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Tony Pinto reviews the new Spider-Man film that is sweeping the nation See the Out and About section

R E P O R T E R REPORTER

THE THE 3 SECTIONS 56 PAGES

Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

Volume LV No. 9

Congratulations THE to all our area graduates! Special Section Inside 2 SECTIONS 22 PAGES

Volume XLVII No. 50

Your Villain My Hero, above, will be one of a host of local groups to play during RidgeFest or the Centennial Weekend Kevin M. Coyne reports, page 3

R EPORT ER Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

Seventh half marathon low on numbers but was high on energy

which bills itself as the premier athletic event in the southwest suburbs, struggled in recent months with financial uncertainty, concerns about security, a slow start in attracting volunteers, and an unseasonably cold winter that severely limited training opportunities for runners throughout the Midwest.   Yet as predicted repeatedly by event co-founder and co-director Jeff Prestinario, of Palos Heights, all the right elements gelled by race day and resulted in success.   “I hope this race goes on and on for years to come,” said Palos Park resident Beth Ann Mayhugh, one of hundreds of people who lined College Drive to cheer on family, friends and neighbors competing. “It pro-

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Thursday, March 1, 2007

motes the sport, it promotes physical activity, and it’s held in my back yard. I hope they expand it next year and add a fun run for kids.”    Palos Heights Mayor Robert Straz, who helped welcome runners and just over an hour later helped hold the tape hit by Half Marathon winner Ryan Giuliano, of Oakwood Hills, agreed with the upbeat assessment.   “This has been a great day and a successful event,” he said. “A lot of people who otherwise might not come out this way got to see the beauty of this area.”    Earlier, Straz told the gathering, “Many of you come from north or northwest. We want you to know that this is not (Continued on page 5)

Violet Kooyenga, daughter of Palos East teacher Cathi Kooyenga, cheers the runners on at the start of the half marathon race on Sunday.

End of the line Toy trains sound off for last time at Snackville Junction

By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter   Cari Malone leaned on the counter between serving orders at Snackville Junction Saturday afternoon, just hours before the iconic restaurant closed for the final time.    Malone, a freshman at Moraine Valley Community College, was about to lose her first job, which she’s held for the past two years. She said she’d missed the job, the restaurant and many regular customers.    Malone and her colleague, Lucy Perez, spent the day doing what they’ve done on so many other

weekends. They served customers by placing lunch orders—hamburgers, hot dogs and other entrees—on a model train that traversed a track that ran the length of the lunch counter.   The choo-choo train was the focal point of the railroad-themed restaurant and delighted children of all ages when a whistle sounded and the engine emerged from the kitchen carrying a basket of food.   A steady crowd filled the Evergreen Park diner throughout the day, including families who Photo by Bob Rakow wanted their small children to enjoy Snackville Junction a final Cari Malone stands behind the counter at Snackville Junction Saturday afternoon during the final hours of her last shift at the Evergreen Park diner, which closed its doors after being open more (Continued on page 11) than 60 years in Beverly and Evergreen Park.

Good time to head for Hills

Palos Hills ranked one of safest cities in state By Kelly White Correspondent

Police News........................2 Our Neighborhood.............4 Sudoku.............................4 Commentary.....................6 Death Notices......................7 Crossword.........................7 School...........................8 & 9 Calendar..........................10 Consumer.........................11 Photo by Jeff Vorva

Jeff Vorva...........................3 Bob Rakow..........................6 Wine Guy..........................12

USPS 118-690

It was seventh heaven

INDEX

COLUMNISTS

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Photos by Jeff Vorva

  Like a long-distance runner who lags early but finishes with a burst to win a race, the First Midwest Bank Half Marathon overcame challenges and hit the tape in triumph last Sunday.   The seventh annual event,

Vorva takes a lighthearted look at the half marathon on page 3 and Rakow has an insightful take on how mothers who have lost their children feel on Mother’s Day on page 6

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Chicago Ridge’s Tyrone Meeks, left photo, flashes a peace sign while Oak Lawn’s Donna Marie Ivers is all smiles after crossing the finish line in the seventh First Midwest Bank Half Marathon event Sunday in Palos Heights and Palos Park. For more stories and photos see page 3 and 4 and the sports section.

By Tim Hadac Staff reporter

Mayors Mike Howley of Hickory Hills and Jerry Bennett of Palos Hills drop by the historic opening day celebration of the merged Hills Baseball Softball Association Page 5

USPS 118-690

Oh, say, I can’t see

   Members of the youth soccer Estudiantes Inter FC squad line up with Stagg High School players during the National Anthem last Wednesday before a match with Sandburg and one young player wanted to see what was going on. Sandburg beat Stagg, 3-1 in the match to wrap up a Southwest Suburban Conference Blue title. For more photos see sports.

had to have a population of over 5,000 as of 2012 and needed to show data regarding both violent Palos Hills residents can sleep and property crimes, according soundly knowing their city was to FBI statistics from 2012. Saferanked one of the top 25 of Il- Wise then analyzed the number linois’ safest. of violent crimes (aggravated The SafeWise Report released assault, forcible rape, murder, a top 50 list in Illinois and Palos robbery) and property crimes, Hills made the list right in the (arson, burglary, larceny-theft, middle, ranked 25th of the safest motor vehicle theft) and then cities to live in Illinois. calculated the chance of these “We really have our police de- crimes happening out of 1,000 in partment to thank,” Alderman order to level the playing field Joe Marrotta said at Thursday’s for the different populations of city council meeting. “I would each city. like to say thank you to our Palos Hills has no reported police chief [Paul Madigan] and rapes or murders in the FBI’s all of our police officers.” most recent crime statistics and The SafeWise Report was con- shows a record of 7.97 property ducted through most recent FBI crimes per 1,000 and .34 violent Crime Reports along with in- crimes per 1,000. dependent research from home “With statistics like that it is security websites to compile the obvious that the hard working list. To meet the criteria, a city officers of Palos Hills are doing

a fine job,” Marrotta added. Madigan and the Palos Hills Police Department sponsor a robust selection of programs and services to attempt to keep the community and its members from harm. Officers work in local schools as part of the G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education and Training) program. The program was designed as an immunization against delinquency, youth violence, and gang membership, working with young children in the crucial years before gang involvement usually starts. Other programs include assistance for the elderly and free child car seat safety inspections. Mayor Jerry Bennett agreed the police department does an outstanding job, not only pro(Continued on page 3)


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The Reporter Thursday, May 8, 2014

POLICE / LOCAL NEWS

Chicago Ridge

suspended license April 30 after being stopped at 95th Street and Western Avenue, police said. ***    Corey Ewing, 31, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended license April 30 after a stop in the 3100 block of Western Avenue, police said.

  Paul Abrams, 41, of Oak Lawn, was charged with trespassing May 1 after allegedly refusing to leave Lucky’s Lounge, 6605 W. 95th St., police said. ***    Matthew R. Paciga, 22, of Chicago Ridge, was charged with driving to fast for conditions, no insurance, leaving the scene of an accident and failure to   Elias Romero, 26, of Hickory report an accident May 2 after Hills, was charged with driving striking a landscaped area at on a suspended license May 4 107th Street and Menard Av- after a stop in the 7800 block of enue, police said. 95th Street, police said. *** ***    Layla Enriquez, 24, and Juan   David W. Jouravleff, 27, of Lopez, 24, both of Chicago, was Bridgeview, was charged with charged with retail theft May retail theft May 5 after he al4 after allegedly stealing mer- legedly stole merchandise from chandise from Kohl’s at Chicago Walgreens, 7945 W. 95th St., Ridge Mall, police said. police said. ***    Ricardo Rumo, 31, of Chicago Ridge, was charged with driving on a suspended license, failure to signal and no seatbelt May 4 after a stop at 93rd Street    Steven J. Lisak, 21, of Worth, and Harlem Avenue, police said. was charged with possession of a controlled substance April 17 after a stop at in the 4900 block of 105th Street, police said. ***   A television and computer    Kevin F. Proszek, 41, of Tinley were reported stolen April 22 Park, was charged with posses- from a house in the 9600 block sion of a controlled substance of East Shore Drive. and drug equipment April 26 *** after a stop at 95th Street and    Andre M. King, 24, of Calumet Western Avenue, police said. Park, was charged with retail *** theft April 23 after reportedly    Karla M. Lee, 24, of Chicago, stealing merchandise from Tarwas charged with driving on a get, 4120 W. 95th St., police said. suspended license April 28 after *** a stop at 91st Street and West-   A car was reported stolen ern Avenue, police said. April 24 from a parking lot at *** 87th Street and Cicero Avenue,   Marek Serocki, 44, of Oak police said. Lawn, was charged with driving *** on a suspended license April 29    A catalytic convertor allegedly after he was stopped in the 3400 was stolen April 25 from a car block of 99th Street, police said. in the 5100 block of Museum *** Drive, police said.   Randy K. Johnson, 38, of *** University Park, was charged   Kevin M. Whitworth, 33, of with driving on a driving on a Oak Lawn, was charged with

Hickory Hills

Oak Lawn

Evergreen Park

THE

possession of a controlled substance, drug paraphernalia and a hypodermic needle April 26 following a stop at 92nd Street and Pulaski Road, police said. ***    Laura Caruso, 49, of Orland Park, was charged with possession of drug equipment and a hypodermic needle and obstructing a police officer April 26 after a disturbance the Miami Motel, 9041 S. Cicero Ave., police said. ***    Tools valued at approximately $1,000 allegedly were stolen April 30 from truck parked in the lot of Home Depot, 4060 W. 95th St. ***   A wallet containing $1,800 was reported stolen April 30 from the shopping cart of a customer at the Salvation Army store, 8732 S. Cicero Ave. ***   Christian A. Calo, 22, of Bridgeview, was charged with retail theft May 1 after reportedly stealing merchandise from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said. ***    Kevin M. Mueller, 28, of Chicago Ridge, was charged with retail theft May 1 after he allegedly climbed over a counter at Jewel-Osco, 4650 W. 103rd St., where the smaller bottles of liquor kept, police said. Mueller allegedly opened a bottle of alcohol and began drinking from it. He refused to stop drinking and said he had no way to pay for the alcohol, police said. ***    Leah A. Dampier, 41, of Blue Island, was charged with retail theft May 2 after reportedly stealing goods from Target,

4120 W. 95th St., police said. ***   A change purse containing $50 allegedly was stolen May 4 from the cart of a customer at Fairplay Foods, 8700 S. Cicero Ave. ***    Kelly A. Greenan, 20, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft May 4 after allegedly stealing goods from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said.

Palos Hills    A BMX bike was reported stolen May 1 from the 8600 block of 103rd Street. ***    Ezell Washington, 26, of Lake in the Hills, was charged with speeding and having a defective windshield May 2 after being stopped in the 9000 block of 111th Street where he was traveling at 102 miles per hour, police said. ***    Oscar Gallardo, 32, of Homer Glen, was charged with drunken

driving, speeding and improper lane use following a stop May 4 in the 111th Street and Southwest Highway, police said.

Worth    Dennis Russell, 50, of Worth, was charged with domestic battery April 27 after a disturbance in the 11600 block of Harlem Avenue, police said.

***    Matias Reyes, 29, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended license April 29 after a stop at Harlem Avenue and Southwest Highway, police said. Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

Homeless man allegedly hits man with a stick    A homeless man was charged with aggravated assault, battery, theft and criminal assault last Friday morning during an altercation under the Southwest Highway overpass, police said.   Przemyslawr Leleweiz, 34, of Oak Lawn, was charged at 6:48 a.m. following an argument with several other homeless men who

loiter under the overpass near Ridgeland Avenue, according to reports.   Lelewicz allegedly produced a knife and demanded drugs before striking another man with a stick, police said. The disturbance was over when police arrived. — Bob Rakow

Spa client allegedly throws in the towel    An Oak Lawn man was charged Saturday with indecent exposure after removing his towel at a spa, police.    Essa H. Wasili, 31, was charged at about 6 p.m. shortly after he allegedly removed the towel and exposed his genitals to a massage therapist at Lamour Salon and Spa, 8826 S. Cicero Ave., Oak Lawn, according to reports.   The therapist told police that Wasili was read the spa rules,

which prohibit nudity during a massage. Wasili said he understood the rules and signed a release.    During the massage, he allegedly began to turn onto his back but was told by the therapist to remain on his stomach. He allegedly refused, removed the towel and exposed himself to her. She placed the towel over him and reminded him that nudity was not allowed.

   He again allegedly removed the towel and started at the therapist while smiling before walking into the hallway. He returned to the room and closed the door when he was told police were called, reports said.    Wasili was issued a trespassing warning and told that the spa did not want him to return. He refused to speak with police, saying, “I don’t understand.” — Bob Rakow

REPORTER

Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jeff Vorva Sports Editor Ken Karrson Graphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora Advertising Sales Val Draus To advertise call (708) 448-6161 To subscribe call (708) 448-6161 / Fax (708) 448-4012 Website: TheReporterOnline.net e-Mail: thereporter@comcast.net

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Ex-cops give out warnings to business owners

The Reporter is published weekly by the Regional Publishing Corp. 12247 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon

  Michael Tardi, left photo, and Bob Troy, right, are a pair of former Hickory Hills police officers who now working in security for the Standard Bank and Trust Company. They gave a presentation on Identity Theft and Fraud Schemes to guests of the Hills Chamber Network Luncheon last Wednesday at Prime Time Restaurant in Hickory Hills.

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Orland auto repair shop accused of dumping septic waste into sewer

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Orland Park police said last week that the owners of a local auto repair shop have admitted illegally discharging toilet and sink waste into a storm sewer that leads into a nearby pond for the last three or four years. Kamal Khuntia, 62, and his wife, Tami P. Khuntia, 54, both of Mokena, are charged with two misdemeanor counts of hazardous waste discharge and causing water pollution. The couple owns Sparks Complete Auto Care, 9544 W. 159th St.,

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-22-14, a sale will be held at Three Brothers Hernandez, 3045 S. Kilbourne Avenue, Chicago, IL. 60623, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. LDS Foods & Aable License Consul 2000 International VIN# 1HSCBAHRXYJ1063149 Lien Amount: $4,336.00

Orland Park. They told police they have owned the business since 1986, and that it has been in its current location since about 2006. Tami Khuntia is a past president of the Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce. Police said that on April 8, they were called to assist a village public works official, as well as an investigator from the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District, at the scene. The MWRD had been alerted to the situation by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, police said. MWRD surveillance photos reportedly showed that the effluent from the auto repair shop’s septic tank had been pumped into a nearby storm sewer, which flowed downhill for about a block before emptying into a pond about a block to the northwest, adjacent to the Potbelly Sandwich Shop at 15825 S. La Grange Road. When questioned by police, the Khuntias reportedly said they were

unaware that they were doing anything illegal, police said. They explained that the shop’s septic tank backs up during heavy rain, police said. They said they had complained about the situation years ago to their landlord, who did not fix the problem but instead advised them to hire a private firm to pump out of the tank, according to the police report. They said they did hire a private waste removal company to pump out the tank, according to police, but that the service had become too expensive and that they began pumping it out into a storm drain periodically over the last three or four years. The Khuntias are scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview on May 21, according to the police report. People who want to report what they think may be illegal dumping of waste into waterways or storm sewers are encouraged to call MWRD at 1-800-332-DUMP (3867) or IEPA at 1-888-372-1996.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-22-14, a sale will be held at Sergio’s Body Shop, 15330 S. Cicero Avenue, Oak Forest, IL. 60452, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Fermin Cancino 2011 Ford Photos by Joan Hadac VIN# 3FADP4BJ6BM143230 The pond in the 15800 block of South La Grange Road, which Lien Amount: $3,500.00 police say was polluted by septic discharge into a storm sewer.


Thursday, May 8, 2014 The Reporter

The half marathon featured some fun Monika-rs There were 1,023 runners who finished the seventh First Midwest Bank Half Marathon on by Jeff Sunday. Vorva There were some notable names and some noticeable names. Among the noticeable, the race featured hope, pain and joy. And it featured Curtis Hope, Sherese and Samira Payne and Tracy Joy. It featured Jacklyn Boekeloo and Monika Sestakauskaite, who probably could have loaned a vowel to help out the last name of Kenneth Yff. It featured Genevieve Gravel, who ran on the asphalt, Those who were thirsty could talk to Jordan Earlywine or Mark Boozell. Finishing less than a second apart were Paul Sager and Jamie Seger and later on Kelly Ciger crossed the finish line. When the sun came out, you would figure that Shady El-Zayaty would keep his cool as he cruised to 239th place. A few other names that caught my eye were Thomas Tomas, Josafat Javier Roman, Sky Legge, Thomas Fortune, Kristi Rude and Jeremy Boat. And someone signed up as J. Race, whose name is almost as

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perfect as Lisa Chase or Kelly Ran, who also ran the race. Among the notable names, state sen. Bill Cunningham, was one of the 1,023, finishing 195th. Congressman Dan Lipinski signed up but for the second time in five years had to scratch because of an injury. District 135 School Board President Joe La Margo finished 866th.

Editor’s Notebook

Something to cheer about Since 1,023 finished the race, that means there were 1,023 pretty good stories to tell. I wish I could have interviewed them all, but that’s impossible. There was one story I heard that I got a kick out of. Stagg cheerleader Brittany Klimas of Palos Hills, who said she had never run a race of this distance, finished 643rd with a time of 2 hours, 14 minutes and 21 seconds. Kilimas crossed the finish line with her father, David. “My goal was to just finish the race,� she said. Mission accomplished. What’s fun about this story is that Brittany is recovering from

All is calm

Photos by Jeff Vorva

It was hard pressed to find a bigger smile than Alsip’s Shanta Berry (left photo) in the Walk, Run or Roll Race as fans cheered her on Sunday. Palos Hills’ David and Brittany Klimas (right photo) cross the half marathon finish line. Brittany had two knee surgeries in the past three years and her goal was to finish the race. her second right knee surgery in three years. She messed it up in cheerleading and messed it up again playing tennis. She had to wear a leg brace during the race but still got through the 13.1 miles without reinjuring the knee. Her twin sister, Danielle, decided not to stick around with her family and ran ahead to finish 335th.

Best part of the day

off. That leaves plenty of fans sticking around and cheering on these athletes.

My favorite part of the half marathon festivities is the Walk, Run or Roll race, which is put on by the South West Special Recreation Association.

The smiles from these folks can’t get any bigger as evidenced by Alsip’s Shante Berry, whose photo appears above.

Adults and children with disabilities have a chance to participate in a half-mile race shortly after the 1,000-plus runners in the half marathon take

And you see things that you might not have seen before. One young runner was wear-

ing a jacket and about 200 or 300 yards before the finish line, he decided to stop and take his jacket off. Some of the fans were yelling and encouraging him to finish the race. When he realized how close he was to the line, he put the jacket back on and sped to the finish line with his arms raised and he and his friends had a good laugh as he picked up his medal.

After two explosive meetings, Worth’s board back to normal By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

board was able to go about with its routine business with little stress. There was no yelling or swearWawrzyniak’s family members ing. did not appear at the meeting There were no police patting despite a pledge from some that down people who wanted to enter they would continue to attend. the meeting. Worth police recently closed the There were no TV cameras case, ruling Wawrzyniak’s death from Chicago. accidental. It was just a normal meeting. Last Friday, Eric S. Johnson Worth trustees handled a va- of Midlothian was sentenced to riety of routine business mat- 3 ½ years in prison for selling a ters Tuesday night during a prescription drug to Wawrzyniak brief board meeting that got on the night that she died. everyone home in time to see Johnson pleaded guilty to sellthe Blackhawks playoff game. ing an anti-anxiety medication to No one asked to address the Wawrzyniak, 18, who was killed board, a departure from the ar- Nov. 8 after falling out of Johnray of comments made during son’s car as he drove away from the past two meetings in April, the scene in the parking lot of mostly regarding the Brittney the Worth boat launch. Wawrzyniak death investigaJohnson also was placed on one tion. year of supervision following his Those meetings sizzled with prison term and ordered to pay emotion and packed some fire- $1,079 in fines and court costs. works but Tuesday night the In matters before the board,

Photo by Jeff Vorva

After two meetings that included red-hot emotions, including an April 1 meeting featuring people yelling at board members in the above photo, the Worth village board meeting was calm on Tuesday night. trustees: • Approved a request from the Marrs-Meyer American Legion for its outdoor music festival from 7 to 11 p.m. on June 21, July 19 and Aug. 16. • Approved an expenditure not to exceed $30,000 to purchase computer servers for the police

department and village hall. • Approved business licenses for 3 Broke Girls, a shop specializing in antiques and gently used items at 11350 S. Harlem Ave., and Worth Citgo, 11458 S. Harlem, which is expected to reopen in June. • Announced the board’s May

20 meeting will take place at Gale Moore Park, 109th Street and Nordica Avenue. Games and fireworks will follow the meeting, which marks the start of the village’s 100-day centennial celebration. • Announced that on May 22, the Worth Park District will join

in the celebration by hosting an open house at its facilities at 11500 S. Beloit Ave. • Announced that Water’s Edge Golf Club, 7205 W. 115th St., will host a Mother’s Day brunch at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Sunday. The price is $24.95 for adults and $11.95 for children.

RidgeFest headliner yet to be named

Chicago Ridge to shop mostly local for its rock and roll bands By Kevin M. Coyne Correspondent To celebrate Chicago Ridge turning 100 years old this year, village officials will put on a Centennial Weekend celebration and rather than bringing big-named entertainment to play, they will highlight the village’s rich history by showcasing local musical talent while saving the city a few bucks. Also, RidgeFest, which has brought in national acts to town such as Ted Nugent, Bret Michaels, the BoDeans and Joan Jett, will have a mostly local flavor to it as the festival will feature the Suburban Cowboys July 24, Your Villain My Hero July 25, an act yet to be announced on July 26 and Chicago 6 and American English on July

Hills

(Continued from page 1)

tecting the city, but getting involved with the community through organizations and school programs. “Our police department is very involved with our community and our residents on a very active basis,� Bennett said.

end. Members of the planning committee have proposed several events, which include a centennial parade, classic car show, community photo shoot, pancake breakfast and a 5k run. In order to pay for the blowout birthday party, Chicago Ridge is offering residents a chance to purchase banners for with their family’s name and affix the banner to the nearest streetlight to the family’s home. The village is also creating an advertisement book for local businesses and non-profits to market their company to the community they serve.

towns in the state of Illinois,� Marrotta stated. Topping the list at No. 1 with 1.06 property crimes per 1,000 and zero violent crimes is Round Lake Park; and, completing the list at No. 50 with 10.80 property crimes per 1000 and .83 violent crimes per 1,000 is Mundelein. (bullet) The City of Palos Hills has received its 26th consecutive Tree City USA Award from the Arbor Day Foundation this year. The city successfully celebrated Arbor Day by giving away 350 trees to its local residents, which was made possible by the Palos Hills City Government in coordination with the Living Land and Waters Million Trees Project.

The 350 trees were several varieties of oak trees that stood one to five feet in height when they were wrapped to be distributed during the Palos Hills’ Touch a Truck and Kids’ Day Event on Sat., April 26.

Village officials are still determining which bands are set to perform at the 100-year anniversary. Local bands such as The Neverly Brothers and The

Saturday Act are two potential bands discussed in the past that meet the local criteria. “This is a great opportunity for us to bring local bands that showcase our community’s talent,� Scheyler said. “We are planning on discussing which bands will be selected and we have a committee working on Photo courtesy of Your Villain My Hero website selecting bands that will be the best fit for the Centennial Chicago-area band Your Villain My Hero will appear at RidgeFest in late July. Weekend.�

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One of Palos Hills’ neighboring communities, Palos Heights, also made the list at No. 34. Palos Heights shows a record of 9.86 property crimes per 1,000 and .48 violent crimes per 1,000. “It’s great to know that both Palos Hills and Palos Heights are known as two of the safest

27. The July 26 band will likely be a national act, according to officials. Chicago Ridge Village Clerk George Scheyler said the Centennial Weekend is perfect for local bands to showcase their talent while the village benefits financially. “We are planning on showcasing local talent this year since RidgeFest is right around the corner and usually is the big money maker that attracts the big-name bands,� Scheyler said before Thursday’s board meeting. “I’m not sure who we’re going to pick but we’re definitely going to stay local.� In the coming months, the village will host various events to spark community interest. The festivities are set for Sept. 5 and will run through the week-





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The Reporter Thursday, May 8, 2014

Our Neighborhood

Sights and scenes from the half marathon

Medals await the finishers of the seventh First Midwest Bank Half Marathon.

More than a thousand runners started the seventh First Midwest Bank half marathon Sunday in Palos Heights, Palos Park and Palos Hills. The police presence at the half marathon was lighter than in 2013 but there were still some bomb-sniffing dogs patrolling the Photos by area. These two didn’t find any bombs but the dog on the left was not happy at the start of the race when more than 1,000 Jeff Vorva runners were whizzing by.

Pam McLeod of Chicago hugs her boyfriend Max Capouch after the inaugural running of the 10K race. Capouch finished second overall and McLeod took third and she became the first woman’s champion in the history of the race.

Becky Maszak of Richton Park rolls in the Walk, Run or Roll race as a part of the half marathon festivities.

RETRO

SUDOKU The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

By Mark Andrews

Compiled by Jeff Vorva

News and events from our archives.

To shave, or not to shave? 50 years ago

May 7, 1964   The story: Worth Police Chief Lee Becatti warned residents of a new ordinance that all home swimming pools must be surrounded by a fence.   The quote: “Those offended by saying those offended by the letter can take him to court. It is an opinionated letter and is the way I see it from back here.’’ — Palos Hillls resident LeRoy Roloff, who circulated a letter in the 4th Ward that Alderman Jim Wilkensen called “libelous” and “slanderous.”   Fun fact: Chicago Ridge Village President Arthur Cooper was mulling whether he should shave or grow a beard for a contest that his village was hosting in honor of its 50th anniversary.

It was baking soda, not cocaine 25 years ago May 11, 1989

(Solution on page 11)

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History of the World

  The story: Even though it was delayed once, the grand opening of the new Fifth District Court in Bridgeview was getting set to open on June 1.   The quote: ‘’[My wife] puts baking soda in every sink. It was underneath the sink in the bathroom. It was in plastic bags because she doesn’t want the box to get wet.” — former Oak Lawn trustee John Petrozza explaining why drug charges were dropped against him. He said Oak Lawn police had him arrested for political reasons and he planned to sue for damages.   Fun fact: Moraine Valley’s baseball team, which had a 9-21 record, beat Oakton, 12-2 and 2-0 in a doubleheader. Oakton entered the twinbill with a 28-3 mark and was nationally ranked at the time.

Bar manager, baseball team caught with pants down 10 years ago

From the May 6, 2004 issue   The story: A Palos Hills bar, Café 9, was shut down after violating liquor licenses weeks after police charged the bar’s manager with battery and disorderly conduct after allegedly having a female employee perform a sex act on him.   The quote: “We kind of caught them with their pants down,” — Sandburg baseball coach Doug Sutor on a play where Eagles baserunner Lee Fischer stole home in a 4-2 victory over Andrew.   Fun fact: Hickory Hills detective Lt. Michael Tardi was named Suburban Police Officer of the Year by the Illinois State Crime Commission. He helped solve a 1982 murder that he thought may never be solved.

  May 8: ON THIS DATE in 1541, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto reached the Mississippi River. In 1952, Mad magazine debuted.   May 9: ON THIS DATE in 1502, Christopher Columbus left Spain on his fourth and final voyage to the Western Hemisphere.   May 10: ON THIS DATE in 1869, a golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, marking the completion of the first U.S. transcontinental railroad. In 1963, Decca Records signed the Rolling Stones on the advice of Beatle George Harrison.   May 11: ON THIS DATE in 1946, the first packages from the relief agency CARE arrived in France. In 1949, Israel was admitted to the United Nations as its 59th member.   May 12: ON THIS DATE in 1908, “wireless radio broadcasting” was patented by Nathan B. Stubblefield.   May 13: ON THIS DATE in 1110, Christian Crusaders from Western Europe marched into Beirut, causing a bloodbath. In 1959, the Diners Club issued its first credit cards.   May 14: ON THIS DATE in 1948, the independent nation of Israel was proclaimed in Tel Aviv as British rule in Palestine came to an end; Arab antagonists immediately attacked. In 1998, the last episode of “Seinfeld” aired on NBC.   Answer to last week’s question: This week in 1983, Reggie Jackson became the first Major League Baseball player to strike out 2,000 times.   This week’s question: In 1916, the cover of the Saturday Evening Post first featured an illustration by what American artist?   (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarqmail.com.)


Thursday, May 8, 2014 The Reporter

5

Hills Baseball Softball Association celebrates inaugural year   A sunny morning at the ball field at 99th and 76th Avenue marked the first opening day festivities for the new Hills Baseball Softball Association.    The first pitches were thrown out by the Mayors of Hickory Hills and Palos Hills, Mike Howley and Gerald Bennett following a ceremony dedicating the access road to the ball park in honor of the late Dave Sinclair.   Sinclair, who succumbed to ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) last fall, was a longtime coach and

volunteer for the little league and a football coach at St. Patricia School in Hickory Hills. His wife, Lori Sinclair, accompanied by two of his three children, John and Carrie, received a plaque in his honor from the association.   The longtime Hickory Hills Youth Baseball and Palos Hills Baseball Association organizations merged during the offseason and this is the revamped organizations’ first season.   This new league will use all

of the fields and facilities formerly used by each program. Hills Baseball Softball Association will provide baseball and softball at all levels for children ages four to 16 years. Hills Baseball Softball Association will be accepting boys and girls from throughout the southwest suburbs for recreational participation as well as part-time and full-time travel teams.    This merger hopes to increase baseball and softball participation and competition in the two

communities.   George Czarnik of Hickory Hills and Peter Donahue of Palos Hills are leading the foundation and development of this new league as President and Vice-President of Hills Baseball Softball Association respectively.   For more information on the merger or how to register and take part in HBSA email GeorgeCzarnik@thehillsbaseball.org or call 312-919-0295. — Submitted by HBSA

Submitted photos

John Strus says a few words at the Opening Day ceremonies of John, Lori and Carrie Sinclair pose with the new Dave Sinclair Way sign in honor of the former baseball and football coach at St. Patricia. the new HSBA organization.

