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THE 2 SECTIONS 20 PAGES

Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

Volume LIV No. 20

Green tea and aloe vera team to protect skin Read Dee Woods, Page 12

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Thursday, July 25, 2013

Summer Classic

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    One of the southwest suburbs’ most anticipated annual events took place last Thursday across the Calumet Sag Channel, just south of Worth.     The 10th edition of the Palos Heights Classic Car Event was held in the city’s downtown business district along Harlem Avenue. Thousands of people — car owners, car-lovers, and other folks just looking for a good time — descended on the two-block stretch between 122nd and 124th streets on a sultry summer evening. Some showed off their wheels, while others were just there to see what they were showing off at the event that has a festival-like atmosphere. The Chicago Kingsnakes entertained the masses with a mix of bluesy rock tunes, while vendors sold snow cones, nachos, hot dogs and tamales. Serving Chicago Ridge,the Evergreen     A passing rainstorm interrupted show for Park, just a Hickory few minutes, prompting car owners to scramble to cover their beloved vehicles with tarpaulins; but the sun returned and event proceeded shortly thereafter, the only reminder of the rain being owners drying beaded water from their well-waxed rides.     Several residents from Reportland made the short jaunt to the Heights to participate in the show. John O’Callaghan of Palos Hills, below, brought his red 1965 Chevy Malibu S3, and George Johnson of Worth, right, traversed the Harlem Avenue bridge to display his blue 1953 Willys-Overland Jeepster. Jerry Horn of Oak Lawn, meanwhile, represented his hometown with a red 1957 Chevy Bel-Air that he bought three years ago, above right.

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Last week’s results:

Do you agree with the Worth Village Board’s decision to reduce the roles of finance director and code enforcement officer to part-time positions? Yes....79% No.....21% This week’s question:

What local summer festival is the best? Street Fair Day in the Park Friendship Fest RidgeFest Worth Days Fall on the Green Vote on Facebook at The Reporter or at thereporteronline.net, call us at 448-6161 or email thereporter@comcast.net

index Police News.....................2 Our Neighborhood..........4 Sudoku...........................4 School...........................5 Commentary...................6 Consumer.....................7 Crossword......................8 Death Notices.................8 Calendar........................11

columnists Dee Woods..................12 Wine Guy......................12

Photos by Jason Maholy

Bridging the pond Neverly Bros. cover U.S., British artists at Evergreen show By Kevin M. Coyne Correspondent     For more than 10 years, the Neverly Brothers have taken audiences back to the 1950s and ’60s in their musical time machine playing tunes from American and British artists.     The three-man rock ’n’ roll band, a popular draw at area summer festivals and events, was in Evergreen Park on Sunday where they took the stage for a nearly two-hour set at Klein Park, 97th Street and Homan Avenue. Known for their showmanship, musical abilities and knowledge of music, the Neverly Brothers dazzled an audience of all generations as they played some wellknown songs from Elvis to The Beatles.     “Our show is about the beauty of the music and from all different generations,” said Neverly Brothers lead guitarist and lead vocalist Kevin Giragosian. “We find songs that are fun to play and sing, and we like to play songs that are not the standard hits but more the secondary hits.”     The band played two distinct sets, the first from the 1950s and which covered songs by American artists including Muddy Waters and Jerry Lee Lewis. After about an hour, the Brothers took a short break, changes into garb made famous by 1960s stars such as The Beatles, and changed the tone of the show with songs that were first played in the United States, and then made famous by British performers. Some songs sounded familiar,

Photos by Kevin Coyne

The Neverly Brothers performed at Klein Park in Evergreen Park on July 21. The band plays a mixture of tunes from the Elvis-area to songs made famous during the British Invasion. but were given a little twist.     One of the more famous songs, “Twist and Shout,” was performed first by the Isley Brothers and later covered by The Beatles. The tune is a perfect example of an American-born song made famous during the British Invasion, Giragosian said.     “We always have a mixture of generations in the audience, from young to old, we appeal to all ages,” Giragosian said. “People either grew up with the songs or know the songs from their parents or grandparents and that’s why we appeal to so

many generations.”     Evergreen Park residents Katie Gesch and her husband, Karl, recently moved here from rural Wisconsin where country music is the standard. Both Wisconsin natives thought the Neverly Brothers performance was outstanding.     “We come from a farm town in Wisconsin and this is a lot better than some of the country fest-style shows we are used to seeing,” Karl said. “It is cool to see so many generations of music and they are pulling it off Evergreen Park residents Katie and Karl Gesch watch the Neverly very well.” Brothers on Sunday in Klein Park.


2

The Reporter Thursday, July 25, 2013

police news

they allegedly took clothing from a store at the Chicago Ridge Mall.     Marie Johnson, 21, and     An 18-year-old Chicago Ridge Kristianna Dantzler, 18, were woman was charged with batreportedly arrested at 6 p.m. tery after she allegedly struck last Friday. Johnson allegedly a 28-year-old woman in the took $194 worth of clothing and face and pulled the woman’s Dantzler allegedly took $166 hair during an argument in worth of clothing. the 10400 block of Natoma Avenue.     Breanna Gilich was reportedly arrested at 7:28 p.m. Sunday. ***     A 29-year-old Oak Lawn man was charged with DUI and failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident after the vehicle he was driving reportedly struck two vehicles in the 10200 block of Ridgeland Avenue.     Jason ball was reportedly ar-     A 55-year-old Posen man was rested at 12:45 p.m. last Thurs- charged with theft after he alday. Police arrived at the scene legedly took a charity’s donation of the accident to find Ball jar containing as much as $50 reportedly lying on the curb. from the counter of a conveThe vehicle Ball was driving nience store in the 8000 block reportedly struck the rear of of 95th Street. one vehicle, which then struck     Sy Spreadbury was reportedly the vehicle in front of it, as the arrested at 12:56 p.m. July 17. drivers were stopped for an ap- A surveillance video reportedly proaching ambulance. showed Spreadbury taking the *** jar from the counter at 5:52 a.m.     A woman reported her wal- July 16. Spreadbury reportedly let containing $150 was taken returned to the store the next from her purse while she was day, wearing the same clothes shopping at the Chicago Ridge as he had on the day of the alMall. The woman later found leged theft, and a store employee the wallet in a store display, alerted the police to his presbut the money was missing, ence. Spreadbury possessed six police said. The incident was $1 coins, which were returned captured on surveillance video, to the store, police said. police said. *** ***     The living room window of a     A catalytic converter was re- home in the 8200 block of 91st portedly taken from a vehicle Street was reported shattered parked at the Chicago Ridge by an unknown object at 10:44 Mall between 2:30 and 10:30 p.m. July 20. p.m. last Friday. *** ***     A 50-year-old Chicago man     Fewer than $5 in change was was charged with retail theft reported taken from a vehicle after he allegedly stole $105 from parked in the 10500 block of the cash register at the conveSouthwest Highway at 7:5 p.m. nience store he worked at in the July 18. 8000 block of 95th Street. ***     James Brown was reportedly     Two Chicago women were arrested at 4:10 p.m. July 19. charged with retail theft after Brown reportedly took the mon-

Chicago Ridge

Hickory Hills

Man may have thought charity jar was for him

THE

REPORTER

Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jason Maholy Sports Editor Ken Karrson Graphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora Advertising Sales Val Draus

ey while working the midnight shift at the store on June 27 and 28. Brown voided all transactions customers paid for in cash, then removed the cash from the register, police said. ***     A 21-year-old Palos Hills man was arrested on a Hickory Hills police warrant for failure to appear in court on a traffic offense charge.     Jose Molina-Garcia was reportedly arrested at 12:30 a.m. July 18.

Oak Lawn Chicago man apparently not pleased with ‘Blue’     A Chicago man was cited for battery after he allegedly pushed an umpire to the ground after a softball game in Centennial Park, 9401 S. Oak Park Ave.     Darryl R. Lusk, 29, was upset with the umpire’s calls and began yelling at him before pushing him in the chest, causing the official to fall to the ground around 9:30 p.m. July 17, according to police. ***     A car burglar smeared feces on the seat of the 2006 GMC Canyon from which sunglasses and change were taken sometime between 10:15 p.m. July 11 and 9 a.m. July 12 while the vehicle was parked in the 9600 block of South Melvina Avenue, police said. ***     A yellow 2003 Dodge Neon containing a laptop, iPhone 5 and clarinet was reported stolen from in front of a home in the 9100 block of South 51st Avenue sometime between 3 a.m. and 12 p.m. July 11. ***     An Oak Lawn man was charged with disorderly conduct after he allegedly threw a yard sign at a neighbor’s truck while intoxicated, according to reports.     Daniel T. Pranaitis, 37, was arrested at 8:13 p.m. in the 9000 block of South Cicero Avenue, according to reports. Pranaitis allegedly walked to his neighbor’s drive as the neighbor was washing his 2013 Ford F150, and became angry after the neighbor told him to leave. ***     Vandals broke a front window of a pub in the 9700 block of South Cicero Avenue sometime before 6:15 a.m. July 14, according to reports.

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Notice is Hereby Given that on 9-1-13, a sale will be held at Super Auto Repair, 2552 W. 71st Street, Chicago, IL. 60629, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Maribel Gonzalez 2004 Pontiac VIN# 2G2WS522841347056 Lien Amount: $2,700.00

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    A 52-year-old Romeoville man was cited criminal damage to property after he allegedly broke a drain pipe at a restaurant in the 11400 block of Harlem Avenue.     Julio Galindo was reportedly ticketed at 11:35 p.m. July 10. Galindo reportedly dropped his false teeth down the drain in the bathroom sink, and broke part of the ceramic sink and the metal drain hardware in an attempt to retrieve the dentures. The owner of the restaurant reportedly told police he will have a plumber open the drainpipe so the teeth can be retrieved and returned to Galindo. ***     A 21-year-old Palos Heights man was charged with two counts of criminal damage to property after he allegedly punched a window, breaking the glass, and a door by kicking it at an apartment unit in the 7200 block of West 111th Street.     Nicholas Holda was reportedly arrested at 6:18 a.m. July 12. ***     An 18-year-old Worth man was charged with trespassing and disorderly conduct after police found him to be in possession of stolen property in the 10700 block of Depot Avenue.     Mohammed Ziko was reportedly arrested at 7:55 p.m. July 7. Ziko was in possession of backpack in which another youth had reportedly placed stolen DVDs. ***     Two 19-year-old men were cited for underage consumption of alcohol after a police officer reportedly found them fishing and drinking at the municipal boat launch on the Calumet Sag Channel.     Casey Fico of Merionette Park and Jeffrey Banaszak of Chicago were reportedly ticketed at 10:36 p.m. July 17. The youths possessed a 40-ounce bottle of King Cobra malt liquor and one 24-ounce can of Bud Light Lime Straw-ber-Rita, police said. Banaszak was also reportedly cited for possessing open alcohol. ***     A 15-year-old Worth girl was charged with criminal damage to property after she allegedly punched the window of an apartment, breaking the glass, in the 6900 block of W. 111th Place.     The youth was reportedly arrested at 7:46 a.m. July 16 for the incident that occurred around 11 p.m. the previous night, police said. ***     An 18-year-old Worth man was cited for damage to property and illegal consumption of alcohol after he allegedly threw a rock at a Ford Mustang parked outside an apartment building in the 6900 block of West 111th Place.     Anthony Vancura was reportedly ticketed at 1:27 a.m. July 16. Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

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was charged to her credit card by a business in Washington state. Computers purchased online with the credit card were reportedly delivered to Waco, Texas.

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glary after he allegedly threw a brick through a convenience store window, then entered the building and took at least six packs of Newport cigarettes.     Cory Brown was reportedly arrested on July 17. Brown allegedly threw the brick through the window of the store, 8600 W. 103rd St., in the early morning hours of July 17. The store owner after being called by police to the scene reviewed store surveillance video that captured the incident, and he was able to provide police a description of the burglar. Police subsequently questioned Brown, who allegedly admitted to the burglary. ***     A 21-year-old man and a 39year-old woman were arrested after the man allegedly damaged property.     Jose Molina-Garcia was reportedly charged with criminal damage to property, and Sandra Molina-Garcia was reportedly charged with two counts of battery. Police were called to the home and reportedly arrived to see Jose running from the scene. Jose had allegedly broken the window of a home in the 10400 block of 88th Avenue.     Police reportedly found Sandra at her home in the 10300 block of Charles Avenue. While talking with officers she became angry and allegedly pushed and struck them. ***     A 42-year-old Palos Hills man was charged with criminal damage to property after he allegedly punched a wall at an apartment building in the 10000 block of 84th Avenue.     Zydrunas Mickevicius was reportedly arrested at 10:40 p.m. Saturday. ***     A bottle of Bacardi rum was taken from a store in the 10600 block of Roberts Road at approximately 3:45 p.m. July 16. A female who left the store with another woman on a tandem bicycle reportedly put the rum in a backpack and left without paying. ***     A 25-year-old Worth man was reportedly charged with criminal trespass to a vehicle after police stopped a vehicle that had been reported stolen.     Matthew Juarez was reportedly arrested at 2:50 a.m. July 17. The green Jeep Cherokee had been reported stolen out of Indiana after it was borrowed and never returned, police said. ***     A water heater in the basement of an apartment building in the 9800 block of Roberts Road was reported damaged on July 17. ***     An air conditioning unit was reported taken sometime *** between July 12 and July 17     The cable wires of a home in from outside a home under the 5400 block of West Frankforeclosure in the 10600 block lin Avenue were cut sometime of 81st Avenue. between 8 and 9:20 p.m. July *** 15, according to reports.     The rear window of a vehicle parked in the 10000 block of S. Hill Terrace was reported broken between 5 p.m. July 17 and 5 p.m. July 18.     A 20-year-old Palos Hills man *** was charged with felony bur-     A woman reported that $7,800 ***     A Chicago man was charged with leaving the scene of an accident that caused an injury after the 2002 Chevy Avalanche he was driving allegedly struck a pedestrian in the 10800 block of South Cicero Avenue.     Jonathan D. Lozano, 18, was arrested at 9:01 a.m. July 10, according to reports. Lozano allegedly struck the victim as she was standing in the median of Cicero Avenue while waiting to cross the road to reach the Advocate Healthcare building. Lozano allegedly drove away from the scene, paused a short distance away, then leave again. The victim was treated for injuries to her arm and head, police said. ***     A Vizio 55-inch flat screen, Blu Ray player and Aerobed were reported stolen from an apartment in the 9600 block of South Ridgeland Avenue sometime between 11 a.m. and 5:59 p.m. July 15. ***     A purse containing an unknown amount of cash and credit cards was reported stolen from a white GMC utility vehicle parked in the lot of a fitness facility in the 10200 block of South Cicero Avenue sometime between 9 and 9:45 a.m. July 10. ***     A purse containing credit cards, $250 in cash and two pairs of diamond earrings worth $4,100 was reported stolen from a black 2005 Jeep Liberty while the vehicle was parked in the 9600 block of South 50th Court sometime around 6 p.m. July 15. ***     Thieves stole $100 and a Movado watch worth $750 after ransacking an apartment in the 10300 block of South Mansfield Avenue sometime between 6:50 a.m. and 3:45 p.m. July 15, according to reports. ***     An Oak Lawn man cited for assault after he allegedly yelled obscenities at a woman during a disagreement at an apartment complex in the 10400 block of South Major Avenue.     Gene A. Boyd, 46, was ticketed around 10 p.m. July 17 after opening the woman’s car door and screaming at her while, according to reports. ***     An iPhone 5 was reported stolen from a cell phone store in the 9600 block of South Cicero Avenue around 4:35 p.m. July 17. Witnesses reported seeing a man described as tall and black and wearing a white polo shirt tear the phone from its security cord and run from the store before fleeing in a silver fourdoor Dodge.

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Submitted Photo

Red rider

    Rosa Castanon, a fourth-grader at Hometown Elementary School in Oak Lawn Hometown School District 123, was chosen to take a ride to school with Hometown firefighters because of her accomplishments, character and leadership.

LEGAL NOTICE

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Notice is Hereby Given that on 8-25-13, a sale will be held at Lans City Auto Body, 3050 E. 170th Street, Lansing, IL. 60438, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Brenda May Clarson 2003 Ford VIN# 1FMZU67E53UB42997 Lien Amount: $1,925.00

Notice is Hereby Given that on 9-8-13, a sale will be held at Hollywood Motors, Inc., 3637 Woodside Avenue, Brookfield, IL. 60513, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Archer M. Vailoles & Gary Valls 1985 Volkswagen VIN# WV2XB0253FH087745 Lien Amount: $8,458.66

Notice is Hereby Given that on 9-8-13, a sale will be held at Belair Auto Collision, 11320 S. Pulaski Road, Chicago, IL. 60655, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Franklin Johnson 2010 Buick VIN# 1G4GE5GVXAF167295 Lien Amount: $19,764.60


Thursday, July 25, 2013 The Reporter

3

What do you say? Briefly describe the greatest concert experience of your life. (Asked at Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanical Garden in Palos Heights)

Photos by Emily Szymanski

Emil Koschnitzki, Palos Park     “I was fortunate enough to go to Frankfurt, Germany, to see one of Mozart’s symphonies. I was dressed up in a suit, and it was extremely hot. The concert was in a ballroom, and there were beautiful murals on the wall. Since it was a ballroom, we sat on folding chairs on the ballroom floor, but it was beautiful. They tried recreating it as if Mozart was still there.�

Drew Baar, Lockport     “Me and a few friends went to see Jimmy Buffet when we were in seventh grade. It was at the Tweeter Center and my friend had box seats. It was super chill and super relaxed. It was a fun concert.�

John Ferriter, Palos Park     “I saw Michael Flatley. Being Irish, it was great! There was a crowd of Irish people and everyone was excited.�

Sam Hynes, Palos Park     “I went to see The Fray with my best friend, Drew, a few years ago. Jack’s Mannequin opened. We sat on lawn seats. It was cool — there was a laid back atmosphere even though there were lots of people. I got a free pair of sunglasses.�

John Griffin, Oak Forest     “I saw Neil Diamond. It was fabulous with all the people there; it was a huge crowd.�

From appeals bench, Sterba joins law firm

Enters private practice after judicial career By Jeff Vorva     Palos Heights attorney David Sterba never served as a juror in his life.     “I was called but never chosen,� he said.     That’s one of the few things the man has never done in the courtroom. He has done just about everything else.     Sterba is now a part of the reorganized Walsh, Fewkes and Sterba Law Firm, which has offices in Palos Heights at 7270 W. College Drive and in Chicago.     Matt Walsh has been a trial lawyer for 45-plus years. Dave Fewkes has been at it for 30 years. They are parlaying that threequarter of a century wealth of experience with a guy who knows the ins and outs and many sides of the courtroom and court system.     The 55-year-old Sterba has been a criminal defense lawyer and worked with personal injury litigation from 1984-1996. For 12 years, he was a circuit judge for Cook County and served as a felony trial judge in the Fifth Municipal District based at the courthouse in Bridgeview.     He was appointed Presiding Judge of the Fifth District in 2008 and was the boss over 24 other judges. In 2011 the Illinois Supreme Court appointed him as a Justice on the Illinois Appellate Court and in 2012 the South Suburban Bar Association named him “Jurist of the Year.� He’s also used his lofty position to teach and give lectures to his peers, college students and high school students.     And now he is heading back into the trenches.     Sterba resigned as a judge July 1 and will be back in action in the courtroom as a lawyer again.     “I’m back in the battle,� he

Submitted photo

Former Illinois Appellate Court Justice David Sterba is heading back to the courtroom as a lawyer in private practice after spending close to two decades as a judge. said. “I found being a judge stimulating and challenging and that part I will miss. But with every new opportunity I look for a new host of challenges. My life is one where I like to climb mountains. I’ve climbed a few and that was one of them and now I will climb another.�     The former judge can’t wait to get back to his roots.     “I like litigation and trying cases in a courtroom,� Sterba said. “I look forward to getting back into the well of the courtroom and arguing before juries. I miss that. I use this analogy — trial lawyers are to the law what surgeons are to medicine. It’s very stimulating to get into the court and litigate like that.�     He said his style is to be “authentic� and “genuine� when he is litigating and “not to try to be someone I’m not.�     Sterba grew up in Alsip and attended Richards High School and started to grow an appreciation

for law at an early age.     “I read books and watched television programs and found the law to be very intriguing and interesting,â€? he said. “I enjoyed a composite of the television lawyers and the real life lawyers. I liked reading biographies of lawyers from Abraham Lincoln to Gerry Spence to Clarence Darrow. I loved reading all of those books. I tried to learn something from all of them because those lawyers certainly had a lot to offer and teach young aspiring lawyers.â€?     He grew up with his brother, Bob, who was a longtime Palos Heights policeman and is now the police chief in New Lenox. David also picked up some police training as he was a deputy sheriff in the Cook County Court Services Division.     Sterba attended St. Xavier University and the John Marshall Law School and has lived in Palos Heights since 1991. He is married to Patricia and they have three children — Lisa, Ashley and David. He is a parishioner at St. Alexander Catholic Church in Palos Heights.     Sterba admits that there is a lot more to law than the exciting trials seen on television and in movies. There is the preparation work, which is not very glamorous. But he said he enjoys that aspect of law because “the best lawyer in the room is the one who is best prepared.â€?     He can’t wait for his first case, he said.     “Everything I have done provides and advantage to me and an added perspective,â€? he said. “From being a deputy sheriff in the courtroom when I was a law student to being a prosecutor, a defense attorney, trial judge and appellate judge ‌ all of those things give me an added perspective and allow me to be as good as I could be.â€?

Photos by Jessie Molloy

Suds in the sun     Patrick Ciesieskli (from left), Brian Stibernick and Jessica Spear were among the volunteers who helped wash cars last Saturday at the Marrs-Meyer American Legion Post 991’s car wash fundraiser, above.     Dawn Bailey-Williams and her daughter, Jessica, 11, were charged with drawing potential car wash patrons off 111th Street, right.

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Palos to straighten rural road By Margaret Pretkelis Correspondent     Road construction is on the agenda for a second consecutive summer in Palos Hills, as city officials last week announced plans to improve 90th Avenue.     The project with an estimated cost of $220,000 will align the five-block stretch of the road between 103rd and 98th streets, according to Palos Hills Mayor Gerald Bennett. City officials are hopeful work can begin before fall, and be completed in about one month.     The construction will be funded with a portion of the city’s annual share of state Motor Fuel Tax (MFT) money. Palos Hills receives

between $350,000 and $375,000 in MFT funds, Bennett said.     The segment of 90th Avenue to be widened serves as a geographical divider between the eastern edge of the White Oak Woods Forest Preserve and some of the city’s west-most residential neighborhoods. The work is necessary because of the road’s inconsistent width, particularly the portions that narrow, Bennett said.     “90th Avenue has never been a straight street,� he added. “It starts wide and goes narrow, and then goes wide and narrow again, which is a safety hazard.�     The project will allow traffic in both directions to move more safely and in less confined quarters, according to Bennett.

