Page 1

over

Standard Mail U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 16 Dillsboro, IN

Register Publications 2012 ©

DECEMBER 2012

Down Memory Lane

Making THE CALL, taking a different step

I knew I needed to make the call. Ray’s nose started bleeding around eleven o’clock in the morning. When it had not stopped by one, we went to the local emergency room. The doctor’s first words asked Ray if he was on a blood thinner. “Yes, I am.” “That might make a problem. It did. I watched as he sprayed the inside his nose several times. The bleeding continued. Then he inserted a pad, but it still would not stop. Last, he inserted a larger one and the bleeding lessened. Hoping it would stop, after five anxious hours there, the doctor sent us home. Soon after we were home, the bleeding increased, not a steady flow, but enough to again be concerned.

After we had been dealing with the nose bleed since the morning, I will admit I had a major meltdown. Finally, I pulled myself together and made Doris the call. grandson answered Butt “IsOur your Mom home?’’ “No.” “Do you know when she will be home?” Same answer. “Tell her to call me when she gets home.” I figured Tina, our daughter-inlaw, who is a registered nurse, was teaching an EMT class. After anxiously waiting until a little after nine I called her cell phone and left a message. “Dad has a bloody nose and we don’t know what to do.” Ten minutes later, she called back. The conversation was short. “Do you want me to come?” “Yes.” She was on her way. Tina arrived and surveyed our situ-

ation. Ray was holding a Kleenex to his nose. Our waste paper can was filled with bloody remnants of the situation No doubt, she also read the feeling of desperation in the room. Immediately, she became Nurse Tina. “You need to go back to the emergency room.” Soon Tina loaded us in the van and she drove a distance away to Dearborn County Hospital, where she works. I appreciated that Nurse Tina knew all the folks we met in the emergency room. Ray would get good care. Soon the doctor and a nurse arrived, they closed the curtain as they vacuumed his nose and inserted a balloon to stop the flow. As I sat waiting I thought of my feeling of helplessness that resulted in the call. I must add, our children appreciate the help we have given them through the years and are quite willing to do for us. They had helped us with our

yard sale and moving from the farmstead. Jennie, our oldest daughter, and Frank, her husband, who are retired, helped us by putting up the blinds, our shelves and fans in our new place. Offering to help and accepting is different. I thought back to the times when Ray and I would be awakened from calls from my Mom. I remember the helplessness in her voice. We quickly were on our way, not knowing what to expect. Many times, it ended with accompanying Dad to the hospital. After Dad died, Mom tried living alone, but soon became insecure and went to live with my caring sister, who had a special room for her. After a time there were calls from my sister. Mom died at age 91 while visiting me in Florida. I made the final call. We never received many calls concerning Ray’s folks. His Dad died See CALL, Page 10

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OVER FIFTY

PAGE 2

Auxiliary, hospital mark milestones

Dearborn County Hospital recognizes its Auxiliary every October by hosting a banquet in their honor at the Hollywood Casino Ballroom. This year’s event featured a buffet dinner, followed by the organization’s annual meeting and special entertainment. Highlighting the celebration was the presentation of a check for $40,000 to the hospital from the Auxiliary. This donation was earmarked to provide support for the hospital’s high school internship program for area students. To date, the Auxiliary has contributed approximately $1.92 million to the hospital since the volunteer organization was founded in 1958. Donations from the Auxiliary over the years have assisted the hospital in making numerous equipment purchases and in the development of new services and facilities. Auxiliary funds are derived primarily from the DCH Auxiliary Gift Shop and Snack Bar, along with special projects such as the Dillard’s mini store. During his address, DCH President/ CEO Roger D. Howard recalled one of the first times he experienced the generosity of the Pink Ladies and Red Coats. In his early years at DCH, Howard asked the Auxiliary to purchase a por-

table X-ray machine for use in nursing homes, so that residents wouldn’t need to be transported to the hospital for imaging. Graciously, the Auxiliary agreed to purchase the equipment and shortly thereafter, they also purchased a van so the X-ray machine could be transported more efficiently. “The Auxiliary has shown their support for the hospital in countless ways over the years. We are extremely grateful for the efforts they put forth on behalf of our hospital, our patients and the community at large,” said Howard. Following Howard’s address the Auxiliary held their election of officers. Re-elected to their current offices were Sylvia Plashko, President; Nancy DeWees, First Vice-President; and Jackie Johnston, Corresponding Secretary. Auxiliary officers continuing in their current positions are Marita Cizek, Second Vice-President; Marjorie Waldon, Recording Secretary; Marilyn Courtney, General Treasurer; Barbara Nead, Gift Shop Treasurer; and Betty Swales, Snack Bar Treasurer. The evening continued with the recognition of Auxilians who have reached significant milestones in their hours of service to the hospital. Individual volunteers were recognized

DECEMBER 2012

Roger D. Howard, DCH President/CEO, thanks several of the new Life Members of the Dearborn County Hospital Auxiliary for their service. Life Members pictured with Howard are (left to right) Barbara Rice, Arlene Young and Marita Cizek.

