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BA (HONS) INTERIOR DESIGN VIEW FROM THE FOURTH FLOOR: ISSUE 1 VIEW FROM THE FOURTH FLOOR: ISSUE 1 BA (HONS) INTERIOR DESIGN WWW.REGENTS.AC.UK


BA (HONS) INTERIOR DESIGN VIEW FROM THE FOURTH FLOOR: ISSUE 1

“Allow events to change you. You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them.” Bruce Mau, Incomplete Manifesto for Growth (1998)

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INTRODUCTION

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AUTHENTIC LEARNING EXPERIENCE SECONDARY SKIN PARASITE PROJECT ASLAN GARDEN ROOM INTERIOR DESIGN PUBLIC LECTURES

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OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL INTERIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES: INTRODUCTION INTERIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES: STRUCTURE INTERIOR DESIGN PRACTICE: INTRODUCTION INTERIOR DESIGN PRACTICE: DECAY INTERIOR THEORIES: RE-TRACING THE CITY DISSERTATION PORTFOLIO AND INTERVIEWS

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THE GRADUATES MAJOR DESIGN PROJECT ANIYSA ALLEYNE ZOË BAILEY EDA BULUT RIA DARAI BEATRIZ DOS SANTOS NELLY MUTHONI IRERI ANIYA KUDYSHEVA EMIR NOBRDALI AHMED OMAR VANESSA WREDE ANNA YUMASHEVA

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CREDITS AND THANK YOUS

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INTRODUCTION

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE TERM 1 Year 1: LEVEL

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In Year 1 students learn the principles of interior design and in Year 2 they put these principles into practice. In Year 3 the students identify a specific area of interiors that interests them and they work on self-initiated projects.

IND401 Interior Design Principles I Proportion, Materials and Structure (20 credits)

TERM 2 IND402 Interior Design Principles II Colour and Light (10)

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IND405 Interior Design Principles III Form, Function and Ergonomics (20)

A NEW AGENDA IND406 Interior Design Principles IV Joints and Junctions (20)

GBL401 Global Perspectives (10) IND404 Communication Skills I (20) IND403 Interior Histories (20)

TERM 1 Year 2: LEVEL

FOCUS:

IND501 Interior Design Practice I ReHab ReUse (20)

TERM 2 IND502 Interior Design Practice II In Detail (20)

IND505 Interior Design Practice III paraSITE (20)

IND506 Interior Design Practice IV Event (20)

IND503 Interior Theories (20)

TERM 1 Year 2: LEVEL

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IND603 Interior Design Study Live Project (20) IND602 Portfolio and Professional Studies (20) IND601 Dissertation (20)

TERM 2 IND604 Major Design Project Feasibility (20)

IND605 Major Design Project Realisation (40)

INTRODUCTION

IND504 Communication Skills II (20)

Welcome to ‘View from the Fourth Floor’, the first issue of our Interior Design yearbook that celebrates the work of our graduating students and showcases the events and achievements of the year. Within the pages of this document you will see that our students consistently push the boundaries of the subject area by working directly with real clients, exploring new ways of working while maintaining the programme’s Situationist spirit. Unlike Architecture, Interior Design is not restricted by a regulating body’s agenda, which therefore enables our student’s to set their own. In the time this graduating group have been with us they have seen their ‘paraSITE’ objects displayed with retailers in support of Marylebone Interiors Day, they have produced ‘Secondary Skin’ proposals for the rear façade of a 1960’s row of terrace houses in Marylebone and worked in tandem with Year 2 students submitting proposals for nine lodges for The Zoological Society of London’s (ZSL) new overnight experience at London Zoo. Our Year 1 students have also been working with the ZSL on a new welcome area at London Zoo and our Year 2 students have been investigating the idea of ‘Decay’ in the city and how this may develop into proposals for a new Alexander McQueen store. Last year during the Portfolio module Year 3 students were interviewed by multi-disciplined agencies Household and Imagination. This year design consultancy Brinkworth interviewed all of our Year 3 students. We are seeing students developing their skills through numerous live projects with an undying sense of enquiry and experimentation. The industry facing nature of the programme, which makes use of the teaching teams extensive networks in industry, provides an authentic and focused learning experience for our students that prepares them for a life in design practice and beyond. Mark Gower MA (RCA) Programme Director Interior Design

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Authentic Learning Experience

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Authentic Learning Experience

Year 3 students were asked to develop proposals for the face-lift of the rear façade of the 1960’s row of terrace houses on Devonshire Place Mews in Marylebone. The project was set as a design competition by and on behalf of the Devonshire Place Mews Residents Association. The applied ‘Secondary Skin’, while being sympathetic to the 1960’s mid-century character, should reflect the perception of quality of the houses in proportion with their setting in the mews, the conservation area and their prime location just off Marylebone High Street. Students were required to regard the City of Westminster’s planning and conservation area policies, however, they were encouraged to be as creative and ambitious as they like. Zoë Bailey with her ‘Mid-Century Muse’ proposal won the competition. The competition was not only judged on budget or build-ability, but also brief interpretation and creativity, and the judges felt that Zoë’s scheme met all the judging criteria.

Project:

Secondary Skin Client:

Devonshire Place Mews Residents Association Site:

Devonshire Place Mews, Marylebone, London

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Ahmed Omar (above) and Zoë Bailey present their Secondary Skin proposals to the residents of Devonshire Place Mews at the awards evening.

Secondary Skin

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Detail from Zoë Bailey’s visualisation of her winning design ‘Mid-Century Muse’.

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“The experience of a live project on the scale of ‘Secondary Skin’ was something I didn’t think we would experience on an Interiors Programme. The final result at the exhibition was great as the whole class got to see their hard work being admired by the residents and local community. Overall, the ‘Secondary Skin’ project pushed me into being more aware of the professional side of our discipline.” Zoë Bailey, Year 3 Student

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Anna Yumasheva presents her work in progress to Devonshire Place Mews Residents Association client Matthew Cohen.