    “It will improve the condition of the road, but it will still remain a rural road,� Bennett said, noting there will be no additional work such as gutters or curbs.     90th Avenue was last resurfaced about 10 to 12 years ago, the mayor said.     The construction should have a limited impact on residents who live on 90th Avenue, but may require traffic to be temporarily redirected to one side of the road for several minutes during portions of the work, said Palos Hills Public Works Commissioner Dave Weakley.     “People will be able to get in and out of their homes fine,� Weakley added. “It’ll be business as usual.�

Worth Township picking Supplies from Apple Tree     Worth Township is holding its annual Apple Tree Program to collect school supplies for student whose families are experiencing financial difficulties.     The program is open to families who live in Worth Township. While the Apple Tree is active all year, the greatest need for children is the beginning of each school year. Visit worthtownship.com and click on Youth Commission and Apple Tree Program to find a list of the supplies needed. Donations can be dropped off at the Township offices, 11601 S. Pulaski Road in Alsip (south entrance). For more information call the Worth Township Youth Commission at

371-2900, Ext. 45. Pixie School     Worth Township has announced a change to the Pixie School Program beginning with the fall 2013 session on Sept. 3. The program has been expanded to five days a week. Children 4 and 5 years old will attend Monday, Wednesday and Friday between 9 am and 11:30 a.m.; 3-year-olds will attend during the same hours Tuesday and Thursday.     Enrollment is open to children who reside in Worth Township. Children outside the Township boundaries may enroll at a slightly higher cost. The fee can be paid in full or

divided into two payments.     Parents and children are encouraged to visit the Township during the Youth Commission’s open house on Thursday, Aug. 29 between 10 am and noon.     Children who participate in Pixie School must be toilet trained before the start of classes. For more information visit worthtownship.com and click on Youth Commission or call 371-2900, Ext. 45. Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter

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4

The Reporter Thursday, July 25, 2013

Our Neighborhood District 218 plans its annual Back to School Health Fair Event features free food, and school supplies

    Numerous medical facilities and government agencies will join District 218 on Friday, Aug. 9 in hosting a Back to School Health Fair at Richards High School in Oak Lawn.     The event, which will run from Submitted Photo noon to 4 p.m., will feature a limited number of free school physicals, free dental exams, and free vision screens. Richards is located     Hannum Elementary School Principal Ann Marie McGovern reads to students in the park as part of the at 10601 S. Central Ave. “Pages in the Park,” which met July for a reading of Judy Blume’s “Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing.”     Other services include reducedcost school physicals for $40; immunizations for $10; and comprehensive eye exams for $40. Parents must accompany their children in order for them to receive health care services.     The event also includes free vision screenings and free health screens for blood pressure, bone density, body glucose, and others. MetroSouth Medical Center,     For the second year in a row, terology; gynecology; nephrology; represents the second straight in Advocate Christ Medical Center, Advocate Christ Medical Center neurology and neurosurgery; which Christ has been named by Complete Vision Care, Mt. Greenin Oak Lawn has been recognized orthopedics; pulmonology; and Truven Health as being among wood Eye Care, the St. Xavier as one of the top 50 hospitals urology. the nation’s leading hospitals for University health center, Orland in the nation for cardiology and     Details regarding the 2013- performance. The campus was heart surgery, and for geriatric 14 U.S. News hospital rankings one of only seven hospitals in medicine, according to the “Best are available at health.usnews. Illinois — and one of only five Hospitals 2013-14” rankings re- com/best-hospitals. The rank- major teaching hospitals in the leased July 16 by U.S. News and ings also will be published in state — to make the top 100 list World Report. the U.S. News “Best Hospitals for 2013.     The medical center also has 2014” guidebook, available in     The specialty rankings and been rated third overall among bookstores and on newsstands data were produced for U.S. hospitals in the Chicago metro- at the end of August. News & World Report by RTI politan area and the state of Il-     Announcement of the medi- International, a leading research linois, and was cited as a “high cal center’s inclusion in the organization based in Research performer” in 10 other clinical U.S. News rankings follows its Triangle Park, N.C. Using the areas: cancer; diabetes and endo- selection earlier this year to Tru- same data, U.S. News produced crinology; treatment of ear, nose ven Health Analytics’ 2013 list the state and metropolitan region and throat disorders; gastroen- of 100 Top Hospitals. This year rankings.

Park it for stories

Christ cracks the Top 50 for second year in a row

Submitted photo

Dr. Katherine Narbone, a Richards High School graduate, from Complete Vision Care in Oak Lawn will volunteer to provide free eye screens at the Back to School Health Fair on Aug. 9, at Richards High School in Oak Lawn. Park Dental, and Smile, Illinois, are among the many health care facilities providing services.     The fair includes free food,

drinks and free school supplies. For young children, the fair will feature free games, a bounce house, a clown and face painting.

Trinity ranks in top 110 best colleges for the cash     Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights has been ranked No. 103 among the top 150 best colleges for the money nationwide by collegefactual.com, a new site that uses customizable outcomesbased tools and rankings systems to guide students through the college selection process.     Trinity’s rank reflects the institution’s academic quality and economic value, based on the cost of obtaining an undergraduate degree. A number of outcomesbased factors were used to determine this ranking such as average

This week in

THE

student loan debt per student, loan default rates, how well the institution retains and graduates students, and graduates’ starting salaries and earning potential.     “College rankings lists are a dime a dozen and often rely on data that provides limited value-we publish rankings to get students and parents thinking about key factors they need to consider when choosing a college,” said Bill Phelan, CEO of College Factual. “How long will it take you to graduate? How much debt will you incur? How

REPORTER history

News and events from our archives

50 Years Ago

July 25, 1963     Worth village officials set a new curfew for the public parks and playgrounds, enforcing that they remain closed from 10 p.m. until 7 a.m. ***     Summer storms created flooding issues in the area, creating large pools of water area of up to 75 yards in diameter in some areas.

25 Years Ago

July 28, 1988     United States marshals seized Rush’s Restaurant and Lounge in Worth under allegations that the business used the sale of illegal narcotics to earn money. ***     The Evangelical School of

Nursing in Oak Lawn ended its three-year nursing program after 77 years of operation.

10 Years Ago

July 24, 2003     The Palos Hills City Council approved a bid of $18,850 to demolish a building east of Roberts Road and south of 107th Street that one housed the Deep Six Lounge, among other establishments. A garage for the public works and police departments was planned to be constructed once the spot was cleared. ***     The Ridgeland School District 122 board of education voted to rename Dearborn Heights School as Ernest F. Kolb Elementary School in honor of the city’s late mayor.

much money will you make? We highlight important factors such as these in our rankings to help build personalized lists, which is the ultimate goal in any college selection process.     College Factual’s ranking system is based on a series of algorithms that include information from the U.S. Department of Education, nationally mandated data reporting for institutions and Payscale. Find all Trinity Christian College’s rankings at collegefactual.com/ colleges/trin ity-christian-college/ rankings/badges/.     For more information visit collegefactual.com or contact media@collegefactual.com.

Submitted Photo

High flyer     Park Lawn volunteer and boy scout Donny McKenna (second from left) completed his Eagle Service Project by creating a memorial garden for Park Lawn Center’s residential facility in Alsip. The memorial is in honor of the residents of the Park Lawn facility who have died. Relatives and friends of the departed Park Lawn residents now have a place in which to remember their loved ones.     McKenna, 15, is a student at Brother Rice High School. He began the project in April and finished the project earlier this summer. The project included recruiting other troop members, family, and friends to help assist him with the project. He led the group of about 10 to 15 volunteers in their journey to finish the project. McKenna and his team filled the memorial with plants, stone, mulch and gravel, and a bench.     To attain the rank of Eagle Scout one must obtain 21 merit badges, serve actively for a period of six months in his unit in one or more of the following positions — Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, and Venturing crew/ship — and complete a service project.

Duty, Honor, Country     Air Force Airman 1st Class Thomas A. Hollingsworth has graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in San Antonio.     Hollingsworth completed an intensive, eightweek program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.     Hollingsworth is the son of Angelica Hollingsworth of Palos Hills and Thomas Hollingsworth of Tinley Park. He is a 2007 graduate of St. Rita High School in Chicago and earned a bachelor’s

SUDOKU degree in 2011 from North Central College in Naperville. ***     Army Reserve Pfc. Brandon M. Ramos has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C.     During the nine weeks of training, Ramos studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches, and field training exercises.     Ramos is the son of Carla Hughes of Lockport. He is a 2012 graduate of Richards High School in Oak Lawn.

Free Children’s Orthopedic Clinic Does your child:

• Have feet turning in or out? • Complain of leg, knee, hip, shoulder, elbow or wrist pain?

• Complain of back pain? • Been diagnosed with scoliosis?

Wednesday, August 7, 2:00-4:00pm

The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

(Solution on page 11)

D IDSI SCCOOUUNN TT RRAT ATEESS withoutdiscount discount service. without service.

It’s accident no accidentmore morepeople people trust It’s no trustState StateFarm. Farm. ErikR RNelson, Nelson, Agent Agent Erik 10200S SRoberts Roberts Road Road 10200 Palos Hills, IL 60465-1539 Palos Hills, IL 60465-1539 Bus: 708-430-7575 Bus: 708-430-7575 erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com

PARKVIEW ORTHOPEDIC GROUP 7600 W. College Drive • Palos Heights

Dr. Mark E. Moran, Clinical Services For information or appointment: Call 1-800-272-0074 between 1:30 and 4:00pm Monday thru Friday Sponsored by Oak Lawn Elks Lodge #2254 / Chicago South Elks Lodge #1596 and the Illinois Elks Children’s Care Program

2x3

P040036 P040036 02/04 02/04

StateFarm FarmMutual Mutual Automobile Insurance Company in NJ), Bloomington, IL State Automobile Insurance Company (Not in (Not NJ), Bloomington, IL


Thursday, July 25, 2013 The Reporter

schools

5

Shepard students earn spring honors     The following students made the honor roll for the spring 2013 semester at Shepard High School in Palos Heights. Honors with Distinction Freshmen     Namra Shafi, Natalie Bruce, Abigail Graham, Krystyna Nedza, Hannah Vasil, John Wolniak Jr., Michael Cuzco, Michael Graham, Benjamin Meyer, Aleck Poradowski, Janet Santoyo, Caroline Graham, Jacob McGrath, Kylie Sterling, Kendall Yerkes, Dylan Doidge, Hannah Horstmann, David Lawando-Reddy, Sarah Quattrocki, Hayden Wiest, Troy-Lemuel Magpantay, Kailey Fitzgerald, Sara Campione, Riley McDermott, Elizabeth Ciukaj, Bryanna Cross, Morgan Dolehide, Nancy Lesnicki, Maria Munoz, Angeline Schulist, Margaret Sera, Alexander Gowaski, Max Jones, Jacob Zuiker, Karsyn Hettlinger, Alana Oliveros, Grace Spindler, Samantha Stone, Kathryn Baker, Skylor Hilger, Taylor Hoekstra, Jennifer Kempczynski, Osbaldo Suarez, Kerry Hermann, Zachary Sierzega, Alyssa Trinko, Jayna Wilson, William Fitzgerald, Brandi Roberts, Aolani Cahue, Jared Aladenika, Logan Couture, Anthony Crespo, Ahmad Hamdan, Nickolas Loquercio, Islam Sandoka, Marlen Terrazas, Maulika Thakkar, Garrett White and Taiah Womack Hayes. Sophomores     Nathaniel Gibson, Kyle Ruger, Nicholas Martinez, Gabriella Ramirez, Oluwatomi Sogebi, Nicolette Alex, Brandon DeChene, Jonathan Kalabich, Logan Dolehide, Kiersten Mahler, Macryan Caballero, Aubrey Quick, Michael Reddy, Taylor Wareyko, Rhonda Habbal, Kayla Cody, Jordyn Czarny, Emily Jones, Kyle McNamara, Rachel Tuttle, Daniel McEvilly, Brianna Devitt, Antonio Martinez, John Morrissey, Jonathan Venzor, Kristen Gries, Jessica Makenas, Martha Turwon, Eva Adomaityte, Cesar Jimenez, David Atut, Monica Bova, Syed Raza, Julianna Bliss, William McCormick, Benjamin Schlusemann, Morgan Powers, Jessica Bomberry, Sarah Wohler, Kayla Robinson, Ashley Kamholz, Brianna Padecky, Aleksander Kowalkowski, Jamie Bledsoe, Rebecca Gleich, Traverse Jarman, Joseph Brewer, Robyn Folk, Elizabeth Gallegos, Kyle Smith, Alexis Pezdek, Gina DeMauro, Kimberly Leeper, Tyler Timmer, Mary Lippert, Jennifer Payne, Andrea Krolikowski, Sanders Yu and Christina Scales. Juniors     Hussein Al-Rashdan, Enrique Montoya, Michael Peretz, Kimberly Kosman, Nicholas Zuiker, Joshua Maier, Corey Galvin,

Janek Wasag, Kristina Schmude, Kyler Ayres, Natasha Wierzal, Rawan Zayed, Jamie Fredrick, Bridget Curry, Christian Wallace, Kaley Lorch, Colleen McInerney, Ashley Buksa, Jonathan Randich, Desiree Davis, Christina Kotas, Tiffani Kotas, Luke Oprondek, Mariana Reyes, Daniel Ewers, Samuel Hermanas, Stephanie Washington, Jacqueline Evans, Ivan Magana, John Nagle, Stephen Szajek, Taylor Ciukaj, Brendan Hermann, David Jones, Rowida Zatar, Rebecca Bruesch, Krystal Goldschmidt, Christopher Bailey, Melissa Kelly, Konrad Ksiazek, Patricia Clohessy, Trisha Mutzbauer, Meagan Mueller, Brittney Johnson, Natalia Goryl, Tiana Martin, Sabina Choragwicki, Jenifer Fitzgerald, Scott Schultz, Collin Crowl, Megan Williamson, Brian Loftus, Anera Gusic, Quentin Riley, Haya Alalfi, Nicholas Heidinger, Brian Pioppo, Jennifer Shapiro, Scarlett Quiroz, Alex Karasek, Elise Walano, Lindsie Bliss, Michael Bonomo, Madeline Dziedzic, Zipporah Allbritton, Gladys Herrera, Amy Lagerstrom, Cody Larson and Claudia Pina-Martinez. Seniors     Hannah Jarman, Amanda Potenberg, Michael McIntyre, Samantha Korsak, Emily Marszalek, Abigail Leeper, Emma Kautz, Betty Waters, Jodilyn Butkovich, Timothy McIntyre, Taylor Warren, Kyle Jasik, Joey Molloy, Matthew Cabel, John Garetto, Alexis Kozicki, Jamie Pieroth, Sarah Walker, Ileen Gruchot, Tyler Strejc, Trenton Hettlinger, Stephanie Knafl, Abigail Walters, Zackery Zebrowski, Jasmine Ortega, Alec Manzo, Torin Pena, Kendal Wigboldy, Jordan Oliva, Alexandria Albrecht, Michael Miletich, Justin Reynolds, Nickolas Schwartzkopf, Dania Ballout, Joseph Cullinan, Josef Szajek, Thomas Eyer, Deanna Santamaria, Lauren Loomis, Tristan Busch, Dena Hamdan, Theresa Boltz, Robert Doherty, James Donohue, Tiana Thompson, Amanda Nowak, Mitchell Pearl, Breanna Witt, Mallory Kerkstra, Elizabeth Pacenti, Adam Samad, Maris Libera, Sarah Davidson, Sydney Warren, Matthew Scott, Steven Salcik, Jordan Loman, Zachary Abbott, Caroline Dunn, Kyle Joy, Brooke Dunn and Delvin Perkins. High Honors Freshmen     Randall Barnes, Mackenzie Behrens, Gabriela Juszczak, Stefanie Neylon, Taylor Novak, Carolina Slaby, Jenna Kozicki, Edmund Leyden, Michelle Wojtas, Sherdell Edwards, Adam Gordon, Abigail Schultz, Ryan Alsot, Jasmine Anderson, Cody

Esparza, Paige Harkabus, Tamara McCondichie, Brianna McDonald, Noah Oprondek, Sara Al-Rashdan, Heather Banis, Timothy Kruse, Kira Andrist, Precious Boddie, Kelsey Domina, Jacob Knoll, April Larson, Michael LoPresti, Vincent Martin, Anthony Rodriguez, Emma Lazowski, Nicole Rivera, Suad Sandoka, Hayley Vasil, Gabrielle Villarreal, Eric Walters, Taylor Domina, Katherine Healy, Samuel Tuttle, Rebecca McNicholas, Hanan Taher, Amanda Carberry, Jason Contreras, Dania Dmour, Alec Hufstedler, Felicx Reyes, Alaina Peters, Allyson Swaagman, Adriana Arellano, Richard Buergel, Connor Doolan, Lydia Jones, Casey Radz and Joshua Vergara. Sophomores     Alexander Covone, Alexis Lyons, Joanna Rangel, Briana Haugh, Lauren Mikos, Katelyn Paulsen, Marie Lippert, Alexander Bohm, Bryan Spoon, Ivan Morales, Xuxa Santos, Kenneth Gorski, Larry Lesniak, Gabrielle Casillas, Sydney Horton, Jocelynn Thurmond, Kelli Flagg, Nathan Morfoot, Ewelina Waksmundzka, Rachel Libera, Hoa Le, Joshua Reynolds, Shenaya Hopkins, Sarah Wandachowicz, Nicole Kocanda, Kyle Longfield, Kevin Lynch, Sara Shareef, Breanna Graffeo, Kelly Evancich, Kaylee Neylon, Colin Pfeiffer, Sara Anderson, Christopher Goldschmidt, Atoria Huddleston, Robert Peterka, Andrew Miller, Jaylin Moore, Kelli Ahern, Calie Edwards, Tyler Callahan, Heather Slaninka, Eliana Rahman, Justine Flanagan, Travis Pruim, Summer Rice, Christopher Dykstra, Richard Mundo, Paola Negrete, Wayne Palaszynski, Micaela Petkus and Steven Reddy. Juniors     Reem Motan, Sonia Schultz, Alexander Mendoza, Kaitlyn Augle, Alexus Maravillas, Matthew Domina, Madeline Kachold, Andreas Telios, Miranda Lindgren, Colm McGhee, Fiona Flynn, Alexandra Joiner, Dulce Santoyo, Stephanie Brand, Zachary White, Nereida Castillo, Anthony Iaquinta, Gina Cesario, Khahari Cook, Heather Romano, Alexander Bruce, Fuad Abuzerr, Omar Ashkar, Bryce Marrello, Chrystal McAlpin, Rachel Habina, Kortnie Hanold, Lajaniece Burnett, Omar Abedalrahman, Samantha Castillo, George Ilenikhena, Cathy Antony, Matthew Kellerman, Alexander Kacija, Hannah Wright, Nora McMahon, Christopher Verdin, Jacqueline O’Leary, Shana Woodland, Kelley Kozlowski, Cody Buffer, Aileen Rohan, Briona Allen, Shane Javorski, Kevin Knoerzer and Brian Piszczek. Seniors     Franchesca Graffeo, Nisarg

Bulletin Board Evergreen Park Dist. 124

    School District 124 provides free vision, hearing, speech, language, basic concepts knowledge, and fine and gross motor skills screenings for children 3 to 5 years old who are not yet in kindergarten. Children eligible can qualify for special programs. For more information call Jean Hector at 423-0951, Ext. 2140.

reading, math, computer, or English skills to an assigned student for two hours each week for one year. Regular meeting days and times are decided by the tutor and the student. The literacy program offers tutoring at local libraries, the main campus in Palos Hills and college extension centers in Blue Island and Tinley Park. Tutors can choose a location close to their work or home.

    Volunteers for Moraine Valley Community College’s Literacy Program are currently being recruited to tutor adults who read, write or compute math at or below a ninth-grade level or who need additional help in learning English.     Tutors commit to teaching basic

    Volunteers should be high school graduates over the age of 18. Teaching experience is not required. Volunteers must complete 12 hours of mandatory training, which can be completed online at cyberdriveillinois.com or at the college in September.     To volunteer or for more in-

Moraine Valley

formation, call 608-4151.

