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for what’s new in technology (they were beta-testers for Quark and Apple in their early years), Hershkovits was an early advocate for social media, especially for his staff. “Give me two tweets and I could tell you the history of humanity,” said Mickey Boardman, who is the most active on social media at the magazine with nearly 90,000 tweets and over 51,000 followers. “I am at my very best when it’s spontaneous and nonsensical— I’m not too serious overall, and Paper is that way, too.” Earlier this year, as their website and digital strategy called for a bit of revamping, Paper has re-introduced a veteran of the brand, Drew Elliott, who came from theAudience and formerly ran ExtraExtra. He is now a partner in the company and their the chief creative officer. “Drew is a genius at amplification,” said Hastreiter. “He is leading this new charge of integration of all content.” In just the past four months, Paper has grown its Instagram following by 70,000 users, and increased its unique web viewers from just under 500,000 to around 750,000 per month. “The thing about Paper that is interesting is discovering the new and introducing people to these types of things,” said Elliott. “There are Paper people out there all over the world and they want to understand what’s happen at the edge of culture. People are much more interested in discovery. And that’s our big advantage,” he added. With Elliott behind the wheel, the publication is continuing with Hastreiter and Hershkovits’ bottom-line of connectivity and discovery while using large-scale,

modern-day tools, allowing them to redefine the emotional relationship with their reader and continuing to achieve that symbiotic connection. The tight-knit atmosphere at Paper—the sense of community that fueled their steady growth for the past 30 years—has turned out to be its biggest asset. Boardman first followed Paper because he had built a niché, heart-to-heart relationship with the brand. “The heart of Paper overall is that we have the enthusiasm of the zine with a slicker production value,” he explained. That crunchy zine mentality is the same still, and the duality of authentic transparency and community cultivation is still at the heart of the operation. The September issue cover with Courtney Love, too, speaks to the aesthetic of what Paper was at its onset: large, block letters dominating an otherwise very simple image. It’s a change, a hark back at their formative years, that Hastreiter embraced with a nonchalant shrug and raise of brow: “We love change. We embrace change. We are old radicals. And we have nothing to lose.” It is as if, amongst all the progress since the magazine first issue 30 years ago, the mentality of representing New York hasn’t faded away and given rise to more shallow publishing ideals. “Certainly coming from our history, starting with [just a] poster, it was very minimal in some ways of what we were trying to do,” Hershkovits started, “but we were connecting with those people. [And] we never really left there. That’s still who we are.”

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Relapse Magazine - Fall 2014  

The Current State of Mind: For this issue, we explore and celebrate the most up-to-date viewpoints in New York City fashion and culture.

Relapse Magazine - Fall 2014  

The Current State of Mind: For this issue, we explore and celebrate the most up-to-date viewpoints in New York City fashion and culture.

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