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HolidayGUIDE Gift //november2013

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2 • Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14

Gift for those who help us Great gifts under $50 Do you have to find the perfect gift for less than $50 to please someone you love? Here are a few ideas.

For her

A cozy blanket or throw for cocooning, a therapeutic massage, a gift certificate for a spa, a professional facial, a pair of elegant leather gloves, a little black dress, a jewelry stand, a bathrobe, a relaxing cushion for the bath, sunglasses, a fountain pen, fine chocolates, a mixer for making smoothies, champagne glasses, a famous chef’s recipe book, or a beautifully illustrated cookbook.

For him

Earphones, speakers for an MP3 player, a digital tablet, a tablet stand, a DVD collection of a popular TV series, a wine aerator, a wine decanter, a good bottle of wine, a corkscrew, a cheese knife, cufflinks, beautiful slippers, sexy underwear, a free-standing hammock, or a BBQ recipe book.

For children and teenagers

A push scooter, snowshoes, a smart phone accessory (holder, case, earphones), a stylish bag or backpack, a jewelry box, a pretty watch, a change purse, or a slush machine.

For baby

Comfortable clothing, sturdy toys, unscented products for delicate skin, a cuddly blanket, a stuffed toy, a pair of slippers, an exerciser, or a digital scale. These will be sure to please baby, or Mom and Dad!

Holiday gift-giving etiquette can be confusing, especially when it comes to gifting those men and women who aren’t necessarily friends or family members, but still help us out in a variety of ways. Deciding how to thank the people who intersect our lives by delivering mail or cleaning the pool can take a little ingenuity. Gifting preferences often vary from region to region. What might be acceptable in a certain area of the country may be frowned upon elsewhere. For example, in urban areas cash gifts are usually appreciated, whereas rural, close-knit communities tend to give homemade gifts. The rule to remember, above all, is that if a gift is given with good intentions, it should be happily received. That being said, here are some general guidelines for gifting those men and women who help us throughout the year. ■■Determine your list. Think about the people with whom you interact regularly. The sanitation workers who pick up the trash twice a week and your mail carrier may take priority over the hairstylist you visit once every month or two. ■■Establish a budget. The holiday season can be costly, so set a firm limit on what

you plan to give, perhaps between $10 and $20 each, and stick to that budget for each recipient. ■■Recognize that not everyone is allowed to accept gifts. Some service providers are not allowed to accept cash gifts or presents. Government employees, for example, may be prohibited from accepting cash gifts or gifts that exceed a predetermined amount. With this in mind, gloves or a gift basket may be your best option. ■■Gift a little more to personal care professionals. Your hairstylists, masseuse or anyone who performs more personal tasks for you may warrant a larger gift. Etiquette suggests giving a gift equal to the price of one session of service, even if that gift is cash. Therefore if your hair cut costs $35, gift $35. ■■Health and child care employees warrant special treatment. A private nurse, nanny or nursing home worker should be gifted for the holidays. Avoid cash gifts with health service providers, opting for a more personal gift that is a token of your affection and appreciation. If gifts are not allowed, consider making a charitable donation in the person’s name.

Holiday Baking-Candy Making

Serendipity’s Specialty Foods

Bulk Foods • Spices Custom Gift Baskets Organic Foods Gluten Free Foods Candy Making & More Family Owned & Operated 690 W. Eads Pkwy, Lawrenceburg Located in plaza between Skyline Chili & Penn Station

Holiday Hours Starting Nov. 4 Monday-Saturday • 10am-8pm

812-537-3663


Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14 •

3

Classes, supplies & more all at Adam’s Art Adam Gilliam likes a challenge. He’s constantly adding classes, supplies and opportunities. Upcoming challenges include a bookbinding class, and teaming up with another local business. This year marks his second anniversary in downtown Lawrenceburg, and the business has been growing since he opened Dec. 5, 2011. One of his most popular offerings are painting parties. Folks bring their own snacks, hors d’ ourves, wine, etc., and everyone paints the same picture. “Those are a lot of fun,” said Gilliam. The shop will be hosting its first kids party soon, and Gil-

liam is even up to the challenge of teenagers. He has plans for a Manga class at the Lawrenceburg librar y soon, and will be part

