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Halloween Costume Contest Winners See section 2, page 12

R EPORTER Reporter

THE The 2 SECTIONS 24 PAGES

Volume LIV No. 33

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EP is getting juiced up for Binny’s

Editor Jeff Vorva likens MVCC volleyball star Village is a hard-hat haven with to Ted Williams beverage store opening and and Ty Cobb See page 3 THEMariano’s grocery on horizon

EP woman’s 2 SECTIONS past in 1969 22 PAGES supermarket bombing Volume XLVII No. 50 resurfaces See Rakow’s report, Page 3

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received more than 300 online applications and another 100 at the job fair, Sexton said.     Ground will be broken in Ever-     The store has 29 locations in green Park next Thursday for an the Chicago area. The Evergreen upscale grocery store, while one Park store will be the third in mile away, workers will be busy the southwest suburbs and will converting a long-time bowling employ approximately 300 emalley into a liquor store in time ployees. for the holiday season.     The 70,000-square-foot MariaChicago Evergreen Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth Thursday, March 1, 2007     Mariano’sServing Fresh Market is not Ridge, no’s will be built onPark, the site of expected to open its doors un- the shuttered Webb Ford, 2601 W. til August 2014, but store and 95th St. The site has been vacant village will turn over the first for five years and convincing the shovels of soil at a groundbreak- upscale grocer to come to town ing ceremony, which is scheduled was not accomplished overnight, for 10 a.m. Sexton said.     Meanwhile, Binny’s Bever-     The mayor first contacted age Depot hopes to open before Bob Mariano, the store’s chairThanksgiving at the site of Bleek- man, in February 2009. Sexton Photo by Jeff Vorva er’s Bowl and Tavern, 3447 W. had a previous relationship with Binny’s, which took over Bleekers Bowl in Evergreen Park recently, could be open by 95th St., a veritable landmark Mariano from his days as CEO Thanksgiving. in the village since 1950s. of Dominick’s.     “I’ve never seen so many hard     “There’s just a whole lot to itan Water Reclamation District     Dominick’s, Kmart and some     Mariano’s is owned by Milwauhats on 95th Street,” Evergreen it,” Sexton said. were involved, he said. small businesses were previously kee-based Roundy’s SupermarPark Mayor Jim Sexton said.     In addition to negotiations with     Mariano’s also is opening a located on the site. That store is kets, which operates four other     Binny’s held a hiring fair last the property owner and the gro- store in Oak Lawn, which will expected to open in 2014. Village supermarket chains in Wisconweek at Evergreen Park Village cery store, governmental agencies anchor a retail development at officials are hopeful the store will sin and Minnesota. The store Hall and is expected to fill 25- such as the Illinois Department of 111th Street and Cicero Av- draw other businesses to the re- features an Italian coffee shop, 30 positions. The business has Transportation and the Metropol- enue. tail center. (Continued on page 3)

Lights, camera, action in Ridge

Palos Hills pooches parade around and Kelly White brings you the details, Page 4

By Kevin M. Coyne Correspondent

Murder! Dinner! Beer!

All in the Retro Reporter, Page 4

Submitted Photo

Happy homecoming for red-hot Richards     Richards students celebrate a big play during the Bulldogs’ 45-0 victory over Oak Lawn Friday night. Since suffering a 35-34 home loss to Evergreen Park, the Bulldogs have outscored their last three opponents — Reavis, Argo and Oak Lawn — by a combined 112-0 score.     For more photos and details of the Battle of Oak Lawn plus a look at other area action, see the sports section.

    Chicago Ridge police are looking for some solutions and upgrades in their emergency lighting system and village camera system.     One problem with the lighting system popped up Oct. 12 when officers had to clean up a serious single vehicle accident.     Police said an intoxicated motorcyclist was rushed to the hospital late that night but added they did not have the proper equipment to clean up the wreck.     Emergency lights were loaned out to a local football program earlier that week and not available to the police on the scene of the accident.     The key to the storage area for the lights was loaned out to the football team and police did not have it.     The solution to that problem was simple as the police were scheduled to make a second copy (Continued on page 5)

Will this man win the heralded Football Forecast contest? Evergreen Park mom runs Marathon to celebrate her 40th birthday — and get away from the kids Find out his     Editor’s note: Reporter cor- among us. Within the first This was her first Chicago Marchances in sports respondent Claudia Parker ran mile of the race, I witnessed athon, my second, so I knew

Go (huff) shawty — it’s your (puff) birthday!

index Police News.....................2 Our Neighborhood..........4 Sudoku...........................4 Commentary...................6 Death Notices..................7 Crossword......................7 School.........................8 & 9 Consumer....................11 Calendar........................10

columnists Jeff Vorva........................3 Dee Woods....................12 Wine Guy......................12

in the Oct. 13 Chicago Marathon and shared some of her amusing thoughts throughout the race By Claudia Parker Correspondent