Oak Lawn High

    Oak Lawn Community High School will hold its 2013-14 schedule/textbook pick-up days on Tuesday, Aug. 6 and Wednesday, Aug. 7 in the media center from 10 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Parents/ legal guardians will need to show proof of residency by providing a current driver’s license or state ID of parent/guardian indicating an address within the district; mortgage or rental documentation in the name of parent/guardian indicating the same address within the district; and two utility bills (other than cell phone) in the name of parent/guardian indicating the same address within the district. Questions about proof of residency

Shah, Stephanie Korbakes, Teresa Lopez, Courtney Kalebich, Hadeal Krakra, Heidi Haack, Paige Zander, Faith Petkus, Dominique Tanchez, Grace Michalik, Dana Dooley, Ryan Riley, Elizabeth Stachowiak, Adam Timmer, Erin Lyons, April Nagel, Cassius Vassalla, Joshua White, Daniel Brooks, Zachary Smith, Samantha Newhall, Katherine Vree, Michael Albrecht, Rylea Fanning, Robert Jatho, Dyriana Washington, Kevin Benson, Jamal Jackson, Crystal Fierros, Abel Hernandez, Scout Garbaczewski, James Healy, John Staehlin, Kristie Bagus, Erik Ziolkowski, Sarah Chornomaz, Julia Fischer, Luz Rodriguez, Meghan Ferguson, Jordan Fredrick, Megan Mendoza, Jacob Mandes, Nicholas Lavery, Justin Rohlicek, Quinton     Oak Lawn High School 2010 graduate Dennis Evashenk (right) poses with the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Singapore David I. Starzyk and Vincent Porcaro. Adelman. Evashenk is serving as a management intern at the United States Embassy in Singapore this summer. Evashenk is a senior at Honor Roll DePaul University majoring in business management with a double Freshmen     Hannah Moore, Philip Quin- minor in international business and hospitality leadership. lan Jr., Allison Schuldt, Michelle Sneddon, Edward Urban, Abigail Newsome, Daijerne Slater, Quinn Floyd, Lamese Ballout, Jose Beltran, Kaitlyn Blanton, Tiffany Gmyrek, London Magee, Nate Szypulinski, Margarita Frausto, Katarzna Latocha, Matthew Bai-     Kevin Mehalek of Oak Lawn     The following area residents ley, Cole Akimoff, Micaela Con- has been selected for an internship graduated in May from the Unitreras, Ashley Crowder, Tishana at Youth Villagversity of Illinois. Holmes, Heather Ihmeidan, Mages, a private nondalena Janik, Conor O’Meara, Chicago Ridge Mohamed Rashid, Vivian Ruiz, profit organization dedicated to     Rebecca Calvillo, Sarah Victoria Zarzycki, Blasé Michel, helping children Cartagena and Ciera DigRyan Paulauskis, Juan Reyes, and families live gins. Pedro Avina, Daniel Boyer, Jada successfully. MeJackson, Jeremy Schultz, Joseph Evergreen Park Weidner, Corry Williams, Isaac halek is a senior majoring in social work at Illinois     Tyler Billings, Philip Casey, Hernandez, Emily Urban, Nicole State University. He is a graduate Thomas Cronin, Jessica DeckAlmazan, Nicholas Bray, Milan of Marist High School. er, Mary Ellen Grochocinski, Carter, Kara Kosman, Heather     Youth Villages provides programs Adam Lawler, Ysaye McKeevSerpe, Ashley Shellberg, Samanto help children who may have er, Kiara Merritt, Emily Sawtha Vanoskey, Benjamin Sunta, suffered abuse or neglect, or who yers, Nicholas Shine, Owen Haley Stevens, Christopher Cammay have emotional and behavSkalitzky, Thomas Skalitzky pos-Pittman, Kevin Courtney, ioral issues. Mehalek is interning and Elise Trojanowski. Aaron Juarez, Brooke Pioppo, at Youth Villages’ Poplar Group Jessica Verwey, Shaher Abdallah, Theodore Aguilar, Kathleen Home, helping boys in residential Hickory Hills Craven, Tierra Giddin, Jaime treatment learn more positive be-     Sheila Egan, Daniela GarHerrera, John Lucin, Gerardo havior patterns and deal with past cia, William Podborny and Brian Siorek. Munoz, Jacob Nevarez, Joseph trauma. *** Ramirez, Christopher Rodriguez, Kylee Schnelle, Daphny Smith,     Amanda Pohrebny of Oak Oak Lawn Ty Woods and Granit Xhema- Lawn earned high honors on the     Mary Albano, Danielle ArAurora University dean’s list for nold, Grace Barker, Matthew jli. the spring 2013 semester. Caulfield, Kimberly Cerf, Win*** nie Cheng, Katherine Cronin, Sophomores     The following area residents Thomas Curran, Danielle     Magaly Escobedo, Abigail made the dean’s list for the Dace, Carol Dyra, Rebecca Dyszcakowski, Erica Morales, spring 2013 term at Augustana Egan, Kevin Finn, Elizabeth Nichole Chaput, Abbey Linnert, College. Fitzgerald, Maureen Foley, Eric Horbach, Alec Anderson,     Meghan Deplaris, Brittney John Francis, John Grazulis, Emilie Crofton, Chase SmoSexton and Meredith Skala, all Theodore Hoard, Nicole Janlen, Georgeann Elliott, Kristen of Oak Lawn; and Alexa Gutausik, Kristina Karakas, Brittany Ryniec, Igor Skubera, Jamie kas of Palos Hills. Kawa, Mary Kobiernicki, KevWargin, David Donnick, Jennifer *** in Koehler, Iwona Krzysiak, Pacenti, Rawa Saadeh, Samantha     The following area residents Daniel Kueltzo, Sarah Louis, Nape, Kyle Dye, Liam McCool, made the dean’s list for the spring Tyrone Martinez-Black, John Kimberly Rinck, Jeffrey Taylor, 2013 semester at Eastern Illinois Murphy, Michelle Paul, AnJada Mayers, Kashay Alexander, University in Charleston. drew Piech, Claire Sereiko, William Newhall, Reiner Rolle,     William Knobbe of Chicago Joe Smith, Meggan StanShane Wright, Justin MacDonRidge; Hannah Thies and ton, Meggan Sterk, Marissa (Continued on page 7) Jayme Wazio, both of Ever- Sutera, James Wallace, Daniel green Park; Mark Michaels of Walsh, Alexa Weiler and Claire Hickory Hills; Elizabeth Bur- Wilmsen. batt, Caitlin Danforth, Daniel *** Harrington and Erin Murhp,     Mary Schmidt of Evergreen all of Oak Lawn; and Jessica Park graduated May 11 from Mican be directed to Maria Vander- Svoboda of Palos Hills. ami University in Oxford with a warren at 741-5602. Students who *** bachelor’s of arts degree. pick-up their schedule/textbooks     Matthew Eakins of Evergreen *** after Aug. 14 will be assessed a Park, a senior English major at     Benjamin Nelson of Oak $50 late fee. Missouri University of Science Lawn graduated May 18 from     Families who are new to the and Technology in Rolla, has been Taylor University in Upland, school district and have not yet named to the honor list for the Ind., with a bachelor’s degree in registered or selected courses 2013 spring semester. computer science. should contact Vanderwarren *** *** to begin the registration process     The following students made     The following area residents prior to the schedule/textbook the dean’s list for the spring 2013 graduated in May from Northern pick-up days. semester at Washington Univer- Illinois University in DeKalb.     Enrollment fees for the 2013- sity in St. Louis.     Adam Lindquist of Chicago 14 school year includes a $365     Suvrat Chandra of Palos Ridge; Christina Sekula of Evergeneral fee and additional fees for Heights. Chandra is enrolled in green Park; Christina Zorek and items such as driver education the university’s College of Arts Jazmine Lee, both of Hickory training, yearbooks, newspapers, & Sciences. Hills; Mitchell Downey, Ashley and student parking requests. Fee     Kevin John Kosiewicz of Sorrentino, Nicolette Samupayments are due upon registra- Evergreen Park. Kosiewicz is en- els, Gytis Tamosaitis, Lauren tion. Additional information is rolled in the university’s John M. Hickey, Andrew Brus, all of available online at olchs.org. (Continued on page 8) Olin School of Business.

Interning in Singapore

CLampus eaders

College Grads

You are invited to attend an . . .

Evening Under the Stars A benefit for Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens Spend the evening at Lake Katherine enjoying good food, drinks, music and entertainment while raising money for the addition of an outdoor pavilion.

Saturday, August 17, 2013 Submitted Photo

Top Spartans     Oak Lawn High School has recognized the following students for their Top 15 status for the graduating class of 2013: Kyle Cheng (valedictorian), Connor Niemiec (salutitorian), Nicholas Contino, Marcin Krzysiak, Christine Richter, Sean Dunne, Yusra Sarhan, Barbara Pajor, Lorenzo Gudino, Weronika Ciezczak, Thomas Mallon, Nathaly Gal, Cathal Burke, Ronald Luce and Carly Psik.     Seen here are Psik (front, from left), Richter, Pajor, Sarhan and Mallon; and Cheng (top row, from left), Dunne, Contino, Gudino and Niemiec.

7:00 pm

Individual tickets are $100 each. Sponsorship tables are $1500 and include 10 tickets and name recognition on a stamped brick on the pavilion walkway. Please RSVP by August 12th.

7402 W. Lake Katherine Dr. Palos Heights, Illinois 708-361-1873 www.lakekatherine.org Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens is a 501 (c)(3) charitable organization.


6

The Reporter

Thursday, July 25, 2013

commentary The

Reporter

An Independent Newspaper Amy Richards Publisher

Jason Maholy Editor

Published Weekly Founded March, 16, 1960

Inside the First Amendment

‘Fear’ greatest threat to First Amendment freedoms By Gene Policinski     At various times, every American likely has wished for less of some things that the First Amendment protects. Less hateful speech. One less noisy protest group. Or maybe even the swift departure of a media outlet or personality whose stance or voice is just grating on a personal level.     For the most part, those wishes come and go — or the targets do, as media fortunes or political trends wax and wane.     But wishes don’t change constitutions. There’s no impact on what we can say, what we write, how we worship, or our ability to challenge and seek to change government policies and practices.     And the same 45 words of the First Amendment exist today as when they were ratified by the fledgling nation as part of the Bill of Rights in 1791.     But the just-released 2013 State of the First Amendment survey by the First Amendment Center gives us reason to worry about the future because of a repeating threat to our core freedoms: fear.     In this year’s survey, conducted in May — about a month after the Boston Marathon bombing — 34% of Americans said the First Amendment goes too far in the rights it guarantees, up 21 points from the 13% recorded in the 2012 survey.     The increase is the largest one-year rise in the survey’s history, and more than double the point increase seen in the wake of 9/11 — when those fearing too much freedom went from 39% to the all-time high of 49%.     Fear has been a powerful force in American history. A mere seven years after we gained the Bill of Rights, amid fear that a critical press would tilt us into war with France, Congress passed the Sedition Act — authorizing jail for those who criticized Congress or the president. Some editors were jailed, but a nation repelled by those actions allowed the act to expire two years later.     President Lincoln suspended certain civil rights during the Civil War. Japanese-Americans were interned during WWII. There were “blacklists” during the McCarthy era. The unprecedented national-security restrictions and regulations adopted quickly after 9/11, embodied in the

Patriot Act, resulted from wide fear of future terrorism. Even seven months later, in the 2002 SOFA survey, 49% of us said the First Amendment went too far — still the highest result recorded in the annual sampling.     We have been reminded many times by public officials — from former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich to several attorneys general — that “the First Amendment is not a suicide pact.” But protecting and preserving fundamental rights preserves the very character of the nation — those qualities of religious liberty and freedom of expression that make the United States unique in all the world.     As the old joke goes, “You’re not paranoid if they really are after you” — and certainly there are forces that aim to do this nation harm. And no constitutional rights are absolute. But history shows us that political leaders may overreact to threats, and gain at least temporary political support from a fearful citizenry. We’re arguing about that now, concerning the disclosure of massive government surveillance of our phone records and e-mails.     In the years after 9/11, the percentage of those saying we had too much liberty “reset” to between 25% and last year’s 13%. But this year’s results warn that even a single incident — even as authorities moved swiftly to arrest the Boston bombers — can endanger public support for freedoms we have had for 222 years.     The nation’s Founders didn’t waffle — or let fear dilute their support — when it came to standing behind the permanence of the First Amendment: Its first words are “Congress shall make no law … .”     In 1775, Ben Franklin bluntly offered his view of balancing national security and core freedoms: “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”     Even when faced with real threats, we need to remember who we are as a nation — and what we stand for in the rest of the world. Gene Policinski is senior vice president of the First Amendment Center and COO of the Newseum Institute. E-mail him at gpolicinski@newseum.org.

Another Perspective

Take down the bird feeder By Dr. Harold Pease     I am disturbed by a news report this week that shows one out of every three persons in the United States is fed by the other two. This means that in the grocery line before I get to the checkout I pick up the bill of either the person in front of me or the one behind. Since I live in California where we are told a third of all welfare recipients reside, and assuming that the vast majority receive food stamps, it is more likely that I pay for the one in front and the one behind. The vast majority of whom look to be stronger than I.     This news brings to mind a script “Take Down the Bird Feeder,” source unknown, that I read some time ago. Most have shared this same experience sometime in their life. It goes like this: “I bought a bird feeder. I hung it on my back porch and filled it with seed. What a beauty of a bird feeder it was, as I filled it, lovingly with seed. Within a week we had hundreds of birds taking advantage of the continuous flow of free and easily accessible food. But then the birds started building nests in the boards of the patio, above the table, and next to the barbecue. Then came the poop. It was everywhere: on the patio tile, the chairs, the table... Everywhere! Then some of the birds turned mean. They would dive bomb me and try to peck me even though I had fed them out of my own pocket. And others birds were boisterous and loud. They sat on the feeder and squawked and screamed at all hours of the day and night and demanded that I fill it when

it got low on food. After a while, I couldn’t even sit on my own back porch anymore. So I took down the bird feeder and in three days the birds were gone. I cleaned up their mess and took down the many nests they had built all over the patio. Soon, the back yard was like it used to be... quiet, serene.... And no one demands rights to a free meal.     Our free enterprise system, vastly stimulated by our Constitution which limited the government’s power over us so enterprise could blossom, has made it possible to eradicated poverty from this nation for anyone who really wanted to work. I know because I was once poor. I have 14 brothers and sisters and my father, the only breadwinner in the family had severe heart problems from which he died leaving most under 18. About not having enough, I experienced more than I wished; a snack was a raw potato. I watched those who had some measure of wealth (I knew no one wealthy) and I learned early that education and industry could save anyone who wished to use them. Others took the course that led to dependency. Every person in America has the same choice. It has always been so. How, like the birds depicted above, have so many of our people become.     One of the poorest men I ever knew refused the dole and worked till the day he died. His legs were virtually worthless. Vastly overweight he could only get off the couch or a chair by first rocking until he had momentum to shift the weight to his legs. A fall drastically limited any meaningful use of his arms. He made no excuses for

his situation. He found a job with a moving company answering the telephone where he scheduled help for the “real” disadvantaged, those broken down on the highway.     I tell my students of the folk tale of the old man who came to the Florida everglades to catch some wild hogs reputed to be uncatchable. No one took him seriously, only chuckled, when he inquired where they might be. You see no one had ever been successful in capturing these hogs and those would be catchers were much stronger and faster then he. “Never mind, just point me in the right direction,” he responded. They did. He placed in his old-battered pickup truck a few ears of corn, found a clearing, and left them before driving away. Day after day he did the same thing. No hog ever came forth to partake. They were way too smart. Nor did the younger hogs for they revered the wisdom of the old sages who were quick to remind them that humans were to be avoided at all costs. Day after day the old man did the same thing.     Ultimately the younger hogs began to question the wasteful practice of not partaking of the free corn and in time began to nibble, ever so watchful. There were no negatives, no consequences, only fools would reject this heaven sent meal. The old hogs would still occasionally remind them that there is no free lunch. “If it is free to you someone else is always picking up the tab,” they said. But, obviously, the old hogs were wrong. The little nibbles turned in to feasts and the old man left even more corn.

With time, and feeling foolish, the older hogs joined in one by one. The old man did not go so far away. In fact, eventually he did not leave at all and enjoyed watching all feast without concern. After several months of this they, not even the wiser hogs, noticed the old man dig a hole and insert a single pole; eventually another, than another, and the chicken wire in between. Nor did they notice when he attached the only gate. He had captured them all.     So what happens to the “birds” and the “hogs?” If the practice goes on long enough they no longer know how to do things necessary to preserve themselves. They vote for the politicians that continue the practice and begin to believe that the freebies — food stamps, subsidized housing, socialized medicine, and etc., were actually owed them. They eventually lose their freedom — all of it. When the economy collapses, because the freebies cannot be sustained, the new rulers end all welfare practices as happened in every communist county in the 1900’s and starvation followed. For those who are healthy enough to take care of themselves let’s take down the bird feeder before it comes down on its own. Dr. Harold Pease is an expert on the United States Constitution. He has dedicated his career to studying the writings of the Founding Fathers and applying that knowledge to current events. He has taught history and political science from this perspective for over 25 years at Taft College. To read more of his weekly articles, please visit www.LibertyUnderFire.org.

In Other Words

There ought to be a better law By Donald Kaul     I wasn’t too surprised when do-it-yourself vigilante George Zimmerman was found not guilty of murdering Trayvon Martin. The trial took place in Florida, after all.     You have to be pretty stupid or reckless or both to be found guilty of murder in Florida.     If you want to kill someone in the Sunshine State, all you have to do is get him or her alone and then provoke them into threatening you. At that point, you can pull out a gun and shoot them dead, later saying that you felt your life was in danger.     And if you get them really alone, you don’t even have to provoke a threat. You can just say you were threatened. It’s your word against theirs and they’re dead. Perfect crime.     Remember Columbo, the quirky and long-running TV mystery series starring Peter Falk? Columbo would have been out of a job if he tried to exercise his funky detective skills in Florida.     Only two people know what really went down that night, and one of them is unable to

tell his version of the events. Zimmerman made sure of that.     His story is that he saw Martin, a black teenager, acting suspiciously in a community where Zimmerman was trolling for miscreants. He followed the kid for a while, reporting the youngster to the 911 operator. Then, acting against the advice of the operator, he got out of his car and started to follow the young man on foot.     Eventually, Zimmerman said, he stopped and began walking back to his car. At which point, the defendant claimed, Martin jumped out from some bushes and attacked him, knocking him down and repeatedly beating Zimmerman’s head against the sidewalk. Fearing for his life, Zimmerman pulled out a gun he’d been carrying all this time and shot Martin, killing him.     That was his story. The jury bought it, though I can’t imagine why. (Actually, I can imagine why, but I’m not going to say it. It might start a riot.)     This is a cockamamie story from start to finish.

    In the first place, Martin was a skinny kid and Zimmerman’s an older, burly guy. If they got in a fight, you’d bet on the bigger fellow, particularly if he fancied himself a kind of cop.     In the second place, there were no bushes for Martin to jump out of. Pictures show the site to be clear of foliage.     In the third place, an examining doctor said that Zimmerman’s head wound looked as though it were the result of a single blow, not repeated bashing.     In other words, at every point that could be checked, Zimmerman lied. In addition, he lied to the judge about his resources at his bail hearing, for which he was jailed again.     Yet the jury seemed to believe him.     This is what I think happened: Zimmerman got out of his car to follow Martin more closely and, perhaps, harass him. Martin, nervous (wouldn’t you be?), turned to confront him. Maybe Zimmerman accosted the young man, maybe he didn’t.     In any case, thinking he was acting in self-defense, Martin popped the bigger

man, knocking him down, all the while yelling for help.     Zimmerman, panicked now, pulled out his gun and shot his assailant. Then he called the cops again.     I think that plays.     However, it’s no more than a fiction, a work of the imagination. Were I a juror, I would not act on the assumptions I made there.     As a matter of fact, I would not vote for a guilty verdict on the charge of murder. By Florida law, the evidence did not prove “beyond the shadow of a doubt” that Zimmerman murdered Martin.     It’s a really stupid law.     Given the opportunity, I might vote for a manslaughter verdict (getting out of the car against expert advice puts him somewhat at blame for what happened later). But the prosecution was so lame I doubt I’d get the opportunity.     As President Barack Obama pointed out, we are a nation of laws.     Justice has nothing to do with it. OtherWords columnist Donald Kaul lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan. OtherWords.org


Thursday, July 25, 2013 The Reporter

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How young investors can cope with tough times     As Americans, we’re used to thinking that we will inevitably do better than our parents’ generation. But, for now at least, this type of progress may be facing some roadblocks — and this inability to gain ground, financially, can have real implications for today’s younger people and their approach to investing.     Before we get to the investment component, though, let’s quickly review the nature of the problem. In a nutshell, younger Americans — those in their twenties and thirties — have accrued significantly less wealth than their parents did at the same age, according to a recent study by the Urban Institute. Here’s why:     • Bursting of housing “bubble” — Many younger people who bought houses shortly before the housing “bubble” began deflating in 2006 now find themselves to be “underwater” on their mortgages — that is, they owe more than their houses are worth. Consequently, they have less opportunity to build home equity — which has been an important means of building wealth for past generations.     • Student-loan debt — The median balance among all households with student loan debt is now more than $13,000, according to the Pew Research Center — and debt levels are much higher for recent graduates. It can take years to pay off these debts — and the money being used for debt payments is money that can’t go toward building wealth for long-term

goals.     • Wage stagnation — For several years, the job market has been pretty bad for younger workers. And even those with jobs aren’t making much headway, because wages, adjusted for inflation, have largely stagnated for over a decade. Less income clearly equates to less opportunities for investing and creating wealth.     Still, even given these somewhat grim realities, younger people can help themselves build resources for the future and make progress toward their long-term goals. If you’re in this group, what can you do?     For starters, pay yourself first. Set up an automatic payment each month from your checking or savings account into an investment vehicle, such as an IRA. At first, you may only be able to afford small sums — but, over time, you may be pleasantly surprised at the amount you’ve saved.     Next, every time your salary goes up, try to increase the amount you put into your 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plan. Because

you typically contribute pretax dollars to your 401(k) or other plan, the more you put in, the lower your taxable income. Plus, your money can grow on a taxdeferred basis.     Here’s another suggestion: Don’t be “over-cautious” with your investments. Many younger investors, apparently nervous due to market volatility of recent years, have become quite conservative, putting relatively large amounts of their portfolio into vehicles that offer significant protection of principal but little in the way of growth potential. Of course, the financial markets will always fluctuate, and downturns will occur — but when you’re young, and you have many decades in which to invest, you have time to overcome short-term declines. To achieve your long-term goals, such as a comfortable retirement, you will unquestionably need some growth elements in your portfolio, with the exact amount based on your risk tolerance and specific objectives.     These aren’t the easiest times for young people. Nonetheless, with diligence, perseverance and a measure of sacrifice, you can gain some control over your financial fortunes — so look for your opportunities.

Photo by Jason Maholy

New digs     Heide Wealth Management partners Dave Heide (from left), Dan Jakuta and Jeff Neumann stand in the lobby of their new office on the second floor of 7420 College Drive in Palos Heights. The financial advisement firm last Friday held a ribbon-cutting attended by former Chicago Bears quarterback Caleb Hanie and former Chicago Blackhawks winger Troy Brouwer. Not pictured is Heide partner Mark Anderson.

Shepard (Continued from page 5)

ald, Brandon Faro, Emily Pierce, Madalala Abderrazek, Ranasia Bean, Samantha Culver, Paulina Xhemajli, Gadulla Alawi, Mohammed Abualhuda, Mark Albrecht, Amy Gordon, Jarrell Jackson, Scott Johnson, CFP, is a finan- Duaa Ashkar, Jose Medrano, cial advisor with Edward Jones, Shane Toomey, Carly Gruchot, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, Caleb Kurchinski, Amal Tom974-1965. Edward Jones does not malieh, Tiarra Morgan, Manar provide legal advice. This article Yassin, Arasally Duran, Luis was written by Edward Jones for Flores, David Gmyrek, Jasmine use by your local Edward Jones Hodges, Christian Larson, Jessica financial advisor. Skirmont, Sierra Docks, Kourtney Bledsoe, Kevin Budz, Miranda Echevarria, Elpidio Villanueva, Giselle Arroyo, Lea Sieck, Cole Kalebich, Jessika Deleon, Bethany Rios, Jaime Herrera, Alice Dee Novotney, Paige Recchia, Tyler Walthers, Zackery Haxel, Charbel Karaziwan, Ra’Von Smith-Gibson, Robert Stockdale, Itzel Villegas and Ayah Yacoub.

Juniors     Jason Kolanda, Gabrielle Hartl, Jacob Morrison, Christina Calderon, Chanel Dotson, Francisco Juarez, Suha Ali, Brian Callahan, Alexandra Nelson, Yaqkeha Witherspoon, Zaria Hunter, Kamaree Marshall, Lizette Rodriguez, Brianna Volpentesta, Alondra Delfin, Charles Leyden, Caleb Goggins, Symone Alexander, Terence Jones, Alyssa Petrishe, John Alberts, Alyssa Paetow, Jessica O’Sullivan, Emily Peters, Casey Bledsoe, Alyssa DeChene, Robert McEvilly, Jonathon Mysliwiec, Anna Wedster, Nahid Yasin, Rachel Mandes, Jacob Rose, Bridget Milcarek, Catherine Petrak, Rachel Harms, Camilo Sarmiento, Julia Morra, Paul Moskal, Andrew Meiron, Raymond Dusek, Michael Evancich, Noelle Joy, Emily Killeen, Jaclyn Reimer, Amy Miller, Stephanie Andersen, Jake Disbrow, Melody Dominguez, Patrick Nelson, Jacqueline Navarrete, Malik Harper, Aracely

Mortgage Rates Around the Area United Trust Bank (as of July 23) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed Submitted Photo

Fire it up     Area firefighters will raise money to help fight pediatric cancer at The Cure It Foundation’s second annual Fire Up A Cure event to be held Saturday, July 27 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Saint Xavier University’s Chicago campus, 3700 W. 103rd St. To purchase tickets visit the Cure It Foundation’s website or call (872) 222-5437.     Fire Up A Cure will bring together firefighters from across Illinois to compete in a series of challenges to raise awareness and funding for pediatric cancer research and for local children who are battling this illness. Events will include a fire truck pull, a hot wing eating contest sponsored by Buffalo Wild Wings, a forcible entry door competition, an obstacle course, inflatable jousting, and tug-of-war. Pediatric cancer patients will serve as honorary coaches for each team.     The event also features an inflatable fire truck slide, an obstacle course, a kids’ fire pole to slide down, a real fire truck for children to explore, face painting, and a balloon artist. A DJ will provide music and there will performances by local dance troupes, travel cheerleading squads, and a magician.     The event is sponsored by Advocate Christ Medical Center. For more information please contact Becky Vacco-Giudice at (872) 222-5439 or becky@cureitfoundation.org.

