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THE MAGAZINE OF REGIS COLLEGE Spring/Summer 2021

SAME ROAD, DIFFERENT PATHS Sisters Jennifer Amaral ’16 and Rachel Amaral ’19, ’21 speak their truth to champion for others.


regıs g inside

BE SOCIAL Regis College Alumni Regis College

@regis_ma @regiscollegealumni

@regiscollege_ma

regiscollegeweston

“Paramedicine is very rewarding, but after I treat a very specific illness, I leave the patient in the emergency department. I want to spend more time with my patients. My end goal is to be a nurse practitioner and treat those patients after the paramedics leave.”

Regis College

“The tree of knowledge this scholarship helped me plant is still growing and its shade has been enjoyed by myself and the whole family.”

Features

18 Shift/Change

Why Timothy Abbott, ABSN ’23, NRP, Justin Andrews, ABSN ’22, and Jacqueline Gorman, ABSN ’21 are changing careers to nursing amid the pandemic.

LORI HANKS ’99

22 Same Road,

Different Paths

Sisters Jennifer Amaral ’16 and Rachel Amaral ’19, ’21 are following different career paths, but both advocate for the good of others.

28 You’re Not Alone

Regis alumni and faculty work to overcome stigma and provide treatment as cases of mental health conditions increase in the United States.

Paramedic Timothy Abbott, ABSN ’23, NRP, (pictur (pictured ed with daughter Charlotte and son Drew) is making a career change to nursing. Read more on page 18.

regisma

Alexis Baum Senior Director of Advancement Communications and Donor Relations Editor | alexis.baum@regiscollege.edu

Board of Trustees 2021* Chair John J. Tegan Jr., MEd

Michael J. Halloran (Treasurer) Antoinette M. Hays, PhD, RN Lee Hogan, CSJ, ’61, PhD Kristin Hokanson, SNDdeN

Kristen L. Walsh Managing Editor | kmwcreative.com

Members

Ashley Starr Assistant Director of Advancement Communications Contributing Editor | ashley.starr@regiscollege.edu

Wael Al-Husami, MD, FACC, FACP

Kathleen S. Jose ’87, ’94, MSN, RN (Vice Chair)

Marian Batho, CSJ, ’70 (Secretary)

Judy M. Lauch ’68 (CSJ Liaison)

Anita Brennan-Sarmiento ’77

Mary Ann Walsh Lewis ’74

Rosemary Brennan, CSJ, ’70, MEd, MDiv

Jacquelyn McCarthy, CSJ, MA, RN, LNHA

Allison S. Cartwright, JD

Kathy McCluskey, CSJ, ’71, PhD

Meyer Chambers, MLM

Eileen Ng, MBA

Hans Christensen, MBA

Thomas P. O’Neill III, MPA

Kevin C. Conroy, JD

Jigisha B. Patel, JD

Kevin T. Conry, JD

Lisa Thompson ’91, MBA

Joanne Crowley ’74, MS

Maylin S. Truesdell ’05, ’06, MS

Camille Ferazzi ’69

Satish Vankayalapati, MBA

Joe-Ann Fergus, PhD, RN

*As of June 15, 2021

Lilly Pereira Designer | aldeia.design Regis Today is published twice a year. © 2021, Regis College, Weston, Massachusetts. All rights reserved. The opinions expressed in Regis Today are those of the authors and not necessarily of Regis College. Please send address changes to: Office of Institutional Advancement, Regis College, 235 Wellesley Street, Weston, MA 02493-1571 or call 781.768.7220 or online at alumni.regiscollege.edu.

John M. Gray, MBA, JD

Cover photo: Holly Redmond

Departments

02

03

12

Dear Neighbor A return to campus; celebrating 2,300+ graduates; strategic partnerships; diversifying programs; fighting against racial injustice.

14

Tower Views

16

Commencement ceremonies; new trustees; meet the director of the Regis College Health and Wellness Center and COVID-19 Testing Center team; progress report on Institutional Action Plan to Address Racism; First-gen Forward designation.

After Class Students gain hands-on experience with alumni entrepreneurs Iliana Ramirez ’10 and Mary Lou Blas ’08.

Academic Innovation Regis Professional MBA program bridges business and science.

34 36

Reunion throwback edition.

In Memoriam Remembering alumni who passed away.

39

Alumni Spotlight

40

Hearts & Minds

Looking Ahead Partnerships between Regis and employers like Boston Public Schools extend discounts on graduate degrees and open up opportunities.

Alumni Together

Elizabeth Dill Chafcouloff ’68 reflects on a lifelong love of language and travel.

Lori Hanks ’99 gives back to the Hannah Bradley Scholarship that helped her achieve her college dreams.


alumni spotlight

neighbor

What did you learn at Regis that has served you well throughout your life?

What an incredible spring semester we had at Regis! We successfully

Antoinette M. Hays, PhD, RN PRESIDENT

What was your first job after graduating from Regis?

I moved to France after graduating and worked occasionally as a freelance secretary-translator and other pick-up jobs in Paris. After I left Paris I traveled around Europe and North Africa, hitchhiking as hundreds were doing then, from Amsterdam to Marrakech (the circuit!), picking grapes, cherries, garlic, and working

in factories before settling in San Francisco in 1972. I spent most of the 70s oddjobbing, volunteering at the San Francisco Community grocery store, tutoring French, and traveling to Mexico with my little tent for months at a time on a budget of a few hundred dollars. I was 34 before I had my

first “real” job as an ESL teacher in Japan.

How did your experiences and education at Regis shape your life after college and your career path thus far?

My most powerful experience at Regis came about unexpectedly. One day a friend asked if I would like to study in France with her during junior year. The next week, I changed my major to French, and we worked with Sister Juan (Mahan) to bring this about. Since our families did not have the means to send us to France, we worked two or three jobs after school for a year to save money for a year abroad. It is no exaggeration to say that this was a major turning point in my life. From this study in France came a lifelong love of language and travel, and my career has centered around these two major interests.

felt like and the thrill of being in an entirely different culture. Tell me about your career and your current job.

After being an ESL teacher in Japan and in the U.S. for 15 years and a speech-language pathologist for 12 years, I retired and founded a nonprofit called Speech Therapy Cambodia in 2013. The organization treats Cambodian patients after strokes who have speech, language, and swallowing disorders. I have spent time in Cambodia over the last six years organizing the program and helped train 14 Cambodian hospital nurses and physical therapists. In all of my careers you can see the love of language, the interest

in problem-solving and critical thinking, and the love of travel that I first discovered at Regis. I later discovered that I enjoyed educating people and doing humanitarian work, but I had to mature a bit after college to get there. <<

Regis Major: French Current Employment: Co-founder of Speech Therapy Cambodia Current city: San Francisco, California

39 SPRING 2021

REGIS TODAY

“I am so grateful to the Regis community for their resiliency and for all we have accomplished this year for our students.”

Elizabeth Dill Chafcouloff ’68

Photo (left): Brian Smith

2

welcomed back more than 350 students to campus in January, and nothing gave me more pleasure than seeing our campus starting to resume to some sort of normalcy. I am so proud of our faculty and staff who worked diligently to ensure a safe return for our students. Since last August, Regis has administered more than 20,000 COVID tests to students, faculty, and staff on campus and 99.7 percent were negative. As a result of this success—in conjunction with the rollout of the vaccine—we intend to reopen the campus this fall close to full capacity. I am so grateful to the Regis community for their resiliency and for all we have accomplished this year for our students. In May we held virtual commencements for the classes of 2020 and 2021. It was fantastic to celebrate more than 2,300 graduates from associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degree programs and welcome them into the Regis alumni community—which is now more than 18,000 strong! During the past year, enrollment at all levels has remained strong. In fact, we have seen an increase at the graduate level, in both on-campus and online programs, thanks to several new programs and updates. Our online Master of Social Work is now accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, a three-year process. Regis also recently launched a master’s degree in speech-language pathology and is actively recruiting for the fall. A boost in applications to our online accelerated nursing program— for students who have a non-nursing bachelor’s degree but want to return to school to change careers to nursing—reflects a career trend toward nursing during the pandemic that is truly heartwarming. Read some of their stories on page 18. Inside this issue you will also find stories demonstrating how Regis holds a competitive advantage by diversifying programs. Our new Professional MBA program bridges science and business, while a new partnership with Boston Public Schools provides tuition discounts on Regis graduate programs to BPS employees and full-tuition scholarships to current BPS students interested in pursuing a major in education. We are proud to help shape a new generation of educational leaders and teachers who will have a significant impact on students for generations to come. There is still unrest in our Regis community and the nation as a result of racial injustice. While the guilty verdicts of Derek Chauvin are a significant step toward advocating against systemic racism, there is still so much work to be done. We stand up against ongoing anti-Asian rhetoric and violence. We fight against any intolerance against communities of color and uphold the values of our founders, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Boston. In March the university shared a six-month progress report on the Institutional Action Plan to Address Racism at Regis (see page 6), and this important work continues as the action plan is only a first step. Throughout a very challenging year, there was still so much to be grateful for. I have learned that we must embrace where we are and what we have. We have our friends and family. We have our tight-knit Regis community and I am grateful for all of you. This year more than ever, your support means so much to Regis and our students. So thank you for being a valued member of the Regis community and for standing with me as an ambassador of our vision, our mission, and our students.

In 1966 when Regis helped four girls to journey to France on our own to take part in an unorthodox and unaccredited junior year abroad program, it taught me that it is worth pursuing what you really want even if the odds seem against you. Every time I have come across obstacles in life, I remember how it felt to be on that ocean liner sailing across the Atlantic—what freedom and adventure

THE BASICS

R EG I S ST R O N G

dear

WE WANT TO HEAR YOUR STORIES TOO! Submit your Alumni Spotlight Trevon Wright ’20, ’22 questionnaire for Read about the continued a chance to be What piece of advice do you have for currentrepopulation students? of the Regis featured in one campus on page 4. of our alumni publications: alumni.regiscollege. edu/spotlight e

What you choose at first may not be what you end up doing later. There are happy accidents—have your antennae out ther looking for intriguing opportunities and take chances. When I look back, much of what satisfied me career-wise started out completely unplanned.


memoriam in

Regis Strong

Trustees

Regis has been notified of the following alumni and friends who passed away.* May they rest in God’s eternal peace.

36 4

Margaret Sellers Fitzpatrick February 19, 2021

March 4, 2021 Marie Ward April 17, 2021

Remembering Jane D’Ercole Roman ’61, PhD, Professor Emerita of Chemistry and former chair of the department of Chemistry. She is remembered fondly by classmates, students, and colleagues for her passion for excellence and dedication to Regis.

*As of June 15 print deadline.

1961 Patricia Bench April 7, 2021 Barbara Healey Ring December 5, 2020 Jane D’Ercole Roman February 21, 2021 Nancy Sizer August 22, 2018

Constance O’Brien 1971 Allison S. Cartwright, Marie A. JD, Sheahas Skahan and jury trial July 27, 2020 April 15, 2021 extensive litigation experience and serves as attorney-in-

Judith Guillette Smith 1978 charge at CPCS Roxbury Defenders, Therese Reilly Burke December 2, 2020 a unit of the state public defender May 24, 2021 Agnes Reardon Sughrue owned a general law pracagency. She previously January 2021serving as a supervising tice while15,also attorney 1981 Kelley A.Cartwright Lafferty with Suffolk Lawyers for Justice, Inc. 1962 April 21, 2020 also held the position of assistant corporation counPatricia McDonald Gavel sel for the City of Boston. Appointments and board April 18, 2021 1989 memberships include the Boston KarenPolice ForanReform Dempsey Diane Lear Simpson Task Force, the Massachusetts Advisory Board December 24, 2020 January 12, 2020 on Probation, the Governor’s Restorative Justice Advisory Committee, faculty 1995 at the Harvard Law 1963 Donique L. Hill School Trial Advocacy Felicienne Murphy CullenWorkshop, Massachusetts October 5, 2015 Black Lawyers Association, and Massachusetts December 29, 2020 Black Women Attorneys. Cartwright holds a juris 2000 1964 from Boston College, a master's degree in doctor Angela M. Travers Audrey and Dalton Gorman studies from Michigan State English American December 5, 2020 May 19, 2021 University, and a bachelor’s degree in English and 2001 psychology from the University of Michigan. Mary Ellen Bresnahan Linda H. Shen LeBlanc April 6, 2021 June 4, 2021 Kevin T. Conry, JD, adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University, 2012 Patricia McDonough, CSJ his career has spent John J.serving Maguirein higher March 21, 2021 education and the nonprofit sector. March 8, 2018 As an adjunct professor of law for 1965 Lifelong more than two OP decades, he has taught Learning about issues S. Marie Cleary, Jacqueline Griffith related to nonprofit December 2, 2020 organizations. He most recently July 4, 2020 served as the vice president for development at the Claire Ryan Hickey Center for Global Development, a Harris nonprofit that John April 6, 2021 aims to reduce global povertyMarch and improve 13, 2017 lives through 1966 innovative economic research and policy Marie Kelley Carol Wixted Cahill advocacy. Prior to this, Conry served in a variety of September 12, 2020 February 7, 2021 administrative roles at Georgetown senior academic Malikowski University, including law vice Karen president of strategic Susan Carter O’Brien December 9, 2017 development and external affairs, and associate June 3, 2021 dean at Georgetown Law. He provided oversight Mary Pughe Joan Mullaly for fundraising, alumni relations, communications, December 15, 2019 April 21, 2021 real estate planning, public safety and emergency Wylde Married planning, and continuing legalLinda education. Sheila Kelly Sullivan April 12,Conry 2021 ’74, he to Regis alumna Mary Beth Graham May 1, 2005 received bachelor and juris doctor degrees from Former Faculty 1967 Georgetown University. Patricia Elliott, PhD Eileen A. Hayes May 17, 2021 February 11, 2021 Jigisha B. Patel, JD, associate genSusan Nessen eral counsel and chief adviser for 1968 December 7, 2020 Nicola McKeen international and immigration services at Northeastern University, Paula Schneider December 19, 2020 has spent the majority of her career April 2, 2021 1969 as a global adviser in higher education. Her serving Nancyfocuses Wilcox on Dowling work global initiatives, international stuJanuary 21,programs, 2021 dents and international hiring and con-

tracts, globalMarie compliance and regulatory affairs, and S. Bernadine U.S. sanctions/embargoes. As chief adviser for interEgleston, OP national and immigration services, Patel strategically December 2, 2020

Planned gifts provide a unique opportunity for donors to give back to Regis while receiving tax benefits or income. Whether you’d like to extend your impact guides a university with more than 16,000 international students and scholars. She previously through a bequest intentionwas or make a gift through an IRA Charitable Distribution, an associate attorney at Costa and Riccio, LLP in there are for you to leave a lasting legacy at Regis while supporting Boston and Zavala Lawmany Officesways in Phoenix, Arizona. She serves on the Boston Bar Association In-House future generations of students. Forum Advisory Committee and is a member of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, National Association of College and University Attorneys, American Immigration Lawyers Association, and South Asian Bar Association. Patel received a juris doctor from New England Law and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Arizona State University.