    I celebrated my 40th birthday by running the 2013 Bank of America, Chicago Marathon.     Don’t be impressed. I have a confession. I ran it to get away from my kids. Running 26.2 miles through 29 Chicago neighborhoods is easy compared to some of my days as a stayat-home mom. Trying to catch a Kenyon wasn’t my objective, I took my time, relishing in “me” time.     This race was special because it was the first major U.S. race since the Boston Marathon bombings. There was unity

a runner turn around to grab a protein bar that had fallen from another runner’s waist strap. Then she scurried up to him to return it.     Unfortunately, when I looked down, the only thing my eyes found were remnants of furry, grey, animals, plastered to the pavement. Never mind looking down, it was exhilarating looking up into the faces of the spectators cheering.     “What at a great way to celebrate my birthday,” I thought, while belting out a few lyrics of rapper 50 Cent’s, “In Da Club,” “Go shawty it’s your birthday…we gonna party like it’s your birthday.”     I’m sure my horrid singing was like bad Karaoke to my running mate, Tracy Tryban of Chicago. Our conversation was steady the first five miles.

the route.     “We’re in Lincoln Park Zoo. Next water stop is around the curve.” I told her.     We felt good.     We had energy to laugh at a little old lady who apparently missed the memo about the marathon. We were on North Lake Shore Drive about mile 8 when we spotted her waiting at a stoplight. When it changed, she began to cross, pushing a milk crate cart on wheels. A course marshal had to quickly whisk her back to the corner. She looked perturbed, as if to say, “I have the rightof-way!”     Shortly thereafter I saw Erin Mendoza of Chicago, a childhood friend, with her family, cheering in the crowd. I hugged Photo by Jeff Vorva them hello and continued. She Evergreen Park’s Claudia Parker celebrated her 40th birthday by (Continued on page 4) running in the Chicago Marathon.


2

The Reporter Thursday, October 24, 2013

police news

trays from Edible Arrangements, 8732 S. Kedzie Ave., police said. Lacey purchased the items over the Internet using someone else’s     Gary Cooper, 22, of Chicago, credit card, they said. was charged with possession *** and delivery of a controlled     Brian C. Malone, 41, of Chicago, substance and Lamont Wesley, was charged with retail theft Oct. 21, was charged with posses- 17 after allegedly stealing mersion of a controlled substance chandise from Wal-Mart, 2500 W. Oct. 15. They were arrested in 95th St., police said. the 10400 block of Ridgeland Avenue, police said. ***     Steven M. Bogovich, 18, of Chicago, was charged with battery Oct. 17 after a fight in the     A cell phone was reported sto10500 block of Parkside, police len Oct. 3 from the purse of a customer at the Salvation Army said.     Kelly Hazzard-Hilger, 35, of store, 8732 S. Cicero Ave. *** Oak Lawn, was charged with retail theft Oct. 17 after stealing     A catalytic convertor was remerchandise from Kohls at Chi- ported stolen between Oct. 5 and 10 from a car in the 10900 block cago Ridge Mall, police said. of Keating Avenue. ***     A 70-inch television, a game system, an iPod and seven Gucci belts were reported stolen Oct. 7     Vivian Martinez, 24, of Chicago, from an apartment in the 9600 was charged with driving under block of Ridgeland Avenue. Ofthe influence of drugs, disobey- fenders entered the apartment ing a red light, having no insur- after breaking the kitchen winance, driving with open alcohol dow. and damage to village property *** after a two-car accident Oct. 12     Stephen G. Gaal, 55, of Oak at 93rd Street and Pulaski Road, Lawn, was charged with drunken police said. driving, speeding and no insur*** ance Oct. 8 after a stop in the     Kortney E. Skelly, 28, of Chi- 6100 block of 97th Street, police cago, was charged with retail theft said. Oct. 15 after allegedly stealing *** goods from Michael’s, 9140 S.     Adan C. Garcia, 24, of Chicago, Western Ave., police said. was charged with drunken driv*** ing, speeding, improper lane use,     Tashawn A. Chavis, 20, of Chi- no insurance and no driver’s licago, was charged with retail theft cense Oct. 10 after a stop at 95th Oct. 16 after allegedly stealing Street and McVicker Avenue, pomerchandise from Wal-Mart, 2500 lice said. W. 95th St., police said. *** ***     Cara B. Schrage, 37, of Home    Michael J. Roland, 28, of Chi- town, was charged with drunken cago, was charged with theft Oct. driving, speeding, no insurance 16 after allegedly stealing mer- and improper lane use Oct. 11 chandise from Wal-Mart, police following a stop at Southwest said. Highway and Kilpatrick Avenue, *** police said.     Dawan P. Lacey, 25, of Chicago, *** was charged with theft Oct. 17     Harold Morgan, 58, of Chicago, after allegedly stealing two food was charged with assault Oct.

