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summer.regent-college.edu

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Name (Dr./Mr./Mrs./Ms.) ______________________________________________ Address________________________________________ City___________________________________________ Province/State__________________________________ Postal/Zip Code_________________________________ Phone (home)_ __________________________________ E-mail________________________________________ Occupation_ ___________________________________ I would like to receive information about upcoming Regent events:

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Please send me information about:

❏ Pastors’ Conference Wonder and Devotion, May 4-7 ❏ Evening Public Lecture posters (Spring and Summer) ❏ Prayer Retreats information (available in April) ❏ Urban Spaces Bus Tour information (available late April) ❏ Teaching Practices Workshop (with David Smith) Please send me course information sheets for: APPL ______ ______ ______ ______ BIBL ______ ______ ______ ______ HIST ______ ______ ______ ______ INDS ______ ______ ______ ______ SPIR ______ ______ ______ ______ THEO______ ______ ______ ______ LANG ______ ______

Regent College 5800 University Boulevard Vancouver, BC V6T 2E4 Phone: 604.224.3245 Fax: 604.224.3097 Toll free: 1.800.663.8664 www.regent-college.edu admissions@regent-college.edu printed in canada

Spring Session M ay 10 –J u n e 11 Summer Session June 28– August 30

AN INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF CHRISTIAN STUDIES


Photos: Beni Gaydarova, Ken McAllister, Flikr.com (James Cridland, Eric F., Mandy Jansen, Gord McKenna, Geoff Peters, Stephen Rees, Larissa Sayer and others)

Writing to Revive Broken Truth (p.16) n Alan Jacobs INDS 592 c Potter & Friends  (p.17)

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Dave Diewert BIBL 520 Solidarity, Resistance, Liberation (p.19) Edith Humphrey  BIBL 679 Revelations on Revelation  (p.21) Bruce HindmarshHIST/SPIR 599 Wesley, Whitefield, and Edwards (p.18) John Stackhouse INDS 510 Make Up Your Mind  (p.20)

Regent College 5800 University Boulevard Vancouver, BC V6T 2E4 Canada

INDS 591

(p.22)

Marsden & SvelmoeHIST 592 Revive Us Again  (p.20) John Hare INDS 680 Philosophy of Religion  (p.21) Susan Phillips SPIR 554 Introduction to Contemplative Listening (p.22) Makoto Fujimura INDS 591 The Art of Nihonga  (p.22) Bruce Waltke  BIBL 587 The Book of Proverbs  (p.23) Bruce Kuhn INDS 597 Truth Telling by Story (p.24) Julie Canlis  SPIR/THEO 529 The Relational Self  (p.25) Makoto Fujimura INDS 591 The Art of Nihonga  (p.22)

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Carolyn Hindmarsh LANG550/551 C

h Introductory New Testament Greek (p.26) a p Keith Ganzer LANG 510/511 e Introductory Old Testament Hebrew(p.26) l

Loren & Mary-Ruth Wilkinson Technology,Wilderness and Creation

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Dave Diewert BIBL 520 Solidarity, Resistance, Liberation(p.19) Edith Humphrey  BIBL 679 Revelations on Revelation  (p.21) Bruce HindmarshHIST/SPIR 599 Wesley, Whitefield, and Edwards (p.18) John Stackhouse INDS 510 Make Up Your Mind  (p.20) David Skeel 

INDS 511

L Christianity and Secular Law  (p.24) u Lauren Winner  INDS/SPIR 561

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(p.23)

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Carolyn Hindmarsh LANG550/551 Introductory New Testament Greek (p.26)

Keith Ganzer

LANG 510/511

Introductory Old Testament Hebrew(p.26)

Weeks 1-7 July 29-Aug14

The cover shows a painting by Mako Fujimura. Mako will be teaching a painting studio class from July 12-30.

INDS 571

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Simon Gathercole BIBL 547 The Pastoral Epistles  (p.17) Marsden & SvelmoeHIST 592 Revive Us Again  (p.20) John Hare INDS 680 Philosophy of Religion  (p.21) Jeremy Begbie INDS/THEO 567 Theology Transposed  (p.18) Makoto Fujimura The Art of Nihonga 

u J. M. Walker 

Week 5 July 26-30

summerprograms@regent-college.edu admissions@regent-college.edu bookstore@regent-college.edu bustour@regent-college.edu conferences@regent-college.edu housing@regent-college.edu international@regent-college.edu prayerretreats@regent-college.edu studentservices@regent-college.edu

SPIR 540

APPL/bibl 669

Themes in Hebrews 

Week 4 July 19-23

Summer Programs Admissions Bookstore Bus Tour Conferences Housing International Student Services Prayer Retreats Student Services

Mark Buchanan A Man for All Seasons 

a f t e r n o o n s

L Ross Hastings 

Week 3 July 12-16

Useful Addresses

James K.A. Smith INDS 564 p Decadence, Aestheticism, and Grace (p.15) e

Weeks 1 & 2 June 28-July 9

Pastors’ Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3 Spring Session Pastors’ Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5 Weeks 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–9 Weeks 3–5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Weeks 4 and 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–13 Special Information for INDS 525 and INDS 535 13 Summer Session Weeks 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–17 Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17–18 Weeks 3 and 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18–22 Weeks 3–5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 –25 Off Campus courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 19, 25 Biblical Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Under the Green Roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27–30 Regent Summer Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Professor Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Building Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Accommodation/Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31–32 UBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32–33 Medical Services & Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Vancouver and beyond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34–35 Course Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, inside back cover Registration Insert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . between pp.18–19 How to Register for Courses Registration Form Tuition Benefit Application Form Student Contract (including fee information)

David Smith APPL/INDS 640 C Called to Teach  (p.14) week 1 only h Marilyn McEntyre INDS 524 The Call of the Wild  (p.14) a

m o r n i n g s

INDS 525 (p.25)

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summer.regent-college.edu

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Summer Term: Summer Schedule

Contents


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Summer comes to mind. come relax, connect and learn at regent’s summer programs.

relax while

you learn, combining study with a holiday in beautiful Vancouver. Start with the Pastors’ Conference, “Wonder and Devotion: Bringing Science and Faith Together for the Church” being offered in conjunction with the Templeton Grant awarded to Regent College. Leading scientists and theologians will bring a fresh approach to this important topic. Stay for the Pastors’ Institute, courses specially for church leaders. connect with others who are hungry for God, who want solid scholarship and thoughtful answers. learn from scholars like Marva Dawn, Alan Jacobs, James K.A. Smith, Jeremy Begbie, Bruce Waltke, Lauren Winner. Plus 37 more courses. This year’s Summer Term booklet is organized chronologically, from The Pastors’ Conference in May through to the Technology, Wilderness and Creation course in late August. If you wish to hunt more quickly by topic we have also colour-coded the courses by Regent disciplines. APPL

Applied Theology

BIBL

Biblical Studies

HIST

History

INDS

Interdisciplinary Studies

SPIR

Spiritual Theology

THEO

Systematic and Historical Theology

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Pastors’ Conference May 4-7 Alan has written widely in the fields of Christian doctrine and philosophical theology–most recently, on the relationship between theological anthropology and developments in the neurosciences, Chair of Systematic and on the interface Theology, University between Christian dogmatics, ethics, of St Andrews. and politics. In 2007, MA (Philosophy), BD he and Professor Eric (Systematic Theology), Priest launched the Dr Theol (University Gregory Lectures on of Erlangen-Nurnberg). Science and Religion.

Alan Torrance

Denis Alexander

Director of the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion, St. Edmund’s College, Cambridge. BA (Hons) (Oxford), PhD (University of London), MA (Oxford).

Iain Provan

Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies (OT), Regent College.

After receiving his PhD in neurochemistry, Denis spent 15 years in academic positions before joining the Imperial Cancer Research Fund and the Babraham Institute. Dr. Alexander has published widely in the field of lymphocyte signalling and development, and is the editor of the journal Science & Christian Belief, and the author of Rebuilding the Matrix: Science and Faith in the 21st Century.

Iain has written numerous articles and several commentaries, including ones on Lamentations, 1 and 2 Kings, and Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs. He also co-authored A Biblical History of Israel with Phil Long and Tremper Longman.

MA (Glasgow), BA (London Bible College), PhD (Cambridge).

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Wonder and Devotion: Bringing Science and Faith Together for the Church Why a conference about science and theology for pastors? One of our evangelical forefathers believed theology and science to be the “twin daughters of heaven.” In fact, during the 19th century twenty percent of the content of one theological journal, The Princeton Review, was of a scientific nature! Only our capitulation to the influence of the Enlightenment which dichotomized faith and science makes this seem strange. You can relax though! We’re not hoping to make every pastor into a scientist. This conference is expressly for non-scientist pastors as well as the geeks! Sadly, the worldview of Modernity and the conflict around the science of origins has led many of us as pastors to stay away from engaging science at all in our preaching and Christian Education curricula, with the consequence that many young people when they encounter science at school and university flounder, lose their faith, or abandon careers in science. Even more importantly, we ourselves, and therefore our people, have robbed ourselves of one of the ‘two books’ by which God has revealed himself. We have dulled the sense of wonder and worship that emerges from the habits of discovering and delighting in science. We hope through this conference to recover that sense of wonder by re-inculcating the inquisitiveness and curiosity that ought to characterize us as persons made in the image of God the Creator who commissioned us to continue his creative work. This will equip us to affirm the work of scientists as devotion, and to invoke fearlessness about discovering all reality in our young people. What’s more, we will as pastors spur our people on in fulfilling what it means to be humans fully alive as we and they live out the first great mission ever given to all humans – the creation or cultural mandate of Genesis 1 and 2. We won’t ignore the controversial matters and we hope to help to equip you for those, but above all this will be about developing a way of being that is the heart of the Gospel which calls us to live in creation and participate joyfully in the new creation.

For on-line registration, session descriptions and schedules visit: www.regent-college.edu/pastorsconference


Spring Session: The Pastors’ Institute

The Pastors’ Institute

At Regent, we believe it’s vital to support those called to pastoral ministry and congregational leadership. The Pastors’ Institute—involving an annual Pastors’ Conference and two weeks of courses in Spring School—is a concentrated modular focus offered to Regent students and those in ministry seeking continuing education opportunities. A core faculty of outstanding teachers will be a regular part of the Institute. Visiting faculty will add their expertise to a wide range of courses focusing on the distinct dimensions of ministry and congregational leadership. We hope the Institute will be something that pastors can depend on as a regular opportunity for their own personal and professional development.