The Dearborn-Ohio County Child Advocate program is looking for volunteers to be the “Voice of A Child”. All neglected or abused children deserves a voice - someone to speak up for their best interest.

See AUXILIARY, Page 7

If you have time, compassion and a love for children, please consider volunteering.

To find out more, visit us at VoiceOfAChild.net or call 812-537-8741. “To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world”


OVER FIFTY December 2012

DECEMBER 2012

LifeTime Resources

SNAC Menu

PAGE 3

December 2012

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

12/3/2012

12/4/2012

12/5/2012

12/6/2012

12/7/2012

Breaded Pork Patty with Gravy

Parmesan Chicken

Breakfast Casserole

Ham and White Beans

Grilled Beef Fingers Brown Gravy

or

or

or

or

Beef with Gravy and Peppers

Meatballs with Gravy

Omelet with Cheese Sauce

Tuna Noodle Au Gratin

or

Whipped Potatoes

Garden Rotini

Hashbrown Potato Patty

Stewed Tomatoes

Garlic Rosemary Chicken

Mixed Vegetables

Seasoned Green Beans

Hot Sliced Apples

Cornbread

Cheesy Potatoes

Wheat Bread

Texas Bread

Wheat Bread

Glazed Fruit

Broccoli

Mixed Fruit

Apple Pie

Cinnamon Cake

Milk

Multigrain Bread Peaches

Milk

Milk

Milk

Margarine

Diet - Same

Diet - Apple Pie

Diet - Cake

Diet - Same

LifeTime Resources, Inc. invites adults ages 60 and over to visit the Senior Nutrition Activity Center in their community. The Senior Nutrition Activity Centers and their directors are: Jeanne Gilliam at North Dearborn Village Apts, at 6568200; Moores Hill Senior Center, Linda Emery at 744-8657; Madison Senior Center, Karen Lewis at 2655376; Dearborn Adult Center, Janet Tonne at 539-2102; Buckeye Village, Dee Huskey at 689-4234; Rising Sun Senior Citizen Bldg., Sharon Holland at 438-2468; Switzerland Co. Senior Center, Debbie Cox at 427-3626. Reservations should be made a day in advance. Suggested contribution is $2.25 for lunch. Transportation is available. We are serving an alternate entree at all SNAC locations except Sunman. Let the director know when you are choosing an alternate entree when calling for reservations.

