & Co. Bon Temps Boutique

Lilly & Co.

BLEU, a Blowdry Bar

701 Metairie Road, Suite 112-2A, Metairie 309-5999

BLEUaBlowdryBar.com Bon Temps Boutique

603 1/2 Metairie Road, Metairie 571-5952

BonTempsBoutique.com Boudreaux’s Jewelers

701 Metairie Road, Metairie 831-2602

BoudreauxsJewelers.com Elizabeth’s

204 Metairie Road, Metairie 833-3717 FeBe

474 Metairie Road, Suite 102, Metairie 835-5250

FeBeClothing.com Lilly & Co.

2513 Metairie Road, Suite 100, Metairie 324-3593

The Linen Registry

She

831-8228

644-4273

TheLinenRegistry.com

Instagram.com/she_metairie

Optical Shoppe

Wildflower

301-1726

218-8996

OpticalShoppeBR.com

Instagram.com/WearWildflower

Relish

Z Event Planning

309-3336

510-5838

RelishNewOrleans.com

ZEventCo.com

200 Metairie Road, Suite 102, Metairie

800 Metairie Road, Suite Q, Metairie

600 Metairie Road, Suite B, Metairie

2561 Metairie Road Suite 2, Metairie

2700 Metairie Road, Suite C, Metairie

508 Metairie Road, Metairie

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 49


50 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018


Guide to Entertaining By Sarah Ravits Photographed by Mike Lirette

The transition from summer to fall entertaining can be a smooth one for hosts, hostesses and eager partygoers ready to celebrate more temperate and calm weather. Whether you’re throwing a small cocktail gathering with close friends or an all-out soirée, there are a few things to keep in mind to keep the event stress-free and fun for all. Belinda Belk of Blue Gardenia Events says that would-be hosts should plan their event at least a month in advance, no matter the size of the crowd, because we all have “busy lives” – especially once the weather becomes more pleasant and the social gatherings stack up onto the calendar.

Mitch’s Flowers STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 51


YOU’RE INVITED One important aspect of partyplanning to consider is the invitation itself. It can be difficult to keep track of Facebook invitations and social media posts. Belk recommends at least using a service like Paperless Post if you’re going the elec-tronic route, as it allows you to easily keep track of the guest list and track who’s opened the invitation or not. Sending physical invitations can give the event an air of importance and prestige. “Getting an invitation in the mail is a world away from opening an inbox,” says Melissa Mortillaro from GEM Printing. “From inexpensive party invites to engraved formal invitations, physical cards are far more special for guests than an email.” An invitation sets the tone of the event, she adds. “Even if it isn’t spelled out on the actual card, an invitation can clue your guests in on how to dress and what to expect at the party. It elevates even a backyard barbecue to a memorable occasion.” “In our day and age we have sort of lost the art of sending an invitation,” says Belk. “But when you get something in the mail it adds a level of just making peo-ple realize it’s truly a special event.” She notes that guests are also more likely to honor their RSVP upon receiving a physical invitation.

SETTING THE TONE

Ambiance is also a key element to consider, she says. Music, lighting and the menu are all a part of this, too. For music, she recommends making a few playlists if you’re not hiring a live band or DJ. “One of the most important ele-ments of building the scene is music,” she says. “I would create a couple playlists, so you can transition from different parts of the evening.” For the early part of the gathering, as guests arrive, she says you 52 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

can’t really go wrong with a “New Orleans gypsy jazz kind of feel — it can take you to another time and place, and it’s not too loud. You don’t want it to be too loud.” Belk also recommends drawing inspiration for the theme, menu and décor from the season itself. During the late summer and early fall, she says that figs, plums and peaches can help create the menu as well as the color palette. Stephanie Tarrant, a floral designer at Mitch’s Flowers agrees with this notion. “Bold jewel tones of the fall bloom into the year’s end,” she says. “We replace pods with berries, herbs with hearty greens and blooming branches with preserved fruit.” Southern traditions never change, but every year florists Mitch’s Flowers

and designers chase the trends that modify the norm, she adds. “Deep reds, oranges and purples pop against cypress, boxwood and evergreens.” For both inside and outdoor gatherings, “variegated leaves and petals are defending their beauty in blooming plants and premium fresh cuts.” In terms of textures, Stephanie says “Crushed velvet, antique heirlooms and fab-rics are making a lovely comeback.” If you happen to be planning a few months in advance for a winter gathering, she adds that “green milk glass goblets and distressed garden vessels are perfect for winter décor. Freeform arranging with frogs and Oasis cages are making room for contemporary floristry in modern design.” Belk suggests adding candles to