Marathon (Continued from page 1) the vast wasteland of Chicagoland like most of the time it’s portrayed as on the local news. We’ve got a lot of nice assets out here in the southwest suburbs, like Lake Katherine and the many nice restaurants and shops, and we encourage you to take advantage of that.”    While security was not as visible as it was last year (weeks after the terrorist attack at the 2013 Boston Marathon), it was obvious enough to provide a preventive presence. Law enforcement officials were in abundance, from boots on the ground to officers stationed on the rooftop of a nearby office building. Bomb-sniffing dogs and their handlers also walked the route.    The event had a tender moment, as a group of runners surprised event co-founder and co-director Mel Diab, owner of the Running for Kicks specialty running shop, 7158 W. 127th St., Palos Heights, with an award saluting his passion for the sport, his role as mentor and friend to many, and for his use of the event to raise about $165,000 for charity since its founding.    The charities that benefitted this year were the American Cancer Society, the South West

Special Recreation Association (SWSRA), and the Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens.   “I’m just lucky to be a part of this running community,” said Diab, his voice wavering slightly. “It’s a two-way street. I get a lot of energy and good vibes from all the people I see out there that come into the store, and I’m just one of the luckiest guys in the world. This is a perfect day for running, and god speed.”   Giuliano’s time of 1:10:15 was tops among men. Amanda Mirochna was the first woman to hit the tape, at 1:20:24. Some 1,023 runners completed the course, which wound through Palos Heights and Palos Park.    In the newly added 10K race, Adrian Campbell finished first with a time of 40:53. The first woman to finish was Pamela McLeod at the 44:10 mark.    Nearly 60 athletes with special needs participated in the event’s Run, Walk or Roll race, headed by the SWSRA, nearly doubling last year’s final total of 32 participants.    Results for the Half Marathon and 10K race are posted online at theracershub.com.    Prestinario and Diab repeatedly thanked everyone who made the event a success, including corporate sponsors, local units of government, volunteers,

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Maddox Murphy of Manhattan brags about his grandfather, Bruce Tassone, during the seventh First Midwest Bank Half Marathon.

participants, spectators and oth- Marathon’s organizing commiters. tee will meet next week to share    The 2014 First Midwest Half observations and discuss ways to improve the event for 2015. Those with feedback to offer may visit firstmidwesthalfmarathon.com and click on the “Contact” tab.   As another security measure, Clearstream Recycling provided clear trash and recycling containers along the marathon route and at the events at City Hall. Recently the committee was notified that no rigid, opaque containers would be permitted because of the possibility of suspicious activities, like a backpack in a solid container.   Last year, in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon, the Department of Homeland Security began requiring that all containers be clear containers particularly at races in the Northeast.   The same requirement was Photo by Jeff Vorva made for the 2014 Palos Heights State Representitive Fran Hurley, State Senator Bill Cunningham, and Congressman Dan Lipinski half marathon. Working with local law enforcement groups, chat before the start of the race.

Community Briefs Chicago Celebrate spring, create memories at BAC

  The Beverly Arts Center invites the community to tell their personal stories at a free arts workshop being held from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 18. Participants are asked to bring their photos, keepsakes and stories to Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St., Chicago to create a unique work of art that celebrates family, or commemorates a milestone in an individual’s journey.   “Telling Our Stories” will be the theme of the May edition of BAC’s monthly “Get In, Get Art” event, a Sunday afternoon of free, hands-on arts activities for all. Art instructors from BAC and volunteers from the local arts community will help children and adults alike make a work of art based on their own life, one that tells a story to cherish.   For more information, contact

Shellee Frazee, artistic director at 773-445-3838, Ext. 216.

Oak Lawn Village Board meeting Tuesday, June 24.

Oak Lawn Oak Lawn Garden Club presents the Beautiful Yard Contest 2014

Area Wide Senior Resource Fair to be hosted by area politicians   In an effort to help local

  Amateur gardeners with gardens in the Oak Lawn area are welcome to participate in the Oak Lawn Garden Club’s Beautiful Yard contest. Gardens will be judged upon originality of design, suitability of plants, and overall neatness.    Entries must be received by Saturday, June 14, and judges will visit gardens Wednesday, June 18.    Amateur gardeners should send their name, address, and phone number to junesviolets@yahoo. com, or call 499-0578. They also may send the information to ladybug1129s@aol.com, or call 422-3713.   First, second and third place awards will be presented at the

senior citizens connect with government and community resources, state Rep. Fran Hurley is co-hosting a Senior Fair with U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski and State Sen. Bill Cunningham.   The senior fair hosted by Hurley, Lipinski and Cunningham will take place between 10 a.m. and noon at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway, in Palos Hills. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Hurley’s constituent service office at 773445-8128, 233-9703, or email RepFranHurley@gmail.com.   Attendees will be able to meet with a number of local, state and

federal agencies and organizations, including the Social Security Administration and the Secretary of State driver’s services, as well as non-governmental providers like Humana, and receive assistance with Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Participants can also receive information on local, state and federal resources and programs for seniors.

Palos Township Township Health Services wants to educate public

   Palos Township Health Service presents “Understanding Your Heart,” the first in a series of lectures by retired professional nursing educator, Patricia O’Donnell, RN, BS, MA.   The program will begin at 9 a.m. Tuesday, May 20 at the Palos Township office, 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills. For more information and to make reservations, call 598-2441. Light refreshments will be served.

the race committee identified a local business that provides the required containers. Clear trash and clear recycling bins were loaned to the 2014 First Midwest Bank Half Marathon by Clearstream Recycling Inc. for the race and the other festivities surrounding the event. Clearstream is located at 6420 W. 127th St., Suite 212, Palos Heights.

Photo by Tim Hadac

A table piled high with participation medals awaits runners near the end of the race.

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6

The Reporter

Thursday, May 8, 2014

COMMENTARY THE

REPORTER

An Independent Newspaper Jeff Vorva Editor

Amy Richards Publisher

Published Weekly Founded March, 16, 1960

Editorial

Unique local businesses are losing their steam   The choo-choo train rolled along the tracks for the last time Saturday afternoon at Snackville Junction.   The iconic restaurant, a staple in Evergreen Park after years in Chicago’s Beverly community, closed its doors for the final time because its owners were unable to workout mortgage refinancing with the bank.   The Kedzie Avenue diner didn’t look like much from the outside, but inside children watched in delight as hamburgers and hot dogs were delivered on a choo-choo train that traveled out of the kitchen on a set of tracks mounted to the counter.   That train took several trips on Saturday as patrons made a final journey to the restaurant, which they described as unique and a one-of-akind. The food was good and kids could be kids, playing with toy trains while waiting for their meals.   Sadly, those experiences weren’t enough to save the restaurant. The owners were unable to work out an extension on a balloon mortgage that had come due. The bank wanted its money, and Snackville Junction apparently didn’t have it.   It’s easy to blame the bank, but lending institutions are in business to make money. Snackville Junction’s owners knew the terms of the mortgage when they agreed to them, although the last few years have been tough on small businesses of all kinds.   The demise of the Snackville Junction is disappointing, however. Its closing means there’s one less unique, family-owned business in the area that caters to families. A place where the owner knows your name and has put his or her heart and soul into the place.   There’s plenty of play lands at McDonald’s and Burger King and lots of corporate-owned bowling alleys and movie theaters dotting the landscape. There are endless places to play mini-golf or laser tag, jump on trampolines and race go-karts. But few are locally owned joints with a stake in the community.   You’ve heard this mantra before, but support your local businesses, especially the ones that you and your families have enjoyed for years. Do it before they become the next Snackville Junction.

Special thoughts for those mothers who have lost their children The B-Side One of the toughest stories a reporter has to cover is the death of a child. At some point during the assignment, we have to call or visit the family for reaction. It’s never easy. Each family handles media requests differently. Some appoint a family spokesperson—typically not one of the parents—to answer questions. But in some cases, mom and dad will meet with reporters to discuss the circumstances of the death. Perhaps it’s therapeutic for them to share some loving memories of their child. Again, it’s not an easy assignment. I remember years ago sitting in the kitchen of a home in Addison talking to the parents of a girl who died in a car accident. Mom was able to answer some questions and share photos, but dad sat at her side barely able to contain himself. He held back tears and never said a word. I wasn’t covering Oak Lawn when Megan Hurckes, the 10-year-old daughter of former village trustee Jerry Hurckes, died in an ATV accident. But offering condolences to Jerry and his wife at the wake was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever done. My daughter played softball with Megan. Her loss was tough on my family and much of the Oak Lawn community. The day in 2012 that Hometown resident Kaylah Lentine, 14, died from injuries sustained after being hit by a car on

Southwest Highway in Oak Lawn, I was at the site of the accident talking to people who were adding flowers to a makeshift memorial. I spotted a woman walking down Cicero Avenue who turned out to be Lentine’s mom, Krista Wilkinson. She visited the memorial to thank everyone for their gestures of support. I was shocked to see her so soon after he daughter’s death. But she had the courage to walk to the memorial across the street from where her Kaylah was hit just to thank people. Impressive. These recollections came to mind because Sunday is Mother’s Day, a day that most of us celebrate while honoring or remembering our mothers. But for some moms, Mother’s Day is one of the most difficult days of the year. Rebecca Tully is one of those moms. Tully, as many of you know, is the mother of Brittany Wawrzyniak, who died in November after being ejected from a moving car near the Worth Boat launch. I remember the first time I met Tully. I visited her home just a few days after her daughter’s death and was more than a little uneasy when I knocked on the door. Tully’s husband, Mike, and her mother, Becky, greeted me. I sat down in the living room and greeted Tully, whose face exhibited a level of grief and agony only a mother could experience.

We began to chat and I made it clear she didn’t have to answer questions she was uncomfortable with, and we could end the interview at any time. But that never happened. Tully soldiered through the interview, answering all of my questions the best she could. Throughout our conversation, her young twins ran in and out of the room, and I couldn’t help but think about how she had to continue to be a loving mother to them despite the desperation she was feeling over the loss of Brittany. Imagine having to cope with the pain associated with the death of a teenage daughter while having to be there for two young children who were confused, to say the least, about the loss of their big sister. I gained huge respect and admiration for Tully that day and in the months that followed. I know she’s been at odds with the Worth Police Department over the investigation into her daughter’s death. But that’s not the focus of this column. Rather, I’m thinking about what she and other mothers in her perdictiment face each day as they try to return to some level of normalcy. I talk to Tully each time there’s a development in the ongoing story surrounding her daughter’s death. Each time I call, I ask if she minds talking or answering questions or if there’s a better, more convenient time.

by Bob Rakow

She rarely refuses a request because she’s advocating for Brittany every time she talks to the media, attends a Worth village board meeting or meets with police. Tully will always be Brittany’s mom, and she won’t rest until she knows the details connected to her daughter’s death. She has amazing resolve, though I’ve often thought about the pain she must experience during quiet moments when she’s alone and has time to reflect on her Brittany’s short life. Brittany was 18 years old and was in the midst of that special time of life most teenagers experience after high school. She was working, pursing a college education, looking to the future, enjoying time with friends. Suddenly, her life ended, and Tully is left behind to grieve. But she’s too resilient to simply mourn and lament Brittany’s death. That alone solves nothing. Tully understands this. So, when you celebrate Mother’s Day on Sunday by attending a religious service, going to brunch or having mom over to the house, be sure to take a moment to think about or pray for Rebecca Tully, a loving and dedicated mom not much different that our own mothers, who is going through a tough time right now and would appreciate your support.

Inside the First Amendment

Politics and perils of closing school for religious holidays By Charles C. Haynes   As New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio will soon discover, adding religious holidays to the school calendar is a slippery slope on the rocky terrain of public school politics.   Earlier this year, the recently elected mayor announced plans to close schools on two Muslim holidays — Eid-Ul-Fitr (end of Ramadan) and EidUl-Adha (end of the annual pilgrimage to Mecca) — and the Lunar New Year, an important holiday for many Asian communities.   Right out of the box, the Association of Indian Americans expressed great disappointment that Diwali, the festival of lights celebrated by Hindus, Sikhs, and Jains in India and other South Asian countries, didn’t make the list.   Deciding who’s in and who’s out on school calendars is a complicated political and legal conundrum in a city (like

many other American cities) exploding with religious and cultural diversity.   Mayor de Blasio is drawing the line at three — the three he thinks most justified — but balks, for now, at adding others for the obvious reason that students don’t learn much if they are not in school.   But wait. Doesn’t the First Amendment’s Establishment clause bar city officials from closing public schools on religious holidays? Yes, if the purpose is to accommodate religion. No, if the closing serves a legitimate secular or educational purpose.   The best, and perhaps only, “secular purpose� for shutting schools on a religious holy day is when opening school doesn’t make financial or educational sense. New York City and some other school districts, for example, close on major Jewish holidays because large numbers of Jewish students and teachers will be absent.

  It’s worth noting that most Christians don’t need to push for this accommodation because Protestants baked Christian holy days into the school calendar when they founded public schools in the 19th century. Schools don’t meet on Sunday, Christmas is a national holiday, and many “spring breaks� still fall during Easter week.   If numbers drive these decisions, where should public schools draw the line? As the population of Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs, and others grows in many American cities, how can school officials afford to keep adding holy days — even when the numbers are compelling?   Some school districts have decided the best solution is to say “no� to everyone. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, schools in Hillsborough County, Florida don’t close for any religious holidays (save Christmas, which is also a “secular� holiday).

  Other school districts choose to follow the numbers. In Dearborn, Michigan, for example, where almost half of the students are Muslim, schools close on Muslim holy days.   It could be argued that Mayor de Blasio has defensible secular reasons for expanding the school calendar to include two Muslim holy days. Although it isn’t entirely clear how many Muslim students are in NYC public schools, most estimates put the number at about 10 percent. And with Asians comprising some 15 percent of city students, closing on the Lunar New Year could also make financial and educational sense.   But here we start down the slippery slope. New York City is also home to many Hindus, Sikhs, and Jains — and they are lobbying hard for recognition. The Diwali Coalition, an interfaith group, recently wrote the mayor arguing that the numbers favor

their cause. Asian Indians make up 2.4 percent of the city’s population — and that doesn’t count thousands more of other racial and ethnic groups that also celebrate Diwali.   As religious diversity continues to expand in all parts of America, many school and city officials may be forced to decide that Hillsborough County has landed on the only viable solution.   But whatever schools decide about the calendar issue, they should do two things to promote fairness and uphold religious freedom:   First, every public school should have an absentee policy that allows students to miss school on a reasonable number of religious holidays without penalty. The policy should also ensure, to the extent possible, that significant school events aren’t scheduled on major religious holy days.

  And second, every public school should teach students about religions — including religious holidays — at various times of the year. Religious literacy is critical for sustaining a free society in which people of many faiths and no faith treat one other with civility and respect.   Religious diversity brings messy new challenges to America. But here’s the good news: The greater the diversity, the more protection for religious freedom.   As James Madison pointed out many years ago, “For where there is such a variety of sects, there cannot be a majority of any one sect to oppress and persecute the rest.� Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum Institute, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20001. Web: religiousfreedomeducation.org Email: chaynes@newseum.org

 What will you miss about Snackville Junction? (Asked at Snackville Junction in Evergreen Park on the restaurant’s last day)

Photos by Bob Rakow

Mike Walsh, Evergreen Park   “It was a place for a little kid to have fun and be a little kid.�

Jesse Gonzalez, Chicago   “We’ll miss being here having fun.�

Mireya Gonzalez, Chicago    “My kids having fun. They love the food.�

Sascha Friedrich, Chicago   “It’s a unique place. It’s been around forever.�

Norine Fitzgerald, Chicago    “The kids are going to miss it. It’s like a tradition.


Thursday, May 8, 2014 The Reporter

Ridge Run set for Memorial Day   The Beverly Area Planning Association hosts the 37th annual Ridge Run on Mon., May 26.   Start times are 8 a.m. for the 10K, 8:10 a.m. for the Dick O’Neill Youth Mile, and 9:30 a.m. for the 5K run and walk. The start/finish line is at Ridge Park, 96th and Longwood Drive, Chicago. At Ridge Park, runners and spectators can enjoy refreshments, get information from race sponsors, and keep track of race results. A free Tot Trot will be held for children up to age 6 at 10:15 a.m.    Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers of Evergreen Park returns as the Ridge Run presenting sponsor, providing medical personnel for race day emergency attention and blood pressure

checks and other activities for race participants and spectators in the Little Company of Mary Hospital Family Services tent.   The Ridge Run tries to be one of Chicago’s friendliest races because of the thousands of Beverly/Morgan Park neighbors line who the route, playing music, cheering on the runners and offering water throughout the course.   Participants in the 5K and 10K will all receive dry tech tshirts and youth mile runners will receive cotton shirts in youth sizes. Prize money is awarded to the top three overall men and women in the 10K and 5K races. The Ridge Run is certified by the Chicago Area Runners’ Association.   Running Excels, 10328 S. Western Ave., will sponsor Middle of the Pack winners: the male

and female runners in the 5K and 10K whose results are in the exact middle will receive a free pair of running shoes donated by Saucony and Running Excels.   In honor of Memorial Day, active U.S. military personnel will be eligible for free entry in the Ridge Run. For information on this opportunity, call BAPA, 773-233-3100, or send an email to ridgerun@bapa.org.    Ridge Run entry fees through May 25 are 5K (timed), $35; 5K (untimed) $30; 10K, $40; Ridge Run Challenge 5K and 10K, $60; Youth Mile, $20. Race day entry fees are, 5K (timed) $40; 5K (untimed) $35; 10K, $ 45; 5K and 10K, $65; Youth Mile, $25. The fee for active military with ID is $15 any time. — Submitted by The Beverly Area Planning Association

Focus on Seniors Oak Lawn Senior Center To Offer Events During May

   The Oak Lawn Senior Center is offering many programs during May to benefit their target audience, senior citizens. For more information, or to register for a program, call 499-0240.    An arts and crafts program will be held from 10 a.m. to noon today, Thursday, and Thursday, May 15.    Seniors will walk down “Memory Lane,” from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Mondays, May 12 and 19 at the Senior Center.   Bingo will be played from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, May 12 at the Senior Center.   Coffee time entertainer John Boda will be at the Senior Center at 10 a.m. Monday, May 19.   The Senior Center box lunch will be held at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, May 22, and is sponsored by Oak Lawn Bank and Trust. Tickets for the box lunch are $4. For more information, or to make a reservation, call the Senior Center.    The Parketts of Evergreen will be performing from 9:30 to 10:30

a.m. Friday, May 23 in the Oak Lawn Senior Center gym.   Medicare Fraud and Prevention will be the topic under discussion from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, May 28.   Blood and sugar testing will be available at 10 a.m. Friday, May 30 at the center.

Oak Lawn Senior Volunteer Earns Recognition

  Phyllis Collura, a volunteer at the Oak Lawn Senior Center, was selected by AgeOptions to be recognized with other volunteers at the annual luncheon and volunteer recognition celebration, Celebrating Aging.   Madonna Ray, administrative assistant at the Oak Lawn Senior Center, nominated Collura.   Celebrating Aging will take place at 11 a.m. Thursday, June 19 at the William Tell Holiday Inn, 6201 Joliet Road, Countryside.

Double Nickel

   The Double Nickel Plus Chorus meets at the Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen Park, every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers are

welcome. For more information call 422-8776.

Across

47 See 51-Across 48 __ music 50 Fire 51 With 47-Across, former “American Idol” winner, literally 53 Con artist 55 Years in Claudius’ reign 56 Certain cracker 59 Guides in the direction of 61 Jason of “Harry Potter” films 65 Fancy marble 66 See 67-Across 67 With 66-Across, 1975 Best Picture nominee, literally 68 People people: Abbr. 69 Celebrity chef Burrell 70 Initial stages Down 1 Common HDTV feature 2 Sushi-grade tuna 3 These, in Toulouse 4 Bank listing: Abbr. 5 Culottes kin 6 Declares 7 Overmuch 8 Fidel’s successor 9 Just starting to roll, perhaps 10 Econ. yardstick

Submitted photo

TV stars

  Ed McElroy, host of “The Ed McElroy Show”, recently interviewed former Senator Louis Viverito, Supervisor of Stickney Township and Robert Fuesel, Law Enforcement Consultant.    That show will air at 8 p.m. Tuesday on various public access channels throughout the area. McElroy is Past National Commander of Catholic War Veterans, U.S.A.   Pictured left to right are Fuesel, McElroy and Viverito.

Meals on Wheels

  The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services offers a Meals on Wheels program for village residents 60 years and older who are unable to prepare their own meals. Meals are delivered Monday through Friday. For more information call 422-8776.

Church Corner

   Sacred Heart Church, 8245 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, is hosting its third annual summer music series for the 2014 season.   Musicians, under the guid55 and Up   Palos Hills residents 55 years ance of James Grzadzinski, and older meet from noon to music director, will present 2 p.m. the second and fourth five installments throughout the Wednesdays of each month at the summer months, and everyone Palos Hills Community Center, is invited to attend. Those at8455 W. 103rd St. Tickets for tending may make a free will events must be purchased one offering to benefit the Sacred week in advance. Entertainment Heart Music Department. For includes musicians, singers, lun- more information, call Grzadzcheons, movies, plays and bingo. inski at 974-3336, Ext. 245.    The series will be presented Pinochle on these five dates:    The Worth Senior Pinochle club   • Sunday, June 8 at 4 p.m. is seeking new members. Mem- in the Ministry Center Gym. bership is free. Visit the group The theme will be Broadway at the Worth Park District Ter- Hits and Popular Favorites and race Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., will be featuring musicians Rita every Monday and Wednesday Burns, Tom Cameron, Dave Gaifrom 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games das, and Christine VanLoon. begin at noon. Call 448-1181 for   • Wednesday, June 11 at 7 information. p.m. in the church and the program will feature an organ recital featuring Grzadzinski.    • Wednesday, July 16 at 7 p.m. in the church and the program will be a voice recital featuring soprano and published author Michelle Gliottoni Rodriguez.   • Sunday, July 20 at 4 p.m. in the church and the theme will be Musical Meditations on the Life of Blessed [soon to be Saint] Pope John Paul II in the Year of His Canonization. The musical program will be featuring the Sacred Heart Cantori and Organ under the direction of Grzadzinski.    • Wednesday, Aug. 6 at 7 p.m. in the Church. There will be music for church and chamber featuring an ensemble of strings, woodwinds, brass, and keyboard. Musicians include Helen Blazie (violin), Stephen Moran (violin/viola), D. Liane Cochran-Stafira (cello), Angelica Nolan (trumpet), Christine Otrembiak (flute), and Josh Rodriguez (saxophone/clarinet).

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1 Place for una familia 7 Xerox insert: Abbr. 11 Advanced math deg., in Canada 14 With 15-Across, verifies in advance, literally 15 See 14-Across 16 Suffix with Capri 17 Clubs with balls 18 Yellow butterflies, to Brits 20 Two-note keyboard effect 22 Most fit to serve 23 “Pinocchio” whale 26 With 32-Across, warm apparel, literally 28 Barcelona gold 29 Kiosk 32 See 26-Across 33 Fam. tree member 35 Old cutter 36 Sign of cold feet? 37 See 39-Across 39 With 37- and 40-Across, nosh, literally 40 See 39-Across 42 Progressive Insurance spokeswoman 43 B.C. law group 45 Starr-struck one?

7

11 Image on the Armenian coat of arms 12 Haight or Ashbury 13 “Dog Whisperer” Millan 19 Accepted, as a gift card 21 Bellyachers 23 Like platform shoes in the ‘60s 24 Utah city on I-15 25 Journalist’s asset 27 SALT topic 30 Percolate 31 Prisoner’s demand 34 Pepsi One’s one 38 California wine town near Stockton 41 Posh 44 Ellington standard whose title is Spanish for “lost” 46 Nice view 47 Opening lines? 49 Attaches, in a way 51 Class 52 Pele’s first name 54 Some grenades, briefly 57 Bertie Wooster’s alma mater 58 Road crew item 60 Genetic stuff 62 Stand buy 63 Jazz lover 64 GPS part: Abbr.

(Answers on page 11)

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Death Notices Robert J. Douglas Robert J. Douglas, 73, of Chicago Ridge died Saturday at Christ Hospital. The Visitation was Wednesday at the PalosGaidas Funeral Home in Palos Hills. The funeral is at 10 a.m. today, Thursday, at Our Lady of the Ridge Church. Interment is at Evergreen Cemetery. Mr. Douglas is survived by partner Marge Talla and siblings Edna Dioguardi, Carol Gniedziejko and Gene Douglas. He was born in Chicago and worked in the manufacturing industry. Linda M. Laurencell Linda M. Laurencell, nee Schlegel, 68, of Chicago Ridge died April 29 at Manorcare in Oak Lawn. Visitation was April 30 and last Thursday at the Palos Gaidas Funeral Home in Palos Hills. The funeral was Friday at Our Lady of the Ridge Church. Interment was at Resurrection Cemetery. Ms. Laurencell was survived by her children, Phyllis (Rick) Simpson,  Patrice “Therese” Laurencell and Philip J. Laurencell. She was born in Chicago and worked at Jewel Foods for 40 years.

Palos Hills died April 30 at Palos Community Hospital. Visitation was Friday at the Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home. The funeral was Saturday at Sacred Heart Church. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery. Mr. Mc Clowry is survived by his children Joan (Robert) Quillman, Alice Feeney Doherty, James (Mary Ellen) Mc Clowry, Daniel (Michaelle) Mc Clowry, Richard Mc Clowry, Celeste “Letty” (Tom) Keefe, Joseph (fiancé-Mary Madden) McClowry Jr., Therese (fiancéSteve Barry)  Mc Clowry and Laura (Russell) Showalter. He was born in Chicago and worked as a business manager. Anna Marie O’Neal Anna Marie O’Neal, nee Karner, 80, of Chicago Ridge died last Thursday at Palos Community Hospital. Visitation was held Monday at Schmaedeke Funeral Home in Worth. A funeral service was held Tuesday at Faith Lutheran Church in Oak Lawn.

Ms. O’Neal was survived by her children Gary O’Neal and Leann Lundgren and siblings Joseph Karner, Shirley Burkett and Herbert (Patricia) Karner. Joseph J. Mc Clowry She was born in Chicago and Joseph J. Mc Clowry, age 96, of worked as a printer.

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Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-22-14, a sale will be held at Z & B Truck & Trailer Repair, 680 Industrial Drive, Bensenville, IL. 60106, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Marko Putnik 2008 International VIN# 2HSCUAPR28C658118 Lien Amount: $25,811.17

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8

The Reporter

Thursday, May 8, 2014

SCHOOLS

It’s your funeral (home), D124 breaking new ground

Submitted photo

Scholastic Bowl champs

   Worth Junior High’s Scholastic Bowl team took first place at the South Suburban Junior High School Conference Scholastic Bowl on April 26. Pictured on top are Amal Al Rashdan, Farah Elhoumaidi, Rebecca Ruger, Josh Lagrosa, Adam Zatar, Hanin Abuzer, Antonio Cruz, and Regina Garrity (Scholastic Bowl Coach). Pictured on the bottom left are Sebastian Sproch, Connor Farrell, David Castillo, Jillian Cabusas, Ragad Abu Shalbak, Tim Kopec, and Gilbert Williams.

Bulletin Board District 122 Hosts Informational Meeting

  Ridgeland School District 122 in Oak Lawn invites parents to an informational meeting for families who live within District 122 boundaries, those who have homeschooled their children, and

families that have children enrolled in private schools, at 9 a.m. Monday, in the District Office, 6500 W. 95th St., Oak Lawn.    The purpose of this meeting is to inform families how to access specialized services through special education programs. Agenda

items will include local dollar allocation for this program, specialized services available to schools and children, and an opportunity to ask questions.   For more information and reservations, call Cathy Lattz at 599-5550, Ext. 211.

Campus Leaders    Hickory Hills, resident John Gorman, a master’s student in the Advanced Inquiry Program (AIP) from Miami University’s Project Dragonfly and Chicago Zoological Society-Brookfield Zoo, will travel to Hawaii this summer to study the extinction of Hawaiian species and what it takes to save them in the wild.    Gorman is a science teacher.    Since the program began 10 years ago, Earth Expeditions graduate courses from Miami University’s Project Dragonfly

have engaged more than 1,500 people in firsthand educational and scientific research at critical conservation field sites in Africa, Australia, Asia and the Americas. Dragonfly’s AIP master’s program began in 2010 with the Chicago Zoological Society-Brookfield Zoo and Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. The program is now also offered at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, Denver Zoo, Phoenix Zoo, San Diego Zoo Global, Wildlife Conservation

Society/Bronx Zoo and Woodland Park Zoo (Seattle). ***    Cornell College, a private liberal arts college in Mount Vernon, Iowa, has accepted several students from the area, including: Jacob Slusinski of Oak Lawn, who was also awarded the Community Enrichment Award; Timothy Daker and KateLynn Hohman, both of Evergreen Park, and who were also awarded the Presidential Scholarship.

