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Coverage of high school softball, baseball, water polo, soccer and more

REPORTER Sports, Section 2

THE Volume LVIX, No. 10

Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

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Thursday, May 17, 2018

Zoning change request angers some residents Public hearing set for possible rezoning of Our Lady of the Ridge By Dermot Connolly A public hearing notice recently erected outside Our Lady of the Ridge School regarding the possible rezoning of the parish school and church in the 10800 block of South Ridgeland Avenue has caused a stir on social media. But some village officials have said the concern is unwarranted. The hearing will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 24 at Chicago Ridge Village Hall, 10455 S. Ridgeland Ave. The Village Board recommended the rezoning following a brief discussion at a special

meeting held on Feb. 1, after the Archdiocese of Chicago announced that Our Lady of the Ridge School would be closing permanently when the school year ends in June. The five trustees present voted in favor of making the change. Only Trustee Bill McFarland was absent. He was on vacation at the time. But many residents said on the Chicago Ridge Neighborhood Watch page on Facebook that beginning the rezoning process so soon and placing the sign up while the school is still open was hurtful to the students watching their school close. Others were not aware of the special meeting and

thought something was being snuck through. The pastor, Rev. Wayne Svida, could not be reached for comment this week, but parishioners said he spoke about the issue at weekend Masses. According to the map on the sign, the entire block owned by the Archdiocese, stretching from 108th to 109th Street between Ridgeland and Oxford avenues, as well as a parking lot south of 109th Street, could be rezoned from R-1 (residential) to C-3 (regional shopping district). But Trustee Fran Coglianese said it would actually be changed to See ZONING, Page 9

Photo by Dermot Connolly

A notice of a public hearing to discuss the possible rezoning of the Our Lady of the Ridge School and Church property has raised concerns among some residents, but village officials say it is nothing to worry about.

CHICAGO RIDGE

Traffic light can’t come soon enough By Dermot Connolly The Chicago Ridge Village Board has been working on getting a traffic light at the corner of 99th Street and Ridgeland Avenue since at least 2015, but the process is moving much too slow for some of the nearby residents who report seeing accidents there on a weekly basis. Although there are already traffic lights at 98th Street and 100th Street, traffic studies determined that a light at 99th Street was necessary. The street divides the main Chicago Ridge Mall from the Chicago Ridge Commons, and motorists coming from the malls Photo by Dermot Connolly Chicago Ridge officials are working with the Illinois Department of Transportation to get a traffic light installed at the busy intersection of 99th are often lined up at that intersection waiting to head east, north Street and Ridgeland Avenue. Nearby residents say the progress is too slow.

See LIGHT, Page 9

Durbin advocates for brick-and-mortar stores

A bit of NASA comes to town

Senator urges ruling that would require online companies to pay sales tax to local municipalities

Lunar and meteorite samples draw residents to EP Library

By Joe Boyle

By Joe Boyle Two staff members at the Evergreen Park Library recently hosted an exhibit that was, quite frankly, out of this world. Julie Keaty, public events coordinator, and Kerrie Stone, the head of technical services, invited residents of all ages to view a disk that had lunar samples from the moon and another disk that contained fragments of meteorites at the library’s Teen Activity Center on May 9. Keaty and Stone felt this event was ideal for sharing with the community. Keaty said the session was due initially to the efforts of Stone. “I went to an American Library Association convention that had all this information from NASA,” Stone recalled. “It was very informative and interesting. Scientists were on hand from the Johnson Space Center and they helped to identify the rocks on display. I asked them about it and wondered if we could do something at our library. They said they could make it available to us. I told Julie we had to do this.” Keaty did not have to be convinced. She began the process of making arrangements to have the lunar samples and meteorites on display at the library. However, first Keaty and Stone were required to attend an all-day training session organized by NASA. “We not only learned about what was contained in the disks but about other aspects of NASA,” Keaty said. “It was a lot of information and very interesting.”

or south. Although there are stop signs for motorists on 99th Street, often cars can be seen darting across Ridgeland in between cars heading north and south. Village board meetings are usually held on the first and third Tuesday of every month, and at each one for the past few years, village engineer Andrew Pufundt has given an update on any progress made toward getting the traffic light. Often, there is little to report. Chicago Ridge is expected to pay $100,000 for its share of the project, but because most of the funding is coming from the Illinois Department of Transportation, there is a lot of red tape to

Photo by Joe Boyle

Evergreen Park residents Ray Mankowski and his son, R.J., 7, and daughter, Charlotte, 9, study information and view the lunar and meteorite disks during a program held May 9 at the Evergreen Park Library.

Keaty was able to have the session held at the Evergreen Park Library where other staff members could also be informed about the disks and other information pertaining to NASA. The lunar and meteorite samples were directly on loan from NASA. The rocks were contained in protective disks. NASA also required that security was available, just in case. A member of the Evergreen Park Police Department was on hand. Keaty and Stone were hoping that the disks would interest residents of the community. They did not have to wait long. Curious parents and their children began to file into the Teen Activity Center to view the samples contained in the round disks. Keaty and Stone also had pamphlets available See NASA, Page 9

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said the recent series of closings of once iconic retail giants is a direct result of online companies who are not required to pay taxes to local municipalities. Durbin made his remarks during a Southwest Conference of Mayors Legislative Breakfast May 4 at Georgio’s Banquets in Orland Park. He appealed not only to local mayors but legislators who attended the breakfast. “It’s very important that something can be done,” Durkin said. “We have brickand-mortar retailers like Carson’s that are closing because they can’t compete with Amazon and other online companies who can work out of state but are not required to pay taxes locally, like Illinois. That’s why it’s important that the U.S. Supreme Court make a decision for local businesses in the South Dakota v. Wayfair Inc. ruling. Local municipalities are not collecting sales taxes from these companies.” According to a published report, more than 7,000 retail stores closed nationwide in 2017, a record for a single year. On the other hand, Amazon’s net sales grew

Photo by Joe Boyle

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) speaks at the recent Southwest Conference of Mayors Legislative Breakfast in Orland Park.

by 38 percent, generating $177.9 billion in revenue. The focus comes as the U.S. Supreme Court is hearing South Dakota v. Wayfair Inc., a case that could change the sales tax structure on internet sellers. Quill Corp. v. See DURBIN, Page 9

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2 The Reporter

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Special award for cadet

POLICE REPORTS

Swallow Cliff Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, participated in recent JROTC awards ceremonies held at Richards High School in Oak Lawn. Swallow Cliff Chapter Regent Gale Shafer congratulates Cadet Claire Kuypers (far right), of Richards, for receiving the DAR JROTC award, which consisted of a medal and certificate.

Chicago Ridge Battery off nses

Palos Hills police charge man with felony for taking money from elderly person

• Robert Thomas, 40, of the 10700 block of South Eberhart Avenue, Chicago, was charged with battery following an altercation at 12:29 a.m. last Thursday in the 10100 block of South Anderson Avenue. Police said he punched someone in the face. He is due in court on June 1. • Rosa Gomez, 34, of the 9400 block of South Ridgeland Avenue, was charged with battery following a disturbance at her neighbor’s house at 9:36 p.m. May 9. Police said she punched the neighbor in the face. She is due in court on May 25.

By Dermot Connolly

Delivery of cannabis

Supplied photo

that the victim was suffering from dementia and other conditions that An investigation by Palos Hills would have made it impossible for police led to the May 9 arrest the person to make financial or of Paul A. Paul Jr. 67, of personal decisions since Lemont, on one felony October 2016. Video surcount of financial exploitaveillance cameras also tion of an elderly person. showed Paul accompanyPolice said a Palos Hills ing the victim into the resident hired Paul, owner bank. At total of 16 bank of Paul Design Builders, withdrawals were made to build a new house from the bank, along with for an estimated cost of Paul two more from a credit $267,000. However, the union and a credit card. resident said that while the conPolice said the house was never struction was underway, about finished and received several in$460,000 was removed from spection violations. They said one of the victim’s accounts to Paul was released on $10,000 pay Paul. bond and is due in court on But medical reports showed May 30.

Ryan DiPietro, 42, of the 400 block of Falcon Ridgeway, Bolingbrook, was charged with unlawful delivery of cannabis at 9:20 a.m. May 8 in the 11000 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said detectives saw him deliver an unspecified amount of cannabis to another person. He was also charged with possession of cannabis with intent to deliver. He was held for a bond hearing the next day.

Suspended license • Napoleon Kidd, 56, of the 12200 block of South LaSalle Street, Chicago, was charged with driving with a suspended license at 6:28 p.m. May 4 in the 5800 block of West 111th Street. Police said he was also cited for speeding. He is due in court on June 1. • Miranda Stevens, 20, of the 12700 block of South Lacrosse Avenue, Alsip, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 9:35 p.m. May 5 in the 9900 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said she was also cited for driving without insurance. She is due in court on June 12.

State Sen. Collins opposes Rauner’s call for reinstatement of death penalty State Sen. Jacqueline Collins (D-16th) objects to Gov. Bruce Rauner’s call for the reinstatement of the death penalty in Illinois. Rauner wants to reinstate capital punishment for mass murders and for the killing of police officers. The governor made the announcement on Monday. The death penalty had been abolished by the state since 2011. “Just as darkness cannot drive out darkness, death cannot deter death,” said Collins, whose

district includes portions of Oak Lawn. “The day Gov. George Ryan declared a moratorium on the death penalty in Illinois was a day humanity prevailed over brutality. The state is tasked with dispensing justice, but it should not be in the business of taking away the gift of life. This move by Gov. Rauner is shortsighted and shocking in its cynicism. I oppose his recommendation and I urge all my colleagues and all those who value life to voice their opposition as well.”

Domestic battery • Maurice Turner, 29, of the 6000 block South Loomis Street, Chicago, was charged with domestic battery following a disturbance at 7:57 p.m. May 7 at a home in the 9600 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said an argument between Turner and another person became physical, and Turner allegedly hit the victim in the head with a lug wrench. He was held for a bond hearing the next day. • Laura Serrano, 43, was charged with domestic battery following a disturbance at her home in the 7000 block of O’Connell Drive at 8:47 a.m. May 5. Police said she punched someone in the face and threw a perfume bottle at the victim. She was also charged with resisting arrest and was held for a bond hearing on May 7.

Evergreen Park Retail thefts

• Alicia Streeter, 20, of Chicago,

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was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 12:11 a.m. Friday. Police said she took 32 items, mainly food and toiletries, worth $209. • Antione Belford, 19, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 3 p.m. May 4. Police said he took a watch, toothbrush, toothpaste and media storage worth $59.16 in total. • Dorian Gordan, 41, of Chicago, was charged with two counts of retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 7:39 p.m. May 14. Police said he took four containers of baby formula worth $35 and tried to return a bath rug worth $13.84 for cash although he had never purchased it. Gordan also was charged with resisting arrest because he refused to comply with verbal commands and fled. He was apprehended after a short foot chase. • Deandre Banks, 23, of Evergreen Park, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St.., at 5:17 p.m. May 7. Police said he took six video games worth $181.71 in total. • Davon Williams, 21, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at 1:05 p.m. May 8 at Walmart. 2500 W. 95th St. Police said he took a container of prepared hot wings. He was also cited for theft for allegedly taking someone’s Illinois driver’s license that had been mislaid. • Tameka McKinnis, 35, of Chicago, was charged with felony retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 9:40 p.m. May 6. Police said she took 42 packs of cigarettes worth $432 from behind a counter. The charge was increased to a felony because of her arrest record.

Battery off nse Rodney L. Vincent Jr., 47, of Palos Hills, was charged with battery following an altercation at a baby shower at Jacob’s Well church hall, 3450 W. Maple St., at 3:59 p.m. May 5. Police said he punched a male juvenile, his daughter’s boyfriend, in the head and neck.

Drug possession • Brothers Brad Wnek, 43, and Brian Wnek, 32, both of Oak Lawn, were charged with possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 5:29 p.m. May 9 in the 4200 block of Southwest Highway. Police said they had five small plastic bags containing heroin and cut straws with heroin residue. They were also cited for possession of drug paraphernalia. • Hermon Payne, 67, of Chicago, was charged with possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 12:17 a.m. May 5 in the 3100 block of West 98th Place. Police said he was carrying 24 hydrocodone pills weighing 10.1 grams, and an empty plastic bag and spoon with drug residue. He was also cited for possession of drug paraphernalia. • Sonia Wroblewski, 21, of Justice, was charged with possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 5:55 p.m. May 4 at Columbus Avenue and Pulaski Road. Police said she was a passenger in the car and was carrying one 2-mg suboxone strip and a cut straw with residue. She was also cited for possession of drug paraphernalia and obstructing identification because she provided a false name in order to conceal a felony burglary warrant she was wanted for, police said. Thomas Mack, 27, of Homer Glen,

was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. Police said he had 12 syringes, six plastic bags, two pipes and a spoon, all with drug residue on them. • Ron Verbeck, 35, of Evergreen Park, was charged with possession of a controlled substance and criminal possession with intent to deliver following a traffic stop at 7:16 p.m. May 4 in the 9400 block of South Kedzie Avenue. Police said he was carrying 48 bags of heroin weighing 13 grams in total. Police said he informed police that the bags were in his rectum. He was also cited for improper lane usage.

Hickory Hills

Suspended licenses • Martin Vuelvas, 25, of the 14000 block of South Western Avenue. Blue Island, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 7:36 p.m. May 9 in the 7900 block of South 94th Street. Police said he was also cited for avoiding a traffic-control device because he allegedly cut through a corner gas station to avoid a light. He is due in court on June 21. • Oydin N. Mamedov, 41, of Louisville, Ky., was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 8:32 a.m. last Thursday at 95th Street and 86th Court. He was also cited for passing a bus as it was loading children. He is due in court on June 1. • Marilyn L. Lungu, 23, of the 8500 block of South Kean Avenue, Hickory Hills, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 6:51 a.m. Tuesday in the 8700 block of South 83rd Avenue. Police said she was also cited for having no front registration plate. She is due in court on June 1. • Adam C.W. Hiller, 25, of the 25700 block of Willow Creek Lane, Monee, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 6:58 p.m. Friday in the 7700 block of West 95th Street. Police said he was also cited for having expired registration. He is due in court on June 21. • Sara A. Nassar, 28, if the 7000 block of West Mather Avenue, Chicago Ridge, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 9:44 a.m. May 12 at 95th Street and 88th Avenue. Police said she was also cited for having no front registration plate. She is due in court on June 6. • Craig S. Cline, 38, of Audubon Road, Lombard, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 10:30 a.m. Friday in the 8600 block of South 84th Court. Police said he also cited for using a cellphone while driving. He is due in court on June 1. • Mohammed A. Shkralrat, 33, of the 7900 block of West 95th Street, Hickory Hills, was charged with driving with a revoked license following a traffic stop at 10:57 a.m. Saturday in the 7800 block of West 95th Street. Police said he was driving on a flat tire and initially gave a false name. He was also cited for obstructing identification, driving on an unsafe tire, and no insurance. He is due in court on June 1.

Aggravated speeding Hani F. Fadhel, 23, of the 700 block of West 72nd Street, Chicago, was charged with aggravated speeding following a traffic stop at 12:22 a.m. May 8 in the 8700

block of West 95th Street. Police said he was driving 63 mph in a 35-mph zone. He is due in court on June 21.

Criminal damage An 11-year-old Hickory Hills boy was issued a local ordinance citation for criminal damage to property following an incident that occurred at 7:45 p.m. Sunday, during a carnival in Kasey Meadow Park, 8047 W. 91st Place. Police said a carnival worker reported that the youth had knocked over a hand-sanitation station, and he was found at the scene. The boy told police he did it in a fit of anger following a fight with friends. He is due at a hearing in City Hall on June 5.

Oak Lawn

Suspended licenses • Lamarcus J. Andrews, 22, of Chicago, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 3:22 p.m. May 3 at 95th Street and Massasoit Avenue. Police said he was also cited for driving a car with expired registration, suspended registration, and no insurance. He is due in court on June 19. • Tyneika Phillips, 25, of Harvey, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 4:43 p.m. May 5 at 95th Street and Cook Avenue. Police said she was also cited for unlawful use of a license, speeding 35 mph in a 25-mph zone, no insurance, no seatbelt, and improper use of registration because temporary tags on the car did not belong to the vehicle. She was also issued a local ordinance violation for possession of cannabis after police said a bag containing 6 grams of marijuana was found in the car. She is due in court on June 26.

Drug possession • Zachary E. Carter, 24, of Blue Island, was charged with possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 4:54 p.m. May 4 at Southwest Highway and Kenton Avenue. Police said the car was pulled over after the driver was seen conducting what appeared to be a drug transaction in the parking lot of a 7-Eleven at 10441 S. Cicero Ave. Police said .5 grams of heroin containing fentanyl was found in the car, along with two glass and metal pipes with burnt residue, two hypodermic needles and bags containing drug residue. He was also cited for possession of drug paraphernalia, failure to signal when required, speeding and driving without insurance. He was held for a bond hearing. • Michael T. Perkins, 55, of Oak Lawn, was charged with possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 7:55 p.m. May 4, at 97th Street and Melvina Avenue. Police said he arrived at the accident scene on a motorcycle and became belligerent because a family member was involved. Police said he was carrying 2.6 grams of cocaine in his pocket. He was also cited for reckless driving and was held for a bond hearing.

Battery off nses • Jennifer M. Lestensky, 34, of Oak Lawn, was charged with two counts of battery following a disturbance at a house near 88th and Mobile Avenue at 11:09 a.m. May 6. Police said she allegedly struck one person in the forehead and another in the mouth during an argument that turned physical. She fled the scene and was caught nearby. She is due in court on May 21. • Diamond Rodriguez-Vasquez, 19, of Burbank, was charged with battery following a road-rage incident that occurred at 5:43 p.m. May 2 in the 8800 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. The male driver of another car said that when he braked abruptly in stop-and-go traffic, RodriguezVasquez, driving the car behind his, began honking her horn. He said that after she drove up beside him and caused him to swerve into the curb, Rodriguez-Vasquez came to his window and punched him several times in the face. She also allegedly grabbed his phone out of his hand and threw it into traffic. When she was arrested at her house after fleeing the scene, she was also charged with assault and reckless conduct. Court information was not available.

DUI charge Gabrielle Witherspoon, 30, of Chicago, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 6:04 a.m. May 5 at Southwest Highway and 95th Street. Police See POLICE REPORTS, Page 8


Thursday, May 17, 2018

The Reporter

3

Brannigan backers attend Palos Twp. meeting

‘They’re the haters,’ supporters say of protesters By Anthony Caciopo There was a new development at the Palos Township Board of Trustees meeting Monday — the presence of supporters of Trustee Sharon Brannigan. The township’s monthly meetings since July 2017 have been noteworthy for the large number of people, frequently exceeding 100, who have protested Brannigan for remarks she posted on social media that many consider offensive to Muslims and Middle Eastern people in general. Middle Easterners and nonMiddle Easterners alike have been attending the meetings to express their rejection of her nowdeleted remarks and to demand her resignation. But Monday evening, a twist in the recent proceedings at the meetings took place when about a dozen people attended in support of the embattled trustee. And the differences of opinion were frequently heated. Even the Pledge of Allegiance was a cause for contention. “You wonder why nobody wants to respect you,” shouted a man who stood up from his seat near the front of the crowded meeting room just as the Pledge concluded.