Rod Wilson

President and Professor, Counselling and Psychology, Regent College. BSc (Toronto), MA, PhD (York University), MTS (Conrad Grebel College, University of Waterloo), DD (Hon.) (Trinity Western University).

Rod has been involved in the fields of counselling and consulting for over 25 years and held various teaching and administrative positions at Tyndale College and Seminary in Toronto. For six years he was pastor of a growing church in the suburbs of Toronto. Rod has written several books, most recently How Do I Help a Hurting Friend?

Counselling, Community and Congregational Life In much of the evangelical world there is a separation between counselling, community, and congregational life. The counselling enterprise has become a private sanctioned retreat that has de-emphasized community, with the result that the power of congregational life to bring healing has been ignored or negated. Central to this course will be the assumption that communal paradigms for help are not only more consistent with a biblical understanding of people, but are also more effective. Through the lens of Scripture, sociology, and psychology, this course will invite students, whether they have a call to a counselling ministry or to congregational life, to explore theoretical issues related to the role of community in the process of healing and to develop practical ways to work this out in congregational life.

May 10–14, 8:00-11:00am APPL 537 1 or 2 graduate credit hours

Ross Hastings Associate Professor, Mission Studies, Regent College.

Ross teaches at Regent College in the areas of the theology and spirituality of mission, pastoral theology, and ethics. He has earned two PhDs, one in organometallic chemistry, and the other in theology. Before coming to Regent, he served as a pastor in Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia.

BSc (South Africa), PhD (Queen’s, Kingston), MCS (Regent College), PhD (St. Andrews, Scotland).

Darrell W. Johnson

Senior Minister, First Baptist Church, Vancouver. BA (University of California, San Diego), MDiv (Fuller).

Darrell is convinced that the world is changed, primarily, through the preaching of the Word. He thus majors in his teaching at Regent on expository preaching. His most recent book, Standing in the Mystery: a Spirituality of Preaching was published in 2009.

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Spring Session: The Pastors’ Institute

Bruce Milne

Conference speaker and writer. MA (St. Andrews), BD (London), PhD (Edinburgh).

Bruce was formerly pastor of First Baptist Church in Vancouver, BC, and is presently engaged in writing and in the encouragement of ministers. His books include Know the Truth; The Message of Heaven and Hell; and Dynamic Diversity: The New Humanity Church for Today and Tomorrow.

The Letter to the Philippians Philippians is without question the best-loved of Paul’s letters. Several of its statements are among the most-quoted in the Bible. But the letter is, in general, poorly understood as a literary whole, a unified letter with a critical message not only for its writer, imprisoned and facing possibly imminent death in Rome, or his Christian readers in the colony-city of Philippi, but for the people of God in today’s often confusing and threatening world. It will be the aim of our study, through careful exegesis of the text, to uncover that message and expose ourselves to its challenge—that of authentically relating our lives, both personally and corporately, to the supreme reality of all existence, the triune God in the person of Jesus Christ, God incarnate, crucified, risen, exalted, and returning.

May 10–21, 8:30-11:00am BIBL 676 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

Paul Helm

Teaching Fellow, Regent College; Emeritus Professor, University of London. BA, MA (Oxford).

Among Paul’s books are Calvin and the Calvinists; Eternal God; The Providence of God; Faith and Understanding; Faith with Reason; and Calvin: A Guide for the Perplexed.

Systematic Theology A: Prolegomena, Scripture, the Triune God, Creation, and Providence This course explores the following fundamental themes of Christian theology: theological method and the knowledge of God; the doctrine of revelation; the doctrine of Scripture; the doctrine of the Holy Trinity (including theology proper, or the doctrine of God); the doctrine of creation; and the doctrine of providence. The course will examine the historic Christian teachings on these subjects, how the church came to these conclusions, how these doctrines interact with each other, and why these things matter.

May 10–21, 1:15-3:45pm THEO 605 2 or 3 graduate credit hours Note: Students who need this course to fulfill a requirement for their degree must take this class for 3 credit hours. 4


Spring Session: The Pastors’ Institute

Gordon T. Smith

President, reSource Leadership International. BA (University of Regina), MDiv (Canadian Theological Seminary), PhD (Loyola School of Theology, Ateneo de Manila University).

Gordon is the president of reSource Leadership International, an agency that fosters excellence in theological education in the developing world. He also teaches part time at Regent College in the area of spiritual theology.

Conversion and Transformation This course will examine the theology of religious experience, with particular examination of the nature of Christian conversion and spiritual change. The course enables students to think critically and theologically about religious experience in general, but the focus of the course will be the nature and character of conversion. The lectures and readings will demonstrate that a comprehensive experience of conversion is essential for spiritual transformation and a vital piety. Attention will also be given to the theological rationale for programs that foster conversion and spiritual formation. And, as a primary focus, the course will enable students to see how understanding their own conversion fosters self-knowledge and personal transformation. The course will be based primarily on lectures but will also include guided group discussions.

May 10–21, 8:30-11:00am SPIR/THEO 635 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

Gordon T. Smith

President, reSource Leadership International. BA (University of Regina), MDiv (Canadian Theological Seminary), PhD (Loyola School of Theology, Ateneo de Manila University).

Gordon is the president of reSource Leadership International, an agency that fosters excellence in theological education in the developing world. He also teaches part time at Regent College in the area of spiritual theology.

The Meaning of the Sacraments This course is a theological examination of the sacraments and their place in the life, worship, and witness of the church. Attention will be given to the place of ritual and gesture in Christian worship, the biblical basis for the sacraments, the historic debates and controversies, as well as to the more recent ecumenical discussions and agreements. Further, the practice of the sacraments will also be addressed insofar as they reflect theological perspectives and convictions. Particular attention will be given to two questions: (1) the place of the Lord’s Supper in the life and mission of the church; and, (2) baptism and rites of Christian initiation.

May 10–21, 1:15-3:45pm SPIR/THEO 628 2 or 3 graduate credit hours 5


Spring Session: Weeks 1&2

World Film

Bruce Marchfelder Writer, Director, Producer.

BA (Haverford College), MA (Yale University).

Paul Stevens

Professor Emeritus of Marketplace Theology and Leadership, Regent College. BA, BD, DD (McMaster), DMin (Fuller).

Bruce is an award-winning screen writer and director. His first film, The Artist’s Circle, was selected for the 53rd Cannes International Film Festival. Bruce sits on the Advisory Board of the Film Forum for the Vancouver International Film Festival and has chaired the feature jury for the Leo award. From 2001 to 2005 he ran the Directing Program at the Vancouver Film School.

Paul’s primary focus is empowering the whole people of God for service in everyday life and the world. He is a craftsman with wood, words, and images and has worked as a carpenter, a student counsellor, a pastor, and a professor. Among his books are Down-to-Earth Spirituality; The Other Six Days; and Work in Progress (forthcoming). 

A special crafts exhibition will be on display in the Lookout Gallery, May 12–June 24, 2010. 6

In this course, we will explore the revelatory kinship of theology and film. Our approach will be historical, studying representative works of international filmmakers whose accomplished use of the language of film—its grammar of light, sound, setting, perspective, and montage— results in motion pictures that have the power to evoke the transcendent, to inspire faith, and to create occasions for divine encounter.

May 10–21, 8:30-11:00am INDS 508 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

Heart, Hands, and Head: Crafts, Creativity and the Spiritual Art of Making Things In an age of mass-produced, machine-made, and computer-generated products, it is vitally important to consider the meaning, theology, and spirituality of things that are hand-made, heart-made, and home-made. Far from denoting something second-class, these terms point to something fundamentally human and deeply Christian. In this course, we will consider a broad range of activities that produce hand-made and heart-made things—ranging from weaving, knitting, homemaking, and wood-working to gardening (and many others). We will examine them biblically, theologically, and vocationally. The professor will be assisted by many guests who, through an interview process, will enable participants to see the connection between faith and work. Each participant will be encouraged to bring something to the class that they have made or to create something during the course.

May 10–21, 1:15-3:45pm APPL/SPIR 505 2 or 3 graduate credit hours


Spring Session: Week 3

Jennie McLaurin

Dean of Students, Regent College. BS (Salem College), MD (Wake Forest University), MPH (University of North CarolinaChapel Hill), MCS (Regent College).

Jennie is a pediatrician with a degree in maternal and child health, and has worked for many years with the American Health Resources and Services Administration, serving immigrant populations.

Faithful Medicine: Bioethics and Christian Thought Christians struggle to make sense of modern medicine and its bioethical challenges. Abortion, euthanasia, AIDS and stem cell research continue to make headlines and fuel debate. But less public concerns also occupy us, such as infertility, aging, chronic pain and our neighbour’s unmet medical needs. This course, through the help of interactive case studies, will explore 1) medicine’s new role as a powerful secular institution; 2) ethical methods commonly used in public and Christian debate; 3) theological terms and perspectives that are (or should be) used to support bioethical viewpoints. The goal is to assist health professionals, church leaders and the wider Christian community to think well and Christianly about medicine, and thereby offer reasonable and faithful approaches to bioethical deliberation.

May 24–28, 8:00–11:00am APPL/INDS 503 2 graduate credit hours

Theology and Proclamation

Richard Topping

St. Andrew’s Hall Chair in Studies in the Reformed Tradition, St. Andrew’s Hall, Vancouver. BA (University of Waterloo), MA, PhD (Wycliffe College, University of Toronto).

Richard teaches in the areas of Reformation history, constructive theology, and historical theology. He is ordained in the Presbyterian Church in Canada, and has served as a minister in Ontario and Quebec. Richard has published Revelation, Holy Scripture and Church and is presently editing another work titled Welcome to the Church: A Primer on Christian Faith.

Training for proclamation suitably focuses on the form and structure of the sermon, the context and person of the preacher and congregation, issues of rhetoric and delivery, and, of course, faithful biblical exegesis. While the development of such artistic, imaginative, and technical skills is crucial to the task of preaching, they can eclipse preaching as a fundamentally theological and spiritual task. The triune God is both the subject of preaching (what it is about) and the active agent in the midst of it, where it is effective for faith and life. This course aims to help students understand and appreciate preaching as a task undertaken with the promise of divine grace and communication, and so as a cheerful and modest act of Christian discipleship.