Featured Vendors Blue Gardenia Events 206-8599 BlueGardeniaEvents.com GEM Printing 1904 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie 831-1762 GEMPrinting.com Mitch’s Flowers 4843 Magazine St. 899-4843 MitchsFlowersNola.com

Custom party cup and invitations from GEM Printing

Ralph Brennan Catering & Events 4330 Dumaine St. 539-5510 RalphBrennanCatering.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 53


Ralph Brennan Catering LEFT Pan roasted redfish with fingerling potatoes, crispy prosciutto, and figs RIGHT Roasted beet salad with radish, burrata cheese, Meyer lemon purée and balsamic

the decor to add elegance, no matter the theme, season or the rest of the decor. Simply put, she says: “Candlelight makes everyone look good.” She notes that it’s also easy – and a good idea – to find attractive, scented, bug-repelling candles if you’re planning on hosting guests outside. Belk also says that you don’t have to spend a fortune on new items. “Use things that you have around the home. Mix and match china; layer patterns on patterns. Using things from your home feels cohesive, special and thoughtful.”

CATERING & SETUP

Even if you love cooking, bringing in a caterer and a small waitstaff helps alleviate stress. As the host or hostess, “you want to enjoy the party as well as your guests,” says Belk. “Get help if you’re going to be running around. Being a relaxed host can help your guests feel more relaxed.” Gail Varuso, director of catering for Ralph Brennan Catering & Events, notes that “a caterer’s job is to help them select food items not only that they like, but will also be pleasing to their guests and of course work within their budget.” She says it’s a relief when clients learn that the caterers provide all the servicing ware, set up the event, serve and leave their kitchen spotless upon departure, “so they can enjoy the event, which is equally as important as the food and beverage.” Varuso says she often hears clients say that hiring a caterer was the best decision they had ever made.” Belk suggests doing as much detailed prep work in advance as possible – even just having a few people over can be a tremendous amount of work.

“It makes it so much less work on you and so much less stress,” she says. “Make it easier and take any steps to eliminate the stress and make it much more fun for you as the host.” “Pull the platters, make sure you have all the things you need in the house so you don’t have to run to the store at the last minute,” she advises. Pre-batched cocktails help, as does picking up a few trays of food from the grocery store.

THEME & DRESS CODE Does your party need a theme? Not necessarily, but it does build anticipation. And in New Orleans especially, it’s never a bad idea, given how much we love any excuse to don a costume. “I really find that any chance to dress in a different fashion is appealing,” says Belk. Just make sure you know your crowd: “Make it seem fun, but not mandatory...Some people go all-out; some just want to put a little glitter on.” STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 55


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E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V

Fish Faced A picnic with a theme carried home By Bev Church

62 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

sure to use artificial bait and definitely catch and release. Then bring everyone over that evening for an easy party at home. Begin with putting a cute fish on your door or shutters to carry on the theme. Luis Colmenares and I created a Dancing Diva large centerpiece to which I added sunflowers, orange full

blown roses and metal fish. Platters of boiled shrimp corn and a special mayonnaise sauce are accented by an eggplant and roses and placed on the table in the garden. After guests enjoy margaritas, wine or iced tea, fry up small fish fillets, shrimp and eggplant. Keep the music going and have a leisurely dinner out by the pool! n

PHOTOS BY LINDA REESE BJ ORK

Fishing is one of my favorite things to do and City Park, right at Bayou St. John, is the perfect spot! You can have a picnic while you fish, complete with a decorated umbrella and tablecloth. Add fish glasses and plates, along with baguette sandwiches from La Madeleine, Boursin cheese, pita chips, fresh fruit and raspberry iced tea and you’re done! Be