Most, if not all the crowd had seemingly taken part in the entire Pledge, raising their voices at the end “…with liberty and justice FOR ALL.” We’re not asking for anyone’s respect,” Basem Kawar told the man. “We demand respect!” Kawar is the national coordinator of the National Network of Arab American Communities. Shortly before the meeting began, a Brannigan supporter said “She shouldn’t resign. She’s got her right, too.” “When it impacts people’s rights,” a protester said to her about Brannigan’s remarks, “then she has no rights.” “If she stays, we stay,” said another protestor, referring to Brannigan’s refusal to resign. “This is our township. She doesn’t represent all the people, then people don’t want her.” “Then vote her out!” came a response from another supporter. The voting process, not repeated protests, has been cited by township officials as the only method by which Brannigan can be removed from the board. Because she is an elected official, the board has no power to remove her or to even pressure her to resign, the trustees have said. But the board was again called

upon Monday to speak out against Brannigan, and township officials were grilled about why there has been no statement from the board about the matter. “We’ve been coming here for 10 months,” said Kawar. He was one of a handful of people who took the opportunity to formally address the board before the meeting was abruptly adjourned. “Not once have we gotten our questions answered. Can you explain why? You claim that you’d issue a statement to address the concerns of everyone in this room,” he said. “Where is that statement?” “The only statement the board will make, for anyone that was not at that first meeting (in July), when we went around the table and each board member gave their opinion and thoughts of what was going on,” said Township Supervisor Colleen Schumann. “We stated, myself and the other board members, that we did not agree with what Trustee Brannigan said. But she’s an elected official and we have no authority to remove her from the board. That statement stands.” A mock game of Jeopardy was started by Bill Beaulieu in an effort, he said, to get answers from

Flavio Aguirre and Ala’a Mbayed hold aloft a sign stating, “say no to racism in our community” at the Palos Township Board meeting on Monday.

Photos by Anthony Caciopo

Turning to the crowd of protestors at Monday’s Palos Township meeting following the Pledge of Allegiance, an unidentified man shouts, “You wonder why nobody wants to respect you.” The crowd had taken part in the entire Pledge, raising their voices at the end “…with liberty and justice FOR ALL.”

the board, but it was met with little patience by Schumann. “We’re not playing a game up here at the township board,” she said. “This is not how township meetings are run.” “I thought this (meeting) was to talk about township business,”

said the final person to formally comment. “I think it is a political rally, so to speak. And if it is, I’d like to know how many people are registered to vote?” Multiple people quickly responded and the meeting was adjourned, followed by boos

and chants of “Racist! Racist!” as Brannigan exited the room. “We’ll be back, we’ll be back” was shouted dozens of times in the immediate aftermath of the adjournment. See BRANNIGAN, Page 10

Supreme Court opens door to sports betting State Rep. Zalewski: ‘We should look into it immediately’ By Bob Bong Legal betting on Bears games may become a reality in Illinois, thanks to Monday’s Supreme Court ruling that struck down a federal law blocking most states from allowing wagers to be placed on sports. The high court declared unconstitutional a 1992 federal law that prohibited states outside of Nevada, Oregon, Delaware and Montana from regulating and taxing sports betting. New Jersey, which had looked into allowing sports betting to give a boost to its Atlantic City casinos and racetracks, sued and the court ruled in its favor on Monday. In a 6-3 decision, the court ruled that “Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each state is free to act on its own.” Justice Samuel Alito gave the majority opinion, saying: “Our job is to interpret the law Congress has enacted and decide whether it is consistent with the Constitution. PASPA is not.” One research firm estimated before the ruling that if the Supreme Court were to strike down the law, 32 states would likely offer sports betting within five years. New Jersey and Mississippi are expected to be the first states to jump on the sports

betting bandwagon the quickest. Both have sizable casino gambling operations already in place. Illinois was one of many states that decided to be ready if the court ruled for New Jersey. In January, the Sports Betting Consumer Protection Act was introduced in the Illinois Senate. The bill would “authorize sports betting or electronic sports betting by an electronic sports betting patron or sports betting facility patron.” Sports gambling consultants and representatives from the professional sports leagues, along with assorted opponents and supporters, testified at a preliminary hearing on the issue last month before the Senate Gaming Committee. Also, in January, state Rep. Lou Lang (D16th) offered a shell bill in the Illinois House that would be used to legalize sports betting if the court ruled in favor of it. Among issues that would have to be addressed include tax rates, online wagering and potential venues such as casinos and horse racing tracks. With the General Assembly session ending at the end of May, any action this session is unlikely. “I’m excited about it,” state Rep. Michael Zalewski (D-23rd), whose district covers a

portion of Hickory Hills, said Tuesday. “We should look into it immediately.” Zalewski said sports betting would provide a needed tax boost for the state. “Revenue is hard to calculate, but conservatively, I’d say sports betting would bring in from $50 to $75 million per year,” he said. Zalewski said if approved, sports betting would probably be offered first in sports books in the state’s casinos, much like its handled by casinos in Las Vegas. “We also can’t ignore the impact of the internet,” he said. “Everyone today has some sort of electronic device.” What’s at stake is a piece of a gambling pie worth an estimated $150 billion per year in the United States. Experts say about 97 percent of that money is wagered illegally in the form of parlay cards or bets made with a bookie. “That’s the news every one of these states was waiting for,” sports and gambling law attorney Daniel Wallach told USA TODAY Sports. “Every one of these states’ legislative measures hinged on the finding of the Supreme Court that PASPA is unconstitutional. The ruling allows the states to legislate immediately and for all such laws to become effective immediately.” Many of the major pro sports leagues have indicated they will try to work with the states that allow betting to ensure themselves a piece of the action through so-called integrity fees.

EP High School students strike back against gun violence A group of Evergreen Park Community High School students approached their principal, Bill Sanderson, wanting to bring awareness to the issue of gun violence in schools and communities, in light of recent events. Sanderson agreed to lead the group and asked them to organize a week’s worth of activities leading up to, and in place of, the National School Walkout. Prior to the week of April 16-20, Keegan Cassidy, Maddie Cosgrove, Neema Griffin, Taylor Hoefler, Savannah Judy, Erin Knight, Daniela Salazar, Dana Sanders, Nyah Tsai, Meche Watson and Lori Wilson ordered orange bracelets for all staff and students to wear that read “End Gun Violence & #NEVERAGAIN” and made over 900 orange ribbons that were passed out to staff and students. The group decorated a bul-

Evergreen Park Community High School students (from left) Keegan Cassidy, Lori Wilson, Meche Watson, Dana Sanders, Neema Griffin, Taylor Hoefl and Erin Knight post positive messages on lockers of students to bring awareness of gun violence in schools. Supplied photo

letin board with gun violence facts and when students arrived at school that Monday, the students had inspirational words of kindness placed on every student locker. Throughout the week, the girls provided positive daily announcements where they took

turns reading facts and information regarding gun safety and gun violence in and around schools. Later that week, all staff and students were encouraged to wear orange and on Friday of that week, the school observed a moment of silence to remember all of those

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who have lost their lives to gun violence. “I am extremely proud of these students, and all of our students, in the way they brought awareness in such a positive way and made a difference in their school and community,” Sanderson said.

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4 The Reporter

Our Neighborhood

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Spring Carnival fun at Kasey Meadow Park in Hickory Hills The Hickory Hills Park District held a four-day Spring Carnival this past weekend at Kasey Meadow Park, 8047 W. 91st Place. The event featured rides for youths and teens. Food and refresh-

ments were held at the park from last Thursday through Sunday night. Some of the rides included the Cliff Hanger, which glides through the air in a circle. The Sizzler spins in circles and was a favorite

Kids of all ages got a kick out of the Sizzler that spun around and went in a circle at Spring Carnival at Kasey Meadow Park in Hickory Hills.

The Fun Slide was a popular feature at Spring Carnival at Kasey Meadow Park in Hickory Hills on Saturday.

with teens, along with the Freakout and The Fury. A train for little kids was a favorite, along with the updated playground equipment at Kasey Meadow Park.

Photos by Joe Boyle

Kids glide through the air on the Cliff Hanger, one of several popular rides at the Hickory Hills Park’s District’s Kasey Meadow Park on Saturday.

Memorial Day plans can start at the Palos Heights Farmers Market The Palos Heights Farmers Market, 12217 S. Harlem Ave., is the first place to stop to get ready for the Memorial Day weekend. Early spring vegetables and hot house berries will be available to make salads. The recipes will be fresh and delicious. Salsas and sauces, pesto, and oils and vinegars, along with many cheeses, can make delightful snacks. In addition, the market has everything residents will need for the grill: beef, pork, chicken, sausages, salmon and other fish. Vegan? No worries, The Eating Well has a variety of veggie patties. Finally, many varieties of desserts are also avail-

able, including pies, cookies, carrot cake, breads, bars and toffee! Want some ready-to-eat food for the weekend? Aracely’s Tamales are hot and fresh or can be frozen and eaten later. In addition, Parmesan’s Pizza has either ready to eat or fresh to bake pizza and pizza products. Camille’s Confections will be the guest of the Community Tent. Camille sells a wide variety of handmade English toffees, including original, white chocolate cranberry almond, dark chocolate blueberry pecan, Nutty Buddy, and Sassy Sea Salt. The toffee is sold in half and whole pound containers. It can make the perfect addition to any holi-

day gatherings and graduation parties. In addition, the toffee is the perfect year-end teacher gift. Planning on planting over the holiday weekend? The market has a large selection of flowers, flowering baskets and gifts, perennial plants and flowers, herbs and vegetables to plant. Stop by early for the best selection. Residents can stop by the City Tent to pick up and have their frequent shopper cards endorsed. Patrons will earn double credit on their frequent shopper cards for all canned and fresh food donations. Canned donations are given to Palos United Methodist Church, 12101 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights. Fresh

food donations are given to Operation Blessing in Alsip. All completed frequent shopper cards will be entered into a Market gift certificate raffle every month starting in June. LINK cards are accepted at the Palos market. Stop by the City Tent to start the process. “Palos Bucks” Double Value Matching dollars of up to $15 will be offered weekly. Pick up this week’s recipe, “Strawberry Champagne Chicken Salad,” at the City Tent. This year’s recipes are courtesy of Palos Health Dieticians. The recipe will also be attached to the weekly email, Facebook page, city webpage (www. palosheights.org).

Musicians and face painters are needed for the upcoming market. Contact the market manager (see below) for more information. The market would like to acknowledge and thank this year’s Market sponsors. They include Palos Health, CIBC Bank, Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz, CNB Bank and Trust, United Trust Bank, Running for Kicks, Golden Shoes and Camille’s Confections. Additional information about the market can be obtained at www.palosheights. org, by emailing farmersmarket@ palosheights.org, calling (708) 361-1800, or visiting the Palos Heights Farmers Market page on Facebook.

Hickory Hills welcomes state-of-the art dialysis center By Joe Boyle

The staff at U.S. Renal Care officially greeted the community with an open house and informed guests that they will provide contemporary care for patients at their Hickory Hills location. The open house was held during the afternoon on May 9 at the new U.S. Renal Care Dialysis Center at 9640 S. Roberts Road. Nancy Vanek, RN, MS, CNN, regional director for U.S. Renal Care, said the facility unofficially opened in October but had to wait until January when the state approved their license. Vanek said during the open house that these facilities provide a more intimate setting for patients. The open house was attended by residents, community leaders, the Hills Chamber of Commerce and Hickory Hills Mayor Mike Howley, “A lot of people don’t want to be in large centers,” Vanek said. “We have 13 chairs here to assist patients and they get more oneone-one care here. This means we can have one nurse who can care for 11 or 12 patients. But we also have technicians on staff, if needed.” Vanek added that an isolation section is also available at the center for patients who have Hepatitis B. Phyllis Majka, president of the Hills Chamber of Commerce, attended the open house and was impressed with what she saw. “This is really great for the community,” Majka said. “This really fits a need here. Plus, this is a really nice building.” Vanek said that dialysis patients

Compiled by Joe Boyle

News and events from our archives • 50 years ago Landfill operation to continue on Chicago Ridge land being annexed by Oak Lawn Park District From the May 16, 1968 issue:

Photo by Joe Boyle

Dr. Natalie Selk, M.D., medical director at the new U.S. Renal Care dialysis center in Hickory Hills, cuts the ribbon at the grand opening on May 9.

can make appointments at U.S. Renal Care on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. The sessions last three hours, but patients are made to feel at ease in comfortable chairs in a spacious area, Vanek added. Sarah Young, a marketing specialist with U.S. Renal Care, said that this is the seventh center to open in the Chicago area. Another center is located in Chicago’s Scottsdale neighborhood. Over 350 facilities have opened in the U.S. Another location is in Guam, Young added. U.S. Renal Care, which is based in Plano, Texas, was founded in 2000. The facilities are managed by local physicians. U.S. Renal Care will also offer home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis

for patients who have chronic and acute renal disease. Staff members said that they have a heightened sensitivity to the needs of patients, with a focus on the person’s well-being. Dr. Natalie Selk, M.D., is the medical director at the new U.S. Renal Care center. She is with Southwest Nephrology Associates and also has an office in Evergreen Park. Selk is also affiliated with Advocate Christ Medical Center and Palos Hospital. Vanek added that patients like the modern amenities that U.S. Renal Care offers. The clinic features Wifi, personal TVs, heated massage chairs and ample parking. Rich Demma was the first pa-

tient at the new U.S. Renal Care. He attended the open house and talked to guests and staff members. Demma said he is a longtime Hickory Hills resident and receives treatments three times a week at the center. “I have been treated very well here,” Demma said. “They have really taken care of me. And it is very convenient.” Vanek said that access to the center for patients is a top priority. She said that they don’t want to have patients go long distances for treatments. U.S. Renal Care is closed on Sundays. More information about the center in Hickory Hills can be obtained by calling (708) 4599598 or visit www.usrenalcare. com

Irish Fest at Gaelic Park will feature musical performances, carnival rides A variety of singers and dancers are scheduled to perform over the Memorial Day weekend at the 32nd annual Irish Fest at Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th St., Oak Forest. A full-day pass to four musical stages, live theater performances, full carnival with unlimited rides, and free on-site parking is $15. The fee is $8 for the first hour on Friday, May 25 and $10 for the first hour only on Saturday, May 26; Sunday, May 27; and Monday, May 28, which is Memorial Day. Early online discounts will provide a saving of up to 60 percent. The indoor/outdoor festival also includes a full carnival with rides, special events for children, Gaelic football and hurling, Irish step dancing competition, theater, pony exhibits, food and refreshments. Emmet Cahill returns as a solo artist after performing with the Celtic Thunder. He has enjoyed success as a multiple prize win-

ner in various competitions across Ireland, along with being voted “Tenor of the Year” in 2013 by the Irish Music Association in the U.S. Other acts include The Fitzgeralds, a family group that consists of fiddling and step dancing from Canada’s Ottawa Valley, and Maggie Speaks. The Dancing Noodles, a local favorite, and American English, the popular Beatles’ cover band, will also perform. Other acts include The New Invaders, Rory Makem, Gothard Sisters, Liam Durkin and Kieran Byrne. The Shannon Rovers Pipe Band and the Pipes and Drums of The Emerald Society will also perform. Adults 65 years old and up and kids under 12 can attend for $12. Youngsters 3 years and under can attend free. Online discount tickets, a complete Irish Fest performance schedule and directions are available at www.chicagogaelicpark. org.

The story: The South Suburban Land Development company has until July 31 to finish filling about 90 acres in the vicinity of 103rd Street and Mayfield Avenue, the Chicago Ridge Village Board ruled Monday night. Owner Harry Carlson, who was present at the special meeting, asked the board to reconsider an earlier ruling giving him until June 30 to complete the landfill operation. Carlson said he was negotiating with the Cook County Board of Commissioners for a permit to complete the Chicago Ridge operation to the end of June. Carlson has been filling the property at 103rd Street for the past six years. Trustee Michael Blider pointed out that Carlson had done many philanthropic things for Chicago Ridge, including the installation of a park, a fence, and a road at 108th and Menard. The Oak Lawn Park District, using a new state law, annexed Carlson’s property. Blider would like to have the new Chicago Ridge Park District de-annex the property from the Oak Lawn Park District. The quote: “I would prefer to have Mr. Carlson working with us on this,” Blider said.

• 25 years ago Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills and Worth will receive water bill credits from Chicago From the May 13, 1993 issue:

The story: Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills and Worth are set to receive a windfall in the form of credits on their water bills to the city of Chicago as a result of a settlement agreement reached last month. The three suburbs were among 52 that joined in the lawsuit against Chicago that dates back to the early 1970s. The lawsuit alleged that the water rates Chicago charged the suburbs unfairly factored in costs not associated with supplying water to the suburbs. The quote: “You don’t win many lawsuits these days,” Evergreen Park Mayor Anthony Vacco said. “It took nearly 20 years to do it, but we did it.”

• 10 years ago Oak Lawn resident shares candid videos of her friend, Cher From the May 15, 2008 issue: The story: Oak Lawn resident Linda Stearns has been a long-time friend of singer and actress Cher and her candid home videos and photographs of the star were recently seen on “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” Stearns has known the iconic singer since they met in a downtown Chicago hotel over 40 years ago in the early 1960s. They became pen pals. Stearns was invited to travel with Sonny and Cher on the duo’s Good Times tour. Stearns, however, said she has purposely avoided making money when possible from the experience. The quote: “We’re not here to make money off our own stuff,” Stearns said. “This is personal stuff. I could tell you a million stories.”


Thursday, May 17, 2018

The Reporter

WHATIZIT?

5

Memory care facility opens in Oak Lawn By Dermot Connolly

Photo by Joe Boyle

The clue for this week’s Whatizit (above) is: 103rd St. facility. Send your responses with your name and hometown by noon Monday to: thereporter@comcast.net. Donna Brehovsky, of Palos Hills, said she took a shot in the dark for last week’s quiz and guessed it was the building site for the new Performing Arts Center for Oak Lawn Community High School. And she was absolutely right. The center will be located near 94th and Austin Avenue, just south of the football field adjacent to the parking lot. The list of readers who answered correctly included Jane Foley and Steve Rosenbaum, both of Oak Lawn, and Evergreen Park resident Rich Rahn. The new Performing Arts Center is scheduled to be completed at the end of August for the 2018-19 school year. A new Performing Arts Center is also being built for District 218 at Richards High School, 10601 S. Central Ave., Oak Lawn.

SUDOKU

Residents will begin moving in later this month to Grace Point Place, a residential facility for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia, that recently opened in Oak Lawn. Hundreds of people attended the May 3 open house for the two-story complex at 5701 W. 101st St., described as an Anthem memory care community. During tours of the first floor, visitors were able to check out the living arrangements, which include one- and two-bedroom suites, as well as “companion suites,” with two beds in one room. All the suites, ranging from 300 square feet to 485 square feet. have private bathrooms with walk-in showers. An open lounge area features comfortable chairs, big-screen TVs and an air hockey table and a piano. The first floor also includes a dining room and patios with tables in the enclosed atrium. Candle-making and some of the other arts and crafts and other activities available for residents were also demonstrated. Grace Point Place is designed to exclusively serve people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, and executive director Cortney Malinowski said social and therapeutic activities for each ability level will be offered. The facility also offers clinical services, hair care, and technologybased tools and programs. The common areas are designed for safe freedom of movement, and according to the information available on the website, there is a state-of-the-art monitoring system in place for the residents. Michael Zywicki, the executive director of a similar Anthem memory care facility that recently opened in Glenview, was among the officials conducting tours during the open house. Zywicki said that while families often assume their loved one would prefer being in a single room, once they move in, they see the benefits of having a “roommate” in one of the “companion suites.” “A lot of people are used to living with

Photo by Dermot Connolly

Grace Point Place, a 66-apartment memory-care residential facility, recently opened at 5701 W. 101st Street in Oak Lawn.

someone, and they are inclined to encourage each other to get involved in activities. Not only that the cost is less, but when families come to visit and they see their loved one has made friends with someone, the two families agree to move them into a companion suite,” Zywicki explained. “It seems like a wonderful place. They really thought of everything, as far as engaging the residents with all sorts of activities,” said Roseann Keller, of Oak Lawn, who was there with friends considering Grace Point Place for a family member. “I think it’s very impressive,” added Keller, whose friends sought her advice because she is a retired nurse and hospital chaplain. “This is the type of place that is really needed in the south suburbs. You can see that it is a first-rate operation. We’re excited to have it here in Oak Lawn,” said Mayor Sandra Bury. “It is not the sort of place you like to think of needing for a family member, but it is good to know it is here,” she added. Grace Point Place is built on land sold by the adjacent Southwest Chicago Christian

School. When the memory care center was first proposed more than two years ago, many residents of the surrounding neighborhood argued that it would not be a good fit beside their one-story homes. However, Anthem officials said being in a residential neighborhood was ideal for Grace Point residents. Some of the opponents visited Grace Point Place during the open house to see how it turned out. One of the vocal opponents, who did not want her name used, said she still would rather have seen it built on 111th Street because it would be easier for visitors to find. Many visitors during the open house also parked on side streets because of the limited space in the parking lot, and they said that could be a problem on holidays as well. But even the opponents agreed that the building itself looks nice and has a residential feel that fits into the neighborhood. “There is no doubt it is a nice-looking building, inside and out,” said one woman, adding, “It looks pricey.” More information about Grace Point Place may be obtained by visiting the website at gracepointplace.com or calling (708) 290-3255.