   The Evergreen Park Elementary School District 124 Board of Education will have a ribbon cutting ceremony at its new Administrative Center located at 2929 West 87th Street at 6 p.m. on Monday followed by a groundbreaking ceremony at Central Junior High School.    The administrative offices of the District will be moving in mid-May from its current location at Central Junior High School to make room for sixth grade students.    The District offices are moving to the former site of the Brady-Gill Funeral Home on 87th Street. “I heard some jokes about purchasing that space early on,” Superintendent Robert Machak said, “But the building is beautiful and will meet the needs of our parents, staff, and students for years to come. The community will be very proud of its new Administrative Center.”    The new Administrative Center, built originally by the Gill family in 1965 and operated as

a funeral home until early 2014, offers the District 8,900 square feet of office space, compared to approximately 6,000 square feet in the current District Offices.    Besides housing District administration, the new building will also provide a work area for teachers and staff to collaborate on curriculum, offer professional development activities, and host District-level staff meetings. Renovation work at Central will begin as soon as the District occupies the new Administrative Center.    Central Junior High will become Central Middle School on July 1st and house the sixth, seventh and eighth grade students of the district beginning in August, 2015.   Currently only students in seventh and eighth grade attend Central.   Renovations to Central Junior High School will begin in June with full completion scheduled before school begins for the 2015-16 school year.    Renovations include the ad-

dition of a dozen new student classrooms, including state-ofthe art science labs and media center, as well as upgrades to the building’s HVAC system, gymnasium, and existing classroom spaces.    “The architectural design of literally every space has been motivated by our curriculum and what we feel our students will need to be successful learners in school,” said District Superintendent Robert Machak.    Machak said that the decision to move sixth grade students to Central Middle School has been a topic of discussion for several years in the district.    Middle school philosophy has been studied in depth by the board of education and administration; the district believes that research shows that the middle school configuration offers much more opportunity to support the sixth grade students academically, socially, and emotionally. — Submitted by District 124

District 218 meeting for parents of private, home-schooled children with special needs District 218 will host a meeting for parents of students with disabilities who attend private or home schools at 1 p.m. on Thursday, May 8. Special education staff will conduct the meeting at the district Administrative Center at 10701 S. Kilpatrick Ave. in

Oak Lawn. Special education staff will discuss the district’s plans for providing special education services to students with disabilities who attend private schools or home schools within District 218 during the 2014-2015 school year. Any parent of a home-

schooled student who has been or may be identified with a disability and lives in District 218 is encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Director of Student Services and Special Education Susan Feeney at 708-424-2000, ext. 2561.

Submitted photo

St. Patricia readies for communion

  St. Patricia teacher Sandy Glab’s second graders enjoyed a retreat day preparing for their First Communion. Parents led the children in activities including making a rosary. Principal Tom Clausing joined the class in making loaves of bread in the shape of doves for the children to take home to share with their families.

The Kid’s Doctor By Sue Hubbard, M.D. Measles outbreak points again to the importance of vaccines   With all of the news about the measles (rubeola) in California (51 cases) and New York (25 cases), all pediatricians are on the alert for any measles cases in our areas. I’ve written many times about the importance of vaccines, but this latest outbreak of measles serves as yet another reminder of their value and the concept of herd immunity.   By maintaining high vaccine rates for all children (and adults), even those who may not have been vaccinated are protected because the “herd,” in other words, the largest group of children, has received the vaccine. It typically takes 90- to

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95-percent vaccination rate to maintain this herd immunity.   Once the vaccination rate drops below this level, there’s more likelihood of seeing a reoccurrence of a disease. In some areas of the country, where parents may choose to “opt out” of vaccines, the vaccination rates are below 90 percent. This creates a critical situation.   Although measles was pronounced eliminated in the United States in 2000, it remains widespread worldwide. With international travel an everyday event, it only takes one person to “import” measles into this country.    Measles is a highly contagious disease spread by respiratory droplets. The virus can remain in a room for up to two hours after an infected person has been there. Viruses are smart and hardy. You’d never know it if you walked into a room or an airplane after someone had just left who had measles.   Remember, an infected person is contagious even before the measles rash appears. Measles symptoms may occur up to three weeks after exposure. The illness begins like many others with fever, runny nose, cough and red eyes. It takes several days before the measles rash

develops. By this time, many other people have likely been exposed.   There are certain children who can’t receive vaccines for medical reasons. Those children are protected by all of the others who are vaccinated. Making sure your own children are vaccinated is paramount. Measles vaccine, given as an MMR combination (to protect against measles, mumps and rubella), is typically given at the 12-to-15-month-old doctor visit and again between the ages of 4 and 6.    There has also been a great deal of confusion on social media sites about measles (rubeola) and exanthem subitum (roseola). These are different illnesses, and measles is a vaccine preventable disease, while roseola is not.   (Dr. Sue Hubbard is an award-winning pediatrician, medical editor and media host. “The Kid’s Doctor” TV feature can be seen on more than 90 stations across the U.S. Submit questions at http://www.kidsdr. com. The Kid’s Doctor e-book, “Tattoos to Texting: Parenting Today’s Teen,” is now available from Amazon and other e-book vendors.)


Thursday, May 8, 2014 The Reporter

SCHOOLS

9

Bulletin Board Fenger High School

   The Fenger High School Class of 1964 is having their 50th reunion Saturday, August 2, at the Tinley Park Convention Center. For more information, contact Susan Rheinheimer at susan_ sings@att.net, or email Fengerreunion1964@gmail.com.

Moraine Valley

  The Moraine Valley Community College Foundation is seeking notable alumni, who have achieved success in their careers or through work in the community, for its new Hall of Fame. Between five to eight inductees will be honored at the inaugural Hall of Fame reception in November.   Candidates must have completed any amount of credit or noncredit coursework at Moraine Valley, achieved success in their chosen field and made a positive impact on the community through volunteering or leadership. They also must agree to attend the reception to accept the award, and return to campus at least once within the year to be a guest speaker and/or participate in a student engagement activity.   Nominees can self-nominate (must include a letter of recommendation) or be nominated by someone else. All nominees are encouraged to submit up to three letters of recommendation and a maximum of three pages of supplementary materials such as news articles, brochures or photos highlighting the applicant’s accomplishments and contributions.   Nominations, which must be accompanied by a current resume or bio, are due by midnight Sunday, June 1. Application forms are online at morainevalley.edu/ alumni.    For more information, contact Kari Pantol at alumni@morainevalley.edu or (708) 974-5551.

Oak Lawn Community H.S.

  Oak Lawn Community High School will host its Relay for Life for the 12th year in a row. Relay for Life is an organization dedicated to raising money and awareness for cancer research. This year’s Relay for Life will take place Saturday, May 17. Per Relay tradition, the faculty, staff and students painted the gym purple on Feb. 7 by wearing purple T-shirts during the varsity basketball game. Relay for Life coordinator Thaddeus Zuzga said that OLCHS raised more than $1,500. These funds will be used to cover all of the extracurricular activities at this year’s Relay For Life Event on May 17, 2014. It is not too late to register teams or participants for the event. For more information, call 424-5200.

St. Laurence

  St. Laurence students participated in Viking Quest Week, which included a variety of speakers and culminated in a Team of Teams competition called Igor’s Challenge.   Rich Panico ’69 kicked off the week reminding everyone of the importance of vision and knowing where you’re going. Nathan Kipnis talked about his experience in the architecture industry as it relates to problem solving, and Mark Wollschlaeger highlighted the positive aspects of a STEM curriculum.   During the Igor Challenge, each team of students created a ship from limited materials and then tested it in a competition, which gave them the opportunity to use creativity and problemsolving skills they have learned through the St. Laurence STEM curriculum.   The final assembly also recognized students, faculty, and staff who are emblematic leaders at St. Laurence.

Submitted photo

Students from St. Xavier University hit the road to help out the Misericordia cause.

SXU collects close to 7K for Misericordia    More than 100 Saint Xavier University alumni, students, faculty, and staff volunteered to help raise almost $7,000 in support of Misericordia Heart of Mercy’s Candy Days fundraising event on April 25.   In 10 hours, the SXU ServiceThrough Action Team collected $6,951.93 from motorists at the intersection of 95th and Cicero Ave. in Oak Lawn. All proceeds will support Misericordia Heart of Mercy.    Several groups from SXU made

efforts to participate this year, including: local SXU alumni; the SXU football team; School of Nursing students, staff, and faculty; Communication Sciences and Disorders students; Department of Public Safety staff and student workers; and

University Ministry.    Misericordia currently supports 600 children and adults with mild to profound developmental disabilities from all racial, religious, and socio-economic backgrounds. Their exceptional programs include residential placement and

day-to-day support, employment opportunities, physical and speech therapy, social and recreational outings, health and fitness activities, and opportunities for spiritual growth. — Submitted by St. Xavier University

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And a good time was not had by all   Members of the youth soccer Estudiantes Inter FC squad line up with Stagg High School players during the introductions last Wednesday before a match with Sandburg and one young player was a little upset. Sandburg beat Stagg, 3-1 in the match to wrap up a Southwest Suburban Conference Blue title. For more photos see sports.

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Leaders are newspaper readers.

GSU unveils new mascot   When Governors State University athletics in University Park begins intercollegiate play in the fall, its opponents will face off against the GSU Jaguars.   The university unveiled the Jaguar mascot Tuesday, after conducting a search that took several months and included input from faculty, staff, student and the surrounding community.   “The university is growing and having a mascot is an important component to a rich experience for our students,” said Courtney Sanders, vice president of enrollment management and marketing. “A mascot is an identifying symbol for a university, an important tool for building a tradition. We are thrilled to start building long-lasting traditions as the GSU Jaguars.”   The university began its search in February by taking suggestions from students, staff, faculty and residents of the surrounding communities. It received over 400

entries, more than half of which were unique. The university’s search committee then voted to narrow the choices down to four finalists: the Jaguars, the Prairie Wolves, the Gladiators and the Bengals. After an artist designed sketches of what the mascot could look like, the university then put the choice to an open vote online.    The university received an overwhelming response, logging over 30,000 online votes.    Sanders said the university want-

ed to make the process as democratic as possible. With a mascot being an enduring symbol, the university wanted as much outside input as possible when making the choice, she said.   The Jaguar is the university’s first mascot. It stands among other firsts for the university coming this fall, including the first freshman class, the opening of its first student residence hall and the beginning of intercollegiate play for its first sports teams.   GSU presented prizes to the people who were the first to submit the four finalists. Joseph Iniguez received $175 for his submission of the Gladiators. Calvin Rowe received $100 for submitting the Prairie Wolves and Steven Alvarado received $50 for submitting the Bengals. Paula Franklin was the grand prize winner and received $350 for submitting the Jaguars. — Submitted by Governors State University.

QOP teachers give away free books   Kristine Owens, a history instructor at Queen of Peace High School who was recently recognized for her outstanding achievements with the 2014 Distinguished Service Award, is at it again; this time, donating free books in honor of World Book Night.    World Book Night is an annual celebration dedicated to spreading the love of reading. Each year on April 23, thousands of people go out into their communities and give half a million free World

Book Night paperbacks to light and non-readers. These books are free, no strings attached, with no agenda aside from increasing literacy and love of reading.   This fall, Owens and fellow Queen of Peace employee, Counselor Ashley Dick both applied to be book givers, upon acceptance they were assigned “The Zookeeper’s Wife” and last week, passed out 40 copies at Chuck’s Southern Comfort Café in Burbank.    “We picked Chuck’s because it

is an extremely popular restaurant and we thought there would be good foot traffic there,” Owens said. “The staff was fabulous… the hostess took Ashley into the lounge and walked her around to tables that she thought would be interested in receiving books. We gave the vast majority of the books to people as they walked into the restaurant… Most people said thank you and flipped through the book a bit as they walked away. As a book giver, it was a very nice feeling.’’

most ernment e v o g in d nd th serve "Having ult life I understa lic. d u a p y ed b of m rage an inform value of ive in-depth cove the f g o s s r n e e Newspap at concern citiz motes o th r s p e hich of issu munity, w ers are local com For me, newspap ce for ur . dialogue d most trusted so n." o n ti a a the best ews and inform n l a loc .D. shard, Ph Glenn Po ident, Pres niversity Illinois U n r e th u o S

■ Korean Veteran; Commendation for outstanding service

■ Former Illinois State Senator, U.S. Congressman, candidate for governor ■ Founder, Poshard Foundation for Abused Children

■ Former high school teacher and coach

■ Graduate, SIU Carbondale ■ Graduate, Carmi Township High School

165.5 million people read a newspaper in print or online in the past week Source: Scarborough Research 2010

Be a leader. Be a reader.


10

The Reporter

Thursday, May 8, 2014

FEATURES / COMMUNITY CALENDAR

BTG hopes ‘Firecracker Contest’ is red hot    “The Miss Firecracker Contest” is a play by Beth Henley which will be performed by the Beverly Theatre Guild May 16 through May 18 at the Morgan Park Academy Arts Center’s Baer Theater.    Fred Eberle, a lifelong resident of Beverly/Mt.Greewood and Jeff Ortmann of Oak Lawn are the producers of this Southern Gothic comedy/tragedy. The director, Beth Lynch-Giddings from Blue Island, captures this play’s quirky characters while producing a positive message about self-confidence, courage, perseverance, and compassion with warmth and humor.    It takes place in a small Mississippi town in the 1980’s on the 4th of July weekend during the town’s annual holiday celebration. Pageants, particularly in the South, are important events and truly exemplify all the qualities one would expect to find in a Southern woman, as well as stressing the importance of class and community. Often in Southern pageants, the winner is chosen not because of her beauty or merit, but simply

because of her family connections, social standing, and the values of her community. This is where these characters of Miss Firecracker give us the humor and what the perception of how important, or not, a pageant is like in their small town.   Carnelle, played by Kathy Oliva (Crestwood), is an orphan with more than just a spotty reputation around town. She has entered the pageant which she has been talking about for years. Her pampered first cousin Elain, Laura Wolframski (Chicago), has come to town to deliver a speech for the Miss Firecracker Contest which she won 14 years earlier and made her a local celebrity. Elain’s brother Delmount, played by Brian Whitlock (Beverly), shows up unexpectedly, determined to sell the family home his mother left him and start a new life following a stint in a mental institution.   Elaine Cosgrove Casey (Alsip) is playing the sweet and quirky seamstress, Popeye, who is a new comer to town and falls in love with Delmount

instantly. While Tessy, Katy Franklin (Oak Park), who has a past with Delmount, runs the contest backstage. At the contest, Carnell meets an old boyfriend, Mac Sam played by Jason Taylor (Pullman), a carney who is sickly but still gets a kick out of life.    A Dinner/Theatre Promotion from Jenny’s Steakhouse 111th Street (11041 Menard Ave, Chicago Ridge) for all three shows for $39. For more information and to make reservations for this package deal call Jenny’s Steakhouse at 708-229-2272.    All performances will at the Baer Theater located at Morgan Park Academy Arts Center, 2153 W. 111th Street in Chicago. The May 16 and 17 performances at at 8 p.m. and the May 18 matinee is at 2 p.m.   To reserve tickets call 773284-8497 or order on line at www.BeverlyTheatreGuild.org. Tickets are $20 and discounted Submitted by John Neumann/Beverly Theatre Guild Group Sale Tickets are availCarnella is frantically getting ready backstage for the competition in “The Miss Firecracker Contest” able. — Submitted by Beverly with the help of the others. From left to right of the reflection in the mirror: Popeye (Eileen Theatre Guild Casey, Alsip), Carnell (Kathy Oliva, Crestwood), Delmount (Brian Whitlock, Beverly), Elaine (Laura Walframski, Chicago), Mac Sam (Jason Taylor, Pullman), and Tessy (Kathy Franklin, Oak Park).

Library Notes

Park Clips Chicago Ridge

  The Chicago Ridge Park District has several locations. One is the Frontier Fieldhouse, 9807 S. Sayre Ave. For more information on programs at this location, or to register, call 423-3959. Another location is the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St. For more information on programs at this location, call 708636-4900. ***   May 10: The park district is offering a trip to see Chicago White Sox take on the Arizona Diamondbacks at U.S. Cellular Field. The bus will leave Freedom Activity Center at 4:30 p.m. and will return around 11 p.m. The price is $25 per residents and $35 for non-residents.    There will be fireworks after the game. Seats are in section 110. For more information and to register, call the Freedom Activity Center. ***   Wednesdays through June 25: The second session of Vinyasa “Flow” Yoga, a form of yoga that focuses on flowing from pose to pose and linking the movement

with the breath, will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Freedom Activity Center.   The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents. The class is being taught by Kelly McKimson-Rhodes, a certified yoga teacher trained at Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga School in Chicago.   This energizing type of yoga builds endurance, strength, and flexibility, all while calming the mind. The Class is set to upbeat music and ends with peaceful relaxation. All levels welcome. A third session is scheduled for July 9 through Aug. 13. ***   Thursdays through June 26: The Chicago Ridge Park District invites residents and nonresidents to enjoy the benefits of yoga, connecting the breath to movements.   Julie Chappetto, a 200 CYT Ayurveda Yoga teacher, will lead the class from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Freedom Activity Center. The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents.   Yoga can also build strength while releasing muscles and stress. Hatha style poses will be designed around the chakras, energy centers of the body. Class will begin with short mediation and end in savasana. Participants are asked to bring their yoga mats and yoga blocks if needed. All levels are welcome. For more in(Continued on page 12)

Evergreen Park

   The Evergreen Park Public Library is located at 9400 S. Troy Ave. For more information, or to register for a program, call 4228522. ***   Ongoing: The Evergreen Park Public Library is asking residents to share their time, talents or hobbies with the library. Volunteering gives individuals the opportunity to enrich the quality of life in the community by investing in the public library. There are opportunites to fill an employment gap, enhance personal growth, earn service hours, and meet new people.    Adult and teen volunteers perform a variety of tasks so that more resources can be directed toward library materials, services, and programs. All that is required is a positive attitude and a willingness to give back to our community.   Interested residents will need to schedule a meeting with Volunteer Coordinator Kay O’Connor, by calling, or emailing volunteer@ evergreenparklibrary.org.

Green Hills

   The Green Hills Public Library is located at 8611 W. 103rd St., Palos Hills. For more information, or to register for a program, call the information desk at 598-8446, Ext. 120. Registration may also be available online at greenhillslibrary.org. *** South Side Seniors   May 8: Interested individuals are invited to join the South Side Seniors for coffee and cook-

Here We Are! Pick up a copy of The Reporter Newspaper at the following locations: ChiCago Ridge

Jack & Pat’s - 10717 S. Ridgeland 7-11 - 10658 S. Ridgeland Ave. PK Pantry - 6410 W. 107th Street Shoprite - 9910 S. Harlem Avenue Mobile - 10001 S. Ridgeland Avenue

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7-11 - 9860 S. Kedzie Avenue Lagens - 8859 S. California 7-11 - 3440 W. 95th Street

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Rich Gas - 6760 W. 111th Street Pete’s Liquor - 11428 S. Harlem Ave. Express Gas - 115th & Harlem Ave.

BuRBank

7-11 - 5560 W. 87th Street

ies as they watch the critically acclaimed film “Dallas Buyers Club” at 10 a.m. ***   May 9: Patrons needing some tablet Rx are invited to the Green Hills Public Library at 2 p.m. The staff will help individuals work through any basic issues they might have. ***   May 12: The Green Hills Public Library presents, “Madcap Puppets: Fantastic Fairy Tales Meet the King’s Royal Court Jester, Flump,” at 6 p.m. Flump accidentally overhears a plot by the wizard Glistor to turn the King into a mouse. Flump, as he entertains with fantastic fairy tales, tries to discover a way to save the King. The stories include: The Wishing Tree, The Water of Life, and Rapunzel. All ages are invited to the event. Registration is required and limited to 90. Registration can be made online. ***   May 14: Children, 6 to 8 years old, are invited to Green Team Time with Miss Emily. Children can enjoy nature themed stories and activities from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. ***   May 15: Chicago author and White Sox team historian Rich Lindberg presents a look back at the history of the Chicago White Sox, from the earliest days of the franchise, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the library. Participants can go back in time through the hitless wonder era, the long losing seasons before the “Go-Go” Sox, renewed a winning tradition in the 1950s, and all the years that followed. ***   May 20: The Green Hills Public Library will present the film, “Killing Kennedy,” at 6 p.m. A limited number of books will be available for check out at the Information Desk. ***   May 21: The library is looking for district residents to participate in a focus group on from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. District officials will discuss various areas of library services. This is a chance to help shape the future of the library. Pizza and refreshments will be served. Registration is encouraged. Those unable to attend the event, but would like to provide input, fill out the online survey available from May 1 to May 31. ***   May 22: Teen pizza and movie night will feature “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Pizza and pop will be provided. One person will win a copy of the movie. Registration is required and limited to 30 teens. Registration is available online. ***   May 23: Family Movie Time at the library features, “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2” at 2 p.m. Participants can snack on popcorn and lemonade. All ages are welcome. ***   May 26: The Library will be closed in honor of Memorial Day. ***   May 29: Families are invited to play bingo to win prizes and to partake in trivia between rounds. All ages are invited to participate from 6 to 7 p.m. Registration is required and limited to 40. Registration is available online. ***   Daily: The library offers daily sessions of story time for children 18 months–5 years of age. Parents can register online, or call the Youth Services Department at ext. 117 for more information. ***   Ongoing: The Friends of the

Library accept book donation at the Circulation Desk on the second floor of the library. Those interested in becoming a Friend of the Library can find membership applications in the Friends Bookstore or at the Circulation Desk. ***   Ongoing: Patrons can subscribe to Green Hills Public Library mailing list at greenhillslibrary.org for all of the latest announcements about the library. ***   Ongoing: Patrons interested in their family history can visit the library and gain free access to Ancestry.com Library Edition and HeritageQuest Online. For more information, visit greenhillslibrary.org, or call the Information Desk at ext. 120. ***   Ongoing: New voters and those needing to change their name or address can stop by the library. There are several staff members on-site that are able to register patrons to vote. Patrons can visit, or call the library to check for staff availability. ***   Ongoing: The latest update to Freegal Music allows Green Hills Public Library District patrons increased access to over 6 million songs from 85 different countries. Registered cardholders can download up to three songs each week, as well as stream three hours each day at no direct cost. Patrons can get started at greenhillslibrary.org, or download the free app for their smartphones. ***   Ongoing: Green Hills Public Library District is the first library in the state of Illinois to offer Freegal Movies and Television. This new service offers access to streaming movies and television content. Library patrons are able to access thousands of video selections from major content suppliers conveniently on their personal computer, or portable device. Patrons wanting to get started, should visit greenhillslibrary.org. Those needing assistance, should visit the Information Desk, or call ext. 120.

Oak Lawn

   The Oak Lawn Public library is located at 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The library’s regular hours are: Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, or to register for a program, call 422-4990. ***   May 12: Dr. Paul Silverman, cardiologist at Advocate Christ Medical Center, reveals new research concerning the many changes you can make to avoid heart disease when he tells patrons, “Don’t Become a Statistic: How to Reduce Your Risk and Recognize the Warning Signs of a Heart Attack.” The event will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Oak Lawn Public Library. Body Mass Index and blood pressure screenings will be available. ***   May 13: Jeff Mishur of Art Excursions presents “The Monuments Men” at 7 p.m. at the Oak

Lawn Public Library. He will discuss the story of how art historians, museum professionals and military personnel worked to protect Europe’s cultural treasures, and repatriate stolen objects during and after World War II. This slide lecture deals with some of the major players associated with the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program and why their efforts were needed. ***   May 14: The Oak Lawn Community Partnership will hold free health screening at the Oak Lawn Public Library from 10 to 11 a.m. in the lower level meeting room. Personnel from the Oak Lawn Fire Department will perform blood pressure screenings. In addition, “Ask the Pharmacist” will be available.   The Oak Lawn Community Partnership is a cooperative alliance between the Village of Oak Lawn, Advocate Christ Medical Center, service organizations, educators, interested community members and business leaders. For a complete schedule of dates and programs, call the library, or visit online.

***   May 15: A free movie, “American Hustle,” from 2013, will be screened at the Oak Lawn Public Library at 2 and 6:30 p.m. A con man and his seductive British partner are forced to work for a wild FBI agent, Richie DiMaso. He pushes them into a world of Jersey powerbrokers and mafia. The movie, starring Christian Bale and Amy Adams, is rated R and is 138 minutes long. ***   May 21: The deadline to register for the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library annual dinner meeting is coming up. The dinner meeting will be held Thursday, June 5 at the Hilton Oak Lawn, 9333 S. Cicero Ave. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the dinner program starts at 6 p.m. The cost is $25 per person.    The event includes a full dinner featuring a chicken entrée, as well as early summer trip registrations and the annual free book raffle drawing, in which everyone wins. Registration forms are available at the Oak Lawn Public Library. ***   Various Dates in May: High school students are invited to study for finals at the Oak Lawn Public Library. Students should bring their books, and the library will provide the snacks on the following dates:   May 17 — from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.   May 18 — from 1 to 5 p.m.   May 19 through 22 — from 4 to 9 p.m.   Meeting rooms B and C will be available for group study. Quiet study areas are available throughout the library. *** (Continued on page 12)


Thursday, May 8, 2014 The Reporter

CONSUMER

Snackville Junction

(Continued from page 1)

time.    Mike Walsh of Evergreen Park balanced his 18-month-old daughter, Keegan, on his lap, and explained that the restaurant was special “because it was OK for a kid to be a kid.”   Walsh seemed to enjoy the afternoon almost as much, as he ordered a basket full of the entrees that he’d come to love over the years, including a cheese dog and fries.   Jesse and Mireya Gonzalez and their three children came from their home near Midway Airport to enjoy the diner one last final time.   Jayden, Diana and Melanie Gonzalez played with toy trains as they patiently waited for their orders to be served.    Jesse Gonzalez said his family will miss the memories of the coming to Snackville Junction, which can’t be replicated at a chain or fast-food restaurant, he said.

  The Perez-Rogers family, which has owned the restaurant for past seven years, announced on Facebook last week that they “lost their struggle against foreclosure of Snackville Junction.”    The restaurant got its start in Chicago’s Beverly community more than 60 years ago and moved to Evergreen Park in the 1970s. The Perez-Rogers purchased the restaurant from the original owner and reopened it in 2008.   The owners said in a Facebook posting that they did everything possible to keep the restaurant open.    “We have worked very hard the last seven years to continue with this beloved tradition. We’ve done everything in our power to comply with our initial agreement with the bank that financed our mortgage. We were diligent and prompt with our monthly payments, insurance and everything else that a business owner is expected to do.”    The family said the bank that holds mortgage demanded the entire outstanding loan balance when it came time to renew

the loan.    “After a year-long attempt to negotiate, there is no longer anything we can do. We are broken hearted and felt the need to communicate this very unfortunate circumstance.”   The owners thanked their patrons for their support and well wishes in a May 3 Facebook posting.   “Well, today was officially our last day. It was wonderful to see so many of our regular customers, some that haven’t visited in a while and a few new ones. Everyone expressed their sadness at the closing of such a wonderful place full of multi-generational memories. We, too, are very sad that we were forced to close our doors. We thank all who sat at our counter and enjoyed their meal served by the choo-choo.    “We are honored to have been the custodians of this 60-plus year beloved establishment. We pray that perhaps someday Snackville Junction will return and bring happiness to new generations. Thank you for your patronage and for allowing us to be part of your memories.”

Photo by Brigid Rakow

Norine Fitzgerald and her granddaughter, Alice, 3, ate a final meal at Snackville Junction Saturday afternoon. Fitzgerald said she and her granddaughter will miss spending time at the “traditional” diner.

Be prepared for the changing seasons of your life   Last week, we observed May Day, a celebration of spring. And, after a long and hard winter in many parts of the country, most of us are ready for sunshine, warmer temperatures and the hopefulness that spring always symbolizes. But as winter gives way to spring, we are also reminded that our lives have “seasons,” too — and it pays to be prepared for all of them. So, as you move into the “retirement season,” you’ll need to prepare for several possible challenges, including the following:   Outliving your resources — The idea of outliving one’s financial resources is certainly not one we want to face. In fact, in a poll of people ages 44 to 75 sponsored by Allianz Life Insurance, 61% said they fear depleting their assets more than they fear dying. The best way you can overcome anxiety about running out of money is to invest and plan. Contribute as much as you can afford to your IRA and 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plan — and when your salary goes up over time, increase

your contributions. As for the “plan” part, try to envision the type of lifestyle you want during retirement, and then estimate how much this lifestyle will cost. Once you reach retirement, you will also need to do some planning — specifically, you will need to calculate how much money you can afford to withdraw from your investments each year.   Becoming disabled — Onethird of all people between the ages of 30 and 64 will become disabled at some point, according to the Health Insurance Association of America. If you became disabled, even temporarily, the loss of income could prove devastating to your financial security, and that of your family’s. To avoid this worrisome scenario, you may want to consider disability insurance. If your employer offers this coverage as an employee benefit, take it — but don’t assume it will be sufficient. Many times, an employer-sponsored disability policy will only cover a shortterm disability and may have a long waiting period for benefits to kick in. Consequently

you may need to purchase your own disability insurance policy to supplement your employer’s coverage.    Requiring long-term care — Unfortunately, many people eventually require some type of long-term care, whether that involves a stay in a nursing home or the assistance of a home health care aid. This type of care is expensive, and Medicare only covers part of it. Just how costly is long-term care? The national average for home health aide services is nearly $45,000 per year, and a private room in a nursing home is nearly $84,000 per year, according to

a recent survey by Genworth, a financial security company. To meet long-term care costs, you could self-insure, but that might be prohibitively expensive. But failing to do anything about meeting long-term care costs could result in the need for your grown children or other family members to get involved in some fashion — and that is something you no doubt wish to avoid. Fortunately, you can find solutions. To learn about appropriate protection vehicles, consult with your financial advisor.   With some thoughtful planning, constant vigilance and timely action, you can meet all these challenges — and enjoy all the seasons of life in which you find yourself. Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

Profits & Sense  Ron Beckstrom of Golden Rule Coins will be available to appraise rare or collectible coins in the lobby of the First National Bank of Evergreen Park, 3950 W. 95th St. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, May 29 He will also appraise gold jewelry. No appointments are necessary. Appraisals will be made on a first come, first serve basis. ***   Marquette Bank’s various branch locations will host several after-hours events for the business communities they serve.

