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Graduate Pascal Zigashane, of the Democratic Republic of Congo, used his diploma to start a community organization to teach social entrepreneurship. He also works with 30 kids in a life-skills program. Zigashane has nearly 20 employees and teaches another 24 students how to code. Kakuma has a good many idle hands but through JWL’s efforts, there is hope. “Really,” said Creighton University President Daniel Hendrickson, S.J., who participated in the graduation ceremony. “JWL represents the best of Jesuit higher education in the world.”

MORE IS NEEDED Days prior to the trip to Kakuma, Fitzgibbons was in Bilbao, Spain, near the birthplace of St. Ignatius Loyola, where leaders of the world’s Jesuit universities engaged on critical social justice issues. For Fitzgibbons, Bilbao was a recruitment trip. Regis has piloted the liberal arts diploma since JWL’s inception and has professors who teach in the program. In coordination with Creighton, Regis will offer an associate’s degree in Healthy Lifestyle Management in the fall of 2019 for the first time. Each school will offer at least 20 scholarships to help JWL graduates continue studying in the camp and complete an associate’s degree. Other graduates took the social work classes and started a transitionary organization for refugees coming into the camp. It helps refugees understand cultural differences, what to expect inside the camp and how to transition from a seemingly normal life

United States, only a handful participate in the JWL program. With more than 65 million people forcibly displaced worldwide, the need for education at the margins has never been greater.

into one set inside the camp.

And the thirst for education has never been stron-

“If you’re not ready, you can get to the point where

applied for 66 positions. In the Dzaleka Refugee

you can lose your mind and become crazy,” said

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Of the 28 Jesuit universities and colleges in the

ger. For the latest cohort in Kakuma, 308 refugees Camp in Malawi, there were more than 400 ap-

Joelle Hangi, a JWL graduate and Congolese

plicants, but only enough resources to educate 59

refugee. “You need someone to help guide you and

students. This year JWL enrolled its largest cohort

to understand in a refugee camp there is only one

ever, as 192 students at 11 sites began the program.

way — forward.”

Half of those are women.

REGIS UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE FALL/WINTER 2018

TOP LEFT: INNOCENT HAVYARIMANA HELPED START A SOAP AND SHAMPOO BUSINESS WITH THE HELP OF JWL. BOTTOM LEFT: REFUGEES IN MALAWI PUMP WATER FROM A WELL IN THE DZALEKA REFUGEE CAMP.

Profile for Marcom

Regis University Magazine - Fall/Winter 2018  

Regis University Magazine - Fall/Winter 2018  

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