Authentic Learning Experience Project:

paraSITE Client:

The Howard de Walden Estate Site:

Marylebone Retailers – The Conran Shop, Designers Guild, Lewis & Co, Little Greene, McGlashans, Skandium, Solid Floor

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Year 2 students worked with retailers at the forefront of interior design to support the yearly event ‘Marylebone Interiors Day’. The free and open to the public event, steered by The Howard de Walden Estate, celebrated interior design excellence. Students developed parasitic objects to sit site-specifically outside each participating retailer. This unique family of objects, constructed with wooden pallets and recycled materials, also acted as a signage system for the day.

“It was the most challenging yet rewarding experience that I have encountered in my second year on the Interiors Programme. Seeing my piece come to life from a maquette’s to a 1:1 scale product being displayed by Designers Guild on Marylebone High Street made the extra hours in the workshop worthwhile.”

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paraSITE

Ria Darai, Year 3 Student

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TOP LEFT AND TOP RIGHT

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Ria Darai, pictured left, had her paraSITE fan object displayed outside Designers Guild for Marylebone Interiors Day 2015.

Ahmed Omar with his leaflet dispensing object displayed inside Little Greene and, above left, the dispenser in operation.

Zoë Bailey presents her seat made with plastic bags knitted upholstery at the end of module review and, right, displayed outside Skandium.

Anna Yumasheva’s paraSITE object displayed outside Lewis & Co.


Authentic Learning Experience

Year 2 and 3 students were invited by The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) to submit interior proposals for nine lodges within ‘Project Aslan’ the new overnight experience at London Zoo that will be launched in the summer 2016. Each lodge is individual and has a unique story to tell. Emma Taylor, Head of Commercial Development at ZSL, loved the thoughtful approach on how to creatively link the lodges back to the Gir Forest experience through the various nesses along the tourist trail. Emma was very impressed how our students delivered their concepts in the formal presentation and that they were easy to read through and understand. After reviewing the document and all the students proposals Emma Taylor selected Emma Macleod’s ‘Kerambha Ness’ concept to develop further believing Emma understood the brief really well and produced ideas which would work within the lodges creating a warm environment with some interesting finishing touches.

Project:

Project Aslan Client:

The Zoological Society of London Site:

London Zoo

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Gir National Park and Sanctuary, Gujarat, India.

pROJECT ASLAN

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Students involved: Year 3 Zoë Bailey Eda Bulut Ria Darai

The winning design Kerambha Ness by Emma Macleod, pictured below.

“Participating in this live project was incredibly beneficial to us all as it gave us the opportunity to follow the strict budgets and deadlines associated with working for a real client. I am lucky enough to have been selected to work alongside ZSL to develop my concept in time for the launch in May.”

Year 2 Jamila Yasmeen Akhtar Jan-Michael Ermita Emma Macleod Jiwan Magar Soodabe Najafi

Emma Macleod, Year 2 Student

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The layout of the 9 lodges for the new overnight experience at London Zoo.

The excitement of camping in the Gir Forest inspired Year 3 student Zoë Bailey’s Kasia Ness design.

A faded, monochromatic interior gives visitors a lion’s perspective when they enter the Sirvan Ness designed by Year 2 student Soodabe Najafi.

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Authentic Learning Experience

In term 2 Year 1 students were asked to develop a proposal for a welcome area at London Zoo in Regents Park. ZSL’s ‘Land of the Lions’ – an expansive development being launched in the summer 2016 – will offer a new overnight experience, ‘A night with the Lions’. Students worked on redesigning the Garden Room into a reception and welcome area for guests upon arrival. This project has given students the opportunity to investigate function and ergonomics, learning about the principles of how buildings are designed to accommodate the needs of people. Students were asked to look at the creation of a new customer and staff interface that would enhance the ZSL brand and Gir Lion Lodge experience. They were required to develop a proposal for the redesign of the Garden Room, which also explored the possibility of space being used to serve afternoon tea to visitors. Students began by generating ideas on how to improve the functionality of the room, especially with the challenge of a hybrid space. This was a live project that has provided an opportunity for students to develop their communication skills and gain first-hand experience in working with a client.

Project:

Garden Room Client:

The Zoological Society of London Site:

London Zoo

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GARDEN ROOM

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OPPOSITE

Students on a site visit to London Zoo situated in nearby Regents Park.

Year 1 students present their proposals to Emma Taylor, Head of Commercial Development at ZSL.

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“Having the chance to work on a live project in the first year of the Interiors Programme is seriously amazing, let alone working for London Zoo. Already having experience within industry so early on in the course is amazing, and it has just made me even more excited for my future as an interior designer!” Phoebe Jones, Year 2 Student


Authentic Learning Experience FOCUS:

PUBLIC LECTURES

Interior Design Public Lectures

The Interior Design public lectures series are organised to broaden our students’ intellectual and cultural experience. The three talks at the start of each term are programmed to reflect and enrich this experience. The individual evening lectures are entitled ‘Industry Insight’, ‘Talking Tutors’ and ‘One Year On’. With ‘Industry Insight’ we invite practitioners from a multitude of disciplines so students are fully engaged with the potential of the interior. Interior Designers, Graphic Designers and Architects have all been invited to give their perspectives on the interior. We have learnt so much through listening to the wide range of practitioners such as Jason Bruges, Virgile + Partners Design Director Mario Brown, Household’s Creative Director Sarah Page and award-winning architect Carl Turner. This year our Year 2 students were developing store concepts for Alexander McQueen and they were able gain an ‘Industry Insight’ from Lewis Taylor, Design Director at David Collins Studio, who is responsible for the design of McQueen’s stores globally. Our students are taught by some of the best practitioners and with ‘Talking Tutors’ it is the tutors turn to show students the work they produce when they are not teaching the designers of the future. Our ‘One Year On’ talk is extremely popular with our students. This is where we invite one of our recent graduates to come in and talk about their experiences on the Interiors programme, how they got their job and what their first year in practice has been like. Each student that gives a ‘One Year On’ talk earns a place on the ‘Wall of Fame’, which is located in the Interior Design studios. The talks are a great chance for our Interior Design community, students, staff, alumni, friends and guests to get together on a regular basis.

