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MEET OUR SALES TE AM

Lisa Picone Love Sales Manager 830-7248 Lisa@myneworleans.com

Samantha Shiff Account Executive 830-7226 Samantha@myneworleanscom

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 1


CO N T E N T S

Features

On the Cover

Photographed by Jeffery Johnston

Whether you’re looking for the perfect look for a holiay party or a hot date, find your perfect fit, starting on pg. 56.

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Elegant Opulence St. Charles Avenue’s “Wine, Dine & Design” 2018 tablescapes Preview Party and Luncheon presented by Royal Honda benefited Bastion BY MORGAN PACKARD GRIFFITH | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF STROUT

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Night Moves Step out of the shadows and into the light in head-turning after-five fashions BY TRACE DUNDAS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY THERESA CASSAGNE

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Celebrating the Season Decadent local restaurant specials BY KELCY WILBURN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM HANNA

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Chairs Semmes and Catherine Favrot and Caroline and Murray Calhoun for the Louisiana Museum Foundation’s inaugural “Founders Ball.” The Louisiana Museum Foundation’s inaugural “Founders Ball” will be held Saturday, December 1, 7-10 p.m. at the Cabildo. The event will open an exhibition in the Cabildo on the legacy of Don Andres Almonester and his daughter, Micaela Almonester, Baroness de Pontalba, and will be a lavish costume ball reminiscent of the parties that she hosted in the 19th century at her Paris mansion, which is now the residence of the American Ambassador. Don Almonester was a high ranking Spanish official during the Spanish Colonial period in New Orleans history, and a major philanthropist who generously donated to repair the Cathedral, Cabildo and Presbytere after the 1788 fire. Micaela was responsible for building the Pontalba apartment buildings and transforming a military parade ground into the beautiful Jackson Square that we know today. Baroness de Pontalba’s descendants Charles-Edouard and Isabelle, Baron and Baroness de Pontalba from the family’s ancestral chateau of Mont-l’Évêque, France and other family members will be in attendance. The Louisiana State Museum, founded in 1906, is a collection of historic buildings that house half a million artifacts that showcase Louisiana history and culture. This gala is the LSM’s closing tricentennial exhibition and celebration. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 558-0493.


CO N T E N T S

In Every Issue

20 8 & 10 EDITORS’ NOTES

12 MAKING A DIFFERENCE

American Heart Association: Help for healthier hearts

14 KIDS PLAY

Avery Island: The Tabasco Museum, Jungle Gardens and more

16 WHAT’S HOT

Holiday Fashion Accessories

18 ON THE MENU

Luxurious Layering: Chef Guy Sockrider shares Briquette’s Crabcake Napoleon

20 THE DISH

Virtuous Indulgences: Heading into autumn with new habits

68 ENTERTAINING WITH BEV

Varied Vignettes: Fall in Pass Christian

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22

PHILANTHROPIC FUN

74 70 WITH THIS RING

Branton – Weidenhaft Thanks for the Memories LCM says goodbye to Julia Street with its 20th “CHAIRish the Children.” 22 Save Your Theatrics Le Petit Théâtre’s largest annual benefit supports productions and educational programming. 24 Outstanding Citizens Fifteen exemplary members of the community were honored at the YLC’s annual gala. 26 Cuisine for a Cure Komen New Orleans’ “Summer Cure Chefs Wine Dinner” delighted guests. 28 Teaching Through the Arts TCSF hosted a benefit to help New Orleans children lead creative and meaningful lives. 30

Beauty Through Struggle “You Night’s” warriorthemed fashion show showcased the strength of survivors. 32

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Lighting the Way A historic home on St. Charles Avenue set the scene for “Light Up the Night.” 34

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A Jazzy Luncheon Cancer Crusaders hosted 630 guests for its 18th annual luncheon. 36

SHOP TALK

Charming With Champagne THNOC’s 2018 Antiques Forum weekend hosted a champagne celebration. 38

SHOP TALK

Sensory Dining “A Blind Taste” celebrated its fifth and most successful year to date. 40

88

YOUNG BLOODS

Katy Casbarian: Co-Owner & Operator, Arnaud’s & Arnaud’s Teddy Bear Drive STUDENT ACTIVIST

Brooke Scardino: Archbishop Chapelle High School

74 Mary-Jo Webster: CEO, Aunt Sally’s Pralines

75 Alicia & Scott Reynaud: Owners, Spafoo

76 SNAPSHOTS 80 ONSTAGE CALENDAR NOSTALGIA

Bali Ha’i: Partying in a Polynesian paradise


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NOVEMBER 2018 VOL. 23 ISSUE 6 Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR Bev Church EDITOR Morgan Packard Griffith ART DIRECTOR Ali Sullivan CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mirella Cameran SOCIETY COLUMNIST Catherine Freeman FOOD & DINING COLUMNIST Jyl Benson WEB EDITOR Kelly Massicot EVENT PHOTO COORDINATOR Jeff Strout

Advertising VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan

(504) 830-7241, Colleen@MyNewOrleans.com SALES MANAGER Lisa Picone Love (504) 830-7248, Lisa@MyNewOrleans.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Samantha Shiff (504) 830-7226, Samantha@MyNewOrleans.com

Marketing DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS

Cheryl Lemoine EVENT COORDINATOR Abbie Dugruise DIGITAL MEDIA ASSOCIATE Mallary Matherne

For event information call (504) 830-7264

Production PRODUCTION DESIGNER Emily Andras,

Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney TRAFFIC COORDINATOR Lane Brocato

Administration CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Todd Matherne PRESIDENT Alan Campell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Errol Laborde VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan OFFICE MANAGER Mallary Matherne DISTRIBUTION MANAGER John Holzer SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER Brittanie Bryant

For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

A Publication of Renaissance Publishing, LLC 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, © 2018 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. St. Charles Avenue is not responsible for photos or artwork and assumes that all releases have been cleared upon submission to the magazine. St. Charles Avenue is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, La. 70005, (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $17.95, two year $31, three year $43 — foreign rates vary call for pricing. It is the policy of this magazine to employ people on the basis of their qualifications and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap.


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B E V ' S N OT E

We are honored to have chairmen Murray and Caroline Calhoun and Semmes and Catherine Favrot on our cover representing the Louisiana Museum Foundation’s inaugural “Founders Ball!” The ball will be held at the Cabildo on Saturday. December 1, and they promise a lavish costume ball that you don’t want to miss! They are honoring the legacy of Don Andres Almonester and his daughter Micaela, and many of their descendants will be attending the ball. Micaela was responsible for building the Pontalba apartments and for transforming Jackson Square from a military parade ground into what it is today! The gala will be held 7 to 10 p.m. and will be $300 per person. Please call 558-0493 for ticket information. This will be the closing exhibition for the Tricentennial events for the Louisiana Museum Foundation!  Be sure to check out What’s Hot for Fall Fashion Accessories for that perfect touch to take your outfit to the next level. And if you’re looking for a whole new outfit, look no further than our feature on Holiday Fashion. Then take your new head-to-toe look out for a spin by enjoying our fantastic local cuisine; our feature on Holiday Restaurant Specials will give you an overview of wonderful deals throughout the city. “Wine, Dine & Design” presented by Royal Honda and Renaissance Publishing was a huge hit again. We are thrilled that we could give $117,000 to Bastion and our wounded warriors! Thanks to all of our sponsors and designers who made it the best “Wine, Dine & Design” ever! Thanks to chairmen Betsy and Eric Laborde and Sheldon and Michael Schmidt, and especially to artist James Michaelopoulos! We all love George Dunbar, and you’ll be able to see his celebrated exhibition, “Alluvion,” at Callan Contemporary from November 3-December 31. Dunbar, a celebrated abstract painter and sculptor, is returning to Callan Contemporary for the fifth time with all new work. He balances perfectionist technique with an appreciation for the inspired and random – turning the elements of earth-clay, pigment, metal and the human hand that shapes them into objects of unparalleled sophistication, complexity and beauty. The opening reception is 6-9 p.m. on Nov. 3 The “2018 Walk to End Alzheimer’s” is November 10 at the Baby Cakes Field, 6000 Airline Drive. We all know someone who has been touched by this terrible disease, and we have to find a cure! This is your way of making a difference. Become a team member for your family, corporate or national team and get your friends involved! Registration starts at 8 a.m., program at 9 a.m. and the walk at 9:30 a.m.. The walk is only 2 miles long, and you can google the “2018 Walk to End Alzheimer’s “or call 613-6505. Get out and enjoy the fantastic fall weather while it lasts!

Beverly Reese Church 8 ST. CHARLES AVENUE NOVEMBER 2018

The English Speaking Union is 100 years old, and Michael Harold and Quinn Peeper want you to celebrate with them at their Gala Centennial Celebration “Rach & Bach” at the Orpheum Theatre. The concert will be November

17 and will feature opera soloists Irini Hymel and Christina Comer, as well as concert pianists Michael Harold and Dr. Quinn Peeper! Visit RachAndBach.com to get tickets and more information.


M O R G A N ' S N OT E

November Happy (what I hope is) fall weather! My husband and I are celebrating by using our new backyard kitchen, which the entire neighborhood has seen throughout its permutations over the past eight months. (And a quick thank you to everyone who has worked or is still working on putting the final touches on it, and to our neighbors’ patience!) My son and I get to swing while watching my husband grill or fire a pizza, and I’m hoping the novelty of this adventure never wears off. And while I’m thanking people, I would like to thank all of those who attended Avenue’s “Wine, Dine & Design” tablescapes events! My personal thanks to James Michalopoulos, Dylan Tête, Lauren Bowman, Stephen Sonnier and Jacquee Carvin; to our Chairs; to the Table Designers; to Audubon Tea Room; and especially to Cheryl Lemoine, Abbie Douglas, Samantha Shiff, Lisa Love and all at Renaissance Publishing who helped us help Bastion and our returning warriors and their families. And to Bev Church, without whom this event would never have begun and without who’s passion it wouldn’t thrive. This issue is chock-full of holiday fashion examples and ideas on where to go in town while looking so fabulous. But if you’re looking for a weekend trip away, might I suggest – as my “what’s making me happy this month” – the Hangout Oyster Cook-Off and Craft Beer Festival in Gulf Shores Alabama. I have attended the festival, and was even asked to judge once, and I can personally attest to its fun and tastiness! This year the Craft Beer Festival will be on Friday, November 2, 6-11 p.m., with the Hangout Oyster Cook-Off following on Saturday, November 3, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.You can learn tricks of the trade from renowned chefs and enjoy live music, dozens of craft beers, the beloved bivalve in innumerous combinations and more at the Chef Presentation Stage, the North American Oyster Showcase, in football viewing lounges, at Bloody Mary Bars and much more. Cook-Off tickets are $10. Children 12 and under are free (Craft Beer Festival is 21 and up). Tasting ticket booklets for sampling oysters are available for $30 in advance. And VIP experience tickets are $150. Learn more at HangoutCookoff.com. If you’re so inclined, now is the time to make and freeze your pie dough for the holidays! Enjoy your friends, family and friends who are family this month,