May 24–28, 1:15–4:15pm APPL/THEO 585 1 or 2 graduate credit hours

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Spring Session: Week 3 Sabbath Keeping

Marva Dawn

Teaching Fellow, Spiritual Theology, Regent College; Theologian, Author, Educator with Christians Equipped for Ministry.

Marva is a popular preacher and speaker for people of all ages and the author of numerous articles and almost twenty-five books, several of which have won awards and been translated into other languages.

BA (Concordia University), MA (University of Idaho), MDiv (Western Evangelical Seminary), ThM (Pacific Lutheran University), MA, PhD (Notre Dame).

Peter Shaw

Visiting Professor of Leadership Development, Newcastle University Business School. BSc (Durham University), MSc (Bradford University), MCS (Regent College).

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How can Christians keep sane and faithful in this hectic, confusing, technologically mind-boggling, cyber-spaced world? How can we minister to those around us who are overwhelmed by the vexations of contemporary life? One of God’s greatest gifts to us is the Sabbath—a day of rest, but much more than that. This course will go beyond Marva’s book Keeping the Sabbath Wholly to explore how the keeping of a Sabbath day enables us to live prudently and joyfully in the present age and to minister to the world around us more effectively. Course participants will gain a vision for, a biblical foundation under, and practical wisdom about keeping a weekly Sabbath of ceasing, resting, embracing, and feasting. A renewal of Sabbath-keeping among Christians will transform our lives, renew the church, and change the world!

May 24–28, 8:00-11:00am SPIR 618 1 or 2 graduate credit hours

Peter has held three Director General posts in the UK government and has worked in five government departments. He is an executive coach with an international profile working at chief executive and board levels in government organizations, private sector companies, and national charities. His books include Mirroring Jesus as Leader, and most recently, Deciding Well: A Christian Perspective on Making Decisions as a Leader.

Effective Leadership in Turbulent Times: A Christian Perspective Those of us who are leaders, or who are aspiring to be leaders, in either the secular or Christian worlds are coping, or may well have to cope, with turbulent times. This course will look at leading through such times, making decisions well, “raising your game,” enabling a team to work well, and using time and energy well. Students will be encouraged to be rooted, radical, reflective, and renewed in order to be effective Christian leaders in the global workplace. The course will draw from the life and teaching of Jesus, the experiences of the prophets and the apostles, the current experiences of Christians in senior leadership roles, relevant books and articles, and from the personal experiences of participants in the class.

May 24–28, 1:15–4:15pm INDS 548 1 or 2 graduate credit hours


Spring Session: Weeks 3–5

How Then Shall We Live?

Sarah Williams

Associate Professor, Church History, Regent College. MA, DPhil (Oxford).

Sarah specializes in nineteenth- and twentieth-century social and cultural history. Her work engages with anthropology, sociology, and critical social theory in order to develop an integrated approach to the study of modern religiosity. She is the author of Religious Belief and Popular Culture, and a contributor to European Religion in the Age of Great Cities and Women, Gender and Religious Cultures in Britain, 1800–1940 (forthcoming).

The Cultural and Political Legacy of Total War: 1914 to the Present Day The last one hundred years have been described as the Secular Age, the era in which Christianity has been relegated to the margins of the modern Western world. This course explores this social and political relocation of Christianity, and traces the links between our present cultural and political situation and the impact of “total war,” the holocaust, and the mass mobilization of human and financial resources for military ends. Total War was the “invention” of the twentieth century. Its effects were unprecedented, far reaching, and decisive. War has left an indelible mark on consciousness, political dialogue, economic structures, artistic, literary, and philosophical creativity, and social norms and customs. We will consider how late modern Christianity has been shaped by such changes and assess the degree to which the post-war/post-modern world we find ourselves in today offers a unique and challenging environment for Christian mission.

May 24–28, 8:00–11:00am HIST 589 1 or 2 graduate credit hours

Sven Soderlund

Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies, Regent College. BA (Toronto), MA (Central Bible College), MCS (Regent College), PhD (Glasgow).

Sven has a heart for the integration of biblical scholarship and biblical spirituality in both the church and the academy. His academic studies have been enriched by several overseas ministry experiences in Europe and Latin America, as well as visits to biblical sites associated with the travels of Paul in Asia Minor and Greece.

Biblical Exegesis and Interpretation The purpose of this course is (1) to introduce the student to the principles and tools of biblical exegesis and interpretation, and (2) to provide working models for the use of these principles and tools through a study of Paul’s letter to the Philippians and the Old Testament book of Amos. In this way, it is hoped that the course will provide the foundations for a lifetime of serious Bible study.

May 24–June 11, 1:15–3:45 pm (Mon.–Thurs.), 1:15–3:15 pm (Friday) BIBL 503 3 graduate credit hours Prerequisites: BIBL 501, 502, and LANG 500, 510, or 550. Note: BIBL 503 requires some knowledge of both Hebrew and Greek. Please see the syllabus for more information. 9


Spring Session: Weeks 4&5

Charles Ringma

Emeritus Professor of Mission and Evangelism, Regent College. PhD (University of Queensland).

Charles has worked as a missionary, pastor, social welfare worker, researcher, and educator. For much of his life he has lived in various forms of intentional Christian community. In retirement, he continues to teach and is presently completing two books, In the Shadow of the Cross: The Spirituality of Dietrich Bonhoeffer; and The Art of Healing Prayers.

Building Christian Communities This course will introduce students to a range of models of Christian community from the early church, Monasticism, the Anabaptists, Moravians, and contemporary Christian communities such as Catholic Covenant Communities, L’Arche, Sojourners, House Churches, and the Base Ecclesial Communities. It will provide perspectives for evaluation and determining general applicability and will identify ways in which Christian communities are developed and maintained.

May 31–June11, 8:30–11:00am APPL/INDS 519 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

The Arts in Worship? Getting There from Here

Cherith Fee Nordling BA (Wheaton), MA (College of Notre Dame), MCS (Regent College), PhD (St. Andrews).

Robert Nordling

Professor of Music, Calvin College. BA Music (Wheaton).

There have been challenges in the relationship between the arts and worship throughout the centuries. Yet many churches today desire to incorporate the arts thoughtfully, sensitively, and with theological rigour and reflection. This course will introduce some ways to get that process started. We will examine the role of various forms of art in services of Christian worship. We will also offer theological and pastoral criteria for evaluating the use of the arts in worship, all within the context of trinitarian theology.

May 31–June 11, 1:15–3:45pm APPL/INDS 568 2 or 3 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 25 credit students, auditors welcome

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Spring Session: Weeks 4&5

Iain Provan

Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies (OT), Regent College. MA (Glasgow), BA (London Bible College), PhD (Cambridge).

Iain has written numerous articles and many books, including commentaries on Lamentations, 1 and 2 Kings, and Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs. He also co-authored A Biblical History of Israel with Phil Long and Tremper Longman.

OT Book Study: The Book of Genesis What kind of texts are we dealing with in Genesis, and what difference should this make to our interpretation of them? Are they myth, or history, or both/neither? Have Christians been right to see what they have seen in these books over the centuries? What are the boundaries of legitimate interpretation? What does Genesis have to say to contemporary Christians and their world? These and other similar questions will provide the focus for our exegetical study of portions of the text.

May 31–June 11, 8:30–11:00am BIBL 610 3 graduate credit hours Recommended Prerequisites: BIBL 501, BIBL 502, 503, and at least ONE of LANG 500, 510, or 550 Maximum Enrolment: 50 credit students, auditors welcome

Old Testament Foundations

Iain Provan

Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies (OT), Regent College. MA (Glasgow), BA (London Bible College), PhD (Cambridge).

Iain has written numerous articles and many books, including commentaries on Lamentations, 1 and 2 Kings, and Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs. He also co-authored A Biblical History of Israel with Phil Long and Tremper Longman.

This course aims to present an overview of the background and contents of the books that make up the Old Testament, and to offer some reflection on the question of how they are best read together as part of the Christian canon of Scripture.

May 31-June 11, 1:15-3:45pm BIBL 501 3 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 50 credit students, auditors welcome

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Spring Session: Weeks 4&5

Jesus in Literature

Maxine Hancock

Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies and Spiritual Theology, Regent College. BEd, MA, PhD (Alberta), DHum (Hon.) (Trinity Western University).

Maxine has written widely, including Gold from the Fire: Postcards from a Prairie Pilgrimage; Christian Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality & Community (ed. and intro.); and The Key in the Window: Marginal Notes to Bunyan’s Narratives. Maxine and her husband, Campbell, now live near Canning, NS. They spend winters in Vancouver, BC, where Maxine continues to serve on the faculty of Regent College, working closely with the Christianity and the Arts concentration and supervising creative projects.

This course will survey major works of literature from the late Middle Ages to the end of the twentieth century. We will look at direct representations of Jesus, and at indirect representations through embodiments of aspects of Jesus’ character and work in “Christ-figures.” We will also consider ways in which such motifs as “incarnation,” “kenosis,” “atonement,” and “death and resurrection” have been assimilated into literary art. Noting the compelling centrality of Jesus in Western literature of the past, we will be interested in the range of roles assigned to him, from victim to conquering king. We will find Jesus represented (even if in sometimes contorted forms or signal absences) in literature of what has sometimes been termed the “post-Christian” late twentieth century, and on into the twenty-first.

May 31–June11, 8:30–11:00am INDS/SPIR 563 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

New Testament Foundations

Tony Cummins

Professor of Religious Studies, Director of the MA in Biblical Studies, Trinity Western University. BA (Wilfrid Laurier University), MA (University of Ottawa), MA (McGill), DPhil (Oxford).

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Tony teaches and writes widely in New Testament studies and theology, with particular interests in Jesus and the gospels, Paul, and the theological interpretation of Scripture. He enjoys music, movies, and sports.

This course is an introduction to the context, content, and interpretation of the New Testament. A representative range of New Testament writings are read with respect to their life settings and literary forms, and especially in terms of what they teach and envisage concerning God, gospel, church, and creation. Accompanying this is an appreciation of the New Testament in relation to the Old Testament as together comprising the church’s Scripture, and critical reflection upon its application to our complex world. In this way, the course provides a basis for more advanced study in Christian Scripture, theology, and contemporary culture.