11

  Marquette Bank will host people who want to plan for a business networking af- retirement from 5 to 7 p.m. ter-hours event from 5 to 7 Wednesday, May 14. Particip.m. Wednesday, May 14 at pants are invited to mix, mingle its branch located at 8855 S. and find out everything they Ridgeland Ave., Oak Lawn. need to know so that they are Business owners, managers and prepared and can enjoy your others are invited to enjoy an retirement when it’s time. They evening of refreshments, door can enjoy refreshments and prizes and with networking oppor-Dunst talk to retirement experts and Tony tunities. For more information, financial professionals about and to register for the event, retirement options, plans or call (599-5431. a family member’s arrange  The Orland Park branch ments. Participants will have of Marquette Bank at 9533 the opportunity to ask quesW. 143rd St., will host a “65 tions to professionals from a after 5” after-hours event for variety of financial/retirement

Talkin Poker

disciplines, including financial planning, life care, elder law, trust services, insurance, estate planning, wills and retirement. For more information, or to register, call 873-3519.

Are fitness tracking wristbands a fad?   Nike recently tion. Sadly, Fuel discontinued points were an Nike Fuel bands arbitrary metand fired a ric that helped bunch of related you accomplish staff. President nothing. The and CEO Mark software was Parker said, simple to use, By Shelley Palmer “I think we but forced you to will be part of tap or click way wearables going too many things forward. It’ll be integrated into to create an emotionally satisfyother products that we create, ing experience. To be as polite as and then we’ll look at expanding possible, Fuel is probably where our partnerships to create more it deserves to be right now. reach for the Nike Fuel and Fuel   That said, it might be helpsystem that we have … and the ful and instructive to examine best way to do that, we think, some of the component parts of is through the best partnerships the fitness tracking wristband/ that we can find.” wearables trend because… in    Does this mean that Nike is out its current form, fitness trackof the fitness tracking wristband ing wristbands may well be a fad. business, or does it mean that it Nike is going to concentrate on Function and Features software and apps and let oth-    I’ve been using a Jawbone UP ers (like Apple) figure out the (now an UP24) for almost a year. hardware? Or, does it mean that During that time, I have lost over fitness tracking wristbands were 55 lbs. by walking, eating a bala fad and it’s over? anced healthy diet and getting    Nike may stand for excellence enough sleep. I have quantified in sports and fitness, but Nike a good portion of this journey Fuel certainly did not stand for using the UP app. The data excellence in fitness tracking tracked includes: steps per day, technology. Nike Fuel’s unique estimated calories burned (resting combination of hardware and and active), sleep (deep and light) software was an experiment in and calories consumed (which I fitness tracking, social fitness and don’t track with the UP app — self-assembling athletic competi(Continued on page 12)

TECHNO TALK

   Marquette Bank’s Wolf Road location will host a business networking after-hours event Thursday, May 22, at 17865 S. Wolf Road, Orland Park. Participants are invited to enjoy an evening of refreshments, door prizes and networking opportunities. For more information, or to register, call 873-8170.

Talkin Poker

By Chad Holloway

Is poker a game of luck or skill?    Many of the people in my life think that because I play poker, I gamble for a living. I try to explain to them that poker isn’t gambling; it is, in fact, a game of skill. Mathematics back up that assertion, but friends and family members are rarely convinced.   Despite the evidence to the contrary, poker still has a stigma of being a gambler’s game. Why is that?    I think it comes down to shortterm thinking versus long-term thinking. An old maxim suggests that in any one hand, poker is 90 percent luck and 10 percent skill. A prime example of this

took place earlier this year at the bet to 60,000, and then Yazici $1,800-buy-in main event of the seven-bet the rest of his stack. Hollywood Poker Open Grantville Thomas called. (Pa.) Regional Championship.    Fittingly, it was the two biggest    Just five of the final nine play- hands in poker that inspired such ers would earn money. Bradley fierce action. Thomas held pocket Yazici, who began the day as chip aces and was an overwhelming leader with 170,400, and Jason 82.36 percent favorite, while Thomas, who wasn’t far behind Yazici held a pair of kings and with 156,100, were in prime posi- had a 17.09 percent chance of tion to take home prizewith money. catching another. Tony Dunst with Tony Dunst   Play had just begun on Day   The 4h 2s 9c flop wasn’t par2 of the event. Blinds were ticularly interesting, though 700-1,400 with an ante of 100. Thomas became a 91.62 percent Thomas raised to 3,200, only to favorite. But then the dealer have Yazici reraise to 7,500. Ac- turned over the Kd to give Yazici tion folded back to Thomas, and three of a kind. he pushed back with a four-bet to    Thomas was visibly shaken as 16,000. Not to be outdone, Yazici he went from an overwhelming five-bet to 35,000. Thomas six- favorite to being one card away from hitting the rail. The rest of the players at the table, as well as the spectators on hand, were shocked by the sudden turn of with Tony Dunst events, and everyone watched as the dealer put out the 6c on the river. Thomas’ skill allowed him to get his chips in the middle in an overwhelmingly advantageous United Trust Bank (as of May 6)

Talkin Poker

Talkin Poker

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Prospect Federal (as of May 5) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

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All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

SUDOKU Solution

mathematical spot, but bad luck struck.   However, that was just one hand. If they were to play out the same scenario 100 times, Thomas would win far more often than not. So while any single hand of poker may indeed be 90 percent luck and 10 percent skill, over the long haul, with a big enough hand sample, those percentages actually reverse themselves. Once you realize this and accept it — easier said than done to accept bad luck — you’ll be well on your way to being a successful poker player.    By the way, Yazici went on to win the tournament and claim the $22,752 first-place prize, demonstrating that no matter how much skill you have, it doesn’t hurt to have a little luck on your side.    (Chad Holloway is a World Series of Poker bracelet winner and senior news editor for PokerNews. com and learn.pokernews.com. Follow him on Twitter: @ChadAHolloway.)

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Thursday, May 8, 2014

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Best of The Wine Guy

A centuries-old cure still healing today    We think of wine as a drink of the French and Italians, and there is no question the people of France and Italy love their wine. We may also associate wine as an American or Australian beverage; much of the wine here in the states is produced in either California or the Land Down Under.   Wine’s origins, however, go back as many as 4,000 years, and likely longer, to the Far East and Middle East.    Legend has it that 4,000 years ago in China, Yu the Great — the founder and first ruler of the Xia Dynasty — discovered the healing properties of wine.    After an eight-year war, disastrous floods and pestilence, Yu was in such distress he could no longer eat or sleep. His doctor disappeared, but a maid known as Yi Tieh served him some wine she had made. After tasting the wine, Yu’s appetite returned; after several more his worries vanished and he was able to sleep.   In ancient Persia, present

day Iran, which many historians credit as the birthplace of wine, a king noted the healing abilities of wine nearly 2,000 years before Christ. The king found this out by accident. After commanding the juice of grapes be pressed and brought to him, he had it blessed and placed in a touchstone, where he drank it daily. After awhile the juice became bitter, and believing it had been poisoned he put it aside.   Later that day one of the king’s slaves became very ill and, believing he was going to die, tried to end his misery by drinking the “poison” juice. After drinking just a little, however, he felt better, and after a little more fell asleep. When he woke up his illness was gone. The king heard this story and drank some of the juice himself, then ordered everyone else to do the same. Many sick people were made well, and wine was pronounced “the king’s medicine.”   Wine also played a signifi-

(Continued from page 10)

  Last week’s WHATIZIT? was the head of a duck and we were actually looking for people to guess that it was a duck’s tuft (hence the Trump clue).   But people were guessing the animal as a whole instead of its bad hairdo (Trump again) so the miserable Board of Directors decided to allow the guess of a duck.   Willow Springs Harrison Debre was the first early bird with the right answer. Other winners were Worth’s E.J. Oahueke, Theresa and George Rebersky and Celeste Cameron.   Incorrect guesses included a bald eagle, a fish fly or fish jig, a swan (close, but the board of directors say no), a horse’s head of hair, a snowy egret and the tail section of a dog.   This week Bob Rakow comes in with a photo to ponder and the clue is that it might make Johnny Cash blue.    Send those guesses by Monday night to thereporter@comcast.net with WHATIZIT in the subject line and your name and hometown.

  May 23: The Oak Lawn Public Library will host a free movie screening of “Philomena” at 10 a.m. A world-weary political journalist picks up the story of a woman’s search for her son, who was taken away from her decades ago, after she became pregnant and was forced to live in a convent. The movie stars Judi Dench. It is rated PG-13 and is 98 minutes long. ***   Immediately: Students, ages 11 to 15, seeking two hours of service may register for a group volunteering session. Students work together on large projects at the library as group volunteers. The sessions will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, March

Park Clips (Continued from page 10) formation and registration, call the Freedom Activity Center. Another session is slated for July 10 through Aug. 21. ***   Tuesdays through June 17 and Thursdays May 15 through June 19: Zumba class, a Latin inspired dance fitness program that individuals at all fitness levels can participate in, is being offered from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Freedom Activity Center.   The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents. Another session is being offered Tuesdays from June 24 through Aug. 5 and Thursdays from June 26 through Aug. 7. For more information, or to register, call the Freedom Activity Center.    Zumba is a program that the fit athlete and the shy, uncoordinated beginner can enjoy. The dance rhythms include: meringue, salsa, reggaeton and much more. ***   May 17: The Chicago Ridge Park District is hosting a trip to the Volo Auto Museum, which contains an exhibit of collector’s autos from vintage to modern classics with the main focus being American cars of 1950-1980 period, TV and movie cars, bizarre cars and even Disney and Looney Tunes displays. The bus leaves Freedom Activity Center at 9 a.m. and will return around 3:30 p.m. The cost of the trip is $10 for residents and $15 for non-residents. There is also a family package at a cost of $25 for residents and $35 for nonresidents for up to five people. The fee includes transportation to and from the museum, but does not include the admission fee. ***   Spring and Summer: The Chicago Park District is offering a discount special for those who register for yoga or zumba classes. Participants who register for any two yoga or zumba classes will receive the classes at a cost of $65 for residents and $85 for non-residents. ***   Summer: The Chicago Ridge Park District is looking for seasonal supervisory help this spring and summer. The supervisor position would be available from April through September, and would entail supervising a splash pad, miniature golf course and batting cage facility. Applicants must be available days, nights and weekends. Applications are available at the Frontier Fieldhouse, or the Freedom Activity Center. ***   Ongoing: The Chicago Ridge Park District is taking team registration for 4th through 8th grade boys basketball and girls volleyball leagues. For registration information, please call 708423-3959 or visit our website

www.chicagoridgeparks.com. ***   Note: The Chicago Ridge Park District is offering a discount special of any two yoga classes for $65 for residents and $85 for non-residents.

Oak Lawn

   The Oak Lawn Park District administrative building is located at 9400 S. Kenton Ave. For more information, call 857-2225 between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. ***    The Oak Lawn Park District’s Stony Creek Clubhouse, 5850 W. 103rd St., is hosting special events during March. Reservations are suggested. For more information and reservations, call 857-2433. ***   May 12: Registration is due by noon for the Oak Lawn Park District’s Midnight Madness Co-Ed Volleyball Tournament, which will be played at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 16, at the Community Pavilion, 9401 S. Oak Park Ave.   Registration is required and must be done in full teams. For more information and registration forms, visit the Community Pavilion, or online at olparks. com. More information is also available by calling 857-2420. Team managers will be notified of start times. This is an indoor, self-officiated tournament.    The fee is $100 per team. Each team will consist of six to 10 players and compete in either an intermediate division or recreational division. The winning team will be awarded a cash

with Anthony Scarano cant role in ancient Palestine beginning in the 2nd century BC. The Old Testament has more than 500 references to wine and discusses its healing properties, but not until the story of the Last Supper in the New Testament does wine attain the highest praise it has ever received: As the symbol of the blood of Jesus Christ. Did Jesus use wine simply because wine was a common beverage at most every meal, or did he use it as a metaphor for the nearly

Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the opinions of Mr. Scarano based on years of independent study and personal experience, and may not be beneficial to health. Wine should be consumed in moderation, as overindulgence may be harmful to health.

Library Notes

Photo by Bob Rakow

WHATIZIT?

The Wine Guy

miraculous power of wine?    One thing is for sure: Wine has been healing people for millennia and continues to do so today. The moderate consumption of this wonderful drink can boost your immune system, help keep your heart healthy and kill the harmful bacteria in your digestive system that leads to sickness and disease. It is a true wonder drug, and one that will not cause the host of side effects produced by the prescription pharmaceuticals do rampantly consumed these days by a desperate public.

prize and t-shirts. ***   Ongoing: Duplicate bridge will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mondays at the Oak View Center. Cost is $7 per person and includes a light lunch. For more information, call 857-2200.

Worth

  The Worth Park District is located at the Terrace Centre, 11500 S. Beloit Ave. For more information, or to register for the programs, call 448-7080.   The Winter/Spring Worth Park District program guide has arrived. Registration has begun. ***   Ongoing: Pickle Ball will be at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., from 6 to 8 p.m. every Tuesday. Pickle Ball is a cross between tennis and ping-pong and involves strategies such as lobbing, drive shots and overhead slams. Cost is $1. ***   Ongoing: Open gym basketball is offered at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $1. ***   Ongoing: The Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., has an indoor playground featuring slides, a climbing wall, tree house and more for children who can walk through 4 years old. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for non-residents. For more information call 448-7080 or visit worthparkdistrict.org.

Beverly Environmental, LLC

15 with registration already underway; Tuesday, March 25 with registration beginning March 15; and Thursday, March 27 with registration beginning March 17. ***   Ongoing: Several Oak Lawn auto dealers are participating in Oak Lawn Public Library’s Goodreads program auto including: Webb Chevrolet, Mancari’s Chrysler, Mike Haggerty Buick/ GMC, Ed Napleton Honda, Happy Hyundai, Oak Lawn Mazda, Kelly Nissan, Frank Shirey Cadillac and Oak Lawn Toyota. Courtesy of the library, a library staff member set up items, which includes material for children, magazines, nonfiction and fiction, in each dealership’s waiting area. Those who don’t finish a book or article are

Techno Talk (Continued from page 1) I use MyFitnessPal for calorie counting).    Through an aesthetically pleasing — but overly clunky — UI, the UP app tells me what I need to know about my daily activity. Sadly, this information is only available via my mobile device (Android, in my case), so I must manually enter the information into an Excel spreadsheet to make it actionable. Not for the faint of heart.    The problem with every fitness tracking wristband and every associated app is that they only track what they track, and they are mostly incompatible with the other tools you need to create a complete actionable plan. (For hands-on reviews of practically every popular fitness tracking wristband, please visit www.smartphonediet.info.)   More importantly, once you are trained to know how much exercise you need to do each day and what portion sizes you are allowed to eat to maintain or reduce your body weight, there’s not much to quantify… is there?   Of course there is! While Fitbit, Jawbone UP, Withings Pulse, Polar Loop, Misfit Shine and other $100-$200 non-specialized, fitness track-

$

welcome to check the book out at the library. ***   Ongoing: Oak Lawn Public LibraryLocal History Coordinator Kevin Korst’s new book “Images of America: Oak Lawn Tornado of 1967” is now on sale. The book features 180 tornado-related images with caption and chapter introductions and is available at the reception booth for $21.99 (cash or check). Korst’s first book Images of America: Oak Lawn is also available. ***   Ongoing: Patrons are asked to donate their “gently used” books, magazines, CDs and videos to the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library Ongoing Book Sale at the library. Due to space limitations, the Friends

will not accept Readers Digest Condensed Books, encyclopedias and older textbooks. The donation drop-off area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the reception booth to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their donation. The Friends Ongoing Book Sale provides an ever-changing variety of books, magazines and other forms of media at bargain prices. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents and magazines cost 10 cents each. Audio-visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programming and purchases that are beyond their regular budget.

ing wristbands all have very similar features, they all help you understand how you spend your day. The bands use an accelerometer to track your movement and an algorithm takes a best guess at what those movements mean. This is where the process breaks down… it’s early days and these types of fitness tracking wristbands are technologically undifferentiated and the software leaves you wanting.   There are, of course, many specialized fitness tracking wristbands like the GPS enabled watches for runners by Garmin, Timex and Casio. Specialized wristbands with advanced features don’t really fall into the general consumer “fitness tracking wristband” category. Yes, they track and quantify much of the same activities, but they do it at a semi-professional or professional level. And, most have far too many features to be used to simply track steps.

why, the answers fell into three categories:    1. It broke.    2. I used it for a while, but I didn’t lose any weight.    3. I don’t have the discipline to use it right, so I just stopped.    Then there’s another smaller group that doesn’t use it every day, but may use it on the weekend or for a few days during the week. Finally, there are a few (like me) who are fully committed to the program.    If I were to graph the curves, they would look eerily similar to other fad graphs such as the EST Therapy fad in the 70s, the Aerobics craze of the 80s, Beanie Babies in the 90s, iPods in the 00s, etc.   The difference here is that fitness tracking wristbands are not the final form factor. Apple has a patent for headphones that will take your temperature and measure your heart rate; there are all kinds of sensors and wearable computing tools just around the corner. The iWatch is coming soon, as are several “next generation” wristbands that promise greater benefits and ease of use.   Are fitness tracking wristbands a fad? Probably, but the quantified self movement (of which fitness tracking wristbands are only one small part) is going to be here for a good long while. So get ready… this is just the beginning.

Team Members

  Social fitness is a common component of every fitness tracking wristband system. The UP app lets me assemble a team of friends. I have 25 team members. About half of my team has not used the app for months. When I asked some of them (via Facebook or email or text or actually in person)

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Section 2

Page 1

Taking the extra steps Knights play past regulation three times By Ken Karrson Working overtime benefited Chicago Christian only a little last week. Three times in four outings the Knights were required to play foes beyond the seventh inning so a winner could be declared — and in one of those instances, the result was actually indecisive as Christian handed coach Eric Brauer the second tie of his career. The Knights fought host Manteno to a 3-3 draw on Thursday through eight stanzas before darkness intervened. Since the contest was a nonconference one and would require a lengthy return trip to complete, Brauer is calling it a deadlock. And that proved a favorable outcome in comparison to last Monday’s Suburban Christian Conference Gold duel with Aurora Central Catholic. The Chargers, who are chasing Chicago Christian in the divisional standings, unleashed a pair of Division I recruits on Knights batters. The two pitchers shut Christian out after the first inning, although the Knights still had a few chances to break through. “It was never with nobody out,

but we threatened in probably five innings, where we had somebody in scoring position — sometimes two people,” Brauer said. “We just couldn’t come up with a key hit.” Thanks mostly to Christian Bolhuis, neither did Aurora for nine innings. Chicago Christian’s ace handled the mound chores through the first seven of those and was nicked for just one unearned run. He fanned nine, walked no one and allowed only two hits. “He has been pretty good all year,” Brauer said of Bolhuis. “His ERA’s under one, and he was in line to win his third conference 1-0 game in a row if we make one more play behind him.” The Chargers finally broke the tie in the bottom of the 10th, using a pair of walks and a two-out single to collect a hard-fought 2-1 victory. Aurora’s winning rally came two innings after it had squandered a bases-loaded, noout opportunity. A strikeout and Sean O’Meara’s running catch in the outfield short-circuited the would-be uprising. The latter’s effort ultimately became a double play. *** Brauer said one of the reasons he loves coaching baseball as op-

posed to some other sport is that “you rarely have to sit on anything. Forty-eight hours is about the longest you’ll [typically] go between games.” That's why he was glad to have the Knights host a rematch with the Chargers on Tuesday. And just to make certain his guys were equally enthused, he reminded them of a couple important points. “We saw their No. 1 and No. 2 guys on Monday because they couldn’t afford to lose that game, so we were going to see at least their No. 3 pitcher and we should be able to get some hits off him,” Brauer said. “And we were still in the driver’s seat [in the divisional race] as long as we won, so the focus was definitely on Tuesday and not on Monday.” And Christian (16-10-1, 7-5) lived up to Brauer’s words. Dan Vos and Adam Schoenle joined forces on the hill to limit Aurora to two hits while striking out seven between them, and the Knights did just enough scoring behind the duo to produce a 4-0 victory that kept them alone atop the SCC Gold “The conference race is real tight, but we’ll take a split,” Brauer said. “It didn’t hurt us.” (Continued on page 7)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards' AJ Sanchez can't beat a throw to first as Lincoln-Way East's Kenichi Haynie stretches for the ball last Thursday. The Bulldogs still had a good day, though, as they whipped the Griffins 12-3 in Oak Lawn.

Not operating at a loss

Bulldogs bounce back from defeat to win twice By Ken Karrson

   Losing a game is much different than losing one’s bearings.    But when winning has become commonplace, even a lone setback can have dire psychological consequences. Thus, after Richards absorbed just its second defeat over a span of 16 games last Monday, Bulldogs assistant coach said. “To do that, you’ve got to two-run double in the fourth and Kevin Quinn had a message for By Ken Karrson win games, and he put a stop to Musielak lofted a sacrifice fly that the players.    The record shows that Brother the losing streak. That was what completed the Crusaders’ scoring.   “He said, ‘Don’t lose two in we wanted from a senior pitcher.” Sullivan also drew three walks a row this year,’” Richards boss Rice broke even last week. Brian Wujcik said.   Convincing Loyola Academy   While Enriquez has pretty and tallied three times. players the Crusaders were only much toiled in the shadow of   “Our hitting’s saved us in a    And the Bulldogs proceeded to average might be a difficult task, teammates Biondic, Brian Musi- few games [this year],” McCarthy heed that advice. Not only did they elak and Ian McGinnis, McCar- said. “But when your staff goes gain revenge on South Suburban however.   For sure, the Ramblers saw thy considers him every bit as out there and puts up zeros, it Conference Red rival Reavis by Rice at its best, particularly last important to Rice’s mound staff allows your offense time to get answering Monday’s 7-1 loss with an 8-4 victory for themselves, but Wednesday, when it rode Mike as the others. comfortable. Enriquez’s superb pitching to a   “He’s been pitching so con-    “I’ve been pleased with our [of- the locals also went on to hamslaughter-rule win in Wilmette. sistent all year long,” McCarthy fensive] effort day in and day out, mer Lincoln-Way East 12-3 on The Crusaders’ offense wasn’t said. “He worked very hard in but it’s just a matter of staying Thursday. too shabby, either, as it pounded the offseason and it’s good to see consistent in your approach. Sit-    “We are [still] playing with conout 10 hits, six of which — as him have success. I’m happy for uational hitting is so important fidence,” Wujcik said. “The guys well as seven combined RBI — him personally. when you’re playing elite teams.” all understand we’re not Murderer’s Row, but we are efficient were supplied by Andrew Dyke   “Mike got off to a good start *** and Kevin Biondic. Behind that [against Loyola]. He had his chan-    The term “situational hitting” hitters and we can manufacture assault, Rice was able to pin a geup working and it was a domi- usually conjures up images of [good scoring] innings.” nating performance. And it wasn’t things like squeeze bunts and hit-    Ironically, that was the missing 10-0 defeat on Loyola.   But an even bigger story an easy day to pitch because the and-run plays in people’s minds, was Enriquez’s mastery on the wind was blowing out.” but Jake Barry put a more drahill. The senior had a no-hitter   The Crusaders (19-6, 8-2) cer- matic spin on it in Saturday’s through 4 2/3 innings before tainly had no difficulty dealing rematch with the Ramblers. getting touched for a single, the with the elements as they scored   Barry’s walk-off grand slam Ramblers’ lone hit on the after- at least twice in four of their five in the seventh lifted Rice to a noon. Enriquez did walk three, plate appearances. Dyke produced 7-3 triumph and series sweep of but those mattered little as he four of Rice’s first five runs with Loyola. Michael Massey (single), also struck out six men and was an RBI single in the first and Dyke (walk) and Erich Lieser By Ken Karrson backed by a flawless Crusaders three-run homer in the second. He (intentional walk) got on base   When it came to a clash of added another RBI hit in the fifth. ahead of him. defense.    Rice coach John McCarthy ap-    “Andrew’s got close to 30 RBIs,”   Prior to that, Ryan Kutt (sac- champions, league trumped state preciated Enriquez’s effort, partic- McCarthy said. “He’s really a rifice fly), Danny Beese (single) last week. ularly since it came on the heels tough player with an advanced and Sullivan (sacrifice fly) each   During the 2013 regular seaof the Crusaders’ second Chicago approach. He’s a good student of knocked in a run for the Crusad- son, St. Laurence ruled over the Catholic League Blue loss to Mt. the game and I’m not surprised ers, which offset the three the Chicago Catholic League Blue. by his success.” Carmel in a three-day span. Ramblers accumulated off Musi- Among those schools the Vikings   “That was exactly what we   Biondic included a double elak. Loyola tallied once in the beat out for the crown was Mt. needed to keep us in the Catho- among his three hits and totaled fourth and twice in the sixth, the Carmel, which didn’t waste any time bemoaning its shortcoming. (Continued on page 7) lic League Blue hunt,” McCarthy two RBI, Kevin Sullivan stroked a   Instead, the Caravan consoled themselves with an even bigger prize: a Class 4A championship. But when Mt. Carmel and St. Laurence renewed acquaintances on Wednesday, the past no longer mattered.   Only the here and now did, and the Vikings made it known they have every intention of successfully defending their league title. Having outscored Providence Catholic 25-4 in its first two CCL Blue outings, St. Laurence carried that momentum over into its encounters with the Caravan, who also fell to defeat twice.    The Vikings’ 7-3 victory in the teams’ initial contest was satisfying enough for coach Pete Lotus. But when St. Laurence followed up with a 15-6 mauling of Mt. Carmel and its ace pitcher Marko Boricich on Saturday, Lotus was almost at a loss for words.   “With all these [CCL Blue] teams, I don’t feel comfortable ever,” he said. “You want to keep coming [at them], but you don’t expect that.    “I’m really, really proud of our guys. To put up the [number of] runs we did against the guys we saw was great. It was a credit to our approach [at the plate] and the way we swung the bats.”    Saturday’s game, which pitted Boricich against the Vikings’ Mike Kornacker, was tied at 4-all after just two innings. But when St. Laurence tallied twice in the top Photo by Jeff Vorva of the fourth and then was able to stonewall the Caravan in the bottom of that same frame, it was   Stagg's Paulina Stafira (left) and Sandburg's Emily Osoba battle for possession of the ball during in front to stay. last Wednesday's SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue match between the District 230 rivals. The    “That was a huge point in the game to have a shutdown inning,” Lady Eagles notched a 3-1 victory. Sports wrap begins on Page 5.