“Talking to interior design students at Regent’s about the work of our practice struck a chord as we believe that all good buildings and spaces should be conceived from the inside out. I often talk about interior landscapes and rooms within rooms and the play of scale from furniture through to space. I think it’s really important for students to see the work of practitioners, have it explained (warts and all) and for the link to be described through personal experience how one transitions from university to the workplace. I also like to point out that it’s now, while you have time to think (which isn’t always there later in your career) that each student should begin to establish their own design strategies and concerns. It’s also really important that designers of all disciplines are exposed to other areas of design outside their own core curriculum, so it’s great to see interior designers taking a very architectural approach to space and materials.” Carl Turner, Carl Turner Architects

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Award-winning architect Carl Turner, pictured in his London studio. VIEW FROM THE FOURTH FLOOR: ISSUE 1

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PUBLIC LECTURES

Thank you to all our speakers: Industry Insight

Talking Tutors

Lesley Batchelor Johnson Naylor LLP Paul Bretherton Tom Dixon Design & Research Studio Mario Brown Virgile + Partners Jason Bruges Jason Bruges Studio Lee Deverill Greenspace Nina Eklund Freelance Interior Designer Steve Haggarty Hunt and Haggarty Simon Jackson FKA Architecture + Interiors Jane Lawrence Conran + Partners Dominic McKenzie Dominic McKenzie Architects Peter Morris Peter Morris Architects Sarah Page Household Paulo Pimentel Imagination Simon Shaw Exposure Lewis Taylor David Collins Studio Carl Turner Carl Turner Architects George Wainwright Pope Wainwright

Stephen Edge Senior Lecturer in Interior Design Mark Gower Mark Gower Studio Sarah Harkins Another Designer Kieran Mahon History and Theory Lecturer Rentaro Nishimura Rentaro Nishimura Studio Nick Rawcliffe Raw Studio Johann Schnaus Say Architects Amy Thomas History and Theory Lecturer

Guest speaker information accurate at time of lecture.

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One Year On Lisa Chan Erica Deam Deborah Josepovici Svitlana Lavrenchuk Mona Lindell Kristell Mouries Venessa Okanovic Valerie Queen Erik Svensson

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Deborah Josepovici answers questions after her ‘One Year On’ talk and, top right, a full house for Jason Bruges talk to our students.


OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL

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OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL FOCUS:

Interior Design Principles: INTRODUCTION MODULE LEADER:

Laoura Englezou Lecturer in Interior Design

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Year 1 students complete our Interior Design Principles modules during Level 4, which are taken alongside two supporting studies modules: ‘Communication Skills I’ and ‘Interior Histories’. In the first two modules students explore and experiment with the fundamentals of interior design such as ‘Proportion, Materials and Structure’ and ‘Colour and Light’. In the third and fourth modules students develop their first small-scale design project which investigates ‘Form, Function and Ergonomics’ and ‘Joints and Junctions’. Both supporting studies run throughout the year, underpinning and reinforcing the skills students are learning in the design modules. ‘Communication Skills I’ assists them in effectively communicating and presenting their proposals. ‘Interior Histories’ explores the development of the interior, its design and the various historical contexts it has been located in. Year 1 students also learn and discover the fundamental principles behind interior design and are expected to use their creative thinking skills, learn to reflect on their work, and begin to express their ideas.

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Elsa Ågrup’s ‘Points and Lines’ studies expressing words in an abstract way: active, passive (x2), grid, major/minor.

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Principles

Soodi Najafi’s ‘Joints and Junctions’ studies using two contrasting materials and components to develop simple details and experimental junctions.

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Interior Design lecturer Laoura Englezou, right, gives Year 1 student Victoria Caruana guidance before her client presentation.

Aly Mohamed El Naggar, Year 1 student, presents his ‘Colour and Light’ project to Robert Paul from Little Greene.

A composition of vertical and horizontal planes by Anastasia Akimova that explores ‘Modulor’ as a proportioning system and defines three interlocking volumes.

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OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL

The ‘Structure’ project gives students the opportunity to investigate and explore basic structural principles within an interior design context. Drawing from experience of working with ordering principles and proportion in previous assignments, students worked in groups applying what they have learned. The aim of the project is to design and build a structure to support and display an object. Each team was provided with the object and limited materials such as bamboo rods and cable ties. Using these materials and two additional materials of their choice, they were required to create a structural frame that supports and suspends an object off the floor. Working at varying scales, using drawings and making to develop a sequence of possible compositions, the final outcome was built at 1:1 scale and exhibited in the Regent’s Marylebone High Street foyer.

FOCUS:

Interior Design Principles: STRUCTURE MODULE LEADER:

Laoura Englezou Lecturer in Interior Design

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Objects included: The Gianni jar by Alessi Beige perfume by Chanel Louboutin shoe Matthew Syed’s book ‘Bounce’ Signed Brazil football shirt Signed West Ham United football shirt Two Helium balloons

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Students are encouraged to use sketchbooks and think through drawing.

Principles

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“Process is more important than outcome. When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.” Bruce Mau, Incomplete Manifesto for Growth (1998)

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Year 1 students thinking through making and working as a team.

Structures, shown here in the Regent’s Marylebone High Street foyer, not only have to stand up but have to represent the products that they are supporting.