May 31–June 11, 8:30–11:00am BIBL 502 3 graduate credit hours


Spring Session: Weeks 4&5 Food: Communion, Community and Creation

Loren Wilkinson

Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies & Philosophy, Regent College. BA (Wheaton), MA (Johns Hopkins), MA (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School), PhD (Syracuse).

Mary-Ruth Wilkinson

Sessional Lecturer, Regent College. BA (Wheaton), MA (University of Illinois).

Eating is one of the most profound ways we are related to each other, to the created world and to God. In this course we will explore, within the framework of Christian theology, some of the biological, ecological, psychological, aesthetic, spiritual, agricultural and economic aspects of what, why and how we eat. The core of the course will be reading, lecture and discussion of the considerable literature dealing with food. But the twoweek course, held on Galiano Island, will also provide a living context of cooking, feasting, fasting and gardening together, which will add good spices to the academic victuals.

May 31–June 11, off campus INDS 535 This is a live-in, off-campus course. 3 graduate credit hours, no auditors Maximum Enrolment: 20 students For important information about registering for this course, see below.

Both INDS 525 Technology,Wilderness and Creation and INDS 535 Food: Communion, Community, and Creation have some special requirements: 1. Registration for these two courses will open on February 3, 2010 and will require a special course registration form, made available on-line under Academic Info, Schedules and Forms, and in the Student Services Lobby starting on that date. The special registration form will not be available before February 3. 2. INDS 525 Technology,Wilderness and Creation will require both this special registration form and an application form, both made available starting on February 3, 2010. This course will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis, although exception may be made for students with special qualifications, such as medical expertise. The class list for this course will be set by March 5, 2010 and students will then be required to complete and submit medical and liability release forms. 3. INDS 535 Food: Communion, Community and Creation will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Registered students will be asked to submit a liability release form once their registration has been processed. 4. In addition to tuition, these courses each have a $400 fee to cover costs of food and other expenses. Note that this does not include student fees, the registration fee, or the cost of the ferry to and from Galiano Island. For INDS 525, students will be asked to provide some of their own equipment; a list will be provided. 5. See the syllabi for payment deadlines and for the refund schedule. 13


Summer Session: Weeks 1&2

David I. Smith

Director of the Kuyers Institute for Christian Teaching and Learning; Associate Professor of German, Calvin College. BA (Oxford), PGCE (University of Nottingham), MPhilF (Institute for Christian Studies), PhD (University of London).

Marilyn Chandler McEntyre

Professor of English, Westmont College. BA (Pomona College), MA (University of California, Davis), PhD (Princeton).

David taught in secondary schools for a number of years before completing his PhD in curriculum studies at the Institute of Education at the University of London. He serves as senior editor of The Journal of Education and Christian Belief and editor of Journal of Christianity and Foreign Languages. He has authored or edited over ten books and many articles in the fields of language education and philosophy of education, and travels widely as a speaker at educational events and as a consultant to schools.

Marilyn enjoys writing, revisiting Hawthorne, Melville, Faulkner, and O’Connor, and reflecting on medical themes in literature and how literature helps us understand the natural world. Three books of her poetry invite readers to reflect on art (by Vermeer, Van Gogh and Rembrandt) through the lens of poetry. She has just completed a draft of a book on stewardship of language: Care of the Word.

Called to Teach: Teaching as a Christian Practice Our efforts to think about teaching and learning in a Christian manner have often been focused on broad philosophical questions and principles, leaving open the task of relating these to the daily work of the teacher. This course will explore how recent work in various disciplines illuminates the nature of teaching as a practice, and in particular what it might mean to approach teaching as a Christian practice. This work will be drawn from philosophy, sociology, and theology, but will be made accessible to the non-specialist educator, with a focus on how our participation in shared practices relates to our formation and to the life of faith. In light of this work, we will explore together the contours of classroom practice, examining concrete instances of teaching and learning and their relationship to Christian practice.

June 28–July 2, 8:00–11:00am APPL/INDS 640 1 or 2 graduate credit hours Note: See our website for information about a “Teaching Practices” workshop on July 2-3

The Call of the Wild: Poetry and Prose of Earthkeeping In this course, we will reflect on readings by writers who address the theological and spiritual dimensions of care for the created order, and consider how those writers invite us to change our habits, reframe our assumptions, rethink our theology, and connect our faith with participation in care for the earth. North Americans in particular inherit a rich and conflicted legacy of stories, poetry, drama, and films that represent nature in terms that have deeply shaped attitudes, habits, and public policies. As we read material from Thoreau, Dillard, Berry, Duncan, and others, we will consider not only what they have to say about issues of urgent public concern, but how they deliver highly charged, often prophetic messages without descending into polemic—how, for instance, poetic devices, imagery, humour, story, allusiveness, and confession serve their purposes.

June 28–July 9, 8:30–11:00am INDS 524 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

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Summer Session: Weeks 1&2

James K.A. Smith

Associate Professor of Philosophy, Calvin College. BS (Emmaus Bible College), MPhil (Institute for Christian Studies), PhD (Villanova University).

Ross Hastings

Associate Professor, Mission Studies, Regent College. BSc (South Africa), PhD (Queen’s, Kingston), MCS (Regent College), PhD (St. Andrews, Scotland).

James works in the areas of philosophical theology and French philosophy. His research has focussed particularly on questions of language and interpretation. He is the author of a number of books, including The Fall of Interpretation; Introducing Radical Orthodoxy; Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? and most recently, Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation.

Ross teaches at Regent College in the areas of the theology and spirituality of mission, pastoral theology, and ethics. He has earned two PhDs, one in organometallic chemistry, and the other in theology. Before coming to Regent, he served as a pastor in Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia.

Decadence, Aestheticism, and Grace: Christian Theology and Fin de siècle Literature In Paris, Oscar Wilde discovered A Rebours (Against Nature), a scandalous novel by the French “decadent” writer Joris-Karl Huysmans. This novel— detrimental to the imagination of Wilde—became the “poisonous” book of Wilde’s novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray. And yet, the book had a strange ambiguity. As Wilde narrates, “One hardly knew at times whether one was reading the spiritual ecstasies of some medieval saint or the morbid confessions of a modern sinner.” The goal of this course is to explore that ambiguity. The decadence and aestheticism of literature at the end of the nineteenth century seem to be scandalous antitheses of the Christian gospel. But we will explore how these movements actually share much in common with orthodox Christianity. Thus these works are a kind of “back-handed” witness to the richness of God’s creation, the need for redemption, and the enchantment of the world.

June 28­–July 9, 8:30–11:00am INDS 564 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

One Priest for the Many: The Theological Themes in the Book of Hebrews Within the field of NT studies, the book of Hebrews has been seen as a bit of a mystery tome without clear origin or lucid purpose, overshadowed by study of Paul and the gospels, yet with some admirers of its style (which is superior to other NT literature), its lofty Christology, and its inspiring spirituality. Though the last two decades have seen the book “come out of obscurity” in the academy, it is still often absent from the pulpit. This course will seek to prepare the way for its coronation there. Investigating themes like Christ’s essential deity and messiahship, his true and vicarious humanity, his Melchizedekan priesthood, and his atonement will uncover their relevance to a number of debates in contemporary theology, as well as to pastoral matters like salvation, assurance, sanctification, earthy spirituality, and restoring Christ to the centre of the church’s worship and mission.

June 28–July 9, 1:15–3:45pm APPL/BIBL 669 2 or 3 graduate credit hours 15


Summer Session: Weeks 1&2

Mark Buchanan

Lead Pastor, New Life Community Church (Duncan, BC). BFA (UBC), MCS (Regent College), Graduate of Arrow Leadership.

Mark is a pastor and author who lives with his wife, Cheryl, and their three children on the West Coast of BC. He is the author of Your God Is Too Safe; Things Unseen; The Holy Wild; The Rest of God; Hidden in Plain Sight; and A Man for All Seasons. He is currently working on a seventh book and a novel.

A Man for All Seasons: How Jesus Meets Us in High Summer, Deep Winter, and Everywhere In Between Fruit. That’s Jesus’ measure of spiritual maturity. Not vigorous activism or doctrinal precision, but fruit: richness of character, sweetness of temperament, abundance of wisdom—all stemming from abiding with Christ. However, most of us continue to gauge our spiritual success and progress by how much we do or know. Not only does this fail to achieve the intended results, but to some extent it creates the opposite results. We become spiritually stunted and bitter. Fruitless. This course explores Christ’s call to bear fruit, and by implication, seasonality as a model for spiritual formation. This seasonality, rarely applied to our walk with God, provides a missing key to the abundant life Jesus promised. Students will gain insight into the rhythms of their own hearts, and learn how to abide with Christ, the man for all seasons, in deep winter, high summer, and all that lies between.

June 28­–July 9, 8:30–11:00am SPIR 540 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

Jeanne Murray Walker

Professor of English, University of Delaware. MA (Loyola University), PhD (University of Pennsylvania).

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Jeanne’s poems are collected in seven volumes, including Fugitive Angels; Coming Into History; Gaining Time; A Deed to the Light; and most recently, New Tracks, Night Falling. Jeanne’s prize-winning scripts have been produced in theatres in Boston, Washington, Chicago, and London. She serves on the editorial boards of Shenandoah and Image and is a mentor in the Seattle Pacific Low Residency MFA program.

Writing to Revive Broken Truth: Metaphor, Paradox, and Reversal This class will focus on reading, writing, and work-shopping poetry. It is designed to be helpful not only to poets, but to non-poets who want to explore ways of making their lives—or their sermons—more open to and expressive of mystery. In our discussions we will hypothesize that poetry is, in a broad sense, the force that blasts us beyond routine into mystery. Through metaphor, paradox, and reversal, it defies our cultural categories, mocks our technical language, quiets our habitual noise, slows our speed, and challenges institutionalized dogma into which Christianity tends to collapse. Jesus was the master of this kind of poetry. We will look at and learn from the narrative of his life, the Beatitudes, and the parables—as well as from the poems of the great masters.