Milk Diet - Same

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

12/10/2012

12/11/2012

12/12/2012

12/13/2012

12/14/2012

Pulled Pork

Ham, Broccoli, & Rice Casserole

Beef Spaghetti Casserole

Pork Tenderloin

Swiss Steak

or

or

or

Brown Gravy

or

Chicken Breast

Spanish Beef Patty

Brunswick Stew

or

Honey Mustard Chicken Thigh

Crispy Cubed Potatoes

Lima Beans

Tossed Salad

Meatballs with Gravy

Scalloped Potatoes

Hamburger Bun

Sliced Carrots

Texas Bread

Baked Sweet Potato

Mixed Vegetables

Hot Cinnamon Applesauce

Wheat Bread

Apple Crisp

Broccoli and Cauliflower

Wheat Roll

Milk

Fresh Fruit

Milk

Wheat Bread

Blushing Pears

Mayonnaise/Mustard

Chocolate Cake

Assorted Salad Dressing

Fruit Salad

Milk

Diet - Same

Milk

Diet - Hot Sliced Apples

Milk

Diet - Same

Diet - Cake

Diet - Same

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

12/17/2012

12/18/2012

12/19/2012

12/20/2012

12/21/2012

Salisbury Beef

Ham and White Beans

BBQ Pork Rib Patty

Oven Fried Chicken Thigh

Christmas

Brown Gravy

or

or

or

Roast Beef with Gravy

or

Chicken Noodle Casserole

Breaded Chicken Patty

Creole Steak

or

Lemon Pepper Fish

Scalloped Apples

Hot Potato Salad

Baked Potato

Sliced Ham

Whipped Potatoes

Country Tomatoes

Hamburger Bun

Mixed Vegetables

Scalloped Potatoes

Brussels Sprouts

Cornbread Muffin

Peach Crisp

Wheat Bread

Italian Vegetables

Wheat Bread

Fruit Cocktail

Milk

Milk

Wheat Bread

Fresh Fruit

Milk

Diet - Hot Peaches

Citrus Fruit Cup

Cherry Pie

Milk

Diet - Same

Diet - Same

Sour Cream

Milk

Diet - Same

Diet - Cake

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

12/24/2012

12/25/2012

12/26/2012

12/27/2012

12/28/2012

Chicken and Dumplings

Oven Fried Chicken Thigh

Turkey Breast with Gravy

or

or

or

Ham and White Beans

Swiss Steak

Sliced Ham Macaroni and Cheese

Closed for Holiday

Closed for Holiday

Spinach

Baked Potato

Cornbread Muffin

Peas and Carrots

Green Beans

Peach Pie

Wheat Bread

Blushing Pears

Milk

Fresh Orange

Birthday Cake

Diet - Peach Pie

Milk

Milk

Sour Cream

Diet - Cake

SENIOR MENU

Browser 6 Classifieds 5 Senior Source

Diet - Same Monday 12/31/2012 Lemon Pepper Chicken Thigh or Meatloaf

I

Brown Gravy Whipped Potatoes

SOCIAL SECURITY & SSI

Diced Beets Whole Grain Bread Diced Peaches Milk Diet - Same

OVER FIFTY

A monthly issue dedicated to the interests of Southeastern Indiana residents over age 50. Neither the advertiser or the publisher are responsible for ­misinformation herein contained. Over Fifty Magazine reserves the right to accept or reject all news and advertising copy which in the sole judgement of the publisher/editor may not be suitable for publication.

©2012 OVER FIFTY Magazine, Inc.

Deadline: The deadline for news and advertising copy in on or before the 15th of the preceding month in which you desire ­publication. Advertising - 812-537-0063

Editorial Office, P.O. Box 4128, Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 Phone (812) 537-0063 Fax (812) 537-0290 A DIVISION OF REGISTER PUBLICATIONS, LAWRENCEBURG, IN

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PAGE 4

OVER FIFTY

Know cataract risk factors

As men and women age, they can experience certain physical changes and health challenges. Vision impairment is one condition that many associate with aging, and cataracts are a primary concern for those of middle-age and older. Today, more than 22 million Americans age 40 and older have cataracts. According to the National Eye Institute, by age 80, more than half of all Americans will either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. Cataract is clouding of the eye's lens that blocks or changes the passage of light into the eye. Normally the lens is clear, which allows light to pass through to the back of the eye, so that a person can see welldefined images. If a cataract forms and the lens becomes covered in an opaque film, light cannot pass through easily. The result will be fuzzy vision, almost like looking through a fogged-up

window. If cataracts are not treated, an individual may eventually lose most of his or her vision. One or both eyes can be affected by cataracts. In the case of both eyes being compromised, one eye is usually worse than the other. The primary risk factor for developing cataracts is age. The older a person is, the greater their risk. However, there are several other risk factors as well. ■■ Intense heat or long-term exposure to UV rays from the sun ■■ Certain diseases, such as diabetes ■■ Obesity ■■ High blood pressure ■■ Inflammation in the eye ■■ Hereditary influences ■■ Long-term steroid use ■■ Eye injuries ■■ Other eye diseases ■■ Smoking Prevent Blindness America provides free information to the public on everything from cataract basics to tips on