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OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL

In Year 2 our students focus on the creative process behind design rather than a predetermined output and respond to a variety of briefs that are not restricted to any single sector of the discipline. By placing an emphasis on process, students are challenged to leave behind preconceived ideas about material outcomes and are asked to explore new projects in multiple ways. Through a combination of words, images, drawings and objects, students are encouraged to develop their own approach to the discipline and required to craft their ideas by hand, as well as digitally and mechanically. Students explore projects at various scales from a site analysis at the beginning of the year to designing a fully realised environment at the end of the year. In the first studio module, ‘ReHab ReUse’, students are given an opportunity to engage with an existing building and adapting it by introducing a new use. These schemes are developed further in the next studio module called ‘In Detail’ where students focus on an area of their scheme in greater detail and create working drawings for specifications of design and materials. In the third studio module, ‘paraSITES’ students are provided with the opportunity to develop a piece of furniture from initial conception to construction. For the last Year 2 studio module, ‘Event’, students develop an exhibition for the School’s end of year show. This is an opportunity to work with other disciplines and departments on a live project with the reality of real clients, budgets and construction methods.

FOCUS:

Interior Design PrACTICE: INTRODUCTION MODULE LEADER:

Rentaro Nishimura Lecturer in Interior Design

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Year 2 students together develop proposals for the end of year shows.

PrACTICE

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Year 2 students talk through their ideas with Year 3 students.

Year 2 students developing display structures out of cardboard for the end of year shows.

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OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL

In Year 2 our students were asked to develop a proposal for a new showroom for Alexander McQueen’s diffusion line, McQ, within The Mall on Upper Street, Islington, London. Students explored Alexander McQueen’s engagement with romantic literary traditions such as death, decay and darkness to inform their site analysis and conceptual approach to the project. Out of the darkness of decay a series of beautiful and unique schemes surfaced. Soodabe Najafi looked at the hypothetical state that lies in between life and death and developed spaces in a state of transition seemingly floating within the existing building. Elsa Ågrup looked at the nature of legacy and the importance of something received from or handed down by an ancestor or relative and explored and how a new life could emerge through decay. Jamila Akhtar looked at contrasts of life and death, solid and void and heavy and light to develop a staircase that, although made of concrete, gave the impression it was weightless. Students developed their schemes ‘In Detail’ by thinking through making and producing a series of development models.

FOCUS:

Interior Design PrACTICE: Decay MODULE LEADER:

Rentaro Nishimura Lecturer in Interior Design

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“In a decaying society, art, if it is truthful, must also reflect decay. And unless it wants to break faith with its social function, art must show the world as changeable. And help to change it.”

EXTERIOR ELEMENTS

Ernst Fischer, Writer and Politician

INTERIOR ELEMENTS

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Soodi Najafi’s visualisation of her McQ proposal.

ELEVATIONS

PrACTICE

Decay (di’kei) The state or process of rotting or decomposition

SHOWROOM

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ABOVE LEFT

RIGHT

Elsa Ågrup’s develops planning options through studying life that emerges through decaying objects.

Elsa Ågrup’s organisation strategies within her final presentation document.


OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL

Opening Up the Enclosure

FOCUS:

Interior THEORIES: Re-Tracing The City MODULE LEADER:

Kieran Mahon Lecturer in Interior Design History and Theory

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Re-Tracing the City on display in the Marylebone High Street foyer.

Re-Tracing The City

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“It’s the summer and I am at 110 Marylebone High Street. Following a long day of reading and preparing module materials for the new ‘IND503 Interior Theories’, I need a distraction. I decide to illegally venture into a series of construction sites – classrooms on the second and third floors. Work tools, splinters of plaster and empty buckets of white emulsion paint carpet the floor. Although my minor transgressions pale pathetically in contrast to serious place-hacking, those stripped back interiors left their modest mark and still superimpose on the present. The redevelopment of the rooms highlighted their connection to other places and spaces: air and light from the city outside, its historical design details, cables connected to Local Area Networks, electrical conduits. No longer isolated enclosures they opened up like this map and re-traced a more complex set of relationships with the outside world. Similar to my memory of the construction sites, one of the rewarding features of teaching on the Interior Design Programme is that it continually evolves. Intended and unintended outcomes in the classroom enrich the educational experience, allowing both students and staff to learn from each other. The same is true in Interior Theories, which asks students to examine the values that shape our interiors (architectural or otherwise) which go on to shape us. Through this process they have connected the practice of interior design to multiple sites, ideas and theories, developing a more critical dialogue”. Kieron Mahon, Lecturer in Interior Design History and Theory

Re-Tracing the City Editorial Team: Zoë Bailey Eda Bulut Ria Darai Reeshma Fidahoussen

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Re-Tracing the City Contributors: Aniya Kudysheva Vanessa Wrede Anna Yumasheva Merey Zhumabayeva Nelly Muthoni Ireri Emir Norbredali Ahmed Omar Beatriz Dos Santos


Body and Gender Hidden Lines

A person’s identity includes their culture and heritage as two of the most integral pieces of the puzzle. In some cases culture is associated with education in specific fields, such as arts and sciences. In this case we wish to define culture as the approach and attitudes of a specific group of individuals in identifying and solving a shared problem or issue. This definition of culture can be more encompassing, as the approach a group has to a specific problem is a reflection of their common values and priorities. Their approach, collectively, and method of problem solving demonstrates how group members interact with one another, as well as, the social hierarchies that may exist. In terms of design, cultural expression is demonstrated within a group, which shares the same values; a solution to a problem would be very similar in function but very different in terms of its design and characteristics. Design and culture have always been interrelated as it has become a means to capture ideation, innovation and enterprise. Taking the example of re-building Britain in 1951, many aspects of the country suffered huge cultural damage in terms of buildings destroyed and lives lost during the war. Building the Royal Festival Hall during the Festival of Britain brought back the identity of science, technology, industrial design, architecture and the arts, as well as, the identity of hope that culture is still present after such a hard period of time. We would define culture as a shared pattern of behaviour and understandings of a particular group of people, learned by living together.

We have been educated since our youth that there are invisible boundaries between sexes that create a divide. In modern society, it comes as no surprise that there are ‘built’ stereotypes in accordance to profession, interest and lifestyles. For example, it has been believed for many years, that pink and blue are the most identifiable colours when referring to one’s gender. Relating to interior design and architecture, there are similar contradictions.