June 28-July 9, 1:15–3:45pm INDS 571 2 or 3 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 15 credit students, auditors welcome


Summer Session: Weeks 1–3

Hans Boersma J.I. Packer Professor of Theology BEd (Christelijke Academic “Felua,” Netherlands), BA (Lethbridge), MDiv (Theological College of the Canadian Reformed Churches, Hamilton), MTh, ThD (Utrecht)

Hans is the author of a number of articles and books, including Violence, Hospitality and the Cross: Re-Appropriating the Atonement Tradition. He was also a recent recipient of the Henry Luce Fellowship, where his work was in the area of Sacramental Ontology, a topic explored in his latest book, Nouvelle Théologie and Sacramental Ontology: A Return to Mystery. Prior to coming to Regent, Hans taught at Trinity Western University and served as a pastor.

Systematic Theology C: Pneumatology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology All service of God requires solid theological reflection, consisting of both an informed understanding of Christian doctrine and the ability to view life through the lenses of Christian commitment. By exploring three major foci of systematic theology–the doctrines of the Holy Spirit (pneumatology), the Church (ecclesiology) and last things (eschatology)–in the light of Scripture, the theological heritage of the church, and the contemporary context, this course seeks to develop your expertise as a theologically informed Christian for the sake of your service in the kingdom of God.

June 28–July 9, 1:15-3:45pm THEO 607 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

The Pastoral Epistles

Simon Gathercole

Lecturer in New Testament Studies, University of Cambridge. MA (Cambridge), MATR, PhD (Durham).

Simon’s main academic interests include the interpretation of the New Testament, the connections between the New Testament and the literature contemporaneous with it, Christology, and the doctrine of the atonement. Simon’s books include Divine and Human Agency in Paul and His Cultural Environment; The Pre-Existent Son: Recovering the Christologies of Matthew, Mark and Luke; and The Gospel of Judas.

This present course will consist of detailed exegesis of the Pastoral Epistles. Close attention will be focused on three areas in particular. First, we will look at the vision of Christian ministry in the letters, both in the portrayal of Paul’s role as an apostle, and in the presentation of what pastoral ministry involves more broadly. Second, there will be detailed consideration of the opponents in the pastorals, and how Paul envisages appropriate response to false teaching and division. Third, the debates over the Pauline authorship of the letters will be considered, in the context of both the New Testament and ancient letter-writing. The conventional scholarly views of pseudonymity will be considered, as well as the recent challenges to the pseudonymity hypothesis by Luke Timothy Johnson.

July 12–16, 8:00–11:00am BIBL 547 1 or 2 graduate credit hours

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Summer Session: Weeks 3&4

Jeremy Begbie

Thomas A. Langford Research Professorship in Theology, Duke Divinity School. BA (University of Edinburgh), BD, PhD (University of Aberdeen), ARCM (Royal College of Music), LRAM (Royal Academy of Music).

Bruce Hindmarsh

James M. Houston Professor of Spiritual Theology, Regent College. BRE (Briercrest Bible College), MCS (Regent College), DPhil (Oxford).

Jeremy specializes in the interface between theology and the arts and particularly between music and theology. He is author of Voicing Creation’s Praise: Towards a Theology of the Arts; Theology, Music and Time, and most recently, Resounding Truth: Christian Wisdom in the World of Music.

Theology Transposed: Re-Discovering the Gospel through the Arts This course aims to show how the arts can contribute to theology—“theology” here understood as the disciplined thinking and rethinking of the Christian gospel, for the sake of fostering a wisdom that is nourished by and nourishes the church in its worship and mission to the world. This is not primarily a course in the arts, but a course in theology pursued in the company of artists. The student will discover that the arts have a unique and irreplaceable part to play in the growth of Christian wisdom: difficult and unfamiliar themes are brought to light and made clearer, and familiar themes opened up in novel and exciting ways.

July 12–16, 8:00–11:00am INDS/THEO 567 1 or 2 graduate credit hours Note: Student who have taken INDS/ THEO 631 for credit previously may not take INDS/THEO 567 for further credit.

Bruce has published and spoken widely to international audiences on the history of early British evangelicalism. His articles have appeared in journals such as Church History and the Journal of Ecclesiastical History, and he is the author of two major books: John Newton and the English Evangelical Tradition; and The Evangelical Conversion Narrative.

Wesley, Whitefield, and Edwards: Early Evangelical Spiritual Leaders This course will look at the early evangelical movement as a school of spirituality that emerged early in the modern period and made a distinctive contribution to the history of devotion by renewing classical Christian themes under the conditions of a modernizing world. Our approach will be to focus on individuals, since early evangelicalism had no shortage of strong personalities and charismatic spiritual leaders. We will look not only at the biographies of these figures, but also at their distinctive teaching. Although the title for the course includes the famous names of Wesley, Whitefield, and Edwards, we will look at several other figures whose contributions were likewise significant to this spiritual renewal movement.

July 12­–23, 1:15–3:45pm HIST/SPIR 599 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

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Summer Session: Weeks 3&4

Dave Diewert

Sessional Lecturer, Regent College. BA (UBC), MA, PhD (Toronto).

Unsatisfied with an academic career narrowly defined, impacted by the lives of the “least” in society, and disturbed by the systemic injustice in the world, Dave left full-time teaching of biblical languages and Old Testament at Regent College to deepen his understanding of “the view from below” and to struggle with what it means to be with and for the poor.

Solidarity, Resistance, Liberation: The Way of God in the World The notions of solidarity, resistance, and liberation express well the trajectories of divine action manifest in the Exodus and the Incarnation. Solidarity captures the idea of “being with,” of standing with, others in their situation of injustice and suffering. Resistance expresses the notion of “being against,” of opposing, the forces that crush and destroy human life and increase suffering and dehumanization. Liberation is a posture of “being for” the other; it signifies the struggle to open up spaces for life, wholeness, and justice. The purpose of this course is to explore these biblical motifs and discuss together the challenges of participating in the divine drama of liberation in our world.

July 12–23, 1:30–4:00pm BIBL 520 2 or 3 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 25 students Note: This course will be held off-campus, in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. On the first day of class, students are to meet at the Regent Bookstore at 12:30 p.m. and then travel together to the class location.

Bring a Friend Discount If you’ve taken courses at Regent before but have a friend who hasn’t, you will both receive one-third off your tuition if you sign up for the same summer term course together. For more information about this, and other great Summer discounts, see the back of the registration form in the centre of this booklet. 19


Summer Session: Weeks 3&4 Revive Us Again: TwentiethCentury American Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism at Home and Abroad George Marsden

Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History Emeritus, University of Notre Dame. BA (Haverford College), BD (Westminster Theological Seminary), MA, PhD (Yale University).

Bill Svelmoe Associate Professor of History, St. Mary’s College, Indiana.

MDiv (Talbot Theological Seminary), MA, PhD (University of Notre Dame).

This course will examine the history of Protestant evangelicalism and fundamentalism as they have been manifested in North America and then exported abroad. Most of the emphasis will be on the era since the late nineteenth century, including the rise of dispensationalism, the fundamentalist controversies of the early twentieth century, the mid-century division between “neo-evangelicals” and separatist fundamentalists, the late-century emergence of political fundamentalistic evangelicalism, the spread and influence of Pentecostal and charismatic Christianity, and current issues regarding how much evangelicalism reflects or challenges contemporary commercial culture and gospels of success. Throughout, we will also look at how many of these issues played out in the arena of missions. We will close with a discussion of the effects of American evangelicalism on world Christianity.

July 12–23, 8:30–11:00am HIST 592 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

John G. Stackhouse, Jr. Sangwoo Youtong Chee Professor of Theology, Regent College. BA (Queen’s, Kingston), MA (Wheaton College), PhD (University of Chicago).

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John Stackhouse is an advisory editor at Christianity Today, a contributing editor at Books & Culture, and a consulting editor at Christian History & Biography. He is the author of more than five hundred articles, book chapters, and reviews, as well as many books.

Make Up Your Mind: How to Think as a Christian All Christians think, but not all Christians think always as Christians. Yet when Christian A meets issue X and determines to think about it in a Christian way, what is he or she actually to do? What resources should he or she consult, and how should he or she coordinate them with each other? What spiritual factors are involved? And what, finally, is the point of Christian thinking? This course attempts to answer these questions particularly in the context of cultural pluralism and postmodernity.

July 12–23, 1:15–3:45pm INDS 510 2 or 3 graduate credit hours


Summer Session: Weeks 3&4

Philosophy of Religion

John Hare

Noah Porter Professor of Philosophical Theology, Yale Divinity School. BA (Oxford), PhD (Princeton).

Edith Humphrey

William F. Orr Professor of New Testament, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. BA (University of Toronto), PhD (McGill), ARCT (Conservatory of Music, Toronto).

John’s interests extend to ancient philosophy, medieval Franciscan philosophy, Kant, Kierkegaard, contemporary ethical theory, the theory of the atonement, medical ethics and international relations, and aesthetics. He is the author of many books, including The Moral Gap; God’s Call; and Why Bother Being Good?

Edith speaks at academic and church events and writes in the areas of NT studies (especially literary and rhetorical method), the Pseudepigrapha, biblical theology, and issues facing the church today. Her books include The Ladies and the Cities; Joseph and Aseneth; Ecstasy and Intimacy; and And I Turned to See the Voice. She is currently writing a book provisionally entitled Grand Entrance: Worship on Earth as in Heaven.

This course is an introductory examination of topics in the philosophy of religion, including the relation of religion to ethics, the argument from religious experience, the problem of evil, miracles, the relation of faith and reason, three traditional arguments for the existence of God (ontological, cosmological, and teleological), death and immortality, and religious pluralism.

July 12–23, 8:30–11:00am INDS 680 2 or 3 graduate credit hours

Revelations on the Revelation: An Introduction to the New Testament Apocalypse Although the New Testament Apocalypse signals a lifting of the veil of mystery through its very name, readers have often been puzzled, disturbed, or even repelled by Revelation’s exotic imagery and unusual structures. This course will attempt to demonstrate the beauty of this book and its unique place within the New Testament canon and the history of the church through an understanding of its genre, structure, symbolism, and rhetoric. We will also explore the relationship of the Apocalypse to other examples of the same genre. Attention will be given to the book’s historical background, flow of action and overall structure, dominant motifs and symbols, and rhetorical power. We will also consider the various strategies that have been adopted in past and present times to understand the Apocalypse, and the uses and abuses of the book by various individuals and communities.

July 12–23, 1:15–3:45pm BIBL 679 2 or 3 graduate credit hours 21


Summer Session: Weeks 3–5

Makoto Fujimura

Artist, speaker, director of the International Arts Movement. BA (Bucknell University), MFA, Post-MFA program in Nihonga (Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music).