“ This scholarship means the world to me and my family who were hit hard during Lisa Thompson ’91, MBA, is a partner the COVID-19 pandemic. with Axiom Consulting, which just acquired her firm, Sturbridge Growth My responsibilities went Partners. An expert in commercial COMMUNITY PARTNERS strategymaking and strategic planning, from sure Ishegot previously served at Strategic Pricing Group, where education program tooffice helping pay Regis’ bills. undergraduate I am she foundedgood and led thegrades firm’s Chicago growpartnered with the Waltham Public Library to set ing revenues more than 40 percent during her forever tenure. When the firm was grateful sold to Monitor for Group,my scholarship for up homework tutoring sessions for K-12 students. Thompson served as a senior partner and later lifting the weight off my shoulders became a partner at Deloitte Consulting when they Librariansand will help K-12 Waltham Public School acquired Monitor Group. At Deloitte, she served as a on my education allowing me to focus students get connected with Regis student leader of their award-winning Women’s Initiative and led the manufacturing strategy practice. and dreams of Thompson becoming a nurse.” volunteer tutors for one-on-one tutoring. serves on corporate boards including Consigli Construction and Twin Valley, and nonprofit boards ALESSANDRA MIRANDA ’21, NURSING MAJOR including the College Advisory Board at Babson CATHERINE BURKE SCHOLAR College and as chair for MetroWest Chamber of Commerce. She holds an MBA from Babson College and a bachelor’s degree from Regis.

5 SPRING/SUMMER 2021

REGIS TODAY For the latest information on Regis’ response to the pandemic, go to regiscollege. edu/covid-19.

Catherine Purcell Greeley 1955 1940 Eleanor O’Neil Mulhern October 19, 2019 Dorothea McNulty Styles More students return to campus this spring; May 20, 2021 February 4, 2012 Lois McWeeney Moulton fall plans announced June 7, 2020 1956 1941 Marjorie O’Neill Ferren Dorothy Mulhern Carroll Lois Morrison Steffensen May 4, 2021 March 9, 2021 January 16, 2021 More than 350 students moved back to campus in January for Harrington Jane Muckian Josephine Moran 1950 the spring semester. As part of the university’s comprehensive November 13, 2020 Steckevicz Katherine McKnight Agre November 25,health 2018 and safety protocols, move-in took place over COVID-19 Sally Donovan Mandeville March 6, 2021 one week to allow for social distancing, minimal waiting at the December 24, 2020 1942 on-campus testing center,1951 and any required quarantining. Elinor Doyle Corcoran Dolores Gangaro Wilson Ceslaus King Carvalho All 8,student March 2019 residents were placed in single occupancy rooms April 15, 2021 Unknown and everyone had to get a COVID-19 test at Regis Health 1943 Eileen Dunleavy Knott 1957 Services upon arrival. Pauline Sharby Bulman Maryour Maureen Staunton Februarybring 4, 2021to Regis is why “The excitement our students December 11, 2020 Crowley team worked so hard over the past several months to develop Mary Lou Conlin Pearson December 31, 2020 Edith LaMarca Tarricone 2020 a safe move-in plan,” saidNovember Bridget27, Buoniconti, assistant January 9, 2021 Frances dean of student affairs and director of residence life. “WeKellaher are Perron 1952 January 28, 2021 1945 thrilled with how joyous Marie and smooth the process has been.” Brophy Allard Mary Dowd InFoley March, President Antoinette Janet Petty January 18, M. 2021Hays, PhD, RN, December 10, 2020 February announced that Regis is planning to open the campus and24, 2021 Dorothy Barrett Bemis 1946 operations even more in fall 2021. The university intends to Katharine Hourihan January 6, 2021 Margaret Wait return to allConant in-person classes; have close to full capacity Walker in January 16, 2021 halls; hold 1953 our residence engaging on-campus events; June and 4, 2020 Olive Pirani Chupka participate in athletic competition. Marguerite O’Donoghue November 26, 2020 1958 Dowd In preparation for a full in-person return, all students, Marijane Hill Kennedy Maureen Ellis Cremen January 6, 2021 faculty, and staff who live, learn, and work on campus or who November 26, 2020 December 22, 2020 will participate in in-person activities at Regis are required 1947 Doris Good Marr Ellen Craig Davey by Monday, August to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 Marjorie DiMento April 15, 2021 April 18, 2021 Magrath 16, 2021. Immunization against COVID-19 will allow for Joan greatly Gorman McCue August 13, 2020 increased on-campus activities this fall semester and Elaine Guinee Denning Decemberof10, 2020 reduce the risk of transmission. The health and wellness April 4, 2021 1948 our community top priority, and this decision 1959 is Marie Kelly Creedonremains a Dorothy Culpin Murphy Janet Clements Lavey guided by local and stateSeptember public health agencies, our medical February 7, 2021 23, 2017 April 26, 2021 experts, and our COVID-19 Response Team. Marie Mulcahy Cushing Jane Dore Powers Joanne Myers February 6, 2021 May 30, 2021 December 1, 2020 Lourdes Jean-Louis ’22 (left) and Mitchell Weinger ’21 1949 Elizabeth Knowlton are happy to #ProtectThePride and keepBarbara the Regis Meyer Pierce Shirley McKenzie Rourke community safe by wearing a mask on campus. January 4, 2021 Connolly January 6, 2020 April 6, 2021 1960 1954 Mary Dunleavy Jones Jean Ryan Connors Patricia Bellini Cruise May 13, 2021 May 24, 2021 January 5, 2021 Beverly Plouffe Norma Maloney Crowley Rosemary Denmark November 12, 2019 November 23, 2020 Murphy

Join the Catherine Burke Society and leave a legacy that will change lives.

Membership in the Catherine Satish Vankayalapati, MBA, is Burke Society is extended to the founder and chairman those who notify Regis ofoftheir intent and have provided MedicaMetrix, a medical device documentation of a planned gift. If Regis is included in your company leading the development Named in honor of Reverend plans, or you would like to discuss ways in which to make your of a new paradigm that transforms Mother Mary Domitilla, who served on prostate health management. He is also the CEO gift, please contact the Office of Institutional Advancement. of UrbanX Global, which invests in technologies and supporting infrastructure focusing on technology-enhanced health care and medical devices, MORE aboutthe your planned giving platforms forLEARN enhancing and securing online environment,options and realthrough estate. Vankayalapati recently the Catherine Burke Society: served as president of the multi-billion-dollar real estate asset management firm Capri Capital Partners and as partner at McKinsey and Company, where he advised clients in strategic mergers and acquisitions in excess of $100 billion and helped clients conceptualize and execute green-field development projects over $1 billion. He holds an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and an undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering.

alumni.regiscollege.edu/burkesociety

the Board of Trustees from 1927 to 1936, the Domitilla Society honors former members of the Regis Board of Trustees. The Domitilla Society is open to all who have served in recognition of their dedication and service to the university. Jane Cronin Tedder ’66, EdD, was appointed as the first chair of the Domitilla Society when it was established in 2020. Tedder was a dedicated board member from 2012-2020; she is an incredible leader in her class, raising more than $1 million in honor of her 50th Reunion; and, most recently, she led a successful fundraising effort for the virtual Let It Shine Gala—raising nearly $60,000 for the Inspired Leader Sponsorship in support of student scholarships.

1970 Judith Ramsdell Hersey December 3, 2020 Catherine Burke ’31

Learn more: alumni.regiscollege.edu/ domitilla.


together Commitment to Do Better alumni

Reunion Throwback Edition

Six-month progress report on Institutional Action Plan to Address Racism highlights new initiatives implemented and work still to be done

GRANT HIGHLIGHTS Grants fund student aid, COVID-19 research and safety, child care, and curriculum development Grants support a broad range of important initiatives at Regis. The following highlights recent awards:

6 34 REGIS TODAY To read the six-month progress report on the Institutional Action Plan to Address Racism, visit regisma.me/ dobetter.

As part of Heritage Week in March, a celebration of the Sisters Gifts to Inclusive Excellence of Saint Joseph of Boston and their social justice values, Regis As part of Giving Day 2021, the Regis community had the opportunity to desigunveiled a six-month progress report on its Institutional Action nate their gifts to one of six areas, includPlan to Address Racism. The plan highlights new initiatives that ing Inclusive Excellence. Gifts to Inclusive have been implemented and work that still needs to be done. Excellence support all strategic equity, “As this progress report details, we are taking real, tangible steps inclusion, and diversity initiatives across to ensure the future of Regis College is one that is actively antithe university, helping to develop programs, racist,” Regis President Antoinette M. Hays, PhD, RN, wrote in the address structural challenges, and ensure progress report’s welcome letter on March 19, 2021. “I know this Regis has critical resources to fulfill its misis hard, ongoing work. But as the past six months have shown,Class we of 1956 60th Reunion in 2016 sion to serve the dear neighbor without are not afraid of hard work, especially when it comes to ensuring distinction. that Black Lives Matter at Regis and that we truly love, serve, and respect each other without distinction.” Recognition The progress report was presented by Audrey Grace, JD, associLast fall, Regis received the 2020 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award ate vice president for inclusive excellence and chief diversity officer, from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. The at a special town hall event on March 15. The action plan contains national honor recognizes U.S. colleges and nine goals, from increased learning opportunities for the campus universities that demonstrate an outstanding community to a curriculum review to updating the institution’s bias commitment to diversity and inclusion. response protocols. Regis was selected based on several initia“I am by the overwhelming support for this plan, from Class of impressed 1971 45th Reunion in 2016 tives, including a commitment to LGBTQA+ the number of volunteers and community members who committed student support, equity for first-generation their time, to the energy and support from our trustees,” Grace said. students and students of color, and main“It is clear that Regis is willing to do what is needed to advance taining connection and a sense of commuracial equity and social justice for all.” nity during the pandemic. Among the achievements the report highlights are an institutional-wide, self-identification campaign to provide a better sense of the campus’ diversity, and continued opportunities for direct community input and feedback on all anti-racism work on campus. Additionally, Regis’ annual Founders’ Day in October 2020 brought “I am impressed by the more than 700 people together for a daylong dialogue on racism,Class of 1986 5th Reunion in 1991 overwhelming support for equity, and social justice. this plan, from the number of As this work continues, Grace said she would like to focus on strengthening the institution’s hiring and retention work around volunteers and community Class of 1961 25th Reunion in 1986 equity and inclusion. She also credited the Student Government members who committed their Association (SGA) and the Multicultural Student Association time, to the energy and support (MCSA) for their roles in the development of the plan. She hopes to grow student involvement even further. from our trustees. It is clear that “Throughout the development of the action plan, the members of Regis is willing to do what is SGA and MCSA are incredibly proud and honored to have worked with Audrey Grace,” the groups said in a shared statement. “It needed to advance racial equity is without question that the demands made in mid-June 2020 and social justice for all.” required tremendous work from our faculty and staff, who have been highly responsive throughout the planning process. The stuAUDREY GRACE, JD, associate vice dents of Regis College should feel excited and ready for the positive president for inclusive excellence and institutional change that is emerging.” chief diversity officer Class of 1966 25th Reunion in 1991 Class of 1991 25th Reunion in 2016

• Metropolitan District Dental Society provided a grant to help Regis align health and safety protocols with COVID19 best practices at its Waltham Dental Center. • Leslie Mandel, PhD, MA, MSM, program director and professor of public health at Regis, provided a grant to Adjunct Professor Julie Nostrand, PhD, to study the impact of COVID-19 social isolation on seniors living in Newton, Massachusetts. • Harvard Pilgrim Health Care (HPHC) is continuing its long-standing support of the President’s Lecture Series on Health with an award for the 2021 season. • The Regis Children’s Center Director Rebecca Putnam, EdD, received a federal award from the Child Care Access Means Parents in School program of the U.S. Department of Education. It will fund child care vouchers for Regis students with child care needs. • Regis received federal funding from the CARES Act and the CRRSAA Act through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF I and II). The funds support direct student aid and institutional aid to support increased health and safety costs and lost revenue due to the coronavirus pandemic. • Heather Josselyn-Cranson, PhD, Sister Margaret William McCarthy Endowed Chair of Music, received a FulbrightHays Seminars Abroad award. She will travel to Mexico for cultural studies to support her curriculum in music and religious studies.

ALUMNI TUITION DISCOUNTS

One of the benefits for Regis alumni is tuition discounts* on graduate programs. One of the newest opportunities is the Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP). The mission of the program is to prepare students entering the field of speech-language pathology with the skills necessary to assess and treat a diverse population of individuals, to integrate scholarship and policy into practice, and to serve and lead in the community. The combination of classroom preparation and field experience provides students with everything they need for a rewarding career as a speech-language pathologist. Learn more about Regis graduate programs: regiscollege.edu/graduate. * Graduate program tuition discounts for Regis alumni range from 10-20 percent depending on the program. Some exclusions apply. Please contact Graduate Admission for details.

Lifelong Learning at Regis (LLARC) is learning at its best LLARC is a community of adult learners who strive to remain intellectually engaged by participating in courses and lectures designed and taught by their peers. Programs will be offered virtually and in person this fall, giving alumni and friends the opportunity to take advantage of these stimulating study groups from anywhere in the world. There are two levels of LLARC membership: Basic annual membership $75 for the Lunch, Listen, and Learn Program, a series of outside guest speakers who present a new and interesting topic each week. Membership and courses Tuition is $200 per semester after purchasing the basic annual membership. Choose from 20+ study groups per semester. L E A R N M O R E at regiscollege.edu/llarc.


Commencement Ceremonies Celebrate Classes of 2020 and 2021 8

“The world needs your talent more than ever before. It needs that drive and determination that you had to move forward to translate into tackling some of the most difficult challenges that still persist in front of us.” GARTH GRAHAM, MD, MPH Honorary Degree Recipient and Commencement Speaker

REGIS AGAIN DESIGNATED A MILITARY FRIENDLY® SCHOOL For the fifth time in the past six years, Regis is designated a military friendly institution in the 2021-2022 Military Friendly® Schools list. The prestigious list identifies institutions committed to serving the military and veteran community. Regis received a bronze award designation for the opportunities it provides to veterans and their families. Admission counselors at Regis offer one-onone guidance and veterans receive support on applying their benefits to their education. The campus Veterans Center provides students a dedicated space to study or meet up with fellow veterans. Regis also participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program, which allows veterans to receive funds from the Department of Veterans Affairs for their unmet tuition and fees. The university works closely with the Veterans Administration in securing GI Bill®, Veteran Readiness and Employment, Basic Allowance for Housing, and other available supports for active-duty service members, veterans, and their families.