Re-Tracing The City

Culture and Identity Festival of Britain

Architecture is seen as a more superior title, and when the two are fused it becomes more appealing to male students. The label ‘Interior design’ is associated with the craft of colour co-ordination, selection of fabrics and orientation of furniture, which are allied with a feminine attitude. Joel Sanders writes in his article Curtain Wars, ‘Curtains, that element of the domestic interior on which the hands of the decorator and of the architect come directly into contact, embody, many of the tension and prejudices that have divided interior designers and architectures since the emergence of the professional decorator in the late 19th century’. The conflict between professional statuses have lingered in the last decade, but are recently growing in equality.

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City Exterior – Interior

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Crystal Building at Royal Victoria Docks, London for Siemens.

“Interior educators, show that, on average, for every 100 female students enrolled on an interior design degree course there are 22 male students.” M. Gower, 2014

“Still, many architects feel they must defend against the sneaking suspicion that inside every architect lurks a decorator”. T. Bridges

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Sustainability The Importance of Sustainable Architecture

Our homes are one of the most important assets of our lives. With the help of sustainable architecture, a green design can successfully meld beauty and functionality together to save our planet from us. Sustainable approach means considering the whole life cycle of a project and therefore improving the functionality, quality, and human enjoyment and, in the long term, bringing real social and economic benefits. Architects who value the earth and understand the need for a more organic design create green architecture or sustainable architecture. One of the examples of green architecture in the UK would be The Crystal. The Crystal is a new eco building in London’s dockland area designed by Siemens as a centre for sustainability, to promote energy efficient thinking. Designed by award winning architects Wilkinson Eyre, this iconic sustainable building draws inspiration from the many sides of a crystal. The external shape of the building creates unique internal spaces, including an auditorium, conference facilities, meeting rooms and office spaces. The Crystal is an all-electric building that uses solar power and a ground source heat pump to generate its own energy. It showcases state-of-the-art technologies to make buildings more efficient and also profiles Siemens’ Environmental Portfolio. The building incorporates rainwater harvesting, black water treatment, solar heating and automated building management systems.

Cities are incomplete systems as there is always the possibility of making. The characteristics of the city such as history, memory and time are a necessary part of the DNA of the urban environment. Every city is distinct due to its layout however, whether it is London or Venice, cities tend to provide something for everybody, but not everyone knows where they belong or if they are suited to its personality until they have lived in it or been surrounded by its walls. The aged city structure educates us of its history; its streets take us on a repository of possibilities whilst its walls confine us within its interior. The city provokes our senses by manipulating our movement within its frame. It guides us through its streets and restricts us with its signs and buildings pushing us into different directions as if we were puppets and the city is our master. Some cities such as Venice, feel as if you are placed inside a maze where you have to follow a path in order to unfold new spaces. The only way to know that you are heading in the right direction is by finding the small treasured details you encounter on your journey through the city. An example of a public space that links us with the interior of the city could be the way the Barbican is used as a multi-purpose space allowing the unity of the exterior with the interior. If urban life takes place inside, should urban planning not also address the interior? The walls surrounding you within the space are symbolising “a city within a city”, where you’re confined inside, away from the rest of the city allowing us to understand an interior space with a city structure in mind.


FOCUS:

Dissertation: Setting An Agenda MODULE LEADER:

Jos Boys Lecturer in Interior Design History and Theory

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Dissertation is the third and final ‘Histories and Theories’ module at Year 3. It asks students to embark on an intense process of investigation, reflection, and writing that can deeply inform and enrich their final design project. By building up a substantial knowledge of an area of particular personal interest, students develop their own agendas for their interior design development and practice, both at Regent’s University London and beyond into the future. To do this students produce an extended piece of academic writing that can also demonstrate their abilities to structure arguments effectively, to write clearly and to offer a compelling read.

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ABSTRACT 1 STUDENT:

Ahmed Omar Question:

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The old campus, top, and the new campus in New Cairo shown below.

Dissertation

Relocating Modernity: The American University, Cairo 1908–2008 This thesis interrogates the Egyptian notion of modernity through an examination of the construction and relocation of the American University in Cairo. The main object of study is the most recent campus located in New Cairo, a suburban district west of the city centre, inaugurated in 2008. This is compared to the old university campus, founded in 1919 and located in Tahrir Square in central Cairo. By examining both sites through architectural drawings and photographs, together with other archival resources, I show how ideals about modernity and cosmopolitanism have affected the design and layout of both campuses, and how they were both underpinned by similar reasoning. At the same time I also explore the effects on these developments of a belief in the cosmopolitan, and a disdain of the rural, and the often unintended impacts of the new American University campus on its surroundings and academic community.

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ABSTRACT 2 STUDENT:

Zoë Bailey Question:

The Children’s Homes of Victorian London: How did their architecture and interiors express 19th century values of philanthropic childcare? Images from Peter Higginbotham

OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL

ABOVE

The postcard, above, shows the winding paths full of figures gardening and enjoying the outdoors. The top image is shows the social and outdoor qualities of the development.

Charles Dickens’s ‘Oliver Twist’ introduced me to London’s Victorian history and its children. As a child the 1968 musical drama film adaption ‘Oliver!’ was where my interest began. Here was an author who addressed the social issues of the time and I had an urge to know more about this key moment in London’s history. A starting point to understanding the question of how architecture and interiors were related to treatment of the poor and destitute was the development of the Workhouse based on the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act. Combining this with my interest in the care of children and the history of London’s East End led me to find a Barnardo’s care home, the Village Home for Girls in Barkingside, Ilford, to focus my research on. Exploring buildings as social objects is a matter that helps us to understand the behaviour of people in space and why some different architectural models work and others fail. The Village Home’s architectural prototype was planned as a social generator, based on nature and a cottage life, with the aim to use space to inspire a generation.