E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V

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WITH THIS RING

Logan – Williams May 18, 2018 By Mirella Cameran

Ellen Rogers Logan and Patrick Hinton Williams met in high school while Ellen was attending the Academy of the Sacred Heart and Patrick Country Day School. They became friends, but their studies and careers took them in different directions across the country. However they always stayed in touch and saw each when they came back to New Orleans for holidays. The magic of a mutual friend’s wedding in 2017 rubbed off, and they enjoyed their first date shortly afterwards at The Waverly Inn in New York City. A long distance relationship between New York City (where Ellen was living) and Houston (where Patrick was living) ensued. It didn’t last long; within months the pair was engaged. Patrick chose to propose to Ellen their hometown with a ring from Kiss the Ring of New York City, where Ellen worked as a jewelry designer. On May 18, 2018, Patrick’s parents hosted a wonderful rehearsal dinner at Arnaud’s for the couple’s family and friends. Many of the restaurant’s most popular and classic dishes were served, including soufflé potatoes, shrimp Arnaud, Gulf fish Pontchartrain, filet Charlemond and creme brûlée. On May 19, 2018, Ellen and Patrick were married in the chapel of the bride’s alma mater, Academy of the Sacred Heart, by Fr. Tony Rigoli, OMI. The ceremony music was performed by Albinas Prizgintas and Harry Hardin. Ellen was beautiful in a dress from Wedding Belles of New Orleans. The couple chose to have an intimate wedding reception that began in the

64 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

beautiful Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden at the New Orleans Museum of Art in City Park. The wedding party – consisting of Ellen’s sister Ginger and brother King, and Patrick’s brother Lear – joined a small group of guests to enjoy French 75s before being led by Trombone Freddie Lonzo & His Friends. Dinner was served by Catering d’Orleans and floral decorations were created by Meade Wenzel. Guests included the couple’s closest high school and college friends, and they and the wedding party danced into the night to the sounds of Motown by Sha’on and the Girls With Success. Ellen and Patrick enjoyed a wonderful

honeymoon in Kauai and Maui, and returned to Mobile, Alabama where Ellen is a jewelry designer with her own line, Ellen Logan Jewelry, and Patrick is a General Manager with Norton Lilly International, a vessel agency headquartered in Mobile. n Coordinators: Laren Holzer and Andre Cardinale Bride’s and Groom’s Wedding Bands: Designed by Ellen and made in New York City Wedding Cake: The Sweet Life Bakery Groom’s Cake: Peanut butter cheesecake by Dardaneaux’s Photographer: Eau Claire Photography Hair: Beth Washington Makeup: Sarah Walsh Beauty


WITH THIS RING

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 65


YO U N G B LO O DS

Diana Meyers Director of Mission and Wellness, Anna’s Place By Lindsay Mack

66 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

academic work, as well as health and wellness. Working in the program does present its share of challenges. Many of the children face academic difficulties, and over 80 percent read below grade level when they arrive. In addition, poverty, challenging family dynamics and behavioral issues also affect these kids. But Diana Meyers, Director of Mission and Wellness at Anna’s Place, and her team have strategies in place for helping them. “To address these we provide a safe environment, positive reinforcement, dialogue about ethics and morals and reading/ academic enhancement programs to give the kids a chance at a better, more productive life in the future,” says Meyers. The program has received excellent responses from students and parents alike. In fact, some of the children have been with the Anna’s Place team for the entire eight years

that the program has been in existence. Plus, the homework assistance and reading program has helped kids improve their grades and work toward brighter futures. Meyers credits Anna’s Place for helping the children achieve incredible things, including a full scholarship at Loyola University for vocal music, a chance to attend Jesuit High School’s summer academic program and even the opportunity to speak before the City Council. n

Get Involved At this time, the Anna’s Place team is in need of more consistent staff and teachers who can work with the program on a long-term basis. To this end, more grants, fundraising opportunities and volunteers are always welcome. To learn more visit AnnasPlaceNola.org, call 947-2121 or email AnnasPlace@StAnnaNola.org.