Morgan Packard Griffith

1 “2018 Annual Patron Party & Art Exhibition,” benefiting Poydras Home, 897-0535 1 “2018 Alexis de Tocqueville Awards Gala,” benefiting United Way of Southeast Louisiana, UnitedWaySELA.org 1 “A Night with Leah Chase,” benefiting Kingsley House, 523-6221 extension 196, KingsleyHouse.org 2 “New Orleans Then and Now,” benefiting French Quarter Citizens, 588-2929 2 “Magnolia Moonlight Gala,” benefiting Magnolia Community Services, 731-1387 3 “Tour de Cure New Orleans 2018,” benefiting the American Diabetes Association, 889-0278 4 “Cheers to Boys Town,” benefiting Boys Town Louisiana, 293-7900 6 33rd annual “STAIR Affair,” benefiting Start the Adventure in Reading, 899-0820, 501auctions. com/StairAffair 7 “An Evening in the Garden of Eden,” benefiting Eden House, 407-0943 8 “Southern Dominican Gala,” benefiting Southern Dominican Province, 837-2129 extension 8 8 “Growing Partnerships with Latter Library,” benefiting Latter Library, LatterLibraryGC.com/Events

9 “Boudin, Bourbon & Beer,” benefiting The Emeril Lagasse Foundation, BoudinBourbonandBeer.com 9 “Victory Ball,” benefiting The National WWII Museum, 528-1944 extension 363, Victory-Ball.org 9 “All Saints Soirée,” benefiting Save Our Cemeteries, 525-3377 9 “Moonlight and Miracles,” benefiting Ochsner Health System, 842-7113 10 “Carnivale du Vin,” benefiting The Emeril Lagasse Foundation, CarnivaleDuVin.com 10 “Touro Infirmary Foundation Gala,” benefiting Touro Infirmary Foundation, 897-8435 10 “Odyssey 2018: All That Glitters in partnership with IBERIABANK,” benefiting New Orleans Museum of Art, 658-4106 11 17th annual “New Orleans Kidney Walk,” benefiting The National Kidney Foundation of Louisiana, 861-4500, KidneyWalk.org 13 “Exclusive Evening at Saba,” benefiting New Orleans Women & Children’s Shelter, NOWCS.org/Dining 14 “SOUPer Bowl,” benefiting the Salvation Army, 509-7790 15 “Historic Houses Society Gala 2018,” benefiting the Hermann-Grima + Gallier, Historic Houses, HGGH.org

16 Ninth annual “Dancing for the Arts,” benefiting Young Audiences of Louisiana, 523-3525 16 32nd annual “Celebration in the Oaks Preview Party,” benefiting New Orleans City Park, 483-9417 16 “Harvesting Hope: A Fundraiser for Freedom,” benefiting Innocence Project New Orleans, 943-1902 17 Seventh annual “Touch a Truck,” benefiting Junior League of New Orleans, 891-5845 17 “LSUHSC School of Nursing 85th Anniversary Gala Celebration,” benefiting LSU School of Nursing, 568-4106 17 “Fête des Fromages,” benefiting The FrenchAmerican Chamber of Commerce, Gulf Coast, FeteDesFromages.com 23-30 “Audubon Zoo Lights Presented by Children’s Hospital,” benefiting Audubon Nature Institute (select nights only, please check website for details), AudubonNatureInstitute. org/Zoo-Lights 29 “Salvations Gala + Auction,” benefiting the Green Project, SalvationsDesigns.com 29 “‘BIG’ Opening Reception,” benefiting the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 539-9631 30 “Son of a Saint Gala,” benefiting Son of a Saint, 561-7508


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MAKING A DIFFERENCE

American Heart Association Help for healthier hearts By Catherine Freeman

We have a family joke that Saints football gives us weekly heart attacks. Thankfully this isn’t true, but I’m certain our hearts are working harder when jumping up and down after a successful Lutz field goal or high-fiving anyone in arm’s reach after a Kamara touchdown run. Yet in New Orleans, heart disease is clearly more serious than a football game; it’s the leading cause of death locally. The additional sobering news is that our lifestyle is a major contributor: 24.7 percent of adults in New Orleans don’t exercise; 69.5 percent (BMI over 25) are overweight; 20.7 percent smoke cigarettes; and 80.6 percent don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables. Though those statistics may seem jarring, there’s always room for improvement. We are fortunate though that the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) has 155 local offices, including one right here in New Orleans. Through scientific research funding and public health education regarding the positive impact of healthy lifestyle choices, the AHA strives daily to save lives and build healthier communities throughout Greater New Orleans. “The American Heart Association plays an important role in our community by shining a light on prevention. In our role with the American Heart Association, we’ve had a chance to share our heart stories to empower New Orleanians to take ownership of their own risk factors and heart health” say heart disease-surviving

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sisters Amanda and Kelli Tinney. We can all follow the Tinneys’ lead and lower our risk of cardiovascular diseases by following the “AHA’s Life’s Simple 7:” manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking. Adhering to these guidelines doesn’t mean becoming heart healthy can’t be fun! On Saturday, November 17, show your commitment to improving the health of our community by participating in the 1.8 mile “2018 New Orleans Heart Walk at Lasalle Park” in Metairie. Invite your family and friends to make a day out of inspiring others to take that first step towards improving cardiovascular health. In addition to getting outside we need to prioritize healthy eating, especially in a region such as ours, where decadent food choices and varying levels of access to healthy food are common. The AHA’s Healthy Food Choice Collaborative, in partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank, is an ongoing project providing nutrition education and breaking down social determinants of health. Educational materials and recipes create better visibility of healthy meals and make it easier to recognize affordable, hearthealthy options. Personally, I can’t wait to

try the guacamole deviled eggs recipe at my next Saints game-day party! In addition to the $7.4 million awarded to New Orleans-area researchers in the quest to understand, improve and treat cardiovascular disease, the AHA also spearheads programs such as CPR trainings, blood pressure education and local policy initiatives. Like the AHA itself, we can all be the catalyst for a healthy change in New Orleans. n

A little more … Heart attack warning signs: • Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back. • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort. • Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness. Call 9-1-1 if you see or have any of these symptoms. To learn more about the American Heart Association, sign up for the 2018 Heart Walk, or to get involved visit Heart.org or call (800) AHA-USA1.


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K I DS P L AY

Avery Island The Tabasco Museum, Jungle Gardens and more By Brittany Kennedy

There are times when it seems like temperatures are never going to come down in New Orleans. Then, in an instant, “fall” arrives and we enjoy such a brief, and wonderful, moment when it isn’t too hot – and not too cold – that we almost forget about the various school breaks, professional days and holidays that leave us scrambling to figure out what to do with our kids. Just as things start to cool off, however, a quick trip to the Tabasco Museum just 45 minutes south of Lafayette lets us heat things up a bit before our humid winter brings cold back to the big easy. While you will be hard pressed to find a New Orleanian that doesn’t have strong opinions about Tabasco and its use, the amount of us (self included) that have visited its birthplace is perhaps not so plentiful. Avery Island houses both the factory and museum dedicated to the production and history of the famous hot sauce and the McIlhenny family that has run it for generations. The 10-stop, self-guided Tabasco tour takes you through a small museum dedicated to the origins of the hot sauce recipe through the greenhouses that hold the peppers leading to the storage barns where the sauce is aged in white oak for three years before it heads to bottling on the assembly line. Along the way, interactive displays and clear instructions make it easy for school age children to read and follow along while the open spaces and constant flow of the exhibits keep smaller children from losing interest. Meanwhile, the “mining” exhibit that explains how the “island” is actually a huge salt dome surround

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Great Egret in flight and carrying stick to its nest in ‘’Bird City’’ rookery on Avery Island near New Iberia, Louisiana

by swamp is a special treat for kids interested machinery and excavation. The entire Tabasco tour last about an hour and a half, meaning you could make this part of a visit to other places in the area or make a full day at the island, taking a break for lunch in the restaurant or picnicking at a nearby table (they do ask you to be mindful of trash pick-up since there are signs warning you to be careful of bears). You do, of course, get samples and your own souvenir bottle to take home, but the gift shop has plenty of Tabasco products like chocolate, which was surprisingly good. Meanwhile, their extra-aged Family Reserve sauce that you can only purchase on the island is also worth a try. While many would be content to end their day on a spicy note, the island’s other role as a bird sanctuary is the origin of its other attraction. The Jungle Gardens are not only a beautiful refuge on a sunny day, they also hearken back to a dark time in the 19th century when the snowy egret was on the verge of extinction because the feathers of the young, white birds were so valued for women’s hats. Ned McIlhenny not only founded a private bird sanctuary on the island to protect the birds, he also created his Jungle Gardens by filling what is now 170 acres with exotic plants as a means of

continuing his love of conservation. The gardens today still have one of the oldest bamboo groves in the country as well as countless bird species, which you can see best on special bird watching tours as well as other events throughout the year. When facing a rogue school day off this year, Avery Island is an easy day trip that is not just a visit to all things hot and spicy but instead is multi-faceted experience that gives kids a taste of how one small island provides a whole lot more than that red stuff mom is always putting in her gumbo (or, as the commercial says, in just about anything else). n

Just the Facts ... Avery Island: Highway 329, Avery Island Tobasco Factory and Tour Museum: Hours of Operation: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Price: $5.50 Children under 4: Free Phone: (337) 373-6139 Tickets can be purchased online: Tabasco. com/visit-avery-island/factory-tour-museum Jungle Gardens: Hours of Operation: 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Price: $8 for adults ($12.50 with Tabasco tour included) $5 for children ($9.50 with Tabasco tour included) Tickets can be purchased online: JungleGardens.org


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W H AT ' S H OT

Holiday Fashion Accessories By Amy Gabriel

Your four favorite letters are RSVP. As you begin to make holiday plans to attend a string of buzzy parties and family gatherings, prepare to dress the part in accessories that have a little extra pizazz.

� �

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W H AT ' S H OT

1. Stroll the streets of the French Quarter in a faux fur pom embellished hat. Anthropologie, 333 Canal St., 592-9972, Anthropologie.com

2. Take in the sights of the season through a pair of gorgeously sculpted DITA Nightbird-One sunglasses with wing-shaped ombre lenses. The Optical Shoppe, 800 Metairie Road, 3011726, OpticalShoppeBR.com

3. An heirloom cable scarf made of 100 percent superfine wool is the epitome of cool weather chic. Also available in rust. Billy Reid, 3927 Magazine St., 208-1200, BillyReid.com

4. His formal look will be the talk of the town when spruced up with a Guinea Brackish bow tie made from actual feathers. Rubensteins, 102 St. Charles Ave., 581-6666, RubensteinsNewOrleans.com 5. Your feet will be feeling festive in a pair of Lea suede sparkle boots. $189. Relish, 600 Metairie Road, 309-3336, RelishNewOrleans.com 6. Liven up your earlobes with a pair of 14 karat gold plated sunburst studs filled with dazzling blue druzy. Wildflower NOLA, 2700 Metairie Road, 218-8996 7. A metallic envelope clutch from Rebecca Minkoff is the sleekest way to carry your on-the-town essentials. FeBe, 474 Metairie Road, 835-5250 8. Truly gawk-worthy, the crackled metallic leather bag with ostrich feather trim will be a swinging good time. Pilot and Powell, 3901 Magazine St., 827-1727, PilotAndPowell.com 9. Dazzle with every step you take in a pair of Lindsay sandals in nude suede champagne by Jeffrey Campbell. Hemline, 609 Chartres St., 592-0242; 3310 Magazine St., 702-8009, ShopHemline.com

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ON THE MENU

Luxurious Layering Chef Guy Sockrider shares Briquette’s Crabcake Napoleon

Crab Dressing 1 gallon trinity (green bell pepper, onion and celery, chopped) 1 Tablespoon crab base 1/4 cup lemon juice  1/4 cup lime juice  1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce Salt and pepper to taste 1 quart breadcrumbs  1 pound of claw crabmeat SAUTÉ trinity until translucent, then add the crab base, then deglaze with lemon juice, lime juice and Worcestershire sauce. ADD crabmeat, then tighten up with breadcrumbs.