Leaving Ramblers a wreck Shutdowns of Loyola top Crusaders’ week

ingredient in the first matchup against the Rams. Reavis lefty Bibal Abuzir limited normally potent Richards to eight singles and an unearned run.   The Bulldogs took advantage of a bad pickoff throw to set up their only score in the third inning. AJ Sanchez (RBI) and Eric Mallo wrapped singles around that Rams miscue.   “We got beat by a guy who pitched a really good game,” Wujcik said. “We’ve been pretty accustomed to double-digit hits, and often double-digit runs, but nobody’s going to roll over for us.    “There was a little bit of emotion lacking from our guys in this game. I know it’s clichéd, but you’ve got to come out and play hard every day.”   Reavis broke the contest open by tallying five runs in its portion of the fourth, a rally that was helped along by a walk and hit batsman. Ryan Thompson got tagged with his first pitching loss after notching four consecutive wins.    The defeat was Richards’ first in conference play but didn’t really

put its divisional lead in much jeopardy. The Bulldogs’ closest pursuer remains three games in arrears.    “We’re OK,” Wujcik said. “Even at the beginning of the year when the coaches were looking ahead, we thought [anyone with a] 16-3 [league record] would probably be a conference champion. We can still do that.” ***   When Reavis struck for three runs in its initial at-bat on Tuesday, Wujcik wondered if his club was in for another long day. However, two hits and a Rams error enabled Richards to shave its deficit to one in the bottom of the first.    “If we wouldn’t have answered them with a couple runs right away, I think we would have been in a real dogfight the rest of the game,” Wujcik said.    The Bulldogs (17-4, 11-1) then inched in front during their second plate appearance, as Sanchez’s single — Richards’ third hit of the inning — and another Reavis defensive lapse produced (Continued on page 7)

Making a bold statement

Vikings knock off Class 4A champ Caravan twice

Battle for the ball

Lotus said.   Not only did the Vikings (212, 9-1) tee off on Mt. Carmel pitching to the tune of 15 hits, but four of those balls left the park. Kornacker, Kevin White and John Riordan all blasted two-run homers, while Brad Wood’s solo shot accounted for St. Laurence’s second-inning marker.   Kornacker had three RBI in all, five others totaled two, and Riordan led a group of six players who delivered multiple-hit efforts. All that support enabled Kornacker to prosper on a day when he didn’t have his best stuff. ***   While even casual fans likely are aware of Kornacker and Wood, they probably aren’t as familiar with Alex Hitney. The Vikings’ No. 3 starter made his presence felt on Wednesday, though, as he stopped the Caravan on four hits and struck out five through five stanzas.    And by that time, St. Laurence was in control. Five runs plated between the fourth and fifth innings saw to that. The big blow was Mike Miller’s three-run homer.    “He struggled a little bit early on, but these last couple weeks he’s been on fire,” Lotus said of Miller.   As for Hitney, he rarely has been anything but solid for the Vikings this spring. This latest exhibition, however, officially signaled his arrival as a big-time hurler in Lotus’ opinion.   “He threw outstanding and I thought he was tremendous,” Lotus said. “We didn’t play great behind him, but he pitched above that. And that was really, really needed by us.”    Hitney got into some early trouble as Mt. Carmel loaded the bases with no one out in its initial at-bat. The Caravan did score twice, but Lotus felt both St. Laurence and Hitney had nevertheless dodged a bullet.    “To get out of that inning with just two runs [given up] was huge for him mentally,” Lotus said of

his pitcher.   Kornacker’s first-inning groundout and Wood’s second-inning single created a 2-all tie, then Mt. Carmel sabotaged itself with an error that allowed both White (single) and Riordan (double) to cross the plate in the fourth. St. Laurence 17 Providence Catholic 4   Anxious to make amends for the 8-0 whitewash they absorbed two days earlier, the Celtics scored twice in both the first and second innings of last Monday’s rematch. There was only one problem for them: The Vikings exploded for seven runs over that same span, including five in the first.   “Five runs was one of those momentum builders,” Lotus said. “They’re a good team, but we really swung the bats very well.”   Indeed, St. Laurence did as it banged out 14 hits, 10 of which went for extra bases. Miller belted three doubles and knocked in three runs, including one on a groundout, to lead the way. White (two-run homer, RBI double), Roger Wilson (two doubles, two RBI), Rob Gutierrez (pair of RBI singles), Nate Tholl (RBI triple), Mike Finger (RBI double) and TJ Marik (RBI double) were other notables in a high-powered offense.   “There’s days you score runs when the other team makes [many] mistakes, but Monday wasn’t one of those,” Lotus said. “It was just one of those good days [for us]. I wish they could all be like that.”   Like Kornacker on Saturday, Wood wasn’t in peak pitching form, but his five-hitter and five strikeouts over five innings was more than satisfactory on this occasion. St. Laurence 11 Glenbard South 3    Stepping outside the CCL Blue on Thursday could have easily resulted in a comedown for the Vikings. Instead, they used the Raiders as a stepping-stone into Saturday’s meeting with Mt. Carmel. (Continued on page 4)


2

Section 2 Thursday, May 8, 2014  

The Regional News - The Reporter

They want things to go swimmingly Bartosh   (Reprinted from Feb. 12, 2009)    We’re in the midst of another get-healthy craze.   At least that’s what I keep hearing. Apparently, though, the members of my doughnut-munching, burger-lunching, tortilla chip-crunching sportswriting posse have failed to hear the news. Speaking of the news, did you ever notice how the televised version of it never has any trouble finding overweight, out-of-shape folks to profile for stories on our unhealthy lifestyles?    That tells me the get-healthy craze is failing miserably.    Evidently a lot of people live by the slogan found on a T-shirt I own: I’m in shape — round is a shape. Would I like to be more fit? Of course, but I’d also like to be younger, richer and better looking, too, and those aren’t happening for me, either.   Dietary alterations are often recommended for those of us seeking reliable weight-reduction methods, but I always get confused because of all the conflicting reports. Is bacon good for me this week or bad? What about coffee, eggs and starches? Will too much red meat kill me prematurely?   I’ll tell you what’ll shorten all of our lives: stress, the kind brought on by not knowing what to do about our level of bacon, coffee, egg and starch consumption. Leave us alone already and let our nerves slowly eat away at our insides as prices climb, wages fall and too many of us are on the outside looking in.    But that’ll never happen. No, we’ll always receive advice on what to do to make our lives healthier. The latest for me was an e-mail from a lady at a place called BatterUp Productions in Colorado Springs, Colo.    Surprisingly, the organization has nothing to do with baseball. Rather, it sent me information that said how swimming could

cut men’s risk of dying in half. This was great news, assuming I can find some swim trunks that still fit.    Even I can’t deny the benefits that can be derived from swimming — why, if you’re talented enough, it can help you land gold medals, endorse products and have easier access to under-the-counter drugs.   (Let me say right here that I’m not recommending that young people engage in such a thing, unless they truly believe in the product they’re asked to endorse.)   What the BatterUp report — which had been previously published in the International Journal of Aquatic Education and Research and was based upon research performed at the University of South Carolina — indicated was that men who swim regularly reduce their risk of dying by about 50 percent compared to runners, walkers and sedentary males. The risk is slightly higher, however, for men who immediately sink to the bottom of the pool.    Dr. Steven Blair, who headed up the study done at South Carolina, said in the e-mail I received that such things as age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, hypertension, other medical factors and family history were all taken into account during the research phase. After all the data was gathered, dissected, analyzed and categorized, Dr. Blair reached the following conclusion: Men who swim for exercise have a better survival rate than their sedentary peers.    Wow, who would have guessed? But those were the doctor’s actual words, as reported in the IJAER. He said the findings were for a group totaling more than 40,000 men, aged 20-90.    That’s a pretty wide age range. Most of the 90-year-old men I know — who am I kidding, most of the 40-year-old men — get winded from listening to the radio. Tying shoes amounts to an exercise regimen for these

guys, so how on earth is anyone going to convince them to do something as strenuous as climb into a pool?   Using bikini-clad women as lifeguards may help, although that could create more problems, especially for the 70-plus crowd, whose hearts might not be up for it. Better for those seasoned citizens to freestyle 30 or 40 laps with a weighted belt tied around their waists instead.   I’m poking fun at the whole swimming-is-healthy bit, but we all know it’s considered the ideal way to burn calories. (OK, the second-best way, but, remember, this is a family newspaper.)   It’s not shocking that swimming is superior to running or walking, simply because more body parts are put into motion. And, has been documented numerous times, there’s less physical wear and tear inflicted on the body in water-based exercises, particularly if you leave out the exercise part and simply float around on an inflatable raft.    Hey, there’s some exercise for you: blowing up that inflatable raft. It’s a great workout for your lungs, at least until you become light-headed and pass out.   What I find amusing about all this is that news on an activity — I’m talking swimming here, not raft-inflating — that’s pretty much been accepted as healthy for many years is suddenly looked upon as an informational breakthrough in 2009. Then I noticed one of the organizations that helped fund the South Carolina research: the National Swimming Pool Foundation.   Can you say “self-serving?” I thought you could. Having a pool foundation promoting swimming is akin to having an asphalt supplier touting the need for new roads.   All of this information is making my head spin. Maybe I’ll take Dr. Blair’s advice and jump in the water one of these days, but first I need to relax a while and collect my thoughts.    And I think I’ll do it over an Egg McMuffin.

The come-from-behind kids Spartans rally twice to sweep past Argonauts By Ken Karrson   Never say die.   That was Oak Lawn’s catchphrase last week, which was a good thing because the Spartans twice found themselves in critical condition against Argo. In both instances, the Argonauts had Oak Lawn reeling and in danger of dropping South Suburban Conference Red contests coach Bill Gerny had deemed quite winnable.   Ultimately, they proved to be just that as the Spartans picked themselves up off the canvas and landed some big offensive punches. Looming largest among the hit men was Joe Dodaro.    The senior was especially effective in Tuesday’s home matchup. His three-run homer in the third inning started Oak Lawn’s comeback from a 9-3 deficit and gave him four RBI to that point.    “He single-handedly was keeping us in the game,” Gerny said of Dodaro. “In clutch situations, he’s becoming very, very dependable and reliable.   “We moved him up into the cleanup spot and he didn’t stop hitting all week. He’s been absolutely tearing the cover off the ball.”   And Dodaro wasn’t finished making an impact. His RBI double was part of a four-run uprising in the fourth that moved the Spartans into a 10-9 lead. Argo pulled even in the fifth, but Oak Lawn got the last say as Justin Swatek’s single in the bottom of the seventh lifted it to a wild 1110 win.   “We’ve been watching other teams celebrate walk-off wins [against us], so it was nice to be on the other side of that,” Gerny said. “You wish the wins could be a little bit cleaner, but at this point it doesn’t matter how we win. We just need to win.”   And the Spartans (8-15, 7-4) did so the next day as well after climbing out of a 4-2 hole by tallying seven times over their last two at-bats to emerge with a 9-4 triumph. While SSC Blue leader Lemont put a halt to Oak Lawn’s encouraging happenings on Thursday, that afternoon’s 12-0 loss couldn’t completely overshadow what had occurred right before.    “I’m pleased with where we’re at [in the Red Division],” said Gerny, whose squad entered the

current week tied for second with Evergreen Park. The two teams were slated to square off this past Monday and Tuesday.    “It’d be nice to be in first, but we have so many young guys and they’re [able to be] playing some meaningful games. The biggest positive we took was if we have good at-bats, we can score runs and put a little pressure on the other team.”   The Spartans’ hit total was only five versus the Indians, but Gerny felt his players were “still making good contact.” Had they not undermined themselves with a couple first-inning errors that opened the door to a four-run Lemont eruption, they might have stayed in contention much longer; instead, Oak Lawn surrendered eight more runs in the fourth and went down quietly.   There was nothing hushed, though, about its performance on either Monday or Tuesday, as it blasted 31 hits over those two days. A season-high 16 fueled Monday’s comeback, which became necessary when the Argonauts capitalized on a strong wind and freshman pitcher Chad Cwik’s early control issues to pile up nine runs by the third frame and shove the Spartans into the aforementioned deep hole.   “This was a team we were supposed to be competitive with,” Gerny said, “and I was thinking we might get 10-runned. I told [our players], ‘You guys have got to start swinging the bats or it’s going to be a short game.’   “Earlier in the year, we were getting the pitching and we weren’t hitting; now, we’re hitting and our pitchers are kind of struggling. We can’t put everything together.”    But Mitch Swatek finally came to the rescue on the mound. Used as a reliever, the senior iced Argo’s sticks over the last two frames and set up Oak Lawn’s chance to win, which it did when he, Kevin Zurek and Justin Swatek all hit safely in the seventh.   Mitch Swatek also stroked a two-run single in the first, while Matt Witkowski and Brandon Quillin each smacked an RBI double during the Spartans’ fourrun fourth. ***    The pivotal play for Oak Lawn on Wednesday was Ryne Melnik’s inside-the-park homer, delivered

in the sixth as Argo’s left and center fielders collided while going for the ball. Melnik’s headfirst slide into home completed the two-run play and brought the Spartans into a 4-all tie at that juncture.    “It was an exciting play and a hard baseball play,” Gerny said. “It was good to see that.”    Melnik also came through with a two-run single in the seventh, while Matt Dunne (hit by pitch) and Zurek (single) drove in one teammate apiece. Oak Lawn also scored on an error.   While Gerny was obviously happy to see the Spartans storm back, he wished they hadn’t waited quite so long, in part because he felt they benefited from a tiring Argonauts pitcher.    “He was probably throwing at about 70 percent of what he was earlier,” Gerny said. “We need to hit guys a little bit more when they’re fresher so we can get a better gauge on where we’re at. It’s been a little bit more of a challenge this year because we’re still looking to kind of piece things together and putting guys in certain roles.”    Mitch Swatek earned his second pitching victory in as many days by again throwing two scoreless stanzas. Lemont 12 Oak Lawn 0    Dunne took the loss against the Indians, who were in control as soon as they established a lead for themselves on Thursday.    “You give Lemont four runs and it does feel like you’re climbing a mountain,” Gerny said. “Lemont’s lost one conference game in two years, so you kind of know what to expect.”

Statistics Argo 252 010 0 — 10 Oak Lawn 303 400 1 — 11 Oak Lawn 2B: Dodaro 2, Beard, Quillin, Witkowski. HR: Dodaro. RBI: Dodaro 5, M. Swatek 2, Quillin, J. Swatek, Witkowski. WP: M. Swatek (2-3). Oak Lawn 100 012 5 — 9 Argo 201 010 0 — 4 Oak Lawn 2B: M. Swatek. HR: Melnik. RBI: Melnik 4, Dodaro, Dunne, J. Swatek, Zurek. WP: M. Swatek (3-3). Oak Lawn 000 00 — 0 Lemont 400 8x — 12 Oak Lawn LP: Dunne (2-4).

One step forward, two back

Finally fine after nine Despite win, Chargers still can’t find footing Astros end lengthy slide by beating Cards By Ken Karrson   The worst is over.    At least that’s the mind-set of Shepard coach Frank DiFoggio after his club pulled itself out of a long slide last Wednesday. It wasn’t easy — the Astros, in fact, were only two innings away from seeing their losing streak reach an imperfect 10.   But finally Shepard’s offense awakened from its slumber and expunged a 4-2 Eisenhower lead. Three runs in the sixth stanza and four more in the seventh gave the Astros a comfortable lead, which became more than merely cosmetic after the Cardinals made a fair amount of final-frame noise and threatened to throw a monkey wrench into things.    Shepard survived, though, with a 9-7 win that was, without question, much appreciated by everyone connected with the program.   “The amount of joy they had when they got that last out was unbelievable,” DiFoggio said of his athletes. “It was like we had won a regional.   “Just to get it off our backs was big. I’m curious to see how it goes this week.”    DiFoggio was equally as inquisitive about what had caused the Astros to tumble in the first place.    “I am just shocked at the way we played the last 2 ½ weeks,” he said. “We’re a good team — you don’t play with an Oak Forest or a Lemont if you’re no good — but [the negativity] just snowballed until we expected bad things to happen.”   Any lack of confidence was understandable given some of the circumstances that hounded Shepard during its skid. In their first South Suburban Conference Red encounter with the Cardinals last Tuesday, for example, the Astros (6-12, 4-7) endured a series of mishaps, the most glaring of them being baserunning gaffes.   Four times a Shepard player was picked off, with three of those putouts recorded at second base. The contest ended with one more mistake, as an Astro was called out for leaving second too soon on a flyout to center.   Oh, and in case Shepard was seeking solace elsewhere, it didn’t find any on the defensive side. There, the Astros were charged

with four errors.    “We played pretty poorly in this one,” DiFoggio said. “It’s inexcusable that you get picked off base four times.”    Amazingly, Shepard survived all those miscues well enough to force Eisenhower into extra innings. That happened, in large part, because Astros pitchers Brett Smith and Ricky Mundo set down 16 Cardinals batters on third strikes.   “Our pitching just dominated them,” DiFoggio said. “This is a game we should have won, but we couldn’t put it together defensively, and when we got guys on base we couldn’t score them because we’d get picked off. That was the disappointing thing.”    One of Shepard’s errors helped Eisenhower plate a run in the top of the eighth, and that stood up as the difference between the squads in a 3-2 final.   “Nine losses in a row, and it seems like we lost each of them in a different way,” DiFoggio said. “It was looking good [early], but it got bad after that.”   The Astros drew first blood by scoring both of their runs in their initial at-bat. Kevin Knoerzer and Mark Albrecht singled for Shepard, but its tallies resulted from a Cards error and wild pitch. The Astros returned the error favor while on defense in the third, and Eisenhower didn’t waste that inning-extending gift as an RBI double followed.   Shepard escaped further damage by registering an out at home, but that only temporarily derailed the Cardinals. The hosts pulled even in the sixth by combining two singles and a pair of walks.   The Astros failed to take advantage of Knoerzer’s double in the top of the eighth, which set the table for Eisenhower to close them out a half-inning later. Knoerzer’s hit was one of six on the day for Shepard. Shepard 9 Eisenhower 7    With their longest losing streak since 1998 attached to them, the Astros entered Wednesday’s rematch in a less-than-positive mood. And whatever confidence Shepard athletes might have housed at the outset got shaken when the Cardinals used a bases-clearing triple to go up 3-0 in the second stanza.    Eric Horbach’s sacrifice fly put

the Astros on the board in the third without benefit of a hit, as it was preceded by a walk, hit batsman and sacrifice bunt. But that run, plus Shepard’s ability to sniff out a double steal and retire an Eisenhower runner at the plate in the bottom of the inning, gave the Astros a huge boost.   “That’s where it finally started to turn,” DiFoggio said. “We weren’t playing defensively anymore because we had a couple things go our way. We finally executed. I was quite pleased with getting back to productive outs [on offense], which we haven’t been doing.”    Horbach’s RBI single in the fifth inched Shepard closer, then RBI hits from Kevin Carmody (double) and Sam Hermanas fueled a sixth-inning rally.    “You could see where we were ready to explode,” DiFoggio said. “We needed to get the big hit to get us to relax, and Carmody gave us that. The confidence was up after that.”   Five hits in the seventh were at the heart of the Astros’ biggest spurt, and Knoerzer, Mundo and Hermanas all drove in runs with theirs.    Adam Gregory had all he needed to net a pitching win, which he did by limiting the Cardinals to four hits through six frames and whiffing eight. Eisenhower coaxed three free passes in the seventh and had two run-scoring hits before the door was slammed shut on it for keeps.   “Did you think getting the first win was going to be easy?” DiFoggio joked. “Psychologically, you’re probably going to doubt yourself until something works out for you.”    A scheduled five-game week for Shepard was to include three SSC games, as well as nonconference tilts versus Romeoville and Illiana Christian.

Statistics Eisenhower 001 001 01 — 3 Shepard 200 000 00 — 2 Shepard 2B: Knoerzer. LP: Mundo (0-1). Shepard 001 013 4 — 9 Eisenhower 030 010 3 — 7 Shepard 2B: Carmody. RBI: Hermanas 2, Horbach 2, Carmody, Knoerzer, Mundo. WP: Gregory (2-3).

By Ken Karrson    Even in the midst of some success, Stagg keeps being followed by a dark cloud.    The Chargers chalked up a satisfying win over Homewood-Flossmoor last Wednesday, as Nick Gerzon pitched them to victory. The junior, who threw a no-hitter earlier this spring, scattered nine hits and was supported by an error-free Stagg defense.    “Gerzon gave us another good performance,” Chargers coach Matt O’Neill said. “When you’re not walking guys, your defense is on its toes.   “He’s not going to overpower you, but what we’re getting out of him is he proves to the rest of the staff that you don’t need to be overpowering to get guys out. He’s been the most consistent guy [on the hill] in terms of us knowing what we’re going to get.”    So if Gerzon was his usual steady self and Stagg’s oft-maligned offense racked up nine hits, what was the problem? None here, although O’Neill said his team was fortunate the Vikings committed four errors on the day, including two that played major roles in the Chargers’ pivotal five-run fourth inning.    The miscues let in all but one of those markers, with CJ Casey’s single accounting for the other. Stagg eventually stretched its lead out to 7-1 in the SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue contest and rode in a 7-3 winner.   Seeing as how the Chargers have been somewhat snake-bit this season, O’Neill didn’t mind Stagg benefiting from another team’s bad luck for a change. However, he wasn’t crazy about seeing his own club’s return to flawed form in other outings.   The victory over H-F was the Chargers’ only one in a four-game week. The Vikings doled out a 5-3 defeat in another encounter, Lincoln-Way topped Stagg 7-3 and District 230 sister school Andrew outlasted it 10-7 on Saturday.    And most troubling to O’Neill was the Chargers’ continued habit of undercutting themselves with ill-timed mistakes, including more on the bases. Against the Griffins, for example, Stagg scored in the second inning on Max Strus’ double, but ran itself out of a bigger rally by having a man thrown out at the plate.    Drew Bolero’s single did put the Chargers up 2-1 in the third, but

Lincoln-Way East overtook them in the fourth by erupting for four runs and never again trailed.    “I talk to my team all the time about it — that every single run matters,” O’Neill said. “That [second-inning play] totally changed the complexion of that game.   “We’re in a bad place, where we’re making one or two baserunning mistakes every game. I would rather lose 15-1 than lose the way we have been. I don’t know what else to do except take guys out of the game, but every time we put a [different] guy in, he’s the next one to make a mistake.    “When you ask guys why they did what they did, they don’t have an answer. I thought our baseball IQ would be better, but when they keep making the same mistakes, you don’t know what to do.”   Bolero and Jake Wimmer accounted for Stagg’s other RBI in its win, while Ethan Glaza poked a two-run single that brought the Chargers (7-14, 3-4) back within one of H-F in the team’s initial meeting. However, Stagg was unable to overcome 10 strikeouts, as well as the 4-0 deficit it was chasing after the first inning.    A misjudged fly ball that went for a two-RBI double was a key element in the Vikings’ early surge.    “We battled back, but that first inning was just kind of rough,” O’Neill said. ***   Strus finished with three hits and Wimmer added two for the Chargers versus the Griffins, while Nick Nowak (three hits, three RBI), Wimmer (two hits), Brett Stratinsky (two hits) and Bolero (two RBI) were the ringleaders against the Thunderbolts on Saturday. O’Neill has been especially pleased with Bolero’s work for much of the season.   “He leads the team in RBIs,” O’Neill said, “and it seems like every single one is coming with two outs, which is when you want them. [But] this game was another perfect example of us beating ourselves.”   He was referring to the Chargers’ opening inning versus Andrew, which featured three hits — one of them Glaza’s RBI double — but prematurely died because of yet another misstep. Stagg had men on second and third with no one out following Glaza’s hit.    “That’s just frustrating to see, “O’Neill said. “That’s just giving the [opposing] pitcher and team momentum.”

   The T’bolts didn’t waste it, either, as they exploded for a total of eight runs in their first three atbats. Andrew’s five-run lead was reduced, but never relinquished.   “Talking in general, we’re going toe-to-toe with almost all of these teams,” O’Neill said. “In 19 games, I felt we had a chance [to win] and that, at some point, we did something to hurt ourselves.   “We’re still in these games with these good teams, so I’m just waiting for it to click for us. I hope we’re that team that nobody wants to face in the playoffs.”

Statistics Stagg 000 300 0 — 3 Homewood-Flossmoor 400 001 x — 5 Stagg 2B: Casey. RBI: Glaza 2. LP: Strus (1-3). Homewood-Flossmoor 100 001 1 — 3 Stagg 000 520 x — 7 Stagg 2B: Angelos. RBI: Bolero 2, Wimmer 2, Casey. WP: Gerzon (3-2). Stagg 011 001 0 — 3 Lincoln-Way East 100 042 x — 7 Stagg 2B: Strus. RBI: Bolero, Strus. LP: Casey (0-3). Stagg 120 011 2 — 7 Andrew 224 020 x — 10 Stagg 2B: Glaza. RBI: Nowak 3, Bolero 2, Duffner, Glaza. LP: Kivelehan (1-3).

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The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, May 8, 2014 Section 2

3

Softball roundup

Lady Bulldogs draw closer to another title By Anthony Nasella    Richards is seeing red again — a Red Division title, that is.    Nothing is yet official, but the Lady Bulldogs improved their odds of grabbing a fourth consecutive South Suburban Conference Red championship by notching three more victories last week. The trio of wins elevated Richards’ overall record to 14-4 and its league mark to 12-2.    The last of those triumphs, 11-3 over Reavis, gave Lady Bulldogs coach Julie Folliard her 600th career win. She has guided Richards to plus-.500 ledgers in all but two of her 26 seasons at the Oak Lawn school.   Also conquered by the Lady Bulldogs last week were Hillcrest (13-0) and neighborhood rival Oak Lawn (4-3 in eight innings).   “We’re really focused on our conference right now,” Folliard said. “In terms of the 600th win coming in a conference game, that was terrific for the girls because they’ll always remember it. It was a good game.    “We were able to jump ahead [of Reavis] early. The kids have been focused and they’re getting better every game. They’re feeding off the continued progress, which is fun to see as a coach.”    Sara Tobin was a perfect 5-for5 at the plate with a double and triple to pace an active Richards offense. Jordan Battels (two hits, two RBI), Molly Pohrebny (two hits, including a double, two RBI), Sara Kiziak (two hits, including a triple) and Emily Wetzel (triple,

two RBI) were other key figures.    Kiziak’s contributions extended into the pitching circle, where she held the Lady Rams to three hits and struck out eight.   “That triple [by Kiziak in the first inning] helped us and really set the tone,” Folliard said. “She’s been doing a great job, offensively and defensively. She’s been teaming with Sara Tobin (4-2) on the mound, with Victoria Nemec closing out the games, [and] it seems to be working for us.”   It was especially working for Tobin on Monday against Hillcrest as she threw a perfect game over five innings and struck out 10. Andrea Stengle (2-for-3) blasted a three-run homer for the Lady Bulldogs.   “Anytime you can throw a perfect game, that’s special,” Folliard said. “It was great for Sara because she was epitomizing our hard-work ethic and really having pride in her role. But a perfect game takes some extra concentration regardless of the team you’re playing.   “It was really outstanding for Sara and the team. Sara is strong mentally and she also received great support defensively.” ***    Lauryn McManus singled home Pohrebny in the top of the eighth with the deciding run as Richards nipped the Lady Spartans. Savana Julian added two hits and two runs for the Lady Bulldogs, who had fallen behind early in the game after Mia Loya socked a three-run homer for Oak Lawn.   They responded with scores

in the second, fifth and seventh innings in addition to the eighth. Although the Lady Spartans (1010, 5-6) could not do any more damage beyond Loya’s round-tripper, Morgan Jozsa, Hayden Landingham and Elizabeth Childers all delivered a pair of hits on the losing team’s behalf   “To our defensive credit, we shut down Oak Lawn the rest of the way,” Folliard said. “They had some more good hits and baserunners, and our defense stepped up to the occasion. Oak Lawn also had two runners on base in the eighth, [so] it was a great effort on the team’s part.   “Oak Lawn is always a good team and we were expecting a good game. We’re not overlooking anybody [and] we were thrilled at the team’s performance. It was an exciting game and the girls were really focused.”   Folliard said Richards, which possesses much talent, has been discovering more and more of its identity, and it’s been showing in recent weeks.    “Identity comes from not only wins, but also losses,” she said. “When you struggle, you see who rises to the top and who bounces back strong the next day. You learn about a lot about yourself and your team. They’re coming together as a team and really support each other.    “We had girls coming back from last year’s team, but a lot of them were just first-year starters last year on the varsity level. They’ve really matured since last season, (Continued on page 5)

Moran, Meisl pitch Mustangs to success Their names aren’t the first ones to roll off fans’ lips when the subject of top area pitchers is discussed. In fact, one of them wasn’t all that well known even within his own program a few months ago. As a junior in 2014, he had no varsity track record to use as a barometer for what to expect this spring. But both Joe Moran and his more experienced Evergreen Park teammate, Frank Meisl, were deserving of accolades last week. Between them, the two hurlers surrendered just one hit, and the Mustangs made great use of that dominance as they crushed a pair of South Suburban Conference opponents. The headline effort belonged to Moran, who fired a no-hitter at Hillcrest last Tuesday and spurred Evergreen’s 15-0 dismantling of the Hawks in five innings. Forty of Moran’s 56 pitches went for strikes and he ended the day with seven whiffs. Hillcrest had only three baserunners, two via walks and one that reached on a Mustangs error. “Joe Moran threw a heck of a game,” Evergreen coach Mark Smyth said. “His ball moves a ton and he was spotting his fastball. “He’s about 6-2 or 6-3, so he’s got a nice pitcher’s build, and he’s been working hard to get more consistency with his mechanics. He goes about his business and he’s a big part of our team.” Moran obviously didn’t need much offensive assistance to pocket his third victory of the year, but he received it anyway, starting with a two-run second inning. The Mustangs (11-8, 7-4) erupted for seven runs in their next at-bat and five in the stanza after that. Spearheading the onslaught was Corey Miller, who smacked three doubles. His two-baggers in the third and fourth stanzas chased home a total of four runs. “I could not be happier for this

kid,” Smyth said of Miller. “He sat behind Kyle Venhuizen last year, so he didn’t get a lot of [playing] time. But when he’s gotten his chance [this season], he’s made the most of it. “Every game he’s producing. He’s hitting about .490, and every time I call in scores [to the media], I’m mentioning his name.” KeyShawn Carpenter matched Miller by driving in four runs, but an even bigger contribution may have been his defense. Carpenter preserved Moran’s gem by lying out flat to haul in a ball hit to center field in the fourth inning. “That’s on ESPN’s top 10 [highlights], no doubt,” Smyth said. Five other players knocked in a run for Evergreen, which also tallied twice on steals of home plate. Evergreen Park 12 Tinley Park 2 Moran gave Meisl a tough pitching act to follow, but the big senior was up to the test on Wednesday as he fanned 10 in just five innings and stopped the Titans on only one hit. His strikeout total was a season high. Despite his outstanding performance, Meisl was nicked for a couple runs right away. Evergreen exited the first inning ahead 4-2, but Smyth was anticipating a hard-fought battle the entire way. “We very rarely have a lopsided score against them,” he said of Tinley. “And it’s been a while since we’ve gone out there and beaten them. We challenged the kids on the bus ride over because we knew we were going to have to play well to beat them.” Meisl did his part after the rocky beginning, which was something else Smyth expected. “Frank’s been very consistent,” Smyth said. “He’s a senior and it’s kind of hard to get him rattled or upset out there on the mound.” He likely distressed the Titans once he found his groove. And if Meisl didn’t, then the Mustangs’

  Let’s get one thing straight: Sandburg’s pitchers are not infallible.   On Saturday, for instance, Plainfield East managed to pile up nine runs on the Eagles. Of course, all that got it was a higher-scoring loss than those to which some of Sandburg’s other foes have been subjected this spring.   The Eagles’ 15-9 win wasn’t without a healthy dose of mound excellence, however. Providing it was Ben Gresla, something of a forgotten man among Sandburg’s stable of live arms. Gresla proved the worthiness of his own wing by blowing third strikes past seven Plainfield East batters in a span of four innings.   But before that, it was the usual suspects stepping forward

By Jeff Vorva Reporter Editor

school mountaintop, Loyola University became the NCAA’s top dog.   With input from Smalzer, the Ramblers beat Stanford University 25-17, 19-25, 25-19, 25-15 Saturday night in the national championship match at the Gentile Center in Chicago. The title was Loyola’s first in volleyball and, in fact, the first for any Midwestern program in what has been a West Coast-dominated sport.   Smalzer capped his collegiate career with 12 kills, eight digs and a service ace. For the year, he led the Ramblers with 65 aces, was second with 312 kills, and added 140 digs and 61 blocks for 29-1 Loyola.   The 6-foot-8 opposite hitter finished with a school-best 234 aces for his career and 1,424 kills, the fourth-best total in Ramblers

history.    “I don’t think I technically have a chip on my shoulder anymore,” Smalzer said after the title match. “We show it by how we play.    “We were ranked No. 1 all but two or three weeks this year, and for all the people that are hating on us, just look at the wins. Look at our record.”    He is also counting on the success to continue after he is gone.   “I don’t think people [outside the program] know all the work people put in across the team, from our statistician to our head coach and our weight-room staff,” Smalzer said. “All that is private, and it’s not just the guys in the gym.”    Smalzer said he wants to continue playing volleyball and may look into competing professionally overseas.