Talkin Poker

By Bryan Devonshire

    The crux of any decision at a poker table revolves around not what’s usually correct, but what is correct right now. Phil Ivey and Phil Hellmuth are commonly regarded as excellent players who make fundamental mathematical errors. The wizards of my generation, with roots in online poker, have proven this quite comprehensively, yet the sage old Phils continue to crush beyond expectation by being masters of conditional probability.     Last month, during the second week of the World Series of Poker here in Las Vegas, I played this hand against my friend Joey Cappuccio early in a $1,500-buy-in no-limit hold ‘em bracelet event. Blinds were 25-50, and it folded to me in the cutoff. With a 5,000 stack and Ac Kh in the hole, I made it 150. Cappuccio was in the small blind with 3,800 and called, as did the big blind, an unknown player with 3,000 in chips.     The flop came Ah 10h 7s. Both opponents checked, I bet 275, and they both called.     The turn was the 2d, and Cappuccio bet 600 into a pot of 1,275. The other guy folded, and it was my turn.     Without information, most players would agree that this was an easy call. However, the more information there is to be

gathered, the more conditional probability applies. It’s not “this is his range” anymore; it’s “this is his range given A, B C and D.”     This was far from a standard online hand. It was happening in a WSOP Saturday $1,500 nolimit event, notoriously one of the softest events of the year outside of the Main Event. Because of this, good players like Cappuccio and I were meticulously avoiding each other. There was one other all-star at the table, and there was no reason for us to get involved with each other with seven softer players at the table and thousands of others still in the tournament.     There was probably some information coming from his body language, and although I’m pretty good at reading that stuff, Cappuccio is also pretty good at concealing it. Joey and I sat on opposite ends of a table in Mexico and played online poker together for two weeks last month. We’ve played and talked about many hands of poker together. There was no reason for either of us to mess with each other.     Now, combine that information with the natural range estimations we could calculate: Cappuccio is a good player, stacks were deep, it was early, and there were no antes in play yet. Therefore,

he likely had a solid range of hands that included everything that clobbers this board except aces. His range was ripe with hands that were either two pair plus, or 12 outs to a straight or flush plus.     My decision on the turn was between “Does he have me beat?” and “Does he have a hand with a lot of outs against me?” I was able to rule out total bluffs as well as value hands that I beat like A-J and A-Q, because that line of play with those hands would be poor, and Cappuccio is not a bad player. If I was beaten, then I had somewhere from zero to six outs, and if I wasn’t beaten, then he would still beat me on at least 12 river cards.     Couple this with the conditional probability from the situational dynamic, and I decided to fold my hand, still shocked days later that I threw the best pair and kicker into the muck there, but pleased with my decision — especially after Joey confirmed that I was beaten.    (Bryan Devonshire is a professional poker player from Las Vegas. Known as “Devo” on the tournament circuit, he has amassed more than $2 million in career earnings. Follow him on Twitter: @devopoker.)

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8

The Reporter

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Smith Village to remember vets of Korea

Submitted Photo

Great Ceasar!

    Park Lawn has received a grant donation of $15,120 from the Caesar Foundation to fund the expanded art and music therapy activities for aging individuals with developmental disabilities in Park Lawn’s GRACE program. Seen here at the check presentation at Harrah’s Joliet are Melinda Mackey (from left), Harrah’s Joliet direct marketing manager Dave Dunbar, Harrah’s security shift manager Gina Glaubke, Harrah’s director of casino marketing Jason Glickman, Harrah’s vice president of marketing Jennifer Nacco, Park Lawn participants Joe and Leslie, Park Lawn development director Nancy Schmitz, Harrah’s SVP/general manager Darren VanDover, and Harrah’s vice president of donations Joshua San Salvador.     GRACE (Generating Resources for Aging through Collaborative Energies) is an initiative designed to ensure that Park Lawn’s older participants maintain an active and purposeful life as they transition into their senior years. This program was created to engage the growing number of Park Lawn participants who can no longer partake in other day programs including vocational training and placement due to age-related issues such as dementia, change of health status, retirement or other related concerns.     The program helps older participants maintain a functional and purposeful life by contributing through a choice of special program activities in a safe environment. Music therapy became one of the activities in 2011, designed for GRACE program participants to socialize, maintain their health and prevent further deterioration of their cognitive and motor skills. Art therapy was added in 2012.

Church Corner Theology on Tap

    St. Bernadette Parish will present South Side Theology on Tap Thursdays through Aug. 4. Theology on Tap invites young adults to partake in presentations and informal discussions while enjoying food, beverages and the opportunity to meet other young adults in the community. Topics include life issues such as careers, relationships, family and faith. Theology on Tap will take place on the north lawn of St. Bernadette Catholic Academy, 93rd Street and Francisco Avenue in Evergreen Park. If inclement weather occurs the discussions will be moved indoors. All sessions will begin at 6:30 p.m. and are as follows:     August 4 — Father Pawel Komperda, “Rediscovering Our Christian Spirituality”.     At 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 10, all who have attended Theology on Tap are invited to celebrate in a closing liturgy at St. Bernadette Church. There is no cost to attend and all in

their 20s and 30s are welcome. There will be free dinner, beer, and wine. Free childcare will be available for children over 2 years. For more information visit facebook.com/stbernadetteparish.evergreenpark or southsideTOT.wordpress.com.

Green Faith

    United By Faith is one of 11 new congregations nationwide that have been accepted into the Green Faith Certification Program (greenfaith.org), through which religious institutions of all faiths and denominations commit to being leaders in environmental stewardship. United by Faith will during a two-year period engage in a variety of initiatives to be more environmentally conscious within the walls of their spiritual community, to deepen the awareness among their congregation of the relationship between their spiritual beliefs and environmental responsibility and to provide youth and adult education on how individuals can live in greater harmony with

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Bible School

    Pilgrim Faith United Church of Christ, 9411 S. 51st Ave. in Oak Lawn, will hold the “Everywhere Fun Fair” Vacation Bible School July 29 to Aug. 2 from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Each day will feature games, crafts, Bible stories and music with dance moves. Children 4 years old through fifth grade are welcome. Cost is $5 per child for the week. Register at http://2013.cokesburyvbs.com/pilgrimfaithvbs or call 422-4200.

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7-18-13

Cremation Service

    The Korean War, which ended on July 27, 1953, is often regarded as “The Forgotten War” despite the fact more than 33,000 Americans died during the conflict. Kennedy Park is home to Illinois’ first monument to the Korean War, and is one of the few in the nation honoring Korean War veterans. The monument was dedicated in 1988.

College Grads

Ronald Chapman     Ronald Chapman, 68, of Palos Hills, died on July 19 in his home. Visitation is to be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, July 25 at Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home, 11028 S. Southwest Hwy. in Palos Hills. A funeral service isto be held the same day at 7 p.m. at the funeral home.     Mr. Chapman is survived by his daughter, Zorona; his brother, Leland; his sister, Mary Anne; and three grandchildren.     Mr. Chapman was born in Chicago. He worked as a graphic designer. Genevieve R. Partyka     Genevieve R. Partyka, née Fiedor, 87, of Chicago Ridge, died at Christ Hospital on May 18. Visitation was held Friday, June 21 at Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home in Palos Hills. A funeral mass was held the following Saturday at Our Lady of the Ridge, followed by a funeral procession to Resur-

rection Cemetery in Justice.     Mrs. Partyka is survived by her sons, John and Ken; her daughter, Maria; her brothers, Leonard and Ben; and three grandchildren.     Mrs. Partyka was born in Chicago. She was a homemaker. John J. Partyka     John J. Partyka, 89, of Chicago Ridge, died at R.M.L. Hospital on June 6. Visitation was held Friday, June 14 at Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home in Palos Hills. A funeral mass was held the following Saturday at Our Lady of the Ridge, followed by a funeral procession to Resurrection Cemetery in Justice.     Mr. Partyka is survived by his sons, John and Ken; his daughter, Maria; and three grandchildren.     Mr. Partyka was born in Chicago. He worked in the trucking industry.

Patriot’s Pen will award $5K     The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Department of Illinois, is once again holding its Ladies Auxiliary Patriot’s Pen Essay Competition.     Middle school students in grades six through eight have the opportunity to compete in the competition and win thousands of dollars. Students begin by competing at the local post level. Post winners advance to district level and 18 district winners will compete in the state competition. The state winners compete for $46,000 in awards at the national level, and the national champion wins $5,000.

    Students must write a 300- to 400-word essay on a patriotic Bishop in Palos     Sacred Heart Church in Palos theme. The theme for 2013-2014 Hills in will present the Rev. Al- is “What Patriotism Means to berto Rojas, auxiliary bishop of Me.” Entry deadline is Nov. 1. Chicago and Episcopal Vicar of Interested students and teachVicariate III, as celebrant and ers should contact the nearest homilist for Solemn Choral Eve- VFW Post or email vf wil@ ning Prayer I of the Assumption vfwil.org for more informaat 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14. tion. Entry forms and contest A Choral Prelude will begin at rules may be downloaded atvfw. org/Community/Patriot-s-Pen/. 6:45 p.m.

Peace travels

Submitted Photo

    Queen of Peace High School students Jocelyn Perez (back, from center) and Alyson Bourret, and Jenny Sandoval (front, from left) and Jenna Buche, seen here with campus minister and theatre/choir director Claire Aronson, attended the Dominican Preaching Conference in Adrian, Michigan.     The conference features prayer, study, community and interaction with members of the Dominican Family. Seniors Bourret and Buche and juniors Perez and Sandoval also participated in preaching workshops and services. The students devised an action plan to help their schools carry out the Dominican tradition following the four pillars of prayer, study, community and preaching.

Crossword Puzzle

(Continued from page 5) Oak Lawn; Stacy Manfredini and Jessica Ricci, both of Palos Hills; and Kevin McGuire and Cody Dunne, both of Worth. ***     James Dreger Jr. of Worth graduated May 11 from Southeast Missouri State University with a bachelor’s degree in general studies. ***     The following area students received degrees this spring from the University of WisconsinWhitewater.     Allison Bachler of Evergreen Park, bachelor’s degree in operations management; and Jill Nolan of Hickory Hills, bachelor’s degree in biology. ***     Julie Sedlacek, of Oak Lawn graduated in May from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse with a master’s degree in physician assistant studies. ***     Eric Dulzo of Evergreen Park graduated in May from Wichita State University with a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering.

LEGAL NOTICE “Your Neighborhood Funeral Home”

    Korean War veterans, including Smith Village and Smith Crossing residents, will join Chicago and suburban dignitaries to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the close of the Korean War during a ceremony at 10:30 a.m. Friday, July 26, at the Korean War memorial in the northeast corner of Kennedy Park, 11320 S. Western Ave. in Chicago’s Beverly neighborhood.     The ceremony will include the laying of a wreath and remarks from public officials and veterans, followed by lunch at Smith Village, 2320 W. 113th Place.

Death Notices

Notice is Hereby Given that on 9-8-13, a sale will be held at The Zone Honda Kawasaki, 4520 W. 63rd Street, Chicago, IL. 60629, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Jeremy Stone & Paul N. Burdett 2006 Honda VIN# JH2PC37006M302118 Lien Amount: $2,404.08

Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter

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(Answers on page 11)

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Thursday, July 25, 2013 The Reporter

Features

9

Travel Troubleshooter By Christopher Elliott

My mother is terminally ill — why won’t Princess refund her cruise?

Mayo Clinic

Establishing a daily routine a good first step for teen with chronic pain     DEAR MAYO CLINIC: As the result of a sports injury, my 16-year-old daughter has chronic pain that has lasted for more than a year. It’s really taking a toll on her. The pain makes it hard for her to go to school and participate in the activities she enjoys. Medication doesn’t make much difference. What can we do? Is there a chance the pain will go away with time?     ANSWER: Your daughter’s pain may fade over time. While she has pain, though, it’s important for her to find ways to manage it. A cure may not be possible, but there are many strategies that can help her get back into life.     Pain usually comes from illness, injury or surgery, and it goes away as our bodies heal. This type of pain is called acute pain. Chronic pain is different. It is generally defined as daily pain that lasts more than three months. Chronic pain may continue after an injury or illness has passed. It may come from a medical condition that’s hard to treat. Sometimes chronic pain may not have any clear source.     Many children and teens have chronic pain. In fact, the condition is more common in children than adults. As in your daughter’s situation, many of them are not able to go to school regularly and are not living the lives they want to live.     It may seem to make sense that staying home to rest will ease pain. However, withdrawing from school and other activities can actually make chronic pain worse.

Being isolated may bring on feelings of loneliness and sadness. Staying home can contribute to irregular sleep, lack of routine and low activity. All of these can increase pain. Going to school can get your daughter back into a daily routine. It may help her reconnect with friends. School can give her something to focus on other than the pain.     In addition to getting back to school, there are a variety of other steps your daughter can take to ease pain. Relaxation techniques, such as meditation and deep breathing, can be effective. Many people also find yoga to be a helpful way to reduce chronic pain.     Although the thought of exercising may seem impossible to someone dealing with chronic pain, regular activity can be a useful way of managing the pain. Exercise causes the body to release natural painkilling chemicals, called endorphins, which can take the edge off pain. Exercise also strengthens muscles, increases flexibility and lowers stress hormones.     Eating well can make a difference, too. A healthy diet can increase your daughter’s energy and help her stay at a healthy weight. That aids in pain management since shedding extra pounds can lower stress on muscles and joints and increase flexibility. Encourage her to drink plenty of fluids, too. Being dehydrated can make pain worse. Drinking eight or nine glasses of non-caffeinated

beverages or water each day is a good goal.     You mention that medication does not decrease your daughter’s pain significantly. That’s common. Medications used for acute pain, such as narcotics, usually don’t help chronic pain. Medications can play a role in managing chronic pain. But many people who have chronic pain don’t get much relief with medication alone. For most people, the lifestyle choices they make and what they do each day does more to lower chronic pain than medication.     For guidance putting these and other pain management steps into practice, consider a pain rehabilitation program for your daughter. Talk to her health care provider about programs that may be available in your area. Many medical centers offer pain programs specifically for children and teens. The medical professionals who work in pain rehabilitation are trained to help people with chronic pain learn techniques to manage pain and return to normal life. — Barbara Bruce, Ph.D., and Tracy Harrison, M.D., Pain Rehabilitation Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.    (Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic is an educational resource and doesn’t replace regular medical care. E-mail a question to medicaledge(AT SIGN)mayo.edu. For more information, visit www. mayoclinic.org.)

The Kid’s Doctor By Sue Hubbard, M.D. Migraines in children-Part 2: Treatment options     Last week, we discussed migraine headaches and how they’re diagnosed in children. Now it’s time to decide how to treat a migraine. Just as with diagnosing these headaches, it’s important to individualize treatment for each child, with the goal being fast relief, no rebound or re-occurrence, and minimal or no side effects to medication.     When I see a patient who has a history compatible with migraines, I not only have the child and parents keep a headache log, but I also spend a lot of time discussing early treatment of the headache. One of the first things you learn in medical school about treating pain is to “get ahead” of it. This means you need to be aware of your symptoms and begin therapy early, as pain that’s gone on for some time is much harder to treat.     I find that one of the best ways to explain this to a parents and older children is to talk about surgery. When you have a surgical procedure, the anesthesiologist doesn’t wait for you to “wake up” and tell him that it hurts; he’s already given you medication to “keep ahead of the pain” before waking you up. If you’ve ever had surgery, you know this to be true.     The same pain principles apply to treating headaches, especially migraines. At the first sign of a migraine, with or without an

aura, I usually prescribe an ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) product. In studies, ibuprofen was more effective for headache relief than acetaminophen. I use a “generous” (10mg/kg/dose) dose and repeat it once in 3-4 hours if the headache has not resolved.     You don’t want to use ibuprofen more often than several times a week or you may find your child actually gets rebound or overuse headaches. Ibuprofen is available in liquid, chewable and pill form, so can be used in a young child with suspected migraines. I also like to use naprosyn (Aleve) in older children who can swallow pills. It too is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and is available over the counter.     The most frequently used medications for childhood migraines are called triptans. This class of drugs has been around for more than a decade now, but these meds are not FDA approved for use in children and adolescents because of the difficulty in designing a study (this is true of many different medications.) Regardless, they are frequently used to treat childhood migraines with good results, tolerability and a good safety profile.     There are many different drugs, with names like Imitrex, Zomig, Maxalt, Frova and the newest, Treximet (a combination of a triptan and a non steroidal drug), and all have a similar safety profile.

    Once a child has “failed” therapy with an over-the-counter non-steroidal drug, I typically use these drugs as “rescue” medications. Just like many other medications, each person seems to respond differently, so you may need to try different medications to see which one works best for each migraine patient.     When a patient seems to find the best triptan, it’s important to start the medication at the earliest onset of a migraine. I also try to help adolescents distinguish between “different” types of headaches, so they’re not using this class of drugs too frequently (max 3 headaches a week). Not every headache is a migraine!     If these medications don’t relieve the headaches within 48-72 hours, more aggressive therapies need to be used, and preventative treatments and strategies should be considered. There are many studies underway looking at the combined effects of biofeedback therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy in combination with medications. These are discussions that each parent/child should have with their physician as it relates to their headache frequency and pain level.    (Dr. Sue Hubbard is an awardwinning pediatrician, medical editor and media host. “The Kid’s Doctor” TV feature can be seen on more than 90 stations across the U.S. Submit questions at www. kidsdr.com.)

    Q: I am currently sitting on a deck overlooking a park at a hospice facility while my mother lies in her bed taking a morphine nap. She will die in a couple of days.     My mother was diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma last year. We had expected that she would be around for at least another couple of years. But last week we discovered that the tumors she had more than tripled in size and a week later she was given a few days life expectancy.     That bucket list cruise to Alaska, which is scheduled for next week, ain’t happening. In an effort to reduce debt, I tried to cancel her trip. My mother says, “Don’t bother canceling. They’ll keep your money and then book someone else in my room making double what they should!”     So I called the airlines she was scheduled to fly on. They were more than accommodating. They said they simply needed a letter and some other details pertaining to her death, and I was told a refund would be no problem.     I called Princess Cruise Line and they told me that they would not refund her cruise for any reason. They stated that if she bought the travel insurance they offer, she could get some money back, as long as it was not within two weeks of travel. It is within two weeks of her trip, so that wouldn’t have helped.     Is it true that Princess will

now get paid twice for the cruise that my mother could not get reimbursed for? By canceling the cruise, they are informed that she will not be there and they now have the opportunity to resell this space, even if it is at an incredible discount. This seems a bit unethical. What do you think? — Shannon Tait, Wappingers Falls, N.Y.     A: I’m so sorry to hear about your mother. Between the time you first wrote to me and the time I closed your case, your mother passed away. My condolences on your loss.     I looked into the details of your cruise, and when you said this was a bucket list vacation, you were not kidding. Your mother was terminally ill before she booked this trip with her sister, and most travel insurance would not cover her because of her pre-existing medical condition.     This isn’t a simple question of a cruise line pocketing the money for a passenger who passed away. Your mother and your aunt were taking their chances by booking a cruise under these circumstances. I can certainly understand their desire to get away together one last time, but they also knew they were taking a risk.     Could Princess have resold the cabin? Maybe. But that’s beside the point.     The real question is: What should a cruise line do when a passenger dies? Airlines offer

Retire Smart By Jill Schlesinger

Drowning in documents: What to shred, what to keep     You probably just received some bank, investment or retirement quarterly statements in the mail, which makes it a perfect time to fire up the shredder and organize that stack of documents piling up on the table.     Here are some thoughts on financial paperwork that you can toss:     Bank statements: Generally speaking, you only need to keep bank statements for one year, BUT, if you think that you may be applying for Medicaid, many states require that you show five year’s worth of bank statements. Also, you should hold on to records that are related to your taxes, business expenses, home improvements, mortgage payments and major purchases for as long as you need them.     Credit card bills: Unless you need to reference something on your credit card statement for tax or business purposes, or for proof of purchase for a specific item, you can shred credit card statements after 45 days. As with the bank statements, hang on to those statements that you may need for your taxes, as proof of purchase or for insurance.     Tax returns/supporting documents: Despite being able to amend your tax returns going back three years, the IRS has seven years to audit your returns if the agency suspects you made a mistake, and up to six years if you likely underreported your gross income by 25 percent or more. As a result, you need to hold on to your returns and all supporting documents for seven years.     Retirement account statements (including 401(k), 403(b), 457, IRA, Roth IRA, SIMPLE, PSP and Keogh): Keep notices of any portfolio changes you make intramonth (or intra-quarter for some plans) until the subsequent statement arrives to confirm those changes. After making sure the statement is correct, you can shred away. One note: keep evidence of IRA contributions until you withdraw the money.     Brokerage and mutual fund account monthly statements/periodic trade confirmations (taxable accounts): Retain confirmations until the transaction is detailed in your monthly report. For tax purposes, flag a month where a transaction occurs because you may need to access this information in the future. Otherwise, shred monthly statements as new ones arrive, but keep annual statements until the sale of each asset within the account occurs and for seven years thereafter, in case you get audited.     Pay Stubs: Keep for one year, and be sure to match them to your W-2 form before you shred.