Regis was designated a First-gen Forward institution by the Center for First-generation Student Success, an initiative of NASPA–Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and The Suder Foundation. The First-gen Forward designation recognizes higher education institutions that demonstrate a commitment to improving experiences and advancing outcomes of first-generation college students. “I am very proud of how the Regis community, including students, faculty, and staff, have worked together to increase the visibility, voice, and identity of our first-generation students,” says Regis Assistant Professor of Psychology Helen Consiglio, PhD, who spearheaded a number of key initiatives for first-generation students at Regis. “Their stories of success and challenge within and outside of the classroom have laid the foundation, and now the real work begins.” Over the past few years, Regis has made significant strides in prioritizing first-generation student success. Associate Director of the Center for Inclusive Excellence Denise Mashmasarmi led the charge in obtaining the First-gen Forward designation while Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Anabella Morabito and Kelly Brochu, MEd, director of the Health Services Testing Center and co-director for the Summer Scholars Program, played pivotal roles in establishing a task force and several programs focused on enhancing the experience of first-generation students and their families. • Partners in Excellence (PIE) is a Regis mentoring initiative that provides personal guidance and support to first-year students of color and first-generation students through the assignment of trained peer, faculty, staff, and graduate mentors. • The First Pride Program connects first-generation college students to academic resources, faculty, staff, and student leaders to learn more about the Regis community. It also allows early move-in to campus to help students acclimate to the campus environment and navigate offerings and programs. • The annual First-Gen Pride Week celebrates the first-generation college student identity through various programming efforts.

REGIS GIVING DAY

Regis Giving Day 2021 was our most successful Giving Day yet! In just 24 hours, 360 donors collectively raised more than $70,000 for important causes and programs that support our students and further the Regis mission. Thank you to all alumni, friends, parents, faculty, staff, and students who came together to show their love for Regis. Read more and watch a video: alumni.regiscollege. edu/givingday.

As a First-gen Forward institution, Regis will receive professional development, community-building experiences, and a first look at the Center for First-generation Student Success’ research and resources. Interested faculty and staff will be afforded multiple opportunities to engage with peer institutions that are also creating environments to improve the experiences and outcomes of first-generation students.

To learn more about first-generation efforts at Regis, visit regisma.me/firstgen.

+ Focus on Health Q&A with

TAMMI MAGAZZU, RN, MSN, WHNP-BC Director of Regis College Health and Wellness Center In January 2021, Tammi Magazzu, RN, MSN, WHNP-BC, joined Regis as the director of the Regis College Health and Wellness Center. She boasts more than two decades as a nursing educator and previously served as a nursing instructor at Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professionals. Why did you say “yes” to joining Regis? I felt this was a spectacular opportunity to merge my two passions: adolescent health and education. A health services department is all about education and most of the population is older adolescents and young adults. How will your work as a nurse educator inform your role at the Health and Wellness Center? I was blessed to have worked as an educator for over 18 years and this has helped me develop a rapport with students. It taught me to have a mutual respect for them. Additionally, I bring a faculty background, which helps me bridge the gap between faculty and students. What was it like starting your role amid the pandemic, when 350 residential students were returning to campus? It was excellent, scary, educational, and awakening. I felt the support from the Regis team was exceptional. I have enjoyed the opportunity to grow as a person and a health care professional. What has been your experience at Regis thus far? This role has been what my entire career was building toward. I knew I would need to adapt quickly, maintain a calm persona, and bring my team together in the height of what could be a "panic" time. But the Health and Wellness Center team has maintained an environment that put students first, and I'm proud of the work we have done.

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REGIS TODAY

On May 8, 2021, Regis held two separate virtual commencement ceremonies to celebrate the Class of 2021 and the Class of 2020. Garth Graham, MD, MPH (pictured below), an accomplished physician and leading authority on social determinants of health, delivered the commencement address. “The word ‘resilient’ is the word I would use to describe Regis College graduates,” Graham said. “You have been through one of the most challenging time periods in the United States, and in the world. That was not just the pandemic, but also a new call for racial justice.” More than 2,300 graduates across associate, bachelor, graduate, and doctoral programs were honored during the two events. Graham applauded graduates for being advocates and encouraged them to continue their mission. “The lifelong work that many of you will have to improve lives, either through one patient at a time, one community, or even the whole system—that journey is just beginning, but you have the strength of everything you’ve just been through,” he said. “The world needs your talent more than ever before,” Graham continued. “It needs that drive and determination that you had to move forward to translate into tackling some of the most difficult challenges that still persist in front of us.” Graham received an honorary degree in recognition of his commitment to health equity, social change, and making credible public health information more accessible around the world. Regis also bestowed honorary degrees to Forbes’ Top 100 Most Powerful Women honoree and Bank of America Vice Chairman Anne Finucane, and James Brett, president of the New England Council.

First-gen Forward Designation


+ Focus on Health

we’re all experiencing things at the same time. So there is a shift and an openness to look within. That self-reflection includes how people grapple with their race, culture, and identity.” Callwood was toward the end of her Regis education (a bachelor’s degree in psychology) when Black Lives Matter began gaining attention—and it informed her well-being career The safety and of community members is a top path in mental health. priority at Regis. In addition to enhanced cleaning and “Protesting in the streetsduring isn’t the COVID-19 pandemic, the unisafety protocols for everyone, and implemented I knew I couldpreventative do versity measures that include important mandatory advocacy work behind weekly COVID-19 testing for every student, the scenes,” Callwood “What employee returning to campus. faculty, and says. student-facing better wayThe thanRegis to integrate it has come together to make that hapcommunity with the work pen that in theI would testingbe center located behind Maria Hall. doing every single day.” “My role, first and foremost, is not possible without the Stigma around mental illness across the institution,” says Kelly incredible partnership is especially an issue in some Brochu, MEd, director of the Health Services Testing racially and ethnically diverse for the Summer Scholars Program. Center and co-director communities, it had can be “Weand have theaprivilege of various staff members stepmajor barrier accessing pingtoinpeople to support this operation in tandem with their mental health services. Seeking full-time roles. From triaging our wellness housing efforts professional for mental illness to help stepping in to assist with testing center registration, our may be counter to center cultural val- grateful for the gracious hospitality testing is truly ues of strong emotional andfamily care oforour colleagues and leadership.” restraint, forHere example. is a glimpse of the people behind the masks at the “People of color, center: particularly testing Black clinicians, only make up 5 percent of the population of TESTING CENTER TEAM psychologists,” Callwood says. “I Director identify as Puerto Rican•and West of the Testing Center Kelly Brochu, MEd, oversees the institution’s Indian so I understand mental protocol health stigma and also mistrust of of testing compliance, academic progression support of those impacted by the health care system that exists COVID-19, and the supervision of the in Caribbean and other cultures. I testing want to be an agent of change, notcenter operation.

Delivering Care

COVID-19 TESTING CENTER TEAM: BEHIND THE MASKS

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including a shortage of primary care physicians and psychiatrists to supervise a growing number of advanced practice nurses. “There have been a lot of people rooting for this legislation,” Hart said. “I think it is going to encourage more nurses to become advanced practice nurses because they will no longer have this barrier to practice.” Hart, who represented the Massachusetts Association of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses on the most recent push for the legislation, pointed out an increasing number of advanced practice nurses, particularly in psychiatry, simply could not care for their patients because they were unable to find physician supervisors. “But attitudes have changed,” said Hart. “The evidence shows that health outcomes for patients treated by advanced practice nurses are comparable to those who have been treated by physicians. People in health care are beginning to get that.”

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“Experiences stay with you, maybe not at the forefront but in the back of your mind. Therapy is not going to erase what happened. But what we only as a provider who looks like • COVID-19 Coordinator Eddie Hand helps are offeringCLINICAL peopleTEAM is the concept the people I serve, but as someone manage COVID-19 testing compliance. who can open the door for disman• Tammi Magazzu,responses RN, MSN, WHNP-BC, • Administrative Assistants Stacey thatCloutman these are normal to tling barriers to access to quality Associate Dean and Medical Director and Nick Ferreri-Wildason manage testing care. Representation matters.” center registration and organize specimen • Rebecca Hill, PhD, DNP, Rachel Koransky-Matson, traumatic experiences, andFNP-C, that you collections. Clinical Leader DNP, APRN, FNP-C, assistant • Testing Center Monitors observe professor and clinical coordinacanindividube happy, in spite ofMSN, allAPRN, the WHNP-BC bad • Margaret Duggan, collecting their sample for surveillance tor of Regis’ Online Familyals Nurse • Katelyn Durgin, BSN, RN COVID-19 testing. This team is comprised Practitioner Program, embraces things that have happened to you.” of approximately 10 graduate intern both traditional Western medicine • Cheryl A. Murphy, BSN, RN employees from the Division of Student and more holistic approaches— • Vanessa Peixoto, MSN, APRN, FNP-C Affairs and Enrollment and THOMAS health sciences including homeopathy, naturopaKANNON, DNP, PMHNP-BC, assistant professor and interim assistant dean of Graduate Online Nursing at Regis • Erin Tetler, MSN, APRN, FNP-C thy, and aromatherapy. students.

• Beth DeArias, Administrative Assistant

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On January 1, 2021, a newly signed state law lifted practice restrictions and increased access to care. The sweeping health care reform, signed by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, grants nurse practitioners, psychiatric mental health clinical nurse specialists, and nurse anesthetists independent authority over their practice after two years of supervision by a physician or qualified advanced practice nurse. Previously, supervision was required by a physician, limiting the ability of advanced practice nurses to deliver care permitted by their licenses and scope of practice. A driving force behind the reform’s approval was the decision by the state earlier this year to temporarily lift the physician supervision requirement in response to the COVID-19 pandemic to optimize health care access during the once-in-a-generation public health crisis. "This critical reform addresses the rising health care needs of patients and regional workforce challenges that were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Diane Welsh, DNP, RN, CNE, dean of the Young School of Nursing at Regis. “Removing practice restrictions further empowers advanced practice nurses, including the next generation of nurse practitioners we educate at Regis College. This new law will increase access to high-quality care during the coronavirus pandemic and its resulting demands on our health care system, as well as expand access to care into the future.” Twenty-two other states had already removed practice supervision restrictions, including every state in New England except for Massachusetts. Associate Professor Mary Ann Hart, PhD, director for the health administration graduate program and a registered lobbyist who has represented several nursing professional groups advocating for the legislation, explained that numerous factors made supervision requirements a barrier to practice,

I L LU ST R AT I O N BY G O O D ST U D I O

Regis applauds state’s practice supervision reform


class after

YOU’RE NOT

Crafting a Career

ALONE

Students practice public relations and help alumni entrepreneurs boost business BY ASHLEY STARR

REGIS TODAY

Kooker welcomed two Regis alumni entrepreneurs to be the class’ clients for the semester: Iliana Ramirez ’10, CEO and co-founder of Meaningful Occasions, a nonprofit agency that provides event planning services for the underserved communities in Boston; and Mary Lou Blas ’08, owner of Mary’s Sweet Bliss Bakery in Roslindale, Massachusetts. “The main objective was to give students the experience of working with clients in a professional setting,” explains Kooker. “I enjoyed hearing “And in return, the clients—the alumni—would get the benefit the perspectives of the students’ ideas, perspectives, and their work. It’s a win-win of students … I for everyone.” recognize that The alumni presented their communication objectives for their students are an businesses at the beginning of the untapped fountain semester. Students were asked S T O R Y B Yto come K R I up S Twith E N public W A Lrelations SH of innovation.” strategies and campaigns to fulfill ILIANA RAMIREZ ’10 these goals.

“Being able to work with clients from real organizations was a great opportunity and allowed me to practice what I learned in class,” says Matty Jobarteh ’21, a marketing and communications major. “I discovered the importance of understanding a company’s needs before developing a strategy to achieve their goals.” This was something Jobarteh and classmates had talked about in class, but being able to experience the process firsthand brought the ideas to life—and provided a platform to take creative risks and receive professional feedback. Kooker says that students came away with a sense of accomplishment and the alumni business owners are using the campaigns to help their businesses grow.

The National Institutes of Health reported that mental illnesses in the United States affect tens of millions of people each year.AYet the Meaningful Experience stigma of mental health issues often leads people to suffer Ramirez alone. jumped at the opportunity to work with Regis students

to offer them an inside glance at entrepreneurship. Her objective for the class was to create a press kit for Meaningful Occasions that could be shared with investors, partners, and potential clients. “The student pieces were great. I enjoyed hearing the perspectives of students who are being taught cutting-edge ideas,” says Ramirez. “I recognize that students are an untapped fountain of innovation.” Thanks to

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Real-world experience gives students a chance to apply what they’ve learned, explore interests, and gain a competitive edge in the job market. These are just a few reasons why Assistant Professor of Communication Naomi Kooker incorporated a consulting component into the curriculum for her fall 2020 Introduction to Public Relations class.

Finding a Sweet Spot Blas was honored to participate in the class and hoped her story could provide inspiration to students. She graduated from Regis with a major in biology. After working in the science field for eight years, she took a leap of faith and moved into the business world.

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“At Regis, I learned that if you follow others, you will always be behind them,” Blas says. “This helped me eventually thrive in creating a successful business.” Blas currently works as a billing agent at Constant Contact but discovered her true passion when she started her own baking company, Mary’s Sweet Bliss Bakery. She was exploring ways to grow clientele and asked students to build content for social media, blogs, and her website that would help boost her company recognition. “Working with the students was very educational for me,” says Blas. “They offered new ideas and taught me the power of social media. Since creating an Instagram account specifically for the bakery, I’ve seen an increase in clients.” Blas plans to implement more of the students’ ideas and ultimately hopes to work full time on Mary’s Sweet Bliss.

“I hope my story taught students that if you are not given an opportunity, to create one for yourself.” MARY LOU BLAS ’08

“I hope my story taught students that if you are not given an opportunity, to create one for yourself,” says Blas. “I wanted them to walk away with the skills of staying persistent and being determined to achieve their goals.”

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the students’ presentations, Ramirez has revamped her social media and created a YouTube page. Looking to continue the positive collaboration, Ramirez hired Tyler-Lee St. Leger ’21 last fall as Meaningful Occasions’ first intern. “It was important to offer this opportunity to a Regis student,” explains Ramirez. “Regis was a second home for me, and it felt natural to extend this opportunity to a person who is in the same place as I once was.” Ramirez fondly recalls her own internship as a student at Regis. “I am able today to take risks and dream big because my internships as a student gave me the environment to practice for the real world. I hope that I was able to offer the same experience to the students.” St. Leger, a double major in criminal justice and communication, is responsible for boosting Meaningful Occasions’ social media presence—catering toward a younger demographic—and participates in the promotion of the company’s programming. She has successfully reached more than 500 followers on the Facebook page and is working on a virtual Boston-based series, Entrepreneur Partnership Cover. “As an intern, I was given a lot of creative freedom, which helped build my confidence,” says St. Leger, whose career plans include working within the justice system to help underserved communities in the Greater Boston area. “I want to be in the social work field, and this experience has taught me ways to become more involved in my local community. I know I will use Iliana as a resource for the children and families I serve.”


ınnovation academic

In a Class of Their Own

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“I got my bachelor’s degree in May and started grad school two weeks later. It’s intense and I love every minute of it.”