PHOTO BY CHERY L G ERBER

Anna’s Place offers an after-school program, Saturday program and summer camp aimed at promoting academic, cultural and artistic education for children in the Greater New Orleans community. By combining these aspects with holistic health care and lifestyle education, this organization aims to bring children in New Orleans a brighter future, and it has already achieved that goal for many kids. The idea for this program began when Darryl Durham, a professional clarinetist and former Executive Director of the Harlem School of Arts, approached Fr. Bill Terry with the idea to create a program that introduces the arts to at-risk kids. Although learning about operas, dramas and music appealed to the children, many of them requested help with homework. To address this need, the program expanded to include a focus on


STUDENT ACTIVIST

Caroline Elizabeth MacLaren Ursuline Academy High School

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

By Mallory Lindsly

“Being involved in your community involves so many aspects that can ultimately affect someone’s growth and development entirely,” says Caroline Elizabeth MacLaren, a senior at Ursuline Academy High School. MacLaren is involved with her school and local communities by participating in retreat team, Peer Ministry Club, Executive Board and Beyond Our Borders service immersion program. Over the past four years MacLaren has volunteered with the Spina Bifida of Greater New Orleans Camp Friendship. The organization hosts a day camp for children with Spina Bifida or other orthopedic conditions. Each camper is paired with a high school volunteer counselor. MacLaren is placed with many campers each summer that she volunteers. Some years she has repeat campers, and they teach her perseverance through her hardships. “When I’m around these campers, I’m at my happiest state. No matter what happens throughout the difficulties of family, school, health or even the undecided state of politics and issues our society faces, I’m grounded in my memories and presence in this camp,” says MacLaren. “I stay grounded knowing that these loving children are enjoying the best of their life, and I’m influenced and inspired by each and every one of them.” This past April, MacLaren participated in Spirit of America’s Freedoms program.This program is a four-day conference for high school students to learn more about citizenship, democracy, the free

enterprise and judicial systems, and American political process. “America’s Freedom shaped the beliefs I had, and helped me come to realize the intersection of service and political activism,” says MacLaren. Stephanie Carton, one of MacLaren’s English teachers that she had in the eighth and 10th grades, and one year taught her Women’s Literature, has served as an inspiration. “Carton greatly impacted my life by inspiring me and providing me with an understanding of the need for female empowerment, representation, and recognition,” says MacLaren. “By her inspiration, particularly as a female role model, I felt prepared to apply the knowledge of our world by turning that into action.” MacLaren would love to go to Tulane University or University of Southern California where she wants to study Computer Science and focus on coding and developing websites. After high school, MacLaren wants to advocate in beliefs in which she stands firm. She would love to go abroad and work in developing countries to implement better access to technology. n STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 67


S H O P TA L K

Jeanne Monet Roberson Owner, Lily New Orleans (LNO) By Mirella Cameran

How did you come to open Lily New Orleans (LNO)? After closing two other boutiques in the early 2000s, I started other businesses, studied overseas and traveled tons! While away, I would always pick up beautiful, affordable silk and batik pieces to wear. Then last January I decided to open Lily New Orleans on Oak Street as a short-term project. It was a wonderful success, and this spring I reopened Lily on storied Magazine Street.

Will you still bring back items from your travels? Yes, whether I’m in Italy, Peru, Bali or South Africa I’ll be bringing back unique fashion to NOLA.

68 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

What makes it different than all the other boutiques nearby? I believe our mix is different and complements everyone else. We have sizes 0-18, and our price point is keen. Is there anything else you’d like to share? We also feature local designers, such as Nola Bougie and K’Pich. Where do you relax at the end of the day? There’s nowhere better than Victory Lounge on Baronne Street. n

LNO 3649 Magazine St. LilyNewOrleans.com

PHOTO BY J EFFERY J OH NSTON

Is this Lily different to the first? Lily New Orleans on Magazine is known as LNO, and offers more premium designer lines such as McQueen, Nanette Lapore and Australian designer Zimmermann. There is still a little high quality consignment such as Christian Dior nightgowns, Versace and Gucci dresses and Chanel slacks.

How is LNO doing? We opened on the night of the Magazine Street Stroll and we sold a third of our inventory in one evening!


S H O P TA L K

Matt Schwartz Principal, The Domain Companies & Developer, The Standard at South Market By Mirella Cameran

PH OTO BY J EFFERY JOHNSTO N

How did you start the Domain Companies? My business partner, Chris Papamichael, and I launched Domain with a focus on high-quality affordable and mixed-income housing. After Hurricane Katrina, we saw the urgent need for housing and developed our first Louisiana properties in Mid-City. Our comprehensive approach to community development has grown to include condominiums, retail, hospitality and co-working. Tell us about The Standard at South Market and what makes it special? The Standard is the first condominium development of its kind in New Orleans. The building was designed by Morris Adjmi, an internationallyrenowned architect, and offers incredible residences with spectacular amenities, services and views. What kind of clients are you looking for? We look for residents who love New Orleans, value community and appreciate quality and craftsmanship.