Imperial 1 quart heavy cream 1 pound crabmeat  1/4 cup pimentos 1/4 cup mushrooms, diced 1 Tablespoon garlic, minced 1/4 cup salted butter  1/2 cup breadcrumbs  1/3 cup parmesan cheese  1/4 cup green onions REDUCE heavy cream by half. Add salted butter, pimentos, mushrooms and garlic. ADD crabmeat, then tighten up with breadcrumbs, parmesan cheese and green onions.

Serves 4 to 6 BRIQUETTE 701 S. Peters St., 302-7496, Briquette-Nola.com

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PHOTOS BY JE FFERY J OHNSTON

TO PLATE Layer the ingredients in a cake ring the following order: Crab Dressing, Imperial, lump crabmeat, Imperial, Crab Dressing. Bake for 15 minutes at 350 degrees. After baking, slide out of the ring and onto a serving plate. Garnish with lemon butter and corn relish.


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THE DISH

Virtuous Indulgences Heading into autumn with new habits By Jyl Benson

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Fried shrimp soup dumplings with blueberry aioli and buckwheat noodles with poached chicken

PHOTO BY MIK E LIR E T TE

With the first breath of fall I used to flee from the salads and chilled proteins I had been sustaining myself on since just after Mardi Gras. I would run to the rich gumbos, smoked and slow cooked meats and heavier sauces I’ve always enjoyed in the cooler months. Last autumn I changed my ways and started subbing in vegetable-forward and light protein dishes that are hearty enough to register a change of season while still being virtuous enough to keep my health in check. With Luvi three blocks from my Uptown home this will be crazy-easy. Luvi is my favorite new restaurant of 2018. It has become My Extreme Happy Place and it’s impossible for me to feel anything but joyous and energized in this space. Based on the number of people crowding the porch at the front of the restaurant, I have plenty of company. I like to share my favorite places with others and there’s no one I would rather share an experience with more than my daughter, Cecilia. Cecilia fell in love with Luvi right away. We had a grand time sharing a tasting menu ($45-$60), which changes based on what’s fresh and what inspires chef Hao Gong at any given moment.


Our evening began with craft cocktails from David Goldberg, the man behind the bar. His style keeps evolving in delightful new ways to match what Gong sends out from the kitchen. Gong’s exotic, playful Asian hybrid cuisine draws on elements of his Shanghai upbringing, stints at restaurants around the United States and his decade-long career as the head sushi chef at Sake Cafe. Every dish is beautifully plated, a feast for the eyes with bright pops of color and contrasting textures. The first dish out was a trio of shrimp soup dumplings that had been coated in a shaggy, vaguely sweet, complex batter and served with blueberry aioli. I thought Cecilia was going to fall to the floor when she took her first bite; she’s her mother’s daughter. The next dish out was a cool dish of silken buckwheat noodles dressed lightly in a spicy sesame sauce topped with shreds of poached chicken, flecks of chilies and flash fried scallions. A dish of shell-on butterflied shrimp arrived in a piping hot oval metal dish. The large specimens were steamed atop a tangle of thin glass rice noodles, allowing the rich juices from the protein to flavor the noodles. A finishing touch of hot garlic oil transformed with shrimp shells into a pleasant crackly crunch and the noodles into a shimmering puddle of LUVI, 5236 Tchoupitoulas St., 605-3340, LuviRestaurant.com PHO TAU BAY, 1565 Tulane Ave., 368-9846, PhoTauBayRestaurant.com

Try This: Though we’re probably a few weeks off from the first hit of damp, bone chilling cold, when it hits I’ll head to Pho Tau Bay, a perennial go-to for steaming bowls of a variety of excellent pho, PTB wonton soup and hot cups of steaming tea.

gelatinous deliciousness. This dish was a complex study in umami. Wanting Cecilia to try some of my favorites, I ordered up Snow White from the raw bar: delicately arranged cubes of creamy whitefish ceviche arrived with fried garlic, paper thin slices of cucumber, bits of rice crispies and tiny flecks of tomato finished with the bright tang of yuzu sauce. We also shared another of my favorites, Mama’s Soup Dumplings. Here the chef does his mama proud with elegant origami-like pillows filled with pork, ginger and cabbage floating in a multifaceted soy broth that I could drink every single day. Dessert at Luvi isn’t the lame fried banana found in most Asian restaurants. We shared small tastings of three ice creams flavored with the faint perfume of Chinese magnolia, coconut milk with white sesame seeds and black sesame. Next came a creamy, silken coconut panna cotta topped with pearls of yuzu suspended in tapioca pearls and a carefully molded scoop of dragon fruit ice cream. n

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

Thanks for the Memories

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LCM says goodbye to Julia Street with its 20th “CHAIRish the Children.” By Shelby Simon

The Louisiana Children’s Museum opened its big blue doors for the 20th and last “CHAIRish the Children” on Julia Street, Saturday, August 25. More than 600 “Chairished” guests enjoyed a fun and festive evening of gourmet cuisine from more than 20 local restaurants, signature spirits, fabulous auction packages, one-of-a-kind chairs and sultry music by The Jenn Howard Band. Glittering moons and stars decorated the space in the museum’s colors of red, blue and yellow. Watercolor “bubbles,” created by artist Katie Rafferty from iconic museum photos, floated above partygoers’ heads. A Founders Memories wall with vintage photos, Founder quotes and a special video presentation graced the outside of LCM’s signature “Logo House” in the atrium. As a special part of this evening, LCM honored the Founding Board Members who helped start the Museum 32 years ago. The families of the Founding Board Members (The Founding Families Circle) were the presenting sponsors. Hunter Pierson and Allison Berger Tiller served as Founding Families Co-Chairs. “CHAIRish the Children” featured more than 250 auction packages with trips, art, jewelry, local attractions, restaurants and one-of-a-kind chairs. As a special part of the event, LCM also auctioned museum artwork, experiences and select exhibit items, including LCM’s iconic “Mr. Bones.” Partygoers who entered the $2,500 Lee Michael’s Fine Jewelry shopping spree raffle sipped their cocktails from colorful, blinking cups. The event would not have been possible without “CHAIRish the Children” Event Co-Chairs Kaylea and Hunter Hill and Sheldon and Michael Schmidt; Patron Party Chair Jessie Schott Haynes; Decorations Co-Chairs Emily Forrester and Aja Mipro; Auction Co-Chairs Cameron Adams, Emily Carrere, Dawn Fowler and Betsy T. Laborde; Restaurant Co-Chairs Katie and Eric Hoffman; and many generous sponsors, donors and guests. n

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Event at a Glance

1. LCM CEO Julia Bland with King and Anne Milling 2. Co-Chairs Michael and Sheldon Schmidt with Chad Berg 3. Co-Chairs Kaylea and Hunter Hill with Founding Families Co-Chair Allison Berger Tiller 4. Decorations Co-Chair Emily Forrester, Board Member Scott Zander and Patron Party Chair Jessie Schott Haynes 5. Auction Co-Chairs Cameron Adams, Emily Carrere, Betsy T. Laborde and Dawn Fowler 6. FounderMahlon Sanford, Linetta J. Gilbert, Jack Blitch and John Williams

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KENN Y MARTIN EZ

WHAT: 20th annual “CHAIRish the Children,” benefiting Louisiana Children’s Museum WHEN: Saturday, August 25 WHERE: Louisiana Children’s Museum


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Save Your Theatrics

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Le Petit Théâtre’s largest annual benefit supports productions and educational programming. By Shelby Simon

Le Petit paired entertaining theatrical performances with fine dining at its largest annual benefit, which hosted 250 patrons supporting the future of arts education. The evening began in Tableau restaurant, which was decorated in reds and pinks by Urban Earth Studios. After dinner, guests moved into the theatre for a performance celebrating the American musical. Food was generously provided by Tableau and included barbecue shrimp and grits, ratatouille, cheese, charcuterie, an oyster bar, freshly made beignets and pork and turkey carving stations. Highlighting the evening was a performance by Broadway and cabaret actress Christine Pedi, known as “the lady of 1,000 voices” for her many impersonations. Also on stage were a cast of Le Petit favorites, including Leslie Castay, Cameron-Mitchell Ware and Sean Patterson, performing a medley of beloved American musical songs. A silent auction saw vigorous bidding for an amethyst and gold bracelet donated by Friend & Company, antique Etruscan earrings donated by Keil’s Antiques and a painting donated by artist Matthew Peck. In the live auction, a private dinner by chef David Rouse of Herbsaint was a popular item, as were a day on the set of “NCIS: New Orleans” and tickets to The Band’s Visit in New York, the 2018 Tony Award winner for Best Musical. Auctioneer Mark Romig also sold walk-on roles for Le Petit’s upcoming production of A Christmas Carol and oversaw a paddle raise for support of Le Petit’s new education programming. Event chairs were Janet Daley Duval and Julie Livaudais George. Serving as Board Chairman is Barbara Motley with Maxwell Williams as Artistic Director and Don-Scott Cooper as Executive Director. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Board Chair Barbara Motley, Kathleen Van Horn and Event Co-Chairs Janet Daley Duval and Julie Livaudais George 2. Artistic Director Maxwell Williams and Dickie Brennan 3. Robert and Martha Gettys with Executive Director Don-Scott Cooper 4. Kay Favrot, Susan Gundlach and Mary Jane McAlister 5. Jack and Penny Bryant with Alexandra Stafford and Raymond Rathle 6. Sean and Cynthia Schwery

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PHO TOG RAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “Curtain Call Ball,” benefiting Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré WHEN: Friday, September 21 WHERE: Tableau


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Outstanding Citizens

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Fifteen exemplary members of the community were honored at the YLC’s annual gala. By Shelby Simon

