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[ WORK SMART ]

TROUBLESHOOTING SPRAY EQUIPMENT

Photo Courtesy of Titan

HANDS-ON ADVICE FOR KEEPING SPRAY EQUIPMENT IN GOOD WORKING ORDER BY JAKE POINIER

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inPAINT | Aug/Sep 2017

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aintaining your spray equipment in proper working order isn’t just about keeping it out of the shop to save on repair costs. Doing so also improves your productivity in painting tasks, and prevents having to take your sprayer apart in the field. And most importantly, smooth-running equipment results in the best-quality finish for your customers. Within your paint-spraying arsenal, you may have a wide range of equipment, from HVLP and conventional to airless or even static charge. But for Peter Weiss, president of the industrial painting company Induspray, success ultimately comes down to cleanliness. “It may sound obvious, but keeping your equipment clean is going to reduce your failures and troubleshooting down to a quarter or less,” he says.

Gas-powered, electric-powered, and air-powered paint sprayers all basically clean up the same way. Use whatever the coating manufacturer recommendation for cleaning, whether soapy water (preferably hot) for waterbased paints or a compatible thinner such as mineral spirits, lacquer thinner, or xylene for petroleum-based paints. If a novice in your crew accidentally cleans with the wrong cleaner, the results can be catastrophic— creating a cottage cheese-like sludge in the machine. Chris Noto, director of products for WAGNER, recommends starting in bypass mode; using the appropriate solution running through the suction tube and returning through the bypass hose for three or four minutes. Once that’s clean, switch the unit from bypass mode (or priming mode) to the spray mode to clean the hose and the spray gun itself.

inPAINT Magazine Aug/Sep 2017  

The magazine for professionals

inPAINT Magazine Aug/Sep 2017  

The magazine for professionals