Adam’s Art & Supply, 303 Walnut St. Lawrenceburg, has supplies for kids, amateurs and professionals. Owner Adam Gilliam also offers a wide range of classes for kids, teens and adults.

of Small Business Saturday, Nov. 30. Lawrenceburg will have a Cookie and Craft Walk. For $2 per adult there will be cookies and crafts at several downtown businesses.

See ART, Page 8

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4 • Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14

Coalition needs toy donations, vols

Gifts for apprentice chefs At gift-giving time, amateur chefs are really easy to please. That’s because having the right tools is a cook’s real secret ingredient. When shopping, all you have to do is keep in mind two key words: preparation and cooking. To make food preparation more enjoyable, a set of good-quality knives would make any home chef happy. Even better: offer individual professional knives. A real chef ’s knife can cost between $50 and $300, so to receive one as a gift is a real treat. Other ideas that spring to mind include a good vegetable peeler, a selection of cutting boards, or spatulas and high density wooden spoons. For amateur pastry chefs, a set of piping bags for decorating cakes is another ideal choice. You could also opt for kitchen appliances worthy of a real chef ’s kitchen—if your budget is large enough, that is. Then again, there is usually a vast price and quality range, so something for any size of wallet can be found. A food processor or a stand mixer is sure to thrill, or more modest gifts include a blender, ideal for soups and purées, or a mandolin for

finely slicing foods. A couple of hints: don’t let yourself be impressed by the size of the box and avoid buying cheap products. A real amateur chef will appreciate a small, well-made appliance more than a large, inefficient machine. Lastly, think cooking and think quality! While some people would be thrilled to receive a simple sandwich grill, others would prefer a large professional-quality wok or a frying pan with a heavy base or made of ceramic. A miniature frying pan designed to cook eggs is also a great idea for those who love a cooked breakfast. Gifts for apprentice chefs At gift-giving time, amateur chefs are really easy to please. That’s because having the right tools is a cook’s real secret ingredient. When shopping, all you have to do is keep in mind two key words: preparation and cooking. To make food preparation more enjoyable, a set of good-quality knives would make any home chef happy. Even better: offer individual professional knives. A real chef ’s knife can cost between $50 and

See CHEFS, Page 8

The Coalition for Children’s Christmas Toys is looking for volunteers as well as donations. The coalition is a 501-c3 organization made up of folks from churches, non-profit groups, and businesses combining their efforts to better organize the collection and distribution of Christmas toys for the needy children of our community. It operates as an arm of The Clearinghouse Food Pantry. This year the coalition will be housed in the Backman building at 411 George St., Aurora. Clearinghouse director Karry Hollan said the coalition appreciates the space donated by William and Cathey Backman This year the coalition will be taking donations as well as organizing them from Monday, Dec. 2 through Friday, Dec. 20. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Evenings are by appointment. How to help: ■■Collect and bring new, unwrapped toys and games to Coalition Center. The coali-

tion will not be collecting clothing this year. Last day to accept toys is Dec. 16, 2013 ■■Request a toy collection barrel for your workplace, church, or school beginning Nov. 11 ■■ Work at the Coalition Center beginning Monday, Dec. 2 through Friday, Dec. 20. ■■ Help with interviewing candidates at the main location in Aurora on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. (talk to Karry Hollan about this) ■■ Sponsor a family. ■■ Give a monetary donation for toy purchases. ■■ Sort and organize toy donations. Help box wish lists. ■■Help with toy distribution, and clean up afterward, Friday, Dec. 20. To volunteer or for more information, call Hollan at 1-812-926-1198 or 1-812221-4248, email her at hchollan@yahoo. com, or check the Clearinghouse website at www.theclearinghouse.ning.com.