RedHawks begin week atop ESCC

More impressive mound work propels Eagles to mow down opposition hitters on the Eagles’ behalf. Matthias Dietz played an especially big role as he earned one win and one save while Sandburg remained unbeaten in SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue action.    Dietz’s victory came last Thursday, when the Eagles (16-4, 7-0) shut out Joliet Central 4-0. The big senior gave up three hits and whiffed 10.   “He threw all seven innings and was very, very dominant,” Sandburg assistant coach Chuck Peters said.    Not to be outdone, University of Michigan-bound hurler Bryan Pall bettered Dietz’s strikeout total by two while also allowing only two hits to Lincoln-Way East in what became a 5-1 triumph for Sandburg last Wednesday. Julian Gutierrez’s two-run homer in the fourth inning opened things up

Palos Heights resident helps Loyola win NCAA volleyball title

First things first

Another pitch for excellence By Ken Karrson

Smalzer reaches the mountaintop

  He didn’t miss out on the ultimate prize this time.   In 2009, Palos Heights resident Joe Smalzer graduated from Marist after winning two East Suburban Catholic Conference Player of the Year awards in boys’ volleyball and helping the RedHawks claim two regional championships and one sectional crown.    The following season, Smalzer was sitting out as a redshirted college freshman while his pals from Marist went out and won a state championship. While he assuredly was happy for them, a part of Smalzer probably felt 14-hit offense probably did. So empty. potent was it that Evergreen was   No more. Four years after able to easily play through four the RedHawks reached the high errors. Miller stroked three more hits and had five RBI to pace the Mustangs once again, but several other individuals also stepped forward on Evergreen’s behalf. Mark Martin (three hits, two RBI), Carpenter (two hits, three runs), Dan Kohler and Sean Miller were the notables of that bunch. Kohler blasted a two-run homer and Sean Miller swatted an RBI By Ken Karrson triple to trigger the Mustangs’ opening four-run burst, and Co-   Perhaps the secret is smoke rey Miller came through with a and mirrors. bases-clearing double to fuel a    Or maybe it’s simply the result of some very effective sleight-oflater rally. The routs of Hillcrest and Tin- hand. One thing’s for certain, ley enabled Evergreen to remain though: It’s not an illusion. in a second-place tie with Oak   With a team batting average Lawn in the SSC Red. The two hovering in the low .200s and sevteams were scheduled to meet eral regulars hitting below even that, Marist wouldn’t seem to be twice this week. A year ago around this same a strong candidate to occupy the penthouse perch in a stout East time the Mustangs caught fire and used Suburban Catholic Conference. that as the springboard to a mem-    But when the current week got orable postseason run. When underway, that is indeed where asked if their recent streak of the RedHawks found themselves success — they’ve won six of their residing by a half-game. Wins over last seven — is an indication of St. Viator and Notre Dame last another May revival, Smyth was week kept Marist riding high, although the latter did dampen the noncommittal. “Talk to me after Oak Lawn,” RedHawks’ overall enthusiasm a he said with a chuckle. “We’re bit by administering an 8-0 defeat not there yet and there’s a lot in the front end of a Saturday of season left, so we’ll see. [Being twinbill. alone in] second would be huge   Still, Marist was not the fashfor us, but year in and year out ionable choice as a championship contender when the season bethere are no gimmes.” gan, and some may continue to doubt its long-term viability as Statistics such. While coach Tom Fabrizio Evergreen Park 027 51 — 15 isn’t yet ready to proclaim the Hillcrest 000 00 — 0 RedHawks a titlist in the making, Evergreen 2B: C. Miller 3. 3B: Carpenter. either, he sure doesn’t mind living RBI: Carpenter 4, C. Miller 4, Farmer, in the moment. Kohler, Meisl, S. Miller, B. Walsh. WP:    “We are starting to play better overall, which is good,” he said. Moran (3-1). “We’ve taken our lumps, but we Evergreen Park 410 25 — 12 could easily be a dangerous team Tinley Park 200 00 — 2 in the playoffs — or lose in the Evergreen Park 2B: Martin, C. Miller, T. first round. There’s really not Walsh. 3B: S. Miller. HR: Kohler. RBI: C. anything in between [for us] in Miller 5, Kohler 2, Martin 2, Farmer, S. my opinion.” Miller, Rizzo. WP: Meisl (3-1).   Fabrizio is resigned to the notion that Marist’s so-so offense is here to stay, which is an obvious liability.   “We don’t hit the ball in the gaps,” Fabrizio said. “We [mostly] hit singles, and I don’t see the hitting getting any better. It is for the Eagles, who received a what it is and we have to deal pair of hits from Gutierrez, Chris with it.”   The question, thus, remains: Stearns and Jim Landgraf.    Gutierrez was also heard from How have the RedHawks (12-9, in a big way versus Plainfield, as 5-2) fared so well with such an his first-inning grand slam ignited albatross attached to them? a nine-run outburst that enabled   “We’re nowhere near the best Sandburg to easily expunge a 3-0 team [skills-wise], but baseball deficit. Landgraf and Dan Santi- is a confidence game,” Fabrizio

Kings of the hill By Ken Karrson

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Palos Heights native Joe Smalzer, shown during a match earlier in the season, helped Loyola University capture its first NCAA men's volleyball championship Saturday night.

ago chipped in three hits apiece to the Eagles’ massive 18-hit barrage.   Santiago’s double, one of two hits on the day for him, snapped a 1-all tie with Lincoln-Way East in last Monday’s clash and helped boost Sandburg to a 4-3 decision over the Griffins. That was the afternoon Dietz saved a win for Sean Leland by ringing up a game-ending strikeout.   Leland worked the first six frames on a yield of five hits. He struck out five en route to upping his ledger to 4-1.

said. “You can win without the best players if you kind of trick them into believing they’re better than they are.”   Marist is not without talent, although more of that seems to be found on the mound than anywhere else. Junior Rich Kairis is the RedHawks’ undisputed top gun there, and he lived up to that reputation by shutting down St. Viator 8-0 last Wednesday. The Lions managed just five hits off him.    “He has not had a bad outing,” Fabrizio said.   On this occasion, neither did Marist’s offense, which generated eight hits. One of them was Barrett Callaghan’s two-RBI double, which was at the heart of an eightrun uprising in the fourth frame. Eric Hanson (two hits), Kairis, Kyle Barrett, Blake Bieniek and Grant Kenny all hit safely and drove in a run as well.    “That was a good inning, obviously, and we got some momentum,” Fabrizio said. “[But] a lot of what we’re doing is the result of the other team’s mistakes. You can look at it that we’re taking advantage of some opportunities, but we are getting lucky.”

hurler Robert Hovey could not find his groove and, because of that, the Dons were able to claw their way back into contention after falling behind 8-1.   A six-run blitz in the second inning had keyed the RedHawks’ getaway. Kairis (two hits, including a double, two RBI) was a major component in Marist’s attack, as was Pat Meehan (two hits, one RBI).   However, Meehan’s influence extended beyond offense. Long referred to by Fabrizio as the RedHawks’ best pitcher next to Kairis, Meehan had been kept off the hill prior to Saturday out of necessity.   “He’s too valuable at shortstop,” Fabrizio said. “But now we’ve got to have him in there [as a pitcher], so we’ll take our chances in the field.”    Meehan made his 2014 mound debut with the game’s outcome suddenly hanging in the balance following Notre Dame’s six-run eruption in the third. Whatever momentum the Dons had built disappeared upon Meehan’s arrival, as he worked the last 4 2/3 innings and was nicked for only one hit while whiffing five.   “He was great in relief,” FabNotre Dame 8-7 rizio said. “Meehan is our secMarist 0-8 ond-best guy [on the mound] and    That luck temporarily ran out he was the story of the game.” in Game 1 on Saturday, as the    Kenny, Jack Carmody, Tommy Dons blanked the RedHawks and Finwall and Dylan Woodworth held them to four hits. Marist also had RBI in Game 2 for Marist, fanned 10 times. which had five conference games   “We really played brutal that slated for this week. day,” Fabrizio said. “We didn’t pitch it well, we didn’t pick it Statistics up and we didn’t hit.”    The RedHawks put runners in Marist 000 800 0 — 8 000 000 0 — 0 scoring position in each of their St. Viator first three at-bats, but to no avail. Marist 2B: Callaghan. RBI: Callaghan 2, Notre Dame was up only 3-0 at Barrett, Bieniek, Hanson, Kairis, Kenny. that point, but it expanded its WP: Kairis. lead to seven runs by striking for 111 401 0 — 8 a four-spot in the fourth inning. Notre Dame    “I thought if we could cut [the Marist 000 000 0 — 0 deficit] down [early on], we’d have Marist 2B: Kenny. LP: Barrett. a chance,” Fabrizio said. “But Notre Dame was by far the better Marist 260 000 0 — 8 Notre Dame 106 000 0 — 7 team.”   Not in Game 2, even though Marist 2B: Kairis. RBI: Kairis 2, Carmody, the score wound up being close. Finwall, Kenny, Meehan, Woodworth. WP: Like Barrett in the opener, Marist Meehan.

On the edge... and right on target! Straight talk from Bartosh in Sports Southwest


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Section 2

Thursday, May 8, 2014    The Regional News - The Reporter

SXU sports summary Nolen, Nonnemacher named Cougars Athletes of the Year

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Ryan Giuliano crosses the finish line first at Sunday's First Midwest Half Marathon in Palos Heights. Giuliano's wife was the women's champion in 2013.

All in the family One year after wife wins, Giuliano does the same By Jeff Vorva Reporter Editor For the second year in a row, a Giuliano captured the crown jewel of Palos Heights long-distance racing. Oakwood Hills’ Ryan Giuliano, 29, won the seventh First Midwest Half Marathon Sunday. He completed the 13.1-mile race that spanned Palos Heights and parts of both Palos Park and Palos Hills in 1 hour, 10 minutes, 15 seconds, well ahead of runner-up Krzysztof Bak’s 1:15:10. In 2013, Guliano stayed with his wife, Jacqui, as she won the women’s race. This time, he went all out and earned his own victory. “She was treating this race as a workout and wasn’t going all out,” Ryan said. “She was just seeing what would happen and was laying low. I ran with her last year, but this year I tried to jump out and see what I could do.’’ Jacqui finished fourth among women this year. Taking first among women and ninth overall was Naperville’s Amanda Mirochna, who was one second ahead of Lisle’s Kristen Heckert (1:20:24 to 1:20:25). The two are training partners who run for the New Balance Chicago team and came to the event together. “We pushed each other and had a good time,” Mirochna said. "We did that and we’re really happy with the way things went. Our goal was to try to win it.” They came close to tying for the title. “Amanda ran the better race today,” Heckert said. “Hopefully, it will always go back and forth.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Chicago's Adrian Campbell wins the inaugural First Midwest 10K race Sunday in Palos Heights. But the most important thing is that we had good races.’’ There were 1,023 athletes who finished the race. For the first time in First Midwest Half Marathon history, a 10K run was added to the mix and Chicago’s Adrian Campbell, 48, won for the men (40:53). Chicago’s Pamela McLeod, 27, was the women's champion and third overall (44:10). Both have Orland Park connections. Campbell, a native of Ireland, was running for a team honoring Orland’s Jude Borling, who died April 24, 2013, after a three-year battle with cancer. “This is for her,” Campbell said. “This is my first race in two years because I was injured. It’s a rust-buster. It wasn’t a particularly fast time, but it was enough

to get there.’’ McLeod raced with her boyfriend, Orland’s Max Capouch, who took second behind Campbell. She is a Mother McAuley graduate who did not participate in sports. “This was the first time I won a race,” she said. “I just got into running two years ago and it really took off. I focused on school when I went to McAuley and I guess I should have gone out for sports because I guess I’m not that bad at it.’’ Capouch graduated from St. Rita, where he played baseball and hockey. He then attended Lewis University and played golf for the Flyers. Capouch said this was his first 10K race. There were 216 who finished the 10K.

  Football kicker Spencer Nolen and softball pitcher Megan Nonnemacher were named St. Xavier University’s top male and female athletes, respectively, for the 2013-14 school year at last week’s awards banquet.   Their designations highlighted the event, which also feted a total of 94 student-athletes for their classroom achievements. Both Nolen, a graduate student who is pursuing a masters degree in business administration, and Nonnemacher, an elementary education major, were among those individuals awarded gold medallions for maintaining a gradepoint average between 3.75 and 4.0 on a 4.0 scale through Dec. 31, 2013.    On the field of play, Nolen led the Cougars in scoring last fall with 72 points, which came on 33 conversions and 13 field goals. He was also the team’s primary punter. Nolen was a member of the Mid-States Football Association All-Midwest League squad and a Daktronics-NAIA Scholar Athlete.   Nonnemacher has won 22 games for SXU’s No. 8-ranked softball program this spring after being chosen as a first-team honoree for the Capital One Academic All-America College Division team and a Daktronics-NAIA Scholar Athlete.   Others awarded gold medallions last week along with Nolen and Nonnemacher were softball players Alex Bahner, Franchesca Graffeo (Shepard) and Holly Hilden; basketball players Suzie Broski, Darius Draper (Stagg), Maloree Johnson, Kody Kleinrichert and Morgan Stuut; cross country and track athletes Courtney Correa, Ann Kolker, Matt Krakowski (Marist), Dana Martin (Marist) and Ashley Shares (Stagg); soccer players Erik Diaz, Alex Perry, Molly Sheehan (Stagg) and Kamil Szczesniak; volleyball players Meghan Falsey and Kelli Shaffer; football players Austin Feeney, Greg Hayward (Oak Lawn), Matt Johnson, Ron Luce (Oak Lawn), Tyler Sharp, Brian Studnicka (Stagg) and Dennis Vilimek; baseball players Tyler Gaynor, Ryan Pellack, Bryan Polak (Marist) and Jack Surane; and golfer Taylor Thompson.    Silver medallions, given to students carrying a GPA between 3.5 and 3.74, were presented to golfers Ashley Anderson, Brendan Ryan (Shepard) and Zachary Trent; football players JD Barchard, Paul Carey, Zach Dolph, Kevin Lonergan (Oak Lawn), Stephen Simms, Alex Walters and Jacek Wesolowski; volleyball players Sean Barry, Marie Hackert and Cassidy Sponsler; soccer players Rachel Didier, Mariana Hoerr, Rene Leon, Gabbie Risolvato and Rachael Wojtysiak; softball players Ariel Hinton and Savannah Kinsella; basketball players Kyle Huppe, Amjad Karim, Brad Karp, Brandon Marren, Josh Mawhorr and Caitlin McMahon; baseball players Tom Keating (St. Lau-

rence) and Robin Prokaski; and cross country and track athletes Shane Kenney, Amanda Magee, Ali Proffitt, Leslie Rosario and Ben Tracy.    Earning bronze medallions for holding a GPA between 3.25 and 3.49 were baseball players Alika Andres, Jeremy Dryier (Shepard), Brad Myjak and Terrance Southern; football players Kevin Berrigan, Jake Buck, Jacob Ghinazzi, John Glover (Oak Lawn), Nick Kijurna, Khalfani King, Jake Lemming and Marco Scalzatti; volleyball players Natalie Carberry (Shepard) and Anthony Huang; soccer players Dan Cordes (Shepard), Kyle Held, Danielle Inzinga (Marist) and James King; basketball players Chrissy Heine, Meaghan McMahon and Sidney Prasse; golfer Mark Kluk (Stagg); softball players Nicole Nonnemacher, Sarah Saunders and Katie Sears (Mother McAuley); and cross country and track runners Chris Sarna (Stagg), Dan Spencer and Jordan Wallace. WOMEN’S GOLF   Freshman Taylor Thompson, who captured the individual title at the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Women’s Golf Championship two weeks ago, was recognized for her achievement by being chosen as the conference Golfer of the Week for the week ending April 27 and the World Hyundai-SXU Athlete of the Month for April.   Thompson became just the second freshman to claim the latter award in its two-year existence. Softball pitcher Nicole Nonnemacher won it in March 2013.    Thompson posted a two-round score of 160 in the CCAC meet, overcoming a four-stroke deficit on the second day to collect the victory. Prior to that, she tied for eighth place at the Bethel College Pilot Spring Invitational in South Bend, Ind., on April 12 with her two-day total of 164.   Thompson’s CCAC honor was her second of the season. She also was recognized on March 17. WOMEN’S TRACK   Senior Jordan Wallace’s NAIA-qualifying time of 11 minutes, 31.55 seconds in the 3,000-meter steeplechase highlighted the Cougars’ appearance at the Benedictine University Twilight Invitational in Lisle.   Wallace will run in that event at the national meet for the third straight season. The NAIA Outdoor Track & Field National Championships will be held May 22-24 at Mickey Miller Blackwell Stadium in Gulf Shores, Ala.    “I’m really excited that Jordan qualified for the national meet [again] in her final season,” SXU coach Lisa Ebel said. “I can’t wait to see how she performs.”   Five other individuals also keyed the Cougars’ team performance at Benedictine. Junior Leslie Rosario was the top finisher among the quintet with her seventh place in the 800-run (season-best 2:21.34). Two spots

behind her was freshman Nicole Watkins, who completed the race in a season-best 2:21.80.    A third SXU athlete, sophomore Lexi McDermid, was 17th in that same event while clocking a personal-best 2:28.13.    Freshman Rachel Koronkiewicz notched a personal-best time in the 400 with her 1:06.34, which landed her in the 13th position. Junior Amanda Magee took 15th in the 1,500-run with a season-best 5:56.64 effort.    “This was such a great meet for us because so many of our runners had either their best times of the season or their careers,” Ebel said. MEN’S TRACK   Freshman Abel Hernandez’s 30:47.52 clocking in the 10,000, which qualified him for the NAIA Outdoor Championships later this month, represented the Cougars’ most notable performance on a weekend that had SXU sending participants to two different meets.    Most of the men joined the Cougars women’s squad at Benedictine’s Twilight Invitational, but some others traveled to Hillsdale, Mich., for the Gina Relays. The latter stop is where Hernandez ran his qualifying time and junior Janis Pastars registered a 3:58 in the 1,500.    “I am running out of adjectives to describe Abel’s performances on a weekly basis,” SXU coach Ed McAllister said. “He is beyond my expectations for this season and continues to surprise, more by his grit than his actual runs. He will be a name that you will be hearing for a long time.”   Standouts at Benedictine included sophomore Rexford Wiafe (fifth in the 800 in 1:56.13), senior Nick Pesek (sixth in the 100, 11.60) and junior Matt Krakowski (sixth in the 200, 23 seconds flat).   “I am very satisfied with Rex in the 800 as he has taken another step toward qualifying for nationals and looks better by the week,” McAllister said. “[And] Matt showed that he is 95 percent back from an injury and should improve in the coming weeks.” BASEBALL    The Cougars gave retiring coach Mike Dooley something to remember in his final regular-season contest as they defeated Purdue-North Central 10-0 in eight innings last Tuesday at Richard R. Ferrell Field.    Not only did SXU send its leader out on a good note, but the win also secured for it one of the six berths in the CCAC Tournament, which began this past Saturday. The victory followed a 4-1 loss to the Panthers in Game 1 of the conference doubleheader.   The Cougars used a 14-hit attack — six of them going for extra bases — to bury PNC in the second contest. Spearheading the barrage were the trio of sophomore Jim Augle, freshman Bryan Polak and senior Chris Klein, who totaled 10 hits between them.   Included among Augle’s four (Continued on page 7)

Moraine athletics wrap

Cyclones headed back to tennis nationals By Maura Vizza

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Amanda Mirochna of Naperville edges out her friend Kristen Heckert by one second to win the women's portion of the First Midwest Bank Half Marathon.

Vikings (Continued from page 1)

on Wednesday and had another big game in front of us on Saturday. But every game is important because you don’t want to get into bad habits.    “We played some guys in positions we haven’t done normally and used a lot of pitchers, but I thought we hit a lot of hard baseballs and ran the bases really well.”   Two CCL Blue games against St. Rita and one versus Loyola Academy were on tap for the Vikings this week. Today they’ll tangle with Andrean from Merrillville, Ind., which has already registered victories over Brother Rice and Marist this season.

   Six different pitchers took the mound for St. Laurence, with starter Frank Greco getting the win when the Vikes staked him to an 8-0 advantage after two innings. Once again, St. Laurence’s attack was sparked by several individuals, a group that included Sean Burnette (two triples), Wilson (two hits, including a double, two RBI), Wood (two hits, one RBI), Finger (two hits, one RBI) and Miller (one hit, two RBI).   “We never played these guys before, so it was something we definitely talked about — not let- Statistics ting ourselves have a letdown,” 520 0(10) — 17 Lotus said. “It was such a tough St. Laurence 220 00 — 4 thing for [our players] because we Providence Catholic were coming off an emotional win St. Laurence 2B: Miller 3, Wilson 2, Fin-

ger, Marik, White. 3B: Tholl. HR: White. RBI: Miller 3, White 3, Gutierrez 2, Wilson 2, Finger, Kornacker, Marik, Tholl. WP: Wood (5-1). Mt. Carmel 200 010 0 — 3 St. Laurence 110 230 x — 7 St. Laurence 2B: Marik, Riordan. HR: Miller. RBI: Miller 3, Kornacker, Wood. WP: Hitney (5-0). Glenbard South 000 120 0 — 3 St. Laurence 351 200 x — 11 St. Laurence 2B: White, Wilson. 3B: Burnette 2. RBI: Miller 2, Wilson 2, Finger, Kornacker, Riordan, Tholl, White, Wood. WP: Greco (5-0). St. Laurence 310 215 3 — 15 Mt. Carmel 310 010 1 — 6 St. Laurence 2B: Gutierrez, White, Wood. HR: Kornacker, Riordan, White, Wood. RBI: Kornacker 3, Gutierrez 2, Miller 2, Riordan 2, White 2, Wood 2. WP: Kornacker (5-1).

  One missed opportunity was enough.   After a third-place finish in last year’s National Junior College Athletic Association Region IV tennis tournament deprived it of a berth in the national event, Moraine Valley College made sure it could plan a return trip to Texas in 2014. It did so by being the runner-up at this spring’s Region IV tourney in late April.    Although Prairie State edged the Cyclones for the top spot, the latter had several match highlights. Included among them was the first-doubles championship garnered by Kevin Karczynski and Mike Broderick, each of whom augmented that achievement with second places in singles play. Karczynski competed at No. 1 singles, Broderick at No. 3.   Christian Lagunas was a runner-up at No. 6 singles, and every other Moraine entrant at least reached the semifinal round. The group included Brad Smith (No. 2), Tim Stewart (No. 4) and Bryan Jimenez (No. 5) in singles matches, and the doubles tandems of Smith-Stewart (No. 2) and Lagunas-Jimenez (No. 3).    “There were many good things that came out of regionals,” Cyclones coach Ben Thompson said. “Our guys handled themselves with class.   “Second place is a disappointment, but it still gets us into the dance. We will get to see the level of competition that we are striving for in Texas.”   The NJCAA meet runs Sunday-Friday in Plano, Texas. Moraine’s women, meanwhile, will take part in their own national meet in Tyler, Texas. SOFTBALL   The Cyclones overpowered Triton College twice on April 25

as they recorded 11-6 and 15-3 victories in a doubleheader. The games marked Moraine’s final home appearance of the regular season.    Dana Cummings was a batting force in Game 1 as she went 6-for6 with three RBI and four runs scored. Amie Raynor included a double among her five hits, tallied five times and drove in three runs, while Ari Bulthius chipped in four hits, six RBI and four runs.   Key individuals in the second contest were Megan Beckow and Sam Newhall, both of whom supplied two hits and scored once. One of Beckow’s hits was a triple and Newhall included an RBI in her production. ***    Entering the Region IV tournament last Tuesday, the Cyclones tangled with Prairie State in the quarterfinals, just as they did in 2013. And like before, Moraine moved on, thanks to winning two of three games.    Raynor pitched a five-hitter to help the Cyclones post a 6-3 victory in their first postseason contest. Carly Trinley was Moraine’s headliner on offense with a homer, triple and two runs scored. Raynor and Bulthuis both hit safely as well, while Cummings and Beckow each crossed the plate once.    The Pioneers bounced back to win the next game 8-5, despite input from Janay McGovern (two doubles, one run), Bulthuis (homer), Raynor (double, one run) and Trinley (one hit, one run) on the Cyclones’ behalf.    But then it was Moraine’s turn to display resiliency. Prairie State put the Cyclones in a 4-0 hole during the rubber game, and Moraine coach Mike Veen decided it was time for a pep talk.   “I told [our players] they’ve been there before and they could do this,” he said. “I knew they’d pull it out.”    The Cyclones finally did in the

sixth inning, when only six outs separated them from tourney elimination. Beckow started the comeback with a single and Moraine eventually racked up five runs to grab the lead.    Then its defense locked up the win. Cyclones shortstop Jenny Vanek gloved a liner to strand two Pioneers runners and seal the deal for Moraine.   “I had no doubt we were going to win,” Veen said. “You can’t believe how proud I was of those kids. It wasn’t the greatest game, but they came through when they had to.”   Cummings had two hits and scored a run for the Cyclones, while McGovern, Trinley, Kristie Bagus and Sofia Lamb all hit safely once. ***    The playoff road ended for Moraine last Friday as Kankakee and South Suburban colleges handed out 12-1 and 9-4 setbacks in the semifinal round. BASEBALL   It was rough going for the Cyclones last Wednesday as they were blanked 3-0 by Illinois Valley College. Mike Levigne was a hard-luck loser on the hill as he gave up just four hits.    Moraine, however, did itself no favors by committing some fielding errors. Walks and hit batsmen also aided Illinois Valley.    A few Cyclones suffered injuries during the game, which didn’t bode well for Moraine when it took the field again on Saturday. And Kankakee capitalized on Moraine’s shortened state to administer a 12-2 defeat.    Bobby Neylon had three hits for the Cyclones, but Moraine stranded nine baserunners on the day.   Sunday was a better day for the Cyclones, who knocked off Olive-Harvey College 11-0 and 9-2 in a nonconference doubleheader.


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Section 2

5

Sports wrap the latter also made three blocks for Sandburg (15-7, 3-2). Zalewski dished out 20 assists. ***    Stagg (10-7, 2-2) scored a 25-23, 25-20 win over Bolingbrook in an SWSC Blue match. Trevor Crain (five kills, five digs), Kamil Krysiak (five kills) and Nick Stanek (13 assists were the Chargers’ main men. ***    Hussein Al-Rashdan distributed 28 assists and Doug Nelson drilled nine kills to power host Shepard to a 25-16, 18-25, 2522 win over Lemont in a South Suburban Conference crossover match last Tuesday. Steve Szajek added eight kills and seven blocks for the Astros (7-12, 2-2).