The YLC honored 15 community members at a celebratory evening of live music, dinner and dancing. A Patron Party preceded the gala, which featured the awards presentation in addition to cuisine and cocktails from 12 local restaurants. A lively after party at the Ice Pit Lounge completed the festivities. 2018 YLC “Role Model Awards Gala” Committee Co-Chairs Kevin Ferguson and Caroline Hayes welcomed guests, followed by opening remarks from Master of Ceremonies Mark Romig and YLC Executive Director Stephanie Powell. YLC Board President Jack Wiles preceded Mark Romig’s presentation of the YLC Role Model Awards. 2018 Role Models are: Patrick L. Anderson (100 Black Men of Metro New Orleans), Dottie Belletto (NOCCI), Simone Crouere (Demo Diva), Steve Gleason (Team Gleason), Scott Hutcheson (Formerly City of New Orleans), Yvette M. Jones (The Jones Group of New Orleans), Leroy H. Prout Jr. (HRI Properties), Christopher Reade (LookFar), Shelby Russ (AOS Interior Environments), Matt Schwartz (Domain Companies), Stephen Stumpf (Durr Heavy Construction, LLC), Suzanne C. Thomas (Hancock Whitney Bank), Erica J. Washington, MPH (Louisiana Department of Health), Edward Womac Jr. (The Womac Law Firm) and Paris Woods, EdM (College Beyond). Alex Harvie composed a live painting of the event that was raffled to provide 100 percent of proceeds in support of YLC’s leadership development programs and community service projects. Musical entertainment for the evening included Clarence Johnson III on saxophone at the Patron Party, followed by Deacon John Moore and the Ivories performing at the gala. The after party hosted DJ Fayard Lindsey. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Honoree Patrick Anderson, YLC President Elect Aimee McCarron and Gala Co-Chair Kevin Ferguson 2. YLC Executive Director Stephanie Powell, Board President Jack Wiles and Gala Co-Chair Caroline Hayes 3. Jeff Crouere, Role Model Simone Crouere and Paulette and Frank Stewart 4. Margaux Krane, David Briggs, David T. Baker and Master of Ceremonies Mark Romig 5. Role Model Suzanne Thomas, Charlie Fenton and Role Model Erica J. Washington, MPH 6. Steve and Cynthia Rome, Susan Russ and Role Model Shelby Russ

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PHO TOG RAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “Role Model Awards Gala,” benefiting Young Leadership Council WHEN: Wednesday, August 8 WHERE: The Orpheum Theater


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Cuisine for a Cure

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Komen New Orleans’ “Summer Cure Chefs Wine Dinner” delighted guests. By Shelby Simon

The sold-out “Summer Cure Chefs Wine Dinner,” hosted by the Windsor Court Hotel, invited guests to enjoy a magnif icent f ive-course meal and wine pairings prepared by a lineup of local chefs in support of the organization’s ambitious mission to reduce the number of breast cancer deaths by 50 percent by 2026. Featured chefs included chef Joaquin Rodas and chef Jennifer Cole of Bacchanal Wine and Spirits; chef Nina Compton of Compère Lapin and Bywater American Bistro; chef Isaac Toups of Toups Meatery and Toups South; Executive Chef Vlad Ahmadyarov of The Grill Room at the Windsor Court Hotel; and chef Kelly Fields of Willa Jean. Pat Denechaud, Holley Haag, Kristi Post, Dottie Reese and Jordan Teich served as Event Chairs, and Mark Romig was Emcee. Joe Briand served as Event Coordinator with Committee Members Regan Forrester, Tracie Garner, SGK Board President Jennifer Neil and Elizabeth Williams. The highlight of the evening was the live auction of the featured chefs by auctioneers Greg Reggio and Jeff Crouere. Chef Isaac Toups doubled his live auction dinners for a $10,000 donation to Komen New Orleans. There was also a silent auction, which included wine lots, local art and dinner packages. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Lisa Plunkett, chef Vlad Ahmadyarov and Co-Chair Pat Denechaud 2. Co-Chair Dottie Reese, Lawrence and Micki Chehardy and Committee Member Elizabeth Williams 3. Co-Chair Holley Haag, Jason Williams and SGK Board President Jennifer Neil 4. David Briggs, Committee Member Tracie Garner and Master of Ceremonies Mark Romig 5. Hon. Paula Brown, chef Kelly Fields, chef Isaac Toups and Co-Chair Jordan Teich 6. Jessica and Ray Brandt

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “Summer Cure Chefs Wine Dinner,” benefiting Susan G. Komen New Orleans WHEN: Friday, August 10 WHERE: Windsor Court Hotel


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Teaching Through the Arts

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TCSF hosted a benefit to help New Orleans children lead creative and meaningful lives. By Shelby Simon

The historic home of Anne Montgomery provided the backdrop for “Miss & Sip,” The Crown and Shield Foundation’s benefit to support the organization’s day programs for children, which utilize the arts and media production as an influential tool. Each program provides an educational theme, a moral component and an art form. Following Anne Montgomery’s welcome, Anne Redd, another host of the evening, spoke about TCSF and why she was compelled to create the event. Event Chair Emilie Montgomery shared why she’s excited to be working on one of the foundation’s projects and made note of the TCSF event “NOLAlympics” this December at Carollton Boosters. Whitney Jordan was recognized as both Founder of TCSF and the evening’s Honoree. She spoke about the motivation of the foundation, its vision and big goals to help the children of New Orleans lead creative and meaningful lives. The event was catered by Stephen Gamble of the New Orleans Lawn Tennis Club. There were salmon dill canapés, crab cakes, and stuffed mushrooms. Libations were provided by The Wine Cellar. Classic oldies played all night; songs like “Proud Mary,” “Locomotion,” and Fats Domino’s “Ain’t That A Shame” filled the air. The auction offered multiple resort packages and trips to St. Lucia, Palm Island and Antigua. Another package called “Music to My Ears” included two hours in a recording studio and a Big Sam’s Funky Nation CD. Basics Underneath donated a private shopping party, including champagne and hors d’oeuvres, fit for a girl’s night out. n

WHAT: “Miss & Sip,” benefiting The Crown and Shield Foundation WHEN: Thursday, September 13 WHERE: Home of Anne Montgomery 1. Susan Brennan and Hostess Anne Montgomery 2. Emilie Montgomery, Founder & Honoree Whitney Jordan, Katie Hardin and Arie Kaller 3. Co-Host Anne Redd and Board Member Eric Strachan

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Event at a Glance

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Beauty Through Struggle

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“You Night’s” warrior-themed fashion show showcased the strength of survivors. By Shelby Simon

“You Night New Orleans 2018” hosted a “FIERCE BEAUTY REVOLUTION” for a sold-out audience of 600 guests, comprised of friends, family members, health care providers and program sponsors, all of whom attended to cheer on 18 cancer survivors who walked the runway as a celebration of life. You Night Founder Lisa McKenzie and Pastor Maize Warren opened the program with a greeting and blessing. Fran Lawless from Mayor LaToya Cantrell’s office welcomed the guests.The fashion show featured 40 “You Night” alumnae dressed as Warriors who walked out on the runway to a choreographed song, “Salute,” accompanied by live drummers.The Center for Restorative Breast Surgery, the Title Sponsor for the fourth year in a row, welcomed the guests and re-enforced the program’s message and mission: women need a support system after a cancer diagnosis, and You Night accomplishes this in a fun, meaningful and powerful way. The runway show featured three clothing collections and a variety of thematic elements to showcase the theme and the beauty of the participants. See-Hear Productions provided the stage and lighting, featuring “You Night’s” signature 92-foot-long stage. Featured boutiques included: Town & Country Bridal, Blink, Chico’s, Maiya Boutiques and – as the grand finale – Jean Therapy. Hair and makeup styling was gifted to each participant by H20 Salon and Spa in Metairie. The 18 cancer survivor role models who were celebrated on stage include: Ann Martinez, Michelle Ripoll, Michelle Shove, Shemal McKnight, Patricia Laubenstein, Lori Upton, Kristin Gonzalez, Pamela Fields, Antoinette Bradstreet, Donna Thomas, Pat Quintini, Marty Looney, Lesley Rubenstein, Monica Campuzano, Mariann Teacher, Robin Smith, Louise Poche and Leslie Horn. Additionally, classmate Laurie Bercegeay was honored during the show. Laurie succumbed to cancer three weeks prior to the show. The event décor had a post-apocalyptic theme, combining elements with rough edges and glamorous touches. Mismatched metallic and floral elements evoked the theme of beauty despite the struggle. More than 20 area restaurants and beverage companies donated food and libations to the guests. Co-Chairs Kristyn Kemp and Ruth Avila, both graduates of the You Night New Orleans class of 2015, are now also directors of the big sister program. n

WHAT: “You Night New Orleans 2018,” benefiting You Night WHEN: Thursday, July 26 WHERE: Contemporary Arts Center 1. Cheryl McKey and Jerry Parker 2. Role Models Marie Campo and Rhonda Ebel 3. Sandy Hicks, Dr. Jimmy Ellis and Michael Holmes

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Event at a Glance

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Lighting the Way A historic home on St. Charles Avenue set the scene for “Light Up the Night.” By Shelby Simon

Held at the Grace-Montgomery Mansion on St. Charles Avenue, Lighthouse Louisiana welcomed patrons to the foundation’s annual “Light Up the Night,” which benefits programs to empower persons with disabilities through services, employment and advocacy. Approximately 422 partygoers attended. The Patron Party began inside the historic home, which has been in the same family for more than a century and is a celebrated toasting point along the Rex parade route. Patrons were welcomed by residents Anne Kock Montgomery, her daughter Anne and son-in-law Billy Grace. The main event followed in the garden, decorated with yellow and black linens and party lights. Guests were treated to lighted trinkets and balloons to help “light up the night” while enjoying dancing and cocktails. Crescent City DJ Harold Spinner provided musical entertainment. Nine local restaurants and caterers provided cuisine and treats, including Plum Street Snoballs topped with liqueurs. Sean Kelly, the “Voice of the Pelicans” served as Emcee. A live auction featured prizes including a private dinner for 12 by star chef Justin Devillier of La Petite Grocery and Balise, diamond hoop earrings donated by Friend and Company Fine Jewelers, a custom blazer donated by Luca Falcone Custom Clothiers and an original oil on paper piece created by Kevin Gillentine. Event Chairs were Ransdell and William Prieur and Holt and Gordon Kolb Jr. n

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WHAT: “Light Up the Night,” benefiting Lighthouse Louisiana WHEN: Friday, September 14 WHERE: Grace-Montgomery Mansion 1. Co-Chairs Gordon and Holt Kolb Jr. and Randsell and William Prieur 2. Jim Perrier, Michele Reynoir and Jim Ashbee 3. Julie Nosser, Gregory Manning and Ty and Rebecca Primo

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Event at a Glance


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A Jazzy Luncheon Cancer Crusaders hosted 630 guests for its 18th annual luncheon. By Shelby Simon

Cancer Crusaders hosted its 18th annual “Celebration of Life Luncheon” on September 14, and recognized a new class of honorees. Judy Hof, Charter Member of Cancer Crusaders, delivered the invocation. Richard Buchsbaum served as Emcee. The national anthem was performed by Lauren Mouney Gisclair. Guitarist Don Vappe from the Loyola School of Music performed during the reception. The Mande Milkshakers provided a dance performance. The 2018 Honorees included: Pat Besselman, Richard L. Granen, Angela Hill, Kate Elizabeth Launey, Kathy Kittok Piazza, Patsy Kennedy Quintini, Lucille Schonacher Ruffino, Karen Stall, Julie Stokes, Donna Thomas, Eve Vavrick and Roy Weiner M.D. For the luncheon, Fancy Faces Décor provided centerpieces of authentic jazz instruments and cylindrical vases with crystal strands and red rose flower spheres. The auction featured 191 items, including a highlight prize: a “Ride in a Pink Cadillac” at the “Steak Out Against Breast Cancer Night.” A Parade of Prizes, with 103 items, included the raffling of Southwest Airline tickets, Lee Michaels sapphire-and-diamond earrings and a mystery prize of a year of desserts from Maurice’s Bakery. Jim and Dawn Miller and Eric and Charleen Boos with Eric served as Luncheon Chairs. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Honorees Donna Thomas, Patsy Quintini, Kathy Piazza and Julie Stokes 2. Honorees Eve Vavrick, Rick Granen, Angela Hill and Roy Weiner M.D. 3. Honorees Lucille Schonacher Ruffino, Kate Elizabeth Launey, Pat Besselman and Karen Stall