Considerations when building in-law suites Perhaps thanks to a struggling economy and an unpredictable stock market that has resulted in many retirement nest eggs being decimated, more and more adult children are welcoming their aging parents into their homes. Such living situations have led to a growth in in-law suites. In fact, in 2010 the National Association of Home Builders found that 62 percent of builders surveyed were working on home modifications related to aging. In-law suites are often created by converting a room in the house, such as the basement or even a garage, into a livable suite. Such suites can benefit elderly relatives who might have been dealt an unforeseen financial blow. But in-law suites can also benefit younger homeowners who want to see their parents more. In addition, when older men and women move in with their adult children, they can provide some necessary relief from the escalating cost of

daycare. But before building an in-law suite in their home, homeowners might want to heed the following tips. ■Be ■ certain it is legal. Making changes to your home may require a permit, particularly if your in-law suite will be an entirely new addition to your property and not just a strict room remodel. Contact your local zoning board to ensure the project is within your rights as a homeowner. ■Consider ■ the health of your in-laws when making plans. Many in-law suites are occupied by aging relatives who might not be able to get up and down stairs as easily as they used to. That makes accessibility of the suite a top priority. Typically, it's best to locate inlaw suites on the first floor, so relatives won't find it difficult to get in and out of the suite. ■Don't ■ overlook privacy. Just because your parents or in-laws will be moving in doesn't mean they don't still value their See SUITE, Page 7

what to expect from cataract surgery. Visit preventblindness.org/cataract or call its toll free number at (800) 3312020. And, as part of its new Healthy Eyes Educational Series, PBA offers a specific online module on cataracts, including a Power Point presentation and guide. The organization shares this information about cataracts: Early symptoms of a cataract may include cloudy or blurry vision. Lights may cause a glare, seem too dim or seem too bright. Sufferers may also find it difficult to read or drive, especially at night. Individuals may have to change their eyeglass prescriptions often. There are no medications or other treatment options besides surgery to correct cataracts. In the United States, cataract surgery has a 95 percent success rate, and patients often have 20/20 or 20/40 vision post-surgery. Cataract surgery is also

DECEMBER 2012

the most frequently performed surgery, often performed as an outpatient procedure. In Canada, where, according to Statistics Canada, seniors will make up 21 percent of the population by 2026, cataract surgery is also frequent and well tolerated. Approximately 250,000 cataract surgeries take place in Canada each year, according to The National Coalition for Vision Health. It is widely recommended to get regular eye exams to check for cataracts early on. "By getting a complete, dilated eye exam, your doctor can discuss with you the best strategy to protect your vision well into the future," said Hugh R. Parry, president and CEO of Prevent Blindness America. "We encourage everyone, especially those ages 40 and older, to make their vision a priority by scheduling an eye appointment today."


OVER FIFTY

DECEMBER 2012

Senior Source

Dear Senior Source, Q. I am 62 years old and going through treatment for prostate cancer. Even though I am going through treatments, I am still going to the office and working regularly. My job is in sales and my appearance has always been important. I don't mind that people know that I have cancer, I just don't want to look like I have cancer. Since I have started radiation and chemotherapy treatments, I have lost weight and hair, and my skin is taking on a yellowish hue. My normal grooming routine does not seem to be working like it used to before my diagnosis. Are there any resources for grooming while going through cancer treatments? A. Most people know that cancer treatments are harsh and can leave an extremely visible effect on the person receiving the treatment. Sometimes that visible effect can have a negative effect on your work and social life. This can lead to diminished morale when you are already feeling sicker than you ever have before and fighting for your life. It is common to think that only women care about their looks and fear how their looks will change during treatment. However, if you’re a man going through cancer treatment and your appearance has always been important both personally and professionally, it is perfectly normal to be concerned

and look for ways to counteract. Several studies have shown that when you look good on the outside, you feel good on the inside. Dressing up and being clean can be a big morale booster. The organizers of Look Good…Feel Better for Men keeps this in mind as they try to help people with cancer maintain their outer appearance. Look Good…Feel Better for Men assist men who need help trying to minimize the effect cancer treatments have on their body and appearance. Some suggestions include using an electric razor to prevent cuts and infections, using gentle soaps for washing, using concealer to cover discolorations, and wearing relaxed or casual fit clothing to hide weight loss or gain. For more information visit www. lookgoodfeelbetterformen.org There is also a program for women going through cancer that goes into a little more detail regarding hair and make-up. Look Good…Feel Better has free workshops at local sites to help women feel their best. For more information visit www.lookgoodfeelbetter.org. I hope this information has been helpful to you and as always, "May the Source be with You!" The Source is written by Jennifer R. McClellan, Community Relations Assistant of LifeTime Resources, Inc. 13091 Benedict Drive, Dillsboro, IN 47018. If you would like to ask her a question, feel free to write in or call. E-mail:jmcclellan@lifetime-resources. org, phone (812) 432-5215.