    Medical Records: Given how hard it is to deal with health insurance companies, you should keep medical records for at least a year, although some suggest keeping records for five years from the time when treatment for the symptoms ended. Retain information about prescription information, specific medical histories, health insurance information and contact information for your physician.     Utility and phone bills: Shred them after you’ve paid them, unless they contain tax-deductible expenses.     Paperwork to keep for as long as you own the asset:     Appliance manuals and warranties: Keep these documents handy in case something goes wrong and you need to cash in on the warranty or contact a repairman.     Vehicle titles and loan documents: Do you want to wait in line for an hour at your local department of motor vehicles office in order to request a duplicate of your vehicle title? Me neither, so keep this paperwork in a safe and accessible place.     House and mortgage documents: Hang on to your deed as well as home purchase, mortgage, sale and improvement records until six years after you sell. Remember that improvements you make and expenses such as your real estate agent’s commission can increase the basis in your house and potentially lower your capital gains tax.     Insurance policies: Keep your homeowners, auto, disability and life insurance policies and declaration pages for as long as the policies remain in force. You can shred old policies.     Paperwork to keep forever (in a fireproof safe, on the cloud or in a safe deposit box):     • Birth/death certificates and Social Security cards     • Marriage licenses and divorce decrees     • Pension plan documents     • Copies of wills, trusts, health care proxies/living wills and powers of attorney (attorneys/executors should also have copies)     • Military discharge papers     • Copies of burial deeds and plots     • Safe-deposit box inventory (Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Emmy-nominated, Senior Business Analyst for CBS News. A former options trader and CIO of an investment advisory firm, Jill covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated radio show), the web and her blog, “Jill on Money.” She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney.com.)

a refund, no questions asked. I believe that’s the right thing to do for cruise lines as well.     The Princess representatives you spoke with didn’t see it that way, mostly because your mother had not yet passed away. But after she did, I believe the cruise line’s position would have changed. I can’t imagine any company not refunding a dead passenger’s ticket — whether she’s insured or not.     Indeed, when I contacted Princess on your behalf, it said her case was still “open,” meaning it hadn’t decided what to do yet. After it reviewed the details of your request, it refunded both your mother’s and your aunt’s cruise.    (Christopher Elliott is the author of “Scammed: How to Save Your Money and Find Better Service in a World of Schemes, Swindles, and Shady Deals” (Wiley). He’s also the ombudsman for National Geographic Traveler magazine and the cofounder of the Consumer Travel Alliance, a nonprofit organization that advocates for travelers. Read more tips on his blog, elliott.org or e-mail him at chris@ elliott.org. Christopher Elliott receives a great deal of reader mail, and though he answers them as quickly as possible, your story may not be published for several months because of a backlog of cases.)

History of the World By Mark Andrews     July 22: ON THIS DATE in 1933, aviator Wiley Post completed the first round-the-world solo flight; it took seven days, 18 hours and 49 minutes. In 1967, Jimi Hendrix quit as the opening act on the Monkees’ tour.     July 23: ON THIS DATE in 1914, Austria-Hungary issued an ultimatum to Serbia following the killing of Archduke Francis Ferdinand by a Serb assassin; the dispute led to World War I. In 1967, rioting that would claim 43 lives erupted in Detroit.     July 24: ON THIS DATE in 1969, the Apollo 11 astronauts two of whom had been the first men to set foot on the moon splashed down safely in the Pacific. In 1974, the Supreme Court ruled 8-0 that President Nixon must turn over subpoenaed White House tape recordings to the Watergate special prosecutor.     July 25: ON THIS DATE in 1946, the United States detonated an atomic bomb at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific in the first underwater test of the device. In 1956, 51 people died when the Italian ocean liner Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Swedish ship Stockholm off the New England coast.     July 26: ON THIS DATE in 1945, Winston Churchill resigned as British prime minister after his Conservative Party lost control of Parliament in nationwide elections. In 1953, Fidel Castro led an attack on Moncada Barracks, beginning the Cuban revolution.     July 27: ON THIS DATE in 1789, Congress established the Department of Foreign Affairs, forerunner of the State Department. In 1953, the Korean War armistice was signed at Panmunjom, ending 37 months of fighting.     July 28: ON THIS DATE in 1540, King Henry VIII’s chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, was executed; on the same day, Henry married his fifth wife, Catherine Howard. In 1945, a U.S. Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the 79th floor of New York’s Empire State Building, killing 14 people.     Answer to last week’s question: This week in 1775, Benjamin Franklin became the first U.S. postmaster general.     This week’s question: In 1970, which member of the Huntley-Brinkley news broadcast team retired from NBC?    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarqmail.com.) The The most most dangerous dangerous animals animals in in the the forest forest don’t don’t live live there. there.

ONLY YOU CAN PR E VE N T W I L D FIRE S. w w w. s m o k e y b e a r. c o m


10

The Reporter

Thursday, July 25, 2013

You can’t do much business from the back of a wagon ... This is the new millennium and today there is a more modern, efficient and time-saving method of letting the public know just what we have for sale. The Reporter’s Advertising Department has over 50 years of experience in ways to better promote your store. Are you still running the ole family business the same way your daddy did? Many businesses are, but times have changed and so have ways of advertising in the newspaper. Call the Reporter for the newest and most innovative ways to capture the attention of your prospective customers. We have five decades of experience helping our customers better promote their wares. We would be delighted to sit down with you and work out an advertising program that would suit your particular budget and your particular business. A program that’s tailor-made for your satisfaction. Simply call 448-6161 and say, “Get over here, please, I’m ready to start advertising and make more money.”

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Thursday, July 25, 2013 The Reporter

community calendar hat’s W Going On After Hours     The Oak Lawn Chamber of Commerce will hold after-hours networking events from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 8 at Southwest Orthopedics, 9618 Southwest Highway; and 5 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21 at Stony Creek Golf Course, 5850 W. 103rd St. Events are free for prospective and new members; current members are asked to donate $5. RSVP to the Chamber office at 424-8300.

Hamfest     The program at the Hamfesters Radio Club meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2 will focus on the final planning for the club’s annual Hamfest. An amateur radio Hamfest is a combination of vendor exhibits, volunteer exams, and a bustling flea market. The Hamfest will take place Sunday, Aug. 4 at the Will County Fairgrounds in Peotone. The final planning program, led by Kerry Nelson, will be held at the Crestwood Civic Center, 14025 S. Kostner Ave. in Crestwood.     Hamfesters RC conducts VE testing for those wishing to get their ham tickets — and for radio amateurs wishing to upgrade to higher classes of licenses. Testing takes place on the second Saturday of each month at 9 a.m. at Oak Forest Village Hall, 15440 Central Ave. Testing will also take place at the Hamfest the morning of Aug. 4 from 8 to 10:30 a.m. For more information contact Al Bukowski at abukowski@sbcglobal.net, Jim Riley at 218-0895 or at kb9cyl@hotmail. com, or Kerry Nelson at 335-4574 or at kw_nelson@earthlink.net.

OL Chamber Lunch     The Oak Lawn Chamber of Commerce will host its monthly luncheon with the Alsip Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, Aug. 13 at the Doubletree by Hilton in Alsip. Registration and networking begin at 11:30 a.m., followed by noon lunch. The event provides an opportunity to network and meet with other businesses in and around Oak Lawn. All events are open to members and business owners. Contact the Chamber office at 424-8300 or email office@oaklawnchamber.com to reserve a spot.

Focus on Seniors Program for family caregivers at PLOWS     PLOWS will offer a three-week program on caregiver issues on Wednesdays, Aug. 7, 14 and 21, from 5:30 to 7 p.m.     The sessions are free and will be held at the PLOWS Council on Aging offices, led by June Bachan, caregiver specialist.     PLOWS is at 7808 College Drive, 5th floor, in Palos Heights.     Week 1 is on legal and financial issues.     Week 2: Caring for a loved one with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.     Week 3: Caring for the caregiver.     To register for this three-week program, call 361-0219.

Double Nickel

    The Double Nickel Plus Chorus meets at the Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen Park, every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers are always welcome. For more information call 422-8776.

Rules of the Road

    The Worth Township Seniors will hold a free Rules of the Road class from 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Aug. 7 and Oct. 2. Appointment must be made to attend; call the Worth Township Senior Room at 371-2900, Ext. 28. Worth Township Center is at 11601 Pulaski Road in Alsip.

11

Park Clips Evergreen Park

    The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services will take a seven-day trip to “Christmas at the Biltmore House and Dollywood” in Tennessee from Nov. 10 to 16. Cost includes transportation, hotel, some meals, and admission to Dollywood and Biltmore Estate. For more information call 422-8776. ***     The Evergreen Youth Department has teens and young adults available to help with yard work, cleaning garages and basements, and hauling items to the dumpster. For more information call 229-3377.

Hickory Hills

    The Hickory Hills Park District has openings in its preschool classes. Five-day class is $1,540, three-day class (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) is $860, and two-day class (Tuesday and Thursday) is $695. Classes start in September and run through May 2014. Class times are 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 3:15 p.m. The office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for registration. Parents must provide child’s birth certificate and immunization records. For more information call 598-1233 or visit hhparkdistrct. org.

Oak Lawn

    Duplicate bridge will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mondays at the Oak View Center. Cost is $7 per person and includes a light lunch. For more information, call 857-2200.

Palos Hills

    The Palos Hills Community Resource & Recreation Department, 8455 W. 103rd St. in Palos Hills, will take a trip to Shipshewana, an Indiana Amish community, flea market and historical downtown shopping area on Tuesday, Sept. 24. Coach transportation is $30 per person, must register and pay before trip. ***     Future Pros Soccer Camps for ages 5 to 14 will be July 29 to Aug. 2 (Session II). Camps are Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. All participants receive a T-shirt and soccer ball. ***     Zumba classes are Tuesdays, July 30 through Sept. 3 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Cost for residents is $40, non residents are $45. For more information call 430-4500.

Worth

    Explore the history, mystery and haunts of American serial killer H.H. Holmes and the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893 on Thursday, Aug. 8. Holmes operated the so-called “Murder Castle” during Chicago’s Columbian Exposition. Locations on the tour will include the site where the labarynthian castle once stood, remnants of the 1893 World’s Fair, murder sites, ghost stories and more. Fee is $50 and includes tour and transportation. Trip leaves from the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., at 10 a.m. and is expected to return at 1:30 p.m. register by July 24. ***     The park district will celebrate National Ice Cream Day at 1 p.m. Sunday, July 21 at Gale Moore Park, 109th Street and Nordica Avenue. There will be games, crafts, fun inflatables and ice cream. ***     Touch A Truck will be from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 31 in the Terrace Centre parking lot, 11500 Beloit Ave. The free family event will feature the chance to play with fire trucks, police cars and large construction equipment. In the

event of inclement weather the event will be cancelled. ***     The park district is taking registration for men’s 16-inch and co-rec 12-inch fall softball leagues. The deadline for registration is Monday, Aug. 5, which is also the night of the mandatory captains’ meeting. For more information visit worthparkdistrict.org or call 448-7080. ***     The next Movie in the Park will be “Wreck-it Ralph” at 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25 at Gale Moore Park, 109th Street and Nordica Avenue. ***     Play in the Parks presented by RecExpress will be from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 30 at Homerding Park. ***     The park district will celebrate National Ice Cream Day at Gale Moore Park, 109th Street and Nordica Avenue, from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, July 21. There will be games, crafts, a bounce castle, an inflatable obstacle course and ice cream. ***     A trip to see the Tall Ships at Navy Pier will be Saturday, Aug. 10. Tour the ships dockside or sail on Lake Michigan on select ships. Fee is $45 per person and includes general admission, ship tour, transportation and parking. Register by Aug. 3. Trip leaves from the Terrace Centre at 10 a.m. and returns at 5 p.m. ***     Pickle Ball will be at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., from 6 to 8 p.m. every Tuesday. Pickle Ball is a cross between tennis and ping-pong and involves strategies such as lobbing, drive shots and overhead slams. Cost is $1. ***     Open gym basketball is offered at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $1. ***     Pickle Ball, a cross between tennis and ping pong, will be offered as an open program on Tuesdays, 6 to 8 p.m. at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave. Open gym basketball will also be offered at the Terrace Centre on Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost to play either game is $1. ***     The park district is holding a smile search contest with two ways to participate. All summer long the park district will hide its “Worth Your Smile” logo throughout its website, worthparkdistrict.org. To participate follow “Worth Park District” on Facebook for contest details. Through Facebook participants will get instructions and clues on how to find the logo and report back to the park district. Several online Smile Searches will be held through the summer. ***     Little Club offers benefits such as free indoor playground usage. Fee is $10 resident, $15 non-resident. For more information call the park district. ***     The Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., has an indoor playground featuring slides, a climbing wall, tree house and more for children who can walk through 4 years old. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for non-residents. For more information call 4487080 or visit worthparkdistrict. org.

Photos by Jessie Molloy

A treat to beat the summer heat     Alexa Smith, 9, of Worth, plays a shuffleboard-type carnival game with her mom, Rose, at the Worth Park District’s celebration of National Ice Cream Day, held last Saturday at Nordica Park, above.     Jamie McCarthy (left), 6, and Ysabella Romundo, 4, visit the toppings table to sweeten their cool treats, left.         Leva Kondratas, 14, and her brother, Simonas, 7, enjoy ice cream, below.

Library Notes Evergreen Park

***     Intermediate to Advanced Guitar Clinic with Frank Tsiones will be Tuesday, Aug. 6 at 7 p.m. Registration required. ***     Learn what makes the Midwest soil special, how it is created, and what everyone can do to save it Wednesday, Aug. 7 at 6:30 p.m. For persons 5 years and older. Registration required. ***     Children 5 years and older may paint a ceramic pig Thursday, Aug. 8 at 6 p.m. Registration required. ***     International Vintage Desserts in which attendees can sample and hear the history of desserts brought here area from other parts of the world, as depicted in 1940s through 1980s cookbooks, will be Aug. 13 at 7 p.m. Registration required. ***     Green Team Time with Miss Emily featuring nature-themed stories and activities for youths 6 to 8 years old will be Wednesday, Aug. 14 at 6:30 p.m. Registration required. ***     Art Glass Done Wright, about Frank Lloyd Wright-designed art glass windows and doors, will feature a presentation on Wright’s art glass designs Thursday, Aug. 15 at 6:30 p.m. Children will be guided in creating their own art Green Hills glass designs using tracing pa    The Green Hills Public Library per, colored pencils, construction is at 8611 W. 103rd St. in Palos paper, and examples of Wright’s Hills. The phone number is 5988446.     The Evergreen Park Public Library is at 9400 S. Troy Ave. The phone number is 422-8522 ***     A crochet club for teens and adults will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Aug. 13. Beginners should bring an H/8 crochet hook; yarn will be provided. Non-beginners should bring a current project. Registration required. ***     The library will be closed on Sundays until Sept. 8. ***     The library is accepting donations of hardcover books, paperbacks, music CDs, videos and DVDs. Magazines, encyclopedias and textbooks are unacceptable. ***     The library is accepting applications for exhibits at its Mini Maker Faire to be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19. The event will celebrate the do-ityourself mind set by showcasing various projects in a show-andtell format. Submit projects at evergreenparklibrary.org. ***     The library booth at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market will be offering samples of strawberry shortcake, strawberry recipes and strawberry themed stories and crafts from 10 to 11 a.m. at the market, 89th Street and Kedzie Avenue.

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Meals on Wheels

art glass designs. Registration required. ***     Family Movie Time featuring “Up” will be Friday, Aug. 16 at 4 p.m. All attendees get popcorn and lemonade. Registration required. ***     A recycling information session will be Tuesday, Aug. 20 at 7 p.m. Registration required. ***     A “Dork Diaries” party featuring trivia questions and prizes for children 8 years and older will be Thursday, Aug. 22 at 6 p.m. Registration required. ***     An electronics recycling drive will be held in the Interlochen Drive parking lot at the library Saturday, Aug. 24 from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ***     Teen Manicure Night will be Monday, Aug. 26 at 6:30 p.m. The library will provide a Sally Hansen Salon Effects nail kit. Teens will do their own nails but an instructor will be present to help. Refreshments will be served. Registration required. ***     The foreign film “Amour” will be shown at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29. The film is about Georges and Ann, retired music teachers whose lives change after Anne suffers a stroke. Amour was the 2013 Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film. Refreshments will be served and an AMC (Continued on page 12)

My granddaughter says I’m a good listener.

    The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services offers a Meals on Wheels program for village residents 60 years and older who are unable to prepare their own meals. Meals are delivered Monday through Friday. For more information call 422-8776.

55 and Up

    Palos Hills residents 55 years and older meet from noon to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. Tickets for events must be purchased one week in advance. Entertainment includes musicians, singers, luncheons, movies, plays and bingo.

Pinochle

    The Worth Senior Pinochle club is seeking new members. Membership is free. Visit the group at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., every Monday and Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games begin at noon. Call 448-1181 for information.

Crossword Answers

Robot rocks

Submitted photo

    Stephanie Vaccaro of the Queen of Peace High School robotics team “RoboPride” stands next to Zetabot. Queen of Peace staff, students, alumnae and their families walked in Evergreen Park’s annual Independence Day parade.     The Queen of Peace robotics club is the first all-girls competitive team in Illinois. RoboPride designs, builds and programs functioning robots. Zetabot got the parade crowd going by throwing flying discs along the route.

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12

The Reporter

The

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Aloe, green tea to banish the burn Back Page

Whatizit?     Hello, readers. I hope you are all having a fine day, and giving thanks for the good things you have in your life. This is not the last “Whatizit?” but it is the last one I, Jason Maholy, will be presiding over. After 12 years at The Reporter, it is time to move on. I have enjoyed my time here, meeting fine people such as yourselves and covering community news. Cheers to you all, be good and be well.     Last week’s “Whatizit?” was a tortoise (we accepted turtle), and that was known by Celeste Cameron, Kathy Higgins, Tom “Mad Mac” McAvoy, Nancy Kennedy, Bella Fruendt, Dana Oswald, Mike Martin, Marilyn Gutierrez, Theresa and George Rebersky, Jerry and Carol Janicki, and Mary Kurdziel. Great job, ladies and gents!     This week’s clue is: Don’t get it in your pants. Send responses to thereporter@comcast.net under the subject Whatizit, and include your first and last names and where you live.

Get LinkedIn at Moraine Valley     Moraine Valley Community College’s speaker series will next week present “LinkedIn: Breakthrough Strategies For Career Development.”     The free event, part of the college’s Career Paths and Coffee adult information sessions, will be from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1 in Building M, on campus at 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills.     The speaker will be J.D. Gershbein, CEO of Owlish Communications and who specializes in LinkedIn. Gershbein will discuss steps to build a healthy network on LinkedIn to aid in the job search and transform a job seeker’s career development strategy. He is considered a top influencer in the field of social business, and has been a guest on FOX News Chicago, WGN AM Radio and in the Chicago Tribune. He also blogs for NBC Chicago on topics related to LinkedIn.     Sign-in begins at 6 p.m. with light refreshments before the presenta-

tion begins at 6:30 p.m. There will be time for questions.     The speaker series occurs several times a year on campus and features current job trends, career search tips, Moraine Valley programs and certifications, and career paths. Target audiences include anyone who wants to learn how to improve their competitive edge in the job market or workplace.     In addition to the speaker series, Career Paths and Coffee sessions are monthly hour-long gatherings on all three of Moraine Valley’s campuses and throughout the year at district libraries. They provide information for adults interested in learning about programs and resources at Moraine Valley in a relaxed setting.     To RSVP for the speaker event or for more information contact Peggy Heenan at 974-5312 and heenanm6@morainevalley.edu or visit mo rainevalley.edu/adultsuccess.

    I just realized this column is about a month or two late because summer is escaping us too quickly!     I can remember when my son was 12 years old and came home with one heck of a sunburn. A friend told me about aloe vera many years prior, so I grew the exotic looking succulent around the house. They are desert plants that contain a sticky gel that has been used as an application for sunburn for many years.     I asked my son if I could apply aloe vera to half of his back and an over-the-counter Noxematype cream to the other half to compare which healed the most. He was game. Cool. I cut open a leaf from one of my plants and applied it to the left half of his back, and continued to do this on a daily basis for three days. Initially, his entire back hurt with both applications. On the second day, though, he reported much more improvement on the aloe side after I applied the aloe vera. All in all, the aloe side seemed to improve somewhat more rapidly after the second day.     After three days, the redness seemed to be disappearing on both sides, but more on the aloe side. I checked his back every morning to see how it was doing,

and I saw improvement on both sides of his back with a bit more on the aloe vera side.     About a week later, I checked his back again, and couldn’t believe what I was seeing. The aloe

Mixing it up for good health By Dee Woods

vera side of his back showed the skin to be smooth, and boasted a neat, deep, wow-looking tan. The other side was a disgusting, peeling mess revealing a two-tone skin that appeared raw under the nasty looking “fish scales” he was shedding. He said his back on that side itched, and as he attempted to rub a towel across it when he showered the skin continued to peel off.     I learned from that anecdotal experience that aloe vera does help in a deep down fashion, even if it didn’t relieve all of the pain immediately. Studies have also shown that when taken internally, aloe vera can be helpful with ulcerative colitis and other

internal disorders.     Since the time of our experiment with the aloe vera gel, I have learned that green tea containsa polyphenol, epigallocatechin (EGCG), that also protects the skin, among other things. The greatest part of this discovery is that if one consumes the tea before exposing the skin to the sun, the skin can be more fully protected. By the way, excessive exposure to the sun is a serious and dangerous problem, regardless of what nutrients one may take.     I remember about 10 years ago when Evergreen Park pediatrician Van Koinis prepared his own wonderful facial and skin protective cream to be used by children prior to being exposed to the sun. That cream was a wonder cream. I used it every day just because it made my skin feel and look wonderful. (I think I may have cried the day he said he was no longer having the cream produced.) I believe it was far too costly for him. As I recall, it contained EGCG and other ingredients that he personally researched and found to be protective. I have never seen a more thorough researcher than Koinis. I believe he is a genius. At any rate, I can honestly say my

skin was never so protected.     Since that time I have done a great deal of reading on healing teas and teas that protect the skin. My favorite is white tea, which is actually the same as green tea, only the leaves are picked prior to the buds blooming. It is higher in EGCG and tastes very mellow. It is said to be very heart protective as well as supplying antimicrobial and antifungal constituents.     There is a problem, however, for those on Coumadin/warfarin or other anti-coagulants. Some physicians believe it is okay to take a small amount of green tea even with the anticoagulants, but you must discuss that with your physician if you are on any blood-thinners.     Just as in every other nutrient or healthy substance, moderation is always key. I have known people to go overboard taking the attitude “if a little is good, a lot must be better.” Whether it is a little wine or a cup or two of green tea, too much can pose a problem. Remember…moderation. Dee Woods is available to give presentations about alternative health treatments and healthy living. She can be reached at deewoods@comcast.net.

Best of The Wine Guy

Proper fiber intake helps build a better diet     As we continue learning about how to build a better diet, and with that a better body and mind, don’t underestimate the importance fiber.     Fruits and vegetables are great sources of essential vitamins and minerals, but they are also the greatest source of fiber because they are composed largely of indigestible material such as skins and cellulose. Fiber is so important because it is a cleansing agent that helps rid the body of waste that can otherwise accumulate in the large intestine, where it can breed harmful bacteria that lead to myriad illnesses. Fiber, some experts say, prevents constipation and diseases of the large intestine. The excessive consumption of meat couple with a low-fiber diet is doubtless a contributing factor in many if not most cases of colon cancer. Adequate fiber consumption may also help one control weight.     Other good sources of fiber are beans and lentils — which are also loaded with protein — and whole grains such as barley, brown rice, millet and quinoa. Whole grains are typically good

sources of protein, vitamin B and iron as well, but the fact is you can’t go wrong by incorporating them into your diet. They will help you become healthier and maintain good health. In any case, it is a good idea to cut down on meat consumption — or eliminate it completely — and instead opt for other sources of protein. If you do, however, be sure to replace those lost protiens with the legumes and whole grains I have just described.     As far as vitamins and minerals are concerned, different fruits and vegetables provide different types and varying amounts of these nutrients. For this reason it is wise to eat a wide variety of natural foods. Dark green vegetables and yellow vegetables such as squash, broccoli, spinach and kale provide high amounts of vitamin A, and most dark green vegetables also provide good amounts of vitamin C — but only if they are not overcooked. Some greens including collards, dandelion, mustard greens and kale also are high in iron and calcium.     Citrus fruits like oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit are also

The Wine Guy with Anthony Scarano

great sources of vitamin C, as most of you probably already know.     Nearly all fruits and vegetables are low in fat, and all are void of cholesterol. The ones that do contain fat — avocados and coconuts, for instance — are loaded with good fats that the body needs. Milk, cheeses and yogurt are also good sources of essential fats, but your intake of these products should be moderated. Dairy products are good sources of vitamin A, calcium and protein, and most milk has vitamin D added to it. Vitamin D is necessary for the immune system, and a lack of this important nutrient has been implicated in colon and prostate cancers. It also helps the body

absorb calcium, which is needed for strong bones and teeth. Lowfat and skim milk may be better than whole milk, especially for people trying to cut down on animal fats or calories, but all milks have the same amount of other vitamins and minerals.     Keep yourself in good health. Eat everything in moderation, but be sure the diet is properly balanced — that means more fruits and vegetables than anything else, a good supply of whole grains and legumes, and a little dairy and meat, if you so choose. And whatever you do, don’t skimp on the wine. I have been writing lately more about food and proper diet, but don’t forget, I am The Wine Guy. Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an 88-year-old Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the opinions of Mr. Scarano based on years of independent study and personal experience, and may not be beneficial to health. Wine should be consumed in moderation, as overindulgence may be harmful to health.