...the greatest gift you can give your loved ones is your safety.

Don’t drink and drive this holiday season. A message from your friends at

812.532.3538 or 812.537.5065 www.dearborncountycasa.com


Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14 •

E

very holiday

season Hillforest Victorian House Museum, Fifth Street, Aurora, takes on the nostalgic feeling of Christmas past as the 1855 home is adorned in traditional holiday décor.

Hillforest was home to industrialist and financier Thomas Gaff and his family from 1855 to 1891 and is a prime example of Italianate architecture. Hillforest was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1992, and has been open as a house museum serving the touring public since 1956. The mansion offers visitors a glimpse of the lifestyle of a wealthy family living in the Victoria America. Guided tours featuring the “Victorian Christmas” exhibit are available 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday through Dec. 29. Admission is $6 for 14 and up; $3 for students, 7-13; and is free for children 6

Did you know?

Many Christmas traditions are older than some celebrants might think. The tradition of lighting up a Christmas tree, for example, dates back to the days before Christmas lights. Before electric-powered twinkle lights were invented and even before electricity was discovered, people used actual candles to adorn the Christmas tree. As one can imagine, having an open flame next to a dried-out tree was risky, so it was customary to keep a bucket of water next to the tree in the case of fire. As if fire wasn’t enough, the tinsel used to decorate trees was made from strips of silver and even lead -- something that is now known to be a health hazard to adults and children alike. Although we’ve come a long way since candles and lead, even now trees that are overly dry and decorated with lights that have frayed wires can just as easily lead to fires. Plus, plastic tinsel can be a choking hazard for children and pets. One Christmas staple that has lost its status as a safety hazard isthe poinsettia plant. It has long been thought that poinsettias are poisonous to people and animals. While there is some toxicity to the plant, it would require the ingestion of hundreds of leaves to get a toxic dose of a plant’s poison.

and under. Hillforest will hold its Holiday Open House from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 7, featuring periodic entertainment, costumed docents, and refreshments. Hillforest Victorian Tea Times will be Thursday, Dec. 5, Tuesday, Dec. 10, and Thursday, Dec. 12, beginning at 1 p.m. The event includes a tour of the museum, a three-course tea served in the elegant Hillforest parlors featuring delicious seasonal treats, and flavored tea. Cost is $22 for Hillforest members and $25 for non-members. Attendance to a tea requires a prepaid reservation, which may be placed by calling 812-926-0087 or visiting www.hillforest.org. Hillforest thanks Indiana Michigan Power, Lawrenceburg, for sponsorship of Hillforest’s holiday events.

Warm

the

Children

Providing New Winter Clothing For Needy Children Winter weather is just around the corner and children in Dearborn County need your help!

How can I help, you ask?

It’s easy! Please fill out the form below indicating how you would like to help children in need this year and submit it to:

Warm

the

Children

c/o Brooke Thies Register Publications P.O. Box 4128 Lawrenceburg, IN 47025

Or stop by our office at 126 W. High Street in Lawrenceburg. You can also reach our office at 812-537-0063 for information or questions, or to sign up to be a volunteer shopper. * Families interested in receiving help must contact Kimberly Elliot at SIEOC 812-926-1585 or toll free at 888-292-5475 or visit 110 Importing St, Aurora, IN 47001. Enclosed is my donation to

