Page 33

so monochromatic and minimal,” said Garcia. “We don’t have our brand plastered all over the place, so we have to speak in a different language, through the details—it’s in the zippers, in the style lines, in the stitch count.” En Noir’s Fall 2014 show at New York Fashion Week last February was evidence that Garcia’s particularity and self-admitted stubbornness had paid off. The collection, themed “Industrial Grand Minimalism,” debuted to a full house at the legendary Park Avenue Armory and also marked Garcia’s first try at womenswear. The minimal light and coldness of the venue proved a stunning complement to the slew of mostly all-black looks Garcia sent down the runway. “When we had the opportunity to show at the Armory, it was definitely a move,” said Garcia. “It meant putting in the time and effort and resources to make sure the show was done properly. We are still proving that we belong in this high-end realm, because it’s very special, very small, very focused.” One of the most highly anticipated shows at New York Fashion Week, En Noir’s fall collection is a refined and organic progression from previous seasons. Models Yuri Pleskin and Cole Mohr, who were both featured in the past season’s campaign, opened the show with two looks that embody Garcia’s unique approach to what he calls “monochromatic minimalism.” The bad-boy models wore messy hair and layered looks— on Pleskin, a leather jacket with chainmaille details in a cropped silhouette with a tall white tee and scrunched black pants; and on Mohr, a stiff suede leather cardigan over a shiny leather t-shirt and leather pants with reptile leather kneepads. Other standout looks from the collection included a voluminous varsity jacket with leather-striped panels, an asymmetric reptile leather motorcycle jacket, and a fur-lined parka with exaggerated lapels and boxy pockets.

Women who have embraced the men’s leather sweatpant will likely be pleased with En Noir’s womenswear offerings—Garcia tailored some signature men’s silhouettes including the sweatpant and the tank top to better fit the female figure. “I was a little unsure about doing womenswear,” said Garcia. “But when I saw women responding to the way they did to the men’s collection, it seemed natural.” Garcia is very aware of En Noir’s exceptional rise to fame, but humbly credits a combination of good timing and preparation for the success he has experienced thus far. “Being on the fashion calendar is like playing cards at the big table. Everyone shows their hand at the same time. You’re working on your hand and you don’t know what the other guy has, but you want to make sure that when you lay out those cards, you have something solid—that you’re not bluffing.” Obviously not bluffing, he continues to challenge himself as a designer by pursuing collaborations with other labels including luxury sneaker brand Buscemi, fellow LA brand STAMPD and, soon, via GQ, GAP. Only entering En Noir’s second anniversary, Garcia plans to cautiously expand the label’s offerings with a line of accessories, footwear and other lifestyle items in the next few years while staying true to the sinister edginess consumers have come to expect from the brand. The next few years will be pivotal in En Noir’s evolution, but Garcia is in not one for selling out or making hasty decisions, opting instead for consistency and longevity. “The greats are the greats for what they have done,” said Garcia, “but you can’t just follow down their exact trail—do as they’ve done. You kind of have to find your own while always keep in mind the right way to do things—there’s always a right way and wrong way. If you’re not in the game the right way, there’s no way you’ll last.”

33

Relapse Magazine - Fall 2014  

The Current State of Mind: For this issue, we explore and celebrate the most up-to-date viewpoints in New York City fashion and culture.

Relapse Magazine - Fall 2014  

The Current State of Mind: For this issue, we explore and celebrate the most up-to-date viewpoints in New York City fashion and culture.

Advertisement