By Anthony Nasella    With just five matches remaining in the regular season for Chicago Christian’s girls’ soccer team, coach Tim Dustin knows the Lady Knights need to play with consistency.   During last Tuesday’s Suburban Christian Conference encounter with Guerin Prep, Christian was able to perform at that level most of the way, including in overtime. That allowed the Lady Knights to pull out a thrilling 3-2 victory.   Even with the score knotted 1-1 at intermission, Dustin commended his athletes.    “The first half was among the best soccer the girls have played thus far this spring,” he said. “The ball movement was outstanding, as many passes were one touch and the opponents were caught chasing the ball.   “With the ball movement, the girls played their positions outstandingly and had multiple chances to score. But they were just off the mark and had to settle for a tie at halftime.”   In the second half, Christian struggled to get footing and Guerin was able to apply some extra pressure. Still, the match extended beyond regulation as the teams were locked in a 2-all standoff.    In the overtime period, the Lady Knights grew aggressive and took the attack to the Lady Gators. Consequently, they secured numerous scoring opportunities and finally cashed in on a goal with just 30 seconds remaining to notch the win.   “We played a good game,” Dustin said. “The season is rapidly wrapping up and we will need to continue to improve and stay consistent with the work effort to gain momentum for the second season that follows.”   Christian has thus far received contributions offensively from Carolyn Richards, Anica Pausma, Kalyli Deckinga, Katie Voss, Megan Wise, Amber Voss, Lauren Kuipers, Therese Walsh and Julie Michaelis. ***    Sandburg won a pair of SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue matches last week, which assured it of its first divisional title since 2011.    The Lady Eagles edged Bolingbrook 2-1 on Tuesday before knocking off District 230 sister school Stagg 3-1 on Wednesday. A goal by freshman Christine Szymanski with six minutes left in regulation pushed Sandburg past the Lady Raiders, who had been locked in a tie with the Lady Eagles at halftime.   Sarah Dewolf delivered Sandburg’s initial marker.    “Despite dark skies in the first half and a constant rain in the second half, both teams put in a great effort,” Lady Eagles coach Desi Vuillaume said. “We played tough defense to earn the victory.”   Stagg jumped ahead of Sand-

GIRLS’ TRACK    Second-place performances from BOYS’ WATER POLO Grace Foley in the 3,200-meter   Shepard dropped an 18-10 de- run (11 minutes, 37.36 seconds) cision to Lincoln-Way West last and Rayphina Foma’i in the shot Tuesday despite a team-best four put (36 feet, 7 inches) guided the goals from Jerry Zachery. Lady Eagles (58 points) to fifth   Notching one score apiece for place in the 12-school Palatine the Astros were Lucas Souza, An- Invitational on Saturday. drew Choragwicki, Sanders Yu,   The host school finished first Patrick Muhne, Zach Sierzega and with 160 points. Alec Kleczkowski. GIRLS’ LACROSSE ***    Sandburg co-op lost a 13-9 de  Zack Amendola’s hat trick cision to Nazareth Academy on guided Stagg to a 13-4 triumph Thursday. Grainne Kelly’s four over Shepard last Monday. The goals led the visiting Lady EaChargers, however, were unable gles (1-8). to defeat Sandburg in an SWSC BADMINTON Blue match on Thursday. There,    Shepard went 1-2 last week as it defeated TF North (9-6), but Photo by Jeff Vorva the Eagles prevailed 11-9. Sandburg goalie Emily Furmanek gathers in a Stagg shot and prevents a score during last    Leading the way for Sandburg fell to Bolingbrook (9-6) and Bradwas Mitch Zeiler, who registered ley-Bourbonnais (15-0). Wednesday's match in Palos Hills. burg 1-0, but the latter rallied with three scores in the final 26:17 to log the triumph and claim the SWSC Blue crown. Sam Milwat, Jennifer Olsen and Szymanski tallied for the Lady Eagles (9-31, 5-0).   Allison Stefan accounted for the Lady Chargers’ goal in the 20th minute on a penalty kick. It was awarded after Hannah Yandel was taken down by a Sandburg defender while making a strong move into the box.    Stagg (4-6-2, 2-2) also dropped a 2-1 verdict in Homewood-Flossmoor in another SWSC Blue meeting on Monday. ***    Hat tricks by Tiffani Kotas and Kelly Evancich carried Shepard (10-4-1, 6-2) to a 7-0 South Suburban Conference Red victory over Oak Lawn last Tuesday. Aubrey Quick had the Lady Astros’ other goal. BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL   Wins over Andrew (22-25, 2521, 25-17) and Lincoln-Way Central (25-18, 26-24) gave Sandburg a perfect week last week.    Dan Tynski’s 13 kills and Erik Krause’s 16 digs were the main ingredients in the Eagles’ conquest of the Thunderbolts last Tuesday. Leading the way past the Knights on Thursday were Neil Naughton, Kyle Van Stedum and Ian Zalewski.   Naughton and Van Stedum combined for a dozen kills, and

An attempted pass by Stagg's Matina Halikas bounces off the leg of Sandburg's Rachel Latus last Wednesday.

Trinity sports report

Trolls scramble to stay alive in playoffs By Tim Cronin   It’s crunch time, and Trinity Christian College’s baseball team tried to avoid being crunched.    The Trolls dropped a 6-5 decision in 13 innings to St. Xavier University in the opening game of the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Tournament in Elgin on Saturday. That sent them into the losers’ bracket of the double-elimination carnival and a date with top-seeded University of St. Francis this past Monday.   The loss to the Cougars left Trinity 25-19 for the season — the victory total is a school record — and with something of a bitter taste.   The Trolls had a 1-0 lead in the early going against SXU, fell back 3-1, then tied it with two outs in the eighth inning on Steve Brewer’s two-RBI single. Victory could have been Trinity’s in the ninth, but it stranded a runner on third and regulation ended in a 3-3 deadlock.   Both the Cougars and Trolls scored once in the 10th, and SXU took a 6-4 lead on a pair of RBI singles in the top of the 13th after threatening in the previous inning. Trinity answered with a run in the bottom of the frame when Joe McCaw scored on a wild throw on Brewer’s one-out steal of second, but Brewer was stuck there as the next two batters were retired.    The Trolls finished third in the CCAC regular-season standings, thanks to 5-1 and 10-3 victories over Trinity International University. Trinity Christian piled up 19 hits in the twinbill, including McCaw’s fifth homer of the year. The nightcap was 9-0 after four innings and ended after seven. ***   • The Numbers (through Saturday): 25-19 overall, 17-10 CCAC, 10-7 home, 8-7 road, 7-5 neutral. Leaders: Joe McCaw, .385, 60

six goals. Mitch Winkelmann was credited with four assists. BOYS’ TENNIS    Chicago Christian slipped past Sandburg 3-2 last Monday, but neither squad enjoyed success later in the week. The Knights got blanked 5-0 by Wheaton-St. Francis in a Suburban Christian Conference encounter on Tuesday, while the Eagles fell short of Andrew by a 4-3 count on Wednesday.    A bright spot for Sandburg versus the Thunderbolts was Jonluke Passett’s win at No. 1 singles.   Shepard totaled 25 points to place fifth at the Brother Rice Invitational, which was won by St. Ignatius (76 points).

hits, .609 slugging percentage, 44 RBI, 5 HR; Lance Lammers, McCaw, 11 steals each; Benny Collesano, 5 wins; Vince Flores, 2.70 ERA; Brad Kopale, 3 saves; Danny Britt, 46 strikeouts.   • Schedule: TBA. SOFTBALL   Losses to top-seeded Olivet Nazarene University and Calumet College of St. Joseph knocked the Trolls out of the CCAC Tournament following their victory over Cardinal Stritch Universty, but that didn’t end Trinity’s season.    The Trolls were invited to the National Christian College Athletic Association North Central Regional, which began at Bethel College this past Wednesday. Success there would lead to a berth for Trinity in the NCCAA nationals.    Beating Stritch 4-3 in the tournament opener gave the Trolls 24 wins this season, more than they had collected in the last two years combined. Trinity was 12-32 last season and 10-37 in 2012.   Even without any NCCAA results factored in, this is the Trolls’ best season in the last six. The previous high point was a 17-32 campaign in 2010.   Trinity and the Wolves were tied 3-3 after four innings. Adrianna Puente scored the eventual winning run in the fifth on a wild pitch after reaching on a walk and moving to third on Anna Phillips’ sacrifice bunt. The Trolls hung on for the win despite getting outhit 9-5.    Pitcher Mattie McGuire picked up the victory while fanning seven.    Trinity scored five runs against Olivet Nazarene, but the Tigers, fourth-ranked in the NAIA survey, tallied 13, including three in the first inning. All of the Trolls’ scoring came in a madcap second inning that featured five hits, including Tori Grzincic’s three-RBI double.    The defeat shoved Trinity into

the consolation bracket, and it was shown the tournament door by Calumet College the following day via a 4-1 loss. It was 1-1 after two innings, the Trolls’ getting a run on Grzincic’s sacrifice fly that brought in Phillips, but the Crimson Wave kept scoring as they posted one run in the fourth and a pair in the fifth. ***   • The Numbers (through Saturday): 24-25 overall, 11-9 CCAC, 11-7 home, 4-9 road, 9-9 neutral. Leaders: Samantha Radunz, .444, .611 slugging percentage; Jayme Love, 57 hits; Tori Grzincic, 24 RBI, 3 HR; Anna Phillips, 8 steals; Brianna Brugioni, 9 wins, 80 strikeouts, 2.38 ERA; Mattie McGuire, 2 saves, 13 complete games.   • Schedule: TBA. TRACK & FIELD   The Trolls went forth to the CCAC Championship and each team finished fourth.   The women saved their best for last, as the 1,600-meter relay unit triumphed in 4 minutes, 5.25 seconds, which was close to the quartet’s season-best time. Courtney Kalous, anchor of the relay team, took second in the 800 (2:18.51) and Anna Bos gave Trinity another runner-up position by clocking an 18:20.45 for 5,000 meters.   Ashley Jourdan, who like Kalous was also on the third-place 3,200-meter relay team, ran fourth in the 1,500 (4:44.45).    On the men’s side, Andy Reidsma set a 4:00.05 winning pace in the 1,500-run and also anchored the runner-up 3,200-relay squad (8:03.20). In addition, he was a member of the 1,600-relay contingent that took fourth.   Cody Velthuizen was third in the 3,000-steeplechase after posting a time of 10:00.52.    This weekend, the Trolls travel to Naperville for the North Cen(Continued on page 6)

Softball

(Continued from page 3)

and I really see our juniors this year as a lot like seniors. [It’s] time for them to step up, and they are.”    The Lady Bulldogs were scheduled to meet Evergreen Park, Eisenhower and Riverside-Brookfield this week. MARIST   A split with Providence Catholic was the lone bright spot for the Lady RedHawks last week as they posted a 1-3 record. Marist dropped both ends of an East Suburban Catholic Conference doubleheader to Benet Academy (5-2 and 10-8) on Saturday.   The Lady Celtics also got the better of the Lady RedHawks last Tuesday by a 4-2 score. Brooke Wyderski (two hits) tallied once for Marist and knocked in its other run.   Behind Madison Naujokas’ perfect 5-for-5 exhibition and three RBI, the Lady RedHawks rebounded to take down Providence hard, 14-6, in a Wednesday rematch. Also contributing for Marist were Brooke Wilson (three hits, three RBI) and Hayley Franks (three hits, four runs).    Naujokas’ pair of two-run homers kept the Lady RedHawks fighting in Game 2 on Saturday, but neither those long balls nor a two-hit performance by Wyderski were enough to derail the once-beaten Lady Redwings. Wyderski homered and Alexis Rogers stroked an RBI double for Marist in Saturday’s opener. SANDBURG   After losing a 5-1 verdict to Lockport last Monday, the Lady Eagles bounced back to defeat Fenwick (5-4), Stagg (12-0) and Joliet West (8-7) in succession, the latter two in SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue contests.   Sandburg (12-9, 5-2) required 10 innings to top the Lady Friars on Tuesday, finally doing so on Madeline Hanley’s RBI. Caroline Kuzel fired a six-hitter and fanned seven for the Lady Eagles.

  Sandburg’s work day got cut in half on Wednesday as it overpowered the Lady Chargers in five innings behind big days from Katie Krzus and Brianna Soltis, who combined for five hits and six runs. Each player slugged a homer.   It was back to a nail-biter when the Lady Eagles tangled with Joliet. Sandburg emerged triumphant when Cierra Adams poked a two-run single in the sixth, which capped a seven-run rally.   Kristen Zarate’s bases-loaded walk gave the Lady Eagles their lone run in the loss to Lockport. MOTHER MCAULEY    Wins over Queen of Peace (160) and Reavis (7-3) assured the Mighty Macs of a successful week despite an ensuing setback versus Oak Forest (5-3).   Jen Alberts threw a one-hitter and struck out 13 as Mother McAuley hammered the Pride in a GCAC Red contest. Maryssa Vela slammed a three-run homer and Kara Bischoff (three hits, three RBI, three runs) also played a featured role for the Macs, who stayed perfect (8-0) at home.    Isabelle Ogden collected Peace’s lone safety with her fourth-inning single.   Alex Brown, Kelly O’Donnell and Morgan Fleming all had RBI singles in a five-run first inning that catapulted McAuley past the Lady Rams. Dara Sanders fanned seven in pitching a complete game for the visiting Macs (14-4).

Photo by Jeff Vorva

hits with a homer, five RBI and three runs in Game 2). Maddie Vojacek was the winning pitcher in the opener.    Evergreen (14-8) triumphed 6-4 and 20-14. CHICAGO CHRISTIAN    The Lady Knights had a mixedbag week as they slipped a 3-0 victory over Wheaton Academy in between losses to Aurora Central Catholic (4-3) and Illiana Christian (4-2).    Davina Gutierrez struck out 10 batters in Chicago Christian’s win, which was also made possible by offensive input from Sam Kubik (two hits, three RBI) and Trisha Belgrave (two hits, two runs). Gutierrez belted an RBI double for the Lady Knights (7-10) on Saturday versus Illiana. SHEPARD    Alyssa DeChene’s ninth-inning double gave the Lady Astros the deciding run in an 8-7 win over Reavis last Tuesday. The hit scored freshman Jenna Husenga, who also had two RBI on the day.    Stephanie Brand pitched a complete game for Shepard. MT. ASSISI   Terri Dearth (two hits, two runs) and Molly Murphy (RBI triple) had good days, but that couldn’t prevent the Screeching Eagles (5-11, 3-6) from absorbing an 11-6 GCAC loss against De La Salle last Wednesday.

STAGG    Besides their loss to Sandburg, the Chargers also dropped an QUEEN OF PEACE SWSC Blue contest to Lockport   Jasmine Escobedo unloaded a (4-0) last week. Alexis Minet had three-run homer later in the week a double for Stagg (2-11, 1-6) in and Abigail Bennett smashed a Friday’s setback. grand slam, but the Peace were unable to prosper as a team as SIGN UP TO GET FREE they slipped to 3-14. Bennett colAMBER ALERTS lected three hits in all and totaled ON YOUR CELL PHONE. five RBI in Game 2 of a Saturday twinbill against Evergreen Park. wirelessamberalerts.org   Erin Jones went 2-for-2 with two RBI and a run in the opener.    Starring for the Lady Mustangs that day were Abby Langevin (three hits, three RBI in Game A child is calling for help. 1) and Caroline Andrade (three


6

Section 2

Thursday, May 8, 2014   The Regional News - The Reporter

Community sports news emy Tryban, which shut out St. Laurence's pairing of Andy Li-Jay Wu 6-0, 6-0. Singles victories for Rice came from Liam Millerick (6-0, 6-1 over Chris Thomas at No. 1), Will Saas (6-1, 6-1 over Justin Dang at No. 2) and T.J. Saas (6-0, 6-1 over Frank Murray at No. 3).

Submitted photo

Marist grad Colleen Biebel will become the Lady RedHawks softball coach in 2015. Marist chooses Bromberek's replacement Colleen Biebel, a 2007 Marist graduate, will take over as the Lady RedHawks softball coach when Denise Bromberek steps down at the end of the current season. Biebel pitched for Bromberek between 2004-07, winning two East Suburban Catholic Conference Player of the Year designations during that span and being named to the all-conference squad all four years. She also played softball at Western Illinois University, where she was a four-year starter in center field. Biebel concluded her career with the Leathernecks as a four-time All-Summit League selection for both her sport and academically. She was also named to the CoSIDA/ESPN The Magazine All-District V team in 2010. Biebel finished among WIU's top 10 in career hits, stolen bases and runs scored. Biebel, who'll become just the second head coach in Marist's 11year softball history, is currently a coach for the Beverly Bandits in addition to assisting with the Lady RedHawks since 2012. She previously coached the Palos Rippit softball club.

softball player Elisabeth Childers (Trinity Christian College). Rice blanks St. Laurence in Catholic League tennis Five straight-set wins, all by wide margins, carried Brother Rice's tennis team to a 5-0 victory over St. Laurence in a recent Chicago Catholic League match. Only the Vikings' No. 2 doubles tandem of Bob Dorenz-Manny Sanchez was able to win as many as two games. They wound up falling to a 6-2, 6-0 defeat against the Crusaders' duo of Dan Mahoney-Aruydas Jarulis. Also triumphing in doubles play was the team of Jack Gorman-Jer-

tral (17-2). Rice wins own track relays Victories in five events propelled host Brother Rice to the championship of its own track relays last week. The Crusaders amassed 97 points, which put them comfortably in front of runner-up Providence Catholic (71 points). Marist (70), Evergreen Park (53) and Marmion Academy (51) rounded out the top five in the 12-school meet. Other local teams taking part were Stagg (ninth with 16 points) and St. Laurence (10th, nine points). Rice's triumphs were earned in the following relays: 800 meters (1 minute, 30 seconds), 1,600 (3:28.8), shot put (124 feet, 11 inches), discus (349-1/2) and pole vault (33 feet). The Crusaders were second in the high jump (178), 400 (43.6) and the unscored Big Man 400 (53.5). Other local winners included Marist in the long jump (537), 3,200 (8:31.5), mile medley (3:48.1) and distance medley (11:04.8), and Evergreen in the triple jump (109-2). The Mustangs ran second in the 3-by-110 high hurdles (53.2) and 800 (1:33.4), and St. Laurence did likewise in the mile medley (3:48.4). The lone individual event was the unscored elite mile, where area runners occupied the 3-6 positions. In descending order, the finishers were Marist's Luke Haberkorn (4:37.2) and Luke McGovern (4:37.6), Evergreen's Matt Przeslicke (4:40.8) and Rice's James Durkin (4:41.0).

Marist falls to JCA in volleyball Despite Jake Moran's 12 kills, Marist didn't have enough firepower to take down Joliet Catholic Academy in a recent East Suburban Catholic Conference volleyball match. The Hilltoppers had the final say by a 25-18, 25-20 score. "Unforced errors truly can take you out of a match," RedHawks coach Jodi Frigo said. Marist had little else besides Moran working well for it along the net, as the next-best kills total was just two. Matt Munro did register a team-high five blocks, however. Other contributors for the RedHawks were Tim Hauser (11 assists), Luke Mayer (six digs) and Nick O'Gorman (six digs). Offensively, Marist managed only two service aces. Sandburg second, Rice fifth in water polo One goal was the difference between first and second place for Sandburg at the two-day Brother Rice Tournament, and the host Crusaders secured the fifth spot over Curie by that same margin. Rice edged the Condors 13-12 in the fifth-place match, while the Eagles lost 9-8 to fellow SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue member Lockport in the title encounter. Other tourney wins for the Crusaders were notched against Hinsdale Central (15-8) and De La Salle (12-10). They lost Annual Shepard football camp set for 10-5 to Sandburg early on Day 2. May 18 The sixth annual Shepard Besides Rice, the Eagles also got the better of Hinsdale Cen- Youth Football Camp will be held

Sunday, May 18, from 2-4 p.m. at the school's football field. Registration for the camp, which is open to ages 6-14 (grades 1-8), will be taken at 1 p.m. that same day. The cost is $10, and includes a T-shirt and pizza. Players must supply their own cleats/gym shoes, shorts and practice T-shirt. Astros varsity coach Dominic Passolano, who guided Shepard into the state playoffs in four of his first five seasons in charge of the program, will lead the non-padded camp, which seeks to develop the skills and teamwork necessary to participate in the sport. There is no weight limit or experience level necessary for individuals to take part. For more information, contact Passolano at 371-1111, ext. 3362, or email dominic.passolano@ chsd218.org. Golf outing at Cog Hill Mt. Assisi Academy will sponsor a golf outing on Monday, May 19, at Cog Hill in Lemont. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. that day, with lunch to follow at noon and a shotgun start at 1 p.m. The event will also feature auctions, raffles and various contests. The cost is $150 per person, and includes a round of golf with cart, lunch, dinner and refreshments. Visit www.mtassisi.org for more details. Moraine to conduct summer sports camps Moraine Valley College will conduct three youth sports camps this summer. Athletic director and former men's basketball coach Bill Finn will lead a hoops camp from July 14-17 for youngsters entering grades 3-8. Each session will run from 9-10:30 a.m. The camp is designed to develop and

improve fundamental basketball skills through instruction, group and individual drills, and team play. Former Cyclones volleyball coach Gloria Coughlin will host a camp in that sport July 14-17 from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily. The program, which is open to players entering grades 5-9, will improve fundamental skills through individual attention and group work. Moraine women's tennis coach Nicole Selvaggio will instruct youngsters entering grades 5-12 in the fundamentals of her sport July 7-10. Sessions for those in grades 5-8 will go from 9-10:30 a.m. each day, with ones for grades 9-12 to follow from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The cost of each camp is $70, and all three will be held in the school's new Health, Fitness & Recreation Center gymnasium. For more information, call 9745727 or visit www.morainevalley. edu/Athletics. Girls' basketball camp to be offered at SXU St. Xavier University women's basketball coach Bob Hallberg will host his annual basketball camp for girls aged 7-15 the week of June 16-20 at the Shannon Center. Sessions will run from 1:30-4 p.m. daily. Participants will be grouped according to age and ability, and Hallberg will actively teach each day. SXU assistant coaches and players will also be on hand to instruct campers. The cost is $135 per individual, and includes a camp T-shirt. Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis. Applications are available through the SXU athletic department or online at www.sxucougars.com under the "summer camps" link. For more information, call Laura Kurzeja at (773) 298-3785.

Local golf instructor to conduct free clinic Professional golf instructor Bob Gates, a former coach at Oak Lawn High School and longtime contributor of a golf advice column to this paper, will conduct a free one-hour clinic on Saturday, May 17, at Stony Creek Golf Course, 5850 W. 103rd St. in Oak Lawn. The session, which will run from 11 a.m.-noon, will focus on two of the sport's most neglected fundamentals: proper setup position and club takeaway. Both subjects will be discussed, demonstrated and have solutions suggested through hands-on instruction. The clinic is open to all. For more information, call Stony Creek at 857-2433. Submitted photo

Oak Lawn athletes sign letters of intent Eleven student-athletes at Oak Lawn High School recently made official decisions regarding their collegiate futures by signing national letters of intent. The signees represented seven different sports. Included among them were track athletes Victoria Jones (Illinois State University) and Jasmin Pelaez (Robert Morris University), basketball players LaTondra Brooks (Western Michigan University) and Jannah Mahmoud (Robert Morris), baseball players Jake Slusinski (St. Xavier University) and Matt Dunne (Roosevelt University), football players Ed Trybula (Concordia University) and David Michaels (Elmhurst College), tennis player Paulina Kotwica (Roosevelt), volleyball player (Becky Bradshaw (University of Wisconsin-Stout) and

A number of Oak Lawn High School student-athletes officially declared their college intentions by signing letters of intent.

Trinity (Continued from page 5) tral College Invitational. GOLF    The Trolls finished fifth in the CCAC Championship at George Dunne National in Oak Forest.   Logan Vos’ 36-hole aggregate of a 15-over-par 159 (77-82) led the Trinity charge and was good for a tie for 12th place individually. Freshman Jon Zandstra also carded a 77, but had to add it to an opening-round 90 for a 23-over 167 total. He tied for 31st.   No other Troll was able to break 80. ***   • Scoring leaders (season complete): Logan Vos, 75, Aug. 30, Sept. 20; Jonathan Zandstra, 76, Sept. 21, April 12; Spencer TenHaken, 77, April 11; Scott Ebbeling, 78, Aug. 31; Tim Hoeksema, 79, Aug. 31; Brian Deckinga, 79, April 16.

Signing on the dotted line

Submitted photo

Palos Heights resident Rachel Janke (seated, with pen) signs a letter of intent last week with Trinity Christian College, where she will continue to compete in track and field. Surrounding her are her Chicago Christian teammates and Lady Knights coach Jim Kwasteniet.


The Regional News - The Reporter    Thursday, May 8, 2014 Section 2

SXU

   The Cougars (22-27) faced No. 2-seeded Judson University this past Monday night in the next tournament round. SOFTBALL    One week after her sister Megan received the same honor, sophomore Nicole Nonnemacher was tabbed as the CCAC Pitcher of the Week for the period ending April 27.    During that seven-day stretch, Nonnemacher went 3-1 in the circle while striking out 54 batters and compiling a 0.80 ERA over 35 innings. She walked only 11 and opponents hit just .143 against her. She got no decision when the Cougars played eventual conference champ Olivet Nazarene to an eight-inning tie in the back end of a doubleheader, but Nonnemacher whiffed 10 Tigers, one of four double-digit strikeout totals she posted in five appearances for the week.   Nonnemacher carried a 19-3 ledger and NAIA-leading 0.36 ERA into postseason play. She currently ranks second nationally in strikeouts per game (11.03) and fourth in both hits allowed per game (3.45) and opponents’ average (.143).   On Friday, Nonnemacher also claimed CCAC Pitcher of the Year honors. She was one of six Cougars selected for the all-conference squad.   Joining her on the first team were senior pitcher Megan Nonnemacher (21-2, 1.17 ERA, 148 strikeouts) and junior outfielder Katie Sears (.356, 53 hits, 34 runs, 17 stolen bases). Second-team recognition went to senior outfielder Katie Houlihan (.371, 43 hits, 22 runs), junior first baseman Amanda Hainlen (35 RBI, nine doubles; 199 putouts, 12 assists, one error) and sophomore second baseman Kasey Kanaga (.346, 47 hits, 29 runs). ***   Junior Megan James slugged a two-run homer in the fourth inning on Friday to enable SXU (43-5-1) to pull away and register a 7-1 triumph over Calumet College of St. Joseph in its opening CCAC Tournament game.    James’ blast came on the heels of a four-run Cougars rally in the third. The earlier surge was sparked by RBI hits from Nicole Nonnemacher, Sears and Kanaga. Kanaga also belted a run-producing double in the sixth frame.   The Nonnemacher sisters teamed up in the circle to stop the Crimson Wave, who managed just two hits on the day while whiffing a total of 13 times. Nicole Nonnemacher earned the win by throwing the last 3 1/3 stanzas, striking out nine and allowing no hits or walks. ***    With two runs in the bottom of the seventh, No. 4 ranked Olivet Nazarene University rallied to beat the Cougars 3-2 in a winners’ bracket tourney matchup on Sat-

urday afternoon at SXU Softball Field. The hosts rebounded to down No. 3 seed University of St. Francis 9-1 in five innings later in the day to advance to Sunday’s championship game and a rematch against the top-seeded Tigers.   With the victory against the Fighting Saints Saturday evening, SXU also officially punched its ticket to the NAIA Opening Round Tournament since Olivet had already earned the conference’s other automatic bid to the national event by virtue of its regular-season title.    Saturday’s first game featured a pitching duel between Nicole Nonnemacher and Tigers junior Lindsay Stotler. James (infield groundout) and Hainlen (single) had RBI in the fifth and sixth innings, respectively, to give the Cougars a 2-1 lead, and Nonnemacher had Olivet down to its last strike when she surrendered a two-run, game-winning single to Katie Megyesi.   SXU cranked out 12 hits in thesecond game, which was far more than Megan Nonnemacher needed to gain her 22nd pitching win. Nonnemacher stopped USF on five hits and did not walk anyone.   Pacing the Cougars’ offense were junior Sarah Saunders (three hits, two RBI), Nicole Nonnemacher (two hits, three RBI, two runs) and Hainlen (tworun double). ***    Sears’ two-run double broke up a scoreless tie in the fifth and sent SXU on its way to a 5-2 triumph over Olivet in the first game on Sunday. That set up a winnertake-all confrontation between the same two clubs in Game 2, which the Tigers captured by a 7-4 count.   Sears ended the day 4-for-8 with four RBI and three runs. Her second two-RBI double in the opener enabled the Cougars (45-7-1) to break a 2-all tie and move in front to stay.   Nicole Nonnemacher notched her 20th victory by stopping Olivet on four hits and striking out seven. Two of the Tigers’ hits were sixth-inning homers.    Game 2 was more of the same for a while as SXU constructed a 4-1 lead, but CCAC Player of the Year Hannah Gardner socked a two-run homer and tournament MVP Justine Phillips added a twoRBI double in the fifth as Olivet overtook the Cougars. Gardner had two round-trippers in the contest.   Megan Nonnemacher suffered the loss despite recording seven strikeouts. Sears and James both collected a pair of hits in the losing cause. Sears, James, Houlihan, Kanaga and Nicole Nonnemacher were all tabbed for the all-tourney squad.    SXU now awaits its seeding and site location for the national tournament, which begins Monday.

happen very often.” Neither does having a pitching-by-committee approach work (Continued from page 1) so well. Manteno did accrue nine Jack De Vries’ double and Max hits, but Brauer was pleased that Kerfin’s sacrifice fly staked Chris- five different hurlers were able to tian to a 2-0 edge in the fourth, keep a team batting .340 for the then Kerfin’s single and a wild season fairly well in check. “We were planning on using pitch provided a couple insurance runs for the Knights two innings at least four pitchers, or more,” later. Christian finished with eight Brauer said. “We didn’t want to hits, one more than the Chargers push anyone beyond three innings managed over two days and 17 or have them face more than nine batters, so none of their batters frames. “We really held them down of- got to hit twice against the same fensively,” Brauer said. “I think pitcher.” we’ve had 16 games where we’ve 7 held teams to three runs or less. Chicago Christian 5 We’ve played a lot of close games Illiana Christian The Knights’ longtime rival and I think we’re very well prewill be shifting their school site pared [for the postseason].” The Knights close out the to Indiana within the next few conference portion of their 2014 years, but until that happens the schedule with four games this two teams will resume the sharing week, including a pair of match- of a conference home this fall. But right now, the Vikings repups with another of their closest pursuers, St. Edward. If it is able resent a nonconference clash for to eventually claim the league Chicago Christian, which means crown, Christian’s back-to-back neither Brauer nor his athletes conference championships would wanted to read too much into Saturday’s extra-inning success. be a first in program history. “It’s great to get a win, but Chicago Christian 3 Manteno 3 I’d rather beat St. Ed’s twice on Three suicide squeezes were re- Monday and Tuesday than beat sponsible for all of the Knights’ Illiana,” Brauer said. “A conferscoring on Thursday. Bolhuis and ence championship is our focus.” And as for the rivalry itself, Pat McCarthy both laid down bunts in the fifth inning, while it’s on the back burner, at least Mike Santarelli came through in during baseball season. “It’s really been that way in the sixth. “We had a tough time scoring all baseball for a few years because week, and we were in a squeeze it’s always a Saturday game,” situation and had good bunters Brauer said. “As such, neither up there,” Brauer said in expla- team is going to expend a lot nation of the unusual strategy. of pitching, so it’s kind of more “We rolled the dice all three times high-scoring [between us] of late. and it worked out. That does not Last year, we 10-runned them.”