R EGIS

15

REGIS TODAY

business. Walsh, for example, was concerned that “some classes or subjects would be like learning a new language to me because they were far outside the realm of my current job and I wasn’t familiar with them.” It was that fear factor that Professor of Finance and Accounting Chris Kubik, DBA, wanted to address head on. “My goal was first and foremost to not have students be fearful of what we were going to talk about. I took a focused approach on industries where they could see some of their language like comorbidities and other sorts of things you wouldn’t necessarily see in any traditional MBA program.” Former paramedic Stephen Monteiro, MS ’08 spent decades in various leadership positions with Caritas Christi Norwood Hospital and Boston Children’s Hospital, served as a Federal Disaster Worker with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and helped Massachusetts General Hospital develop a statewide pandemic plan before making a couple of significant career decisions. “The arrival of COVID-19 became a very clear signal that it was time to test my knowledge and skills in the open health care market,” he explains. “I am motivated by the vision of accessible health care that is affordable to all. I am driven by knowing that it can always be made better.”

Learn more about the Professional MBA degree in the Marshall M. Sloane School of Business and Communication at Regis: regisma. me/mba.

In August 2020, he launched Mitigant Risk Solutions, LLC, which provides consulting services in health care emergency management and hospital operations, including comprehensive program reviews. In March 2021, he began the Regis MBA program. “Being a former graduate student at Regis, I understand how valuable the educational offering is here,” he explains. “My prior studies in organizational development helped to shape my critical thinking and leadership philosophy as well as provided me a rich contextual understanding of why so many impossibly simple organizational problems turn out to be ‘simply impossible.’” Garozzo’s job also has ties to the pandemic; Pall is a supplier for many of the biopharmaceutical process developmental strategies used in vaccine manufacturing. “I’ve worked with numerous companies directly involved in the COVID-19 vaccine race by providing them with tools, solutions, and documentation (necessary for submission to regulatory agencies) as part of their scale-up production plans,” Garozzo says. “When I’m able to support customers’ efforts, I feel like I’m making Regis proud by doing my part to contribute to the common good.”

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doctor degree, she worked in varied areas of the law while actively networking with legal colleagues. Her experience in pharmaceutical law led Jennifer to her current path in the health care field. “Law is fluid and you’re always developing and honing E XPLORING OP T IONS skills, so I’m not sure where I’ll end W I TH INTERNSHIP S up in the future,” she says. Internships gave the Amaral women For Rachel, senior year brought the chance to explore career options. deep reflection as she questioned her They approached the job search with career trajectory. “I was burned out gusto—and strategy. “I submitted and felt lost and disengaged. Despite dozens of résumés and cover letRegis MBA helps graduate students and alumni bridge science and business all of my internships, I wasn’t sure ters and always circled back. I was what I wanted. I was so focused on persistent but professional,” says ADAPTED BY KRISTEN WALSH the perfect résumé and being the RACHEL AMARAL ’19, ’21 Rachel, who landed multiple internperfect student that my path was lit ships. She worked for a marketing for me rather than me lighting my agency and an executive search firm, ownregulapath.” for the offices of Boston Mayor Marty “I had told myself I would likely not go back to Marissa Garozzo ’10, MS ’12 had science and withfor herquite own some time given Walsh and Massachusetts Governor SERV ICE school I hadAND justSELF gone-CARE tory management skills down pat when she Years startedof coping therapy,ancoupled Charlie Baker, and as a social media Despite and their hectic lives, the associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s her career in the pharmaceuticals industryanxiety after throughthrough with her affinity for helping people, intern for a nonprofit health care Amaral sisters find time to care for degree without a break,” Nugent recalls. She completing an undergraduate degree in chemistry drew Rachel to Regis’ master’s proorganization. others. They are longtime volunearned a Regis master’s degree in the Family Nurse and a master’s degree in regulatory and clinical gram in counseling psychology. After Often, she and Jennifer held down teers at the Perkins School for the program. “ButBlind the MBA has research management at Regis. Today, shediscussion works at withPractitioner Karen Miranda, several internships simultaneously. and program the Bread of Life Food helped me discover how health care and business Pall Corporation; with more than 10,000 products director of graduate counseling Jennifer described one of these busy Pantry. At Regis, Rachel tutored tie insupport so well together.” across portfolios, the global and with programs, from weeks:different “I’d workbusiness two daysunit at UBS children at Bethany Hill Place while The curriculum directly relates toattended Nugent’s awork company supplies filtration, separation, and purifiher family, Rachel applied and was Financial, two days with the Office Jennifer mission trip providing annual wellness to visits through home care with accepted into the program. of Senate President Therese Murray cation solutions across life sciences and industrial Jamestown, Mississippi, “I got my bachelor’s degree in at the State House, one at athen, that Garozzo Campus Ministry and Service. The working with UnitedHealth Group/Optum. applications. It’s notand surprising, May and started grad two what I was local law says that parrecipient Law’s Pro Bono “Thisschool is exactly hopingofforSuffolk from an is back atfirm.” Regis She for an MBA. intense and I love realization ticular summer was demanding Service Award, Jennifer recently proprogram—the that understanding “By being in the MBA program,but I really weeks under-later. It’sMBA every minute ofthe it,”business says Rachel, who helpful. “I got a taste of the business vided legal in a Department aspect of health carefree is just asaid imporstand how much business I didn’t know before,” completed a one-year counseling and law worlds. It solidified my deciof Children and Families case. “I’m tant as understanding how to treat and care for my says Garozzo, who is a biotech technical inside sales internship with Housing Families sion to pursue law.” a big proponent of pro bono legal patients,” Nugent says. “Because the truth is, you associate at Pall. “But I can already see how much in Malden, Massachusetts. services for people who can’t afford adequate health care she without more I am on the job. I can now speak Though she’s cannot headedhave in a new them,” says.a strong L IGHTcompetent ING THE IR business supporting the field.” about the importance of inventory turns, more direction, Rachel says she doesn’t To minimize stress and to maxiOWN PATHS closely examine recognition, regret her undergraduate journey. mize wellness in their own lives, After taking the revenue LSATs and applying and conduct Knowledgeskills and Confidence more margin “I’lluse use my communication Jennifer and Rachel practice selfto lawcomprehensive schools, Jennifer choseanalysis. Suffolk I also Kayleigh Walsh, MS ’14 graduated from Regis with talk with clients and my business marketing toolsShe I learned care. They exercise, meditate, enjoy University strategy Law School. startedto worktowith skills if I set upaamaster’s private pracmusic and books, and eat well. in August 2016 and found herself new product degree in clinical research management product management on proposing tice,” she affirms. For now, Rachel Mental health advocate and budding challenged toideas.” new heights. and regulatory affairs. A principal lead clinical development is enjoying graduate school and at Johnson therapist Rachel she’s come “LawRegis school is not for the faint of research associate & Johnson insays Irvine, The Professional MBA program launched working as a graduate assistant looks forward to supheart,” saysand Jennifer of her threeCalifornia, she plans to usefull thecircle MBAand to advance in fall 2020 is designed for, and open exclusively for the Institutional Review Board porting people with mental health year experience. She served as a her career even further. to, Regis graduate students and alumni who can to offset tuition under the superviconcerns—just as she received help legal intern for the U.S. Attorney’s “I see the MBA as an opportunity to possibly apply previous coursework and receive the degree sion of Malachowski. “She has been in the past. And she wouldn’t change Office and as a judicial intern for the leave the clinical become morejourney. “As with as fewMarianne as six additional online and a my mentor throughout my under-research abubble thing and about her Regis Honorable B. Bowler ’67. courses involved in the higher-level company-wide decisions personalized, career-focused specialization. Unlike graduate and graduate years and long as I’m fueled by passion, I’m on “I learned so much working with and practices butmy from thethe research angle,” Walsh traditional MBAs, Regis Professional MBA offers deserves a shoutout for making right path.” Judge Bowler,” shethe says, noting says. “Having an MBA would give me the confidence aBowler’s tailoredrole curriculum developed to meet the rapRegis experience so worthwhile,” in the Boston Marathon Rachel says. to speak to the business side of the decision-making idly growing needs ofBulger professionals bomber and Whitey cases. in non-business Jennifer law clerk process and also utilize my previous research experifields, such held as health care,positions education, social service, for the City of Boston and a Boston ence to make well-informed decisions for that side communication, and life sciences. law firm. After receiving Samantha her juris Nugent, of the business.” For nurse practitioner Members of early Professional MBA cohorts MSN ’17 the notion of an MBA was not top of mind varied widely in their initial comfort level with until she heard about the Regis program. of the Department of Business Management. “Professor Christie had personal experience as a law student. I relied on his guidance when I started applying to law schools.”


ahead looking

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Talking to Jennifer Amaral ’16 and Rachel Amaral ’19, ’21, it’s hard to believe the two surrounded by Portuguese culture— affable and articulate sisters once considered the language, the food, the music. It’s a big part of our identity.” themselves shy. The Amarals—who both Rachel wrote her college admissions essay about her family’s immimaintained 4.0 GPAs while double majoring gration story. She says the difference between her life in America and at Regis—are an outspoken force today. that of her Azorean cousins is stark. Education Collaboration “They left school to work the family Jennifer, 27, a practicing attorney, and Rachel, farm. It’s a poor and quiet life with Regis partnerships open doors and forge relationships little opportunity for growth.” 24, pursuing a graduate degree in counseling ADAPTED BY KRISTEN WALSH WOMEN IN BU SINE S S psychology at Regis, say their college years When it came time to choose majors at Regis, Jennifer and Rachel opted taught them to speak their truths for the good for business management degrees. “It ingrained Martin, Retention Specialist forwas the Office of in us as little At any given Regis graduate orientation, students of others. girls that women need to be finan-

potential recruits into the fold and to retain the talent we currently possess,” says Rashaun J.

Like Rodriguez, Mariano Humphrey, EdD ’23 learned about the Regis partnership at a BPS

An Opportunity to Shine It was by chance that Rachel Briden, BSN ’20, MSN ’22 learned about Regis’ partnership program. While attending Regis’ annual Let It Shine Gala in October 2019, she and Etheridge struck up a conversation. At the time, Briden was a senior undergraduate nursing student at Regis and considering next steps. “Amy was excited to learn that I had been working as a patient care associate at a major Boston hospital throughout my Regis undergraduate nursing studies and she told me that it was one of the hospitals that Regis has a partnership with,” recalls Briden. “We continued talking and I told her about my dream of working

“Not everyone can afford to leave their jobs for a whole year to complete internships, but the Regis EdD program allowed me to work and study while pursuing the degree.” JACQUELINE RODRIGUEZ, EdD ’23

as a nurse while attending graduate school.” It turns out, Briden is doing that now through Regis’ partnership with Saint Anne’s Hospital in Fall River, Massachusetts, where she landed a full-time job as a nurse in the Intensive Care Unit after graduating with her undergraduate nursing degree. “Between Regis’ online Family Nurse Practitioner program and working night shifts in the ICU at Saint Anne’s, it has been a rewarding semester,” says Briden, who expects to complete her graduate degree in May 2022. “When I look at pictures at the gala, I am reminded of how much has changed since then, not only with the pandemic, but also in the way that we as a society value online education and the work of nurses. I look forward to mentoring nurses to show my gratitude for all at Regis who have assisted me.”

To learn more about Regis partnerships, visit regiscollege.edu/admissionand-aid/strategic-partnerships.

Rachel Briden, BSN ’20, MSN ’22

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Recruitment, Cultivation and Diversity Programs might look to their left, then to their right, and note cially independent and a business at Boston Public Schools. “Not only does this help that, were it not for an innovative partnership prodegree seemed to offer the most us with retention efforts, it also can be used as a gram, one in five of them might not be there. lucrative job opportunities,” says F INDING THE IR VOICE S LE S S ONS LE ARNED AT HOME tool as well. Our partnership witha second major Regis and variousInemployRachel, who added AsPartnerships a recipient ofbetween the full-tuition addition to arecruitment sense of gratitude, Regis allows BPS to hone the skills of our human ers extend substantial discounts toward attaining in communication while Jennifer Presidential Catholic Schools the Amarals brought a strong work capital further than they may have been able to on major in graduate degrees. More than 60 corporations, health graduated with another Scholarship, Jennifer, who was ethic to Regis. their own. And that is something we are incredibly systems, school districts, government entities, and law and government. The sisters class valedictorian says, “I wanted “Our parents never had the chance of.” more for professional offer employeestodiscounts were active members of the Business to give back organizations to Regis for taking go to college proud and wanted Association—Jennifer helped form a chance on completion, me.” us. They on bachelor graduate, and doctoral pro-knew education was the the group and Rachel later served She was Pride Guide as a firstkey to success, so they insisted acaFar-reaching Impact grams. Thata number is growing every month—and as co-president. year student, giving campus tours to demics came first at home.Rodriguez, No TV, Jacqueline for good reason. Rachel credits Assistant Professor prospective students. “I was terrified no computers, and sports until two EdDno ’23 has spent “The program is a win-win-win,” says Amy of Global Business Management of public speaking,” she says. “But homework was done. We became decades with the BPS Etheridge, executive director of institutional Charlene Geary, PhD, with teaching I ended up being surprisingly good “to-do” list people, writing schedules system as a bilingual partnerships. “Students save thousands of dollars her to think critically. “There are two at it. When you’re passionate about in our little Hallmark calendars,” working with types of learning: memorizing and annually, employers a valuable recruitment something, it shines gain through.” recalls Jenniferpsychologist with a laugh. K–8 students BPS. and retention tool atScholarship no cost to them, regurgitating and thinking things The Presidential was and professions The sisters admit they stillin adhere “When I think about from health care to education benefit from a more through. Professor Geary pushed also a primary reason for Rachel to a no-procrastination philosophy. Jacqueline Rodriguez, EdD ’23 the work I’ve engaged highly trained choosing Regis.workforce.” She was initially “Get the work done and you’ll have in and challenged me. She gave me for theJennifer, last 20 years—being the marriage of therapy Tuitionto breaks are“Ijust of the benefits theto play,” advises extra support when I needed it.” hesitant attend. wasone worried time who Rachel says her relationships with I’d have trouble carving out my and own employers. served as student class andgovernment education as a school psychologist—I think partnerships provide employees college professors such as Colleen life,” Rachel explains, recalling to a meet the president about the next 20 years and an EdD in higher educaEvery agreement is customized needs at Regis. Malachowski, PhD, associate profesprofessor’s exclamation earlyparticipating on: The Amaral sisters are the tion seems likefirst a natural next step,” Rodriguez says. of the organization. At some hospitals sor of Educators communication and Carole “You’re an Amaral? You have bigRegis created generation in their family It extended was through a BPS Women of in Greater Boston, for example, cusRemick Endowed Director, sustained shoes to fill!” to receive a college education. Their Color executive coaching leadership program tomized cohorts with on-site “classrooms.” For her during difficult times. “It’s hard Pushing aside misgivings, Rachel parents emigrated as children from that she learned about the partnership between an organization like Boston Public Schools (BPS), being a college student. I apprecifollowed her sister’s lead and joined Portugal to the United States. BPS working and Regis; plan with staff of as more than ated thatcareer I could drop into Professor PrideaGuides a way to 10,000, pay it one goal included “Our dad started in and her long-term became attainable. assisting the school district in becoming more Malachowski’s office to discuss classforward and step outside her comfort landscaping and snow removal at 15 everyone can affordwork to leave jobs competitive against other employers to recruit and their get life advice.” zone. With Jennifer and former and made his way“Not up to operations. for a whole year to complete internships, butbegan the leaning and retain a seasoned and diverse workforce. When Jennifer Regis staffer James Guaragna ’11, Mom has been with UBS Financial Regis EdD program me toawork and after college, sheer fact that we’re to offer that toward law degree ’13“The as mentors, Rachel grewable in confor 30 years,” says Jennifer. While allowed she turned toRodriguez. John Christie, PhD, fidence. “I began to embrace their parents worked multiple jobs, the degree,” study while pursuing says opportunity to obtain a degreeRegis’ at a discounted associate of managesmallwhich size and appreciate the closeJennifer and Rachel wereofcared for partnership, “Because the BPS it professor became finanrate, could be necessary to the advancement ment and economics and chair knit community.” “We were cially feasible for me.” of their career within BPS, goes a long waybytotheir bringgrandparents.

program (Men Educators of Color) and is pursuing an EdD. As program director in special education at Community Academy Alternative High School in Jamaica Plain, he works with students who have disabilities and have experiMariano Humphrey, EdD ’23 enced race-based and other forms of trauma, including anxiety and various types of depression. In addition to the Regis EdD program’s affordability and flexibility, he values the far-reaching impact of the degree. “I see this as my calling and passion, to work with individuals with disabilities and those who have experienced trauma,” says Humphrey, who has worked at Boston Public Schools for nearly 18 years. “This commitment to continue to serve urban communities at the district level and gain additional knowledge and resources through the EdD course work at Regis will make me a better educator and practitioner.”