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF STROUT

WHAT: 18th annual “Celebration of Life Luncheon,” benefiting Cancer Crusaders WHEN: Friday, September 14 WHERE: New Orleans Marriott Hotel


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Charming With Champagne THNOC’s 2018 Antiques Forum weekend hosted a champagne celebration. By Shelby Simon

The final activity on the Friday of the “New Orleans Antiques Forum, the champagne reception drew 125 guests to The Historic New Orleans Collection (THNOC)’s Royal Street complex to cap the first full day of sessions for the 2018 forum weekend. Themed “It Really Works! Utilitarian Objects, Beauty and Facility,” this year’s panel of speakers included: Lydia Blackmore, Sarah Duggan, John H. Lawrence, Priscilla Lawrence and Jack Pruitt of The Historic New Orleans Collection; Leslie Lambour Bouterie, independent researcher and former New Orleanian; Eugene D. Cizek, Tulane School of Architecture (emeritus); Linda Eaton, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library in Delaware; Philippe Halbert, Ph.D. candidate, Yale University; Ashley Hlebinsky, Cody Firearms Museum, Buffalo Bill Center of the West; Alexandra A. Kirtley, Philadelphia Museum of Art; Natalie Larson, textile historian and owner, Historic Textile Reproductions; and Tyler Rudd Putman, Museum of the American Revolution. Tom Savage, Director of Museum Affairs at Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library in Delaware, returned as the forum’s moderator, a role he has held since the inaugural event in 2008. The evening’s festivities began with a lavish spread in THNOC’s elegant Counting House portrait gallery. Performing traditional New Orleans jazz were Scott Kyser on keyboard and Robin Sherman on bass. Chez Nous provided Southern-style food with a picnic theme. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Poppy Tooker, Moderator Tom Savage and Speaker Leslie Lambour Bouterie 2. Matthew Thurlow, Speaker Priscilla Lawrence and Daniel Hammer 3. Chuck and Amy Lapeyre with Speaker Jack Pruitt

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WHAT: “2018 New Orleans Antiques Forum Champagne Reception,” benefiting The Historic New Orleans Collection WHEN: Friday, August 3 WHERE: 533 Royal St. (inside THNOC’s Royal Street complex)


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Sensory Dining “A Blind Taste” celebrated its fifth and most successful year to date. By Shelby Simon

La Petite Grocery welcomed 80 guests to a seated dinner and live auction for the fifth annual “A Blind Taste,” which benefits the WRBH Reading Radio for the Blind and Print Impaired. The FM reading radio station broadcasts over a 90-mile radius from New Orleans. The station’s programming includes a broad range of interests ranging from news, magazines, literature, fiction, non-fiction and interviews with writers, authors, poets, chefs, musicians and people working in service for the blind and other local populations in need. Co-Chairs were Angela Hill and Charles Smith. Charlotte Travieso, a WRBH volunteer reader and longtime supporter, was the guest speaker. The dinner and auction were held in La Petite Grocery’s dining room, arranged by proprietor Mia Freiberger-Devilier. The five-course meal was prepared by chef Justin Devilier. The Greg Smith string duo performed during the Patron Party, which included passed hors d’oeuvres such as blue crab beignets, chanterelle mushrooms on brioche and Louisiana caviar and creme fraiche on cornbread blinis, paired with a Spanish sparkling wine. The live auction featured a five-night, six-day stay in a Paris apartment, a cocktail party for 25 guests presented by La Petite Grocery at the winner’s choice of local venue, a Saints and Pelicans package, a couple’s afternoon, a framed print by Butch Anthony and a membership to the New Orleans Athletic Club. This year, there was a new addition of an online-only silent auction ran for two weeks leading up to “A Blind Taste,” plus a raffle for one José Balli sterling silver fleur de lis necklace, donated by Kaye and Jerry Smith. n

WHAT: A Blind Taste benefiting WRBH Radio for the Blind WHEN: September 17 WHERE: La Petite Grocery (4238 Magazine St.) 1. Co-Chair Charles Smith, Mia Deviller, Emcee and Co-Chair Angela Hill and Geoff Worden 2. Kaye Smith and Jerry Smith 3. Board Member Matt Berger, Board President Daniel Meyer, Board Member Lindsey Wands and Buddy Henricks

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St. Charles Avenue’s “Wine, Dine & Design” 2018 tablescapes Preview Party and Luncheon presented by Royal Honda benefited Bastion BY MORGAN PACKARD GRIFFITH | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF STROUT

Beginning with a Preview Party on Wednesday, October 3 and culminating with a luncheon on Thursday, October 4, St. Charles Avenue and its parent company, Renaissance Publishing LLC and the Renaissance Foundation, together with Presenting Sponsor Royal Honda and Chairs Betsy and Eric Laborde and Sheldon and Michael Schmidt, presented a check for over $100,000 to Bastion at their fifth annual “Wine, Dine & Design” tablescapes luncheon. The Preview Party allowed 275 guests a sneak peek at the fabulous designs while sipping wine and dining on hors d’oeuvres by the Audubon Tea Room catering team. In addition, patrons enjoyed live music courtesy of Band Sponsor Access New Orleans and bid on live auction packages including a Black Pearl necklace courtesy of Marty’s on Magazine, a Napa Valley Winery Stay compliments of Elizabeth and Clarke Swanson and a Best of New Orleans package filled with hotel stays, restaurant gift cards and more. The next day, the Audubon Tea Room hosted 23 tables created by retailers and designers, each with its own theme and design elements. Almost 230 guests dined and sipped among these creations, while learning more about Bastion. Following our thank yous, we held a live auction of a VIP Experience from Scarlet Pearl Casino, a live painting

by Kelly Boyette and for “Saturn’s Turn” by James Michalopoulos. The Renaissance Foundation’s mission is to support nonprofit organizations through marketing, events and financial support. Bastion, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, is an intentionally designed neighborhood for returning warriors and families located on 5.5 acres at 1901 Mirabeau Ave. in New Orleans. Their powerful community model incubates meaningful, lifetime relationships to sustain a thriving recovery from the wounds and casualties of war. Phase 1, including 19 double family homes with 73 residents who have 196 years of combined military service, green space and a 1,700-square-foot Wellness Center, is complete and 100 percent leased up. Phase 2 is leasing up, adding 20 more units for a total of 58 apartments. Bastion is executing a three-phase development strategy that will fill a critical gap in the continuum of care for post 9/11 veterans and families in Southeast Louisiana. If you would like to learn more, visit the campus or donate, please call (888) 737-5577 or visit JoinBastion.org. Read on to learn more about these tables and see the incredible designs, and prepare to join us next year!

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“After the Fox Hunt” designed by Gene Luke for Ambrose Garden LLC (8015 Maple St., 861-1953, AmbroseGarden.com)

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“Midnight in the Garden of Good & Evil” designed by Eric Fredericks for Bee’s Wedding & Event Designs & Belinda Belk for Blue Gardenia Events (738 Phosphor Ave., 343-4530, BeesWeddingDesigns.com)


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“Saints” designed by Kellie Mathas for Crystal Clear Creative (1401 Edwards Ave., 508-1303)

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“Le Luxe Au Quotidien” designed by Stephen Sonnier for Dunn and Sonnier Antiques • Florals • Gifts (3433 Magazine St., 524-3235, DunnAndSonnier.com)   STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 43


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“Home” designed by Marguerite Oestricher and Terri Dreyer for New Orleans Area Habitat for Humanity (2900 Elysian Fields Ave., 609-3335, Habitat-Nola.org; NANOLlc.net) 44 ST. CHARLES AVENUE NOVEMBER 2018

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“Au” designed by Kim Starr Wise for Kim Starr Wise Floral Events (437 Philip St., 315-5607, KimStarrWise.com)


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“Fancy Hosts” designed by Tony Leggio and Holly Bethay for Hosts New Orleans (365 Canal St., Suite 1400, 252-5476, HostsNewOrleans.com)

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“Infinite Grace” designed by Donna Russell for Infinity Farms (119 Riley Boone Road, 552-8880, InfinityFarms.com)

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“Landscape Images, LTD in Puerto Vallarta” designed by Marianne Mumford for Landscape Images, LTD (655 Central Ave., 734-8380, LandscapeImagesLtd.com) 46 ST. CHARLES AVENUE NOVEMBER 2018

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“Louisiana Harvest Moon” designed by Loftin Brooks, Marian DeMeyers and Susan Clasen (220-0303)


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“The Edible Garden” designed by Amy Graham, Laren Holzer and Marguerite Andrews for Longue Vue House & Gardens (7 Bamboo Road, 293-4726, LongueVue.com)

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“Asian” designed by Lauren Soley for Lovegood Wedding & Event Rentals (1340 Montegut St., 433-2112, LoveGoodRentals.com)

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“Hang Tight, Epiphyte” designed by Monique Chauvin for Mitch’s Flowers (4843 Magazine St., 899-4843, MitchsFlowersNola.com)

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“The Orléans Collection” designed by Margaret Ludwig for the New Orleans Museum of Art (1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4139, NOMA.org)


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“A Glass Affair A Glass Act” designed by Juli Juneau for Nomad Collection by Juli Juneau (615-2113, NomadCollection.com)

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“Garden of Eve” designed by Glenn Vatshell for Palate New Orleans (2818, 8220 Willow St., 864-2990, PalateNewOrleans.com)

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“Diamonds and Pearls” designed by Maitee Gomez for Royal Events, Candles and Décor (110 Campbell Ave., Suite 1, 400-9416, RoyalEventsNola.com) 50 ST. CHARLES AVENUE NOVEMBER 2018

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“El Septuagesimo de la Generalisima!” designed by Steve Baker for Steve Baker Designs LLC (777-0557)


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“Coastal Paradise” designed by Eva Baillie and Cady Barrett for The Plant Gallery (9401 Airline Highway, 488-8887, ThePlantGallery.com)

“Spooky Carnival” designed by Candice Gwinn for Trashy Diva (537 Royal St. & 2048 Magazine St., 299-3939, TrashyDiva.com)

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“Precious Stones” designed by Wink Design and Events for Wink Design and Events (1519 Tchoupitoulas St., 366-8063, WinkDesignAndEvents.com)

“Butterflies & Trees” designed by Z Event Company for Z Event Company (508 Metairie Road, 510-5838, ZEventCo.com)

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THANK YOU We wish to thank our Chairmen: Betsy and Dr. Eric Laborde and Sheldon and Michael Schmidt. We also wish to thank our Presenting Sponsor: Royal Honda. And our Supporting Sponsors and Table Sponsors: Libby Dufour Fund; PJ’s Coffee; New Orleans Saints; IberiaBank; The Patrick F. Taylor Foundation; Greater New Orleans Foundation; Woodward Design & Build; Touch Vodka; Access New Orleans; Loftin Brooks, Marian DeMeyers & Susan Clasen; Peggy & Jack Laborde; Betsy & Dr. Eric Laborde; Sheldon & Michael Schmidt; The Packard Family; Peyton & Elizabeth Bush; Michelle & Lamar Villere; Trashy Diva; Infinity Farms; Marshall & Faye Ballard; Manny Bright; Arlene Philipson; Sally & Walter Cockerham; Joel & Mary Funderburk; and Valerie Thibaut. Special thanks to James Michalopoulos, Marty Leatherbury, Kelly Boyette and Clarke and Elizabeth Swanson.