“If the children of the slums can be removed from their surroundings early enough and can be kept sufficiently long under training heredity counts for little, environment counts for everything.” W Fletcher, 2006, Keeping the Vision Alive: The Story of Barnardo’s 1905-2005, p127


ABSTRACT 4

STUDENT:

STUDENT:

Ria Darai

Nelly Ireri

Question:

Question:

An Ambiguous Mind: How does Carlo Scarpa help us understand an approach to interior design?

What is Architecture’s response to fear? Exploring how to create spaces of belonging through design.

Interior Design is centrally about engaging with existing buildings and spaces. Finding approaches that can balance between old and new is vital in order to create interiors that capture the essence of beauty, the spirit of the client and endure the transitions of time. By examining the works of Carlo Scarpa, I want to better understand what kinds of techniques can inform approaches to interior design. The restoration of Castelvecchio Museum in particular demonstrates Scarpa’s extraordinary capacity to create spaces that integrate through design a love of materials and making; the experiential journeys through space of its inhabitants; a sensitive response to context; and a deep understanding of methods of formal composition. By studying this project in depth, I aim to analyse the complexity and subtlety of one approach to remodelling space, particularly in building on the power of detail and knowledge of materials to show how it can enable the creation of a powerful relationship between part and whole, and between old and new.

Fear is an unpleasant legitimate emotion caused by the threat of danger, pain, and harm. Towns, cities and the homes have always required protection from danger. Protection from intruders – keeping particular people out or in – motivated cities to build enclosed perimeters such as walls or fences from the villages of Mesopotamia to the Native settlements. The practice of architecture evolved and offered inventive design strategies and solutions to prevent harm and danger and instead to promote security and safety. Densely populated cities are associated with fear more than safety because the occupiers are diverse and often areas of the city are seen as being dominated by specific and potentially dangerous groups. There can be distinct divisions between racial or economic enclaves; this often intensifies and magnifies dangers such as crime, civil unrest, illness, violence, and poverty. So we look for safe havens from these dangers through a range of architectural and planning solutions. One architectural solution for protecting the home is creating gated enclosures that can be regulated and controlled by introducing safety features such as CCTV. Yet these buildings can also disrupt established communities, displace people, their homes, and businesses, increase social segregation and diminish the public realm. The aim of this essay is to study the architectural solutions that protect individuals from danger, and minimise or control fear; but to see what can be provided through design for the least safe in society – the homeless. It asks what can be learnt from the gated enclaves of the better off, to offer instead feelings of protection and belonging to those with nothing, and who are most vulnerable in the city. How can we make safe havens for these people?

ABOVE

Bow Quarters, London, top, is architecture’s response to fear through design strategies; gated entrances and technology – CCTV. And, below, at the Lillington Gardens Estate in London, architecture’s response to fear; promote safety and security without the technology; increase in natural surveillance. Photos by Ria Darai

Dissertation

ABSTRACT 3

ABOVE

Carlo Scarpa’s Museo di Castlevecchio in Verona.

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FOCUS:

Portfolio and Interviews MODULE LEADER:

JOHANN SCHNAUS Lecturer in Interior Design

6 IND603 IND604 IND605 IND602

ABOVE AND ABOVE RIGHT

Eda Bulut, above, and Vanessa Wrede, right, present their work to Kevin Brennan, Brinkworth CEO; and Lucy Porter, HR and PR manager at Brinkworth.

PORTFOLIO AND INTERVIEWS

IND601

‘Portfolio & Professional Studies’ is the final ‘Communication Skills’ module at Level 6. The module not only covers business practice for the interior design industry, but students create a comprehensive portfolio of work they have completed throughout the programme and undergo ‘real’ interviews with practitioners from the design industry in order to prepare our students for job interviews. Year 3 students were interviewed by senior creatives from multi-disciplined agencies Household and industry giants Imagination last year. This year London-based design consultancy Brinkworth interviewed all of our Year 3 students. Established in 1990, Brinkworth work across a range of disciplines including architecture and interiors which has resulted in a highly creative international portfolio completing projects for the likes of Dinos Chapman, Rapha, Selfridges and Supreme.

Photos by Mark Gower

OUR PROGRAMME IN DETAIL

OPPOSITE

Ahmed Omar discusses his major project with Kevin and Lucy.

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“It was great to see such a diverse and enthusiastic cohort of students. Joining the course at Regent’s University London from a wide range of places around the world seems to have encouraged mutual support and a shared ambition to succeed in the design industry”. Lucy Porter, HR and PR manager, Brinkworth


THE GRADUATES

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THE GRADUATES FOCUS:

Major DESIGN Project MODULE LEADER:

Mark Gower Programme Director in Interior Design

6 IND603 IND604 IND605 IND602

2

ABOVE

Haggerston Baths, Whiston Road, Hackney, London.

Major DESIGN Project

IND601

Visitors to the interior design exhibition at the Marylebone High Street campus and at the Interior Educator’s show at Free Range saw the culmination of students’ work on the Interiors Programme. On display was their ‘Major Design Project’, which was an individually driven interior design proposal that focuses on students’ personal aspirations towards the subject. Students undertake a wide-ranging and in-depth study to ascertain the feasibility of a self-initiated interior design proposal. Undergraduates are required to define a concept, spatial organisation and the realisation of a scheme within a specific site. Visitors got the opportunity to see innovative projects that range from addressing the homeless crisis in London to reinventing a piano school. The projects are communicated through beautiful architectural models, drawings, sketches, 3D visuals, materials and moving images. London is at the heart of the interior design industry and our students use this thriving world capital and its rich tapestry of architecture as their laboratory. All site-specific projects are set in London, the proximity allows for access during the span of a project. Students benefit from all the prompts, which the designer can get from how a building sits among its surroundings, regarding for instance from the interior, aspects of vista and into the interior, the quality of daylight penetration at different times and seasons. The analytical stage of the major project leads to an understanding of the style and provenance of the chosen building, as well as its physical and spatial characteristics.