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5


6 • Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14

Find your Treasure

Looking for a unique gift for a friend or family member? Need something clever and reasonably priced for the office gift exchange? Look no farther than Hidden Treasures, 134 Walnut St., Lawrenceburg. Owners Lisa and Al Schrand came here as part of Lawrenceburg Main Street’s Pop Up Shop campaign, but they knew they wanted to stay here permanently. Hidden Treasure’s will mark its first anniversary Saturday, Nov. 23, with a sale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. And if the shopping leaves you in need of a snack, there will aslo be refreshments. They’re active in Lawrenceburg Main Street, and Lisa Schrand helped get a grant through American Express for the group’s Cookie and Craft Walk during Small Business Saturday, Nov. 30. There is a nominal $2 charge per child or adult participating, but it’s going to be a lot of fun, said Lisa Schrand. The Schrands keep new items coming in all the time, so the store is never the same. And to help folks with their Christmas budSee FIND, Page 8

Fun games for a successful party Is your annual Christmas party about as exciting as a funeral? Here are a few suggestions for games that are sure to put the fun back into the festive season.

■■Winner: the one who succeeds in unwrapping the gift. ■■Tip: when wrapping, be sure to use lots of boxes and plastic bags and excessive amounts of tape!

The yes/no game ■■Preparation: give five clothes pins to each guest, which they will attach to their clothing. ■■Goal: throughout the evening, avoid saying either “yes” or “no” in your conversations, at the risk of losing a peg to the person who tricked you into saying either one. ■■Winner: the last person to have one peg remaining. Pass the parcel ■■Preparation: wrap up a gift with several layers of paper. ■■Goal: sitting in a circle, each participant has a turn rolling the die until someone gets a “6”. The lucky one must then quickly put on a pair of oven mitts (a hat and scarf are optional) and try to unwrap the gift until someone else rolls a “6” and so on.

Mystery jar ■■Preparation: fill a glass jar (or any other transparent container) with candies. ■■ Goal: without them being able to touch it, ask guests to write down their guess at the number of candies in the jar. ■■ Winner: the one who guesses the closest number to the answer. This person also wins the great pleasure of sampling the goodies! ■■ Tip: choose candies of varying sizes, shapes, and colors. Don’t forget to count them before closing the jar! Old favorites such as charades are also suitable for all occasions and all age groups. And don’t forget another “new” classic: karaoke! Lots of fun guaranteed!

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Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14 •

A Christmas Playlist Decorations and shopping are integral parts of the holiday season, but very often it is the music being played over the airwaves that sets the tone for the festivities to come. Christmas music has been enjoyed for decades and certain compositions are widely loved and played year after year. The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, who compiles lists of the most popular songs, lists “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town” and “Winter Wonderland,” both of which were written in 1934, as the oldest and most popular tunes. Though personal preference often determines a holiday playlist, the following tunes are of the more popular Christmas songs: ■■“The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)” - Mel Torme, Robert Wells ■■ “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town” - Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie ■■ “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” Ralph Blane, Hugh Martin ■■“Winter Wonderland” - Felix Bernard, Richard B. Smith ■■“White Christmas” - Irving Berlin ■■ “Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!” Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne ■■ “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer” - Johnny Marks ■■ “Jingle Bell Rock” - Joseph Carleton Beal, James Ross Boothe ■■ “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” - Walter Kent,

Kim Gannon, Buck Ram ■■ “Little Drummer Boy” - Katherine K. Davis, Henry V. Onorati, Harry Simeone ■■ “Sleigh Ride” - Leroy Anderson, Mitchell Parish ■■ “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” Edward Pola, George Wyle ■■“Silver Bells” - Jay Livingston, Ray Evans ■■“Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” - Johnny Marks ■■ “Feliz Navidad” - Jose Feliciano ■■ “Blue Christmas” - Billy Hayes, Jay W. Johnson ■■“Frosty the Snowman” - Steve Nelson, Walter E. Rollins ■■“A Holly Jolly Christmas” - Johnny Marks ■■ “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” - Tommie Connor ■■ “Here Comes Santa Claus (Right Down Santa Claus Lane)” - Gene Autry, Oakley Haldeman ■■ “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas” - Meredith Willson ■■“(There’s No Place Like) Home for the Holidays” - Bob Allen, Al Stillman ■■ “Carol of the Bells” - Peter J. Wilhousky, Mykola Leontovich ■■“Santa Baby” - Joan Ellen Javits, Philip Springer, Tony Springer ■■“White Christmas” is the most covered Christmas song of all time. There are more than 500 versions in several different languages.