The Knights weren’t quite as dominant this time around, but they were still good enough to get the job done. Ron Clark was the ringleader of Chicago Christian’s 10-hit attack as he went 4-for-5 with two doubles, three RBI and three runs scored. De Vries and Trevor Wolterink chipped in two RBI apiece. “It was a good offensive day for us,” Brauer said. “That was the most hits we’ve had in a couple of weeks.” The Knights trailed 5-4 after five innings, but Clark’s RBI double pulled them even in the top of the sixth. He and De Vries each drove in a run with an eighth-inning single to make a winner of Schoenle, who pitched the final 3 2/3 innings as the last of three Chicago Christian hurlers.

(Continued from page 4)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Nate Natividad doubles in a pair of runs for Richards to help the Bulldogs rout Lincoln-Way East 12-3 last Thursday.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards freshman Angelo Smith fires a pitch toward home plate last Thursday versus Lincoln-Way East.

Bulldogs (Continued from page 1) two more runs.   From there, Sanchez assumed control on the hill as he no-hit the Rams between the second and sixth stanzas. The Bulldogs, meanwhile, cushioned Sanchez with four more runs as Nate Natividad (double), Nick Mejia (RBI single), Shawn Chiaramonte (RBI double) and Charlie Zeschke (RBI single) all delivered clutch hits. Sanchez also aided his own cause with a triple and sacrifice fly.   Once again, Richards inflicted some of its damage with two-out surges.    “I can’t explain it,” Wujcik said of the Bulldogs’ season-long proficiency in that area. “But I’m not complaining.”    Sanchez kept his pitching ledger spotless by going the distance on a yield of seven hits. He fanned five and walked just one batter. Richards 12 Lincoln-Way East 3   With designs on a conference title, the Bulldogs’ conquest of the Griffins on Thursday might

Crusaders (Continued from page 1) latter rally temporarily bringing it into the 3-all deadlock.   “Good teams can beat you in multiple ways,” McCarthy said. “Winning on Wednesday got our confidence back.”    Musielak logged the victory by effectively scattering eight hits and striking out six. He did not issue any free passes. Mt. Carmel 8 Brother Rice 6   The Caravan committed four errors last Monday, which led to every one of the Crusaders’ runs being unearned. Mt. Carmel survived, however, behind a 13hit attack and was able to deal a second straight loss to Rice in their head-to-head confrontations.    Massey drove in three runs for the Crusaders, while Dyke and

have seemed like a bonus. Wujcik, though, attached much more meaning to it.   “We told our guys before the game it’s every bit as important as a conference game because Lincoln-Way East is in our sectional and we’re getting close [to tournament time],” he said. “It’s [a] loaded [field], and what’s even more frustrating is the schools that are having down years are still unbelievably dangerous.    “We could still get a four or five seed, but you could get a five seed and maybe have to play somebody like Lockport.”    Lincoln-Way East shares a SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue residence with the Porters, but the Griffins were simply left black and blue by a Richards attack that featured a half-dozen extra-base hits among its 14-hit total. Mejia and Mike Marchione both slugged solo homers, while Natividad (double) and Mallo each supplied a two-RBI hit during the contest.   “We were dialed in,” Wujcik said. “Even our outs were [hit] hard.”    Other contributors for the Bulldogs included Zeschke (two hits, one RBI), Noel Castro (double),

Chiaramonte (double), Sanchez (RBI single) and Danny Estrella (RBI single). Freshman Angelo Smith pocketed the pitching triumph by striking out five and scattering six hits.   Back-to-back encounters with Eisenhower began Richards’ current week, and a showdown with SSC Blue power Lemont is on tap for today. The Bulldogs will meet Yorkville in a nonconference affair Saturday at Silver Cross Field in Joliet.

Kyle Hilliard both provided Rice with two hits and an RBI. Kutt took his first loss on the mound after bagging four wins. Andrean (Ind.) 4 Brother Rice 0   In between their games with Loyola, the Crusaders took on the 59ers. Thursday’s matchup found Rice in quiet mode as it was held to three hits by Andrean hurler Jimmy Skiff.   The last of those was Beese’s fifth-inning single, which was followed by a hit batsman and walk. Massey launched a deep fly ball to center, but it stayed within reach of the 59ers’ outfielder and the Crusaders came away empty-handed.   Rice returned to CCL Blue play this week with two games against Providence Catholic and one versus St. Rita. McCarthy said the Crusaders must simply focus on each day’s assignment when it arrives.

  “Every game’s going to be tough, but that’s what you ask for in the Catholic League,” McCarthy said. “We can’t worry about what other teams are doing.”

SIGN UP TO GET FREE AMBER ALERTS ON YOUR CELL PHONE. wirelessamberalerts.org

Statistics Richards 001 000 0 — 1 Reavis 011 500 x — 7 Richards RBI: Sanchez. LP: Thompson (4-1). Reavis 300 000 1 — 4 Richards 220 112 x — 8 Richards 2B: Chiaramonte, Natividad. 3B: Sanchez. RBI: Sanchez 2, Chiaramonte, Mejia, Zeschke. WP: Sanchez (4-0). Lincoln-Way East 101 001 0 — 3 Richards -Richards 2B: Castro, Chiaramonte, Mallo, Natividad. HR: Marchione, Mejia. RBI: Mallo 3, Marchione 2, Natividad 2, Estrella, Mejia, Sanchez, Zeschke. WP: Smith (4-0).

Statistics Mt. Carmel 201 032 0 — 8 Brother Rice 001 302 0 — 6 Brother Rice RBI: Massey 3, Dyke, Hilliard. LP: Kutt (4-1). Brother Rice 232 03 — 10 Loyola Academy 000 00 — 0 Brother Rice 2B: K. Biondic, Sullivan. HR: Dyke. RBI: Dyke 5, K. Biondic 2, Sullivan 2, Musielak. WP: Enriquez (5-1). Andrean

010 020 1 — 4

hits was a double, plus two RBI. He scored once. Klein went 3-for-5 with a homer, triple, two RBI and two runs, while Polak counted a double among his three hits, drove in two runs and tallied three others himself.    That offensive handiwork made it an easy day for winning pitcher Jesse Lopez, who triumphed for the fifth time in nine decisions. He scattered eight hits, struck out three and walked two.    While SXU scored in six of the eight innings in Game 2, it was nowhere near as potent in the opener. The Cougars fell behind 2-0 in the first inning and never caught up to the Panthers.   SXU finished with just four hits. It scored in the bottom of the seventh on Klein’s RBI triple. Junior pitcher Dan Wetzel fanned seven in a losing cause. ***   Behind sophomore Alec Barnhart and Polak, the No. 4 Cougars won their opening game of the CCAC Tournament with a wild 6-5 decision over No. 3 seed Trinity Christian College in a 13-inning marathon Saturday night at Hoffer Field in Elgin.   Wetzel (4-7) earned the triumph on the mound for SXU after coming in to relieve senior Scott Vachon. Vachon threw the first eight frames and allowed six hits and one earned run while striking out nine. Wetzel fanned six and gave up three hits over five stanzas.   The Trolls scored first when sophomore Vincent Flores drove in a run on a third-inning single, but the Cougars answered in the top of the fourth when freshman Ryan Pellack tied the game with an RBI single. Later in the inning, Trinity senior starter Danny Britt had trouble with his control and walked both Barnhart and senior Tom Keating on back-to-back atbats with the bags filled to give SXU a 3-1 advantage.   The Trolls tied the score with two outs in the bottom of the eighth on a two-run single by senior Steven Brewer after the inning was extended by a Cougars error.   Neither team scored in the ninth, but SXU got a go-ahead run in the 10th on Augle’s double that knocked in senior Brad Myjak. Trinity responded with Joe McCaw’s game-tying double, which led to two more scoreless frames.   Klein, Barnhart and Polak finally decided the issue in the Cougars’ favor by teaming up to produce a pair of runs for SXU in the 13th. Klein’s double got the rally started, and both Barnhart and Polak followed with RBI singles. Wetzel surrendered one run to the Trolls in the bottom of the inning, but retired the side before additional damage could be done.

Knights

SIGNBrother UPRice TO GET FREE 000 000 0—0 Brother Rice LP: Kutt (4-2). AMBER ALERTS Loyola Academy 002 0 — 3 ON YOUR CELL001 Brother Rice 010PHONE. 020 4 — 7 Brother Rice HR: Barry. RBI: Barry 4, wirelessamberalerts.org Beese, Kutt, Sullivan. WP: Musielak (4-2).

A child is calling for help.

7

Statistics Chicago Christian 100 000 000 0 — 1 Aurora Central Catholic 100 000 000 1 — 2 Chicago Christian 2B: Novak. LP: Novak (2-3). urora Central Catholic 000 000 0 — 0 A Chicago Christian 000 202 x — 4 Chicago Christian 2B: De Vries, Novak. RBI: Kerfin 2, De Vries. WP: Schoenle (2-1). Chicago Christian 000 021 00 — 3 Manteno 201 000 00 — 3 Chicago Christian RBI: Bolhuis, McCarthy, Santarelli. Chicago Christian 200 201 02 — 7 Illiana Christian 200 030 00 — 5 Chicago Christian 2B: Clark 2. RBI: Clark 3, De Vries 2, Wolterink 2. WP: Schoenle (3-1).

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8

Section 2 Thursday, May 8, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-FF4, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-FF4 Plaintiff, -v.SAWSON HADDAD A/K/A SAWSON R. HADDAD, RAJAEI HADDAD A/K/A RAJAEI J. HADDAD A/K/A RAY HADDAD, CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, INLAND BANK AND TRUST, MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC, INTEGRA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 028055 17128 POINTE DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 15, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 16, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17128 POINTE DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-29-313-003. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-18640. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-18640 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 028055 TJSC#: 34-6217 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603058

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NA AS TRUSTEE FOR WASHINGTON MUTUAL ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES WMABS SERIES 2006-HE4 TRUST Plaintiff, -v.NAGLA T. ELHASSAN A/K/A NAGLA ELHASSAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., CIT LOAN CORPORATION F/K/A THE CIT GROUP/CONSUMER FINANCE, INC., WORLDWIDE ASSET PURCHASING, LLC, BROOK HILLS HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 09 CH 043338 11765 S. BROOKSHIRE DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 4, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 6, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11765 S. BROOKSHIRE DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-30-310-004. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-26139. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1409-26139 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 043338 TJSC#: 34-4267 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603478

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Fire applications and information packets will be distributed May 1, 2014 - June 20, 2014

Orientation and written exam held July 12, 2014. Note: Valid CPAT card issued after 9/23/13 required for oral interview and licensed EMT- B, I or P by State of Illinois and/or National Registry at time of hire.Fire applications may be picked up in person at Central Fire Station, 1650 S. Walnut Avenue, Freeport, IL. 61032

On-line applications and information packets available at www.cityoffreeport.org The City of Freeport is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate in employment based on race, religion, sex, age, national origin, color, ancestry, marital status, or mental or physical handicaps.

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-2 Plaintiff, -v.MARIA EVELINA CRUZ AKA MARIA EVELINA L. CRUZ, DARLENE CURRY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY-INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, TOWN OF CICERO, TARGET NATIONAL BANK FKA RETAILERS NATIONAL BANK, ERIN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, LLC, PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES LLC, NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY DBA NICOR GAS COMPANY, MIDLAND FUNDING LLC Defendants 13 CH 16202 50 Ruggles Ct. Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 19, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 20, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 50 Ruggles Ct., Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-06-303-011-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $270,321.92. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 16202 TJSC#: 345894 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603852

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTEE FOR CSMC TRUST 2011-11 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ABED MUSTAFA; D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 16204 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 26, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, May 30, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 24-29-406-003-0000. Commonly known as 12519 SOUTH MENARD AVENUE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1310343. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603335

Your Message Gets Across Better in the Classifieds.

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ROBERT L. BREGIN A/K/A ROBERT LOUIS BREGIN SR., MARY MARGARET BREGIN A/K/A MARY M. BREGIN, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 030636 522 LAKE TRAIL DRIVE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 10, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 12, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 522 LAKE TRAIL DRIVE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-28-305-017. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-19472. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-19472 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 030636 TJSC#: 34-4515 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603967

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � RAEDA SHEBAN; THOMAS CHARLES ESTATES TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION; DELL FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 6651 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on June 6, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 8530 West Thomas Charles Lane, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. P.I.N. 18-35-307-035-0000. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 651-6705. 1 2 0 3 1 5 6 5 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603274

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ARUNAS ZABIELSKAS; MINDAUGAS S T A N E V I C I U S ; � VIKTORIJA RAADAVICIUTE; CITIBANK N.A. FKA CITIBANK FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK; CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA), N.A.; D e f e n d a n t s , � 10 CH 16604 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on February 28, 2014 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, May 30, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-11-208-003-0000. Commonly known as 8011 West 98th Street, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call William E. Dutton, Jr. at Plaintiff's Attorney, DUTTON & DUTTON, P.C., 10325 West Lincoln Highway, Frankfort, Illinois 60423. (815) 8 0 6 8 2 0 0 . � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603293

9

Thursday, May 8, 2014 Section 2

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST BY PURCHASE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK FKA WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Plaintiff, -v.SAED HAMMAD, LILIAN KANAN, GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, BROOK HILLS HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION, BROOK HILLS TOWNHOME OWNER’S ASSOCIATION Defendants 12 CH 35359 17302 Highwood Dr. Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 12, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 13, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17302 Highwood Dr., Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-30-407008-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $302,783.10. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 12 CH 35359 TJSC#: 345417 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603070

34

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“10 in the Park” NEW as of 7/7/11 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL ILLINOIS, INC. Plaintiff, -v.FIRST MIDWEST BANK AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED AUGUST 14, 1992 A/K/A TRUST NO. 13336, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF FIRST MIDWEST BANK, AS PURCHASER OF THE LOANS AND OTHER ASSETS OF PALOS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY FROM THE FDIC, ACTING AS RECEIVER FOR THE SAVINGS BANK AND PURSUANT TO THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE ACT U/T/A DATED AUGUST 14, 1992 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1-3336, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MICHAEL GONZALEZ A/K/A MICHAEL A. GONZALEZ, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 023713 16801 S. WOLF ROAD ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 22, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 3, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 16801 S. WOLF ROAD, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-29-100-037. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-18596. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-18596 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 023713 TJSC#: 34-2241 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I590716


10

Section 2 Thursday, May 8, 2014

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � IMAN EL BANNA A/K/A IMAN ELBANNA, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. Defendants 13 CH 14838 11126 S. DEERPATH LANE Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 13, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 17, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 11126 S. DEERPATH LANE, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-22-201-005. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $304,680.86. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC, 175 N. Franklin Street, Suite 201, CHICAGO, IL 60606, (312) 357-1125 Please refer calls to the sales department. Please refer to file number 13-02461. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC 175 N. Franklin Street, Suite 201 CHICAGO, IL 60606 (312) 357-1125 Attorney File No. 13-02461 Attorney Code. 18837 Case Number: 13 CH 14838 TJSC#: 34-4852 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I604625

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HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sat. 9 A.M. to Noon

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS I N D E N T U R E � TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE I N V E S T M E N T � TRUST 2004-4, Plaintiff, v s . � GERARD HANNON AND MARGARET BROWNE N / K / A � MARGARET HANNON, PRAIRIE BANK AND T R U S T � COMPANY, Defendants, 12 CH 5450 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 22, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 9120 South 87th Court, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. P.I.N. 23-02-310-011. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The judgment amount was $232,783.39. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Ira T. Nevel at Plaintiff's Attorney, Law Offices of Ira T. Nevel, 175 North Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 357-1125. Ref. No. 12-00246 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603232

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Wells Fargo Bank, NA P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Maryam Alrazzaq aka Maryam A. Alrazzaq; Nader Alghoul; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 42269 Sheriff's # 140130 F12090436 WELLS Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on June 2, 2014, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 10111 South 81st Court, Palos Hills, Illinois 60465 P.I.N: 23-11-406-023-0000 Improvements: This property consists of a Single Family Home. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I597948

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC. Plaintiff, -v.MICHAEL A. SALIM A/K/A MICHAEL SALIM, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK, N.A., CITY OF CHICAGO, SHIRLEY C. SALIM, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 09 CH 040565 7832 W. OAK RIDGE DRIVE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 26, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 2:00 PM on May 28, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 7832 W. OAK RIDGE DRIVE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-25-300-063. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-33365. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1409-33365 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 040565 TJSC#: 34-4170 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I604075

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � SUSAN E. ALBRECHT A/K/A SUSAN ALBRECHT, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 13 CH 23746 10604 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE PALOS HILLS, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 10, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 10, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10604 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-213-010-0000. The real estate is improved with a gray aluminum siding single family home; two car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1314241. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1314241 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 23746 TJSC#: 34-4166 I605030

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION MIDFIRST BANK, P l a i n t i f f � V . � DEAN R. ILKANIC A/K/A DEAN ILKANIC; MICHELE R. ILKANIC A/K/A MICHELE ILKANIC; BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL I, INC.; SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BENEFICIAL ILLINOIS, INC. D/B/A BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO. OF ILLINOIS, D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 25904 Property Address: 8034 WEST 93RD STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 13-069968 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 6, 2014, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on June 9, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 8034 West 93rd Street, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Permanent Index No.: 23-02-420-011-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 256,869.98. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I596777

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LOcAL HIRING EvENTS: visit schneiderjobs.com/events for dates and locations IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � GEORGE KASBOSKE; HANNAH KASBOSKE; J P M O R G A N � CHASE BANK, NA; Defendants, 10 CH 43017 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 24, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-02-103-008-0000. Commonly known as 9040 SOUTH 85TH AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1027157. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603217

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 8, 2014 Section 2

Out & About

11

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Spider-Man 2 movie great but could be titled ‘The Amazing Peter Parker’ The promotional posters advertise the saying “his greatest battle begins.” By that do the promotional wizards at Sony Studios for “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” mean being on time to graduation, not turning his laundry red and blue, figuring out his future, or myriad of other things Peter Parker aka Spider-Man has to deal with? The movie opens in a flashback showing how Parker’s parents came to leave him with Aunt May, played by Sally Field, and Uncle Ben. It’s a somewhat touching scene that can only happen in a movie. It’s a scene that foreshadows the movie expertly, by setting a both sad and happy tone. It’s a movie about Peter Parker, played by Andrew Garfield, dealing with his emotions more than anything. What should I do? Why did they leave? How do I feel? Those are emotions that run through his head throughout the movie. During the movie, he tries to push away the love of his life Gwen Stacy, played by Emma Stone. Parker had made a deal with her deceased father not to associate her with in the first Spider-Man movie, and he sometimes just happens to see visions of him torment Peter further.

Pinto’s Popcorn Picks by Tony Pinto This may come as a surprise to some, but this is less SpiderMan’s movies as it is more Peter Parker’s movie. This is not a bad thing as this leads to a more well-balanced movie. This film’s not all love and emotions, there is decent amount of action as well. Jamie Foxx plays Max Dillon, or as he is more commonly known as, Electro. A freak accident after hours at Oscorp leaves him with many superhuman powers most noticeably the power to harness electricity. Dane DeHaan plays Peter’s friend Harry Osborn who is the sole beneficiary of Oscorp. We find out that Harry is dying just

like his father and he thinks that Spider-Man’s blood will be the only thing that can save him. Andrew Garfield is not as good as his predecessor, Tobey Maguire, at playing the masked webslinger but he’s no slouch either. Most of the film’s heavy lifting is done by the duo of Garfield and Stone, who work wonderfully together. This is the sequel to the 2012 release “The Amazing SpiderMan,” which is a reboot of the Spider-Man franchise. With just about five years between the previous collection of Spider-Man movies, some wondered whether it was too soon for a reboot. With huge opening weekends at the box office and two more movies on the way, one can assume that the new Spider-man came at just the right time. For the most part there is not much you can complain about with this movie, except the fact it’s a little long. With it being over two and a half hours long including previews, you need to be careful about what you drink because if you walk out. you will probably miss something important. Overall this is a must watch movie that the whole family can enjoy, whether you see it in 3D or 2D. Tony Pinto’s grade: A-

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s possible that someone is praying for the blessings, gifts and talents that you take for granted. In the week ahead, accept every opportunity to pay it forward and to help others. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Focus on mutual benefits. What’s good for you must be good for the other person, whether you’re setting up a date or a business deal. Compromise is the key to success this week. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Put the frowns away and let the world smile with you. A financial situation can take a turn for the better in the early part of the week. An agreement could bring

you extra spending money. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Any job worth doing is worth doing well. Don’t be bashful about adopting a leadership position or adding your two cents this week. This is a good time to start a major project. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Fair play is king when you play ball. People will reflect your sincerity like a mirror this week, so be forthright about your feelings and intentions. Join forces to achieve romantic or career objectives. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Be grateful for what you have. Others may seem to be just going through the motions in the week ahead, or showing off their suc-

cess, but at least they’re willing to share with you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): There’s no reason to screen your calls. Speak what’s on your mind and in your heart in the week to come. Your passion for the good things in life may have a chance for expression. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Knowledge is power. Read up on a new subject this week or let a mentor take you under his or her wing. The more you know, the easier it will be to handle your finances wisely. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Powerful needs can create a positive outcome. People (Continued on page 12)

Broaden Your Horizons This Week

given for starting to grow herbs, ter office. Advance registration either on a windowsill, patio, or is required. Call 361-3650. garden, large or small. The class fee is $16 per perOrland Theatre Troupe The Bridge Teen son. Students who would also murder mystery Center programs like to plant a pot of basil, pars• Archery — 4 to 6 p.m. today ley, chives, and a cherry tomato auditions (Thursday), The Bridge Teen plant, pay an additional $12 maThe Orland Park Theatre Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, terials fee and must register by Troupe is onto its next producOrland Park, will be holding an May 14. tion having enjoyed capacity archery program with The ForThe class will meet outdoors crowds and standing ovations at est Preserve District of Cook at the farm garden. In case of its spring musical, “Peter Pan.” County in which students will inclement weather, the class will The village’s theatre program learn how to safely use a bow meet indoor at the farm activity invites adults age 18 and older to and arrow. center. Advance registration is audition for its summer murder • A Present for Mom — 4:30 required. Call The Center at mystery, “Occupation Murder,” to 6 p.m. today, program for 361-3650. written by Billy St. John and students to make a homemade produced in cooperation with gift for their mother figure for Eldridge Plays and Musicals. Plein aire Mother’s Day. The audience participation • Double Identity — 7:30 to pastel workshops murder mystery centers around 10:30 p.m. May 9, Friday Night A new series of Plein Aire the TV quiz show “It’s A LivLive event with live music by Pastel workshops will be held ing!” and the murder of the Double Identity and ice cream on Mondays, May 19 and June show’s sponsor. from Oberweis. 16, from 9 a.m. to noon, at The Auditions will be held Mon• Trivia/Game Night — 7:30 Log Cabin Center for the Arts, day and Tuesday, May 19 and to 10:30 p.m. May 10,Trivia/ 12700 Southwest Highway in 20, from 7 to 10 p.m., at Orland Game Night with food from Fa- Palos Park. Park’s Old Village Hall, 14413 mous Dave’s. The workshops are taught by S. Beacon Ave. Rehearsals will • Lead U: What Are Your Su- artist Susan Flanagan of Tinley be held Sundays from noon to 4 perpowers? 4:30 to 6 p.m. May Park, who invites both begin- p.m. and Monday and Thursday 13, a leadership program for ners and experienced painters evenings from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. high school students that is de- to join, and welcomes the use Performances will be July 18 signed to help students define of pastels or other media of the and 19 at the Orland Park Civic their values and ethics. student’s choice. The group will Center, where audience mem• Fashion Photography — 5 to take short walks to various areas bers will enjoy cocktails and hors 6 p.m. May 14 and 21, a fashion of interest around The Center, d’oeuvres as they participate in photography program to help and capture the beauty of The the performance. students learn about what goes Center’s ground s and buildings Once cast, members must pay into taking great photographs. in their creations. a $35 registration fee. Readings Students will learn camera funcEach workshop costs $21. will be from the script. tions, where to shoot, what to Students bring their own supFor more information, call the wear, lighting and more. plies. A list of recommended village’s Recreation Department • Build Your Own Computer supplies is available at The Cen- at 403-7275. — 4 to 6 p.m. May 15 & 22, The Bridge Teen Center will hold a A C H I C A G O L A N D P R E M I E R E program that will teach students THEATRE AT THE CENTER the different parts of a computer presents and how they work. For more information on any program, call 532- 0500.

Upcoming Herb garden workshop

An garden herb workshop will be held at the Children’s Farm on Sunday, May 18, from 2 to 4 pm. The farm is located at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Adult participants are invited to taste, smell, observe, feel, and learn how to use a variety of herbs. Instruction will be

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SW Community Concert Band offers band camp The Southwest Community Concert Band is offering its eighth annual summer band camp June 23-27, open to first-year school band students, junior high, middle school, and incoming freshmen band students. The instructors are dedicated, highly qualified music educators/performers from the Chicago area. The band is an all-volunteer organization, averaging 60 musicians, performing at year-round seasonal and summer outdoor concerts in local communities. The goal of the Summer Band Camp program is to promote music education through a positive experience structured to help students develop their musical talents. The weeklong summer camp is open to students entering middle school through 9th grade with at least one year of instructional playing experience. The band will be offering an optional Jazz Band, Theory, or Improvisational classes for interested students. Band camp will be supervised by adult staff. It will be held at the Eagle Rock Community Church, 14367 W. 159th St. in Homer Glen. Band Camp starts at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. On Friday, the campers will be provided with a pizza lunch, followed by an afternoon of recreational activities. Band camp culminates with a closing Camp Finale Concert at 7 p.m. Scholarship opportunities are available. For more, visit the website at www.swcommunityband.com.

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12 Section 2

Thursday, May 8, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond words in the proper ear. People may be willing to unlock doors and invite you into their private circle this week AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. (Continued from page 11 ) 18): Use resourceful means to may be attracted by your “do or fatten your wallet. Take some die” attitude. Expect profitable time to read the newspaper or dealings this week while you scan magazines. You may find possess the Midas touch. valuable information this week CAPRICORN (Dec. 22- that will fill your piggy bank. Jan. 19): Shazam. A bit of PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): magic could be at work when Go for the gusto. Grab every you place a few well-chosen chance to make a mark in the

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Glenn Martin piano luncheon

10336 Cicero Ave. Oak Lawn 708.424.BATT(2288)

Pianist Glenn Martin of Palos Park will perform at a luncheon at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, on Tuesday, May 13, from noon to 2 p.m. Martin’s program will include short piano pieces by Johannes Brahms with a kind of orchestral feel to them, according to Martin, plus some rag-time pieces by William Bolcom, a contemporary American composer from Michigan. The luncheon begins at noon, costs $17 per person, and requires advance reservations. For reservations or more information, call The Center at 361-3650.

Videoview

STARTING THIS WEEK: “HER”: Director Spike Jonze earned an Oscar for his original screenplay for this clever comedy-drama about a relationship between a man and ... a computer system. Joaquin Phoenix plays the man in question, a professional letter writer whose equipment upgrade has a voice (that of Scarlett Johansson) and a soul, apparently. That leads them to bond emotionally. Amy Adams, Rooney Mara, Olivia Wilde and Portia Doubleday play the flesh-and-blood women who are in the fellow’s life. DVD extra: “making-of” documentary. *** (R: AS, N, P) (Also on Bluray and On Demand) “ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK: SEASON ONE”: One of the series that put Netflix on the map as a source of muchbuzzed-about original programming, this dark, fact-inspired comedy from “Weeds” creator Jenji Kohan casts Taylor Schilling (“The Lucky One”) as a woman sent to prison for helping to transport drug money. Her fellow inmates include someone who was quite significant in her past (Laura Prepon). Michelle Hurst, Kate Mulgrew, Laverne Cox, Jason Biggs, Taryn Manning, Natasha Lyonne and Pablo Schreiber also star. DVD extras: four “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary on selected episodes by Kohan and producers Tara Herrmann and Mark Burley; outtakes. *** (Not rated: AS, N, P) (Also on Blu-ray) “I, FRANKENSTEIN”: Mary Shelley’s concept of a synthetic man gets a modern spin in this melodrama, based on Kevin Grevioux’s graphic novel but appearing to cobble much of the “Underworld” movie series onto the original story basics. Aaron Eckhart plays the “monster,” whose life source is of great interest to a leader of demons (Bill Nighy). Yvonne Strahovski also stars as the scientist charged with recharging the creature; Miranda

Otto and Jai Courtney are featured as well. DVD extras: two “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by Grevioux, director and co-screenwriter Stuart Beattie, producers Gary Lucchesi and Richard Wright, and executive producer James McQuaide. ** (PG-13: AS, P, V) “THE DAVE CLARK FIVE AND BEYOND: GLAD ALL OVER”: One of the seminal 1960s British pop groups is recalled — largely through the words of bandleader and drummer Clark — in this hugely entertaining “Great Performances” offering expectedly loaded with classic clips and nostalgic music. “Bits and Pieces,” “Do You Love Me,” “Because,” “Any Way You Want It” and (of course) “Glad All Over” are among

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the Dave Clark Five hits heard, with famous fans from Sir Paul McCartney and Bruce Springsteen to Tom Hanks (in portions from his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction of the Five) and Whoopi Goldberg weighing in. A big plus: segments from the music series “Ready Steady Go!” which Clark bought the rights to. **** (Not rated) (Also on Blu-ray) COMING SOON: “MCCANICK” (May 20): A newly released ex-convict (Cory Monteith, in his final role) is stalked by a police detective (David Morse). (R: AS, P, V)

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