1 Aniysa Alleyne 2 Zoë Bailey 3 Eda Bulut 4 Ria Darai 5 Beatriz Dos Santos 6 Nelly Muthoni IrerI 7 Aniya Kudysheva 8 Emir Nobrdali 9 Ahmed Omar 10 VANESSA wrede 11 Anna Yumasheva

Seven Sisters

1

Highgate

Hampstead

3 Stoke Newington Gospel Oak

Kentish Town

Dalston

Highbury

7 Primrose Hill

Barnsbury

Camden Town

Hackney

8

Haggerston

2

Islington Hoxton

4

Kings Cross St Pancras

Regent’s Park

Shoreditch

Euston Maida Vale Clerkenwell Bloomsbury

11

11

Barbican

Spitalfields

Marylebone

9

10

Bayswater

Holborn City

Soho

6

Whitechapel

Mayfair Hyde Park Southwark

1 MILE

Kensington

Green Park St James’s Park

Knightsbridge Westminster

Elephant & Castle

Belgravia Lambeth South Kensington

ABOVE

OPPOSITE

Shoreditch High Street, London.

11 Major Design Projects at 11 sites London. No.9 is our Marylebone High Street campus.

2 MILES Vauxhall

Pimlico

5

West Brompton

Chelsea

3 MILES Battersea Park

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4 MILES

Clapham

Bermondsey


1 THE GRADUATES

When conglomerate supermarkets, such as Sainsbury’s or Asda, open in communities, the damage that is done to the local businesses can be devastating. The Hive sets the standards of a new way for supermarkets to start taking social responsibilities for the areas they inhabit. I have created a public open space to be used as a market place and for assemblies. The ancient Greek Agora meets a reinvented supermarket outlet.

STUDENT:

Aniysa Alleyne Nationality:

Guyanese Project:

The Hive Question:

How do you blur the boundaries between a local market and a supermarket?

RIGHT

The new interpretation diagram of the ancient Greek Agora creating spaces for Art, Athletics, Politics and Spirituality, laid over a development model of a market stall.

Site:

231-243 High Road, London N15 5BT EMAIL:

Aniysa Alleyne

Aniysa_16@hotmail.co.uk

ABOVE

Sketchbook analysis of the ancient Greek Agora.

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2 THE GRADUATES

The aim of this project is to create a space that can help children from deprived or disadvantaged backgrounds to feel safe and secure. Iconic and recognisable forms inspired by children’s drawings of their homes have been carefully inserted into the Edwardian building. While the structures are playful in nature, they maintain a consistent conversation with the existing building.

STUDENT:

Zoë Bailey Nationality:

British Project:

THE Art ROOM Question:

How do you turn an Edwardian public bathS into a space that feels like home for children? Site:

Haggerston Baths, Whiston Road, Hackney, LONDON E2 8BN EMAIL:

ABOVE

Haggerston Baths, Whiston Road, Hackney, London.

Zoë Bailey

zoejaneBailey@icloud.com

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ABOVE

ABOVE

Translating children’s drawings of a home into 3D forms – initial development models.

Forms inserted into the site and adapted to maintain a consistent conversation with the existing building.

ABOVE

ABOVE

View into the ‘Art Space’. New life is brought into the disused swimming pool with the insertion of art facilities.

Strategic cutouts in the roof of the home structure allow light from the existing skylights to flood the interior.


3 THE GRADUATES STUDENT:

Eda Bulut Nationality:

British Project:

Designing Through Movement

The aim of this project is to design a space to enable its users to immerse themselves within a community hub that has been influenced by seven traditional Turkish dance styles. The seven different forms will work as part of a whole to create a smooth transition between areas. A series of spaces have been translated through the specific values of the dances such as lightweight, levels, birth, continuous, link, rhythm and fluidity.

Question:

How do you design a community hub based on the movement and narratives of seven Turkish dance styles? Site:

Unit C-1, 3 Victorian Grove, Stoke Newington, London N16 8EN EMAIL:

Eda Bulut

eda.bulut@hotmail.co.uk

ABOVE AND ABOVE RIGHT

RIGHT

Development models and development section sketches express the forms of traditional Turkish dance.

Dance: levels. View into the changing levels performance space.

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4 THE GRADUATES

What I love about the subject of interior design is that it is difficult to define. It engenders curiosity because it is vague and misunderstood. I have introduced an oxymoron cube structure, through the heart of building that allows the discipline to break out of. This cube unfolds to reveal spaces and create viewpoints that allow visitors to gradually understand the functionality of the building and possibly the subject as well.

STUDENT:

Ria Darai Nationality:

British Project:

Blurring Boundaries Question:

How do you create a workspace for a discipline that has no boundaries? Site:

4–6 Ellsworth Street, Bethnal Green, London E2 0AX

ABOVE

Model of ‘Too Faced Façade’, a Secondary Skin proposal for the Year 3 minor project.

EMAIL:

Ria Darai

raniadarai@hotmail.co.uk

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ABOVE

ABOVE

Development model experimenting with interlocking volumes and the blurring of space.

Axonometric view showing how spaces break free of the inserted cube structure.


5 THE GRADUATES

In my scheme cardboard creates a flowing landscape of architectural spaces and elements. The cardboard is layered to create textured patterns on the surface, its joined together to create a series of useable spaces. Due to the natural tone of this material it fits perfectly with the tone of the existing fabric of the building.

STUDENT:

Beatriz Dos Santos Nationality:

Angolan Project:

The Cardboard Theatre Question:

How do you create a space that gives the homeless a sense of place? Site:

220 North End Road, London W14 9NX EMAIL:

Beatriz Dos Santos

bbbsantos64@gmail.com

ABOVE

ABOVE AND RIGHT

Development model experimenting with creating a cardboard landscape.

3D CAD view of cardboard theatre, above, and the first floor plan.

ABOVE AND OPPOSITE

View of reception area. The cardboard landscape creates areas to sit, lean and view the performance.