Together We Cope sets annual golf outing for June 6

Solution on Page 9

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Together We Cope’s annual golf outing, “Luck on the Links,” will be held Wednesday, June 6 at the Odyssey Country Club, 19110 S. Ridgeland Ave., Tinley Park. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. with a light breakfast. The shotgun start is at 11:30 a.m. “Join us for golf and make a difference for our neighbors in need,” said Kathy Rogge, TWC’s fundraising manager. “Your registration fee allows us to empower families in crisis, promote self-sufficiency, and alleviate hunger in the south suburbs.”

Oak Lawn Library receives STEM grant

ACROSS 1. Small lump 4. Helps little fi ms 7. A way of performing 12. Lawyers 15. Stirred up 16. Believed in 18. The Bay State (abbr.) 19. Makes computers 20. Sodium 21. As fast as can be done (abbr.) 24. Institute legal proceedings against 27. More compact 30. Ethiopian river 31. Quantitative fact 33. No (Scottish) 34. A concession of no great value 35. Tony-winning actress Daisy 37. More (Spanish) 39. Russian space station 41. Helicopter 42. At the peak 44. Makes ecstatically happy 47. Excellent 48. Material body 49. The Golden State (abbr.) 50. A unit of plane angle 52. Argon 53. Fancy 56. Fried mixture of meat and spices 61. How green plants use sunlight 63. Without wills 64. Unhappy 65. Meat from a pig’s leg DOWN 1. Mentor 2. Lyric poems 3. A dry cold north wind in Switzerland

4. Trapped 5. Used for road surfacing 6. Cuckoos 7. Prefix “away from” 8. Seth McFarlane comedy 9. Not out 10. “The Simpsons” bus driver 11. Popular HBO drama (abbr.) 12. Acclaimed Indian physicist 13. Removes 14. One-name NBA player 17. Revolutionary women 22. Smell 23. Ground-dwelling songbird 24. Midway between south and southeast 25. American state 26. Keen 28. Khoikhoin peoples 29. Int’l defense organization 32. Samoan money 36. A sign of assent 38. One from Somalia 40. Boat race 43. Trims 44. French coins 45. Indigenous Scandinavian 46. Flew alone 51. Loch where a “monster” lives 54. Japanese title 55. Pros and __ 56. Present in all living cells 57. Something to scratch 58. Branch of Islam 59. Appear 60. Former CIA 62. Yukon Territory

Answers on Page 9

The Oak Lawn Public Library is the recipient of a $2,000 grant from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)Chicago Section. The grant will be used to purchase robots, drones, iPads, circuitry, building sets and other Science/Technology/Engineering/ Math (STEM) related activities to create 14 STEM kits. The kits will be part of the library’s circulating collection and will be available for checkout for home use beginning this fall. The kits, designed for kids from preschool through eighth grades, will allow users to carry out science experiments or activities. The contents of the kits will vary. “These kits will give families a great opportunity to explore STEM learning at home,” said Mary Donovan, youth services librarian. “We want kids to discover STEM can be fun, and we hope these kits will generate excitement for kids to learn in a unique way.” For the last five years, the Oak Lawn Public Library,9427 S. Raymond Ave., has hosted a variety of STEM-related activities for kids including the Super STEAM Saturdays program. For more information about the STEM kits or the Super STEAM Saturdays program, contact the Youth Services Department at (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

College scholarships are available for Oak Lawn artists The Oak Lawn Arts Commission seeks candidates for two $500 scholarships that will be awarded to students enrolling in a college arts program. The deadline to apply is June 1. Students who would like to apply must live in Oak Lawn or attend an Oak Lawn school. They must be accepted at a post secondary college to study the arts. One scholarship will be awarded to a student pursuing visual arts and the other to a student in the performing arts. To receive the complete guidelines and application, email linda@vordererart.com.

Registration for the full day’s activities is $150 and includes 18 holes of golf, all oncourse games, breakfast, lunch, and dinner at 5 p.m. Fee for golf only is $120 per person and includes all on-course games, breakfast and lunch. Price for dinner only is $50 per person. Spots are still available for golfers, and many sponsorship opportunities are offered this year. The top tier of sponsorship includes golf and dinner for various size parties at funding levels of $2,500, $1,500 and $1,000. Other levels of sponsorship include different

benefits. Local businesses are invited to advertise their companies by contributing 140 promotional items for golfers’ gift bags, items such as golf tees or snacks or pens. Further information can be obtained by calling Kathy Rogge at (708) 263-0302, ext. 6101. Together We Cope is a nonprofit homeless prevention agency based in Tinley Park and serving families in 27 south suburban communities. Further information is at www. togetherwecope.org.


6 The Reporter

THE

COMMENTARY

Thursday, May 17, 2018

REPORTER An Independent Newspaper Published Weekly Founded March 16, 1960

Ray Hanania

Rauner needs to come up with a ‘good budget’

Silence is not golden when eating at the movie theater

“N

othing’s more important for a governor than having a good budget, because that allows you to manage the state to do your job.” Let that recent quote from former Gov. Jim Edgar, as reported by the State Journal-Register, sink in for a bit. “Nothing’s more important for a governor than having a good budget, because that allows you to manage the state to do your job.” The budget passed last year over Gov. Bruce Rauner’s veto was not a “good budget” because the governor’s budget office wasn’t directly involved. Legislators simply don’t have the expertise to pass a good budget without the governor’s help. The executive branch has experts who know what the agencies and programs need because they are involved with this issue every day. Rich So the governor and his administration have Miller been struggling ever since last July to implement a budget that it had almost nothing to do with. That’s insane. No one who is truly interested in governing would allow that to happen. Whether the governor believes he will be reelected or not, it’s his job to get something done for the future of his state. The very least he can do is provide some stability going forward by finally doing what every governor before him has done: Negotiate and sign a workable budget. I mean, seriously, we always make such a big deal out of state budgets, but this is a routine, mundane matter almost everywhere else. House Speaker Michael J. Madigan told his caucus last week that he believes the governor wants an overtime session so he can blame the resulting gridlock on the Democrats. But Madigan told his House Democrats that he believes voters will blame both sides. This was taken by some of his members as a sign that Madigan finally realizes he needs to get something done one way or another. We’ll see. That assessment could be overly optimistic. The budgeteers met via teleconference last week and not a word was said about the governor’s repeated demands for an “official” revenue estimate. Instead, they reportedly had a fairly productive discussion about various pension ideas. So, that’s a good sign. The revenue estimate demand was a giant red herring used for political and disruptive purposes. The Democrats appear to have gamed out the end of the spring session if they can’t do a deal with the governor for whatever reason. Money for the Quincy veterans’ home and cash-strapped prisons, universities, etc. will all be put into the appropriations bills to entice Republicans onto the legislation. Some of the Republicans who broke ranks last year may not vote for the legislation when it passes, but may vote for it during the override motion. Some Republican top dogs have said privately that they believe rank-and-file Democrats and Republicans who voted for the vetoed budget last year feel betrayed because they were told that the budget they passed was balanced when it actually wasn’t. But in talking to those folks, that doesn’t appear to be the case. Many knew what they were getting into and, besides, what’s done is done and they want another budget now. Plus, some disaffected House Republicans are itching for one last fight with the governor before they retire. House Republican Leader Jim Durkin has painstakingly put his caucus back together twice in the past year. The first time was after the budget override vote, which badly split his caucus. Members were essentially told if they voted for the education funding reform bill, all would be forgiven. Then another blow-up was threatened after Rep. Jeanne Ives nearly defeated Gov. Rauner in the GOP primary. Durkin has managed to keep things mostly cool and separated from caucus business since then. It’s abundantly clear from his public and private remarks that Senate Republican Leader Bill Brady wants a negotiated budget deal. Durkin, meanwhile, has solidly allied himself with the governor, both in public and reportedly during the leaders’ meetings. Durkin badly needs Rauner’s money to fund his campaigns against Speaker Madigan this fall. But this alliance can also help move things along if Rauner’s staunch ally Durkin eventually informs the governor that he needs to cut a deal for the good of the state or face yet another stinging defeat. That worked last year on the education funding reform bill. Whatever happens, it’s long past time that the governor do whatever he can to put together a “good budget” for his state. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax, a daily political newsletter, and CapitolFax.com.

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The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 or e-mail us at thereporter@comcast.net

Y GUEST OPINIONS

President Reagan stepped up on Grove City Bill By Dr. John A. Sparks We wrote earlier about the Grove City College Supreme Court case (Grove City College v. Bell) in which the high court ruled that any “financial assistance” used by students and their families to pay for their education at Grove City College made the college a “recipient.” What did this mean and what were the implications? Being a “recipient” required Grove City College to be in compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments which prohibited sex discrimination for entities receiving federal monies. As the court emphasized, Grove City College had not actually engaged in discrimination based on sex, but it still had to deliver a signed assurance that it was in compliance. The Supreme Court said, however, that only the particular “program or activity” receiving the federal funding would be required to comply with federal regulations. That restrictive language, “program or activity,” was actually in the original Education Amendments. Liberal legislators were pleased with the portion of the court’s decision holding that the receiving of federal funds, no matter how indirect, made colleges “recipients.” However, they strongly disagreed with the court’s “program specific” holding—that is, the part of the decision that limited the reach of the federal government to that part of the college’s operations that actually received the federal monies. They believed that if an institution of higher education received any federal dollars to support any portion of its program, the whole institution should be required to comply with federal law. It was no surprise that Senator Edward Kennedy proposed new “corrective” legislation, entitled, the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, to reverse that part of the Supreme Court’s holding in the Grove City College v. Bell case that the big-government political left did not like. Dubbed in the press the “Grove City Bill,” it changed Title IX and other federal civil rights legislation. As Congress had originally passed it, Title IX limited the reach of federal bureaucrats into institutions which received federal monies by restricting the application of regulations to only that portion of the institution receiving the funds. Suppose for example that a regular four-year educational institution received a special federal grant to allow it to retrain displaced workers (non-traditional students). Only that program had to comply with federal regulations, not the whole school. However, the “Civil Rights Restoration Act” boldly redefined what “program or activity” mean t— and in the process, making nonsense of the original language. The Restoration Act said that program and activity, from there on, should be read to mean all of the operations of the recipient institutions, schools, governments, or businesses in their entirety. President Ronald Reagan saw the threat to freedom and the substantial compliance burden that could result from the Restoration Act.

On March 16, 1988, he returned the proposed Grove City Bill unsigned, exercising his veto power and stating his reasons for the veto. First, he said the bill would have an adverse effect upon the independence of religious institutions. If a church or synagogue received even a small amount of federal aid for a program for the poor or needy, the presumption would be that its total operation would be covered. Although private schools that were “controlled by a religious organization” were exempt, schools that adhered to religious tenets, but were not regarded as “controlled” by a denomination, would not be exempted if any part of their program received federal dollars. That would have been the case with Grove City College and many other Christian schools who were not directly under the control of a religious order. Second,, businesses that received federal monies for job training, for example, would have their operations covered in their entirety — perhaps, ironically, leading the businesses to withdraw from the federal program. Third, state and local governments, often receiving small amounts of federal funds for particular programs, would now find their entities covered by a plethora of regulations further undermining traditional principles of federalism. Fourth, compliance costs for those newly covered schools, businesses, and local governments would rise. They would rise because of compliance with ever-changing regulations and their interpretations. These schools and businesses and other entities would be required to either employ or retain compliance experts, to prepare for on-site visits, and to defend lawsuits that could arise. Therefore, rightly concluded President Reagan, even though vetoing a bill with “civil rights” in the title would subject his administration to a considerable political risk and the likelihood of being misunderstood, the dangers of this Restoration Act outweighed the political firestorm that would and did swirl around him. Unfortunately, the House and Senate overrode his veto and the Civil Rights Restoration Act became law. Just as President Reagan had predicted, Title IX regulations and the Office of Civil Rights (OCR), mostly under the Obama administration, “catalyzed the establishment of gigantic and costly campus bureaucracies” dealing with alleged sexual discrimination. The OCR issued letters prescribing the requirements for internal campus investigations, even mandating the lowest standard of proof necessary for a violation to be found. In a recent article, one commentator summarizes the situation this way: “At its worst, Title IX is now a cudgel with which the government and school administrators enforce sex rules too bluntly, and in ways that invite abuse.” Dr. John A. Sparks is the retired dean of Arts & Letters at Grove City College and a fellow for The Center for Vision & Values. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan Law School and a member of the State Bar of Pennsylvania

Federal government jobs may mean you never get fired By Natalia Castro The average American looking for complete job security need not look further than the nondefense federal government’s public workforce, where there is a 99.5 percent chance they will never be fired for cause, according to data retrieved from the Office of Personnel Management’s FedScope. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics annual Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLT) survey, between 2005 and 2017 the private sector workforce maintained an average discharges and layoff rate of 17.27 percent. Conversely, FedScope reveals the public sector maintained a rate of 3.37 percent over the same period. The public sector termination rate includes both firings for cause and general reductions in force. Perhaps even more frightening is that once these figures are separated, FedScope data reveals only 0.53 percent of federal employees are terminated for cause. Without proper accountability or firing measures in place, our federal workforce continues to reward inefficiency and fails to meet the needs of the public. In 2016, scandal broke when a Government Accountability Office report revealed that mismanagement within the Department of Veteran Affairs caused new veterans to wait three to eight weeks for medical care, with many patients failing to receive any care at all. This scandal worsened when the Washington Times reported it had taken over two years to propose

the firings of two senior leaders within the VA responsible for the death of nearly 300 veterans waiting for care. Luckily, this sparked legislation pioneered by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to increase accountability and transparency within the VA. According to data retrieved from the Office of Personnel Management FedScope, in the three months following the passage of the VA Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act, firings for cause at the VA increased by 26 percent. FedScope data reveals the Department of Education has the lowest termination for cause rate at 0.14 percent, last year only 10 employees were terminated for cause. The most accountable department was the Department of Homeland Security, which had a 1 percent termination rate. But even when you factor in reductions in force and expiration of appointments, 3.37 percent is still well below the private sector’s 17.27 percent discharge and layoff rate. Nobody wants employees to be fired, but poor performance cannot continue to be rewarded and accepted, and our federal employees must be held to the same standard as all working Americans. After all, these are the employees who are technically working for the American people, we must require them to be their best. Natalia Castro is a contributing editor at Americans for Limited Government.

ears ago, as a kid, I got excited when my parents took me to a drive-in movie. Back then, movies and meals were almost the same. My mom is from Bethlehem, Palestine and she would cook a huge pot of lamb and rice stuffed grape leaves and bring it to the drive-in. We didn’t have a lot of money so the grape leaves replaced the expensive hot dogs and popcorn other movie-goers would buy from the concession stand. We’d snack and watch the movie listening through the scratchy sound from the gray box that hung from the top of the hand-rolled window in the car. The movie experience has changed a lot since then. Drive-in theaters have closed and you can’t sneak friends into the theater by hiding them in the trunk anymore, which is probably a good thing. Screens are larger. Pictures are clear, as if you were in the movie itself. The sound thunders from every direction. The stationary chairs have been replaced by comfortable lounges. And, they have seriously improved on the food. A few weeks ago, I went to the Emagine theater to see the latest Hollywood blockbuster, “A Quiet Place,” a horror film about frightening large-mouth monsters with rows of shark-like teeth. John Krasinski, from the TV comedy series “The Office,” produced and stars in it with his real-life wife, Emily Blunt, as two parents trying to protect three children from the aliens that don’t have eyes but hyper-sensitive auditory, or huge ears. When they hear sound, they pounce on it, ripping the clumsy humans to bloody pieces. And how better to enjoy a movie than ordering a tray of nachos with cheese and hamburger topping? The movie is 90 minutes long, but the first half is literally without sound. The actors sign to each other, with captions along the bottom of the screen. As the Quiet movie played out, the theater cashier delivered the nacho tray to my seat and realized I was in trouble after biting into the first nacho, which created this huge crunching sound. You don’t realize how loud crunching a nacho can sound until you are in a large theater, and you are the only one making a sound. People turned around to sneer at me with that same look you give to other movie-goers who are talking during movies. You know that look. I started to sweat and spent the first 50 minutes of the movie praying for sound so I could eat. A crackle. Music. Anything to drown out that crunching sounds. The nachos sat there taunting me, untouched, because I was too afraid to eat and cause a noisy ruckus. Finally, there was burst of sound and dramatic music. I then started stuffing my mouth as fast as I could. Snap. Crackle. Pop. People around me were stuffing popcorn in their mouths. Then the screen went silent, and everyone stopped chewing. Can the nachos melt in my mouth, I started to pray? I started thinking about the past, forgetting about the movie. I wouldn’t have had that problem at a drive-in theater, I sighed. Ray Hanania is an awardwinning columnist, author and former Chicago City Hall reporter. Contact him through his website at www. Hanania.com or by email at rghanania@gmail.com


Thursday, May 17, 2018

The Reporter

Son pays homage to Judy Baar Topinka

St. Mark Lutheran Church members to honor veterans at Marrs-Meyers AL Post Members of St. Mark Lutheran Church will be holding a special brunch to honor U.S. veterans for their service from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at the MarrsMeyer American Legion Post 991, 11001 S. Depot St., Worth. The St. Mark volunteers will be working in conjunction with the auxiliary and the members of the post to provide the brunch. Veterans and a guest are invited to attend. Along with the brunch,

‘Just Judy’ book offers life lessons By Steve Metsch The son of the late Judy Baar Topinka is hoping a book he has written about his mother can teach valuable lessons to young people. Joseph Baar Topinka, 50, who now lives in Texas and teaches employment law at Texas State University, has written “Just Judy,” an entertaining and interesting 96page book about his mom, one of Illinois’ most beloved politicians. He presented a brief videotape about his mother’s life, and then chatted with people at a book signing May 12 at the Riverside Public Library. Judy Baar Topinka lived much of her life in Riverside and it was there that she began her career in politics. She certainly had a loyal following, losing only one election. “Somebody had to tell the story. And what better person than her son?” he said. “Her life has a lot of great lessons we can all learn from, especially young people.” The colorful book is designed to act as a study guide for middleschool students, he said, but at the book signing, all the people there were adults. James Connelly, of Chicago, said Judy was popular because “she never forgot her roots and

what people were about.” “Wouldn’t you say we need a little bit more Judy? She was the most popular Republican in the state. Even Democrats liked her,” Connelly said. Judy Baar Topinka was all about four core issues, her son said. “Good government, civility, ethics and love of heritage, which is one reason I’m wearing this,” he said. He wore a bright red Czech Republic hockey jersey bearing the name of legendary NHL star Jaromir Jagr. His mother was proud of her Bohemian and Czech roots, he said. “This book is about her life and really about how she loved everybody and accepted everybody how they were,” he said. “It didn’t matter if you were Hispanic, African American, green, yellow, blue, vegetarian, transsexual, gay, lesbian, Czech, Polish, you were just a person. Honestly, if she could have done things without being affiliated with a party, I suspect she would have been on her own,” he said. A former reporter who earned her degree at Northwestern University’s prestigious Medill School of Journalism, she worked for several local newspapers before she decided to try her hand

Chicago Park District to host summer day camp The Chicago Park District will hold summer day camp sessions from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday, June 11 through Aug. 3, at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham Ave. The enrichment program will focus on age-appropriate activities and safety. Campers will learn new things while making friends. Each week will feature a variety of activities planned around weekly themes. Activities include weekly field trips, recreational swimming, special events, crafts, and large group games. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900 or visit www.chicagoridgeparks.com.

Play camp to be held at Freedom Activity Center The Chicago Ridge Park District will hold a min-summer play camp for children ages 3 to 5 from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, June 5 through July 12, at the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham Ave. The cost is $100 for residents and $150 for non-residents. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 636-4900 or visit www.chicagoridgeparks.com.