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PAGE 5


OVER FIFTY

PAGE 6

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DECEMBER 2012

AUXILIARY, From Page 2

and presented with pins or numbered guards. Those honored were: ■■500 hours: Vicky Hendrick, Lesley Holbert, Andy Lawson and Paul Titkemeyer ■■1,000 hours: Leona Adams, Jackie Campbell, Mike O’Neal and John Vincent ■■2,000 hours: Marilyn Courtney, Stella Dobson, Pat Garrison, Johanna Witte and Arlene Young ■■3,000 hours: Bonnie Knox, Barbara Nead, Barbara Rice and Luther Rice ■■4,000 hours: Jean Benning, Sylvia Plashko and Dorothy Svara ■■5,000 hours: Marjorie Waldon ■■6,000 hours: Carolyn Bailiff ■■7,000 hours: Karen Luers ■■8,000 hours: Nancy DeWees and Phyllis Johnson ■■9,000 hours: Wilma Holden ■■11,000 hours: Betty Swales ■■12,000 hours: Ruth Wilson. Ten years ago, DCH began recognizing

OVER FIFTY volunteers who had reached milestones in age and volunteer service by honoring them as Life Members. This year, John Borgman, Marita Cizek, Shirley Morris, Barbara Rice and Arlene Young were recognized and presented with Life Member pins. In addition, the Auxiliary presented Luella Ropers, the organization’s most senior member, with a gift of flowers. Performers Liz Comstock and Greg Lee concluded the evening by singing songs from the early 1900s to the 1960s. They also took requests from the audience. New volunteers are welcomed by the Auxiliary. Volunteers serve the hospital by assisting in the following areas: Gift Shop, Hospice, Information Desk, Outpatient Services, Sewing Room, Snack Bar and Community Relations and as Messengers. They also help at special events such as the annual Health-A-Fair. Persons interested in joining the DCH Auxiliary should call Plashko at 1-812-5378217 or 1-800-676-5572, ext. 8217.

PAGE 7

SUITE, From Page 4

privacy. Chances are your relatives will initially feel as though they are invading your space and your privacy, so be sure the suite affords adequate privacy to all members of the household. It might be best to build the suite so it has its own separate entrance from the rest of the home. The suite should also have its own full bathroom and, if possible, its own kitchen area so your in-laws can cook for themselves and entertain their own guests without feeling like a burden. A second kitchen is also something to discuss with a zoning board, as some locales prohibit having two complete kitchens in a single residence. ■■ Tailor certain amenities to the elderly. If your in-laws are older, install certain amenities, such as grab bars in the shower and bathroom, during the initial construction so you won't have to make changes down the road. In-

stall easy-open drawers and make sure the suite has ample lighting. ■Remember ■ to install safety features. Safety features like fire, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are a necessity. Make sure the alarms on each of these detectors are loud enough so elderly men and women who have hearing loss can hear them without issue. Make sure all walkways leading to the in-law suite have motion detecting lamps at night to reduce risk of falling. Also, if the suite will be a separate building from your house, such as a converted pool house or detached garage, install an intercom system that connects with the main house so your relatives can easily reach you in case of emergency. In-law suites are becoming more popular as a greater number of older adults are moving in with their adult children. Such suites can bring families closer together and prove beneficial for all parties involved

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OVER FIFTY

PAGE 8

DECEMBER 2012

Warm the Children needs donations, volunteers

Back for another year, Warm the Children is expecting about 200 to 300 children to be referred. At $80 per child that adds up to $24,000 if 300 children are referred. With money rolled over from last year, and donations so far, “we still need about $10,000 in donations this year,” said WTC coordinator Brooke Thies. Every donation to WTC counts, whether it is $5 from a child to help another, $50 from an individual, $500 from a company or a $1,000 grant from a community foundation, it all helps, she said. So far, donations have been coming steadily, and about $10,000 is still needed, said Thies. The greatest need, however, is volunteers. “We’d like to have as many people as possible volunteering to shop, so we can get done well before Christmas and really cold weather,” said Thies. Students who need community ser-

vice hours for scholarships can use the volunteer shopping trips toward those hours, said Thies. “If you’re under 18, you’ll need to bring your mom or dad with you, though,” she said. Thies will have a form for students after they have completed their shopping trips as volunteer shoppers, she said. Adults and retirees also are more than welcome to volunteer to shop, just call The Register, 1-812-537-0063 and leave a message. Meanwhile, this year also has seen some changes made to Warm The Children. All referrals are now made by Southesastern Indiana Economic Opportunity Corporation. After partnering with them last year we decided they are our best resource in the community to help us with the referral process, said Thies.