Give the Gift of Home Cooking this Year!

2013 Taste of Home Annual Recipe Cookbook

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Pick one up today at Register Publications 126 W. High St, Lawrenceburg, 812-537-0063

You Promised I Could Go This Year!

Hey pet owners of all ages don’t let your loved one down! Dress them up for Christmas & Take them to

Miracle on Main Holiday Pet Parade Sunday • Dec. 15th At 2:00pm Parade forms at corner of Second & Bridgeway Streets

Sponsored by:

7


8 • Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14

FIND,

ART,

From Page 6

From Page 6

gets, they’re offering layaway through Sunday, Dec. 15. Inside Hidden Treasures, there really are treasures large and small. Upstairs is what Al Schrand calls the “man cave.” It’s a room choc-full of sports memoribilia, collectibles from Westerns, and college sports related items, such as team blankets. Also upstairs is a room full of intersting antiques and collectibles, ranging from a vintage Flexible Flyer sled, which may be sold by the time this gets in print, to large film reels. “The film reels are really popular. I was surprised. We had two of them that still had film, and a couple on the last Main Street Wine Walk were so excited they bought them both,” said Al Schrand. Also upstairs is a room full of purses and colorful clothing. “We have to be unique, because we know we can’t compete with the big box stores,” said Lisa Schrand, adding she and Al also are devoted to providing a friendly atmosphere devoted to old-time customer service. Besides their anniversary sale, and the Small Business Saturday activities, Hidden Treasures also is planning for the kickoff of Winter Wonderland Friday, Dec. 6, and Saturday, Dec. 7. For a full list of those activities, check out the special section in The Dearborn County Register Thursday, Nov. 28. The Winter Winterwonderland section will have all the details on the skating rink, events, the Christmas parade and more. Meanwhile, Hidden Treasures will have it’s final Wine Down Wednesday for 2013 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 18. It will give people a week before Christmas to finish up shopping, and take a break at the same time, said the couple.

His craft will be a cute little origami Santa. The store houses supplies for professionals, such as drafting tables and easels, for dabblers and those who want to learn something new, in the form of books and supplies, as well as for kids, with kits on origami and basic drawing. He has a variety of mediums, from oil pastels to acrylic paints to calligraphy and water colors. “I’m always trying new things, and I went to the comic book convention in Cincinnati a couple months ago, I learned a lot. My philosophy is if you’re standing still, you’re moving backward,” said Gilliam. He also spearheaded the mural painted on the back wall of Durbin

Bowl, facing Todd-Creech Park. A group of teenagers helped design and paint it. Working on the mural were Ian Thornhill, Shelby Rose, Brad Sandlin, Miranda Hartry, and Kori Powell. And he works with local school teachers if they have a project as well, he said. Gilliam is teaming up with an Aurora business for another unique experience: Pints and Pencils. Artists young and old can head to Great Crescent Brewery, Importing and Mechanic streets, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5. Pints and Pencils will have two live models and an Alice in Wonderland theme, said Great Crescent’s Dan Valas. It’s open to all ages, so those over 21 can indulge in a beer, and younger folks can have non-alcoholic beverage. Great Crescent also serves food. To find out more about what Adam’s Art & Supply offers, visit www. adamsartandsupply.com, or find the