Susan Phillips

Executive Director and Professor of Sociology and Christianity, New College, Berkeley. BA (Willamette University), PhD (University of California, Berkeley).

Mako assimilates abstract expressionism with the traditional Japanese art of Nihonga. In 1990, he founded The International Arts Movement, which hosts a major annual conference in New York City. Mako’s works are displayed by the Dillon Gallery in New York and Tokyo, and in public collections. In 2003, Mako was appointed by the President to serve on the National Council of the Arts.

Susan is part of San Francisco Theological Seminary’s teaching faculty for the Diploma in the Art of Spiritual Direction and supervises spiritual directors.

The Art of Nihonga: Basic Technique, and Theological Implications In this class we will explore the basic method of Nihonga (Japanese styled painting) using mineral pigments, metallic leaf, and natural ink. We will also look at the basis of Japanese aesthetics and seek to apply biblical cultural exegesis to the Japanese aesthetic.

July 12–30, 8:00–11:00am INDS 591 3 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 15 credit students, no auditors Note: Students will need to purchase a packet of Nihonga materials which will cost approximately $200. Students should bring their own watercolour or acrylic materials.

Introduction to Contemplative Listening: The Foundation of Spiritual Friendship and Direction Scripture resounds with God’s call to hear— Shema. The discipline and gift of listening is foundational to the Christian life of loving God and neighbour. Listening creates a sanctuary within which we may receive God’s Word and welcome the neighbour, and by listening we are shaped as Christ’s disciples. How do we orient toward God’s voice and toward another person in a culture that so loudly drives, seduces, engages, and distracts us? How do we quiet external and internal noise in order to hear? Contemplative spiritual disciplines and practical listening skills aid our listening to God and the hearts of others. This course will offer some basic theory and practices of contemplative listening, which lie at the core of the ministry of spiritual direction and relationships of spiritual friendship.

July 19–23, 8:00–11:00am SPIR 554 2 graduate credit hours 22


Summer Session: Week 5

The Book of Proverbs

Bruce Waltke

Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Studies, Regent College; Professor of Old Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary. AB (Houghton College), ThM, ThD (Dallas Theological Seminary), PhD (Harvard).

Bruce is a member of the committee responsible for Today’s New International Version, and is the author of numerous books, including An Old Testament Theology, as well as commentaries on Genesis, Psalms, Micah, and a two-volume commentary on Proverbs.

This course both aims to introduce the student to the Book of Proverbs and to apply the book’s wisdom to specific areas of life. The introduction will consider, among other things, the who, what, when, why, and how of wisdom. The answer to those questions will engage us in the sage’s epistemology, a definition of his terms “wisdom” and “fear of I Am,” and the identification of “Woman Wisdom.” The course will also consider the book’s structure and its rhetoric; its doctrines of health, wealth, and prosperity; and its connection to the wisdom of Jesus Christ. The book’s wisdom will be specifically applied, among other subjects, to communication/ speech, wealth/money, marriage, and parenting.

July 26–30, 8:00–11:00am BIBL


Summer Session: Week 5 Truth Telling by Story

Bruce Kuhn Actor.

BS (West Virginia University), MFA (University of Washington).

Bruce has toured throughout North America and Europe with his solo performances of The Gospel of Luke and The Acts of the Apostles. He brings the memorized Word to life, telling the good news as an eyewitness might have. Bruce appeared on Broadway in Les Miserables, in the National Tours of Chess and The Cotton Patch Gospel, and was in the resident company of Actors Theatre of Louisville for three seasons.

Live story-telling was the original medium of the gospels and remains, arguably, the best medium for relating truth. Can we recapture the power and reality of the eyewitness accounts? Students will memorize five minutes of gospel story and tell it as an eyewitness might have. Using the tools of an actor and exegete, we will create imaginary memories to see what the eyewitnesses saw and say what they meant. Students will play themselves as if they had witnessed the event. If successful, what we “see” will spark genuine emotion and rich, subtle communication. The resulting authenticity will (hopefully) compel attention and trust. The point is to profoundly experience the Word and pass it on. The students who enroll for credit should be capable communicators already, with some ease and experience before an audience.

July 26–30, 8:00–11:00am INDS 597 1 or 2 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 15 credit students, auditors welcome

Christianity and Secular Law

David A. Skeel, Jr.

S. Samuel Arsht Professor of Corporate Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. BA (University of North Carolina), JD (University of Virginia School of Law).

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David is the author of Icarus in the Boardroom: The Fundamental Flaws in Corporate America and Where They Came From and is currently working on a book tentatively entitled God’s Law and Our Law: The Sermon on the Mount in American Law. He has written many articles for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, Financial Times, and a variety of other publications.

How should Christians think about gay marriage? Should we simply lock criminals away or try to rehabilitate them? What is the future of international law? In this course, we will develop a foundation for thinking about these and many other questions. After briefly considering the classical perspectives offered by Augustine, Aquinas, Calvin, and Luther, we will explore some of the key thinkers of the past century, including Dutch politician and theologian Abraham Kuyper; Reinhold Niebuhr (Barack Obama’s favourite theologian and philosopher); and contemporary British thinkers, Oliver O’Donovan and N.T. Wright. We will also consider the visionary insights of the Civil Rights movement and of current movements such as International Justice Mission and Jubilee. This course is for anyone who ever wonders whether law can make the world a better place.

July 26–30, 1:15–4:15pm INDS 511 1 or 2 graduate credit hours


Summer Session: Week 5 and beyond

Julie Canlis BA (University of Washington), MCS (Regent College), PhD (University of St. Andrews).

Julie Canlis won the Templeton Award for Theological Promise in 2007 for her work on John Calvin, published recently as Calvin’s Ladder of Ascent: A Spiritual Theology. She is a part-time lecturer and directs Children’s Spiritual Formation in a small Church of Scotland parish where her husband Matt is minister. Together, they are raising four young children in rural Scotland.

The Relational Self: Trinitarian Insights on What It Means to Be Human Being Christian and being human are sometimes seen (or felt) to be at odds. So what does it mean to be human? How can we be our true selves? Do the roots of our authenticity lie within or—mysteriously—without? This course uses the doctrine of the Trinity as a springboard to understand issues of personhood, de-personalizing views of sin and salvation, and the modern desire for, or addiction to, uniqueness. We’ll draw on a number of historical figures who, like us, found themselves at a time of radical change and social upheaval. Students will gain an understanding of how a relational, trinitarian view of personhood impacts upon much of the nitty-gritty of the Christian life—sanctification, freedom, prayer, deep views of sin, faith in Christ, and our quest to be our truest selves.

July 26–30, 8:00–11:00am SPIR/THEO 529 1 or 2 graduate credit hours

Technology, Wilderness and Creation

Loren Wilkinson

Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies & Philosophy, Regent College. BA (Wheaton), MA (Johns Hopkins), MA (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School), PhD (Syracuse).

Mary-Ruth Wilkinson

Sessional Lecturer, Regent College. BA (Wheaton), MA (University of Illinois).

This course will use an eight-day voyage in an open rowing/sailing boat as an occasion for study and reflection on our relationship to God and creation. The trip will be in the Gulf Islands—wild or rural places which have been tenuously preserved (through isolation and much local struggle) from the development that is transforming much of the region. The course will also provide occasion to reflect prayerfully on the nature of place and pilgrimage in the Christian life and will draw especially on the writings of those many Christians whose own understanding of God has been focused by the experience of voyaging in the sea. No previous sailing/rowing experience required.

August 21–30, off campus

INDS 525 2 or 3 graduate credit hours This is a live-in, off-campus course. Maximum Enrolment: 14 students For important information about registering for this course, see the notes on page 13. 25


Biblical Languages

Carolyn Hindmarsh

Sessional Lecturer, Regent College. BBS (Briercrest Bible College), MTS (Regent College).

Keith Ganzer

Sessional Lecturer, Regent College. BA, MA (Wheaton College), MDiv Cand. (Regent College).

An avid reader of the Greek New Testament for over twenty years, Carolyn has added to her formal education by studying with many master teachers. She is able to draw on a robust body of method and approaches to open up their language to her students in new and enticing ways.

Keith is passionate about biblical languages and their application to biblical interpretation in the church and the everyday life of faith. Since 2007, he has taught several sections of Greek and Hebrew at Regent, including the 2008 and 2009 summer Hebrew courses.

Introductory New Testament Greek I &II This course provides an introduction to the basic elements of Greek in order that students may become readers of the New Testament in its original tongue. With this objective, the first half of the course will focus on vocabulary and grammar, the second half on the Greek verbal system, especially in its morphology and syntax. The ultimate goal is to enjoy the text itself, and by the end of the course students will begin to translate larger portions of the New Testament. However, as C.S. Lewis wrote in one of his sermons, “this will not, for most of us, happen in a day; poetry replaces grammar, gospel replaces law, longing transforms obedience, as gradually as the tide lifts a grounded ship.”

June 28-August 13, 8:30am–1:00pm LANG 550&551 6 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 30 credit students, auditors welcome

Introductory Old Testament Hebrew I &II This intensive course introduces the basic morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, laying the foundation for a lifetime of reading the original language text of the Old Testament. Upon completion, students will be able to read most prose sections of the Hebrew Bible with the use of a standard lexicon. The core assumption of this course is that knowledge of the original languages is essential for faithful biblical interpretation. Therefore, as we encounter the biblical text in class, there will be opportunity to discuss some component disciplines of Old Testament exegesis and to illustrate the value of approaching the text in its original language. It is essential that students study the first two chapters of the textbook (Basics of Biblical Hebrew, 2nd ed.) and complete workbook exercises one and two before the first class. Once registered, refer to the online syllabus for more details about advance preparation requirements.