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This feeling is mutual, said Kimberly Elliot from the SIEOC, “we are thrilled to be partnering with The Register again this year.” Elliot said during the referral process families are asked to comment on how the program will benefit their family as a whole. Elliot said many families report that after paying their bills they struggle to find the extra money to buy their child or children the winter clothing they need. Thies said WTC is run by volunteers at The Register, and people from the community who go shopping with the families. After The Register gets referrals from SIEOC, Thies assigns a child and his or her parent or guardian to a volunteer shopper. The volunteer shoppers contact the family, and set up an appointment to meet them at the Aurora Wal-Mart Su-

perCenter where all shopping takes place. Then it is time for the families to go shopping. Children and their families can pick out coats, hats, boots, pants and other warm winter clothing, including underwear and socks. The shoppers have a form to fill out for each child detailing the purchases, and after the trip, the form is returned to The Register along with a receipt from the transaction. The transactions are tax-free, and donations to WTC are tax deductible because WTC has Internal Revenue Service 501-3-C nonprofit status, said Thies. To volunteer to shop, call Brooke Thies at 1-812-537-0063 ext 112. To make a donation, mail it to Warm The Children, c/o The Dearborn County Register, P.O. Box 4128, Lawrenceburg, IN 47025.


DECEMBER 2012 CLUES ACROSS 1. 1st Hall of Famer Ty 5. Coat with plaster 9. Reciprocal of a sine (abbr.) 12. Jai __, sport 13. Straight muscles 14. 10 = 1 dong 15. Peru's capital 16. Of a main artery 17. Latin for hail 18. Give birth to a horse 19. Colors material 20. Triglyceride is one 22. Take a plane hostage 24. Margarines 25. A tributary of the Missouri River 26. Bring up children 27. 3rd tone of the scale 28. Light boat (French) 31. Relating to geometry 33. Cursed, obstinate 34. Aluminum 35. Sec. of State 1981-82 36. Barn towers 39. Bonito genus

OVER FIFTY 40. Deep ravines 42. Spirit in "The Tempest" 43. Small restaurant 44. Bambi for example 46. Actor DeCaprio 47. Ambled or strolled 49. Cleanse with soap and water 50. Atomic mass unit 51. Var. of emir 52. Supplemented with difficulty 53. Manuscripts (abbr.) 54. Frambesia 55. Auld lang __, good old days CLUES DOWN 1. A young cow 2. Collection of miscellaneous pieces 3. Mali capital 4. Onion rolls 5. "10" actress Bo 6. Performs in a play 7. Iguana genus 8. Fox's Factor host

9. French hat 10. One who rescues 11. Female students 13. Rolls-__, luxury car 16. Slow tempos 21. Relating to the ileum 23. Irish flautist 28. Sleeping place 29. Indicates position 30. Prepared for competition 31. One who shows the way 32. Of I 33. Decayed teeth 35. Seraglios 36. More free from danger 37. Great amounts 38. Surreptitious 39. Arabian greeting 40. Angel food and carrot 41. # of ancient wonders 43. Ball of thread or yarn 45. To interpret: explain 48. Doctors' group Answers on Page 11

PAGE 9


OVER FIFTY

PAGE 10

Old Friends and Bright Beginnings’ monthly luncheon Dec. 6 Old Friends and Bright Beginnings’ monthly luncheon will be Dec. 6, at Dearborn Hills United Methodist Church at 11:30 a.m. Lunch will be catered by B&P Grubbs. They will be serving roast beef, mashed potatoes, gravy, vegetable medley, Christmas Crunch Salad, bread and dessert. Your reservation and $8 will be appreciated by Dec. 1 by contacting Lois Gellert 812-4872026 or Thelma Stutz 812-6375569. We are looking forward to some special entertainment by the 45-member East Central High School Concert Chorus under the direction of Donna Tanner. They will be singing Christmas songs and will be featuring some soloists. In the spirit of Christmas, we are making our annual plea ask-

ing you to bring canned goods and non-perishable food items for the North Dearborn Food Pantry. It is our hope you will be generous at this time of need. Loretta Steffans will be leading the devotions. We extend a very large Thank You to Mr. Jim Helms, Chancellor of Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana for his very humorous and challenging speech at the November luncheon. Mr. Helms has such a great talent for keeping his audience laughing continuously and also presenting a good meaningful message. We certainly appreciate his taking this time from his busy schedule to be with us. Also thanks to Mr. Jon Batch for his timely devotions on counting our blessings and thanks to B&P for the excellent Thanksgiving meal.