What do you think the future of the city looks like? I see tremendous growth and momentum for New Orleans. There’s a reinvigorating entrepreneurial spirit here, and we’re excited to be a part of that. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the development? The amenity deck is amazing. It features 30,000 square feet of private cabanas, a saltwater pool, outdoor kitchens, a clubhouse, a pool house, a fitness center and skyline views. You won’t find that anywhere else downtown. Where’s your favorite place to grab an after-work cocktail? Domain’s office is downtown at The Shop at the CAC, so I walk a few blocks to the Ace Hotel. There’s never a dull moment between Three Keys, Josephine Estelle, Alto on the roof and Seaworthy right next door. n THE STANDARD AT SOUTH MARKET 1001 Julia St., New Orleans Sales Gallery: 719 O’Keefe Ave. 383-9438, sales@standardnola.com STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 69


S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel

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1. Jim Blanchard (right) poses in front of his work “Howard Memorial Library” with Bill Goldring during the opening reception for “A Precise Vision: The Architectural Archival Watercolors of Jim Blanchard” at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Blanchard’s work was featured in the museum’s exhibitions to celebrate New Orleans’ Tricentennial. 2. Carroll Morton, Manager of the 2018 Tricentennial Commission, is welcomed by Ogden Museum Executive Director William Pittman Andrews during the reception for the Museum’s Tricentennial exhibitions, “Salazar: Portraits of Influence in Spanish New Orleans, 1785 -1802” and “A Precise Vision: The Architectural Archival Watercolors of Jim Blanchard.” 3. Todd Murphy, Jim Henderson and Nick Karl attend “Gala Royale,” the Jefferson Chamber’s 21st anniversary celebration in March. The event was held at the Ochsner Sports Performance Center and was presented by Ochsner Health System and hosted by the New Orleans Saints and Pelicans. 4. Montgomery Creamer, Samantha Kurtz, Brandy Christian and Francisco Christian are pictured at Jefferson Chamber’s “Gala Royale.” The event featured an open bar, hors d’oeuvres by Pigeon Caterers, over 75 silent auction items, a parade of prizes, punch wall, dancing and live musical entertainment by the Bag of Donuts. 5. Mickey and Hilary Landry hosted an event at their Nashville Avenue home in March to announce the Communities In Schools of Greater New Orleans’ expansion to the entire Gulf South. 6. Terri Wittenberg Benton accepts the All in for the Kids Award on behalf of her parents, Frankie and John Wittenberg. The award was granted to the Wittenbergs posthumously and presented to their daughter at the Community in Schools of Greater New Orleans expansion party in March.

70 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018


S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel

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7. Dr. Qi Charles Zhang, Vineen Huston, Tiffany Delcour and Dielda J. Robertson attended the seventh annual “Brass Bash,” a yearly fundraising party to benefit Luke’s House. This year’s bash was held at The Howlin’ Wolf and featured live music, a silent auction and a photobooth. 8. Lyndsey Kirchner, C.J. Kwan, J. Brent Wallis and Rebecca Tamayo are pictured at the “Brash Bash” in March. Proceeds from the event benefited Luke’s House’ mission to provide free health services to the medically underserved. 9. Allen Square, David Payton and Emily Madero attended the Idea Village’s annual dinner during New Orleans Entrepreneur Week in March at Commander’s Palace. Guests were treated to cocktails in the courtyard before dinner in the Garden Room. 10. Ting-ting Rivers, Jen Medbery, Tim Williamson, Lindsay Fox and Severti Wilson enjoyed a cocktail in the in the Commander’s Palace courtyard before the Idea Village’s annual dinner in March. 11. Artemis Antippas, Anastasia Pelias and Magda Pelis pose in front of Anastasia Pelias’ work, “A Thousand Desires” during the Ogden’s exhibition “The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction.” 12. Shawn Hall is pictured in front of her work “BIOlogy” during the opening reception for “The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction” at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 71


ADVERTISING SECTION

HOLIDAY PARTY PLANNING Ambrose Garden 8015 Maple St., New Orleans 504-861-1953, TheNewOrleansFlorist.com Whether your event will be large and formal or small and intimate, Ambrose Garden has the creative ability to translate your vision and create an atmosphere as special as the occasion. They will guide you through the process of choosing the perfect flowers. Their close attention to detail will ensure that everything is exactly as you envisioned so that your party is a magical one. Ambrose Garden will turn your visions and desires into reality.