July 2-August 14, 8:30am–1:00pm Note: This course starts on Friday, July 2. The final exam for this course is on Saturday, August 14. 26

LANG 510&511 6 graduate credit hours Maximum Enrolment: 30 credit students, auditors welcome


Under the Green Roof

Regent Summer Term

Summer is a time of wonderful possibilities for learning, growing, and interacting with others. Many activities have been planned to augment your classroom learning and to provide an opportunity to meet other “pilgrims along the way.� Once you arrive, do visit our Atrium Information Desk staffed with friendly and knowledgeable volunteers. Here you can browse a wealth of information about Regent College, courses, activities, and the greater Vancouver area. Chapel is foundational to our life at Regent College and you are warmly

invited to participate in the worship life of Summer term. Many students and faculty have found the mingling of testimony and praise, exposition and intercession makes possible an atmosphere of rich spiritual vitality. Held just before lunch twice weekly in May/June, daily during July, Chapel is always a highlight. Lunch Our catering prepares nutritious and delectable dishes every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at a cost of $4.00 for a complete meal. You cannot get a better deal in Vancouver! And the communal lunchtime is a wonderful opportunity to share a meal with classmates and professors.

S a t l e a e S @ 50%

Alumni Seat Sale - 50% OFF Regent graduates (diploma or degree) enjoy an automatic 50% discount on Audit fees for unrestricted courses. For more information visit the Alumni webpages on the Regent website at www.regent-college.edu/alumni

27


Under the Green Roof

Lunchtime Concerts During July, Regent invites guest musicians to play concerts during the lunch hour. From jazz to Celtic harp, classical cello to flamenco nuevo, the variety of musical styles will delight any music lover. Prayer Retreats Recognising that prayer is central to our relationship with God, Regent invites you to deepen your capacity to listen and respond to God at one of the two Prayer Retreats offered by visiting and resident faculty. Held at nearby St. Helen’s Anglican Church, the church overlooks the water and mountains, and is within walking distance of the beach. Our time together will include worship, teaching, and guided silent prayer. Space is limited, so register early to avoid disappointment.  prayerretreats@regent-college.edu Postmodern Urban Spaces: A City Tour David Ley, Head of the Department of Geography at UBC, leads us on a char28

tered bus tour through Vancouver’s downtown and inner-city districts training our eyes with the living postmodern text of the city. Emphasizing the changing social values of postmodern culture as these are expressed and reproduced in the urban landscape, we can gain a deeper understanding of how to read cities by their urban landscapes and as a mission field. The bus tour will take place on a Saturday. Please check our website for the exact date. Space is limited, so register early to avoid disappointment. bustour@regent-college.edu Professor Connections Evening Public Lectures Evening Public Lectures are a hallmark of Regent’s Summer schedule. Offered once weekly in May/June and twice a week in July from 8:00–9:30pm, these free lectures provide an opportunity to hear from a number of Summer Term faculty outside of the classroom.


Under the Green Roof

Each week throughout Spring and Summer we take a break from the classrooms to spend a little time getting to know the faculty. At Coffee and Dialogue one of our Spring faculty gathers with students and visitors for an informal, honest chat.  During July you can sip tea with one of our professors at an afternoon Tea on the Lawn. In Spring we are invited to eavesdrop in on weekly Roundtable Discussions with our faculty and visiting sessionals who meet to chat through engaging topics. And in July, our own John Stackhouse engages 2-3 professors in spontaneous topical conversation for Stackhouse and Friends. This intentionally informal roundtable format draws on professors’ experience in thought-provoking discussion and lively debate. At Food for Thought, join a faculty member who will speak informally on a topic that is personally relevant to her/him.

Building Benefits As Summer Term students Regent wants you to feel at home. When you arrive you can count on a few perks to make your life a little easier. Bringing your lap top? Regent provides wireless throughout the building. As outlets are at a premium, you may consider bringing a power strip and sharing! Unfortunately there are no DSL or phone lines available for connections. Desktops and printers The Regent College Student Association provides six desktops (Microsoft Office) and two printers (10¢ per page) available for use in the John Richard Allison Library. The John Richard Allison Library One of the great gifts of Regent College is the beautiful John Richard Allison Library located on the lower level. Leather chairs and well-equipped study carrels are weaved in and through the stacks and original works of art, all well lit by gener29


Under the Gren Roof

ous skylights. Once you have registered and paid course fees, you are eligible for a free Allison Library card, valid for one year from the day of membership request. Research Capabilities The 11 Library Catalogue computers can help you find books, audio and video in our collection, as well as provide search capabilities for other libraries in the area. Instruction pamphlets are available at the Circulation desk, and library staff are available for assistance. The Allison Library provides two copy machines, in the Copier Room next to the Circulation Desk. The Lookout Gallery Regent’s own art gallery shows a variety of artists and is a quiet respite from the bustle of the Atrium while Summer term is in session. Come enjoy some art! The Regent Bookstore The Bookstore is considered by most Regent students to be the area of greatest temptation at Regent 30

College, due to its excellent selection of books. The Regent Bookstore also offers CDs and DVDs of individual lectures and an audio selection of various Regent courses. Be sure to leave space in your suitcase to bring home the treasures you find here! The Well Coffee Bar Located at the entrance to the Bookstore, this Regent Alumnus-owned coffee bar offers a fine selection of espresso drinks and teas, as well as various snack and lunch menu items. The daily soup is a tasty alternative when lunch is not served. Lockers are located in the basement level and are available for free during Summer School. Expecting mail? Anything received by mail (not phone messages) for Summer Term students will be placed in the mailboxes arranged alphabetically near the stairs on the basement level. Parking Parking is available for small


Accommodation

fee just a bit down the road at University Other on-campus accommodation Chapel, and UBC has many parking facili(many with views of the water and ties within walking distance to the College. mountains): • Carey Centre Accommodation (10 min. walk) 604.224.4308 Self-Arranged We recommend three options to suit your budget. option 1 The first is our Regent Housing database which lists summer bookings in current student houses and with our regular Regent-friendly landlords. The database is made available through the Regent website once you have registered. option 2 On campus housing. UBC Conferences and Accommodations provides a mix of single, double and family accommodation, most with kitchen in-suite/access. An 8-minute walk from Regent, UBC accommodations can be booked for short term or the whole summer. Spots tend to fill up though, so phone 604.822.1000,

www.ubcconferences.com

www.careycentre.com

• St. John’s College (20 min. walk) 604.822.8788, www.stjohns.ubc.ca • St. Andrew’s Hall (10 min. walk) 604.822.9720; www.standrews.edu • Green College Guest House (15 min. walk) 604.822.8660

www.greencollege.ubc.ca

• Vancouver School of Theology (15 min. walk) 1.866.822.9031

www.vst.edu/housing/index.php option 3 Booking a B&B or hotel.

We highly recommend: • Harbourview Retreat B&B (5 min. drive/bus), 1.866.221.7273 www.ahvr.com Lovely views and Regent friendly couple! 31


UBC and more

• Point Grey Guest House (5 min. drive/bus); 604.222.4104

www.pointgreyguesthouse.com

• Beautiful Bed&Breakfast (20 min. drive); 604.327.1102 (10% discount for Regent events),

www.beautifulbandb.bc.ca

Arranged For those who wish for more of a full service option we recommend to you Michael McSevney at Optimal Travel. Mike has worked booking travel for Regent faculty and staff for years and is happy to help you book everything from flights to accommodation and transportation to special weekend packages in and around Vancouver, Whistler, the Okanagan and beyond. Let him know you are coming for a Regent Summer program for extra special rates and service: Michael McSevney at Optimal Travel 604.662.7220. Getting To Regent By Air The best way to Regent College from 32

Vancouver International (YVR) is via taxi and costs appox. $35CAD to UBC. Look for the taxi rank immediately outside the baggage claim area. Most take credit card and cash. If you are staying at one of the local hotels enquire at time of booking if they have a free shuttle service. Alternatively, try the new Canada Line rapid transit system to move between the airport and downtown Vancouver. www.canadaline.ca. Bus It! Take advantage of Vancouver’s excellent public transportation system. Bus routes to Regent are 4, 9, 17, 25, 33, 41, 43, 49, 480 and 99. Bus schedules are available online at www.translink.bc.ca. And the buses take you everywhere. UBC Regent College is situated at the entrance of the University of British Columbia. Known for its academic excellence as well as its beauty, the UBC campus boasts


UBC and more

some of the city’s best attractions & recreation facilities. Visit the Museum of Anthropology, the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, the UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research, and take the opportunity to explore forested trails in the adjoining 763-hectare Pacific Spirit Regional Park. Wander through the gentle Nitobe Japanese Memorial Garden, the Rose Garden, then stop and have a cuppa at one of the many coffee shops or The Barn community centre with its life-size chess board and swings for the kids. For evening life UBC has its own cinema, pubs, eateries and there are always stimulating cultural events happening at the Frederic Wood Theatre or the Chan Centre. Fitness and Play at UBC For the sports minded UBC offers the Aquatic Centre, a basketball gym, workout and volleyball facilities at the Bird Coop, and tennis courts at the Coast Club

Tennis Centre. Within a short walk of Regent is the University Golf Club, one of the most beautiful courses in the area with a “Non-Members Only” policy. Clubhouse facilities include indoor and outdoor eating at its restaurant and a gift shop. Kidzone We have all sorts of community children’s events happening in Vancouver this summer. If you are interested we can provide information about Daycare, UBC Summer sports camps and activities, family friendly options and Pioneer Pacific Camp, www.pioneerpacific.ca. Medical Services and Insurance For those coming from within Canada be sure to bring your province’s health services card with you in case of any emergency. For those coming from the States or beyond we encourage you to purchase short-term travel insurance for the duration of your journey. Regent is surround33


Adventure Vancouver

ed by first-rate health care options in case of emergency including UBC hospitals and clinics. There are two pharmacy/drug stores within walking distance. Vancouver Regent Summer Term activities include tours hosted by resident students to many of UBC and Vancouver’s highlights and attractions. See weekly activities schedule. There is a ton to do in Vancouver too! If you want to venture beyond campus, Regent organizes a plethora of summer activities hosted by resident students. For additional information packages on restaurants, local events and attractions, check the form on the back leaf and we will send you all you require. But, don’t stop there! Grab a couple of fellow summer pilgrims and head out on your own. 34

Adventures We Recommend… Take a first stop at the beaches then have a wander down the bustling Broadway or 4th Avenue shops. Keep walking along the waterfront and you get to Granville Island where you can peruse the fresh fruit and veg stands, watch the buskers and have a donut on the dock. From there catch the water taxi over to the Vancouver Aquarium at Stanley Park (North America’s largest city park). After going nose-to-nose with the baby Belugas get lost among Stanley Park’s trails, totem poles and beaches or walk the sea wall for 360° views of the city. Book a dinner cruise around the harbour or head up to Grouse Mountain’s cable car which zips you 1000m into the air. Restaurants, natural habitats and a