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“New Orleans: The City of Palms” designed by Beverly Church and Luis Colmenares for Beverly Church (5914 Pitt St., 891-0726, BeverlyChurch.com)

In addition, a very special thanks to our host, the Audubon Tea Room.

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Step out of the shadows and into the light in head-turning after-five fashions Photographer: Theresa Cassagne Fashion Stylist: Tracee Dundas Makeup Artist: Pilar Miranda Hair: Heidi Schirrmann Model: Helena Koclanes

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SCARLET CLEMATIS (Opposing page) Red high necked long sleeved hand embellished iridescent sequin swing dress from SoSuSu; gold dangle earrings from Perlis; gold plated bronze arrow pin from Reagan Charleston Jewelry; multi-metal platform peep toe sandal from Joseph

OUT OF THE BLUE Navy sequin sleeved off-the-shoulder top and slit sequin pencil skirt from SoSuSu; multi-color glass crystal oval earrings and red suede sandal, both from Joseph

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BLUE MOON (Opposing page) Navy crepe V-neck gown with starburst beaded sleeves from Perlis; silver and gold starburst dangle earrings from Elizabeth’s

BLUE STEEL Navy and silver metallic vines dress with tulle hem from Elizabeth’s; wine velvet clutch from Perlis; tassel earrings and black lace mesh booties, both from Joseph

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CODE BLUE Navy smocked waist wide-leg jumpsuit, sapphire and druzy moonstone medallion, pavĂŠ diamond dragonfly pendant necklace and red suede sandal, all from Joseph; gold and tanzanite gemstone earrings from Perlis

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MOULIN ROUGE Red cold shoulder ruffle sleeved and hemmed column gown from Ballin’s; navy velvet clutch from Perlis; gold hoop earrings from Elizabeth’s; multicolor strap sandal from SoSuSu

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Snapper Pontchartrain from Briquette

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Celebrating the Season Decadent local restaurant specials BY KELCY WILBURN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM HANNA

As the weather changes, so do the flavors we’ve come to know and love in South Louisiana. Braised meats and squash, apples and warm soups begin appearing on menus across the city as chefs welcome in seasonal ingredients. The holidays are upon us, and restaurants are gearing up with specials, holiday menus and special events. Food is how we celebrate here, and it’s time to celebrate the season. Arnaud’s continues its 100th anniversary celebration with special menu items and events. A longtime holiday favorite, Arnaud’s will be open on Thanksgiving, serving a four-course table d’hote menu mastered by Executive Chef Tommy DiGiovanni and including Traditional Roasted Turkey, Stuffed Gulf Black Drum and Seared Pork Tenderloin as entrée options. Meanwhile, throughout November Arnaud’s will feature a special, three-course 100th Anniversary table d’hote

menu. From December 1-23, Arnaud’s will honor its French roots with a four-course Reveillon dinner menu with entrée selections of Coquille St. Jacques, Chicken Victoria and Chargrilled Porkchop. “Chicken Victoria was a very popular menu item back in the 1980s. It consists of roasted chicken, country pâté, golden raisins and port wine glace, and is served with roasted root vegetables,” says Co-Owner Katy Casbarian. Holiday guests can also expect another of Arnaud’s past classics, the Creole Onion soup, which features a roux, “making it distinctly Creole.” says Casbarian. “It is rich, but isn’t too heavy and is perfect for a holiday dinner.” Red Fish Grill plays host annually to a festive gingerbread workshop, inviting guests to reserve a table and build their own gingerbread houses. This year, the restaurant is expanding on the idea and opening up group workshops from December 2-21, Sundays-Fridays, be-

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Sauteed Red Snapper with Thai Pesto from Gautreau’s

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tween 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Available for family gatherings, birthday parties, office teambuilding and a fun day out, the workshops cost $35 per person and include one gingerbread house, decorative candy, a jingle bell and an adult beverage. Groups can tack on a two-course or three-course lunch package if desired. Holiday cocktail offerings include the Candied Poinsettia (cranberry-orange syrup and sparkling wine), the Gingerbread Cocktail (vodka, cream liqueur and housemade ginger spice syrup),or the Kris Kringle Old Fashioned with rye bourbon and honey-winter spice. Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse is welcoming the fall and winter seasons with a new addition rolling nightly: the tableside martini cart. The restaurant is seeking to resurrect the “decadence and showmanship of a bygone era of hospitality,” according to Wesley Noble, Marketing Specialist. “New Orleans is special in that we hold tight to many of our culinary and hospitality traditions, and it will be fun to see the return of cocktail carts,” says Dickie Brennan. Beverage Director Barry Himel set out to create a fun, elevated new martini menu. New additions include The Black and Gold Martini (Hendrick’s Gin, Cajun Caviar stuffed olives and edible 24 karat gold leaf) and the Truffled Martini, featuring a cured, dry-aged Louisiana Wagyu garnish. Celebrating its one-year anniversary in the Central Business District is Briquette, a new restaurant from Owner Anna Tusa. Briquette brings a contemporary vibe to the traditional New Orleans restaurant scene and contrasts a bit of modernity with the long history of the building that houses it. An “open kitchen” is enclosed with glass, allowing diners to see the action of the chefs over the impressive 18-foot chargrill that informs the menu. “What we feature is whole fish,” says Tusa. “Every day offers a different fish, from Louisiana redfish and red snapper to pompano and sea bass.” The whole fish are skewered and placed on the grill, coated in olive oil and cooked over the open flame. The fish is then topped with a choice of puttanesca, olive caper miso or poblano butter. The menu also features filets of fish in addition to steak, lamb shank and pastas. The Snapper Pontchartrain is a favorite of locals and tourists looking for a classic Creole dish. A pan sautéed filet of snapper is topped with hollandaise and lump crab meat and served with


heirloom potatoes and baby green beans. The restaurant will be open for the holidays with specials on Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. Tucked away Uptown, Gautreau’s is highlighting the fall season with the ingredients and flavors adored by chef Baruch Rabasa. Gautreau’s celebrates the season perhaps more subtly than some of the city’s grand dame restaurants – no holiday menus or special events and giveaways, just classic dishes, a warm welcome by the owner and the fine dining service its longtime customers have come to know and love. Highlights of the fall and winter menu include the Apple and Belgium Endive salad with maple-walnut vinaigrette, warm brie and Vidalia onion. Guests can expect a new appetizer in the Beef Tartare with charred scallion aioli, ghost pepper caviar, pistachios and fried yucca. A favorite entrée is the Sauteed Red Snapper with Thai Pesto, a complex dish featuring a black garlic jasmine rice cake, bok choy, eggplant grits and tomato braised kale. August is welcoming fall and winter with a significant addition: lunch service. Chef Ross Dover calls the restaurant a hidden gem for lunch, a place where guests can find their Cajun fix and expect local ingredients elevated with the flare you’d expect from a fine dining restaurant. “My whole vision is to bring to light those feelings, thoughts and memories, the food that influenced my upbringing and cooking and allow guests to experience those same feelings and memories and bring them back home,” says Dover. Growing up between New Orleans and Lafayette meant an influence of both Cajun and Creole traditions on Dover, who enjoys playing with both on his menu. A fall favorite, August will highlight the Two Dog Farms Butternut Squash Ravioli, a play on fall flavors such as squash, ham and pecan. The delicate ravioli are stuffed with a purée of butternut squash, cream cheese, goat cheese and braised mustard greens. The sauce includes the puréed squash with ham hock jus, butter and spiced pecans, and the dish is then topped with a gremolata of parsley, garlic and shallots. August will feature special menus on Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve as well as a Reveillon menu throughout December.

Two Dog Farms Buternut Squash Ravioli from August

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ARNAUD’S 813 Bienville St. 523-5433 ArnaudsRestaurant.com AUGUST 301 Tchoupitoulas St. 299-9777 RestaurantAugust.com BRIQUETTE 701 S. Peters St. 302-7496 Briquette-Nola.com DICKIE BRENNAN’S STEAKHOUSE 716 Iberville St. 522-2467 DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com GAUTREAU’S 1728 Soniat St. 899-7397 GautreausRestaurant.com RED FISH GRILL 115 Bourbon St. 598-1200 RedFishGrill.com

Chicken Victoria from Arnaud’s

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E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V

Varied Vignettes Fall in Pass Christian By Bev Church

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I decided to set up different vignettes for you to enjoy, using items almost entirely from her shop. The first setup is on the beach. Why not use a lamp as a centerpiece and have a late afternoon lunch? We used handpainted placemats and coasters by artist Heather Hewitt Daniel, originally from New Orleans.  Next, we went to a friend’s house and created a fun dinner party for friends who were spending the weekend. I made the tablecloth and we added gurgle

pots for the wine and water, and added handpainted square pictures by artist Tracey Stieffel for the favors for each guest to take home. Pillows by Stieffel made the chairs more comfortable and bright. Cocktails were set up by the pool, so everyone could gather after a boat ride to relax before dinner. After dinner,watch the sun set, start a great fire, turn up the music and dance. House parties are so much fun, because no one has to drive home! n

PHOTOS BY LINDA REESE BJORK

As dyed in the wool New Orleanians, we love to go to Pass Christian, Bay St. Louis and Waveland, Mississippi whenever we get a chance! So many locals have summer houses on the coast and the fall is the best time to go and enjoy the water, waves, boating, walking and playing on the beach because it’s finally cool. Whenever I go, I have to visit Mimi Parker Thomas at her shop, Parkers, Inc. in Pass Christian, because it has everything!