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6 THE GRADUATES STUDENT:

Nelly Muthoni Ireri Nationality:

Kenyan Project:

Making Use Of The In-Between

My project aims to offer a solution for the hidden homeless by providing a place to rest, to give shelter and where an individual can have privacy. Looking for a site I approached it as a homeless person, searching for recesses in the city that were hidden from the public that would give me the opportunity to construct a living sanctuary to provide accommodation, privacy and safety.

Question:

How do you tackle the lack of accommodation affecting the homeless in London? Site:

74-82 Queen Victoria Street, LONDON EC4N 4SJ and St Mary’s Aldermary, LONDON EC4M 9BW EMAIL:

ABOVE and ABOVE RIGHT

Development models of in-between home made from found materials.

Nelly Muthoni Ireri

Nellyireri@googlemail.com

ABOVE

Long section through the in-between home for the homeless.

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7 THE GRADUATES

As you enter ‘The Poetry Society’ you are taken on a journey through Dante Alighieri’s poem “The Divine Comedy”. Members enter the dark forest of Hell, then move through the ever-descending squares of Purgatory to end up working in the beautiful light of Heaven. On this journey there are places to pause, to think, to read and to write.

STUDENT:

Aniya Kudysheva Nationality:

Kazakh Project:

THe Divine Project Question:

How can a poem inspire the design of spaces for poets to think, read and write? Site:

The White Building, Queen’s Yard, 7 White Post Lane, London E9 5EN

RIGHT

Development model showing the dark forest rooftop of hell.

EMAIL:

Aniya Kudysheva

Aniya.km@hotmail.com

ABOVE

OPPOSITE

External view of the adapted façade of The White Building.

View into the library of heaven.

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8 THE GRADUATES

Endeavouring to fashion a balance between the arts and sports within a space that heightens the interactions between its users. Brutalism approach combined with an insertion of a social generator aims to heighten the interaction, hearing and visual awareness of all activities.

STUDENT:

Emir Nobrdali Nationality:

n/a Project:

Social Generator Question:

How can a space encourage the social interaction of participants of differing disciplines? Site:

London Temperance Hospital, Hampstead Road, London NW1 2LT EMAIL:

ABOVE

Hospital consultation note.

Emir Nobrdali

emir.nobrdali@gmail.com

OPPOSITE

Design development sketches of the inserted social generator.

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9 THE GRADUATES

RUL-LAB Street is a proposal to reinvent the Interior Design educational environment. The focus of the proposal is on fostering a testing and analysis approach to design within an environment that encourages experimentation. By introducing a street through the building, students develop their work and observe its direct relationship to London’s urban context.

STUDENT:

Ahmed Omar Nationality:

Egyptian Project:

RUL-LAB Street Question:

How can an Interior Design educational environment push the boundaries of the subject area? Site:

110 Marylebone High Street, London W1U 4RY EMAIL:

Ahmed Omar

Ahmed.rOmar.1994@gmail.com

ABOVE

OPPOSITE

Analytical sketches: Thinking through drawing and writing.

Understanding the site: The spatial exploration of 110 Marylebone High Street.

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10 THE GRADUATES

Visitors are taken on journey to meditation, cleansing their bodies and mind from the outside in. Visitors move through a sequence of transitional spaces where they remove all of their material possessions, shower and dress into a kimono to feel a stronger sense of commitment to meditation.

STUDENT:

VANESSA wrede Nationality:

Finnish Project:

Silent Spaces Question:

How do you design a meditation centre on the rooftop of a busy department store? Site:

Rooftop, Selfridges, 400 Oxford Street, London W1A 1AB EMAIL:

VANESSA wrede

vane_wrede@hotmail.com

ABOVE

TOP

ABOVE

Sectional perspective through silent spaces.

Isometric showing organisation of silent spaces.

Development of short sections through the scheme.

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11 THE GRADUATES

Designed to function like a piano the building holds practice rooms at the front and a concert hall has been inserted towards the rear. A series of womb-like timber sound waves wrap themselves around the outside of the concert hall. City sounds are removed to create a series of moments of seclusion with the music.

STUDENT:

Anna Yumasheva Nationality:

Russian Project:

Piano School Question:

How do you create a Piano School that encourages those from disadvantaged backgrounds to explore their potential through music? Site:

3–10 Shoreditch High Street, London E1 6PG EMAIL:

Anna Yumasheva

annayumasheva@yahoo.co.uk

RIGHT

Site model of Shoreditch High Street 1:500.

ABOVE

ABOVE and ABOVE RIGHT

TOP

Perspective view of two performance areas divided by timber fins.

Development models exploring the relationships of the timber fins with the existing building and the concert hall.

Sectional perspective showing the bar area and a view into the concert hall.

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Edited by Mark Gower Programme Director Interior Design +44 (0) 207 467 2473 gowerm@regents.ac.uk Designed by Joe Fox joe@fourmills.co.uk

Student portraits by Mark Gower Inside cover photography by Philip Grey

CREDITS AND THANK YOUS

CREDITS AND THANK YOUS

Thank you to all our dedicated and brilliant teaching team:

Thank you to the ‘Marylebone Interiors Day’ participating retailers:

Jos Boys Paul Bretherton Laoura Englezou Sarah Harkins Greg Jones Kieran Mahon Peter Morris Rentaro Nishimura Bryan Oknyansky Nick Rawcliffe Johann Schnaus William Warren

Designers Guild Farrow and Ball Lewis & Co Little Greene McGlashans Skandium Solid Floor The Conran Shop

Thank you to our clients that made all the live projects a reality:

Kevin Brennan Brinkworth Lucy Porter Brinkworth

Emily Bratt Howard de Walden Management Limited Matthew Cohen Devonshire Place Mews Residents Association Jenny Hancock Howard de Walden Management Limited Robert Paul Little Greene Emma Taylor The Zoological Society of London

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Thank you to our industry practitioners who conducted interviews:

Thank you also to Gill Stark, the most supportive Head of School you could wish for.

And, finally, the biggest thank you goes to all of the Interior Design students, without your hard work and dedication this first issue of ‘View from the Fourth Floor’ would not of happened.

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