EVERGREEN PARK

EP Historical Commission seeks volunteers to mark village’s 125th year The Evergreen Park Historical Commission is looking for volunteers to assist with the 125th anniversary celebration of Evergreen Park that will include a variety of events that will begin this summer. The commission is looking for volunteers who like good, old-fashioned art and craft projects. Display boards are being created and volunteers are needed for cutting, pasting and helping with a variety of creative efforts. Individuals who are interested can send an email to epinf@hotmail.com for more information.

HICKORY HILLS

Rolling the dice with bunco Bunco will be on tap for adults ages 21 and up from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, May 18 at the Krueger Park Recreation Center, 9100 S. 88th Ave., Hickory Hills. Guests will also be treated to pizza, popcorn and refreshments. Participants will also win some gift certificates. The registration fee is $11 for residents and $13 for non-residents. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 598-1233

Grand Bingo Night to be held at Krueger Park

George Chronis

Photo by Steve Metsch

Joe Baar Topinka holds a copy of the book “Just Judy,” the life story of his mom, Judy Baar Topinka, a popular Illinois politician who died in December 2014.

at politics. She first ran and won a seat in the Illinois House in 1980 and won re-election in 1982. Judy Baar Topinka rose through the political ranks. After the House, she became a state senator, leaving that to win election as state treasurer. In 2006, she was the Republican candidate for governor, losing to the incumbent Rod Blagojevich. She got 39 percent of the vote to his 50. Four years later, she was back, elected state comptroller, becoming the first and only woman in Illinois politics to have held two statewide offices, her son noted. The book is an easy read. It includes letters from those who knew her well, people like Craig Dellimore, political edi-

OAK LAWN

Pryme Tymers host event to salute America The Pryme Tymers, a local senior organization, will hold a program saluting America beginning at 11 a.m. Thursday, May 24 at Trinity Covenant Church, 9230 S. Pulaski Road, Oak Lawn. Sandi Haynes, a cruise line entertainer, will provide a special patriotic performance entitled “Celebrate America.” The performance is being held in honor of Memorial Day to remember U.S veterans who died in the line of duty. Guests are encouraged to wear red, white and blue. A catered turkey breast luncheon will be served at noon. Reservations are $7 and are required by Friday, May 18. Reservations can be made by calling the church office, (708) 422-5111, or Tom Panush, (708) 636-7548. Non-perishable canned goods will also be collected for the Blue Island Salvation Army Food Pantry.

Oak Lawn film group to view, discuss ‘The Caine Mutiny’ CineVerse, the Oak Lawn Park District’s weekly film discussion group open to anyone age 17 and older, will screen and discuss the classic 1954 Hollywood drama “The Caine Mutiny” from 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 at the Oak View Community Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn. Members should check the building signage for the correct room number. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 529-9028 or visit cineversegroup.blogspot.com.

Stony Creek to host Memorial Day Golf Scramble The Oak Lawn Park District will host the Stony Creek’ Golf Course’s Memorial Day Golf Scramble beginning with a 7:30 a.m. shotgun start on Monday, May 28 at the course, 5850 W. 103rd St. The four-person scramble is open to all golfers who would like to have fun. The fee is $45 per player and includes green fee, cart fee, range balls, lunch and prizes. The entry deadline is Friday, May 25. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 857-2433.

Free summer concerts, movies will be held at Village Green Free summer concerts and movies will be offered at the Village Green, 95th Street and 52nd Avenue, Oak Lawn, beginning in June. The first concert is scheduled for Sunday, June 3, and the first movie will be screened on Friday, June 22. All six concerts begin at 7 p.m. Sundays, and all three movies will begin on Fridays at dusk. For a full listing of concerts and movies, check out the Summer 2018 Program Guide at www.olparks.com or call (708) 857-2200.

‘A Chorus Line’ to be held Grand Bingo Night will be offered from 1 at Oak View Center

to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at the Krueger Park Recreation Center, 9100 S. 88th Ave., Hickory Hills. During this special bingo night everyone is guaranteed a prize. The event is for participants who are at least 21 years old. The registration fee is $18 for residents and $19 for non-residents. The registration fee includes prizes, snacks, refreshments (coffee, pop and water) and dinner. More information can be obtained by calling the park district, (708) 598-1233 or visit www. hhparkdistrict.org.

free drawings and door prizes will be awarded. St. Mark volunteers and the Marrs-Meyer Post want to honor veterans who have either served at home, abroad, currently in active duty, or retired. Reservations are required by Saturday, May 12 by calling Vivian, (708) 4441720, or vivian22@comcast.net. Reservations can also be made by calling St. Mark Church, (708) 448-6555.

DEATH NOTICES

tor at WBBM Newsradio, who wrote that she taught others to “not be afraid to change careers in life.” On the book’s cover, President Barack Obama writes: “She was blunt, pragmatic, unfailingly cheerful and energetic, and always willing to put politics aside to find common-sense solutions that made a difference for the people of Illinois.” Her son says “my goal is not to make money, but to promote her legacy. Her legacy is teaching her core issues to young people so when they grow up they can bring Illinois into a golden age again.” You can order copies of the book ($16.95) at Hilton Publishing, at www.judybaartopinka. org, or at Amazon.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CHICAGO RIDGE

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Tickets are available for the Oak Lawn Park District Community Theatre’s production of “A Chorus Line,” which will be held at the Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St. The productions will be held on Friday, June 1, Saturday, June 2, Friday, June 8, and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, June 9. It will also run on at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 3 and Sunday, June 10. Tickets are $23 for adults and $22 for children ages 12 and under, and seniors 60 and over. Tickets are available at the Oak View Center by calling (708) 857-2200 or online at www.showtix4u.com.

Participants can compete in Oak Lawn’s ‘Got Talent’ auditions The Oak Lawn Park District’s “Got Talent” auditions will be held on Tuesday, June 12 and Wednesday, June 13 at the Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St. Finalists will perform from 3 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, July 4 at the Oak Lawn Park District’s “Party in the Park.” The winner will go on to perform at the evening fireworks show at Richards High School, 10601 S. Central Ave., Oak Lawn. The application deadline is Sunday, June 3. Applications are available at www.olparks.com and at all park district facilities. Once a completed application is turned in, an audition time will be determined. Oak Lawn’s Got Talent is offered in cooperation with the Oak Lawn Arts Commission. For more information, call (708) 857-2420.

WORTH

Veterans will be served brunch at Marrs-Meyer AL Post Members of St. Mark Evangelical Lutheran Church, 11007 S. 76th Ave., Worth, is inviting veterans and their guests for a special brunch honoring them for their services from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at the MarrsMeyer American Legion Post 991, 11001 S. Depot Ave., Worth. The staff at Marrs-Meyer AL Post is assisting in serving the residents. Veterans who have served or are currently in active duty can attend. Along with the brunch, free drawings and door prizes will be offered. More information can be obtained by calling Vivian, (708) 444-1720, or vivian22@comcast. net. Residents can also call St. Mark Church, (708) 448-6555.

Memorial Day service A Memorial Day service will be held for U.S. veterans who paid the ultimate sacrifice beginning at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 20 at the Veterans Memorial at 111th and Harlem Avenue in Worth. Visitors will have an opportunity to meet veterans and honor them for their service. Following the Memorial Day service, guests are welcome to drop by the Marrs-Meyer American Legion Post 991, 11001 S. Depot Ave., Worth, for food and refreshments.

Summer day camps will be held at Terrace Centre The Worth Park District will offer summer day camp activities beginning next month at the Terrace Centre, 11500 S. Beloit Ave. Various day camps will run from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, June 11 through Aug. 17. Activities will include field trips, pool days, craft sessions and games. More information can be obtained by calling the Worth Park District, (708) 448-7080, or visit www.worthparkdistrict.org.

New membership directory will be off red at St. Mark The new membership directory for St. Mark Evangelical Lutheran Church, 11007 S. 76th Ave., Worth, will be ready for publishing in August. Anyone interested in placing a business advertisement or personnel message in support of the new directory should call Dick Garfield at (800) 544-6903, ext. 112, or email to dgarfield@cathedraldirectories.com. A current ad or business card could be used, or help in making up a new ad.

George Chronis, M.D., 57, a Palos Park resident, died May 4 in Texas. Mr. Chronis, who was born in Evergreen Park, served the community for many years as an obstetrician and gynecologist. Survivors include his wife, Connie (nee Klier); daughter, Arianna; sons, Ian and Evans; mother, Demetra Chronis; sister, Helen Chronis; brother, Paul Chronis; uncle of Basil, Demi, Elena and Niki; and many relatives and friends and relatives. Services were Wednesday at SS Constantine & Helen Church in Palos Hills. Interment took place at Fairmount-Willow Hills Memorial Park. Arrangements were made by Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home.

Robert Colles Robert A. “Bob” Colles, 63, a Hickory Hills resident, died May 8. Mr. Colles was a plant manager for over 20 years at Kris Dec and Associates in South Elgin. Survivors include his wife, Sherry A. Colles; daughters, Jennifer Colles and Ashley Colles; brothers, Gerald Colles and John Colles; three grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Services were Tuesday at Colonial Chapel. Interment was private.

Patricia Fessler Patricia L. Fessler, 89, a former longtime Palos Heights resident, died April 19 at Peace Village in Palos Park. Mrs. Fessler was a coordinator for the Learning Resource Center. She was active in numerous civic organizations in Blue Island and Palos Heights. She was also an advocate for numerous library and media organizations locally, statewide and nationally. Survivors include a daughter, Barb Helwig; son, James Fessler; brothers, Paul McKeen and Dick McKeen; three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Visitation is from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Friday, May 18 at Schmaedeke Funeral Home, 10701 S. Harlem Ave., Worth. Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. at the funeral home. A columbarium interment will follow at Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery.

Joseph Pezdek Joseph Pezdek, 66, a Palos Park resident, died Monday at Palos Hospital. Mrs. Pezdek, a U.S. Army veteran, was a retired millwright at Reynolds Metal in McCook and owner of All-Around Home Repair. Survivors include his wife, Cecelia “CeCe” (nee Arnone); daughter, Danielle Kurkevich; sons, Jeremy Pezdek, Jason Pezdek, Jack Best, Jason Best and Tim Best; sisters, Sophia DeLonghi, Barb Benitez, Diane Russell and Irene Pietrowski; brother, Ed Pezdek; nine grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Visitation begins at 9 a.m. today (Thursday, May 17) at PalosGaidas Funeral Home, 11028 Southwest Highway, Palos Hills, until 10 a.m. for Mass at Our Lady of the Woods Church, 10731 W. 131st St., Orland Park.

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8 The Reporter

Thursday, May 17, 2018

COMINGS & GOINGS

Suggestions on meeting your short-term goals

New gas station for Hickory Hills

hy do you invest? If you’re like most people, you’d probably say that, among other things, you want to retire comfortably. Obviously, that’s a worthy long-term goal, requiring long-term investing. But as you journey through life, you’ll also have short-term goals, such as buying a second home, remodeling your kitchen or taking a much-needed vacation. Will you need to invest differently for these goals than you would for the long-term ones? To answer that question, let’s first look at how you might invest to achieve your longerterm goals. For these goals, the key investment ingrediScott ent is growth – quite simply, you want your Johnson money to grow as much as possible over time. Consequently, you will likely want a good percentage of growth-oriented vehicles, such as stocks and other stock-based investments, to fund your 401(k), IRA or other accounts. However, the flip side of growth is risk. Stocks and stockbased investments will always fluctuate in value — which means you could lose some, or even all, of your principal. Hopefully, though, by putting time on your side — that is, by holding your growth-oriented investments for decades — you can overcome the inevitable short-term price drops. In short, when investing for long-term goals, you’re seeking significant growth and, in doing so, you’ll have to accept some degree of investment risk. But when you’re after short-term goals, the formula is somewhat different: You don’t need maximum growth potential as much as you need to be reasonably confident that a certain amount of money will be there for you at a certain time. You may want to work with a financial professional to select the appropriate investments for your short-term goals. But, in general, you’ll need these investments to provide you with the following attributes: • Protection of principal: As mentioned above, when you own stocks, you have no assurance that your principal will be preserved; there’s no agency, no government office, guaranteeing that you won’t lose money. And even some of the investments best suited for short-term goals won’t come with full guarantees, either, but, by and large, they do offer you a reasonable amount of confidence that your principal will remain intact. • Liquidity: Some short-term investments have specific terms — i.e., two years, three years, five years, etc. — meaning you do have an incentive to hold these investments until they mature. Otherwise, if you cash out early, you might pay some price, such as loss of value or loss of the income produced by these investments. Nonetheless, these types of investments are usually not difficult to sell, either before they mature or at maturity, and this liquidity will be helpful to you when you need the money to meet your short-term goal. • Stability of issue: Although most investments suitable for short-term goals do provide a high degree of preservation of principal, some of the issuers of these investments are stronger and more stable than others – and these strong and stable issuers are the ones you should stick with. Ultimately, most of your investment efforts will probably go toward your long-term goals. But your short-term goals are still important — and the right investment strategy can help you work toward them.

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roviso Petroleum Co. is planning to build a new Falcon Fuel gas station and convenience store at the site of a former Clark gas station in Hickory Hills. The Clark station at 8702 S. Roberts Road closed in 2016 but wasn’t torn down until earlier this year. The property is surrounded by a chain-link fence. Proviso originally proposed building a new gas Bob station, convenience store studio apartment on Bong and the site, but Hickory Hills officials nixed the idea of an apartment. Mayor Mike Howley said no other gas stations in the city had apartments and he didn’t want to set a precedent. In March, the city council voted unanimously to approve a special use permit minus the apartment for the site. The property owner is William Stefan. He could not be reached for comment. No timetable for building the new station and convenience store was available.

School buys restaurant Sad to report, but the work underway at the former Coco’s restaurant at 9505 S. Roberts Road in Hickory Hills will not result in a new restaurant for the area. The neighboring School District 117 purchased the 6,000-square-foot building last year and is converting it into a new transportation building for the district. The project started earlier this year at an estimated cost of $1.6 million. The district had been planning on a mobile transportation building since late 2015, but decided to buy the restaurant building when it became available.

Police reports Continued from Page 2

said she appeared intoxicated and refused to take field sobriety tests or submit a breath sample. She was also cited for illegal use of an electronic communication device while driving and illegal transportation of alcohol because a half-empty bottle of tequila was found in the car, according to police. She is due in court on June 9.

Palos Hills Street racing

• Paul Vivirito, 25, of Palos Hills, and Analizbeth Munoz, 23, of Chicago, were charged with street racing following a traffic stop at 7 a.m. May 7 in the 11000 block of South Roberts Road. Police said Vivirito was also cited for driving without a front license plate and Munoz for failure to yield to an emergency vehicle. Both were also cited for failure to notify the secretary of state of an address change. They are due in court on June 18. • Marcin Kruzel, 20, of Justice, and a 16-year-old male juvenile, were arrested for street racing at 7 p.m. Sunday in the 10200 block of South 76th Avenue. Police said Kruzel was also cited for reckless driving, driving without insurance, illegal screeching of tires, driving with a defective windshield, driving with tinted windows, driving without a front license plate, and driving with a loud muffler. He is due in court on May 31.

Deceptive practices Police are investigating a deceptive practices complaint received at 2:30 p.m. May 7 from a resident of Palos Hills reported being scammed out of money by following directions given on

Photo by Bob Bong

A fence surrounds the site of a former Clark gas station slated for redevelopment at 87th and Roberts Road in Hickory Hills.

Hair shop wins Chicago Ridge Pop-Up Battle Robin Wilson and her custom hair business Le’ Tresses are the winners of the Battle of the Pop-Ups at Chicago Ridge Mall. Wilson had been selling her luxury, custom hair products exclusively online. She now has a rent-free space for four months, use of existing mall or store fixtures, and free utilities. She also receives a $500 merchandising package from the mall that includes interior signage, table-printed displays and graphic design services. “I’m very grateful to win and be placed in such a large and busy mall in the city,” said Wilson, 25, who lives in Chicago and founded the business. “I am blessed to have such an opportunity.” Le’ Tresses specializes in high quality, virgin hair wigs and strip lashes. Wilson carefully crafts each wig to her customer’s request. She is known for her expertise in color, soft and deep waves as well as full lace wigs. “Our contest highlights local entrepreneurs like Robin by giving them a platform to build their business and introduce new ideas, products or services to the community,” said Sandy Martinez, marketing director at Chicago Ridge Mall. “We’re excited to celebrate Le’ Tresses grand

a pop-up computer ad stating the computer had a virus. The victim said that after calling a number on the ad to solve the virus problem, remote access was gained to the computer and money was withdrawn from a bank account.

Theft crimes • A cellphone and keys were reported stolen from a home in the 10700 block of South Roberts Road at about 1 p.m. May 8. The resident of the home told police than an ex-boyfriend returned to the home and took the items. • Two rings were reported stolen from a home in Cour D’Alene at noon on May 10. The resident told police that the items were taken sometime over the past several weeks. She said only she and her husband live in the residence but several other people have access to it.

DUI charge Steven Witkus, 40, of Oak Lawn, was arrested on an outstanding Palos Hills warrant for driving under the influence of alcohol at 4:30 p.m. Friday. Police said that while in custody, he required medical attention and was taken to Palos Hospital. While there, he allegedly became agitated and struck the accompanying officer in the head while threatening to “break his nose.” When he was released, he was charged with aggravated battery to a peace officer and aggravated assault. He was held for a bond hearing.

Aggravated speeding Kamil Sagula, 21, of Palos Hills, was charged with aggravated speeding following a traffic stop at 11 p.m. Saturday in the 9900 block of South Roberts Road. He was also cited for driving with a loud muffler. He is due in court on June 18.

opening this June and look forward to supporting Robin and her amazing business throughout the summer.” Le’ Tresses will be located between Express and Charlotte Russe.

O’Hara and Friends Salon has new home Cathy O’Hara, who opened O’Hara and Friends Salon in Alsip in 2013, recently moved into a bigger space in Palos Heights. “We built a great business and wanted to offer more services for our guests so we moved and opened a bigger space in Palos Heights,” she said. The salon is now at 7008 W. 127th St. “Now we can not only do hair but can offer nail services, facials and waxing. We also have a lady that offers energy services such as Reiki and Reflexology,” O’Hara said. Hours at the new location are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. The salon is closed Sunday and Monday. For more information, call (708) 239-1111. If you see a new business in town or wonder what happened to an old favorite, drop me a line at bobbong@hotmail.com. You can track business openings and closings at http://bobbongonbusiness.com/

Criminal damage Viera Koscakova, 37, of Hickory Hills, was charged with criminal damage to property following a disturbance at 2 p.m. Sunday in Cour St. Tropez. Police said she allegedly got into an argument with the owner of the home she was staying in and cut the cords to all the appliances in the kitchen. She is due in court on June 18.

Worth

Suspended license • Rosezetta M. Fluker, 41, of Orlando, Fla., was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 11:35 p.m. May 5 in the 6400 block of West 111th Street. Police said she was also cited for aggravated speeding, going 62 mph in a 30mph zone. She is due in court on June 5. • John Terry, 18, of Hammond, Ind., was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 10:08 p.m. May 5 in the 6700 block of West 111th Street. Police said he was also cited for driving without headlights when required. He is due in court on June 5. • Aous M. Odeh, 19, of the 10300 block of South Ridgeland Avenue, Chicago Ridge, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 6:57 p.m. April 28 in the 10700 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was also cited for speeding, driving without insurance and failure to signal when required. He is due in court on June 5.

Outstanding warrant Alexander Mullican, 24, of the 6500 block of West 111th Street, was arrested on an outstanding Chicago Ridge warrant after police responded to a 911 call at 7:15 p.m. May 3 at Fairplay Foods,

6620 W. 111th St. Police said he was stopped outside the store after allegedly trying to steal merchandise. Employees said he returned the items and was banned from the store but no theft charges were filed. However, the warrant for failure to appear in court was discovered and he was turned over to Chicago Ridge police.