E N T E R TA I N I N G W I T H B E V


WITH THIS RING

Branton – Weidenhaft By Megan Holt

Abigail “Abbee” Lee Branton was 18 years old when she met 21-year-old Jonathan William Weidenhaft at a mutual friend’s game day party. They caught each other’s eye as the Saints played the Bears, but they never really talked. Two months later, they ran into each other at the Howlin’ Wolf, and sparks flew! They got to know each other for about a month before realizing they had never been on a real date, and the very next night they had their first official date at Sake Café. Eleven years later, Jon was planning to propose and wanted to include everyone in their families – including their dogs. The couple was vacationing in the Bahamas with Abbee’s family, while Jon’s parents were sitting for their “granddogs” back home. Before the trip, Jon recorded a video with his parents and the dogs that he planned to show Abbee right before he proposed. During the vacation, Abbee and Jon boated to a private beach and were taking a walk when he said he received a text message from his parents with a video of the dogs. Abbee immediately grabbed the phone to see what their pups were up to! In the video his parents were walking the dogs around the block; when they got to back to the house, Jon appeared on screen and said, “Look behind you!”. Abbee was incredibly confused for a split second, but when she turned around Jon was on one knee with the ring out! Abbee and Jon wanted something casual and fun for their rehearsal, so they decided on The Rusty Nail decorated with a balloon canopy by Bad Ass Balloon Co. and had it catered by Drago’s. For the wedding, the couple wanted everything to be timeless, elegant and over the top, with just the right amount of modern edge. On January 13, 2018, Abbee walked down the aisle at the Marigny Opera House, her first and only choice for

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her wedding. She wore her “something new,” a custom Monique Lhuillier gown from I Do Bridal in Baton Rouge, and carried her “something borrowed,” a crystal rosary passed down from her great-grandmother, wrapped around the stem of her bouquet. The celebration started immediately after the ceremony. Upon exiting, guests were entertained with champagne service and the music of the Kinfolk Brass Band and the Mardi Gras Revelers. They were then transported to the reception at the Royal Sonesta New Orleans, where they were greeted by Deux Montegut on the piano and more champagne. The menu ranged from classic New Orleans to Italian, including seared foie gras, duck, pheasant and quail, locally sourced. The

Ice Dragon created an amazing ice bar, and a special bourbon bar and lounge area featured a selection of some of Jon’s favorite bourbons. Artist Frenchy wowed the crowd with a live painting of the evening! The couple chose Davie Bowie’s “Life on Mars” for their first dance, simply because they love it and always have fun together when it comes on the radio. As they danced to the song performed by the Jordan Kahn Orchestra, the couple’s new monogram was projected onto the dance floor. The couple departed the next morning for their honeymoon in Thailand, where they spent one week in Phuket and one week in Krabi soaking up the sun and sand. They then returned to the New Orleans area and are currently remodeling their dream home in Covington. n


WITH THIS RING

Bride’s Dress: Ceremony Dress: Custom Monique Lhuillier from I Do Bridal in Baton Rouge; Reception Dress: Zuhair Murad Bridesmaids’ Dresses: Custom made by Vinnie Summers Groom’s Attire: Custom suits by Chris Cook, Fellow Menswear Groomsmen’s Attire: Custom suits by Chris Cook, Fellow Menswear Engagement Ring, Bride’s Wedding Band & Groom’s Wedding Band: Jack Sutton Fine Jewelry Coordinator: Terry Cambise Wedding & Event Consulting Florist: Wedding and Reception: Kim Starr Wise; Cake florals and Reception: Ambrose Garden Florals Reception Décor: Luminous Events of New Orleans; AD Event Group; Event Rental; Chair Couture LLC; Wildflower Linen/LA Tavola Fine Linen Rental Invitation: Scriptura Photographer: Oscar Rajo Photography Videographer: Studio Vieux Carre Hair: Chelsey and Rhonda, H2O Makeup: Rita Lucurto, Luxury Beauty Clinic

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YO U N G B LO O DS

Katy Casbarian Co-Owner & Operator, Arnaud’s & Arnaud’s Teddy Bear Drive By Lindsay Mack

Pictured: Katy Casbarian with her brother and business partner Archie Casbarian

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“I think that everyone’s generosity is always a surprise,” says Katy Casbarian, Co-Owner and Operator of Arnaud’s. The New Orleans community has really embraced this unique and thoughtful take on a traditional holiday toy drive. The 2018 drive will begin at Arnaud’s restaurant on Thanksgiving Day, and teddy bear donations are accepted throughout the holiday season. Families who are out enjoying a holiday celebration at the restaurant can drop off a teddy bear and give back to the community at the same time. Additional teddy bear drop-off locations include the NOPJF, New Orleans & Company (formerly known as the New Orleans CVB) and the Entergy Center. The goal is to collect more bears every year. “We’d like to continue this for years to come and fill the need,” says Casbarian. “Unfortunately, New

Orleans experiences a lot of children in distressing situations. This can help put them at ease.” Even a moment of relief can really help these children facing trauma, and sometimes a cuddly toy can provide so much comfort. n

Get Involved Drop-Off Locations: The New Orleans Police & Justice Foundation 141 Robert E. Lee Blvd., 210 New Orleans Police Department Headquarters 715 S. Broad Ave. New Orleans & Company 2020 St. Charles Ave. Entergy Centre 1100 Poydras St., Lobby Arnaud’s Restaurant 813 Bienville St. ArnaudsRestaurant.com

PHOTO BY CHERY L G ERBER

The fine dining restaurant Arnaud’s is celebrating its 100-year anniversary in 2018, which is quite the achievement for the French Quarter establishment. Although its Jazz Brunch menu and Creole cuisine are well known in New Orleans and abroad, the restaurant is also renowned for its community service. In fact, Arnaud’s annual Teddy Bear Drive is also celebrating an anniversary this year. In the weeks leading up to the holiday season, Arnaud’s collects new, unused teddy bears. The bears are donated to local police departments, who give out the bears to children in times of need. Now in its fifth year of operation, the Teddy Bear Drive has already collected over 5,000 bears. By directly benefiting the New Orleans Police & Justice Foundation (NOPJF) and the New Orleans Police Department, the bear drive is a great way for the Arnaud’s community to give back.


STUDENT ACTIVIST

Brooke Scardino Archbishop Chapelle High School By Mallory Lindsly

“In order for a community to effectively work, there needs to be involvement. A community is nothing if it doesn’t have support from its members,” says Brooke Scardino, a senior at Archbishop Chapelle High School. Scardino’s most rewarding volunteer experience has been participating in the Greater New Orleans Miracle League. For the past three years,she has been a buddy to assist children with mental and physical disabilities to play baseball. “The children that I’ve helped have given me a positive outlook on my own life because they’ve taught me to enjoy even the little things such as playing a simple game of baseball,” she says. As a volunteer at Ochsner Health System, Scardino learned more about her community. She has met many people from different backgrounds and different lifestyles. “Despite the fact that most of the people I interacted with at this hospital were from the same community I was from, there was so much diversity in lifestyles and personal views that I never realized existed.” Scardino was also a participant in Ochsner’s Science Technology Academics Research (STAR) Program. This program is a tuition-free program for high school students interested in pursuing education and careers in science and medicine. Scardino doesn’t have just one adult who influenced her to become an activist, but many; she credits her science teachers throughout her entire education. During the STAR program, Scardino was able to explore the

medicine and business sides of working in a large health system. She grew her leadership abilities by meeting and getting advice from the leaders at Ochsner Health System. Spending the summer in this program taught Scardino that it takes a variety of people with different skills to run a hospital. “[The teachers] all truly care about and love what they teach, and therefore it’s so much more enjoyable to learn from them. I think that’s what being an activist is about,” says Scardino. “You have to have a strong belief in what you’re sharing with others or else activism would not be possible because people don’t want to follow a leader that doesn’t have faith in what they’re doing.” Scardino doesn’t know where she wants to attend college just yet, but would like to attend a school in the South and pursue a career in a STEM field, like engineering. Engineering interests Scardino because she enjoys finding creative solutions to problems. She also will continue her activism with her community and hopes to get involved with women’s equality. n STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 73


S H O P TA L K

Mary-Jo Webster CEO, Aunt Sally’s Pralines By Mirella Cameran

What is it like to work for such an iconic New Orleans brand? For me this is a dream job. It is about food, retail and New Orleans – three of the things I love the most! Aunt Sally’s is a strongly local, well-established, still relatively small business. It is family owned, and that sense of family is quite real and present in our daily operations.

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Is your staff allowed to eat as many pralines as they like? You betcha! Tell us something we might not know about Aunt Sally’s? We are about to start introducing some new flavors as limited time offerings. The first one up is a fabulous Salted Caramel Praline. n

AUNT SALLY’S 750 St. Charles Ave., 944-6090 810 Decatur St., 524-3373 AuntSallys.com

PHOTO BY J EFFERY J OH NSTON

Can you give us a brief history of Aunt Sally’s and what makes it so special? Aunt Sally’s was founded in the French Quarter in 1935 by a French Creole couple named Diane and Pierre Bagur. Our flagship store has been in the French Market from the beginning. Our pralines are truly the best. They are made with the finest fresh ingredients; cooked by hand in big copper pots over an open flame, and dipped by hand to cool on a marble slab. To watch our cooking process is to watch a theatrical display of culinary history!

What’s your favorite item in the store? I love our Tricentennial Tin! It is a limited edition collectible that we made to celebrate New Orleans’ 300th birthday.


S H O P TA L K

Alicia & Scott Reynaud Owners, Spafoo By Mirella Cameran

What is Spafoo? Scott: Spafoo is a smartphone app that delivers beauty on demand to your door. Think UBER or Lyft but for beauty services. How did it start? Scott: We wanted to develop a beauty app for New Orleans that would create convenience for clients and opportunities for stylists. I’ve been a stylist since 1993, and own my own salon, Jupiter, in the Warehouse District. Alicia is my business partner and wife.

PH OTO BY J EFFERY JOHNSTO N

How is it going? Alicia: It’s going so well, we’re looking for more professionals to join! Who are your clients? Alicia: Locals love it for special events and it’s a great solution for visitors. Recently we went to the Saints facility and gave the team pedicures; they loved it and it just proves we can go anywhere, anytime!

What do clients like about it the most? Scott: Convenience is a great benefit; we’re open seven days a week and for early mornings and late nights. What are the most popular services? Alicia: Manis, pedis, hair styling and makeup. Is there anything else you’d like to share? Scott: We just added gift certificates and we need more professional providers to join; all you have to do is go to Spafoo.com and fill out the application. n

SPAFOO Spafoo is an app available for IOS and Andriod

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S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 1

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1. Paula Wallace, president and founder of the Savanah College of Art and Design, and Alexa Pulitzer celebrated the release of Wallace’s newest book and SCAD’s 40th anniversary at Pulitzer’s home in April. 2. Winnie and Mark Brown shared a dance to the music of the Storyville Stompers at the Orleans Club’s closing reception in May. 3. Kay McArdle, Orleans Club President Marilyn Aiken and President-Elect Brenda Moffitt celebrated the end of the 2018 season at the Orleans Club’s closing reception in May. 4. Constance Cowart, Jean Rice and Anita Brite (seated) attended the “Leading Ladies Luncheon” with Janie Kahn and Barbara Ballard (standing) to raise money for the Jefferson Performing Arts Society at the Metairie Country Club in May. 5. New Orleans Women & Children’s Shelter (NOWCS) Founders Jackie and Dan Silverman are pictured at the organization’s “There’s No Place Like Home Gala.” The first ever Jackie and Dan Silverman Homeless Champion Award was presented at the shelter’s 10th anniversary celebration, which was hosted at the Audubon Golf Clubhouse in May. 6. Dawn Bradley-Fletcher posed with Debbie and Chaffer Rees at NOWCS’ 10th anniversary gala, where Debbie Rees was presented with the inaugural Jackie and Dan Silverman Homeless Champion Award. 7. Amy Dye and Cole Newton attended NOWCS’ “There’s No Place Like Home Gala.” The event featured live music by Caren Green & Friends, New Orleans cuisine and a silent auction and benefited the work NOWCS does to break the cycle of homelessness.