English Turn Golf & Country Club One Clubhouse Drive, New Orleans 504-392-2200, EnglishTurnGolf.com

Emeril’s Delmonico 1300 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504-525-4937, EmerilsRestaurants.com/Emerils-Delmonico Located on famed St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, Delmonico, the legendary, century-old institution, is an icon in the restaurant industry and has been a cornerstone of traditional Creole dining since 1895. Reopened by Emeril Lagasse in 1998, Delmonico continues today serving a modern style of Louisiana’s Creole cuisine in a grande dame restaurant setting. Their private dining rooms can accommodate parties up to 120 guests in a beautiful and historic New Orleans atmosphere.

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Host your next event at English Turn. Luncheon packages start at $25 per person.* Their holiday catering menu is available for individual courses or complete family meals. The Jingle and Mingle Buffet starts at $32 per person.* Call 504-392-2200 for reservations or for more information. *Per person prices do not include tax or service charge.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Galatoire’s

GEM Printing

209 Bourbon St., New Orleans 504-525-2021, Galatoires.com/Private-Dining sales@galatoires.com

1904 Veterans Blvd., Metairie 504-834-9580, GemPrinting.com

Spend the holidays with Galatoire’s! Their eight private dining spaces are ideal for hosting holiday parties for groups of 10-150 featuring the finest cocktails, food and balconies overlooking Bourbon Street. No matter the occasion, they have a space with the right ambiance to suit your needs. With their world famous New Orleans cuisine and impeccable service, every aspect of your holiday gathering will reflect the iconic, festive experience that guests have enjoyed at Galatoire’s for generations.

Hampton Inn & Suites New Orleans Convention Center 1201 Convention Center Blvd., New Orleans 504-566-9990, NewOrleansHamptonInns.com Imagine your Holiday Party at a historic New Orleans Hotel! The Hampton Inn & Suites Convention Center is the perfect choice for your one-of-a-kind party or luncheon. Their Riverside Ballroom offers 5,400 square feet and they serve a delicious customized menu based on your cravings. Their staff would love to have you over for a tour of the hotel and event space, so give them a call.

GEM Printing Co., now celebrating 100 years, is your one stop shop for the holidays. GEM offers an array of personalized items including: holiday cards, party invitations, napkins, cups, glassware, guest towels and gifts. Most items are printed in one day. They also carry an assortment of stationery and invitations from Crane, William Arthur, Embossed Graphics and Carlson Craft. From small get-togethers to large corporate events, let GEM Printing help plan your perfect holiday soirée.

Messina’s at the Terminal 6001 Stars and Stripes Blvd., New Orleans 504-241-5300, MessinasCatering.com Let your holiday event take flight to a magical era! Host your holiday event at Messina’s at the Terminal in the iconic Art Deco Terminal Building at the Lakefront Airport. Enjoy the award-winning cuisine of Messina’s Catering served with hand-crafted cocktails and expert service. Call Maggie now to reserve your holiday event on the runway at 504-241-5300 or visit MessinasCatering.com. Offsite Catering also available.

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ADVERTISING SECTION

Mitch’s Flowers

NOPSI Hotel

4843 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-899-4843, MitchsFlowersNola.com

317 Baronne St., New Orleans 504-962-6500, NOPSIHotel.com

Inarguably,most of us say good food, good music and good people are the staples of any celebration. But fresh flowers add an important, latent stamp of approval to every holiday or occasion. Bringing fresh cut, living things into your home meets you in a season’s scent giving the fleeting moments of memories sentiment.