Unlicensed driving • Edward M. West, 21, of the 8800 block of South Ryan Road, Hometown, was charged with driving a motorcycle without a valid license following a traffic stop at 1:46 p.m. April 30 in the 11500 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said his passenger, Amanda Forbes, 22, of Hometown, was cited for not wearing protective glasses. West is due in court on June 5. • Jose Tepetlanco, 28, of the 3300 block of South Western Avenue, Chicago, was charged with driving without a valid license following a traffic stop at 11:55 a.m. April 27 in the 11600 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he also was cited for having no front license plate. He is due in court on June 5. • Travon D. Anderson, 23, of the 4000 block of Fir Street, East Chicago, was charged with driving without a valid license following a traffic stop at 9:48 p.m. April 27 in the 10600 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was also cited for driving without insurance, failure to signal when required, obstructed windshield and having an excessively loud muffler. He is due in court on June 5. Police reports are provided by law enforcement agencies. Charges are not evidence of guilt. They are a record of police actions taken, and persons charged with a crime are presumed innocent until proved guilty in a court of law.

Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, (708) 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

Mortgage Rates Mortgage Rates Around the Area Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of May 14)

Chicago Ridge Element Inv Corp to Mutan Abdel O, 9645 S Harlem Ave, Unit #1F, $82,000.00; Kirkner Andrew G to Cleveland Grace, 6430 W Pamela Ln, Unit #643011, $66,000.00; Hurckes Richard J to Trojanowski Anita, 7006 98th St, Unit #1B7006, $45,000.00.

Evergreen Park White Virginia R to Cervantes Margarita, 9213 S Lawndale Ave, Unit #$122,500.00; Intercounty Judicial Sales Corp to North Shore Holdings Ltd, 9800 S Artesian Ave, $106,000.00; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Kirchner Kenneth, 3328 W 95th St, $50,000.00; Pci Llc to Cannon Angela S, 3143 W 98th Pl, $200,000.00.

Oak Lawn Pilipauskas Laverne to Forlenza

Gina Marie, 6211 S Melvina Ave, Unit #62112NW, $135,000.00; Community Initiatives Inc to Joda Prop Inc, 9224 Menard Ave, $75,000.00; Bankfinancial Tr to Vega Kamila R, 4989 Wick Dr, $199,000.00; Jarzabek Franciszek to Wokoun Diane R, 6343 W 89th Pl, $190,000.00; Kania Grzegorz to Lopez Ricky S, 10241 S Central Ave, Unit #1A, $93,000.00; Hernandez Jose A to Kent Jacqueline M, 9924 Kilpatrick Ave, $350,000.00; Streit Robert J to Gaoat Jeri A, 9841 53rd Ave, $240,000.00; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Ramirez Belen, 5220 W 107th St, $400,000.00; Schwarz Carolynn L to Washington O Neda, 4823 109th St, Unit #5304, $60,000.00; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Marquez Leticia, 4009 93rd Pl, Unit #40094D, $100,000.00; Masoud Faruk to Zapien Jorge, 8708 50th Ave, $225,000.00; Lindemuider Sadie Tr to Walsh Martin R, 10012 Kilbourn Ave, $250,000.00; Mitchell John W to Antunez

Giovanni, 5853 W 88th Pl, $240,000.00.

Palos Hills Kanan Ismail to Hammad Saed, 10732 W Doric Cir, $278,000.00; Trejo Frances to Manaa Salma, 10615 S 82nd Ave, $187,000.00; Kim Domingo to Skiba Conrad Tr, 8697 W 111th St, Unit #1C,

APR 4.670 4.180 4.430

POINTS 0 0 0

APR 4.651 4.292 4.434

POINTS 0 0 0

APR 4.491 4.284 3.952

POINTS 0 0 0

APR 4.830 4.6470 4.334

POINTS 1 0 0

United Trust Bank (as of May 14)

RATES 4.625 4.250 4.375

30-year fi ed 15-year fi ed 10-year fi ed

Prospect Savings Bank (as of May 15) RATES 4.375 4.125 3.750

30-year fi ed 20-year fi ed 15-year fi ed

CNB Bank & Trust, N.A. (as of May 15) RATES 4.625 4.50 4.250

30-year fi ed 20-year fi ed 15-year fi ed

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

LEGAL NOTICE CCCO 0037 -11/03/14: Notice of Hearing on Petition to Change Name of a Minor

AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS Following are the property transfers in the area, according to the latest report, as received from the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office. The Reporter Newspaper does not attempt to correct errors made by that office.

RATES 4.625 4.125 4.375

30-year fi ed 15-year fi ed 30-year fi ed Jumbo

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT, COUNTY DIVISION

$152,000.00;

Worth Hogate William B Tr to Jarosz Maciej, 6741 W 113th Pl, $255,000.00; Evtuch Scott R to Preston Jessica, 11501 S Oak Park Ave, $156,000.00; Nowara Hashem to Farroukh Samer, 7308 W 111th St, $250,000.00.

LEGAL NOTICE WATERS EDGE ESTATES 7240 W. 107th Street Worth, IL 60482 708-671-1540

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF Natalie Albadri by Biological Mother Rou Abuhlaleh (NA) __________________________________________________________ (Minor’s Initials)

of Change of Name to

18 M5 003352 Case No. ____________________________

Ella Sofi Abuhlaleh (NA) __________________________________________________________

(Minor’s Initials)

NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION TO CHANGE NAME OF A MINOR Omer Mohammad TO: ________________________________________ 6071 N.W. 61 Ave #210 _____________________________________________ Tamarac, FL 33319 _____________________________________________ June 21 2018 203 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that on _____________________________, ________ in Courtroom ______________ 1:30 at _____________ a.m./p.m. (Circle one.) in the Courthouse located at:  Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Room __________ Chicago, Illinois 60602  District 2 - Skokie, 5600 Old Orchard Road, Skokie, Illinois 60077  District 3 - Rolling Meadows, 2121 Euclid, Rolling Meadows, Illinois 60008  District 4 - Maywood, 1500 Maybrook Avenue, Maywood, Illinois 60153  District 5 - Bridgeview, 10220 South 76th Avenue, Bridgeview, Illinois 60455 ■

 District 6 - Markham, 16501 South Kedzie Parkway, Markham, Illinois 60426

NOTICE OF REMOVAL AND DISPOSAL THE FOLLOWING ABANDON MANUFACTURED HOME WILL BE REMOVED FROM THE SITE AND DISPOSED OF ON OR AFTER MAY 25, 2018 UNLESS THE OWNER CONTACTS SOUTHWEST ESTATES LAST KNOW OWNER Dennis Doyle 7240 W. 107th Street, Site #45 WORTH, IL 60482

NA a hearing will be held on the Petition to Change the Name of _________________________________________________ , (Minor’s Initials)

 your minor child ■

 a child in your legal custody (Select one.). You may appear and be heard on this matter at that date

and time. The matter may be continued from time to time. You will receive no additional notification.

Natalie Albadri by Biological Mother Rou Abuhlaleh _____________________________________________ Petitioner (Print name.)

Under penalties of perjury as provided by law under Section 1-109 of the Code of Civil Procedure I state that a copy of the 7415 W. 63rd St., Summit above notice was served upon the person(s) name above by depositing same in the U.S. Mail at ________________________

4:00 IL, 60501 ______________________________________________________________ (place of mailing) at ____________ a.m./p.m. 2018 April 26 on _____________________________, ________ with proper postage prepaid.

_____________________________________________ Signature of Person Serving Notice

DOROTHY BROWN, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS Page 1 of 1


The Reporter

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Zoning

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C-2, a commercial shopping district. “C-3 is usually for shopping centers, like the Chicago Ridge Mall,” said Coglianese, who has received “a lot of calls” from concerned residents since the sign went up last week. “The rezoning is a good thing. It is not going to change the church. It’s our church, as long as it is here. The rezoning would only affect the church site if the Archdiocese decides to sell it,” she said. “The only change is, we are upping the value of the property by changing the zoning,” said the trustee. “Property in a C-2 zone is worth much more than in an R-1. We’re actually helping the Archdiocese if they decide to sell

Light

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go through. “Working with IDOT to get anything done is very frustrating,” said Mayor Chuck Tokar at several meetings this year when the issue was brought up. “I suppose if we could pay for it all ourselves, it would be different.” The village actually did agree to pay upfront for some of the preliminary work to get the process started. As an interim solution while waiting for the streetlight, village officials installed flashing yellow lights that warn of the intersection, but Gino Amato, who looks out on the intersection from his balcony, said they have not helped. “No one pays attention to them, or obey the stop signs,” he said. “I told the mayor I often see two accidents a week there,” said Amato, who lives on the Oak Lawn side of the intersection. “I’ve seen some very serious accidents there and at least one fatality since 2010.” One corner of the intersection marks the border between Chicago Ridge and Oak Lawn, with the northeast corner being in Oak Lawn. Amato has appealed to Oak Lawn as well. But most of the collisions occur on the Chicago Ridge side of the intersection because the cars are coming out of the mall. “The cars often inch out into traffic past the stop sign, or don’t stop at all before crossing Ridgeland,” said Amato. In late April, the village issued

Durbin

the school property. I really feel it is a plus for the Archdiocese.” “The village has to look to the future. The Carson’s store in Chicago Ridge Mall brought in $473,000 in tax revenue to the village last year. With it closing, we won’t have that next year,” she noted. “This is just being proactive.” Coglianese said that leaving the zoning residential would not be worthwhile. Although houses are located on Ridgeland now, they were built when it was a quieter street. It has become a busy thoroughfare since the Chicago Ridge Mall opened, and is now lined with businesses, in addition to Chicago Ridge Mall a few blocks north. “I can’t imagine very many people would build a house on that section of Ridgeland now,” said the trustee. an invitation for statements of qualifications from IDOT prequalified engineering firms that want to assist with the completion of Engineering Phase III for the installation of new traffic signal and associated intersection improvements. But Pufundt said it could still be next May before the streetlight is up, and even that is not guaranteed. “We don’t want to wait until next year to get that light. I don’t want to think of the number of accidents we will see,” said Amato. In an effort to spur some action, Amato also sent accident reports to investigative reporter Pam Zekman with CBS Channel 2 News, but does not expect much to come of it either. Trustee Lisel Kwartnik suggested putting up a “right-turn only” sign at the 99th Street exit from the mall, so vehicles wouldn’t be crossing traffic lanes on Ridgeland to go north or east. However, Pufundt reported at a recent meeting that while the village is entitled to do that, traffic engineers advised against it because it would cause back-ups on Ridgeland. “The timing of the lights would have to be changed,” said Pufundt, and then changed back when the new light is finally installed. “We’re getting the runaround,” said Marilyn Scalfaro, a neighbor of Amato’s who is equally upset about all the delays. “We should at least have a four-way stop there,” suggested Scalfaro, who said she has witnessed at least one fatal crash there in recent years.

North Dakota set a precedent in 1992 in which sales tax can only be enforced on businesses that have a physical location in a state. When South Dakota passed a law requiring large online-only retailers to charge sales tax on in-state purchases, Wayfair, Overstock.com and Newegg refused, citing the Quillprecedent. That led to a lawsuit from the state, which made its way all the way to the Supreme Court. Durbin said a decision by the Supreme Court that would allow for local governments to collect sales taxes from Amazon and other online companies would help to level the playing field. The Supreme Court is expected to rule on South Dakota v. Wayfair Inc. in June. “You (local municipalities) are being denied revenue because these online companies do not have to pay a sales tax,” Durbin said. No one is more painfully aware of this dilemma than Chicago Ridge Mayor Chuck Tokar, who is reeling from the fact that Carson’s announced that it will be closing its store at the Chicago Ridge Mall. Although Tokar was aware that Bon-Ton Stores, Inc., the company that owned Carson’s, had filed for bankruptcy in February, it was his understanding that because the store was still profitable, a new buyer would be found. But a bankruptcy judge on April 18 approved the sale of Bon-Ton’s assets, which included Carson’s, to two liquidation firms. Tokar was not sure how long the store would remain open, but some employees at the Chicago Ridge Mall location said it will

close at the end of June. Tokar keeps in contact with Chicago Ridge Mall management to discuss any further options. But the Chicago Ridge mayor said that it will be difficult to replace Carson’s, which was an upscale store and anchor at the south end of the mall. Currently, he is not aware of what retailer will replace Carson’s, which has two floors and is 150,000 square feet. “Unless the Supreme Court does something, I’m not sure what we will do,” Tokar said. “We have our fingers crossed.” Evergreen Park Mayor James Sexton saw a successful opening of a new Carson’s in September 2016. The store was the new anchor of the new outdoor Plaza at 9700 S. Western Ave. Like Tokar, Sexton believed that Carson’s would survive despite Bon-Ton Stores filing for bankruptcy. Despite his disappointment that Carson’s would soon close, Sexton said that Lormax Stern Development Company, which owns the new Plaza development, have indicated to him that several retailers have expressed an interest in the Evergreen Park Carson’s location, which is 120,470 square feet. Recent reports have indicated that at least three retailers are interested in leasing the property. Durbin is holding out hope that a favorable decision will be coming out of South Dakota. However, he said that more needs to be done at the local and national levels of government. “It’s been hectic,” Durbin said. “We should be doing more but we are not. But we have people in Washington that won’t vote on anything that involves raising taxes. It makes it hard to get something done for people. We have to keep up with the 21st century.”

SUDOKU

CROSSWORD

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Answers

Answers

9

Conrady Junior High students recite requests to mayor A group of sixth-graders got on their “soapboxes” and made impassioned pleas for change in the city of Hickory Hills. Fortunately, they had the right person’s ear to bend as they delivered those impassioned speeches: Hickory Hills Mayor Mike Howley. The speeches were part of a change in the sixth-grade social studies curriculum on democracy at Conrady Junior High School in Hickory Hills. Conrady Team Leader Adie McHugh said the idea came from the C-3 Social Studies Standards that stresses inquiry. “The idea was to show students what democracy was all about,” McHugh said. “We wanted them to know they can have a voice in their community.” The two sixth-grade teachers who led the effort are Matt Anderson and Kristine Frickenstein. All 11 students who spoke praised the city for being “a great community with lots to offer.” However, they said there were some changes they would like to see made. They made it clear that raises taxes to pay for the

Samantha Kavaliauskaite, a sixthgrade student at Conrady Junior High School in Hickory Hills, recites a speech she prepared calling for changes for Hickory Hills.

Yosef Muhammad, a sixth-grade student at Conrady Junior High School, rehearses his speech on changes for Hickory Hills.

improvements was no object at all. How their parents think of that idea may be a whole other story. Yosef Mohammad said while “Hickory Hills is an amazing community,” he would like to see additional surveillance cameras in town to help prevent crimes. He cited a study from a town in California that added surveillance cameras and saw a

significant drop in crimes, which they attributed to the additional cameras. Yosef suggested holding fundraisers to raise money for the cameras. Samantha Kavaliauskaite asked the mayor to call for a tax increase to install additional red-light cameras at more intersections.

NASA

Continued from Page 1

available to inform the adults and kids about some of the samples and space exploration. Visitors could view the disks, take photos and look at them under a magnifying glass. A steady flow of adults and children entered the room for the next hour to view the samples. Along with the disks and the pamphlets, a slide show was available to view locations on the moon where U.S astronauts have landed and specific regions of the planet. Members of the Mankowski family, of Evergreen Park, were on hand to view the samples and read the literature. Ray Mankowski was joined by his daughter, Charlotte, 9, and son, R.J., 7. He had a keen interest in the display because he is a biol-

Supplied photos

ogy and earth science teacher at Evergreen Park Community High School. “Yes, this all very interesting to me,” he said. “I wanted to take the kids here to show them all of this. They are interested, too.” Suzie Klimowski was joined by her daughter, Megan. The Evergreen Park residents said when they found out about this event, they wanted to come. “My daughter is very interested in this,” Suzie Klimowski said. The lunar and meteorite samples are intended for classrooms ranging from kindergarten through high school. Between 1969 and 1972, six Apollo missions returned with 842 pounds of lunar rocks, core samples, pebbles, sand and dust from the moon. The six space flights brought back 2,200 separate samples from six different exploration sites on the moon, according to NASA. The samples are housed in a special sample building at

“We have one red-light camera in Hickory Hills,” she said. “I think we need more.” Natalia Tyrala urged the mayor to call on the community to conserve water. “Water is a natural resource that is needed to survive,” she said. “People take water for granted.” She suggested people shut off the water while they are brushing their teeth and to take quicker showers. Omar Shatat suggested the city needs more public art. “It seems that we only have art displays inside public buildings,” he said. “We have such diversity in this town that we need to have different artists represent that diversity and show it off around the city.” Omar asked Howley to “raise taxes for eight to 12 months to pay the artists.” Howley listened attentively to the speeches and thanked the kids for their input. He said he would share the students’ concerns with the city council at an upcoming meeting.

the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Nearly 400 lunar samples are prepared and distributed each year for research and teaching projects. Study of the lunar samples brought back by the Apollo missions continue to provide information about the moon, which is believed to have been formed from debris knocked off the earth 4.4 billion years ago by a planetary body the size of Mars, according to NASA. That was just some of the information that Keaty and Stone shared with visitors to the library. The lunar disk contained fragments of rock and soil samples found on the planet. Keaty and Stone, who was accompanied by her grandson, Killian Luckhard, 9, of Orland Park, were delighted that the program interested so many residents. “It was fun and I’m glad we did this,” Keaty said. “It is educational and I think everyone is enjoying this.”

LIBRARY HAPPENINGS

CHICAGO RIDGE

milkweed, butterfly gardening or plants in general. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 422-8522.

The next “Saturday Sew-In” session will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at the Chicago Ridge Library, 10400 S. Oxford Ave. Patrons can work on their latest projects, which include quilting, knitting and stamping. Sewing machines are available upon request. More information about the free program can be obtained by calling the library, (708) 423-7753, or visit the website at www.chicagoridgelibrary.org.

OAK LAWN

Sewing lessons at library

Reliving memories of old game shows “Those Wacky Game Shows” will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 21 at the Chicago Ridge Library. Residents who remember old TV game shows that included celebrity guests like Liberace, Bobby Darin and Jack Benny will be interested in this session. Steve Cooper will show old flim clips of the old “Gong Show, “Make Me Laugh” and “Password.” The free presentation will include musical numbers. More information can be obtained by calling the library, (708) 423-7753, or visit the website at www.chicagoridgelibrary.org.

View images of artist Diego Velasquez A variety of images of esteemed artists will be showcased during “Mastery, Mystery and Majesty” from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 31 at the Chicago Ridge Library. Author Dawn Patitucci, who wrote “The Queen’s Prophet,” will provide a retrospective on Diego Velasquez, a preeminent painter of the Spanish Golden Age. His works focus on humble tavern scenes, royal portraits and his masterpiece, “Las Meninas.” The presentation will transport viewers to 17th century Spain. Patrons will be able to view one of the finest images in the Western canon by one of the most esteemed artists in history. More information can be obtained by calling the library, (708) 423-7753, or visit the website atwww.chicagoridgelibrary.org.

EVERGREEN PARK

Snack and study sessions offered for high school students Snack and study for high school students studying for final exams will be offered this month at the Oak Lawn Library, 9427 S. Raymond Ave. High school students can bring their books and friends to the library to study. Extra supplies and snacks will be provided by library staff members. Study sessions will be offered this month from 3 to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 3 to 6 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. More information about this and other teen programs can be obtained by calling (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

1967 Oak Lawn tornado exhibit will soon end April 21 marked the 51st anniversary of the devastating tornado that struck Oak Lawn and surrounding communities and in recognition of the 50th anniversary, Local History unveiled the exhibit “Voices in the Wind: Remembering the 1967 Tornado” at the Oak Lawn Library. The exhibit features 200 images, archival footage of the aftermath and recollections from witnesses. The display is located in the second floor Local History Room of the library. The exhibit ends on Friday, May 18. Residents are asked to view the exhibit before it closes. For more information about this and other programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Discuss summer book releases The Anderson’s Bookshop booktalker and fiction staff from the Oak Lawn Library will discuss the upcoming summer book releases at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 24 at the library. The session will focus on a discussion about new books from favorite authors and the waiting lists for the books. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Celebrate Royal Family Wedding with tea

Book sale donations are requested at library

Patrons can celebrate the wedding of Prince William and Meghan Markle with a “Royal Family Wedding Royal Tea” at 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at the Evergreen Park Library, 9400 S. Troy Ave. Celebrate the wedding of the royal couple by sipping tea, eating finger sandwiches and desserts. Guests will also play Royal Family trivia. Visitors can also have their picture taken in front of St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 422-8522.