Pints and Pencils

CHEFS, From Page 4

$300, so to receive one as a gift is a real treat. Other ideas that spring to mind include a good vegetable peeler, a selection of cutting boards, or spatulas and high density wooden spoons. For amateur pastry chefs, a set of piping bags for decorating cakes is another ideal choice. You could also opt for kitchen appliances worthy of a real chef ’s kitchen—if your budget is large enough, that is. Then again, there is usually a vast price and quality range, so something for any size of wallet can be found. A food processor or a stand mixer is sure to thrill, or more modest gifts include a blender, ideal for soups and purées, or a mandolin for finely slicing foods. A couple of hints: don’t let yourself be impressed by the size of the box and avoid buying cheap products. A real amateur chef will appreciate a small, wellmade appliance more than a large, inefficient machine. Lastly, think cooking and think quality! While some people would be thrilled to receive a simple sandwich grill, others would prefer a large professional-quality wok or a frying pan with a heavy base or made of ceramic. A miniature frying pan designed to cook eggs is also a great idea for those who love a cooked breakfast.

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Gift Certificates Available 1220 Eads Parkway Lawrenceburg 812-537-1141 • M-Sat 12-9

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Hours: M-F 10a-5p Sat 9a-1p • Closed Sun.


Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14 •

I

A green Christmas: good for the planet & the wallet

may be dreaming of a white Christmas, but what I really want is for you to have a green Christmas.

gifts to make for the following year. Memberships, like to a children’s museum or the zoo, also keep on giving all year long. Consider gifts that get the recipiGive some thought to the addi- ent up and moving, such as passes to tional mounds of trash generated be- local sports events, the movie theater tween Thanksgiving and New or a fitness club. Years Day. What will you do arbara Pair these with a meal card to reduce the amount of trash for a nice evening out. Gift ult you and/or your gifts will procertificates are available from duce? most restaurants, from fast Last year I asked readers food to a nice sit-down meal. to share their ideas for greener gifts. Reusable lunch bags are a useful Here are a few that I received. One gift for anyone who packs their lunch person suggested considering what or maybe just for snack food. the recipients really need, then giving For the coffee drinker, consider a only one or two good gifts. reusable mug and nearly anyone can Another person used photos taken make use of a reusable water bottle. during the year to personalize her Whatever gift you are purchasing, gifts, maybe an enlargement in a nice look for products made with recycled frame or an album with vacation content. Green is fashionable and memories. many manufacturers will identify One from my family was to donate their products as being green. Check money traditionally spent on gifts for those less fortunate, through the local 37TH ANNUAL food pantry or such programs as “Angel Trees” or “Shop with a Cop.” Some would prefer gifts of your CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR time over a store-bought present. The TH home-bound might enjoy a visit or SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24 AM PM the elderly may appreciate someone just to run an errand. NEARLY 200 EXHIBITORS Maybe you know someone who FROM THE TRI-STATE REGION could use help with simple chores FEATURING HAND CRAFTED like house cleaning or light mainteGIFTS AND DECORATIONS nance. Parents with young children might appreciate a few hours to enjoy a movie. IT WILL PROVE TO BE Who wouldn’t enjoy a homeTHE LARGEST CRAFT cooked meal or your favorite dessert? SHOW IN SOUTHEASTERN Did you make jams or preserve INDIANA. any home grown food this summer? Consider giving a decorated jar with a tried-and-true recipe. If you choose to purchase gifts, make them practical gifts. I give my family subscriptions to the local newspapers. I love getting a magazine subscription; it’s like getting monthly gifts. If HIGHWAY 101, MILAN it’s a craft magazine, I get ideas on

B

A

Milan High School 10 -5

Food, Crafts, & Fun!

the label to see what percentage is recycled content. The higher the content, the better it is for recycling. As always carry your reusable shopping bags with you during this season for shopping. All those extra plastic bags add to that mountain of trash generated over the holidays. Do what you can to reduce the trash and enjoy a “Green” Christmas! Barbara Ault is director of the Dearborn County Solid Waste Management District, known to laymen as the recycling center. She urges folks who choose live trees to look for ads about dropp off locations once the holidays are over.

