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hen it comes to overspray, less is always more. Less overspray means more paint gets applied to the intended surface, saving you money on material. It also means less time needs to be spent on prep and cleanup, leaving more time for productive painting. And less overspray also allows sprayers to be used for jobs not normally considered conducive to spraying, like near vehicles or property that must remain untouched by paint—or on breezy days, or when sharing spaces with other contractors.

BY CHRIS NOTO, DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS AT TITAN

Experienced paint contractors will tell you airless sprayers are essential tools that provide better and more uniform coverage while significantly reducing the time required to complete jobs. They will also tell you that overspray, the airborne paint material that doesn’t adhere to the target, is inherent to the process. Overspray is, indeed, a by-product of spraying—and there are ways to minimize and control it. 22

inPAINT | April 2018

Technique First and foremost, reducing overspray starts with technique. Holding the gun approximately 12" from the substrate and parallel to the surface at all times is essential. It’s also important to understand how to adjust the pressure correctly. A common misstep is to set the sprayer to maximum pressure and start the job. The best method is to start at a lower pressure and slowly dial it up until the spray pattern is free of tails and holidays. Technology Spraying at low pressure helps to minimize overspray while reducing wear and tear on the pump and spray tip. Fairly new to the market are high-efficiency airless (HEA) tips. They can spray coatings at 1000 PSI with the same flow and production levels as standard airless

Photo Courtesy of Titan

MANAGING OVERSPRAY WHEN USING W AIRLESS SPRAYERS

inPAINT Magazine April 2018  
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