Remember Senior volleyball Dec. 13. Only once this month due to Christmas week.

Next Luncheon will be Jan. 3, 2013

DECEMBER 2012

CALL,

From Page 1 suddenly from a heart attack at age sixty-five. Later, I began to appreciate how often Ray’s sister, who lived nearby, must have responded to the calls from his mother who continued to live at the home placer for fifteen years. She died after a short stay in a nursing home. Ray’s sister made that last call. We have handled all sorts of my operations together. We have no fears as I face knee replacement this winter. We have our operation routine. Jennie and Frank have offered to come if we need them. We will see. It was a serious nose bleed brought us down. Ray wore the insert in his nose for five very unpleasant days before it was removed. Then he wore a large band

aid mustache for two days before his nose stopped bleeding from the irritation from the removal of the insert. Even though I knew there were tons of health happening worse, it was no fun to see him in such discomfort. However, that life trauma is over. When I made that first help call, I felt our fifty-four years of independence made a big lean toward dependence. Ray and I may not need to call for help again for a long time, but we must admit it is that time of our lives. Caring for each other may not be enough. Doris Butt is a retired teacher, and can be reached at raydoris53@aol.com.


OVER FIFTY

DECEMBER 2012

PAGE 11

Rehab is work. But it can also be fun. Gourmet dining. Fine linens. Personal concierge service. This is rehab? Our Home Again rehabilitation service will pamper you while you undergo physical, occupational or speech therapy. You’ll work out with some of the most modern equipment, using innovative therapy approaches with proven results. And once you’re ready to return home, we’ll send you back with prepared meals and do a home inspection to insure your safety. To find out how we can help you or someone you love transition smoothly back home, call us to schedule a personal tour.

Did you know?

As one of the oldest bowl games played in the United States, the Sun Bowl is traditionally played every year during the last week of December in El Paso, Texas. College teams face off for one last game of the year at Sun Bowl Stadium on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso. The Sun Bowl was previously held at El Paso High School Stadium and Kidd Field. In addition to the game on the field each year, the Sun Court is an annual tradition as well. Rooted in tradition that has endured for 70 years, the Sun Court competition presents the titles of Sun Queen, a Sun Lady-in-Waiting and Sun Princesses to El Paso women who go on to promote their city and volunteer as community ambassadors.

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OVER FIFTY

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DECEMBER 2012

DEARBORN ADULT CENTER & DIAMOND TOURS

2013 TRIP SCHEDULE Departing from 311 W. Tate St., Lawrenceburg, IN @ 8 am

For more information & reservations contact Marie Edwards - 812-539-3113

Miami & Key West, Florida

Fabulous shopping at Bayside Marketplace

9 Days • 8 Nights Saturday - Sunday February 16 - 24, 2013

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Mount Rushmore, the Badlands & Black Hills of South Dakota

9 Days • 8 Nights Saturday - Sunday June 22 - 30, 2013

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U.S. Presidents immortalized in stone at Mt. Rushmore

• Motorcoach transportation • 8 nights lodging including • Motorcoach transportation 4 consecutive nights in • 8 night lodging - 4 nights in South Dakota Miami Area • 14 meals: 8 breakfasts Spectacular Badlands Magnificent Ocean Drive • 13 meals: 8 breakfasts & 6 dinners National Park & 5 dinners • Tour of Wildlife Loop Road at Custer State Park • A cruise by celebrity homes on • Guided Tour of Deadwood, plus Biscayne Bay gaming at a Deadwood Casino • A visit to the beautiful • Visit to the amazing Crazy Horse oceanfront Hollywood Beach The Famous 7 Mile Crazy Horse Monument Memorial Bridge to Key West to be 10x the size of Mt. “Boardwalk” • Visit to the spectacular Rushmore • Free time in famous South Beach Badlands National Park • Visit to the Mount Rushmore • A visit to exciting Key West National Memorial • A visit to Bayside Marketplace Admission to the Unique • Guided tour of Miami Celebrity Spotting Cruise Journey Museum Wildlife enhances the on Biscayne Bay • Much, much more! and much more pristine Black Hills *Price per person, based on double occupancy. Additional charge may be added for single occupancy. Call for more information - (812) 539-3113


Over50-Dec.2012-Pg  
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