From intimate family gatherings on the patio, to extravagant holiday soirées on the rooftop to an authentic New Orleans banquet in the industrially elegant Dryades Ballroom, NOPSI Hotel offers the most enjoyable holiday scene in New Orleans. From the moment guests walk through the doors of the 1920s era property, they feel a sense of elegance and a spirit of the holidays – all housed in the immaculately restored former headquarters of the city’s former power company. This holiday season, make electrifying memories at NOPSI Hotel.

Ogden Museum of Southern Art

Riccobono’s Peppermill

925 Camp St., New Orleans 504-539-9607, OgdenMuseum.org Make your event a work of art this holiday season at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art! The museum is home to Stephen Goldring Hall, showcasing the world’s largest collection of Southern art, and the historic Patrick F. Taylor Library, known for its ornate architectural design. Events held between Dec. 1 and Jan. 31 qualify for their Holiday Special: 15% off. Contact 504-539-9607 or email events@ogdenmuseum.org to book today!

3524 Severn Ave., Metairie 504-455-2266, RiccobonosPeppermill.com

74 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

The Riccobono Family has been hosting memorable events for their customers for over 40 years. Experience fresh caught Gulf seafood, hand-cut beef filets and superbly prepared Italian fare passed down through three generations of Riccobonos. View sample menus online or let them create a custom menu for your holiday dinner, wedding event, corporate meeting or another special occasion. Their private dining room accommodates groups up to 50. Let Riccobono’s Peppermill prepare your next celebration.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Royal Sonesta New Orleans

The Country Club

300 Bourbon St., New Orleans 504-553-2205, Sonesta.com/RoyalNewOrleans

634 Louisa St., New Orleans 504-945-0742, TheCountryClubNewOrleans.com

Royal Sonesta New Orleans offers an array of holiday fun and revelry, from dazzling décor and lights, to marvelously memorable feasts, to its beloved Royal Teddy Bear Tea extravaganza. The resortstyle, luxury property located in the heart of the French Quarter is the perfect destination to host a holiday party or ring in the season with sophistication and style with its package getaway stays. Contact rsnosales@sonesta.com to learn more.

The Country Club offers an elegant escape from everyday living. The beautifully renovated restaurant and bar deliver exquisite food and drink in sophisticated surroundings. Host your next dinner or cocktail party in one of their grand parlors, which comfortably seats 10-50 people for dinner or 100 people reception style. The pool area is available for rent October through March. Order from their fabulous favorites or their chef will create a custom menu for your special event.

The Event Glossary

Z Event Company

EventGlossary.com

508 Metairie Road, Metairie 504-510-5838, ZEventCo.com

The Event Glossary provides everything you need to plan your own event, wedding or meeting of any size from start to finish. Everything you need is all in one place! Their event concierge is online to answer questions and help walk you thru the process – even if you’re looking to source something not listed. Not everyone needs an event planner, so this site was developed by an experienced local planner to save time for novice and professional planners alike.

The planners at Z Event Company create memories that last a lifetime! Their knowledge and access to the best sources both locally and worldwide allow them to design the event of your dreams, personalized just for you. Your event will be enjoyable and memorable when their award-winning team is part of it. Visit their showroom on Metairie Road to see the latest designs available for your next event. Z Event specializes in luxury weddings, social, corporate, non-profit and milestone celebrations.


PERFORMING ARTS

August By Fritz Esker

2

10 & 11

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Stand-up comic Brian Posehn, who has appeared on hit TV shows like “The Big Bang Theory,” comes to the Joy for a night of laughter. The Joy Theater, 1200 Canal St., 528-9569, TheJoyTheater.com

If you miss the music of Michael Jackson, come to the Saenger for this tribute concert to the King of Pop. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

The Grammy-winning band Evanescence will perform alongside electronic violinist Lindsay Stirling with a full orchestra in Champions Square. Champions Square, LaSalle Street, 587-3663, Champions-Square.com

BRIAN POSEHN WITH MATT OWENS

3

“BRING IT!” LIVE

Miss D and her Dancing Dolls, the stars of the Lifetime Network’s show “Bring It!,” bring their incomparable energy to the stage. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 5

IMAGINE DRAGONS

Grammy-winning pop superstars Imagine Dragons come to New Orleans on their “Evolve” Tour with special guest Grace VanderWaal. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com

“MJ LIVE”