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18 REGIS TODAY

Nursing school applications are on the rise as people change careers amid a global pandemic

STORY ADAPTED BY K R I S T E N WA L S H


Justin Andrews, ABSN ’22 was a 25-year-old personal banker when he got a nagging feeling of regret about his career choice. It was February 2020 and the COVID-19 virus was heading toward pandemic status. Health care workers, including Andrews’ aunt who is a Silver Lining nurse, were putting their own lives at risk to The pandemic also influwork the front lines. And he wanted to be there. enced career plans for Jacqueline Gorman, “Seeing my aunt work so hard in the emerABSN ’21. As the economy shut down in March 2020, gency room and watching the news showing so did the wellness company the nurses battling the virus made me want she had opened on Boston’s south shore a year-and-a-half prior. to join the fight with even more passion,” But, she discovered a silver lining. Andrews recalls. “Pandemics happen, but we “I began my practice by working in two different wellness centers and quickly developed a craving to need people to help others.”

“I think what surprised me as I started in my first semester at Regis was how capable I was of doing this program,” Gorman says. “I was always scared of nursing programs and thought they were impossible, but if you have a dream to cling onto as you go through the program, it helps you persevere.” Plus, she adds, “I feel supported and cared for as a student. In each class, my professors inspire me on the type of nurse I want to be, and not just the title of RN. I’m inspired to build the precision, intelligence, humility, and humor of a nurse.”

A Dedicated Cause

Like Gorman, Timothy Abbott, ABSN ’23 also comes from a family of health care practitioners. As a nationally trained paramedic, he has treated and transported so many COVID-19 patients that he “has lost track.” The nature of his job is to provide emergency treatment of a life-threatening illness and transport patients by ambulance to the hospital. “Paramedicine is very rewarding, but after I treat a very specific illness, I leave the patient in the emergency department,” Abbott says. “I want to spend more time with my patients. My end goal is to be a nurse practitioner and treat those patients after the paramedics leave.” Choosing the Regis ABSN program to help him reach that goal was easy. Several people he knows— including his wife Katelynne Lyons Abbott, BSN ’06, FNP ’08—completed graduate and master’s degrees in nursing at Regis. Abbott holds an undergraduate degree in communications and worked in the mortgage industry for six years. He decided to make a change after witnessing a significant motor vehicle crash. At the time, Abbott was volunteering for the Haverhill, Massachusetts, auxiliary police department but was off duty. “One driver was very injured,” Abbott recalls. “While I helped where I could, I did not have the skills of an EMT. So that night is when I registered for the EMT-B class.” A few years after becoming an EMT, Abbott completed the Paramedic Technology program at Northern Essex Community College. The intensive training included pharmacology and life-saving skills like intubation and cardioversion both with medication and

“I was in the midst of the pandemic when I started filling out my applications, but it honestly didn’t affect my decision in a negative way. I think it really added some fuel to the fire.” JUSTIN ANDREWS, ABSN ’22

electricity. Abbott also spent more than 250 hours in the emergency department and operating room working with nurses and physicians, plus an additional 250-300 hours riding on an ambulance with senior paramedics. “I am excited for how Regis is preparing me for the next journey in my health care career,” Abbott says. “Regis has graduated so many outstanding nurses and NPs and I feel honored that I will be among so many great providers in the future.” Abbott, Andrews, and Gorman are not alone in their pursuit of a nursing degree during the pandemic. Between March and August 2020, the accelerated nursing programs at Regis received 117 percent more inquiries than in the same period the year before. Applications were up by 40 percent in both spring and fall 2020. “Nursing schools are experiencing an increase in applications, particularly from individuals with a previous non-nursing degree,” says Donna M. Glynn, PhD, RN, ANP, associate dean of pre-licensure nursing and associate professor. “These individuals report that they want to make a difference and contribute to health care and underserved populations. Many startling health disparities and social inequities came to the forefront through the crisis.” Learn more about the Young School of Nursing at Regis: regiscollege.edu/nursing.

21 SPRING/SUMMER 2021

Justin Andrews, ABSN ’22

He applied to the 16-month Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) program at Regis. “I was in the midst of the pandemic when I started filling out my applications, but it honestly didn’t affect my decision in a negative way. I think it really added some fuel to the fire.” Andrews received a bachelor’s degree in psychology and communications from Worcester State University, although he admits that nursing had been on his mind since high school. When he finally decided to explore a career shift into nursing, he spoke with longtime bank client Ann Fryer, who just happened to be an associate professor of nursing at Regis. “Justin is a very empathetic, compassionate person,” Fryer says of Andrews’ interaction with bank customers. “Observing him during the COVID-19 crisis, I watch him talk to people who are bringing all sorts of baggage and fear with them. I think that running toward the fire is part of what nurses do. We put out fires all the time. I think he will do very well.” Andrews likens the rigor of the Regis program to an Olympic torch. “It’s like a fire burning under you. It has pushed me and my peers to get the gold. After the first few weeks, my cohort developed a flow and time management; getting everything done became second nature.” He continues, “My cohort is full of people with such kind hearts and powerful brains; it really feels like a family. I know they will all make great nurses.”

learn more and become a stronger advocate and practitioner for my clients,” Gorman says of her business, Sovereign Wellness. “Along the way I met nurses and nurse practitioners who inspired me to gain stronger clinical experiences to fill that hole I was looking to fill. While the pandemic took my business, it allowed me to focus on the greater goal of becoming a family nurse practitioner.” At the encouragement of family members in nursing, she chose Regis’ ABSN program. “I wanted an education that would really support me from day one to finding a job in a major Boston hospital after my RN licensure.” Gorman has two undergraduate degrees—one in environmental studies with a concentration in sustainable food systems, and a second in communication, advocacy, and social change. “At that time, I had become enamored with the local food movement while seeking out healthier ways of living after my mother’s diagnosis of breast cancer,” she recalls. Gorman worked as a farmer, event planner, and private chef on Martha’s Vineyard until the grueling hours caused chronic health problems. She found relief in brain integration, a complementary therapy based on techniques of acupressure, applied kinesiology, and physiotherapy. And she also found a new career interest. “I became amazed by the role you could play in other people’s lives while helping them overcome significant challenges with diagnoses like ADHD, dyslexia, emotional trauma, and post-traumatic stress,” she says. After continuing her education, Gorman became a brain integration practitioner and integrative health coach and opened Sovereign Wellness. She is both proud and humble as she describes the next step in her journey: becoming a nurse.

<< Jacqueline Gorman, ABSN ’21

Timothy Abbott, ABSN ’23


SAME ROAD

RACHEL AMARAL ’19, ’21

/

and JENNIFER AMARAL ’16

REGIS TODAY

balance academic and professional demands with a holistic approach to life.

STORY BY

Nursing school applications are on the rise as people change careers amid a global pandemic

P A T R I C I A M U R R AY D I B O N A ’ 8 4

DIFFERENT PATHS

18

From Pride Guides together to independent career paths, sisters

STORY ADAPTED BY

PHOTOS BY

K R I S T E N WA L S H

H O L LY R E D M O N D


ahead looking

24 16

Talking to Jennifer Amaral ’16 and Rachel Amaral ’19, ’21, it’s hard to believe the two surrounded by Portuguese culture— affable and articulate sisters once considered the language, the food, the music. It’s a big part of our identity.” themselves shy. The Amarals—who both Rachel wrote her college admissions essay about her family’s immimaintained 4.0 GPAs while double majoring gration story. She says the difference between her life in America and at Regis—are an outspoken force today. that of her Azorean cousins is stark. Education Collaboration “They left school to work the family Jennifer, 27, a practicing attorney, and Rachel, farm. It’s a poor and quiet life with Regis partnerships open doors and forge relationships little opportunity for growth.” 24, pursuing a graduate degree in counseling ADAPTED BY KRISTEN WALSH WOMEN IN BU SINE S S psychology at Regis, say their college years When it came time to choose majors at Regis, Jennifer and Rachel opted taught them to speak their truths for the good for business management degrees. “It ingrained Martin, Retention Specialist forwas the Office of in us as little At any given Regis graduate orientation, students of others. girls that women need to be finan-

REGIS TODAY

Recruitment, Cultivation and Diversity Programs might look to their left, then to their right, and note cially independent and a business at Boston Public Schools. “Not only does this help that, were it not for an innovative partnership prodegree seemed to offer the most us with retention efforts, it also can be used as a gram, one in five of them might not be there. lucrative job opportunities,” says F INDING THE IR VOICE S LE S S ONS LE ARNED AT HOME tool as well. Our partnership witha second major Regis and variousInemployRachel, who added AsPartnerships a recipient ofbetween the full-tuition addition to arecruitment sense of gratitude, Regis allows BPS to hone the skills of our human ers extend substantial discounts toward attaining in communication while Jennifer Presidential Catholic Schools the Amarals brought a strong work capital further than they may have been able to on major in graduate degrees. More than 60 corporations, health graduated with another Scholarship, Jennifer, who was ethic to Regis. their own. And that is something we are incredibly systems, school districts, government entities, and law and government. The sisters class valedictorian says, “I wanted “Our parents never had the chance of.” more for professional offer employeestodiscounts were active members of the Business to give back organizations to Regis for taking go to college proud and wanted Association—Jennifer helped form a chance on completion, me.” us. They on bachelor graduate, and doctoral pro-knew education was the the group and Rachel later served She was Pride Guide as a firstkey to success, so they insisted acaFar-reaching Impact grams. Thata number is growing every month—and as co-president. year student, giving campus tours to demics came first at home.Rodriguez, No TV, Jacqueline for good reason. Rachel credits Assistant Professor prospective students. “I was terrified no computers, and sports until two EdDno ’23 has spent “The program is a win-win-win,” says Amy of Global Business Management of public speaking,” she says. “But homework was done. We became decades with the BPS Etheridge, executive director of institutional Charlene Geary, PhD, with teaching I ended up being surprisingly good “to-do” list people, writing schedules system as a bilingual partnerships. “Students save thousands of dollars her to think critically. “There are two at it. When you’re passionate about in our little Hallmark calendars,” working with types of learning: memorizing and annually, employers a valuable recruitment something, it shines gain through.” recalls Jenniferpsychologist with a laugh. K–8 students BPS. and retention tool atScholarship no cost to them, regurgitating and thinking things The Presidential was and professions The sisters admit they stillin adhere “When I think about from health care to education benefit from a more through. Professor Geary pushed also a primary reason for Rachel to a no-procrastination philosophy. Jacqueline Rodriguez, EdD ’23 the work I’ve engaged highly trained choosing Regis.workforce.” She was initially “Get the work done and you’ll have in and challenged me. She gave me for theJennifer, last 20 years—being the marriage of therapy Tuitionto breaks are“Ijust of the benefits theto play,” advises extra support when I needed it.” hesitant attend. wasone worried time who Rachel says her relationships with I’d have trouble carving out my and own employers. served as student class andgovernment education as a school psychologist—I think partnerships provide employees college professors such as Colleen life,” Rachel explains, recalling to a meet the president about the next 20 years and an EdD in higher educaEvery agreement is customized needs at Regis. Malachowski, PhD, associate profesprofessor’s exclamation earlyparticipating on: The Amaral sisters are the tion seems likefirst a natural next step,” Rodriguez says. of the organization. At some hospitals sor of Educators communication and Carole “You’re an Amaral? You have bigRegis created generation in their family It extended was through a BPS Women of in Greater Boston, for example, cusRemick Endowed Director, sustained shoes to fill!” to receive a college education. Their Color executive coaching leadership program tomized cohorts with on-site “classrooms.” For her during difficult times. “It’s hard Pushing aside misgivings, Rachel parents emigrated as children from that she learned about the partnership between an organization like Boston Public Schools (BPS), being a college student. I apprecifollowed her sister’s lead and joined Portugal to the United States. BPS working and Regis; plan with staff of as more than ated thatcareer I could drop into Professor PrideaGuides a way to 10,000, pay it one goal included “Our dad started in and her long-term became attainable. assisting the school district in becoming more Malachowski’s office to discuss classforward and step outside her comfort landscaping and snow removal at 15 everyone can affordwork to leave jobs competitive against other employers to recruit and their get life advice.” zone. With Jennifer and former and made his way“Not up to operations. for a whole year to complete internships, butbegan the leaning and retain a seasoned and diverse workforce. When Jennifer Regis staffer James Guaragna ’11, Mom has been with UBS Financial Regis EdD program me toawork and after college, sheer fact that we’re to offer that toward law degree ’13“The as mentors, Rachel grewable in confor 30 years,” says Jennifer. While allowed she turned toRodriguez. John Christie, PhD, fidence. “I began to embrace their parents worked multiple jobs, the degree,” study while pursuing says opportunity to obtain a degreeRegis’ at a discounted associate of managesmallwhich size and appreciate the closeJennifer and Rachel wereofcared for partnership, “Because the BPS it professor became finanrate, could be necessary to the advancement ment and economics and chair knit community.” “We were cially feasible for me.” of their career within BPS, goes a long waybytotheir bringgrandparents. potential recruits into the fold and to retain the talent we currently possess,” says Rashaun J.