The Holidays are Creative at... Great Gifts for Kids Classes for All Ages Gift Certificates Join us for Small Business Saturday for a Holiday Craft at the Downtown Lawrenceburg Cookie Walk

Saturday, Nov. 30

December 30 & 31 Also mark your calendar for our Holiday Kids’ Painting Workshops

and January 2 & 3

www.AdamsArtandSupply.com

812.537.0508

9


10 • Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14

Soft Glazed Gingerbread Dough â– â– 33/4 cups all-purpose flour â– â– 1 tablespoon cocoa powder â– â– 4 teaspoons ground ginger â– â– 11/2 teaspoons ground cloves â– â– 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon â– â– 1/2 teaspoon baking soda â– â– 1 teaspoon salt â– â– 11/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper â– â– 1 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature

â– â– 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar â– â– 1 large egg â– â– 1/2 cup blackstrap or other dark molasses â– â– 2 tablespoons light corn syrup

Glaze ■■1 cup confectioners’ sugar ■■2 tablespoons water

Yield: 12-20 cookies To make the dough, stir together the flour, cocoa powder, ginger, cloves, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl. Set aside. Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium-high speed until creamy. Slowly add the granulated sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is completely smooth and soft. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. Add the egg and mix well. Add the molasses and corn syrup and beat until incorporated. Stop the mixer again and scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the flour mixture and beat on low speed until a dough forms that pulls away from the sides of the bowl and all the ingredients are well incorporated. Remove the dough from the bowl, flatten it on a large piece of plastic wrap into a rectangle about 1 inch thick, cover the dough with the plastic wrap, and refrigerate overnight. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper on a nonstick liner. Unwrap the dough and place on a floured work surface. If using a plaque with a design, roll out the dough 1/3-inch thick, lightly dust the top with flour, press your cookie molds over the dough, and then cut out the shapes with a small knife and place on the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Alternatively, using the mold as a guide, cut around it with a small knife, flip the mold over so the design is facing you, and place the dough over it, pressing it into the design. Unmold the shapes onto the prepared baking sheet, leaving about 1 inch between them. If using a patterned rolling pin, lightly dust the lined baking sheet with flour and transfer the dough to the pan. Lightly dust the top of the dough with flour and roll it into a rectangle about 1/3-inch thick with a plain pin. Then, using the patterned pin, roll over the dough with enough pressure to ensure a clear impression of the design. Trim the sides with a small knife. It is not necessary to cut into smaller sizes before baking. Bake the cookies until lightly golden along the sides but still soft to the touch in the centers, 7 to 15 minutes. The timing will depend on the size of the individual cookies, or if you have made a single large patterned piece that will be cut after baking. While the cookies are baking, prepare the glaze. In a small bowl, whisk together the confectioners’ sugar and water until smooth. When the cookies are ready, remove from the oven and let cool in the pan on a wire rack for about 10 minutes. Then, while the cookies are still warm, using even strokes, brush a light coat of glaze on the top of each cookie, evenly covering it. Let the cookies cool completely. When the glaze dries, it should leave a shiny, opaque finish. If you have used a patterned pin to make a single large plaque, cut into the desired sizes with a small, very sharp knife. The cookies will keep in an airtight container in a cool place for about 2 weeks. They do not freeze well, however, as the glaze becomes watery when they are thawed.

Give the Gift of News! In Print & Online!

Enjoy getting all the local news and sports coverage delivered Right to your mailbox!