Library Notes (Continued from page 11) gift card will be raffled. Registration required. ***     The library is seeking teen volunteers to help with tis Summer Reading Program. Parental permission is required and volunteers must be at least 13 years old. Sign up at the library. For more information contact Youth Services at 598-8446, Ext. 117. ***     The library offers IndieFlix. Get unlimited access to Award-winning independent movies, shorts, documentaries, and web series that can be viewed on a home computer or portable device. Go to greenhillslibrary.org to start streaming free movies. ***     The library offers books for parents and teachers to borrow for a three-week period. Resources may be helpful for lesson planning and obtaining creative ideas. Books are in the Youth Services Department. ***     The library is collecting Legos to be used in a Lego club that will begin this summer. Bring donations to the library. ***     The library offers the eBook platform 3M Cloud Library, and has a touch-screen Discovery Station where patrons can browse and checkout eBooks. Cloud eBooks can be read on most eReaders, computers, tablets and smart phones. Check out a 3M eReader at the circulation desk. Visit greenhillslibrary.org to get started. ***     The library has an eBook service, Axis 360, through which users can download bestselling eBooks for as many as 21 days directly onto a device using the Blio software application. Titles automatically expire at the end of the lending period and there are no late fees. Place holds on items that are checked out. Service is only available to Green Hills cardholders. To start browsing visit http://ghpl.axis360.baker-taylor. com. For more information call 598-8446. ***     The library is collecting firstperson accounts of stories of mili-

tary service to be donated to the Veteran History Project of the Library of Congress. The library is seeking photos, memoirs, and wartime diaries from World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, and the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Call 598-8446 for more information. ***     The library offers Freegal Music, a downloadable music service that provides access to the Sony Music Entertainment catalog. The catalog offers hundreds of thousands of songs in more than 100 genres of music. ***     The library’s Media on Demand program enables patrons to download best-selling and classic audiobooks, eBooks, music and video. No late fees. Works include best-selling novels, wellknown classics and self-improvement guides. For more information visit mediaondemand.org. ***     The library has a scanner available to the public. Pictures, documents, etc., can be scanned and sent to an email, printer or USB device. ***     The library offers TumbleBooks!, a collection of animated talking picture books with fiction, non-fiction and foreign language titles, and read-alongs (chapter books with sentence highlighting and narration but no animation). Visit greenhills. lib.il.us or call 598-8446, Ext. 117, for more information.

Oak Lawn

    The Oak Lawn Library is at 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The phone number is 422-4990. ***     Geocaching is a free, realworld treasure hunt in which players try to locate hidden containers called caches using a smartphone or GPS. Visit the library to pick up a scorecard and start the adventure. Each scorecard contains a list of coordinates that reveal hidden caches at several libraries including Oak Lawn.     Find each cache and follow the directions to get the scorecard signed. By completing age-level requirements, a participant’s

name can be entered into a raffle to win an iPad, iPod, Geomate. jr and more. When done playing (or by Aug. 3) return scorecard to the Youth Services or Help Desk. All ages are welcome. ***     The free family movie “The Croods” (PG) will be Friday, July 26 at noon and Sunday, Aug. 11 at 2 p.m. After their cave is destroyed, a cave family must trek through an unfamiliar fantastical world with the help of an inventive boy. No advance registration required. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. ***     The free movie “Hugo” (PG) will be Sunday, July 28 at 2 p.m. Set in 1930s Paris, an orphan who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton. Starring Ben Kingsley, Asa Butterfield and Sacha Baron Cohen. ***     The free movie “Anna Karenina” (R) will be Wednesday, July 31 at 2 and 6:30 p.m. Set in late 19th-century Russia highsociety, the aristocrat Anna Karenina enters into a life-changing affair with the affluent Count Vronsky. ***     Donate gently-used books, magazines, CDs and videos to the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library Ongoing Book Sale at the Oak Lawn Public Library. The Friends will not accept Readers Digest condensed books, encyclopedias and older text books. The donation drop-off area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the Reception Booth to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their donation. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents and magazines cost five cents each. Audio visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programming and purchases that are beyond their regular budget. ***     The library sponsors three adult writers groups that meet year-round. A general interest group meets from 10 a.m. to

noon on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. Writers interested in screen-writing meet from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. Budding children’s authors meet from 10 a.m. to noon on the third Thursday each month. Meetings include readings, critiques and writing exercises. New members are welcome anytime. No registration required. ***     The library would like to add photos of patrons reading or listening to library books to the library’s Pinterest page, pinter est.com/OakLawnPL. Send photos to jchurchill@olpl.org. ***

    The library now offers movie check-out for free. Check-out periods are seven days with no renewals. Oak Lawn residents may check out up to 10 films at a time. ***     The library offers “Temporary Online Patron Registration.” Fill out a registration form at oak lawnlibrary.org/ librarycards2.shtml, and visit the Circulation Desk within 14 days to receive a permanent card. Proof of residency in Oak Lawn is required. ***     Books, tapes and CDs not found at the library can be requested online from another library. For more information

call the Interlibrary Loan department or stop by the Help Desk on the first floor.

Worth

    The library subscribes to Zinio, an online magazine stand that enables patrons to read magazines on computers, tablets or phones using web browsers and apps. Must have Worth Library card. Zinio is accessible at worthlibrary.com. ***     The library offers Try-It Illinois, which allows access to 300 free databases from more than 40 vendors. Access Try-It at worthlibrary. com (login and password is available at the library).

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Silliness in the heat of the moment Bartosh     Hot weather occasionally makes people do crazy things.     In the summer of 1974, for example, it caused some people to become public exhibitionists. Strangely, their sanity wasn’t really questioned at the time, only their choice of outfits, especially when those choosing to run naked through crowds were hairy, out-of-shape men.     Streaking wasn’t done to cool off, only to look cool — or so the nudists thought. In retrospect, those appearances were definitely deceiving and the participants daffy.     None of the items I’m about to relate is quite as bizarre as that brief fad of the mid-’70s, but it seems pretty evident that clear and rational thinking is still on holiday almost 40 years later.     • Cap’n Klutz: San Francisco 49ers fans better hope Colin Kaepernick’s responses to on-field dilemmas this fall aren’t as clumsy as the one he gave when questioned about his recent choice of headgear.     A picture of the Niners quarterback wearing a Miami Dolphins cap on the Fourth of July became a semi-big story during a slow news period. Kaepernick’s faux pas might have been glossed over had he been a bit more lowkey about the whole thing.     Instead, though, he reacted to barbs aimed his way with an Instagram that showed him holding a Dolphins cap and with a quizzical expression on his face. Accompanying the photo was the following text: “This the hat y’all mad at? I’m goin wear what I want regardless of what you think, all you need to worry about is the fact that I grind for my teammates and the 49ers! I plan on doin this until they won’t let me in the building! #ridiculous #y’allmustbebored”     Ignoring the fact that this was written by a college graduate, Kaepernick’s in-your-face answer to his critics was disturbing for another reason: He truly doesn’t seem to understand what he did wrong.     His apologists have said that since it’s the offseason, Kaepernick should be free to wear whatever he wants. But Kaepernick is officially a 49ers employee 12 months of the year, and it’d be understandable if team management were not too crazy about the QB’s attire.     Kaepernick could have worn a Miami Marlins hat without fear of reprimand, except no sane person is advertising his allegiance to baseball’s bottom-

feeders these days. Conversely, he could have jumped aboard the Miami Heat bandwagon and been accused of no worse than front-running.     And had Kaepernick opted to wear a University of Miami hat, all that would have happened is that he would have been mistaken for the Hurricanes’ latest recruit.     But he chose a Dolphins hat. As others before me have stated, were Kaepernick operating in the corporate world, his actions would be akin to a General Motors employee driving a Toyota to work, a Coca-Cola worker quenching his lunch-hour thirst with a 7-Up, or a FedEx employee using UPS to ship his packages.     In some circles, Kaepernick apparently receives a pass simply because he’s a jock, but he doesn’t get one here. Maybe that’s why he bought pizzas for media members during Super Bowl week last winter — to curry their future favor.     And maybe I’d feel differently now if he had saved me a slice back then.     • Cap’n Klutz, Part 2: Are these hats fitting too tightly or what? Why do guys’ top-of-thehead fashion statements keep saying such dumb things?     In comparison to Mike Pouncey, Kaepernik’s misstep is almost comical. Pouncey, a Miami Dolphins offensive lineman, recently caught heat for wearing a hat that proclaimed support for former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez, who was arrested on murder charges.     Pouncey and his twin brother Maurkice, a member of the Pittsburgh Steelers, both were photographed wearing Hernandez-related hats while appearing in public. Hernandez was a college teammate of the Pouncey brothers at the University of Florida.     Maurkice later issued an apology on his Twitter account, but Mike declined to do the same after being asked about the hats by members of the media. He did, however, acknowledge that he and other professional athletes “get paid a lot of money to act in a certain way, and that’s the way we should be acting.”     Well, that certainly cleared everything up. Personally, I suspect Mike’s been throwing too many blocks with his hat on instead of his helmet.     • Cash clod: Brandon Phillips is a very rich man, but you wouldn’t know it by listening

to him.     The Cincinnati Reds second baseman isn’t being modest and trying to downplay his hefty, prosports income. If his words that appeared in a Cincinnati magazine are to be believed, Phillips really does view himself as financially shortchanged.     He stated that the six-year, $72 million deal he agreed to is “a slap in the face” compared to the 10-year, $225 million pact the Reds presented to Phillips’ teammate, Joey Votto, five days before. Following is part of the statement Phillips offered to the magazine:     “I just feel like they didn’t have to sign Joey to that contract. He still had two more years on his. And for (the front office) to go out there and sign him before they sign me, and they knew I was going to be a free agent. … I told everybody I want to finish my career here. And then they give someone a contract who didn’t ask for nothing? To this day, I’m still hurt. Well, I don’t wanna say hurt. I’ll say scarred. I’m still scarred. It just sucks that it happened.”     If a tear didn’t well up in your eye after reading that, then you are completely without feeling. No man should have to put up with such an insult, and only the most heartless of individuals would begrudge Phillips his rightful share of the Reds’ payroll.     So who wants to start the charity drive on his behalf? Hey, count me in, but before that happens, I do have one question for Phillips:     Can you please identify the management person who pointed the gun at you to get you to sign your contract?     After spouting off, Phillips, like Kaepernick, didn’t have the good sense to just ignore the criticism that inevitably followed. No, he compounded it by asking inquisitive reporters to “tell me exactly what did I say that was so wrong?”     Phillips went on to praise himself for his honesty in dealing with the media and said he “didn’t disrespect nobody.” I guess that means Cincinnati fans — you know, those folks who must spend ever-increasing amounts of their own slap-inthe-face salaries to attend games or purchase Reds paraphernalia because of the dollars being given to guys like Votto and Phillips — don’t really count.     Oh well, at least Phillips didn’t don a Baltimore Orioles hat in protest.

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Thursday, July 25, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

Summer baseball roundup

Locals left out of Lawler Classic By Ken Karrson     Once again, a baseball state tournament lacked local flavor.     No area team was able to advance as far as the supersectional round during the IHSA spring playoffs, and the Phil Lawler Summer Classic that got underway this past Monday at North Central College and Benedictine University was also devoid of neighborhood schools.     Six area entries, in fact, were one-and-done in regional play, while another was two-andthrough. Just Sandburg and St. Laurence — the only local clubs to ever win summer championships — made it as far as a regional finale, and both fell short in their quest for an Illinois High School Baseball Coaches Association Elite Eight berth.     The Eagles narrowly missed, though, as they dropped a 4-3 verdict to Minooka in last Thursday’s Lockport Regional title clash. Longtime Chicago Catholic League rival St. Rita showed the Vikings the exit door in the Richards Regional by knocking them off 10-3 that same day.     Richards had squared off with the Mustangs the day before and suffered a 6-0 setback as sophomore Justin Vivar stopped the Bulldogs on two hits. Eric Mallo’s bunt single in the sixth broke up Vivar’s no-hit bid and Shawn Chiaramonte added a triple in the seventh.     “I thought we hit the ball pretty good, but they caught it,” Richards assistant coach Jeff Kortz said of St. Rita. “[Vivar] hit his spots pretty well and they were good in all phases.”     As for Sandburg, it reeled off four straight wins at Lockport before suffering the gut-wrenching defeat versus Minooka. The Indians did all their scoring in one inning, in part by taking advantage of two Eagles errors.     Minooka’s rally erased a 2-0 edge Sandburg had established in the second stanza.     “After you take the lead, you’ve got to put up zeros after that and lock them down,” Eagles assistant coach George Fear said. “We were disappointed, for sure, at the end, but our pitching gave us a chance to win every single game. We [also] had consistent at-bats — we had a lot of deep flyouts [in this contest] — and picked the ball up for the most part.”     Sandburg was within a run in the seventh when it proceeded to load the bases with no one out, but the Indians registered a key double play to lessen the threat. The back end of the twin killing featured an Eagle being tagged out at the plate on a bullet throw from Minooka’s right fielder. A groundout then concluded the game.     Prior to losing to the Indians, Sandburg upended both Joliet Central (11-1) and Romeoville (9-4) last Monday, Providence Catholic (4-1) on Tuesday and

Lemont (3-2 in nine innings) on Wednesday. Chris Stearns’ walkoff homer was the difference against Lemont.     The Eagles (11-3) also used the long ball to tally their other markers, as Alec Martinez and Julian Gutierrez went deep in the first and fourth frames, respectively. Equally important to Sandburg’s well-being was pitcher Bryan Pall, who worked eight innings and struck out 13.     “He was nasty,” Fear said of his hurler. “Bryan probably made [only] three mistakes in the game. Lemont has some very good players and I’d be shocked if they didn’t make a run in [Class] 3A next year, but he was dominant and had the kind of stuff which is hard to hit. It was one of the better outings I’ve seen.”     The Eagles, who finished with 10 hits, allowed the Indians to forge a pair of ties before getting the final say on Stearns’ blast. ***     Providence, which had slipped past Chicago Christian 5-4 last Monday, held a 1-0 advantage over Sandburg on Tuesday heading into the seventh. And things didn’t look any better for the latter as that stanza progressed, as the Eagles were eventually down to their last strike.     But Ben Kociper’s single pro­ longed Sandburg’s plate appearance. A hit batsman, Jim Landgraf’s infield hit and a wild pitch helped draw the Eagles even, then Jim Roche (RBI single) and Martinez (two-run double) delivered hits that turned the tide for good.     Providence put two men aboard in its half of the seventh, but Pall, who had relieved Sean Leland, induced a game-ending double play.     “We hit a lot of balls on the screws, [so] if we would have lost 1-0, it was one of those games where you’d say, ‘What can you do?’” Fear said. “We felt good because we hit the ball hard, and finally something fell in for us. We were down and out [before that], but we were able to come back.”     Leland pitched a solid game for Sandburg, as the lone run notched off him resulted from a bad-hop single that bounced off an Eagles infielder’s face. Although Sandburg was unable to ultimately position itself for a run at its first summer championship since 2007, Fear thought the spirited display in the regional round would present long-term benefits to the Eagles.     “I think it was great for our confidence,” he said. “We played some good teams here and battled. We can always come back to this when we’re in a funk, which every team goes through during a season.” ST. LAURENCE     Before getting silenced on three hits by St. Rita ace Mike Costanzo, the Vikings’ offense was operating in high gear.

    St. Laurence recorded three straight lopsided victories in the Richards Regional as it routed Shepard (10-1), Homewood-Flossmoor (13-3) and De La Salle (11-1) in succession. The Vikings secured the latter pair of triumphs in just six innings.     “We played very well and swung the bats well,” St. Laurence coach Pete Lotus said. “We definitely put it all together.”     The Vikings (13-6) actually fell behind the Astros 1-0 last Monday after Jake Hart belted an RBI triple for Shepard, but Frank Greco’s triple and an Astros miscue enabled St. Laurence to pull even in its portion of the second inning. From there, the Vikings gradually pulled away, using a three-run fifth to construct an insurmountable 8-1 edge.     “They’re a good team and they showed it,” Shepard coach Frank DiFoggio said of St. Laurence. “Both sides made mistakes, but they took advantage of ours.”     DiFoggio claimed his squad “had some opportunities,” but two such instances got short-circuited by putouts at the plate. Vikings pitcher Rob Gutierrez also hamstrung the Astros at critical moments.     “He had another gear he went to once we got guys on [base],” DiFoggio said.     Shepard was guilty of four errors, which paved the way for St. Laurence’s fifth-inning outburst. None of the Vikings’ tallies in that stanza was earned.     “They didn’t really pound the ball,” DiFoggio said. “They only hit two balls hard. They had a lot of high school base hits.”     Despite the errors on this occasion, DiFoggio thought defense was generally a strong suit for the Astros (7-9) this summer.     “We usually didn’t lose games because of the dropped fly ball or the ball going between our legs,” he said. “It was just little things, little teachable moments that we need to learn from. If we do, we could be a really good team.” ***     St. Laurence continued rolling the next day as it unloaded 11 hits and complemented them with 10 free passes, a combination that proved lethal to H-F. Those Vikings had moved on in the tournament by shutting out Oak Lawn 4-0 on Monday.     Mike Kornacker was St. Laurence’s big gun as he went 4-for-5 with two homers and five RBI. Four of the RBI came on his sixthinning round-tripper, the grand slam serving as the linchpin to a victory-securing six-run uprising.     “All summer, he’s hit,” Lotus said of his Purdue Universitybound senior-to-be. “He’s amazing. There’s not anything on the baseball field Mike can’t do. He’s one of the most talented kids I’ve ever had.     “Once you have a [two-time Player of the Year like] Kyle (Continued on page 2)

Community sports news Orland Warriors win Wisconsin tournament

    These 14s became No. 1.     The Orland Park Warriors 14U travel baseball team made the most of its appearance in the Wisconsin Dells Summer Slugfest by capturing the championship in its age division on July 14. Fourteen squads representing either Illinois or Wisconsin competed for the title.     The Warriors were seeded eighth heading into the final day of the three-day event, but took down opponents that were seeded first, second and fourth to claim the crown. Comprising the team’s roster were Orland residents David Drabeck, Tim Dobrik, Matt Finn, Jake Hutchinson, Camden Landers, Patrick Larkin, Zach Poe, Brad Vetter and Mark Weimar, Oak Lawn resident Jake Larson and Sullivan Stickann of Highland, Ind.     The majority of Warriors players will continue their baseball careers at one of four south-side high schools: Sandburg, Marist, Brother Rice or St. Rita.     “I told the guys that they had it in them to win this tournament, that they had the talent,” Warriors coach Tom Vetter said. “It was a fantastic way to end our season.”     Joining Vetter on Orland’s coaching staff were Mike Poe, Jim Hutchinson and Ron Drabeck.

Hickory Hills man latest to notch ace

    Referring to himself as “very,

very lucky,” Hickory Hills resident Dennis Farley became the latest area golfer to register a hole-inone while playing a round at Silver Lake Country Club.     Farley’s ace occurred on July 17, when he used a 3-wood to hit his shot on the 122-yard fourth hole of the North course. Witnessing the feat were playing partners Dan Pasqua of Orland Park and Kevin Farley of Chicago.

youth sports coaches and volunteers, will be held Saturday, Aug. 3., at Soldier Field in conjunction with Comcast Bears Family Fest.

    NFL Hall of Famer Dick Butkus and other sports legends will take part in the event, which is also being supported by the Chicago Blackhawks and University of

Illinois. Monetary proceeds will benefit the non-profit Butkus Foundation and, eventually, the youth charities supported by participating pro franchises.

    “We appreciate those who share our vision and can help us get this program off the ground,” Butkus said in a statement. “We hope it (Continued on page 2)

34th National Sports Collectors Convention slated to begin July 31

    The 34th annual National Sports Collectors Convention will be held July 31-Aug. 4 at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont.     Approximately 600 dealers will be on hand and about 50 corporate booths set up. In addition, an array of autograph guests will conduct signings each day of the event.     The show is scheduled to run from 4-8 p.m. on July 31, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Aug. 1-3, and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Aug. 4. Single-day tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door, and both VIP and Super VIP packages are also available. Children under the age of 12 will be admitted free of charge.

Youth coaches, volunteers to be honored

Submitted photo     The first-ever Chicago Sports Legacy event, designed to honor The Orland Warriors 14U travel baseball team emerged as a divisional champion at a recent tournament in Wisconsin Dells.