Like Rodriguez, Mariano Humphrey, EdD ’23 learned about the Regis partnership at a BPS

“I was terrified of public speaking. But I ended up being surprisingly good at it. When you’re passionate about something, it shines through.” JENNIFER AMARAL ’16


ınnovation academic

In a Class of Their Own

26 14

“I got my bachelor’s degree in May and started grad school two weeks later. It’s intense and I love every minute of it.”

doctor degree, she worked in varied areas of the law while actively networking with legal colleagues. Her experience in pharmaceutical law led Jennifer to her current path in the health care field. “Law is fluid and you’re always developing and honing E XPLORING OP T IONS skills, so I’m not sure where I’ll end W I TH INTERNSHIP S up in the future,” she says. Internships gave the Amaral women For Rachel, senior year brought the chance to explore career options. deep reflection as she questioned her They approached the job search with career trajectory. “I was burned out gusto—and strategy. “I submitted and felt lost and disengaged. Despite dozens of résumés and cover letRegis MBA helps graduate students and alumni bridge science and business all of my internships, I wasn’t sure ters and always circled back. I was what I wanted. I was so focused on persistent but professional,” says ADAPTED BY KRISTEN WALSH the perfect résumé and being the RACHEL AMARAL ’19, ’21 Rachel, who landed multiple internperfect student that my path was lit ships. She worked for a marketing for me rather than me lighting my agency and an executive search firm, ownregulapath.” for the offices of Boston Mayor Marty “I had told myself I would likely not go back to Marissa Garozzo ’10, MS ’12 had science and withfor herquite own some time given Walsh and Massachusetts Governor SERV ICE school I hadAND justSELF gone-CARE tory management skills down pat when she Years startedof coping therapy,ancoupled Charlie Baker, and as a social media Despite and their hectic lives, the associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s her career in the pharmaceuticals industryanxiety after throughthrough with her affinity for helping people, intern for a nonprofit health care Amaral sisters find time to care for degree without a break,” Nugent recalls. She completing an undergraduate degree in chemistry drew Rachel to Regis’ master’s proorganization. others. They are longtime volunearned a Regis master’s degree in the Family Nurse and a master’s degree in regulatory and clinical gram in counseling psychology. After Often, she and Jennifer held down teers at the Perkins School for the program. “ButBlind the MBA has research management at Regis. Today, shediscussion works at withPractitioner Karen Miranda, several internships simultaneously. and program the Bread of Life Food helped me discover how health care and business Pall Corporation; with more than 10,000 products director of graduate counseling Jennifer described one of these busy Pantry. At Regis, Rachel tutored tie insupport so well together.” across portfolios, the global and with programs, from weeks:different “I’d workbusiness two daysunit at UBS children at Bethany Hill Place while The curriculum directly relates toattended Nugent’s awork company supplies filtration, separation, and purifiher family, Rachel applied and was Financial, two days with the Office Jennifer mission trip providing annual wellness to visits through home care with accepted into the program. of Senate President Therese Murray cation solutions across life sciences and industrial Jamestown, Mississippi, “I got my bachelor’s degree in at the State House, one at athen, that Garozzo Campus Ministry and Service. The working with UnitedHealth Group/Optum. applications. It’s notand surprising, May and started grad two what I was local law says that parrecipient Law’s Pro Bono “Thisschool is exactly hopingofforSuffolk from an is back atfirm.” Regis She for an MBA. intense and I love realization ticular summer was demanding Service Award, Jennifer recently proprogram—the that understanding “By being in the MBA program,but I really weeks under-later. It’sMBA every minute ofthe it,”business says Rachel, who helpful. “I got a taste of the business vided legal in a Department aspect of health carefree is just asaid imporstand how much business I didn’t know before,” completed a one-year counseling and law worlds. It solidified my deciof Children and Families case. “I’m tant as understanding how to treat and care for my says Garozzo, who is a biotech technical inside sales internship with Housing Families sion to pursue law.” a big proponent of pro bono legal patients,” Nugent says. “Because the truth is, you associate at Pall. “But I can already see how much in Malden, Massachusetts. services for people who can’t afford adequate health care she without more I am on the job. I can now speak Though she’s cannot headedhave in a new them,” says.a strong L IGHTcompetent ING THE IR business supporting the field.” about the importance of inventory turns, more direction, Rachel says she doesn’t To minimize stress and to maxiOWN PATHS closely examine recognition, regret her undergraduate journey. mize wellness in their own lives, After taking the revenue LSATs and applying and conduct Knowledgeskills and Confidence more margin “I’lluse use my communication Jennifer and Rachel practice selfto lawcomprehensive schools, Jennifer choseanalysis. Suffolk I also Kayleigh Walsh, MS ’14 graduated from Regis with talk with clients and my business marketing toolsShe I learned care. They exercise, meditate, enjoy University strategy Law School. startedto worktowith skills if I set upaamaster’s private pracmusic and books, and eat well. in August 2016 and found herself new product degree in clinical research management product management on proposing tice,” she affirms. For now, Rachel Mental health advocate and budding challenged toideas.” new heights. and regulatory affairs. A principal lead clinical development is enjoying graduate school and at Johnson therapist Rachel she’s come “LawRegis school is not for the faint of research associate & Johnson insays Irvine, The Professional MBA program launched working as a graduate assistant looks forward to supheart,” saysand Jennifer of her threeCalifornia, she plans to usefull thecircle MBAand to advance in fall 2020 is designed for, and open exclusively for the Institutional Review Board porting people with mental health year experience. She served as a her career even further. to, Regis graduate students and alumni who can to offset tuition under the superviconcerns—just as she received help legal intern for the U.S. Attorney’s “I see the MBA as an opportunity to possibly apply previous coursework and receive the degree sion of Malachowski. “She has been in the past. And she wouldn’t change Office and as a judicial intern for the leave the clinical become morejourney. “As with as fewMarianne as six additional online and a my mentor throughout my under-research abubble thing and about her Regis Honorable B. Bowler ’67. courses involved in the higher-level company-wide decisions personalized, career-focused specialization. Unlike graduate and graduate years and long as I’m fueled by passion, I’m on “I learned so much working with and practices butmy from thethe research angle,” Walsh traditional MBAs, Regis Professional MBA offers deserves a shoutout for making right path.” Judge Bowler,” shethe says, noting says. “Having an MBA would give me the confidence aBowler’s tailoredrole curriculum developed to meet the rapRegis experience so worthwhile,” in the Boston Marathon Rachel says. to speak to the business side of the decision-making idly growing needs ofBulger professionals bomber and Whitey cases. in non-business Jennifer law clerk process and also utilize my previous research experifields, such held as health care,positions education, social service, for the City of Boston and a Boston ence to make well-informed decisions for that side communication, and life sciences. law firm. After receiving Samantha her juris Nugent, of the business.” For nurse practitioner Members of early Professional MBA cohorts MSN ’17 the notion of an MBA was not top of mind varied widely in their initial comfort level with until she heard about the Regis program. of the Department of Business Management. “Professor Christie had personal experience as a law student. I relied on his guidance when I started applying to law schools.”

REGIS TODAY


YOU’RE NOT

REGIS TODAY

ALONE The National Institutes of Health reported that mental illnesses in the United States affect tens of millions of people each year. Yet the stigma of mental health issues often leads people to suffer alone.

S T O R Y B Y K R I S T E N WA L S H

I L LU ST R AT I O N BY L I M YA N S H A N

28


we’re all experiencing things at the same time. So there is a shift and an openness to look within. That self-reflection includes how people grapple with their race, culture, and identity.” Callwood was toward the end of her Regis education (a bachelor’s degree in psychology) when Black Lives Matter began gaining attention—and it informed her well-being career The safety and of community members is a top path in mental health. priority at Regis. In addition to enhanced cleaning and “Protesting in the streetsduring isn’t the COVID-19 pandemic, the unisafety protocols for everyone, and implemented I knew I couldpreventative do versity measures that include important mandatory advocacy work behind weekly COVID-19 testing for every student, the scenes,” Callwood “What employee returning to campus. faculty, and says. student-facing better wayThe thanRegis to integrate it has come together to make that hapcommunity with the work pen that in theI would testingbe center located behind Maria Hall. doing every single day.” “My role, first and foremost, is not possible without the Stigma around mental illness across the institution,” says Kelly incredible partnership is especially an issue in some Brochu, MEd, director of the Health Services Testing racially and ethnically diverse for the Summer Scholars Program. Center and co-director communities, it had can be “Weand have theaprivilege of various staff members stepmajor barrier accessing pingtoinpeople to support this operation in tandem with their mental health services. Seeking full-time roles. From triaging our wellness housing efforts professional for mental illness to help stepping in to assist with testing center registration, our may be counter to center cultural val- grateful for the gracious hospitality testing is truly ues of strong emotional andfamily care oforour colleagues and leadership.” restraint, forHere example. is a glimpse of the people behind the masks at the “People of color, center: particularly testing Black clinicians, only make up 5 percent of the population of TESTING CENTER TEAM psychologists,” Callwood says. “I Director identify as Puerto Rican•and West of the Testing Center Kelly Brochu, MEd, oversees the institution’s Indian so I understand mental protocol health stigma and also mistrust of of testing compliance, academic progression support of those impacted by the health care system that exists COVID-19, and the supervision of the in Caribbean and other cultures. I testing want to be an agent of change, notcenter operation.

COVID-19 TESTING CENTER TEAM: BEHIND THE MASKS

MENTAL HE ALTH INFLUENCER S

According to Mental Health America, the number of people screening with moderate to severe symptoms of depression and anxiety has continued to increase throughout 2020 and remains higher than rates prior to COVID-19. Clinical psychotherapist Sadé Callwood ’15, PsyD, says that a combination of events has influenced the mental health field. “Historically we focus on individual stories and experiences, but what’s happened this last year, between the pandemic and the murder of George Floyd, is that

11

“Experiences stay with you, maybe not at the forefront but in the back of your mind. Therapy is not going to erase what happened. But what we only as a provider who looks like • COVID-19 Coordinator Eddie Hand helps are offeringCLINICAL peopleTEAM is the concept the people I serve, but as someone manage COVID-19 testing compliance. who can open the door for disman• Tammi Magazzu,responses RN, MSN, WHNP-BC, • Administrative Assistants Stacey thatCloutman these are normal to tling barriers to access to quality Associate Dean and Medical Director and Nick Ferreri-Wildason manage testing care. Representation matters.” center registration and organize specimen • Rebecca Hill, PhD, DNP, Rachel Koransky-Matson, traumatic experiences, andFNP-C, that you collections. Clinical Leader DNP, APRN, FNP-C, assistant • Testing Center Monitors observe professor and clinical coordinacanindividube happy, in spite ofMSN, allAPRN, the WHNP-BC bad • Margaret Duggan, collecting their sample for surveillance tor of Regis’ Online Familyals Nurse • Katelyn Durgin, BSN, RN COVID-19 testing. This team is comprised Practitioner Program, embraces things that have happened to you.” of approximately 10 graduate intern both traditional Western medicine • Cheryl A. Murphy, BSN, RN employees from the Division of Student and more holistic approaches— • Vanessa Peixoto, MSN, APRN, FNP-C Affairs and Enrollment and THOMAS health sciences including homeopathy, naturopaKANNON, DNP, PMHNP-BC, assistant professor and interim assistant dean of Graduate Online Nursing at Regis • Erin Tetler, MSN, APRN, FNP-C thy, and aromatherapy. students.

• Beth DeArias, Administrative Assistant

SPRING/SUMMER 2021

REGIS TODAY

Thomas Kannon, DNP, PMHNP-BC, assistant professor and interim assistant dean of Graduate Online Nursing at Regis, agrees. The U.S. Navy veteran sees active duty and retired military personnel in his private practice in Virginia. “It’s one of the most vulnerable populations, but you often can’t see the injury,” Kannon says of conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive disorders. “But because I was enlisted for 15 years, I have a basis of comparison. I know where a lot of them are coming from and what they had to go through.” The National Council for Behavioral Health says that 30 percent of active duty and reserve military personnel deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have a mental health condition requiring treatment. Less than 50 percent of returning veterans in need receive any mental health treatment. Military children, spouses, and other family members also suffer. “Experiences stay with you, maybe not at the forefront but in the back of your mind,” Kannon explains. “Therapy is not going to erase what happened. But what we are offering people is the concept that these are normal responses to traumatic experiences and that you can be happy, despite all the bad things that have happened to you.”

I L LU ST R AT I O N BY G O O D ST U D I O

30

obert Spatzer ’19, CRNP, believes that one of the biggest hurdles to breaking the mental health stigma—negative attitudes toward people with mental health conditions or internalized shame—is a misinformed perception of the “healthy mind.” “There’s a perception that everyone is supposed to feel good all the time and if you don’t, that’s abnormal,” says Spatzer, who is director of clinical and operations at WorldClinic and JobSiteCare. “The reality is that there’s a huge amount of undiagnosed and diagnosed mental illness. Mental health disorders across the spectrum are way more common than anyone realizes.” Unfortunately, more than half of people with mental illness don’t receive help for their disorders, according to the American Psychiatric Association (APA). One common reason: “People avoid or delay seeking treatment due to concerns about being treated differently or fears of losing their jobs and livelihood.”