Patrons can donate gently-used books, magazines, CDs and videos for the ongoing book sale at the Oak Lawn Library. The book sale donations are sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Due to space limitations, the Friends will not accept “Readers Digest Condensed Books,” encyclopedias and older text books. The donation drop-off area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the customer services desk to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their donation. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents, and magazines cost 10 cents each. Audio visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programs and purchases beyond the regular budget.

Butterfly Garden Plant sale to be held at library

The Butterfly Garden Plant Sale will be held from 10 a.m. to noon beginning Wednesday, May 23 through Saturday, May 26 at the Evergreen Park Library. Bob Erlich, curator of the Evergreen Park Public Library’s garden and monarch waystation, offers plants from his home garden. He will offer common and tropical milkweed, bee-lovin’ perennials, vegetable plants, and more for sale in the lobby. Proceeds fund maintenance of the library garden throughout the season. He will also answer questions about

PALOS HILLS

Brain function class A class that provides lesson in improving and maintaining brain function will be held beginning at 10 a.m. Friday, May 18 at the Green Hills Library, 10331 S. Interlochen Drive, Palos Hills. The brain fitness program

is based on neuroplasticity that activates all six functions of the brain. These exercises, based on everyday movements that are natural and organic, focus on the healthy longevity of the body and mind. This event is for adults only. Registration is limited to 40. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Offer session in organizing digital photography Tips in how to locate and organize digital photography in computers will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 21 at the Green Hills Library. Beth Randall, a professional organizer, will walk patrons through simple steps to help them organize and navigate their digital photos. This event is for adults only. Registration is limited to 90. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Book club discussion will be held for youths A book discussion for kids ages 10 to 17 will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 at the Green Hills Library. Snacks will be provided. Copies of the book will be available at the youth services desk. Registration is limited to 15. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

History of henna explored The history of henna will be explored beginning at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 at the Green Hills Library. Patrons will learn the history behind henna, get henna designs applied, and decorate cookies with henna art. The event is for adults only. Registration is limited to 20. Register online at www. greenhillslibrary.org.

Family Bingo will includes prizes Family Bingo will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 24 at the Green Hills Library. Participants can play bingo for prizes and everyone is a winner. Registration is limited to 60. Children of all ages are welcome. Caregivers must register as well. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Patrons can make mini desk aquariums Patrons can design and decorate their own stylish mini aquarium that could be placed on a desk. Sessions will be held at 2 p.m. or 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 30 at the Green Hills Library. Participants will be allowed to bring home their own pet fish. All supplies are included. The sessions are for adults only. Registration is limited to 20. Due to high demand, two sessions are being offered. Patrons are limited to registering for only one session. Register online at www. greenhillslibrary.org.

WORTH

‘Radio and the Great American Songbook’ will be discussed A program entitled “Radio and the Great American Songbook” will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, May 21 at the Worth Public Library, 6917 W. 111th St. The session will be held in the library meeting room. The program will be presented by radio host Steve Darnall, who will take a look at American history and popular culture by examining how early radio affected the way people listened and the way they lived. He will feature radio appearances by legendary songwriters George Gershwin, Cole Porter and Irving Berlin. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 448-2855.


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Supplied photo

Jim Kruse (back row, left), who organizes a volunteer group to send care packages to U.S. troops overseas, joins U.S. Air Force Sgt. Josh Reed and fourth- and fifth-grade students at St. Patricia Elementary School. The sergeant visited the school to speak to students about his experiences overseas.

U.S. Air Force sergeant talks to St. Patricia students The faculty and students at St. Patricia Elementary School in Hickory Hills welcomed a member of the U.S. Air Force who was on hand to speak to students and answer questions. Sgt. Josh Reed spoke to students

Welcome to the forefront.

in the third through eighth grade about the armed forces and serving overseas. Students were honored to see the sergeant and greeted him in their classrooms and as he walked through the hallways. Students listened about his experiences in Syria, Iraq and Qatar. Students were able to ask him questions and found out that Northern Syria looks a lot like a green version of Nebraska. Reed also showed the students an American flag that was flown into combat on a B-52 in support of Operation Inherent Resolve and Operation Freedom’s Sentinel. Reed noted how the student’s correspondences were akin to having surrogate children write to them and send them cards. The effort, coordinated by Kruse Krews, a volunteer group local

OLCHS dean speaks at conference

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to Hickory Hills and Palos Hills led by Jim Kruse, sends care packages to U.S. troops serving overseas in order to honor those men and women defending the U.S. and to let them know they are not forgotten. “Your letters make all the difference. From myself and all those who wear this uniform, thank you. From the bottom of my heart, thank you,” Reed said. The framed U.S. combat flag can be viewed during Masses over Memorial Day weekend, May 26 and 27, at St. Patricia Church, 9050 S. 86th Ave., Hickory Hills. Kruse is following orders to “let it fly” by accompanying the flag to various local schools and sharing with the children the difference their efforts make to the men and women who serve the U.S.

Jamie Hernandez, the dean at Oak Lawn Community High School, gave a presentation during the Illinois State Deans’ Association Spring Conference recently in Schaumburg. Hernandez was part of a panel of over 100 deans and administrators from junior and high schools statewide. The presentation titled “Social Suspension and Probation” highlighted best practices in social suspension polices and implementation. Supplied photo

Brannigan

Continued from Page 3

The appearance by multiple Brannigan supporters at Monday’s meeting, when no supporters have been heard from in almost all previous meetings, may have been prompted by an email. A copy was given to the newspaper in the parking lot of Township headquarters, 10802 S. Roberts Road, in Palos Hills. “I fully anticipate the protestors will be at this meeting again trying to obstruct a government meeting,” it read. “The protestors continue to refuse to meet to start a conversation and, as expected, no further contact with the Department of Justice has been had by the township. “I am encouraging everyone to come out to the Township Meeting if only to see fascism in action. This is the new face of the democrat party: Scream and throw a fit until you get your way.” The copy of the email included notification of a Citizens Utility Board meeting the township will be hosting May 30 at 10 a.m. and concluded “Please contact me at if you have any questions or would like to donate or volunteer for my campaign for re-election. At last month’s meeting, in a surprise interview with Southwest Regional Publishing, Brannigan said she chooses not to encourage her supporters to attend the meetings due to her concerns about security. Palos Township government provides a variety of services to all or parts of Bridgeview, Hickory Hills, Orland Park, Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Palos Park, Willow Springs and Worth. Outside, Brannigan supporter Greg Lombardi, who said he lives in the township, expressed his opinion. “The problem I find with most of these people is that they can’t agree to disagree,” he said. “Just because you don’t have the same political views they do, immediately they start the name calling. “You’re a racist, you’re a big-

ot, you’re a homophobe, you’re this, you’re that,” Lombardi said. “Then they shout you down.” “I have neighbors who are Palestinian and Muslim,” said a woman standing nearby. “They’ve been here for 30 years. They’ve been nice to us, we’ve been nice to them. So how dare they (the protestors) tell us that we’re racist?” Tom Monahan, who also said he lives in Palos Township, said “I think what she (Brannigan) said back then was nothing mean-spirited or derogatory. It was something that most Americans outside the Arab community think. “They don’t talk to you, they’re not friendly, they’re secretive,” he said, referring to Middle Eastern people. “I was in a park once, and here comes about 20 of them. They take it over. I was being polite and I thought ‘I’ll move over and let them know I’m being nice.’ “But usually the ones that always say ‘racist’, they’re the racists, they’re the haters. They’re wasting time and they’re not making any progress,” Monahan said. “She offered an apology. Why don’t they sit down with Ms. Brannigan and talk to her, like she said?” Coalition members withdrew recently from a proposed meeting with selected members of the township board and a representative from the Department of Justice, citing bad faith from the board because the potential meeting was mentioned by a township official to the media. Ala’a Mbayed, who was attending her first Palos Township board meeting with her friend, Flavio Aguirre, said “I feel uncomfortable an upset that we could allow someone like this to be part of the board.” Mbayed said she lives in Bridgeview and is a first-generation Syrian American. “We have a huge population of Arabs in the community, to be disregarded that way in that way, and for (Brannigan) to take that position and think no one is going to care and no one is going to do anything…people are upset,” she said.


SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

Ken Karrson, SportsSports EditorEditor • sports@regionalpublishing.com Jason Maholy, • sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, May 5, 17,2015 2018 Thursday, March

Southwest Section Southwest • Section•2, Page 1 2, Page 1

SOFTBALL ROUNDUP

Knights’ win streak ends at 19

BOYS WATER POLO SECTIONALS

Chicago Christian entered playoffs with 22 victories By Jason Maholy Sports Editor

Photo by Jason Maholy

Griffins claw way past Eagles

Sandburg’s Mike Rzeszowicz spits water out of his mouth as he takes a shot during the Eagles’ win over Lincoln-Way West in a semifinal of the Lincoln-Way East Sectional.

Sandburg’s season ends in sectional championship game By Steve Millar Correspondent

The sound of the ball banging off the crossbar or a post became far too familiar for Sandburg in the second half of Saturday’s Lincoln-Way East Sectional championship game. In the first half, the Eagles seemed well-positioned to earn their first trip to state since 2014. In the second half, their offense went cold, and the host Griffins rallied for a dramatic 9-8 win to end Sandburg’s season. “None of the shots we were taking were bad shots at all,” Sandburg coach Matt Neimeier

Shepard An offense that had been rolling to the tune of more than 11 runs a game found the going get tough last week, as the Astros dropped two games to conference rivals, and another in a South Suburban Conference crossover. Shepard entered Tuesday’s game with Richards at 17-7 overall and 13-4 in the South Suburban Red. Oak Lawn defeated Shepard 5-2 in eight innings on May 11, for just the Astros’ second home loss of the season. With the game knotted at two and Oak Lawn batting in the top of the eighth, a Shepard error allowed the go-ahead run to score for the Spartans. Junior Angelica Rafacz earned with the victory for Spartans. She surrendered two runs on six hits over eight innings, striking out six and walking none. Bridget McDermott

said. “Kids were in the right position. Kids worked to get open and get those lanes. We just put so many shots off that crossbar.” Senior Richard Sokolowski poured in four goals to lead the Eagles (24-7). Senior Josh Grella added two goals while seniors Cooper Reiher and Joey Jenkot each scored once. Sokolowski was unstoppable early, scoring all three of Sandburg’s first-quarter goals as the Eagles led 3-2 after one. “Richard came out on fire,” Neimeier said. “He’s been really solid and consistent for us See BOYS, Page 3

Chicago Christian won four games last week but also lost for the first time in more than 40 days when the Knights fell to Burlington Central in the semifinals of the Immaculate Conception Tournament. The Rockets topped the Knights 5-3 on May 12, halting Christian’s winning streak at 19 games. Knights junior center fielder Brooke Veldman clubbed a two-run home run and scored a run. Bethany Regnerus struck out six and allowed two earned runs, and took the loss. Christian promptly started a new winning streak with an 11-1 victory over Momence in the third-place game. Senior ace Hannah Dieck went the distance, striking out nine and allowing no earned runs while improving her record to 16-0. Dieck helped her own cause with three hits, including a triple, four RBI and a run scored. Dieck led the Knights to victory in the first round with an 11-strikeout performance in a 1-0 win over Aurora Central Catholic. Christian opened the week by beating Reavis, 13-1, on May 7. Dieck threw a completegame one-hitter and struck out 10 Rams. Junior third baseman Abby Sytsma had two hits, including a double, and four RBI. The Knights defeated Elmwood Park, 6-4, the following night. Regnerus pitched four innings to earn her seventh win, and Dieck recorded the final 12 outs for her second save of the season. Dieck also had two hits, including a triple, and three RBI and a run scored. The Knights entered Tuesday’s IHSA Class 2A Seneca Regional against Wilmington at 22-4.

See SOFTBALL, Page 2

Photo by Jason Maholy

Lincoln-Way West’s Liam Hall fouls Sandburg’s Kyle Fox during the teams’ semifinal game at the Lincoln-Way East Sectional.

GIRLS WATER POLO SECTIONALS

East ‘D’ stymies Sandburg Griffins top Eagles, earn trip to state

By Steve Millar Correspondent

The Sandburg and Lincoln-Way East girls water polo teams split a pair of regular-season meetings, so it’s no surprise that Saturday’s rubber match for the Lincoln-Way East Sectional championship was a tight affair. In the end, the Griffins’ swarming defense was too much for the Eagles Photo by Jason Maholy down the stretch. Host Lincoln-Way East Lincoln-Way East sophomore Tina Winter blocks a shot attempt by Sand- held Sandburg to two goals in the second burg junior Erin Falsey as the Griffins’ Reis Parkinson closes in during the half and punched its ticket to the state Lincoln-Way East Sectional title game on Saturday, May 12. finals with a 9-7 win.

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“We did a pretty nice job for most of the game getting to where we need to be, but they play such a tough pressing defense,” Sandburg coach Jim Caliendo said. “If we don’t get the shot off right away, there’s three girls on us. “We defended them really well, too. It was a well-played game between two pretty evenly-matched teams and we just came up a little short.” Erin Falsey led Sandburg (26-7) with three goals. Natalie Barkowski, Ashley Asiddao, Bella Wrobel and goalie Emma See GIRLS, Page 2

Photo by Gary Middendorf

Chicago Christian’s Hannah Dieck bats against Argo during a game earlier this season.

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2

Section 2 Thursday, May 17, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

Crew douses Fire to avenge earlier loss From staff reports

Nearly a month to the day Chicago defeated Columbus for its first victory of the season, the Crew returned the favor and routed the Fire 3-0 last Saturday evening in central Ohio. The hosts opened the scoring in the 28th minute when, after Fire defender Kevin Ellis was whistled for a foul inside the box, Federico Higuain stepped up and buried the ensuing penalty kick for a 1-0 lead. Columbus forward Gyasi Zardes struck twice in the second half, scoring in the 50th and 70th minutes as the Crew took the full three points and improved to 6-3-3. The Fire, which has lost two of three, fell to 3-5-2. Fire head coach Veljko Paunovic was not thrilled with his team’s performance after what he said was a good first half. “No excuses. We played against one of the best teams, for me, in our league,” he said. “They got, in this game, everything they did in the first game, when we played in Chicago. They converted a lot of opportunities. “They definitely deserved the win, and congrats on that. We’ll move forward. Unfortunately, we got more injuries in this game, so that’s not good, but we have to just work and keep going. We’ll get better. That’s always our statement. We always work to get better from games like this, and we move forward.” The Fire got its first good look on goal in the 21st minute when Aleksandar Katai sent a low, bouncing cross into the box, and rookie Elliot Collier sent a left-footed volley towards goal. The ball, however, banged off the post. “I think that in the second half we

RED STARS REPORT

Stars’ keeper named Player of Week Alyssa Naeher sets club record with 12 saves vs. N.C. Chicago Red Stars goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher was voted the National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL) Player of the Week by the NWSL Media Association for Week 6 of the 2018 NWSL season. Naeher, 30, led the Red Stars to a 1-1 draw on the road against the North Carolina Courage on Sunday. The Bridgeport, Conn., native made several great saves including one that came in the 17th minute off a 25-yard blast from North Carolina midfielder McCall Zerboni. In the 49th minute, Naeher came off her line to stop a point-blank attempt by Courage forward Crystal Dunn. She also parried away a low driven shot by Courage midfielder Saman-

tha Mewis in the 56th minute, and a spinning half-volley by Dunn in the 66th minute. The only shot the Penn State product did not stop was an 82nd-minute strike by North Carolina’s Zerboni from just outside the six-yard box to level the game at 1-1. The U.S. international played all 90 minutes of the game and set a new club record with 12 saves on 42 shots (15 on goal). It is the fourth time Naeher has been honored as the Player of the Week, with her previous accolades in Week 5 of the 2016 season, Week 17 of the 2015 season and Week 18 of the 2014 season. It is the 11th time a member of the Red Stars has won the award.

opened very good with a chance by Katai, which we didn’t convert,” he said. “Against this team, you cannot permit yourself to not be sharp. In the end, it comes back to you. We have to get better.” Collier has enjoyed significant playing time, and is not taking the opportunities for granted. “Honestly, trying to get the most minutes and most experience out of this first year and trying to make the most out of the opportunities that the coaching staff has given us,” he said. “It’s huge like I said, can’t ask for more getting starting

minutes or coming off the bench. Just got to make the most of it.” The Fire return home to host the Houston Dynamo at Toyota Park on Sunday, May 20 at 3 p.m. Paunovic looked with optimism at the Fire having a week to prepare for the Dynamo. “It’s good that we now have time to recover for that game,” he said. “But also, it’s important to start getting back injured guys. For a long time now, the team is suffering, not in terms of anything else, but just for the sake of rotations.

We need everyone back.” The Fire were coming off a dramatic victory May 9, when Kevin Ellis scored in the 89th minute to beat the Montreal Impact. The veteran defender cut onto his left foot from the right edge of the box to create space for his shot, which glanced off an Impact player and went into the net. It was Ellis second goal in as many games, and his seventh career MLS goal in eight seasons as a professional. “God is good, man,” Ellis said of scoring in consecutive games. “I’m enjoying it, it doesn’t happen often for anybody, so when you can score in multiple games, it’s exciting. I feel good and I’m just trying to enjoy it, like I said. The Fire dictated terms for much of the evening with 62.5-percent possession, and created several quality chances before the determining goal. Aleksandar Katai nearly opened the scoring twice in the same sequence in the 33rd minute. The Serbian attacker hit the post with a nifty back-foot clip, then returned service on frame only to watch Montreal defender Daniel Lovitz clear the attempt inches short of the line. Fire goalkeeper Richard Sánchez earned his second shutout of the season and his career, while center back Johan Kappelhof picked up his sixth career assist on Ellis’ goal. “It feels good to get three points, Ellis said. “We wanted to get a shutout and we got a shutout. I give credit to Mo Adams, taking one of the best players in the entire league and not giving him any joy in the game. Big credit to Mo, big credit to the whole team for working hard defensively. I’m fortunate enough to come up with a goal and we win the game.”

AREA SPORTS REPORT

Richards senior Flahive is honored for heart and hustle

Richards senior softball nizations that support the fight player Katelyn Flahive has against cancer. been named the recipient of The event annual honors this year’s Heart and Hustle Christa Carbray Johnson, who Award, given annually to the died several years ago after a Bulldogs player who exemplilong battle with the disease. Carfies the qualities possessed by bray was a beloved teammate. late Richards student-athlete The event also honors Abby Christa Carbray Johnson. Wujcik, an 8-year old girl who Flahive The Chicago Ag High School died in 2013 from a brain tumor. joined Richards in a Strike Out Abby’s dad, Kevin, graduated Cancer fundraiser held May 12. The from Richards, and she was the niece event raised money for several orga- of varsity baseball coach Brian Wujcik.

T

he Pheasants/Quail Forever, Tallgrass Chapter is inviting anyone who is new to shooting, to experience the joy of shotgun shooting. Participants will receive instruction from certified instructors. This is free event, but donations would be appreciated. Food and beverage will be provided, so come OUTDOORS out early and have fun learning WITH experienced JIM KIRBY from instructors. Please complete the form prior to the event as this will facilitate a quick registration process. Anyone wanting to shoot must be present for the safety meeting which starts at 11:00 am. No one can shoot without a signed release. This event will be limited to the first 25 that RSVP, so reply early. Remember, this is an outside activity, so dress appropriately. This event will take place June 19 from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Palos Sportsman’s Club, 24000 S. Harlem Ave. Frankfort, 815-4694446. For more information go to: PFTallgrass@gmail.com.

Outdoor reports Turkey hunters are doing well with the weather cooperating. When harvest figures are released I predict close to record numbers. Fishing reports from bait and tackle shops indicate salmon fishing on Lake Michigan is going strong with cohos being the big story from boaters and shore fishermen. Local lakes and ponds are producing pan fish and bass are being taken in great numbers, bluegills on edge of weed beds and crappies near any structure.