2

Section 2 Thursday, July 25, 2013

Summer baseball (Continued from page 1) Wood, you wonder if you’ll ever get another kid like that, in terms of not only talent, but work ethic and leadership. Maybe because he’s been up on varsity since he was a freshman, I’ve noticed [his development] more, but it’s been great to see Mike grow.”     As had happened versus Shepard, the Vikings spotted their foe an early advantage. H-F was ahead 20 and 3-1 before bases-loaded walks to Mike Miller and Roger Wilson in the third inning squared things at 3-all. Nate Tholl’s two-RBI triple, plus a throwing error attached to the end of that same play put St. Laurence ahead to stay.     Also making their presences felt on offense were Kevin White (two hits, two RBI, two bases-on-balls) and Brad Wood (two hits). Wood reached base four times on the day. Relief pitcher John Riordan was the Vikings’ main man on the hill as he fanned four and allowed just one hit over a 2 1/3-inning span. ***     More fireworks were launched against De La Salle, which reached Wednesday’s semifinal by virtue of a 4-0 decision over Brother Rice on Tuesday.     While Wood was handcuffing the Meteors and limiting them to only two hits, the Vikings were backing him with an 11-hit onslaught. Kornacker slugged two more homers, Miller had one, and both players drove in a total of three runs.     Between Tuesday and Wednesday, Kornacker went 7-for-8.     Heard from as well were Wood (double, RBI), White (double, RBI) and Tholl (two RBI). St. Laurence collected four runs in its initial plate appearance and struck for four more in the sixth to wrap up a slaughter-rule triumph. ***     Wood’s two-bagger was the team’s lone extra-base hit off St. Rita’s Costanzo on Thursday. The Mustangs used a six-run fifth frame to build an 8-1 cushion and shove the Vikings into an inescapable hole.     Costanzo had also orchestrated St. Laurence’s departure from the spring postseason, doing so after the Vikings had pinned a regularseason loss on him.     “That’s how it usually goes between us,” Lotus said, referring to the back-and-forth nature of the St. Rita-St. Laurence series. “Unfortunately, the last two times they ended our season, and that doesn’t sit too well [with our players]. We have to do something about that.”     Lotus felt the Vikings “didn’t play our best game, and that was a little frustrating.” That was evident in St. Rita’s pivotal inning, which began with a St. Laurence error and was highlighted by a bases-clearing two-bagger.     Even more debilitating to the Vikings, however, was their sudden lack of batting punch. They went hitless until the sixth inning, and Lotus thought his guys might have been pressing. He certainly felt that was the case with Kornacker on the mound.     “I think he tried to make perfect pitches,” Lotus said, “and that catches up to you. I thought we were all putting pressure on ourselves.     “If we do a little bit more offensively, it could have been different, but we just didn’t have great atbats. The momentum swings are dramatic in these games, and we didn’t do a good job of executing our game plan to put pressure on their defense.”     St. Laurence was bidding for a second consecutive appearance in the Lawler Summer Classic and its third in four years. The Vikings won the summer title back in 1981.     “Hopefully, we learn from it,” Lotus said of his club’s latest experience. “Some people don’t put much stock in the summer season, but I enjoy both formats.     “I like the double elimination [used in the Lawler Summer Classic] and, believe it or not, I like the four-games-in-four-days format of the regional because you see the toughness of the kids. Unless you have rainouts, you don’t [typically] play four games in four days in the spring.” RICHARDS     Before running into St. Rita, the Bulldogs (16-6) scored postseason wins over Eisenhower (12-2) and Bremen (7-6).     The second of those encounters became a nail-biter after the Braves expunged a 4-0 deficit in the top of the fifth. Two more runs in the seventh then put Bremen ahead and placed the pressure squarely on Richards.     Nate Natividad’s one-out single gave the Bulldogs some hope in the bottom of that inning. After a passed ball moved him into scoring position, Natividad raced home on Chiaramonte’s single. A Braves error followed and then Mike Marchione smacked a two-run double to complete Richards’ comeback.     Kortz was impressed with the ’Dogs’ staging of their rally, particularly the roles Chiaramonte and Marchione played in it.     “It was hotter than blazes at that time,” he said, “and Shawn and Mike had been at summer [football] camp from 8 to 9:45 in

the morning. So it was already a long day for them.”     Spearheading Richards’ earlier scoring were Charlie Zeschke (tworun homer in the fourth inning) and Mallo (RBI triple in the second). Alex Villafuerte worked fourplus stanzas on the hill and was effective for most of that stay. ***     Subduing Eisenhower at 10 a.m. on Monday was far less challenging for the Bulldogs, who put up back-to-back six-spots in the first two innings to leave the Cardinals in the dust.     “Eisenhower was very young and eager to play, but our guys were focused,” Kortz said. “We hit the ball and we pounded the gaps, and everyone in the lineup got a hit.”     Taking care of the pitching duties were Brett Thomas and Eric Ruge. The former went four frames and surrendered just two hits.     “[Going] 16-6 isn’t bad,” Kortz said. “I think our kids are happy, but I don’t think they’re satisfied.”     “I still think it was a productive summer,” head coach Brian Wujcik said. “We’ve got some guys who can play next year and we answered some questions. As far as I’m concerned, that’s the purpose of the summer.” BROTHER RICE     Alex Alarcon, who’ll be vying for the starting spot at quarterback for the Crusaders football team this fall, displayed his abilities on the diamond last Monday by pitching Rice to a 10-0 triumph over neighboring Evergreen Park.     The Mustangs had given the Crusaders (14-7) a serious scare during a regular-season meeting a couple weeks earlier before absorbing a 2-1 loss, but Evergreen was no threat to Rice this time, thanks to Alarcon, who held the Mustangs without a hit through four innings. Kevin Farmer’s bad-hop single and another single by Mike Rizzo represented the full extent of Evergreen’s noisemaking.     “He was bringing it early and then went to his curveball, and we couldn’t get much going against their guy,” Mustangs coach Mark Smyth said.     The same couldn’t be said of the Crusaders, who did a fair amount of damage versus Evergreen’s mound duo of Frank Meisl and Aaron Green Van Zee. Six runs in the fourth frame staked Rice to a comfortable lead and assured it of additional tournament play.     “You’ve got to give them credit because we didn’t make any misplays at all,” Smyth said. “We’re very high on [Meisl and Green Van Zee], but they got hit pretty hard, which hasn’t happened very often. [The Crusaders] swung it pretty good.”     Although his squad bagged only one win this summer, Smyth was satisfied with what he had witnessed from it. He believes Corey Miller will become a reliable replacement for the departed Kyle Venhuizen at first base and that Kevin Gallagher can also be an influential figure next spring.     “We answered a few questions and there were a lot of positives, so it was a good summer,” Smyth said. “You never have your cohesive unit, so to speak, so the record in the summer means very little. It’s a good group coming back [in 2014], and it’ll be easier to build on this because of what we did this [past] spring.”     Evergreen netted three Class 3A postseason triumphs in late May, winning the school’s first regional crown in 55 years in the process and reaching a sectional final for the first time ever. CHICAGO CHRISTIAN     The Knights won 11 times in 14 games during the regular summer campaign, but they ended 2013 with an 0-1 playoff ledger after suffering a one-run defeat against Providence last Monday.     The 5-4 outcome tilted the Celtics’ way largely because Chicago Christian (11-4) never completely recovered from an early blitz. Providence constructed a 5-0 edge in the first inning.     “If we don’t spot them five runs, we’re right there,” Knights coach Eric Brauer said. “We just came up short.”     The Celtics’ assault was somewhat surprising in that much of it was mounted against all-area pitcher Josh Novak. The seniorto-be retired only one of the six batters he faced while walking three and giving up a double.     “When you do that, you can do a lot of damage with a minimum of hits,” Brauer said, referring to a team’s ability to coax free passes. “As a junior, Josh wasn’t doing that last spring. We were kind of scratching and clawing right from the first pitch.”     Junior-to-be Christian Bolhuis slowed Providence after that, and RBI hits from Jack De Vries (double) and Mike Santarelli gave Chicago Christian’s offense a lift. Max Kerfin’s two-run single brought the Knights within one in the seventh inning, but the locals — who totaled nine hits in the game — left the potential tying run stranded.     Christian’s inability to capitalize on a two-on, one-out situation in the sixth also undermined its quest to overtake a deeper foe.     “They’ve got 40 guys on their summer team, so they probably

The Regional News - The Reporter bounced guys in and out to get them playing time,” Brauer said of the Celtics. “We had 16 guys and were limited in what we could do [differently], but I think we’ve got enough pieces of the puzzle to do well [in 2014].” OAK LAWN     Four hits were all the Spartans (6-8) could muster against H-F, which rendered moot a solid exhibition from their own pitcher, Mitch Swatek, last Monday. Swatek whiffed six batters in five innings while walking just one and scattering seven hits.     “With a pitching performance like that, we should win about 90 percent of the games [we play],” Oak Lawn coach Bill Gerny said. “Overall, I was happy with how tough we played them. It was nice to see, but we have to find a way to score runs.     “Their defense was lock-down and their pitching was a little better than ours. Their curveballs weren’t overpowering, but we couldn’t make solid contact.”     When Matt Dunne doubled off the left-field fence and a second man reached base with only one out, the Spartans threatened to break through in the second stanza, but they came up empty. The Vikings then struck for a couple runs in their half of the third, using two doubles and a single to inflict harm on Oak Lawn.     The Spartans also got no mileage out of Brandon Quillin’s leadoff single in the first.     “It was 4-0 going into the seventh, and that [margin] seemed big,” Gerny said. “We had a prime opportunity to score runs [early], but we didn’t and that kind of set the tone. It was like pulling teeth after that to get baserunners.     “Six-and-eight is not the best record, but we didn’t play any slouches. We have a lot to build on and we know now where our guys have to do a little bit of work.” STAGG     Also shown the sidelines in their initial playoff contest were the Chargers (3-13), who fell 8-1 to Marian Catholic last Monday.     Peter Angelos’ fourth-inning homer ruined the Spartans’ shutout bid, but Stagg was able to garner only three other hits on the day. Compounding the Chargers’ problems were seven bases-on-balls issued to Marian batters.     “They didn’t really hit the ball that hard, but we walked a lot of guys,” Stagg coach Matt O’Neill said. “And we didn’t really threaten a lot.”     Despite his sub-par performance here, pitcher C.J. Casey did enough good things during the summer to be considered a strong candidate to fill the No. 3 position in the rotation behind Max Strus and Jeff Goral in 2014. O’Neill believes the Chargers will be decent enough on the mound, but he hopes to see further improvement in other areas.     “Guys have got to continue to become better athletes,” he said. “We talk about ‘controllable things,’ and I think guys came and worked hard, but we’re stepping up in class next year.     “You can get lessons on your own, or from us, but we talk about figuring things out on your own. You need to figure out for yourself what you’re doing wrong and how to correct it.” MARIST     The RedHawks (6-8) were the first team to feel St. Rita’s wrath, as they got bounced from the tournament by an 11-1 score last Monday.     Amazingly, the two clubs were locked in a scoreless duel after four stanzas, but then “the doors blew open,” according to Marist boss Tom Fabrizio.     “I was proud of the way our kids battled and it was a real competitive game through five [innings], but it turned fast,” he said. “Once we got behind, it was like, ‘This game’s over.’     “I always expect us to play seven [solid] innings; we only played five, and look at what happened. You can lose by 10 if you don’t play hard for one inning.”     Robert Hovey gave the RedHawks a respectable pitching effort through four-plus frames as he struck out four and scattered seven hits. Pat Meehan’s sacrifice fly that plated Mike Trbovic in the top of the fifth had Marist even at that juncture, but before the Mustangs could be retired in the bottom of the stanza they had grabbed a 5-1 lead.     A hit batsman opened the inning, and St. Rita also stroked two RBI extra-base hits (double and triple) to fuel the surge. Six more runs in the sixth then finished off the RedHawks.     Mustangs pitcher Nick Goldsmith quieted Marist on four hits while whiffing five.     “You can get away with that with some teams, but not them,” Fabrizio said. “You’ve got to give yourself a chance.”     That’s what Fabrizio believes the RedHawks will have in the spring of 2014, even though as many as six juniors could be part of the everyday lineup.     “We won’t have a lot of depth, but I think we’re going to have a few good [pitching] arms and we have a chance to be OK,” Fabrizio said. “If we have our best players out there all the time, I think we’ll develop that consistency we need.”

Community sports news (Continued from page 1) becomes a community celebration to honor youth sports leaders, [who are] the real heroes in organized sports.”     Individual tickets are $151, and include seating in the Zurich Skyline Suite, where a Bears practice and fireworks show can be viewed. Partnership packages are also available.     For more information, call (805) 870-4562 or email rarp@butkusfoundation.org.

Illinois Women’s Open coming to Romeoville

    The Phil Kosin Illinois Women’s Open, women’s golf’s premier state tournament, will be held July 31-Aug. 2 at Mistwood Golf Club in Romeoville. A Wednesday pro-am event will precede the three-day tourney.     For more information about the Illinois Women’s Open, contact Mistwood at (815) 254-3333 or visit www.mistwoodgc.com.

Mt. Assisi announces dates for fall sports tryouts

    Mt. Assisi Academy will begin tryouts for its fall sports teams on Wednesday, Aug. 14.     Cross country coach Bill Rolette will lead his tryout from noon-1:30 p.m. on that day, while golfers will meet with coach Ken Malnar from 12:30-2:30 p.m. The two men will be entering their 14th and 10th

years at the school, respectively.     Doug Stangeland, who coached the Screeching Eagles tennis team to a Girls Catholic Athletic Association divisional championship last season, will hold his tryout from noon-2 p.m., while volleyball coach Karen Van Assen will conduct two tryout sessions. The first, for freshman players, will go from noon-2:30 p.m., while the second one will run from 3-6 p.m. and be for JV and varsity athletes.

Golf outing to benefit Richards athletics

    A golf outing to benefit the football and baseball teams at Richards High School will be held on Saturday, Aug. 24, at Stony Creek Golf Course.     Registration begins at 11 a.m. and plays gets underway with a shotgun start at noon. Cash prizes will be awarded for group scramble low score, closest to the pin on one par-3 hole and beating the coach on the other, and a longest-drive contest on one hole. The latter costs $10 per golfer, with the winner splitting the pot.     The overall cost of the event is $100 for golf, registration gift, snack at the nine-hole turn and a dinner party. Dinner only is $25. Sponsorships are also available for $100 and $50.     For more information, call Tony Sheehan at 499-2550, ext. 5353, or Brian Wujcik at 499-2550, ext. 5087.

HEALTHY EYES

Two athletics clinics to be offered at Peace

    Queen of Peace will include two athletics clinics among the five it will conduct the week of July 29Aug. 4 for girls in grades 4-8.     A sports camp will be held on Tuesday of that week, while one for volleyball will take place on Friday. Each clinic is free of charge and will run from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Attendees will receive lunch and a T-shirt, and limited transportation will be available.     Registration forms can be found online at www.queenofpeacehs. org or received by contacting the school’s main office. For more information, call 458-7600.

Fisk to appear at CSC golf outing

    Hall of Fame catcher Carlton Fisk will be the special guest at the 22nd annual Cancer Support Center golf outing on Friday, Sept. 13, at Flossmoor Country Club, 1441 Western Ave., in Flossmoor.     Fisk will compete against golfers on the club’s par-3 seventh hole. Registration for the event begins at 11 a.m., with a shotgun start to follow at noon. Lunch and dinner are included in the $325 cost.     The CSC provides programs at no charge for anyone affected by cancer in more than 70 Chicagoland south-side communities. For more information, call 798-9171 or visit www.cancersupportcenter. org.

WEAR SUNGLASSES

Every day that you’re outside, you’re exposed to dangerous, but invisible, ultraviolet (UV) sunlight. Left unprotected, prolonged exposure to UV radiation can seriously damage the eye, leading to cataracts, skin cancer around the eyelid and other eye disorders. Protecting your eyes is important to maintaining eye health now and in the future. Shield your eyes (and your family’s eyes) from harmful UV rays. Wear sunglasses with maximum UV protection. For more information, visit www.thevisioncouncil.org/consumers/sunglasses. A public service message from The Vision Council.

Are Areyou you the thepicture picture of ofhealth? health?

“ Colorectalcancer cancerisisthe the2nd 2ndleading leadingcancer cancerkiller. killer. “ Colorectal Butititdoesn’t doesn’thave havetotobe. be.”” But Katie Couric, Co-Founder Katie Couric, Co-Founder EIF’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance EIF’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance

Photo by Andrew Eccles

Photo by Andrew Eccles

Colorectal cancer and precancerous polyps don’t always cause symptoms. So you can look healthy ■ Screening Colorectal polyps always cause symptoms. you so canthey lookcan healthy and feel cancer fine andand notprecancerous know there may be adon’t problem. helps find So polyps be ■ Screening ■ Screening and feel finebefore and not know may be a cancer. problem.This helpsyou findcan polyps so they can be removed they turnthere into colorectal is one cancer prevent! removed before they turncancer into colorectal cancer. This isoften oneleads cancer can■prevent! Screening can also find colorectal early, when treatment to you a cure. If you’re■50 or older, you really are the picture of health. Get screened fortocolorectal canmake also sure find colorectal cancer early, when treatment often leads a cure. ■cancer. If you’re 50 or older, make sure you really are the picture of health. Get screened for colorectal cancer.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF GSAMP 2002-HE2, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-HE2 P l a i n t i f f , � v . � VICTOR F. ESPINOSA, PILARITA G. ESPINOSA D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 17747 8530 WEST BROADMOOR Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 11, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 16, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8530 WEST BROADMOOR, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-115-024-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family r e s i d e n c e . � The judgment amount was $245,118.54. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 6 0 5 / 1 8 . 5 ( g - 1 ) . � IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES, 120 N. LASALLE STREET, SUITE 1140, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 239-3432. Please refer to file number 11IL02167-1. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I550040

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FIRST MIDWEST BANK, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO PALOS BANK & TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, -v.RONALD KOERBER, SHARON KOERBER, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA LIEN CLAIMANT PURSUANT TO LIENS RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. 0926526120 AND 0926526121, THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, LIEN CLAIMANT PURSUANT TO LIEN RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. 1020926017, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 35200 61 CARRIAGE TRAIL Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 3, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on September 5, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 61 CARRIAGE TRAIL, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 2325-110-018-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story residence. The judgment amount was $255,989.82. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Kimberly A. Padjen, GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC, 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410, CHICAGO, IL 60604, (312) 332-6194. Please refer to file number 44495. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410 CHICAGO, IL 60604 (312) 332-6194 Attorney File No. 44495 Attorney Code. 90334 Case Number: 11 CH 35200 TJSC#: 33-14844 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I546542

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � YAHYA HAMMOUDEH, FIRSTSECURE BANK & TRUST CO. AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UTA DTD 8/26/05 KNOWN AS TRUST NO. 10-865, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF FIRSTSECURE BANK & TRUST CO. AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UTA DTD 8/26/05 KNOWN AS TRUST NO. 10-865, FIFTH THIRD BANK S/I/I TO OLD KENT BANK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 13998 10541 SOUTH ASPEN DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 14, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 16, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10541 SOUTH ASPEN DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-105-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story single family home; two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1206850. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1206850 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 13998 TJSC#: 33-12219 I547809

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION GUIDANCE RESIDENTIAL, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MOHAMMAD M. MOSA, LINDA MOSA, 2004-0000384, LLC, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 043183 8746 S. 81ST AVENUE HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 18, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 22, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8746 S. 81ST AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-205-029. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-34967. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-34967 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 043183 TJSC#: 33-16049 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I550131

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION EVERBANK P l a i n t i f f , � v . � BAHAA HAMMOOD, HEBA HELMI D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 00499 7837 WEST 97TH STREET Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 7, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7837 WEST 97TH STREET, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-12-101-013-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $179,814.39. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 00499 TJSC#: 33-12431 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I535783

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For Sale

For Notice Sale

3

Thursday, July 25, 2013 Section 2

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION MIDFIRST BANK, P l a i n t i f f � V . � RUTA HARDIN A/K/A RUTA KHAN; NOORUN KHAN; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 3582 Property Address: 23 COUR MADELEINE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 11-049689 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 19, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on August 22, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 23 Cour Madeleine, Palos Hills, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � Permanent Index No.: 23-23-101-018 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 216,835.68. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I543304

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES 2004-R1 P l a i n t i f f , � v . � DAWN FRY AKA DAWN T. FRY, TONY FRY D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 18183 9348 SOUTH 87TH AVENUE HICKORY HILLS, IL 6 0 4 5 7 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 3, 2010, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 26, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 9348 SOUTH 87TH AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-302-037-0000. The real estate is improved with a brick house; attached 2 car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1009527. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1009527 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 18183 TJSC#: 33-14436 I546956

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For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � RBS CITIZENS NA P l a i n t i f f , � v . � NICK DESALVO, RIVIERA REGAL I CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, RIVIERA REGAL CONDOMINIUM UMBRELLA A S S O C I A T I O N � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 042220 11111 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT #2B PALOS HILLS, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 1, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 19, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11111 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT #2B, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-200-026-1034/1134, Property Index No. (23-23-200-016 Underlying). The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-29805. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-29805 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 042220 TJSC#: 33-11788 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I545057

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Operated by Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, LLC.

2x2 For Notice Sale Run 7 25 13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, -v.JAYNE SCHIRMACHER, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Defendants 12 CH 034505 15024 HUNTINGTON COURT ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 24, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 26, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15024 HUNTINGTON COURT, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-09-306-026. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-10752. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-10752 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 034505 TJSC#: 33-13680 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I545768

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Gentleman looking to rent For more information regarding financ-a room or apartment to share in ing, business opportunities and/or work-athomeSouthwest opportunities in this newspaper, we the Suburban area. urge our readers to contact theThanks. Better Busi$300-$400 per month. ness Bureau, 330 N. Wabash Ave. #2006,

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Seven inexpensive ways to update a home now    Oftentimes, buying a home opens up a bottomless pit of opportunities for projects and improvements. While some homeowners engage in different repairs and fixups out of necessity, many others like to freshen-up their spaces out of personal preference instead of need. But even the most well-intentioned projects can be waylaid if budgets are tight.    What many homeowners may not realize is that there are many ways to make updates and changes to a home that do not require a major overhaul or a large price tag. The following are seven projects that won’t break the bank.    1. Move around furniture. You may be able to change the look of a room without spending any money. Interior designers know how to arrange furniture for maximum appeal, but the average homeowner can do it, too. Find a focal point in the room and angle the furniture toward it. Don’t make the focal point the television, however. Try changing the placement of chairs and sofas. Simply moving a curio cabinet from one corner to another may also make a difference.    2. Add lighting. Lighting at different levels in the room can create a vibrant impact. Many homeowners mistakenly put in a couple of table lamps and think that will be adequate. However, properly illuminating a room means varying the lighting to create different moods at different times. Plus, more light can make a room feel more welcoming.    3. Add new pillows or drapes. Changing a few aspects of a room can give it an entirely new look. If you want to add a splash of color but don’t know what to do, think about incorporating some new throw pillows or change the curtains. An accessory here and there in a bright color also can incorporate a new hue without it being overwhelming.

   4. Change knobs or small accents. Give a room a new look by focusing on the small details. Switch out cabinet knobs for something updated and modern. Take inventory of wall outlets and light switches and think about selecting new ones that coordinate with your home decor.    5. Use plants. Empty corners or spots you’re not certain how to fill may benefit from a plant. Plants are inexpensive ways to add instant color and visual appeal to a room. Plus, having live plants can help improve indoor air by filtering out contaminants. A home with plants also feels more cozy.    6. Hang new wall art. It may be time to look at your photos and artwork and make a few adjustments. Finding new prints to hang could instantly change a room’s ambience. And you needn’t spend a lot of money on professional pho-

tography, either. Grab your camera and take a few close-up shots of flowers or take in a landscape scenery. Many of today’s home printers can produce professionalquality prints in minutes.    7. Try a new coat of paint. After you’ve exhausted other avenues, choosing a new paint color may be the new look you desire. Painting is one of the least expensive yet most dramatic methods of changing a home’s interior. With dozens of hues to choose from, and new apps that enable you to take snapshots of things in nature or in your life and match them up to a paint color, you will have scores of opportunities to explore fresh new colors for your home.    When you get inspired to make improvements to the home but fear how much it may take out of your wallet, consider inexpensive tricks that can induce a big “wow” factor.