Commencement“If you’re caring for a patient with an infection, you know that a prescribed Ceremonies Celebrate amount of antibiotics specific to that infection Classes of 2020 and 2021will work 99 percent of the

First-gen Forward Designation

+ Focus on Health

MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

time. But mental health is different in that there is so muchREGIS moreAGAIN goingDESIGNATED on in A terms of environmental influences thatSCHOOL MILITARY FRIENDLY® impact the outcome: home life, financial struggles, the social isolation of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

9

THE COUNSELING CENTER AT REGIS

SPRING/SUMMER 2021

REGIS TODAY

Regis was designated a First-gen Forward institution by the Center for First-generation Student Success, an initiative of SAMHSA Q&A with NASPA–Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (Substance Abuse and Mental and The Suder Foundation. The First-gen Forward designation Health Services recognizes higher education institutions that demonstrate a Administration) commitment to improving experiences and advancing outcomes “If you’re caring for a patient with National Helpline of college students. anfirst-generation infection, you know that a preprovides referrals Director of Regis College “I am amount very proud of how thespecific Regis community, including scribed of antibiotics to local treatment Health and Wellness Center students, faculty,will andwork staff,99 have to that infection per-worked together to increase facilities, support the voice, identity of our first-generation students,” centvisibility, of the time. Butand mental health groups, and comIn January 2021, Tammi Magazzu, RN, MSN, says Regis Assistant Professor of Psychology Helen Consiglio, PhD, is different in that there is so much munity-based orgaWHNP-BC, joined Regis as the director of the who a number of key initiatives for first-generation morespearheaded going on in terms of envinizations. Callers Regis College Health and Wellness Center. She students atinfluences Regis. “Their ronmental thatstories impactof success and challenge within can also order free boasts more than two decades as a nursing publications and and outside ofhome the classroom have laid the foundation, and now the outcome: life, financial educator and previously served as a nursing other information. the real work struggles, the begins.” social isolation of the instructor at Massachusetts General Hospital 1.800.662.HELP Over the pandemic.” past few years, Regis has made significant strides in COVID-19 Institute of Health Professionals. (4357) or TTY: prioritizing first-generation student success. Associate Director of But Mingolelli does see some 1.800.487.4889 the Center for pandemic, Inclusive Excellence upsides of the including Denise Mashmasarmi led Why did you say “yes” to joining Regis? the charge in obtainingofthe First-gen Forward designation while heightened awareness mental I felt this was a spectacular opportunity to National Suicide merge my two passions: adolescent health and Assistant Dean of and Student Affairs health conditions also a push Anabella Morabito and Kelly Prevention Lifeline: education. A health services department is all Brochu, MEd, director of the Health Services Testing Center and for funding. 1.800.273.8255 about education and most of the population is co-director forfunding the Summer Scholars Program, played pivotal roles “Increased will allow older adolescents and young adults. in establishing task force more access for apatients andand several programs focused on enhancMassachusetts Department of ing the experience of first-generation students and their families. training for providers,” says How will your work as a nurse educator inform Mental Health: Mingolelli, a nurse practitioner your role at the Health and Wellness Center? mass.gov/orgs/ • Partners in Excellence (PIE) is a Regis mentoring initiative certified to provide psychiatric I was blessed to have worked as an educator for massachusettsthat provides personal guidance and support to first-year students services to children, adolescents, over 18 years and this has helped me develop department-ofof color and first-generation students through assignment of at Regis provides individual and adults. “The awareness has Thethe Counseling Center and group counseling, a rapport with students. It taught me to have a mental-health trained peer, faculty, staff, and graduate mentors. workshops, sports psychology counseling, andmutual medication evaluation prompted discussions about offerrespect for them. and Additionally, I bring a management, currently by telehealth. In summer 2020, the center profaculty background, which helps me bridge the ing services within K-12 schools Child Mind • Pride Program stuvided three college times the normal amount of counseling appointments. gap between faculty and students. orThe moreFirst collaboration between connects first-generation Institute is an dents to academic resources, faculty, staff, and to “I student do think leaders that we keep making progress in terms of reducing the social workers and police departindependent, mental health stigma, but it’s a gradual change,” says Regis Director learn for more about the Regis community. It also allows early move-in What was it like startingofyour role amid the ments, example.” national nonprofit Counseling Kathryn Klickstein, LICSW. “There are more students who are pandemic, when 350 residential students were to campus to help students acclimate to the campus environment dedicated to transSpatzer says the use of telemedireaching out and wanting to utilize our services, which to is acampus? good sign. Butexcellent, scary, returning It was andhas navigate offerings programs. forming the lives of cine increased accessand to care, it is a tough decision for many of them to take that step.” educational, and awakening. I felt the support children and famibut is somewhat limited by restricKlickstein says that one of the goals at the from center is Regis to reframe the team mental was exceptional. I have • The annual First-Gen Pride Week celebrates the first-generalies struggling with tions on providing services across health services, including talking with students during first-year seminar. enjoyed the opportunity to grow as a person tion college student identity through various programming efforts. mental health and state lines. Due to COVID-19, some “Many people have this idea that you have to and be really unstable to utilize a health care professional. learning disorders: our services, but we help students states eased behavioral health As a First-gen Forward institution, Regis will receive professional childmind.org experiencing a wide range of condiWhat has been your experience at Regis requirements community-building for providers. development, experiences, and a first look at • To schedule a counseling tions. Students come to discuss manthus far? This role has been what my another note, Spatzer theOn Center for positive First-generation Student Success’ research and appointment, aging stress and anxiety, coping with entirestudents career was building toward. I believes that the pandemic resources. Interested facultywill and staff will bedifficult afforded multiple can call Health relationships, overcoming knew Services I would need to adapt quickly, create a sense of community when opportunities to engage with peer institutionsshyness that are also creating at 781.768.7290 or email or social anxiety, understandmaintain a calm persona, and bring it comes to mental health. “I think environments to improve the experiences anding outcomes first-gencounseling.services@ identity, of improving self-esteem, my team together in the height of there are a large number of people eration students. regiscollege.edu and managing mood issues.” what could be a "panic" time. But who are going to have adjustment • Talk One2Onethe (24/7 Health and Wellness Center disorders during this, and when we phone counseling for has “in maintained an enviteam come out of it they will have gained the moment” support) ronment that put students To the learnfact more about first-generation 1.800.756.3124 first, and I'm proud of the a new appreciation for that efforts at Regis, visit regisma.me/firstgen. work we have done. everyone is susceptible.”

TAMMI MAGAZZU, RN, MSN, WHNP-BC

I L LU ST R AT I O N BY G O O D ST U D I O

32 8

“Working with underserved populations in the U.S., a lot of them come from different areas of the world that have natural health treatments,” says Koransky-Matson. “So it’s important for me to be openminded and have conversations where they can be honest about what they’ve tried or want to try, and we go from there. It’s so beneficial to allow patients to have flexibility and choice when it comes the types of On May 8, 2021, Registoheld two separate virtual commencement certreatment receive.” emonies tothey celebrate the Class of 2021 and the Class of 2020. Garth Graham, MD, MPH (pictured below), an accomplished physician and leading authority MI S SING PIECE Son social determinants of health, delivered the commencementKoransky-Matson address. Unfortunately, “The word ‘resilient’ is theoften word I would use to describe Regis sees how health disparities For the fifth time in the past six years, Regis is College treatment graduates,”choice Graham said. “You have been through one of the disrupt for patients. designated a military friendly institution in the challenging time periods in the United States, and in “In rural most communities, there can 2021-2022 Military Friendly® Schools list. The world. That wasofnot just the pandemic, but also a be a three- tothe six-month period prestigious list identifies institutions committed new call for racial waiting to see a provider—if one justice.” is to serving the military and veteran community. More than 2,300 even available. Some patients couldgraduates across associate, bachRegis received a bronze award designation for the opportunities it provides to veterans and elor,hours graduate, and doctoral programs were honored have to drive three each way their families. two events. Graham applauded graduto see a providerduring or get the to an emerANNE MARIE MINGOLELLI, DNP, PMHNP-BC, APRN-BC, assistant professor of nursing Admission counselors at Regis offer one-onates for in being gency room, sometimes life-advocates and encouraged them to one guidance and veterans receive support on continue their mission. or-death situations.” applying their benefits to their education. The “The lifelong According to the APA, lowerwork fund-that many of you will have to campus Veterans Center provides students a havepatient learned about improve either atmore a time, one epigenetics and started the online Psychiatric ing for mental illnesslives, research orthrough one dedicated space to study or meet up with felwe now understand community, even the whole system—that journey is that just these types low veterans. Mental Health NP Certificate fewer mental healthorservices relative of traumatic or highly emotional beginning, but you the strength you’ve just been Program at Regis,”insays Carroll, to other health carehave are examples of of everything Regis also participates the Yellow Ribbon events can lead to gene activation Program, through,” he said. whose twin sister LeTisha Carroll, institutional stigma: more systemic which allows veterans to receive our neurochemical funds MSN “The world needs your talent more thanthat everinfluences before,” Graham is currently enrolled in Regis’ policies of government and private from the Department of Veterans Affairs responsethat to stress. For unmet tuition and fees. The university continued. “It needs that drive and you had toa percentage for their family nurse practitioner program. organizations that intentionally or determination the to Veterans Administration of people develop into ongo- works“Iclosely move forward tolimit translate into tackling some of the this mostwill difficult felt ifwith I want treat people with unintentionally opportunities GI Bill®, Veteran Readiness challenges that mental still persist in front of us.” ing diagnosable mental illness, and in securing an addiction, I needed to knowand a for people with illness. Allowance Housing, and goingoftohis becoma massive need Employment, Graham received an honorary recognition little bitBasic more about it for than just what The uptick in mental health degree in there’s other available supports for active-duty service formaking more providers.” mitment tobecause health equity, social change, and credible public I learned from my family nurse pracconditions of COVID-19, members, veterans, and their families. health informationsays, more“has accessible titioner program.” Koransky-Matson defi- around the world. Regis also bestowed degrees toINTEGRAT Forbes’ Top 100APPR MostOACH Carroll was a year into the Regis nitely shown us where honorary we are missI VE Powerful Women honoreefor and Bank of America Chairman program in 2019 when she founded ing resources nationally these It wasVice while workingAnne in a pediFinucane, She and specifically James Brett, president of the New England Council. National Addiction and Behavioral patients.” cites a atric ICU unit and an emergency REGIS GIVING DAY Health Clinics Online (NABHCO) to shortage of therapists, counselors, department that nurse practitioner Giving Day 2021 epidemic— was our most helpRegis address the opioid and providers to adequately provide LaTonya Carroll, PMHNP ’20, DNP, “The world needs your talent more successfulin Giving yet! In just 24 particularly areasDay where patients care. And Spatzer agrees. APRN, began to recognize a disconhours, 360 donors collectively raised than ever before. needs that driveand psychiatric don’t have access to care. The clinic “As we are returning to some level It nect among medical more than $70,000 for important specializes in medication manageof normalcy, you’re going to see some services. So she decided to build upon and determination that you had to causes and programs that support ment, treating depression, substance people’s mood improve and return her extensive medical education to our students and further the Regis move forward to translate into tackling use mission. and anxiety and addicto their baseline mental health, help bridge that gap, particularly Thankdisorders, you to all alumni, tionfriends, as wellparents, as primary care diseases. because that’s what we often see most difficult focusing on substance use disorder. some of the challenges faculty, staff, and Assistant Professor of Nursing with adjustment that disorders,” says “We were in the midst of the students who came together to show still persist in front of us.” their love Mingolelli, for Regis. Read more and Anne Marie DNP, Spatzer, who is board certified as a pandemic and I decided I wanted watch a video: alumni.regiscollege. PMHNP-BC, APRN-BC, also takes nurse practitioner in acute care and to have more of a background in GARTH GRAHAM, MD, MPH edu/givingday. an integrative approach to medicine. psychiatric medicine. “But as we mental health, so I went ahead Honorary Degree Recipient and Commencement Speaker


together Commitment to Do Better alumni

Regis on Cape Cod September 29-30, 2021 Ocean Edge Resort and Golf Club, Brewster, Massachusetts

Reunion Throwback Edition

This two-day Cape event will feature a sunset mass, class dinners, a bonfire on the beach, the annual Cape Cod Luncheon, and more. For a full list of events and to register please visit alumni.regiscollege.edu/regisoncape. If you have questions, please contact Director of Alumni Relations Molly Zuccarini at 781.768.7228.

Six-month progress report on Institutional Action Plan to Address Racism highlights new initiatives implemented and work still to be done

6 34 REGIS TODAY To read the six-month progress report on the Institutional Action Plan to Address Racism, visit regisma.me/ dobetter.

As part of Heritage Week in March, a celebration of the Sisters Gifts to Inclusive Excellence of Saint Joseph of Boston and their social justice values, Regis As part of Giving Day 2021, the Regis community had the opportunity to desigunveiled a six-month progress report on its Institutional Action nate their gifts to one of six areas, includPlan to Address Racism. The plan highlights new initiatives that ing Inclusive Excellence. Gifts to Inclusive have been implemented and work that still needs to be done. Excellence support all strategic equity, “As this progress report details, we are taking real, tangible steps inclusion, and diversity initiatives across to ensure the future of Regis College is one that is actively antithe university, helping to develop programs, racist,” Regis President Antoinette M. Hays, PhD, RN, wrote in the address structural challenges, and ensure progress report’s welcome letter on March 19, 2021. “I know this Regis has critical resources to fulfill its misis hard, ongoing work. But as the past six months have shown,Class we of 1956 60th Reunion in 2016 sion to serve the dear neighbor without are not afraid of hard work, especially when it comes to ensuring distinction. that Black Lives Matter at Regis and that we truly love, serve, and respect each other without distinction.” Recognition The progress report was presented by Audrey Grace, JD, associLast fall, Regis received the 2020 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award ate vice president for inclusive excellence and chief diversity officer, from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. The at a special town hall event on March 15. The action plan contains national honor recognizes U.S. colleges and nine goals, from increased learning opportunities for the campus universities that demonstrate an outstanding community to a curriculum review to updating the institution’s bias commitment to diversity and inclusion. response protocols. Regis was selected based on several initia“I am by the overwhelming support for this plan, from Class of impressed 1971 45th Reunion in 2016 tives, including a commitment to LGBTQA+ the number of volunteers and community members who committed student support, equity for first-generation their time, to the energy and support from our trustees,” Grace said. students and students of color, and main“It is clear that Regis is willing to do what is needed to advance taining connection and a sense of commuracial equity and social justice for all.” nity during the pandemic. Among the achievements the report highlights are an institutional-wide, self-identification campaign to provide a better sense of the campus’ diversity, and continued opportunities for direct community input and feedback on all anti-racism work on campus. Additionally, Regis’ annual Founders’ Day in October 2020 brought “I am impressed by the more than 700 people together for a daylong dialogue on racism,Class of 1986 5th Reunion in 1991 overwhelming support for equity, and social justice. this plan, from the number of As this work continues, Grace said she would like to focus on strengthening the institution’s hiring and retention work around volunteers and community Class of 1961 25th Reunion in 1986 equity and inclusion. She also credited the Student Government members who committed their Association (SGA) and the Multicultural Student Association time, to the energy and support (MCSA) for their roles in the development of the plan. She hopes to grow student involvement even further. from our trustees. It is clear that “Throughout the development of the action plan, the members of Regis is willing to do what is SGA and MCSA are incredibly proud and honored to have worked with Audrey Grace,” the groups said in a shared statement. “It needed to advance racial equity is without question that the demands made in mid-June 2020 and social justice for all.” required tremendous work from our faculty and staff, who have been highly responsive throughout the planning process. The stuAUDREY GRACE, JD, associate vice dents of Regis College should feel excited and ready for the positive president for inclusive excellence and institutional change that is emerging.” chief diversity officer

Class of 1951 25th Reunion in 1976

Book a Room at Ocean Edge A block of guest rooms at Ocean Edge has been reserved for Regis alumni and friends at the discounted rate of $195 per night. The deadline to receive this rate is August 30 and you must mention the Regis Cape Cod group when booking to receive the discount. RESERVATION OPTIONS

Call the resort: 508.896.9000 Call toll-free: 800.343.6074 Email: stay@oceanedge.com To see a full list of upcoming events, visit alumni.regiscollege.edu/events.