Dearborn County Register & The Journal Press

1 Year 2 Years The Rising Sun Recorder or Ohio County News

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Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14 •

Chocolate Coconut Meringues ■■4 large egg whites ■■1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar ■■1/4 teaspoon coconut extract or imitation coconut extract ■■1/4 teaspoon almond extract ■■1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract ■■1/8 teaspoon salt ■■1 cup sugar

■■1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder ■■2 tablespoons semisweet chocolate chips or finely chopped chocolate ■■2 tablespoons trans-fat-free white chocolate chips or finely chopped white chocolate, such as Sunspire

Yield: 30 cookies

1. Position racks in upper and lower thirds of oven; preheat to 250 F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper or nonstick baking mats. 2. Beat egg whites, cream of tartar, coconut, almond and vanilla extracts, and salt in a large bowl with an electric mixer on mediumhigh speed until combined. Gradually beat in sugar, 2 tablespoons at a time, beating until stiff, shiny peaks form, 6 to 8 minutes. 3. Sift cocoa over the mixture and gently fold together with a rubber spatula until combined. 4. Spoon the meringue into a gallon-size sealable bag (or pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch tip). Seal the bag, pressing out as much air as possible. Cut a 1/2-inch hole in one corner of the bag. Pipe the meringue into 2-inch circles, about 1 inch apart, on the prepared baking sheets. 5. Bake on the upper and lower racks for 50 minutes. Turn off the heat and let the meringues stand in the oven with the door closed until completely dry, about 11/2 hours. 6. Melt semisweet and white chocolate (see Tips & Techniques) and drizzle or pipe onto the cooled meringues. Let stand until it sets. Tips & Techniques To melt chocolate, place chocolate in a bowl and microwave on medium for 45 seconds. Stir; continue microwaving on medium in 20-second intervals until almost melted, stirring after each interval. Continue stirring until completely melted. Or place in the top of a double boiler over hot, but not boiling, water. Stir until melted. To decorate cookies with melted chocolate, use a pastry bag fitted with a fine writing tip to pipe the melted chocolate or dip tines of a fork in chocolate and drizzle. You can improvise a pastry bag with a small plastic bag. Add melted chocolate to the bag, cut a tiny hole in one corner and squeeze the chocolate out.

Eggnog Fudge ■■2 cups sugar ■■1 cup refrigerated eggnog ■■2 Tbsp butter ■■2 Tbsp light corn syrup ■■¼ cup chopped pecans, toasted ■■¼ cup slivered almonds, toasted

and chopped ■■½ cup chopped red candied cherries ■■1 tsp vanilla extract

Yield: About 1½ pounds 1. Line an 8’’x4’’ loaf pan with aluminum foil; butter foil and set

aside. 2. Combine first 4 ingredients in a 4-quart heavy saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Wash down crystals from sides of pan using a pastry brush dipped in hot water. Insert a candy thermometer into eggnog mixture. 3. Cook, stirring occasionally, until thermometer registers 238F. Remove pan from heat and cool sugar mixture, undisturbed, until temperature drops to 190F (15 to 18 minutes). 4. Stir in pecans and remaining 3 ingredients; beat with a wooden spoon until fudge thickens and just begins to lose its gloss (5 to 8 minutes). 5. Pour candy into prepared pan. Cool completely; cut into squares.

11


12 • Holiday Gift Guide 2013 • The Harrison Press, Wednesday, Nov. 13; The Dearborn Co. Register & Ohio County News, Thursday, Nov. 14

AURORA'S

Miracle on Main Street Weekends December 1st through December 22nd

Opening Evening Events Sunday, December 1 Annual Christmas Tree Lighting, Lighted Christmas Parade & Arrival of Santa 6pm Door Prizes 7pm (Must be present to win) Toy Display & Dickens Village 5-8pm

Live Reindeer Sunday, December 8 & Sunday, December 22 • 1-4pm Sponsored by the Aurora Public Library District Foundation

Holiday Pet Parade Sunday, December 15 • 2pm Parade forms at corner of Second & Bridgeway Streets CASH PRIZES

Ongoing Activities Include

Live Music • FREE Photos With Santa • Toy Display • Dickens Village • Craft Projects Main Street Christmas Carolers Performing Throughout Downtown! *All events located at the corner of Second & Main Streets in the Aurora Lions Building unless noted

Complete Schedule of Events Available at: www.aurora.in.us Check often as new events are added!

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