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S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 7

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8. National Kidney Foundation of Louisiana Board President Dr. Shaminder Gupta with his family Nomita Joshi-Gupta, Yash Gupta and Simran Gupta at the “Big Easy Brunch,” held at the Sheraton New Orleans’ Armstrong Ballroom in June. Over 120 guests attended the event, which benefitted efforts to encourage organ donation and support the NKFL’s programs. 9. Vicki Cardon, Catherine Tremain and Terry Cambise attended the “Big Easy Brunch” to benefit the National Kidney Foundation of Louisiana in June. The event featured music by the Alex Owen Trio, a silent and live auction and bottomless mimosas and Bloody Marys. 10. Louisiana State Representative Austin Badon is pictured with Jaqueline Harris, Alexander Kelso, Dr. Dennis Dillon, Anne Doussan, Barbara Waiters and Alvin Johnson at Boys Town “Bowl-a-Palooza” in June. The event was held at Rock ‘N’ Bowl to benefit Boys Town, a charitable organization dedicated to helping save children and heal families. 11. Brandi Nye and Kevin McCathen are pictured at “Bowl-A-Palooza,” a fundraiser to benefit Boys Town. The family-friendly event and team-building endeavor pitted local companies against each other, competing for bragging rights as the Boys Town King Pin. 12. Emily Licata, Haley Messina and Beata Desselle were all honored with the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest achievement in Girl Scouting. Each recipient organized and executed a community service project. Licata created over 100 activity and craft packets for Ochsner Health Center for Children patients to enjoy while staying in the hospital; Messina educated residents at St. Francis Villa Assisted Living about healthy eating and exercising; and Desselle founded the Big Sibling Safety project to create awareness about the dangers of teen drinking and drug use, and taught responsible social media use.

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PERFORMING ARTS

November By Fritz Esker

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27-December 2

This Tony-Award winning play, written by Martin McDonagh (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri), centers around the interrogation of an author in an unnamed totalitarian state. Lusher Lions Gate Theatre, 5624 Freret St., 302-9117, NOLAProject.com

1980s new wave artists Simple Minds (“Don’t You Forget About Me”) celebrate 40 years of music with songs spanning their entire career. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

This smash hit Broadway musical features the music of Emilio and Gloria Estefan while telling the story of their journey to America and the top of the music world. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

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This musical adaptation of Richard Linklater’s hit film tells the story of a slacker music teacher who forms his own rock band with his students. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

Pop superstar Christina Aguilera’s 22-city North American tour in support of her new album Liberation comes to town. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

A festive, raucous musical pokes irreverent fun at the traditional conventions of holiday plays. Southern Rep Theatre, 2541 Bayou Road, 523-9857, SouthernRep.com

THE PILLOWMAN

SCHOOL OF ROCK

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KEITH URBAN: GRAFFITI U WORLD TOUR

Four-time Grammy Award winner Keith Urban comes to town, singing new songs plus old favorites among his 23 No. 1 songs. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com 2-18

GONE PECANS!

This musical comedy starring Ricky Graham and Jefferson Turner celebrates 300 years of New Orleans. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., 461-9475, RivertownTheaters.com

AN EVENING WITH SIMPLE MINDS: WALK BETWEEN WORLDS TOUR

CHRISTINA AGUILERA: THE LIBERATION TOUR

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THE PRICE IS RIGHT LIVE

Come on down to the Saenger to watch and perhaps play in a live version of the classic game show. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 14

DEBAUCHERY!

New Orleans’ live, ongoing soap opera continues as sisters Chanel and Cartier continue their outrageous adventures. Church of Yoga NOLA, 1480 N. Rocheblave St., 522-6545, SouthernRep.com 15

TCHAIKOVSKY SYMPHONY NO. 4

Tchaikovsky’s fourth symphony ends a night full of music that includes two pieces by Ralph Vaughan Williams. Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com 23-25

NINE INCH NAILS: COLD AND BLACK AND INFINITE NORTH AMERICA 2018

1990s alternative stars Nine Inch Nails perform three dates in the Crescent City with The Jesus and Mary Chain as part of their new tour. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

ON YOUR FEET!

MANDATORY MERRIMENT: AN UNTITLED HOLIDAY MUSICAL

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“PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION” WITH BEETHOVEN’S SECOND PIANO CONCERTO

A New Orleans concerto specifically commissioned for the city’s tricentennial opens this program, which finishes with Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto. Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com 30-December 23

THE SANTALAND DIARIES

This stage adaptation of David Sedaris’ acclaimed story tells the tale of a down-on-his-luck actor who must navigate the Christmas season as an elf at Macy’s. Teatro Wego, 177 Sala Ave., 885-2000, JPAS.org


ADVERTISING SECTION

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE The Garden Gates 504-833-6669 thegardengates.com Handcrafted from rich green Magnolia leaves, this wreath’s natural gloss will be a shining part of your holiday season. The Magnolia wreaths are fresh cut daily and handmade to order. The Original Magnolia Wreath is harvested and prepared for just the holiday season Available in multiple sizes.

Wildflower Aunt Sally’s 504-524-3373 auntsallys.com New Orleans is a gumbo of culture, and now you can send those flavors anywhere with this Gumbo Gift Basket! One of the most popular dishes in New Orleans cuisine, this basket is perfect for the foodies in your life.

504-218-8996 Instagram: @wearWildflower Get in the gift giving spirit with these festive Gold Bow Drop Earrings from Bauble Bar available at Wildflower, $38.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Cristy Cali FeBe 504-835-5250 Facebook: febe clothing (metairie) Be the talk of your holiday party in this fabulous silver sequin top from FeBe.

cristycali.com Please Return to New Orleans Necklace: Whether you’ve relocated but your heart is still in NOLA, you’re a tourist or were affected from Hurricane Katrina, this is for you. The Fleur de Lis Knot Ring: a symbol of empowerment and unity.

Joseph 504-900-1422 josephstores.com Christian Louboutin Cabata Small Love Tote

Art and Eyes 504-891-4494 artandeyesneworleansla.com Jacques Marie Mage Eyewear: Paris and Hollywood’s “IT” boy! Luxury eyewear dedicated to being made in small batches.

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ADVERTISING SECTION

Mitch’s Flowers 504-899-4843 mitchsflowersnola.com This rustic, versatile tray of bud vases is perfect for cut flowers, locally foraged greens, preserved stems or fresh herbs making a great centerpiece or atop the kitchen counter.

GEM Printing 504-834-9580 gemprinting.com

Billy Reid 504-208-1200 billyreid.com Billy Reid began designing in 1998, the Chinese zodiac Year of the Tiger, and this special edition sweater is a celebration of the brand’s 20th anniversary. “20th Anniversary Tiger Crew”. Unisex XXS-L. Alpaca & Wool $495

Shake your holiday libations with some NOLA style! Cocktail Shakers are available in 3 different sizes and include an engraved monogram or name. Starting at $12.95, this accessory shines and make a handsome addition to any home bar.

Elizabeth’s 504-833-3717 Facebook.com/ShopElizabeths Shop local at Elizabeth’s for this sleek and modern Donald J. Pliner suede octagon-heel bootie. Pairs perfectly with leggings, tights or your favorite denim. The octagon-shaped heel provides stellar style and comfort!

Little Pnuts 504-267-5083 littlepnutstoyshoppe.com Think you’ve got what it takes to out-meme your friends IRL? Compete to create the funniest meme by pairing Caption Cards with the Photo Card in play with card game What Do You Meme?

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ADVERTISING SECTION

Optical Shoppe 504-301-1726 opticalshoppebr.com Cordis polarized sunglass by SALT, retail $490, from The Optical Shoppe – a locally-owned designer eyewear and sunglass boutique offering the latest in digital lens technology for the best vision possible. Their highly experienced staff will keep you looking and seeing your best.

The National WWII Museum 504-528-1944 store.nationalww2museum.org The leather in this 100 Mission A-2 Bomber Jacket is vintage lambskin with natural graining and surface characters. It has Military Specification A-2 detailing with no fiberfill or bulky insulation, making it perfect for Southern climates. Proudly Made in the USA!

Relish 504-309-3336 relishneworleans.com Celebrate New Orleans with this limited edition New Orleans Tricentennial Ornament collection. These special pieces were produced exclusively for Relish. Each ornament is handstitched using a combination of fabrics, beadwork and metal threadwork, a technique that can be traced back 2,000 years.

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Eden House 504-407-0943 edenhousenola.org/especiallyeden Shop local and give back with an Especially Eden gift basket! All baskets are assembled by and directly support survivors of human trafficking.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Home Malone 504-324-8352 homemalonenola.com This freestanding streetcar art from 81-year-old folk artist, Lorraine Gendron is one of many designs this Mid City art and gift store carries.

Michalopoulos 504-558-0505 michalopoulas.com “Windup” is an original oil painting of the French Quarter created by internationally celebrated New Orleans artist James Michalopoulos.

Perlis Louisiana Children’s Museum 504-523-1357 lcm.org “Puzzled” for gifts this holiday season? Bring home some brain-building, locally made fun! Topple Rocks are made from African Mahogany recycled from construction projects in Covington, Louisiana.

New Orleans 504-895-8661, French Quarter 504-523-6681, Mandeville 985-674-1711, Baton Rouge 225-926-5909 perils.com This New Orleans vintage map umbrella features the Mississippi River when open to a full 42” wide. Button operated from a small compact size with wrist strap and storage sleeve.

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Ace and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

86 ST. CHARLES AVENUE NOVEMBER 2018

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N OS TA LG I A

Bali Ha’i Partying in a Polynesian paradise By Seale Paterson

88 ST. CHARLES AVENUE NOVEMBER 2018

The drinks menu was glamorous and theatrical. The giant Tiki Bowl, supported by three miniature Tikis, came with extra-long straws for everyone to sip from together. The Fogg Cutter cocktail was served in a ceramic smiling Tiki head, which could be purchased and taken home. There was even a large carved volcano that dispensed drinks to customers. The Cantonese menu brought new dishes to New Orleans diners, including moo goo gai pan, chow mein, rumaki and eggrolls. The new spices and sauces livened up familiar seafood, but American standards were also available for the less adventurous diners. Bali Ha’i became the place for celebrations for decades – weddings and anniversaries, proms and graduations

and, of course, the perfect first date. Private parties could book the Bora Bora Hut, the Lanai Hut or the Samoan Hut. Although Pontchartrain Beach closed in 1983, the restaurant stayed open for a few more years. By 1988, the furnishings and memorabilia had been sold off to the public. The entry port was moved to a pavilion at Veterans Memorial Park in Kenner, where it still can be seen today. n A full wall mural of the Hawaiian Islands complemented the Joseph Lenz-designed Tiki décor at Bali Ha’i: bamboo walls, Taiwanese spears, Samoan tapa cloth, burlap and palm fronds on the ceiling accented by Japanese fish nets and floats, Tiki gods carved from fern roots and totem poles everywhere. Most of the items were imported from 10 different Pacific islands, giving the restaurant a very authentic Polynesian vibe.

IMAGE PROVIDE D COURTESY OF TH E N EW ORLEAN S PUBLIC LIBRARY, LOUISIAN A DIVISION

Bali Ha’i at Pontchartrain Beach was the creation of Harry Batt Sr., who had developed a great appreciation for Asian culture and food on his many travels. The restaurant was first called the Pontchartrain Beach Comber when it opened in 1958, but a lawsuit from Tiki pioneer Don the Beachcomber resulted in a 1959 name change: Bali Ha’i, taken from the musical South Pacific. The exotic experience began even before arrival at the restaurant. A bamboo-decorated “Sampan Taxi” would pick diners up from the parking lot and deliver them to the Bali Ha’i entry port, an impressive bamboo A-frame peak. There were also shuttles running from the restaurant to downtown New Orleans, complete with onboard Tiki drinks.


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

St. Charles Avenue Magazine November 2018  

St. Charles Avenue Magazine November 2018