Mossberg terminates relationship with Dick’s Sporting Goods

Photo courtesy of Dan Ludwig/Community High School District 218

Rocketing to a record

The Shepard boys 4x400 relay team of Nieko Carter, Elijah Butler, Brian Hauser and Dalvin Humphrey broke the school record in the event with a time of 3:20.88 on May 10 during a home meet verus Eisenhower. The time ranks as the second-fastest time in Illinois this year.

Girls

Continued from Page 1 Crnich added a goal each, while Crnich finished with seven saves. Both teams came out of the gates fast offensively as the Griffins (24-8) grabbed a 4-3 lead after a quarter. Falsey and Wrobel scored in the second to send the Eagles to halftime in a 5-5 tie. “We played hard,” Caliendo said. “We played them even through a half and we were happy with that, but you’ve got to play four quarters against a team like that.” Falsey’s third goal put Sandburg ahead 6-5 with 4:58 left in the third. “Erin is the only junior in our starting lineup,” Caliendo said. “She got a lot better as far as how hard she shot and where she put her shots. She was big today.” That, however, would be the last time the Eagles scored until the match’s final minute. Lincoln-Way East outscored them 4-0 over the following 11-plus minutes. Crnich’s desperation heave found the net to cut Sandburg’s deficit to 9-7 with 11 seconds left, but it was too late for a comeback. “The girls are upset now, but once they calm down a bit they’ll appreciate what they did this season,” Caliendo said. “They played some good water polo. We came a long way from where we were at the beginning of March and I’m really proud of them.” A trio of seniors starred

Sharing the joy of shotgun shooting

O.F. Mossberg & Sons, Inc., a leading American firearms manufacturer, announced its decision to discontinue selling products to Dick’s Sporting Goods, and its subsidiary Field & Stream, in response to their hiring of gun control lobbyists in April 2018. Consumers are urged to visit one of the thousands of pro-Second Amendment firearm retailers to make their purchases of Mossberg and Maverick firearms. Firearm retailers can be found through the Mossberg Dealer Locator by visiting http//www. mossberg.com/dealers/. (OutdoorHub Reporters).

10 reasons why bowhunting makes you a better person

Photos by Jason Maholy

Sandburg’s Natalie Barkowski and Lincoln-Way East’s Emma Hernandez bump heads during a physical title match at the Lincoln-Way East Sectional.

for Sandburg. Tara Maher scored 100 goals, Wrobel added 74, and Caliendo praised Barkowski for her defense. “Natalie is like the best defender in the state,” he said. “She stays at home and helps out. She’s everywhere. As soon as someone else gets burned, Natalie pops in and takes the ball away. She really represented herself well in the sectional.” Asiddao and Madison Stuursma were also key senior contributors, as was

Softball

Continued from Page 1

took the loss for Shepard. The junior ace surrendered five runs on eight hits over eight innings, striking out 11 and walking one. Katie Justin led Shepard with two hits. Rafacz and senior infielder Hailey Melvin each had two hits for Oak Lawn. The Astros had beaten Argo, 4-3, on May 10. Shepard junior Emily Edmiston

Crnich in goal. After 24 seasons coaching the boys team, Caliendo came out of retirement to coach the girls this year. He’s unsure what the next step will be. “I’m officially re-retired until if and when I sign a new contract,” he said. “I had a great time and I won’t leave the program behind, but if they get someone young who can give the program a shot in the arm the way (coach) Matt (Neimeier) did with the boys team, that’d be great.”

had two hits, inclusing a double, and two RBI, and senior Cassidy McCarthy had two hits and an RBI. Argo got on the board in the second inning when Brooke Palmer singled in a run, but Shepard took the lead for good with two runs in the fourth inning. In the fourth, Edmiston doubled on a 1-1 count, scoring two runs. McDermott got the win, going three innings while allowing four hits and no runs while striking out three and walking one. Mackenzie Serefono took the loss for

Argo. She lasted six innings, allowing nine hits and four runs while striking out two and walking none. Mariah Martinez started the game in the circle for Shepard. She threw four innings, allowing three runs on seven hits, striking out five and walking none. The Astros’ first home loss of the season came against Evergreen Park on May 8. Both teams were strong in the circle, but Evergreen Park was just a little bit stronger at the plate. Hailey Getz shut out the Astros, al-

Sandburg senior Natalie Barkowski readies to fire a shot on goal during the Lincoln-Way East Sectional title game against the host Griffins.

lowing six hits and while striking out eight and walking none. The blanking was the second time Shepard has been shut out this season. McDermott struck out six and walked none and surrendered two runs while going the distance. McDermott, Katie Justin, Brooke Becker, Jessica Coyle, Becca Harkala and Edmiston each had one hit for the Astros. Haley Ortell went 2-for-3 at the plate for Evergreen Park.

Bowhunting teaches us so many valuable life lessons. The moment you pick one up, and are able to connect on a target down range you will inevitably be drawn into a world that teaches respect for nature and all living things, a thing or two about patience, and many more. Here are 10 reasons why bowhunting makes you a better person: 1. Respect for nature. 2. Patience 3. Dedication 4. Organization 5. Storytelling 6. Humility 7. Decision making 8. Observance of your surroundings 9. Focus 10. Cooking, That’s right, we know our way around the kitchen. Hunters take just as much pride in the way their venison or other game tastes as they do in tacking down their own dinner.

Palos Ducks Unlimited 54th Anniversary Dinner Tickets are still available and I have room for two at my table. This event takes place Wednesday, May 23 at the Palos Country Club, 13100 Southwest Highway, Orland Park. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., cocktails are at 6 p.m., dinner is at 7:30 p.m., and auction is at 8 p.m. Open bar, dinner, win and bid on guns, sporting goods and prizes. Your ticket includes dinner, event attendance and a one-year membership to Ducks Unlimited. For tickets or more information, call Jim Mayer at 708557-1300. This is a fun evening featuring great food, exclusive Ducks Unlimited merchandise, and your close friends as we raise funds to benefit and conserve critical waterfowl and other animal’s wetland habitat. See you there and we can swap a few lies and make plans for future outdoor activities.

Think about it “Golf is like marriage: If you take yourself too seriously it won’t work, and both are expensive.” E-mail Jim Kirby at kirbyoutdoors@ sbcglobal.net  


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 17, 2018 Section 2

3

FOCUS ON AREA COLLEGES

Cougars set five school track and field records Lambros, Kowalczyk in books for two apiece Saint Xavier tack and field athletes broke five school records, and one Cougar punched her ticket to the NAIA Outdoor Track & Field Championships, at the 2018 CCAC Championships last weekend. The women’s program placed seventh out of 10 teams at the meet, held May 5 and 6 in Joliet, while the men’s team finished ninth. The highlight of the event for Saint Xavier was junior Alex Lambros, who finished as the lone Lambros Cougar to earn All-CCAC honors in multiple events. Lambros won the women’s long jump with a mark of 17 feet 11.75 inches, setting a new school record. Lambros placed second in the triple jump, and her leap of 38 feet 1.25 inches – also a new school record – surpassed the NAIA’s “A” standard, earning the junior an automatic bid to the NAIA Brooks Championships to be held May 24-26. The junior set a new school record in the triple jump as well. In the men’s events, a pair of school records fell. Anthony Kowalczyk finished third and earned AllCCAC recognition in the shot put with a throw of 48 feet 2.5 inches. The senior also placed eighth in the hammer Throw, breaking his old school record

with a hurl of 129 feet 2 inches. Rachal Brooks, a senior who prepped at Mother McAuley HS, also earned All-CCAC honors by finishing third in the 400 meter dash with a schoolrecord time of 59.54. Earning points for the Cougars were Claudia Rodriguez, who finished eighth in the triple jump of 31 feet 7.25 inches. The two relay entries also scored, with the 4x400 meter relay team of Brooks, Natalie Andrade, Annette Sanchez and Tasneem Jaber finishing eighth in 4:36.53, and the 4x800 meter relay squad of Brooks, Jocey Camacho, Elizabeth Abundes and Sanchez finishing fifth in 10:21.51. Jaber is a graduate of Oak Lawn High School. For the men, Mario Scarcelli posted a new personal best in the 5,000 meter with a time of 15:43.59 to place ninth.

Eggert excellence Saint Xavier senior pitcher Erik Eggert has been honored for his work both on the mound and in the classroom as the Cougar closer was named to the 2018 Google Cloud Academic All-District Baseball Team, selected by the College Sports Information Directors of Eggert America. Eggert concluded his career at Saint Xavier’s all-time saves leader, with 26. This season, Eggert recorded 11 saves and a 2.41 ERA over 37.1 innings pitched. He struck out 34 bat-

ters, most of any pitcher in the SXU bullpen. The biology major and three-time CCAC All-Academic Team member graduated from Saint Xavier University this month. Eggert advanced to the ballot for the Google Cloud Academic All-America Team, which will be announced on June 4.

Coach becomes a Hall of Famer As part of the festivities during the 46th annual Illinois Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame Banquet, Saint Xavier women’s basketball assistant coach Barry Shaw was one of six Career Coaches to be inducted into the IBCA Hall of Fame Class of 2018. The induction ceremony was held May 11. Shaw just completed his 18th season on the Saint Xavier bench. He has helped lead the Cougars to 16 NAIA Tournament appearances, including most recently back-to-back trips to the NAIA Fab Four in 2017 and 2018. Shaw also is a former head basketball coach at St. Laurence High School, where is is currently the dean of students. Shaw has been associated with SXU women’s head coach Bob Hallberg since 1967, when Hallberg coached Shaw at Kennedy High School. Shaw later attended Saint Xavier, where he worked with the men’s team as a student trainer and manager. His first coaching experience came during the 1976-77 season, when he coached the Saint Xavier University women’s basketball club team. Shaw was an assistant coach at Chicago State University from 1978 to 1982. And was the varsity boys basketball assistant coach at St. Laurence High School from 1983-85 and head coach from 1985-90.

From 1986-90, he coached local high school all-stars for Team Chicago in summer AAU tournaments. Shaw was the assistant men’s basketball coach for University of Illinois-Chicago from 1990-96.

Cougars remember Hunter Saint Xavier University and the SXU football program is mourning the passing of former Cougar student-athlete Josh Hunter. Hunter, 25, died May 8 at Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn. He had been reportedly shot multiple times around 3:30 p.m. Friday, May 5 in the 15500 block of Drexel Ave. in Dolton. The Cook County medical examiner ruled the death a homicide, and determined Hunter died of “complications of multiple gunshot wounds.” Hunter was a graduate of Thornridge High School in Dolton. The 2015 SXU graduate played running back for the Cougars from 2011-15. On the field, Hunter compiled more than 900 rushing yards and six touchdowns over four seasons, while studying Sociology. “Josh was a hard-working, respectable young man and our SXU Football family is devastated by the news of his passing,” said Saint Xavier head coach Mike Feminis. “It is extremely difficult to try and wrap your head around something like this that seems so senseless and cruel. Our heart goes out to Josh’s family and we will certainly keep them in our thoughts and prayers.”  A memorial service for Hunter was held Friday, May 11, at St. Mark Missionary Baptist Church in Harvey. A candlelight vigil was held that night on the football field at Thornwood High School in South Holland.

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL

Chargers end tough week with sweep of Spartans By Jason Maholy Sports Editor

Photo by Jason Maholy

Sandburg’s Joseph Jenkot rears back before firing a shot into the goal during the Eagles’ win over Lincoln-Way West in a Lincoln-Way East Sectional semifinal match.

Boys

Continued from Page 1 during the season but today he just played out of his mind. He gave us a lot of momentum where we felt like if he was doing that, we’ve got this the rest of the way.” Grella scored both his goals in the second quarter and Reiher also found the net. Leading 6-3 in the final minute of the first half, the Eagles had all the momentum. Lincoln-Way East (21-11) got a big lift, however, when Ryan Utt batted in Jared Bruni’s pass just before the halftime buzzer to cut the deficit to 6-4. “That definitely got them going a bit,” Neimeier said. “We were shutting them down and then they get that one in at the end.” The Griffins carried the momentum into the second half, outscoring the Eagles 4-1 in the third to take an 8-7 lead to the final quarter and extending it to 9-7 early in the fourth.

“Down two goals with a

minute left, most teams would shut down. I know our guys are disappointed, but they can be proud of how they played.” ­— Sandburg coach Matt Neimeier Firing several shots off the frame of the goal, Sandburg could not cut into the deficit until the final minute of the game. Jenkot scored to make it 9-8 with 32 seconds left and the Eagles had one final possession in the closing seconds but could not tie it. “I couldn’t be more proud of how those guys kept playing,” Neimeier said. “Down two goals with a

minute left, most teams would shut down. I know our guys are disappointed, but they can be proud of how they played.” The loss ended a terrific season for Sandburg, which beat Bremen co-op 19-4 in the sectional quarterfinals and Lincoln-Way West 18-4 in the semifinals. The Eagles were SouthWest Suburban co-champions with Lockport, finishing with a 7-1 conference record. Sandburg was led all year by its seniors, including Jenkot, Grella, Reiher, Sokolowski, Carter Thoss and goalie Josemaria Mitra. Neimeier was in his first season coaching the Eagles after taking over for Jim Caliendo, who briefly retired after 24 seasons, but returned to coach Sandburg’s girls team this year. “I was really fortunate,” Neimeier said. “I came in with a great group of seniors that had two, three years of varsity experience. We had bench players that I think would be starters on most teams. “We had a lot of success. I just wish we could’ve finished the year with the same sort of success.”

GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER

Youngsters step up for RedHawks Two freshmen score goals in victory over Shepard By Steve Millar Correspondent

Marist senior forward Ally Corcoran’s confidence in the RedHawks’ ability to score goals has grown immensely in recent weeks. “We have really talented young players that are stepping up,” Corcoran said. “I know that I don’t have to do it on my own. I know they’ll score goals just like I’ll score goals. “Early in the season, teams were shutting us down in a lot of games, but now we’re scoring a lot more. We’ve definitely gotten better as the season goes on. Our freshmen have helped us a lot.” Corcoran started the scoring against Shepard on Monday, May 7, then got help from a pair of freshmen as visiting Marist cruised to a 3-0 win over the Astros. Cece Light and Ciara Bridges also scored for the RedHawks, who improved to 10-10-2 with the win. Corcoran took a long pass from Michelle Lenz and broke toward the net. With Shepard goalkeeper

Veronica Janik charging out of the net to cut down Corcoran’s angle, Corcoran banged a shot off the inside of the right post and in to make it 1-0 in the 12th minute. “There was nothing technical about that shot,” Corcoran said, with a laugh. “I just got lucky.” Light made it 2-0 with 14:21 left in the first half. The freshman made a strong run down the right sideline and had the ball knocked away by a defender, but stole it back and fired a quick shot into the upper portion of the net. “Cece is playing great for us,” Marist coach Chris Roe said. “She’s really stepped up and she’s making things happen. Things have started to figure themselves out. We’ve seen where players can and can’t play and we’ve got a better rotation down now.” Shepard, 5-12-2 after the loss, picked up its play in the second half and created some dangerous scoring chances just after the break. Yiselle Silvar took a pass from Diana Lopez and fired just wide with 38:30 to go. The Astros then worked a nice combination play

with Kylie Radz sending a pass to Amara Mason, whose cross found Gabrielle Taylor in the center of the box. Taylor ripped a shot on goal, but Marist goalkeeper Lauren Stapleton made a strong save. It was the first of three saves for Stapleton, who combined with Cassandra Eraci for the shutout. Lenz, Annie Callaghan, Katherine Pappas and Sofia Perez gave the goalkeepers plenty of help on the back line. “Our outside defenders were all new this year and now they’ve gotten a lot more experience and we’re more solid in the back,” Lenz said. Ciara Bridges added the third goal for Marist with 19:59 left in the match. Veronica Janik made 10 saves for Shepard. “Our three captains, Ixchel (Salgado), Amara (Mason) and Kaci (Jasik) made it a point to play together as a team and they realized where to attack in the second half,” Shepard coach Frank Marek said. “We executed a bit better in the second half. Marist was a tough opponent with a strong defense.”

Stagg concluded a busy, challenging week with a doubleheader sweep of Oak Lawn on May 12. In a 12-2, six-inning win over the Spartans in Game 1 of that twin-bill, the Chargers pounded out 14 hits and drew seven walks while scoring in all but one frame. Mike Abraham led the way offensively with three hits, an RBI and four runs, and reached base in all flour of his plate appearances. Senior first baseman Jordan Thompson contributed a double, four RBI and a run scored, and Mike Tobin had two hits and two RBI and reached base three times. The Chargers swiped eight bases in the contest, with Abraham and Joe Lovell each stealing a pair. Stagg pitchers Luke Goral and Thompson combined to allow five hits and one walk. The nightcap didn’t go any better for the Spartans, as the Chargers tallied 10 runs in the first inning and after three frames led by the eventual final score of 19-0. Oak Lawn pitchers issues eight free passes, and the Spartans committed three errors that led to six unearned runs. Nine Chargers had at least one hit, with Ryan Sullivan clubbing three doubles, driving in five runs and scoring twice. Luke Pitcher had a double, two RBI and a run, and John Cleveland had one hit, an RBI, three runs scored and reached base three times. Nick Harper, Leo Angelos, Danny Green, Jimmy Mannette, Connor Rachowicz and Eli Rynkiewicz each drove in a run. Stagg had until the doubleheader endured a trying week, losing five straight games including three over three days to Lincoln-Way East. The Griffins topped the Chargers 6-3 on May 7, then swept a mid-week doubleheader, 15-0 and 4-3, on May 9. In the May 7 contest, East scored five runs in the top of the seventh to break open what had been a 1-1 game. Abraham and Thompson each had two hits and an RBI, and Goral had two hits and scored a run. On May 9, Joe Potempa and Derek Pietrowski each had two hits in the one-run Game 2 loss. Stagg also fell to Bradley-Bourbonnais, 8-6, on May 10 and Providence, 5-3, on May 11. In the loss to the Boilermakers, the Chargers outhit the hosts, 9-7, but Bradley’s four runs over the final two innings were the difference. Luke Vrbancic had three this, including two doubles, to go with three RBI and two runs, and he reached base in all four plate appearances. Goral added a hit and three RBI, and Lovell hit two doubles.

Shepard The Astros went 1-3 last week, splitting a home-and-home series with Evergreen Park and dropping games to Plainfield Central and Tinley Park. The conference rival Mustangs topped Shepard, 3-2, on May 8, but the Astros bounced back the following day with an 8-5 victory. Trevor Lorek had a double and scored two runs, while also walking three times and stealing three bases. Shepard dropped a 4-2 contest to Tinley Park May 10 in a South Suburban Conference crossover, and fell 14-1 to Plainfield Central on May 11. Junior catcher Zach Walthers had a hit and RBI. Shepard entered this week 14-14 overall and 10-6 in the SSC. The Astros were scheduled to play conference rival Richards on Monday and Tuesday.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 17, 2018 Section 2

TRASHING ONE EGG WASTES 55 GALLONS OF WATER

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Section 2 Thursday, May 17, 2018

The Reporter Newspapers Call 448-6161 Deadline 5 p.m. Monday Hours M-F 9 to 5 Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.MARGARET CAREY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, VILLAGE SQUARE OF ORLAND TOWNHOMES ASSOCIATION Defendants 17 CH 09620 15703 DANFORD LN ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 13, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 14, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15703 DANFORD LN, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-15-306-010-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $154,356.49. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719 Please refer to file number 2120-13848. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Fax #: (217) 422-1754 CookPleadings@hsbattys.com Attorney File No. 2120-13848 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 17 CH 09620 TJSC#: 38-2359 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3081640

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Champion Mortgage Company Plaintiff, vs. Lucille M.Hodorowicz aka Lucille M. Hoporwicz aka Lucille Hodorowicz; Secretary Of Housing and Urban Development; N.A.;Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants, Case #17CH16407 Sheriff’s # 180100 F17110268 CPN Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on June 11th, 2018, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Legal Description: Common Address: 2753 West 96th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois 60805 P.I.N:24-12-207-011-0000 ; 24-12-207-012-0000 Improvements: This property consist of a Single Family Home. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier’s check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier’s check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments. Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff’s Attorney ANSELMO, LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. DIEHL., Ste 120 Naperville, IL 60563 Sales Department foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

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Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, -v.DOUGLAS R. ENGBERG A/K/A DOUGLAS ENGBERG, KAREN REPKING-ENGBERG, THE PRIVATEBANK AND TRUST COMPANY AS SUCCESSOR TO FOUNDERS BANK, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 3/9/2000 A/K/A TRUST NO. 5663, HARRIS, N.A. F/K/A HARRIS BANK ARGO, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE TRUST AGREEMENT DATED 3/9/2000 A/K/A TRUST NO. 5663, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 044536 8010 KIRKCALDY COURT PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 27, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 29, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8010 KIRKCALDY COURT, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-35-403-040. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-10-35346. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-10-35346 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 044536 TJSC#: 38-2890 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3086455

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.