Adventure Vancouver

visitor’s centre will help you acclimate to the delightful height and dramatic views from Grouse’s peak. Other “must do’s” include the Capilano Suspension Bridge, Vancouver Art Gallery, Prince of Whales Whale Watching, VanDusen Botanical Gardens, Chinatown, Dr. Sun Yat Sen Chinese Gardens and Science World. If you are out to see the sites hop on the old-time trolleys of the Vancouver Trolley Company Ltd. This live commentated, 26 stop, Hop-on, Hop-off sightseeing tour is your natural transportation link between Vancouver’s top attractions. Bard on the Beach once again sets up tent on the sands of Kitsilano Beach with the Vancouver skyline as a backdrop. This year’s line of world-class performances presents Much Ado About Nothing,

Antony and Cleopatra, Falstaff and Henry V. Schedule and more information is available at www.bardonthebeach.org. Regent hosts a group to Bard during July. See Regent’s Summer Activities Schedule when you arrive for details. Beyond the city limits Take a day or half-day trip, or even an overnight trip on the weekend. Every destination offers attractions to suit every taste. All destinations are best visited by car, but there are many public transportation options available. Try one or more of the following: Victoria and Vancouver Island, Whistler, Sunshine Coast, BC Ferries, Whale Watching in the Georgia Strait, Harrison Hot Springs, Kelowna and The Okanagan wine country. 35


Summer Term: Spring Schedule

m o r n i n g s

Rod Wilson

APPL 537

Week 2 May 17-21

Week 1 May 10–14

Counselling, Community and Congregational Life

The Letter to the Philippians

(p.4)

Week 3 May 24- 28

a

SPIR/THEO 635 p

Gordon T. Smith

Conversion and Transformation

(p.5)

e

Bruce Marchfelder World Film

INDS 508

l

Bruce Milne

BIBL 676 C

Bruce Marchfelder World Film 

(p.4)

h

INDS 508 a (p.6)

p

Gordon T. Smithspir/tHEO 635 e (p.5)

l

Jennie McLaurinAPPL/INDS 503 C Faithful Medicine (p.7) h HIST 589 a

Sarah Williams

How Then Shall We Live?

Marva Dawn  Sabbath Keeping

(p.9)

p

SPIR 618

e

(p.8)

l

appl/iNDS 519

Building Christian Communities (p.10) C

Iain Provan 

BIBL 610

h

(p.11)

a

BIBL 502

p

The Book of Genesis 

Tony Cummins 

L

u Paul Helm 

(p.6)

THEO 605

n Systematic Theology A

(p.4)

c Gordon T. Smith spir/tHEO 628 (p.5) h The Meaning of the Sacraments

New Testament Foundations 

(p.12)

e

L

Paul Stevens

APPL/SPIR 505

u Heart, Hands, and Head

n Paul Helm  c

(p.6)

THEO 605

Systematic Theology A

(p.4)

h Gordon T. Smith spir/tHEO 628

The Meaning of the Sacraments

L

Richard Topping 

n Peter Shaw 

(p.5)

APPL/THEO 585

Theology and Proclamation  u

(p.7)

INDS 548

Effective Leadership in Turbulent Times (p.8)

c h Sven Soderlund

BIBL 503

Biblical Exegesis and Interpretation 

(p.9)

Cherith Fee & Robert Nordling APPL/INDS 568  L The Arts in Worship  (p.10) u Iain Provan  BIBL 501 n Old Testament Foundations  (p.11) c Sven Soderlund  BIBL 503 h Biblical Exegesis and Interpretation (p.9)

Maxine HancockINDS/SPIR 563 l Jesus in Literature  (p.12) Loren & Mary-Ruth Wilkinson

Food: Communion, Community and Creation 

Please see the course descriptions for exact class times. 36

APPL/SPIR 505

Heart, Hands, and Head

(p.6)

The Letter to the Philippians 

Charles Ringma

Weeks 4-5 May 31–June11

Paul Stevens  C

BIBL 676 h

Bruce Milne

Conversion and Transformation

Weeks 4-5

(p.3)

a f t e r n o o n s

INDS 535 (p.13)


Photos: Beni Gaydarova, Ken McAllister, Flikr.com (James Cridland, Eric F., Mandy Jansen, Gord McKenna, Geoff Peters, Stephen Rees, Larissa Sayer and others)

Writing to Revive Broken Truth (p.16) n Alan Jacobs INDS 592 c Potter & Friends  (p.17)

l

h

C

L

h

u

a p

n

e

c

l

h

C h a p e l

L

Dave Diewert BIBL 520 Solidarity, Resistance, Liberation (p.19) Edith Humphrey  BIBL 679 Revelations on Revelation  (p.21) Bruce HindmarshHIST/SPIR 599 Wesley, Whitefield, and Edwards (p.18) John Stackhouse INDS 510 Make Up Your Mind  (p.20)

Regent College 5800 University Boulevard Vancouver, BC V6T 2E4 Canada

INDS 591

(p.22)

Marsden & SvelmoeHIST 592 Revive Us Again  (p.20) John Hare INDS 680 Philosophy of Religion  (p.21) Susan Phillips SPIR 554 Introduction to Contemplative Listening (p.22) Makoto Fujimura INDS 591 The Art of Nihonga  (p.22) Bruce Waltke  BIBL 587 The Book of Proverbs  (p.23) Bruce Kuhn INDS 597 Truth Telling by Story (p.24) Julie Canlis  SPIR/THEO 529 The Relational Self  (p.25) Makoto Fujimura INDS 591 The Art of Nihonga  (p.22)

C h a p e l

Carolyn Hindmarsh LANG550/551 C

h Introductory New Testament Greek (p.26) a p Keith Ganzer LANG 510/511 e Introductory Old Testament Hebrew(p.26) l

Loren & Mary-Ruth Wilkinson Technology,Wilderness and Creation

u n c h

Dave Diewert BIBL 520 Solidarity, Resistance, Liberation(p.19) Edith Humphrey  BIBL 679 Revelations on Revelation  (p.21) Bruce HindmarshHIST/SPIR 599 Wesley, Whitefield, and Edwards (p.18) John Stackhouse INDS 510 Make Up Your Mind  (p.20) David Skeel 

INDS 511

L Christianity and Secular Law  (p.24) u Lauren Winner  INDS/SPIR 561

n Views from the Pews 

(p.23)

c h

L u n c h

Carolyn Hindmarsh LANG550/551 Introductory New Testament Greek (p.26)

Keith Ganzer

LANG 510/511

Introductory Old Testament Hebrew(p.26)

Weeks 1-7 July 29-Aug14

The cover shows a painting by Mako Fujimura. Mako will be teaching a painting studio class from July 12-30.

INDS 571

(p.15)

(p.16)

Simon Gathercole BIBL 547 The Pastoral Epistles  (p.17) Marsden & SvelmoeHIST 592 Revive Us Again  (p.20) John Hare INDS 680 Philosophy of Religion  (p.21) Jeremy Begbie INDS/THEO 567 Theology Transposed  (p.18) Makoto Fujimura The Art of Nihonga 

u J. M. Walker 

Week 5 July 26-30

summerprograms@regent-college.edu admissions@regent-college.edu bookstore@regent-college.edu bustour@regent-college.edu conferences@regent-college.edu housing@regent-college.edu international@regent-college.edu prayerretreats@regent-college.edu studentservices@regent-college.edu

SPIR 540

APPL/bibl 669

Themes in Hebrews 

Week 4 July 19-23

Summer Programs Admissions Bookstore Bus Tour Conferences Housing International Student Services Prayer Retreats Student Services

Mark Buchanan A Man for All Seasons 

a f t e r n o o n s

L Ross Hastings 

Week 3 July 12-16

Useful Addresses

James K.A. Smith INDS 564 p Decadence, Aestheticism, and Grace (p.15) e

Weeks 1 & 2 June 28-July 9

Pastors’ Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3 Spring Session Pastors’ Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5 Weeks 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–9 Weeks 3–5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Weeks 4 and 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–13 Special Information for INDS 525 and INDS 535 13 Summer Session Weeks 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–17 Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17–18 Weeks 3 and 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18–22 Weeks 3–5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 –25 Off Campus courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 19, 25 Biblical Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Under the Green Roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27–30 Regent Summer Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Professor Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Building Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Accommodation/Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31–32 UBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32–33 Medical Services & Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Vancouver and beyond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34–35 Course Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, inside back cover Registration Insert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . between pp.18–19 How to Register for Courses Registration Form Tuition Benefit Application Form Student Contract (including fee information)

David Smith APPL/INDS 640 C Called to Teach  (p.14) week 1 only h Marilyn McEntyre INDS 524 The Call of the Wild  (p.14) a

m o r n i n g s

INDS 525 (p.25)

29

#

summer.regent-college.edu

place stamp here

Summer Term: Summer Schedule

Contents


#

Information Request

summer.regent-college.edu

summer • programs • 2 0 1 0

Name (Dr./Mr./Mrs./Ms.) ______________________________________________ Address________________________________________ City___________________________________________ Province/State__________________________________ Postal/Zip Code_________________________________ Phone (home)_ __________________________________ E-mail________________________________________ Occupation_ ___________________________________ I would like to receive information about upcoming Regent events:

❏ Yes

❏ No

❏ Already receiving information

Please send me information about:

❏ Pastors’ Conference Wonder and Devotion, May 4-7 ❏ Evening Public Lecture posters (Spring and Summer) ❏ Prayer Retreats information (available in April) ❏ Urban Spaces Bus Tour information (available late April) ❏ Teaching Practices Workshop (with David Smith) Please send me course information sheets for: APPL ______ ______ ______ ______ BIBL ______ ______ ______ ______ HIST ______ ______ ______ ______ INDS ______ ______ ______ ______ SPIR ______ ______ ______ ______ THEO______ ______ ______ ______ LANG ______ ______

Regent College 5800 University Boulevard Vancouver, BC V6T 2E4 Phone: 604.224.3245 Fax: 604.224.3097 Toll free: 1.800.663.8664 www.regent-college.edu admissions@regent-college.edu printed in canada

Spring Session M ay 10 –J u n e 11 Summer Session June 28– August 30

AN INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF CHRISTIAN STUDIES


Regent College Summer Programs 2010