For Sale

For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � WELLS FARGO BANK, NA P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ELAINE M. PIPIKIOS, RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, RIVIERA REGAL CONDOMINIUM UMBRELLA ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD C L A I M A N T S � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 043786 11134 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT #3B PALOS HILLS, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 22, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 30, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11134 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT #3B, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-101-116-1106. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-35320. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-35320 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 043786 TJSC#: 33-10903 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I546332

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF NOVEMBER 1, 2005, FREMONT HOME LOAN TRUST 2005-D Plaintiff, -v.WAYNE A. ADAMS A/K/A WAYNE ADAMS, MARJORIE D. ADAMS A/K/A MARJORIE ADAMS, CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Defendants 09 CH 028039 12401 S. 91ST AVENUE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 8, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 9, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12401 S. 91ST AVENUE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 2327-402-007. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-24045. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-09-24045 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 028039 TJSC#: 33-15704 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I548621

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION MARQUETTE BANK Plaintiff, -v.MAUREEN A. GAVIN A/K/A MAUREEN M. GAVAN A/K/A MAUREEN M. GAVIN, MAUREEN M. GAVAN, A TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED FEBRUARY 6, 2008 AND KNOWN AS THE MAUREEN M. GAVAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST DATED AUGUST 15, 2008 , BROOK HILLS TOWNHOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 16654 17302 LAKEBROOK DRIVE Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 18, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 30, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17302 LAKEBROOK DRIVE, Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-30415-041-0000. The real estate is improved with a two-story townhouse. The judgment amount was $154,054.65. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Kimberly A. Padjen, GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC, 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410, CHICAGO, IL 60604, (312) 332-6194. Please refer to le number 44945. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410 CHICAGO, IL 60604 (312) 332-6194 Attorney File No. 44945 Attorney Code. 90334 Case Number: 12 CH 16654 TJSC#: 33-11606 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I546359

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For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB P l a i n t i f f , � v . � VALERIE SLACK A/K/A VALERIE BENNECKE SLACK A/K/A VALERIE L BENNECKE A/K/A VALERIE L BENNECKE SLACK, EDWARD SLACK A/K/A EDWARD F SLACK, FIFTH THIRD BANK (CHICAGO), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 42063 9220 SOUTH 85TH COURT HICKORY HILLS, IL 6 0 4 5 7 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 24, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 27, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 9220 SOUTH 85TH COURT, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-314-013-0000. The real estate is improved with a one story single family home with a two car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1222725. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1222725 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 42063 TJSC#: 33-13046 I546981

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION REGIONS BANK, P l a i n t i f f � V . � JOHN E. DETHMER; NANCY DETHMER A/K/A NANCY L. DETHMER; BAYTREE LENDING COMPANY F/K/A ST. FRANCIS MORTGAGE CORPORATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN O C C U P A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 23265 Property Address: 9647 WOODED PATH PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 12-060579 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on May 30, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on September 3, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 9647 Wooded Path, Palos Hills, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � Permanent Index No.: 23-10-207-009-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 160,080.47. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I542438

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CASTLE PEAK 2012-1 LOAN TRUST; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � GLEE T. HIBBELER; D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 19238 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on May 28, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 29, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 12819 South Shoshone Road, Palos Heights, IL 60463. P.I.N. 23-36-210-004-0000. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, PO Box 165028, Columbus, Ohio 43216-5028. (614) 220-5611. 1 2 0 0 4 1 2 8 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I549709

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ROBERT J. COLEMAN, DELL FINANCIAL SERVICES L.L.C. D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 044171 7813 W. 98TH STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 20, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 22, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 7813 W. 98TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-12-104-014. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-35726. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-35726 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 044171 TJSC#: 33-13139 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I545164

House for sale? Call to place your ad today!

For Sale Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MASTR ASSET BACKED SECURITIES TRUST 2006-WMC3, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WMC3 Plaintiff, -v.AGNIESZKA RUSIN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., WMC MORTGAGE CORP., CAMBRIDGE IN THE HILLS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 09 CH 008734 8100 W. 87TH STREET UNIT #2H HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 15, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 19, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8100 W. 87TH STREET UNIT #2H, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 18-35-407-091-1014, Property Index No. 18-35-407-091-1039. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-04858. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-09-04858 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 008734 TJSC#: 33-12727 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you Publisher’s Notice are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be    aAll debt collector to collect debt Real Estateattempting advertising in thisanewsand any information obtained will be used for that paper is subject to the Fair Housing Act purpose. which makes it illegal to advertise “any I544991

preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under Publisher’s Notice the age of 18 living with parents or legal    All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper custodians, pregnant women and people is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes securing children under 18. it illegal tocustody advertise of “any preference, limitaor discrimination.” Familial includesac tion   This newspaper will not status knowingly children under the age of 18 living with parents cept any advertising for women real estate which or legal custodians, pregnant and people securing custodyof of the children 18. is in violation law. under Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings adver   This newspaper will not knowingly accept any tised in this newspaper are advertising for real estate which is inavailable violation ofon the equal law. Ouropportunity readers are herby informed that all an basis. To complain dwellings advertised in this newspaper are availof discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 able on an equal opportunity basis. To complain (800) 669-9777.callThe telephone of discrimination HUDtoll-free toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. for Thethe toll-free telephone number the number hearing impaired isfor 1 (800) hearing impaired is 1 (800) 927-9275. 927-9275.

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST AGREEMENT FOR THE S T R U C T U R E D � ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE P A S S � THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-8 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � KATARZYNA SZATKOWSKA; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., D/B/A AMERICA'S SERVICING COMPANY; M O R T G A G E � ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S � D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 3511 PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on April 26, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-23-101-116-1048. Commonly known as 11114 South 84th Avenue, Unit 3B, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F12010307 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I549684

Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � NABIL F KATIB A/K/A NABIL KATIB A/K/A NABIL F SALAH, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 34017 8804 WEST 89TH STREET Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 17, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on August 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8804 WEST 89TH STREET, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-03-204-053-0000. The real estate is improved with a 1 story home with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1215436. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1215436 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 34017 TJSC#: 33-13476 I546756


The Regional News - The Reporter

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Thursday, July 25, 2013 Section 2

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LOOKING FOR... Jackie Mohr, Shepard High School, class of 1980. Contact C. Sands, Shepard High School at: (708) 371-1111

For Sale Three plots at Evergreen Cemetery, Evergreen Park. $1,800 each, $5,000 for all three, plus transfer fees. Contact Charles Lange at (217) 793-9760. FLOOR TILE 490 sq. ft. of 12” x 12” glazed ceramic floor tile. Ice Cap Brown (light brown). Will sell individually or all together. $.75 per tile. Please TEXT or call Call (708) 921-8056 The original Nordic Track Sequoia ski machine/cross country skier. Sturdy solid pine framing with redwood finish, adjustable arm and leg resistance and monitor. Folds down for storage. Barely used, excellent condition. $100. Call (708) 458-9233 leave message

Tools, furniture. 8937 S. Moody Oak Lawn

thursday & FRIday JuLY 25th & 26th 9 A.M. to 3 P.M. & SATURDAY, JULY 27th 8 A.M. to 12 P.M. 4337 W. 107th Street Oak Lawn

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ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

Help Wanted

FULL TIME REPORTER

The Regional News has an opening for a full-time general assignment reporter. Duties include writing news and feature stories; covering police news, local governments, school boards and community events; online journalism; photography and basic videography. Must have reliable transportation. Bachelor’s degree in journalism, and two years work experience at college or other newspaper is required. Familiarity with our circulation area is beneficial. Compensation includes competitive salary, health insurance and other benefits package. Send resume, cover letter and clips to: The Regional News 12247 S. Harlem Ave. theregional@comcast.net

Help Wanted

Situation Wanted

Small family owned and operated Intern wanted limousine company seeking drivers. Experience helpful but not This newspaper is looking for an advertising intern candidate to do necessary. some computer office work, appointment setting, etc. Call (708) 839-1098 Experienced cleaning lady wanted for immediate start. Must be licensed driver with dependable vehicle. Good pay. Call (708) 636-4030

If interested, please call Val at: (708) 448-4000

Wanted

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Cars • Trucks • Vans Runing OR Not Top Dollar Paid Call (708) 205-8241

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Run 7 18 13 Garage sale to help haitian missions

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Garage Sale 4 Family Garage sale FRIday & SATURDAY JuLY 26th & 27th 9 A.M. to 3 P.M.

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Classmates

Your Message Gets Across Better in the WANT ADS!

Wanted to Buy Older Chevy Astro van in reasonbly good running condition. Must have 2 rear doors (not 3). Call Tim or Pat B. at (708) 448-4000

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Landscaping

WANTED: LIFE AGENTS; Earn $500 a Day; Great Agent Benefits; Commissions Paid Daily; Liberal Underwriting; Leads, Leads, Leads LIFE INSURANCE LICENSE REQUIRED. Call 1-888-713-6020

LEGAL SERVICES

REAL ESTATE/ HOMES FOR SALE Low/No Down Programs Free Credit Counseling FHA/VA/USDA Paula Wykoff NMLS#137830 Premier Home Mtg NMLS#162291 217-522-5191 919 S 8th Springfield, IL 62703 Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee EHL

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Section 2 Thursday, July 25, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

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Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, July 25, 2013

‘Young Guns’ ride strong after a quarter century by Jase Howell     Twenty-five years ago, Billy the Kid and the Regulators hit the Silver Screen and made an enormous impact on the Western genre with “Young Guns.”     The film, an enjoyable film but by no stretch a masterpiece — more of a guilty pleasure, actually — still has legions of fans, many of whom consider the 1988 action-packed depiction of the Lincoln County Wars to be one of the best shoot ’em up cowboy flicks of all time. Putting Emilio Estevez on the Mt. Rushmore of famous gunslingers along the likes of Clint Eastwood John Wayne and Gary Cooper may be a stretch, but the lasting popularity of the film a quarter of a century later certainly says something about a film that wasn’t expected to do much.     Indeed, “Young Guns” barely made it to the big screen — in 1988 none of the major studios were interested in Westerns. In fact, for the entire decade of the ’80s you can scrape together maybe a handful of quality cowboy flicks. Cop-buddy films set in urban areas, with machine guns and massive explosions, ruled the theaters in the days of “Lethal Weapon” and “Die Hard,” and no one was looking to invest greatly in saloons and six-shooters.     Yet, somehow, a paltry $13 million was shelled out by 20th Century Fox and Morgan Creek Productions for “Young Guns” (Morgan Creek’s first production). Dropped in the late summer — never a sign of confidence from a studio — the film many critics at the time referred to as the “Brat Pack Western” pulled in a surprising $45 million domestically. The Brat Pack stigma may have turned off some critics from the start, and certainly Western purists would never be quite won over; but “Young Guns” revived

the cowboy action flick by introducing and selling it to a brand new audience. “The Unforgiven” and “Dances with Wolves” are often credited with resuscitating the Old West on the Silver Screen, but “Young Guns” was actually clearing the road for those later films.     The film takes place in 1878 New Mexico Territory, where a war to be the largest cattle baron is being waged between John Tunstall (Terence Stamp) and Lawrence Murphy (Jack Palance). Of course, this is not just cattle-ranching business, but animosity from across the pond between the Irishman Murphy and Englishman Tunstall.     For his ranch hands, Tunstell has put together a pack of young misfits and runaways, whom he educates and cares for as a sort of father figure. The newcomer in early scenes is William H. Bonney (Emilio Estevez) the latest hoodlum to join the ranch, and the film wastes little time in showing his quickness with a pistol. We meet the rest of the crew: Richard “Dick” Brewer (Charlie Sheen) a self-appointed leader of the gang; Josiah Gordon “Doc” Scurlock, the only member to have an education before joining the Tunstall Ranch; and Jose Chavez y Chavez (Lou Diamond Philips), the dangerous knife smith and spiritual leader of the group. We also have Charles “Charley” Boudre (Casey Seimaszko), the pugilist, and Dirty Steve Stephens (Dermot Mulroney), whose moniker is self-explanatory.     The rivalry between the ranchers continues to escalate until Murphy has his henchmen gun down Tunstall in front of his boys. The hot tempered young men are hell-bent on revenge, led by Bonney, who though being the newcomer either takes it the worst or is just looking for a

fight — the film suggests a bit of both. Tunstall’s good friend and lawyer, Alex O’Sween (Terry O’Quinn), reluctantly deputizes the gang and they boys are off and running. It isn’t long before the wrong people are killed and the gang is stripped of its badges and become the hunted.     The plot, like many a great Western, is pretty simplistic and as often the case just predicated on pure old-fashioned revenge. With the hip young actors and slick look it may be easy to think the film goes over the top with embellishments, but it’s actually rather grounded in reality. Certainly the dialogue is much quicker and wittier than these chaps were likely to have been, and several scenes including a mescaline trip to the spirit world are most likely Fusco’s imagination, but most of the action was already in the history books. Director Christopher Cain did a solid job of capturing the New Mexico landscape, and excels in handling the gunplay.     The veterans such as Stamp and the late Palance most likely needed little guidance, but the film was resting on the shoulders of the young cast, most of whom had already had some success but were looking to cement themselves major players. The actors here all deliver and that is the biggest reason “Young Guns” is still more than relevant 25 years later. The chemistry is there from start to finish and without it, all the shootouts in the world wouldn’t have elevated this film to the heights it achieved; after all, vengeance is the motive, but loyalty and friendship form the bedrock.     The actors may not have solidified the success the wanted after the film became a hit, but for this film they were pretty much perfect as the Regulators. Siemaszko has the pugilist role down perfectly and manages to steal some laughs and prove his

grit when riding out with the gang after getting married. Siemaszko may have been seen little before the film and even less after, but his portrayal of Charley Boudre will live a long time.     Mulroney doesn’t have much in Dirty Steve, mostly because the character is just not very bright, in a film with some unforgettable dialogue Mulroney sees very little. Mulroney is still very adept at just being there on screen, he landed a big role in 1993’s “My Best Friend’s Wedding” and he did parlay this in to much more than a lot of films and TV appearances.     Charlie Sheen continues to be the most erratic actor in the history of film, strike that, he just may be the most erratic human being on the planet. Here in “Young Guns” he was the most restrained character, arguably his greatest stretch to date as a thespian. He somehow manages to keep getting roles — I don’t think his father and brother even understand it.     Lou Diamond Philips was already riding a hot streak coming into “Young Guns” having starred in “Stand and Deliver” and “La

Bamba.” His star would fall at a rather quick pace after a succession of poor choices in scripts, but he still pops up occasionally to remind people he is still alive and looking for work. His last headlining role was for the forgotten horror film, “Bats.”     Kiefer Sutherland was also riding high coming into “Guns” after attracting attention in “Stand By Me” and “The Lost Boys,” but he would have ups and downs in role choices but never really has left the A-list. His biggest role to date came courtesy of Fox’s “24” as Jack Bauer.     Lastly, of course, is the biggest star of “Young Guns,” Emilio Estevez. Granted, this is an ensemble cast, but anyone who has seen “Young Guns” or its ill-advised sequel can attest there is no stopping Emilio when he is in Billy the Kid mode. As great as the performances are all around him, he still manages to stand a foot above the pack. Estevez, who at one time was a good actor, may have done his best work playing the Kid, at any rate he certainly seemed to have the most fun. The script had the snappy dialogue built in, but Estevez made it his

role with the trademark smirk and cackle.A scene in the film where he gets the drop on a bounty hunter looking for him is all you need to see of one the most entertaining cowboy characters to grace the screen. True to the actual William H. Bonney? Who cares? The Kid was an unstoppable force for the gang in the film. Estevez was the same on the screen.     Western fans can always have entertaining debates on the baddest of the villains the quickest and deadliest of the heroes, and of course what rates as a truly great cowboy film. Considering what this young cast put together; a hit cowboy film when there wasn’t on to be found. A new generation that became enamored with Old West.     “Young Guns” put a fresh look on the classics, but still reveled in themes of the greats, all the way down to the sentimental denoument involving the inscription of “Pals” on a tombstone that isn’t any cornier than a hero riding off into the sunset. “Young Guns” was the perfect cast at the perfect time. One of the greats? Definitely, but don’t hold out for any Lou Diamond Phillips sculptures.

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Whiting’s Pierogi Fest returns     Just days after Trip Advisor named Pierogi Fest one of its top ten wackiest festivals; Pierogi Fest is receiving acclaim and interest from Yahoo.com and TruTV.     Yahoo has announced that it will feature the festival on its home page in conjunction with its “Blue Ribbon Hunter,” which is part food show, part travelogue. The online show features Chef Allison Fishman Task, who travels to food festivals all across America featuring the very best in Blue Ribbon-winning cuisine. The program will be at the festival filming all three days, cov-

ering the parade, polka contest, the Pierogi Eating Contest, the Halupky Cook-off, and finding the most unique Pierogi at the festival.     TruTV’s hit show “Hardcore Pawn: Chicago” has announced plans to participate in the parade and to make an appearance at the festival. The show features brothers Wayne and Randy Cohen (also Wayne’s son Nate and Randy’s daughter Elyse) who run the Royal Pawn Shop in Chicago’s Loop.     The 19th annual Pierogi Fest is held along 119th Street in Downtown Whiting, Ind., and is orga-

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nized by the Whiting-Robertsdale Chamber of Commerce.     The festival features more than 75 food vendors with almost 750 menu choices, 100 arts and crafts booths, dozens of specialty vendors, four entertainment stages and the most bizarre parade in the Midwest.     The festival begins this Friday, July 26, from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday, July 27, from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, July 28, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.     For more information, contact the Whiting-Robertsdale Chamber of Commerce at (219) 6590292.

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Autism Speaks - Chicago Chapter Night! (All tickets are $10.00 with 50% of ticket sales being donated to Autism Speaks - Chicago Chapter. Jersey Off the Back Night sponsored by Jeff Vukovich Nationwide Insurance Agent). $1.25 domestic draft beers & $2.25 domestic bottles.

Series continues on Friday, July 26th at 7:05p.m.

Diamond Dig sponsored by J.U.L.I.E. - “Diamond courtesy of Killelea Jewelers in Midlothian.” $1.25 domestic draft beers & $2.25 domestic bottles.

Saturday, July 27th at 6:05p.m. - Post Game Fireworks courtesy of Flexeon Rehabilitation.

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8 Section 2

Thursday, July 25, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

99th Street Summer Theatre presents ‘Shrek, the Musical!’     99th Street Summer Theatre presents, in its 35th Anniversary Season, Shrek, the Musical! today, Thursday, this, Friday, July 26, and Saturday, July 27, at 8 p.m.     Tickets are $20 and $16 for senior citizens.     The musical features residents from Orland Park, Palos Park and Palos Hills: Damaris King (Palos Hills) plays the lead role of Donkey, Sarah Callis (Orland Park) plays the Fairy Godmother, Ernest Crossley (Palos Heights) plays Tweedle D Dum, Jill Lekow (Orland Park) plays the Sugar Plum Fairy, Jessica Pedroza (Orland Park) plays the Shoemaker’s Elf, Rob Sorenson (Orland Park) plays the Big Bad Wolf, Melissa Trentacoste (Palos) plays Snow White.     Tickets are on sale now. For reservations call (773) 881-6512.     The Broadway hit Shrek, the Musical! will make its premiere on the south side of Chicago on

Mother McAuley’s stage. When Shrek and his companion, Donkey, set out to rescue the princess Fiona from a castle guarded by a fire-breathing and lonely dragon, they quickly find out the mission is not what they expected. Told through the eyes of a grumpy ogre in a magical land, Shrek, the Musical! brings an exciting new twist to the tale of true love.     Leading the talented cast is Patrick Mooney (Oak Lawn) as Shrek. Mooney is the music director at St. Alexander Church in Palos Heights. The veteran 99th Street performer will share the stage with Damaris King (Palos Hills), who will play Donkey. Long-time 99th Street actress Erin Fitzpatrick (Lockport) will take on the role of Princess Fiona. Other cast members include Sarah Haskins (Beverly) as Queen Lillian; Dave Guido (Beverly) as King Harold; Andy Lambros (Chicago) as Lord Farquaad; Frankie

Zabilka (Lemont) as Pinnochio; Kim Brines (Beverly) as Dragon; Alix Solis (Beverly) as Gingy; Jill Lekow (Orland Park) as the Sugar Plum Fairy.     Shrek, the Musical! is under the direction of Patricia Haynes, 99th Street Summer Theatre Manager and Director. Musical Direction was done by Stacy Cunningham and Rose DeSanto; choreography by Michael Gutrich; Technical Direction by Tom Moster and Set Design by Katie McCasland.     99th Street Summer Theatre was brought to life in 1978. Since its inception, the program has continually brought members of the community together in the production of exciting and captivating shows. Now in its 35th season, 99th Street Summer Theatre has produced more than 50 musicals, and has sent former members on to successful careers in theatre throughout Chicagoland and the country.

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Broaden Your Horizons This week Womantalk discussion     The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, will host its monthly Womantalk coffee hour and discussion on Tuesday, July 30, from 10 to 11:30 a.m.     Ladies are invited to join the discussion of “Simple Abundance” and other readings by Sarah Ban Breathnach. There is no cost, but reservations are required.     Ladies are invited to bring a picnic lunch if they would like to stay after the discussion. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Blown glass ornament workshops at McCord     Glass artists John Landin and Elektra Musich will teach two workshops at the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center this Sunday, July 28.     Students will learn how to make beautiful glass ornaments to decorate the home or to give as gifts. A torch will be used to heat glass tubes filled with beautiful colors and the tubes will then be blown into one-of-a-kind wonders. This is a great activity for friends and family. No glass experience is necessary to participate.     Tuition per class is $65 for member of McCord and $75 for non-members. All materials are included in the cost of the class. There will be one workshop 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and another 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.     McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange Road), Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648 or visit Mccordgallery.org.

Submitted photo

The Children’s Farm is open weekends throughout summer     The Children’s Farm at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park is open from 1 to 4 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday this summer.     Family visitors to the farm can tour the barns and see and touch the chicks, ducklings, goats, cows, pigs, ponies, sheep, bunnies, horses and donkeys. Visitors experience the life of the farm. Complimentary pony rides and hayrides are offered, weather permitting, and when the racks are not in use bringing in hay from the fields.     Here, Roseann Cozzie pets Bella the donkey at the Children’s Farm. Roseann is one of many volunteers who help family visitors see, touch, and learn about the animals on Saturday and Sunday afternoons at the farm.     Admission to the farm is $5 per person, or by a $75 annual family pass. No reservations are required on the weekends from 1 to 4 p.m. The farm is also open for group tours on weekdays and birthday parties on weekend mornings, by reservation. For more information, visit thecenterpalos.org, or call The Center at 361-3650.

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‘West Side’   in the Southwest     Megan Arseneau portrays Maria and Ian Black is Tony in the Oak Lawn Park District Theatre’s production of “West Side Story,” which will run at Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St., at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2 and 9 and Saturday, Aug. 3 and 10. Shows will also be Sunday, Aug. 4 and 11 at 3 p.m. Tickets are available at Oak View Center. Prices are $22 for adults, $21 for seniors and children 12 years and under. To order tickets or for more information call 857-2200.

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Reporter(2 sections) 7 25 13