Houses For Sale

Houses For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION LENDINGHOME MARKETPLACE LLC. Plaintiff, -v.RELIANT ASSET CORP, AWAD ODEH, THE CRYSTAL HILLS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 18 CH 136 9158 W. 95TH ST., #3A Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 23, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 4, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9158 W. 95TH ST., #3A, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-03-400-037-1009. The real estate is improved with a condominium. The judgment amount was $110,034.32. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 541-9710 Please refer to file number 17-0838. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 541-9710 E-Mail: ilpleadings@johnsonblumberg.com Attorney File No. 17-0838 Attorney Code. 40342 Case Number: 18 CH 136 TJSC#: 38-3684 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3086242

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, -v.GLORIA D JAMROK, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Defendants 17 CH 05699 8551 WHEELER DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 30, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 8, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8551 WHEELER DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-301-011-0000. The real estate is improved with a tan brick, two story single family home with an attached two car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 346-9088. Please refer to file number 261699. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 346-9088 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 261699 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 17 CH 05699 TJSC#: 38-3793 I3086600

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (‘’FANNIE MAE’’), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, -v.DOROTHY J DANE, STEVEN G DANE, CONDOMINIUMS AT LONG RUN CREEK CONDOMINIUMS ASSN., MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC., UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 17 CH 09887 11840 WINDEMERE COURT, UNIT #301 ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 13, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 28, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11840 WINDEMERE COURT, UNIT #301, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-06-311-047-1009. The real estate is improved with a two unit with an attached three car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 346-9088. Please refer to file number 263202. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 346-9088 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 263202 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 17 CH 09887 TJSC#: 38-1739 I3085492

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DITECH FINANCIAL LLC Plaintiff, -v.KATY RUISZ A/K/A KATY A RUISZ, A/K/A KATY A SVIHLIK, MICHAEL RUISZ A/K/A MICHAEL A RUISZ, FIRST AMERICAN BANK, HSBC NEVADA, NA F/K/A HOUSEHOLD BANK, CHASE BANK USA, N.A., UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 2017 CH 07990 9110 FAIRWAY DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 15, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 18, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9110 FAIRWAY DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-10-203-014-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family home with a detached two car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service. atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5pm. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 416-5500. Please refer to file number 262421. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 416-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 262421 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 2017 CH 07990 TJSC#: 38-2448 I3081552

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Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

OUT & ABOUT

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 7

FASHION CHAT

Affairs of Hair – Part II CAROLINE FOREMAN We now turn to a pair of epic Chicago events that closed out the month of April. The glassencased wonderland of the Modern Wing in Chicago’s historic Art Institute became the setting of a stunning runway showcase of hair artistry and fashion. Then the behemoth McCormick Place once again housed the annual frenzied festival of international devotion to the hair and beauty industries known as America’s Beauty Show (ABS). During Wella’s demo class event with Michael Haase, I met the Wella Field Signature Artist Galini Hristov. Quick-witted and exuding a genuine passion for education, art and personal growth, he excitedly shared plans about the upcoming “Beauty Changes Lives Experience.” I was intensely intrigued by this 6th annual runway show set to occur in my favorite wing of my favorite Chicago museum. However, the event was a gala during ABS weekend, at which time I was already booked to model for TIGI. Galini and I worked through the scheduling details by phone over the weeks to follow, and miraculously, I would be able to model seamlessly in both events. My hair was expertly cut by the young and remarkably skilled, Kansan, Krisslynn Wiles. Galini provided the award-winning Wella NextGen Artist with expert guidance, encouraging her to channel and unleash her creativity in my sculpted look. She gave me a bob with heavy fringed bangs in an exaggerated width, and she crafted an undercut to remove some of the thick bulk of my hair. In front, she colored blues, greens, and whispers of coral throughout the fringe. The three other models received a rose-colored angular short look, a yellow-blonde avant-garde mullet, and a rosyorange extremely exaggerated bob. We lined up along the back of the wing and readied ourselves for the runway show. Erupting with the sheer thrill, the other models and I straightened our crisp, black suit looks and ran through the choreography aloud. We could hear the boisterous audience; there is no better captatio benevolentiae than an open bar. Upon opening our segment of the show, I floated completely out of my body as my stilettos hit the elevated runway. My strides

Photo by Sue Jankowski

Palos women prep for flower sale The Palos Heights Woman’s Club annual flower sale will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at the Municipal Parking Lot, 12217 S. Harlem Ave. Beautiful annual and perennial flowers will be available in flats and baskets, along with many other items. The flowers are being supplied by the Busy Bee Nursery. Only cash or checks can be accepted. “Please come out and support the club, as this is one of our important fundraisers which benefit local charities. You will find something beautiful for your yard,” said event organizers. Pictured from left are members from the Conservation Committee: Kim Prokes, Celeste Kappel and Lois McCann.

Photos courtesy of Instagram

never felt as sure or as long, and the music pulsated through me as if through my very veins. When we all hit our final pose at the end of the show, we felt ourselves as thoroughly a piece of art as the exalted pieces hung along the walls around us. The next day, I arrived at McCormick Place at the crack of dawn. Surprisingly, though halfasleep, I always manage to stumble into exactly where I am supposed to be. I once again joined the warm and welcoming TIGI family at the preparation area, this time around, meeting Houston-based stylist Kimberly Michelle. She examined my current look and planned out her stage demo cut. We agreed upon plans for a cute French bob, and I was whisked off to get my hair colored in a warm caramel shade. After being styled into wardrobe, we headed over to the stage and the magnificent sales booth. My model friend Rimma and I waited patiently in the wings. When the time was right, we entered and took our seats on the

stage. The stylists on stage, Kimberly and Richy Kandasamy, each gave their intricate and intensive educational demonstration. When they completed the looks, we removed our cutting capes to fully reveal to the audience our final hair looks and our chic corresponding wardrobe. Rimma wore a one-shoulder black vinyl mini dress and red platform boots; and I wore silver ruched boots with a black, bondage-style mini dress topped with a belted sequined cardigan. The French bob was jagged, playful, and a complete 180-flip of the previous day’s clean, sculptured look. Celebrating the artistry of hair can transform simple moments into truly enchanted occasions. The opportunity to share these events with the talented craftsmen behind the masterworks enhances the experiences twofold. Beyond that, enjoying venues that are more renowned and picturesque than any others that you have grown to personally and intricately know and love brings unrivaled and immeasurable fulfillment.

The Center presents magic and humor The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, has announced a slate of activities for the days ahead. For more information or to register for a program, call (708) 361-3650. • Art Experiments: 15 Techniques For Using Acrylic Ink will take place from 9:30 a.m. to noon Saturday May 19. Acrylic ink is a versatile medium that can be used to create many interesting effects in art. Participants can use these techniques in making cards, art journals, papers for collage and to create realistic or abstract paintings. This is not alcohol ink. All materials will be provided. The workshop fee is $27 plus a $12

Don Wilberg.

Supplied photo

materials fee. • Vision Board Workshop is planned from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, May 19. Instructor Celeste

Santiago is calling all those needing to reboot their mindset and focus in on some long standing goals or dreams. Participants will create a vision board, a visualization tool one creates by building a collage of words and pictures that serves as an image of the future. The class will take some time to think about dreams and goals and talk about positive mindset before diving into the creative and fun artistic expression of the vision boards. Those interested are asked to bring personal items to include on the boards. The session will conclude with a sacred circle discussion of the vision boards. The workshop fee is $25 and includes all materials and drink refreshments.

• Family Service is scheduled for 10 a.m. Sunday May 20. Participants will gather indoors inside the Lodge on the west side of Southwest Highway for this family friendly service. Hospitality will be shared. • Don Wiberg: Magic with a Laugh! will be presented from noon to 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 22. Wiberg has performed for many large corporations, trade shows, service organizations, men’s and women’s clubs, churches, libraries, schools and youth groups. He is back at The Center to perform for this luncheon. Wiberg will entertain with his humor and magic show. Luncheons cost $22, and reservations are necessary.

IPO names composer in residence for 2018-19 The Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra based in Palos Heights announced that Ben Ash will be the Composer in Residence for the 2018-2019 season. The Classical Evolve competition featured three young composers who had their original works

judged by a live audience, musicians and a judges’ panel on May 8. At the end of the evening Ash was named by Maestro Stillian Kirov. “We are excited to work with this year’s winner, Ben Ash, as he joins us as our Composer in Residence for the 2018-19 season,” said

Kirov. “One of the main goals of Illinois Philharmonic is to nurture the development of young musicians and we are hopeful that as our Classical Evolve competition continues through future seasons, it will be helpful to many young American composers to find their

Orland Park artist earns DAR award

Earlier this month, the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution presented Orland Park artist Carrie S. Carlson with the DAR Women in the Arts Recognition Award. The award is designed to recognize worthy women at the community level for outstanding achievements in the non-performance arts. The recipient is expected to have contributed to her artistic field in an outstanding manner beyond mastery of technique. Carlson’s work, as an art teacher and master of natural science art and printmaking, has already received community recognition, such as Artist in Residence at the Orland Park Grasslands. Displayed at the 2017 exhibits at Governors State University and the Orland Park Library, Carlson’s prints of the native species in the grassland, including the Big Bluestem grass, have brought the visual wonder of the prairie to local audiences, according to a DAR statement. In their nomination of Carlson for the National DAR award, the Founders Crossing Chapter stated, “We believe that Carrie’s art resonates with our Society’s interest in conservation, education and dedication to our American artistic heritage.” Speaking before Carlson, Rita Travis, Founders Crossing Chapter officer and Conservation Committee Chairman, presented an overview of native prairie locations and their endangered status. Travis is a founder and co-chair of the Bluestem Earth Festival, which takes place in Joliet on May 19. “Our shared passions for the preservation of the prairies and our wonder at the beauty of the native species in them made working on the program with Carrie a

Supplied photo

Orland Park artist Carrie Carlson demonstrates the process she uses in printmaking images from nature.

joy,” said Travis. Carlson is continuing her career as an art teacher at Thornton Township High School and at the Morton Arboretum. She is a member of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. She continues to exhibit in local and national contexts. The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution is a service organization founded in 1890. Membership is open to women age 18 years of age and older who can prove lineal descent from a person who served in, or provided for, the American Revolution. There are no restrictions as to race, religion or ethnicity. Founders Crossing Chapter was established in 2015 and meets from September through May on the second Saturday each month. For information about DAR membership, or Founders Crossing Chapter, contact Chapter Regent Christina Bannon at (815) 524-4488 or Registrar Susan Snow at (708) 751-5154.

Seek sponsors, volunteers for Adopt-A-Pot program

artistic voice and make continued steps in the professional music scene.” During his tenure as Composer in Residence, Ash will have the opportunity to write three original An official sign of spring along compositions that will be premiered Harlem Avenue and elsewhere in at three IPO concerts next season. Palos Heights is the appearance of the Beautification Committee’s signature Adopt-A-Pot planters, sponsored each year by individuals, businesses, families and local organizations. fairly roughly so they keep a bit of Volunteers are needed to help texture. Add to the bowl together assemble the pots at 8 a.m. Saturwith the coconut. Halve the lime day, May 19th in the Palos Pool and squeeze out the juice, then parking lot behind City Hall, add 1 tablespoon of the juice to 7601 W. College Drive. Coffee the bowl with the yogurt. Mix in and doughnuts will be provided. gently. Upwards of 50 pots are expected Set a strainer over the bowl and to be put together that morning and sift the flour, baking powder, bak- the Palos Heights Public Works ing soda, and salt onto the mix- Department will put the pots in ture. Mix in well, then scrape the place during the following days. mixture into the prepared pan and Sponsorships are still available smooth the surface. at $80 per pot, which includes Bake for about 1 hour until the plantings, a sign in the pot golden and a skewer inserted into with the sponsor’s name, seasonal the center of the loaf comes out maintenance/watering and placeclean. Carefully remove from the ment of the pot. pan and let cool on a wire rack. A sponsorship form can be Serve thickly sliced. Best eaten downloaded from the city’s webwithin 3 days. Can be frozen for site at www.palosheights.or/projup to 1 month. ect/248, or potential sponsors can

Greet overnight guests with a freshly baked loaf of bread The aroma of homemade bread baking in the oven is enough to compel many people to get in the kitchen and bake. That aroma is even more welcoming when hosting friends and family overnight, as there’s nothing quite like waking up to the smell of freshly baked bread coming from the kitchen. Hosts who want to treat their guests to such aromatic mornings can try the following recipe for “Banana and Coconut Loaf” from Linda Collister’s “Quick Breads” (Ryland, Peters & Small). BANANA AND COCONUT LOAF Makes 1 medium loaf • 3/4 cup unsweetened shredded

fat-free) • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour • 1 teaspoon baking powder • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda • A good pinch of sea salt • 1 8 x 4 x 21/2-inch loaf pan, greased and base-lined with parchment paper

coconut • 7 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened • 1/2 cup packed light brown sugar • Grated peel of 1 unwaxed lime • 2 extra-large eggs, beaten • 3 medium bananas, very ripe (about 1 cup peeled) • 3 tablespoons plain yogurt (not

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Put the coconut in an ovenproof dish and toast in the heated oven for about 3 minutes until a light gold color. Let cool until needed. Put the butter into a large bowl, add the sugar and the grated lime peel. Beat well with a wooden spoon or electric mixer. Gradually beat in the eggs. Using a fork, mash the bananas

Supplied photo

Pictured is one of the many attractive planter pots that will again grace Harlem Avenue soon. Volunteers are needed to assemble the pots May 19.

contact Ed Dombrowski of the Beautification committee at (708) 825-7775 for more information.


8 Section 2

Thursday, May 17, 2018 The Regional News • The Reporter

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS Play examines Watergate figure

“Redeemed: The Fall and Rise of Chuck Colson,” a look at the struggles of a disgraced Nixon-era figure, will be presented by Provision Theater at Trinity Christian College, 6601 W. College Drive, Palos Heights, tomorrow through Sunday. In the 1970s, Chuck Colson, former special counsel to President Nixon, was convicted and sent to jail for his role in the Watergate scandal. Colson paradoxically found new life while in national disgrace and imprisonment. Performances for “Redeemed” are set for 8 p.m. tomorrow, 4 and 8 p.m. Saturday, May 19 and 3 p.m. Sunday, May 20 in Trinity’s Marg Kallemeyn Theatre. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit provisiontheater.org or call 866-811-4111. All seating is general admission.

Bridge Teen Center to offer a place to study with snacks

The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Ct., Orland Park, offers several free events for teens in seventh through 12th grade.  For more information, call (708) 532-0500. • Something’s Fishy” Mystery Night will happen from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday, May 18. Students will celebrate summer approaching with a fun mystery night involving games and live music from Glass Pony and Ardent Life. Red Lobster will provide free food samples.  • Drop In Study Lounge with Fruit Skewers is scheduled from 2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 23. Students can come and go to enjoy a snack of fresh fruit while studying. • Open Art Studio will be held from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23. Students can enjoy the brand-new art studio space, practicing creativity with a variety of art tools. • Drop In Study Lounge with Chicken Nuggets & Sauce Bar is set from 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday, May 24. Students can use The Bridge’s tutors, whiteboards, and study supplies while enjoying a snack of chicken nuggets with a sauce bar. • #Skills Sports Softball Pitch with Morgan will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, May 24. Students will travel to an offsite park to learn the rules and practice the techniques of softball with a Division 1 and professional athlete.

Orland History Museum offers Old Orland Walking Tour

The Village of Orland Park History Museum is offering a walking tour of Old Orland from 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 19,

beginning at the museum, 14415 S. Beacon Ave. The tour is open to those ages 18 and older and registration is available at Recreation Administration, 14600 S. Ravinia Ave. The cost is $15 for village residents and $23 for non-residents. For more information, call the museum at (708) 873-1622.

CCSS to host Kick-off to Summer family event on Sunday, June 10

The Crisis Center for South Suburbia will host its Kick-off to Summer family event from 1 to 7 p.m. Sunday, June 10 at Water’s Edge Golf Club, 7205 W. 111th St., Worth. Frankfort-based Sturdi Iron will present the event. The event includes a large beer tent with headlining entertainment including Related Rhapsody of Oak Forest and one of Chicago’s most popular bands, Midnight. A beanbag tournament and raffles will also be part of the festivities. Free children’s activities include face painting, bouncy houses and more. Assorted beverages, brats, burgers and more will be available for an additional cost. Tickets can be purchased in advance for $20, which includes a raffle ticket for the Big Top Cash Raffle and a door prize ticket. Only advanced tickets are eligible for the cash raffle. Tickets are available at both Neat Repeats store locations: 6602 W 111th St., Worth and 9028 W. 159th St., Orland Park. Tickets can also be purchased online at ww.crisisctr. org/events/kots. Tickets at the door will be $10 for adults, and $5 for kids age 4 to 10. Children younger than 3 are free. For more information on the Kick-off to Summer, visit the website or call (708) 429-7255.

Seek Orland Grassland Habitat Rescue Team volunteers

The Orland Grassland volunteer Habitat Rescue Team is looking for people who love nature, hiking into the prairie wilderness and helping bring the area’s prairie ecosystem to vibrant good health. The team meets at the parking lot on 167th Street just west of La Grange from 9 a.m. to noon on the second and fourth Saturday of every month year around.  Members also meet at various locations around the site every Wednesday during same timeframe, but advance notice is required. Volunteers should dress for the weather and hiking in natural terrain.  No experience is necessary, tools and guidance provided. This qualifies for community service hours and is intended for those at least 8 years old. Adults must accompany minors. For more information, call Pat Hayes at (708) 220-9596 or check out the group’s Facebook page.  

HOROSCOPES ARIES- Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, soon you will be able to clarify your thinking and articulate your needs to others. Until then, you need to wait for an opportunity to share your point of view. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, if you have been struggling with a challenging situation, you’ll get some much-needed support this week. Use the break to treat yourself to something special. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Some epic action may be on tap for you this week, Gemini. You may have to slow things down if everything is moving too quickly. A lively group of people will join you. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, a surge of energy may have you working overtime to complete a task. Just come up for a breather once in a while. Such respites can prove rejuvenating. LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Distant lands may be calling you, Leo. So be sure your passport is in order and set up those discount fare alerts to your email. It’s time to get away for some R&R. VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, be careful what you wish for, as you may just get everything you desire. It’s uncertain how things may turn out, so be ready to make changes as needed. LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Is love in the air, Libra? If you are feeling more amorous than usual, you may be ready for a

new relationship or ready to add some spice to your current one. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Health, wisdom and wealth could be in your sights, Scorpio. Why not throw in being wellliked as well? This is your time to soar. Enjoy the ride while it lasts. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/ Dec 21 Devote more time to self-care right now, Sagittarius. You may need some time to yourself to recharge. When you are done, you can once again be a person of action. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, you may be feeling a little wild this week or ready to just hang around in your pajamas and relax. Either way works as long as you’re happy doing it. AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Your powers of persuasion are dialed up, Aquarius. You can convince others of just about anything you want them to do right now. Use this skill wisely. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, a love of fine things could find you in financial peril if you are not careful with spending. Set limits on how much you treat yourself.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

MAY 17 Derek Hough, Dancer (33) MAY 18 Jack Johnson, Singer (43) MAY 19 Eleanor Tomlinson, Actress (26)

Reporter 5 17 18  
Reporter 5 17 18