Class of 2006 10th Reunion in 2016

Class Notes Class notes may be submitted to your class reporter or directly to Institutional Advancement and Alumni Relations. Each class is limited to 750 words, and the deadline for the next column of notes will be communicated to Class Reporters via email. Email: classnotes@regiscollege.edu Mail: 235 Wellesley Street, Box 30, Weston, MA 02493

Class of 1966 25th Reunion in 1991 Class of 1991 25th Reunion in 2016

Class of 1981 35th Reunion in 2016

Class of 2011 5th Reunion in 2016


memoriam in

Regis has been notified of the following alumni and friends who passed away.* May they rest in God’s eternal peace. 1940 Dorothea McNulty Styles February 4, 2012 1941 Dorothy Mulhern Carroll March 9, 2021 Josephine Moran Steckevicz November 25, 2018 1942 Elinor Doyle Corcoran March 8, 2019

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1943 Pauline Sharby Bulman December 11, 2020 Edith LaMarca Tarricone January 9, 2021

REGIS TODAY

1945 Mary Foley Dowd December 10, 2020 1946 Margaret Wait Conant January 16, 2021 Marguerite O’Donoghue Dowd January 6, 2021 1947 Marjorie DiMento Magrath August 13, 2020 1948 Marie Kelly Creedon February 7, 2021

Catherine Purcell Greeley October 19, 2019 Lois McWeeney Moulton June 7, 2020 Lois Morrison Steffensen January 16, 2021 1950 Katherine McKnight Agre March 6, 2021 1951 Ceslaus King Carvalho Unknown Eileen Dunleavy Knott February 4, 2021 Mary Lou Conlin Pearson November 27, 2020 1952 Marie Brophy Allard January 18, 2021 Dorothy Barrett Bemis January 6, 2021 1953 Olive Pirani Chupka November 26, 2020 Maureen Ellis Cremen December 22, 2020 Ellen Craig Davey April 18, 2021 Elaine Guinee Denning April 4, 2021 Dorothy Culpin Murphy September 23, 2017

Marie Mulcahy Cushing February 6, 2021

Jane Dore Powers May 30, 2021

1949 Shirley McKenzie Connolly April 6, 2021

Elizabeth Knowlton Rourke January 6, 2020

Jean Ryan Connors May 24, 2021 Norma Maloney Crowley November 23, 2020 Margaret Sellers Fitzpatrick February 19, 2021

1954 Patricia Bellini Cruise January 5, 2021 Rosemary Denmark Murphy March 4, 2021 Marie Ward April 17, 2021

Remembering Jane D’Ercole Roman ’61, PhD, Professor Emerita of Chemistry and former chair of the department of Chemistry. She is remembered fondly by classmates, students, and colleagues for her passion for excellence and dedication to Regis.

*As of June 15 print deadline.

1955 Eleanor O’Neil Mulhern May 20, 2021

Constance O’Brien Skahan April 15, 2021

1971 Marie A. Shea July 27, 2020

1956 Marjorie O’Neill Ferren May 4, 2021

Judith Guillette Smith December 2, 2020

1978 Therese Reilly Burke May 24, 2021

Jane Muckian Harrington November 13, 2020

Agnes Reardon Sughrue January 15, 2021

Sally Donovan Mandeville December 24, 2020

1962 Patricia McDonald Gavel April 18, 2021

Dolores Gangaro Wilson April 15, 2021

Diane Lear Simpson January 12, 2020

1957 Mary Maureen Staunton Crowley December 31, 2020

1963 Felicienne Murphy Cullen December 29, 2020

Frances Kellaher Perron January 28, 2021 Janet Petty February 24, 2021 Katharine Hourihan Walker June 4, 2020

1964 Audrey Dalton Gorman May 19, 2021

2012 John J. Maguire March 8, 2018

Claire Ryan Hickey April 6, 2021

Joan Gorman McCue December 10, 2020

1966 Carol Wixted Cahill February 7, 2021 Susan Carter O’Brien June 3, 2021

Joanne Myers December 1, 2020

Joan Mullaly April 21, 2021

Barbara Meyer Pierce January 4, 2021

Sheila Kelly Sullivan May 1, 2005

1960 Mary Dunleavy Jones May 13, 2021

1967 Eileen A. Hayes February 11, 2021

Beverly Plouffe November 12, 2019

1968 Nicola McKeen December 19, 2020

Jane D’Ercole Roman February 21, 2021 Nancy Sizer August 22, 2018

2000 Angela M. Travers December 5, 2020

Patricia McDonough, CSJ March 21, 2021

Doris Good Marr April 15, 2021

Barbara Healey Ring December 5, 2020

1995 Donique L. Hill October 5, 2015

2001 Linda H. Shen April 6, 2021

1965 S. Marie Cleary, OP December 2, 2020

1961 Patricia Bench April 7, 2021

1989 Karen Foran Dempsey December 24, 2020

Mary Ellen Bresnahan LeBlanc June 4, 2021

1958 Marijane Hill Kennedy November 26, 2020

1959 Janet Clements Lavey April 26, 2021

1981 Kelley A. Lafferty April 21, 2020

1969 Nancy Wilcox Dowling January 21, 2021

Lifelong Learning Jacqueline Griffith July 4, 2020 John Harris March 13, 2017 Marie Kelley September 12, 2020 Karen Malikowski December 9, 2017 Mary Pughe December 15, 2019 Linda Wylde April 12, 2021 Former Faculty Patricia Elliott, PhD May 17, 2021 Susan Nessen December 7, 2020

Join the Catherine Burke Society and leave a legacy that will change lives. Planned gifts provide a unique opportunity for donors to give back to Regis while receiving tax benefits or income. Whether you’d like to extend your impact through a bequest intention or make a gift through an IRA Charitable Distribution, there are many ways for you to leave a lasting legacy at Regis while supporting future generations of students.

“ This scholarship means the world to me and my family who were hit hard during the COVID-19 pandemic. My responsibilities went from making sure I got good grades to helping pay bills. I am forever grateful for my scholarship for lifting the weight off my shoulders and allowing me to focus on my education and dreams of becoming a nurse.” ALESSANDRA MIRANDA ’21, NURSING MAJOR CATHERINE BURKE SCHOLAR

Membership in the Catherine Burke Society is extended to those who notify Regis of their intent and have provided documentation of a planned gift. If Regis is included in your plans, or you would like to discuss ways in which to make your gift, please contact the Office of Institutional Advancement. LEARN MORE about your planned giving options through the Catherine Burke Society:

alumni.regiscollege.edu/burkesociety

Paula Schneider April 2, 2021

S. Bernadine Marie Egleston, OP December 2, 2020 1970 Judith Ramsdell Hersey December 3, 2020 Catherine Burke ’31


alumni spotlight

YOUR I M PA C T B E ?

What did you learn at Regis that has served you well throughout your life?

There has never been a better, or more important, time to give back. That’s because when you give, you’ll make a direct impact in the lives of current and future students who could really use your help. WHEN YOU MAKE A GIFT,

Elizabeth Dill Chafcouloff ’68

Help keep Regis affordable.

What was your first job after graduating from Regis?

YOU…

Prepare students for a lifetime of serving others.

THANK YOU

FOR SUPPORTING REGIS AND ITS STUDENTS.

in factories before settling in San Francisco in 1972. I spent most of the 70s oddjobbing, volunteering at the San Francisco Community grocery store, tutoring French, and traveling to Mexico with my little tent for months at a time on a budget of a few hundred dollars. I was 34 before I had my

first “real” job as an ESL teacher in Japan.

How did your experiences and education at Regis shape your life after college and your career path thus far?

My most powerful experience at Regis came about unexpectedly. One day a friend asked if I would like to study in France with her during junior year. The next week, I changed my major to French, and we worked with Sister Juan (Mahan) to bring this about. Since our families did not have the means to send us to France, we worked two or three jobs after school for a year to save money for a year abroad. It is no exaggeration to say that this was a major turning point in my life. From this study in France came a lifelong love of language and travel, and my career has centered around these two major interests.

WAYS TO GIVE ONLINE alumni.regiscollege.edu/regisfund PHONE 781.768.7240 MAIL 235 Wellesley St., Box 30 Weston, MA 02493

PHOTO WAS TAKEN PRIOR TO MARCH 2020

felt like and the thrill of being in an entirely different culture. Tell me about your career and your current job.

After being an ESL teacher in Japan and in the U.S. for 15 years and a speech-language pathologist for 12 years, I retired and founded a nonprofit called Speech Therapy Cambodia in 2013. The organization treats Cambodian patients after strokes who have speech, language, and swallowing disorders. I have spent time in Cambodia over the last six years organizing the program and helped train 14 Cambodian hospital nurses and physical therapists. In all of my careers you can see the love of language, the interest

in problem-solving and critical thinking, and the love of travel that I first discovered at Regis. I later discovered that I enjoyed educating people and doing humanitarian work, but I had to mature a bit after college to get there. <<

Regis Major: French Current Employment: Co-founder of Speech Therapy Cambodia Current city: San Francisco, California

39 SPRING 2021

I moved to France after graduating and worked occasionally as a freelance secretary-translator and other pick-up jobs in Paris. After I left Paris I traveled around Europe and North Africa, hitchhiking as hundreds were doing then, from Amsterdam to Marrakech (the circuit!), picking grapes, cherries, garlic, and working

Strengthen the Regis experience for future generations.

In 1966 when Regis helped four girls to journey to France on our own to take part in an unorthodox and unaccredited junior year abroad program, it taught me that it is worth pursuing what you really want even if the odds seem against you. Every time I have come across obstacles in life, I remember how it felt to be on that ocean liner sailing across the Atlantic—what freedom and adventure

THE BASICS

R EG I S ST R O N G

WHERE WILL

WE WANT TO HEAR YOUR STORIES TOO! Submit your Alumni Spotlight Trevon Wright ’20, ’22 questionnaire for Read about the continued a chance to be What piece of advice do you have for currentrepopulation students? of the Regis featured in one campus on page 4. of our alumni publications: alumni.regiscollege. edu/spotlight e

What you choose at first may not be what you end up doing later. There are happy accidents—have your antennae out ther looking for intriguing opportunities and take chances. When I look back, much of what satisfied me career-wise started out completely unplanned.


mınds

regıs g inside

hearts &

“The tree of knowledge this scholarship helped me plant is still growing and its shade has been enjoyed by myself and the whole family.”

Growing Knowledge Scholarship recipient Lori Hanks ’99 pays it forward to the next generation BY ASHLEY STARR

Features

18 Shift/Change

Why Timothy Abbott, ABSN ’23, NRP, Justin Andrews, ABSN ’22, and Jacqueline Gorman, ABSN ’21 are changing careers to nursing amid the pandemic.

LORI HANKS ’99

REGIS TODAY

Established in 1994 by former trustee Jacalyn C. Egan ’96, the Hannah Bradley Endowed Scholarship is awarded to non-traditional students pursuing an undergraduate degree who are facing the daunting struggles of balancing work, life, and education. As a non-traditional student herself, Egan hoped the creation of this scholarship would help students who were defined by a unique set of circumstances thrive at Regis and beyond. “I am truly grateful to Jacalyn for recognizing the problem that non-traditional students face and designing a solution that continues to propagate as it is sown,” says Hanks. “The tree of knowledge this scholarship helped me plant is still growing and its shade has been enjoyed by myself and the whole family.” Hanks credits the scholarship for paving the way for her family’s success. Inspired by Hanks, her husband went back to college and her son—who occasionally found his bedtime story came from her textbooks—followed a more traditional path to his college dreams. Together the couple ran a successful media and entertainment services company for 10 years, followed by the creation of a boutique investment property designed for college students to foster creativity in a safe environment. With her family now back under one roof due to the pandemic, there are already new lifestyle business ideas populating their whiteboard and they can’t wait for their next adventure. Hanks is optimistic that her support will help others recognize and take advantage of the opportunities that will make their lives—and those they love—a little bit brighter. “I truly hope that my gift to Regis will now find its way to another nontraditional student and impact their life as it did mine,” says Hanks. “To the future recipient of the scholarship, I say, ‘tag—you’re it!’”

22 Same Road,

Different Paths

Sisters Jennifer Amaral ’16 and Rachel Amaral ’19, ’21 are following different career paths, but both advocate for the good of others.

28 You’re Not Alone

Regis alumni and faculty work to overcome stigma and provide treatment as cases of mental health conditions increase in the United States.

Departments

02

03

Photo: Holly Redmond

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Lori Hanks ’99 has always forged her own path through life, so it is no surprise that she found a non-traditional way to celebrate her birthday last fall. As a present to herself, Hanks made a gift to the Hannah Bradley Endowed Scholarship at Regis College in the amount she once received as a student scholar. “One of my goals over the years has been to replenish the scholarship received and pay it forward,” says Hanks. “Choosing to donate on my birthday completed the circle—a celebration of a gift that I could now pass on.” Although Hanks’ journey to Regis had many twists and turns that took nearly a decade for her to navigate, she remained determined. During her senior year of high school, when her parents both faced life-threatening medical illnesses and as the family healed and adapted to a new normal, her college dreams faded into the background but were definitely not forgotten. “As time passed and I became an adult, those dreams functioned as my compass,” reflects Hanks. “Whenever I found myself at one of life’s crossroads, overwhelmed and stymied by the next step forward, I would sign up for a class or two. Furthering my education never let me down, and I always felt better afterward.” Making her way to Regis in her mid-30s, Hanks arrived with hopes and dreams, as well as enormous responsibilities. “I was a single mother and responsible for the functional realities of life: rent, food, child care; the list goes on,” shares Hanks. “Everything I did was to make ends meet—minimally cutting work hours, clustering classes to reduce daycare needs, and taking night classes, which were reduced [cost] at the time.” Just when Hanks was unsure whether she could keep up the balancing act, her mentor pointed her in the direction of the Hannah Bradley Scholarship.

12

Dear Neighbor A return to campus; celebrating 2,300+ graduates; strategic partnerships; diversifying programs; fighting against racial injustice.

14

Tower Views

16

Commencement ceremonies; new trustees; meet the director of the Regis College Health and Wellness Center and COVID-19 Testing Center team; progress report on Institutional Action Plan to Address Racism; First-gen Forward designation.

After Class Students gain hands-on experience with alumni entrepreneurs Iliana Ramirez ’10 and Mary Lou Blas ’08.

Academic Innovation Regis Professional MBA program bridges business and science.

34 36

Reunion throwback edition.

In Memoriam Remembering alumni who passed away.

39

Alumni Spotlight

40

Hearts & Minds

Looking Ahead Partnerships between Regis and employers like Boston Public Schools extend discounts on graduate degrees and open up opportunities.

Alumni Together

Elizabeth Dill Chafcouloff ’68 reflects on a lifelong love of language and travel.

Lori Hanks ’99 gives back to the Hannah Bradley Scholarship that helped her achieve her college dreams.


Regis College 235 Wellesley Street Weston, MA 02493-1571 Change Service Requested

“ I am inspired to give annually as I witness the great impact that our contributions have on students. The Regis community is thriving with talented undergraduate and graduate students, career-oriented academic programs, and extracurricular programming that supports student and professional development. Witnessing such dramatic growth of our programs and the consistent recruitment of committed students motivates me to give back.” KA I T LY N N M A L I N OWS K I A RV I DS O N ’ 0 4 HIGGINS SOCIETY MEMBER

Named after Sister Thérèse Higgins ’47, CSJ—one of Regis’ most beloved presidents, administrators, and friends—the Higgins Society honors members of the Regis community who have given at any level for at least three years consecutively. Learn more: alumni.regiscollege.edu/ higginssociety.

R E N E W YO U R S U P P O RT or M A K E YO U R F I R ST G I F T to be on your way to becoming a member at

alumni.regiscollege.edu/regisfund.

Profile for Regis College

Regis Today | Spring/Summer 2021  

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