11

THE CULT, STONE TEMPLE PILOTS & BUSH

Three rock bands from the 1980s and 1990s join forces for a night of music at Champions Square. Champions Square, LaSalle Street, 587-3663, Champions-Square.com 11

DINE & DANCE WITH THE VICTORY SWING ORCHESTRA

Dance the night away as the National World War II Museum’s own Victory Swing Orchestra celebrates the music of the WWII era. BB’s Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944, NationalWW2Museum.org

8 & 29

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Spencer Racca pays tribute to the music of Frank Sinatra backed by the World War II Museum’s Victory Trio. BB’s Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944, NationalWW2Museum.org

Hip hop artist J. Cole tours America in support of his new album KOD with special guest Young Thug. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com

“THE BEST OF SINATRA”

J. COLE WITH SPECIAL GUEST YOUNG THUG

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DEBAUCHERY!

New Orleans’ live, ongoing soap opera continues as sisters Chanel and Cartier continue their outrageous adventures. Church of Yoga NOLA, 1480 N. Rocheblave St., 522-6545, SouthernRep.com

76 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

EVANESCENCE & LINDSAY STIRLING

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LIL WEEZYANA FEST 2018 PRESENTED BY Q93

This music festival is famous for surprise guests, which in the past have included Drake and Big Freedia. Champions Square, LaSalle Street, 587-3663, Champions-Square.com 25

TONY BENNETT WITH VERY SPECIAL GUEST ANTONIA BENNETT

The legendary, award-winning crooner Tony Bennett takes the stage with his daughter Antonia Bennett. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 27

JOURNEY & DEF LEPPARD

Take a trip back to the 1980s with two of the decade’s most popular rock bands, Journey and Def Leppard. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com


STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 77


PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Ace and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

78 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

PREMIER


PROPERTIES

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N OS TA LG I A

Pool Pleasures The history of the Whitney Young Pool By Seale Paterson

80 ST. CHARLES AVENUE AUGUST 2018

For the next 35 years, the pool was a popular place for social events. Swimming meets and free children’s swimming classes were offered every year, and elaborate exhibitions were held regularly. Olympic and comedic trick divers, water ballet, synchronized swimming and water pageants featuring storylines with music, fishermen, sea serpents and seals entertained the great crowds that flocked to the pool all summer. A sand beach was added in 1939. The pool closed in 1962 to avoid complying with desegregation laws. The suggestion to turn it into a bowling alley was dismissed, and after a great effort by local business and civic leaders the pool was leased to the city and reopened in 1969 with a grand party featuring tons of live music, including Preservation Hall

and the Olympia Brass Band. The pool was renamed the Whitney Young Pool in 1974, in memory of the late Civil Rights leader. The giant pool was closed in 1992 due to deteriorating conditions and cost of operation. After many years of debate, a new, smaller pool took its place and was opened in 1998. n

Many swimming seasons opened with grand pageantry: King Neptune and mermaids rode in on elaborate water floats and left under a display of fireworks; a history of swimming from the Stone Age to modern times was presented; and in 1951, a swimsuit fashion show featured ladies in Hawaiian-themed swimwear being promenaded around the edge of the pool by a ukulele player. Apparently the ladies of 1933, who were horrified by the pool’s “shorts ruling” allowing men to go shirtless, had decided the view wasn’t so bad after all.

IMAGE PROVIDED BY: THE CHARLES L. FRANCK STUDIO COLLEC TION AT THE HISTORIC NE W ORLE AN S COLLECTION. ACC NO. 1979.325.4424

After City Park opened a swimming pool in 1924, Audubon Park decided to build one, too. Funds mostly came from private and corporate donations and an “advertisers fair” held at the park, which featured a children’s bathing beauty contest, a water carnival with gondolas and a treasure hunt through the park for adults. Donated prizes included a trip to Cuba, a new car and an empty lot in Lakeview. The Audubon Park Natatorium opened in 1928. The double connected pools were 250-feet long and together were 150-feet across, making it the largest pool in the South and the second largest in the country. Designed to resemble a Vieux Carré courtyard, the pool had dressing rooms and bathhouses enclosing three sides, and a large fountain in the middle of the pool. Multiple diving boards and slides ran along the sides.


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

St. Charles Avenue August 2018  

St. Charles Avenue August 2018