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Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jeff Vorva Sports Editor Ken Karrson Graphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora To advertise call (708) 448-6161 To subscribe call (708) 448-6161 / Fax (708) 448-4012 Website: TheReporterOnline.net e-Mail: thereporter@comcast.net

By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter     A Merrionette Park man was charged with attempted burglary and possession of burglary tools Oct. 9 after attempting to open car doors in a garage of an Oak Lawn condominium, police said.     Joseph A. Robinson, 19, was arrested at 9:03 p.m. in the parking lot of the condo in the 10300 block of Austin Avenue, according to reports.     Robinson had a screwdriver, folding knife and two padlocks as well as a backpack that contained a flash light, latex gloves and a folding hex key tool, police said.     A witness, who lives in the

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By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

    A woman driving through Oak Lawn 30 miles above the posted speed limit with an open bottle of cognac next to the driver’s seat was charged Oct. 12 with aggravated drunken driving and several other violations, police said.     Nicole M. Townsend, 27, of Chicago, also was charged transportation of open alcohol, speeding, driving without insurance, driving with an

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    Daniel J. Mario, 64, of Worth, was charged with domestic battery Oct. 18 following a disturbance in the 7200 block of 107th Street, police said.

    A credit card, money order and miscellaneous items were stolen Oct. 15 from a purse in the 14000 block of Robert Road. ***     Adam Fijalkowski, 21, of Palos Hills, was charged with trespassing and criminal damage to prop-

Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

building, called police and said he saw two men in the parking garage checking for unlocked car doors. Police arrived and saw Robinson walking away from the building followed by the witness, who was pointing at him.     The witness said he called police shortly after hearing noises in the garage, which is located beneath his unit. He activated security cameras that are focused on his two parking spaces and saw two men wearing hooded sweatshirts trying to enter the cars, police said.     The witness said Robinson ran toward a car parked in the corner of the garage in an effort to hide after another resident entered the garage. The resident did not recognize Robin-

son and questioned him, police said.     Robinson said he was there to visit his mother, but the resident did not believe him because she said she knows everyone who lives in the building. Robinson entered the building’s hallway and went upstairs, followed by the first witness, who saw him exit the building via the Austin Avenue door as police arrived.     The man with Robinson was not found. Witnesses said he wore a black hoodie, a dark hat, which he wore backwards, and dark basketball shorts. He was last seen in the building’s hallway.     The witness who encountered Robinson in the garage told po-

lice that the two padlocks on her storage unit were gone, but nothing was missing. The locks were not secured. She positively identified Robinson as the man she saw in the parking garage, police said.     Robinson told police he was at the building visiting a friend who he met on Oct. 8 at the basketball court at Little Wolfe Park in Oak Lawn. He said he did not know his friend’s last name or the condo unit in which he lived, according to reports.     Police asked him to call his friend, but Robinson said his phone was not on, police said. Robinson later told police he was in the garage while his friend went upstairs to get cigarettes, according to reports.

Driver and passenger pull a hit-and-run Name game play near Worth baseball diamond — men lie

By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

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orderly conduct Oct. 16 following a disturbance in the 4800 block of 95th St., police said. ***     Leroy Stanton, 41, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft Oct. 17 after stealing merchandise from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said.

according to reports.     A witness told police that she heard the “screeching of brakes and a thump.” She went outside and heard the driver racing the engine in an attempt to leave. The driver and passenger eventually got out of the van and ran toward Oak Park Avenue, the witness said.     The van was headed north on Lloyd Drive at a high rate of speed, according to police. It made a slight left turn and continued across the park prop-

erty, striking the barrier before running into the backstop. The van had front-end damage, and a three-foot section of a utility pole was lodged beneath the frame, police said.     The witness said both the driver and passenger were young males who wore hooded sweatshirts and shorts. The van is registered to a Worth residence, but police were unsuccessful in getting a response at the apartment, according to reports.

to cops about monikers By Bob Rakow Staff reporter     An Oak Lawn man was charged with driving on a suspended license and arrested on three outstanding warrants Oct. 18 but not before lying about his identity, Hickory Hills police said.

Barefoot and lead foot — Chicago woman charged in OL with multiple traffic offenses

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    Mario Romero, 42, of Berwyn, was charged with drunken driving, speeding and no insurance after an Oct. 13 stop at 91st Street and Cicero Avenue, police said. ***     Claudia A. Bautista, 40, of Bridgeview, was charged with drunken driving, improper lane use and no insurance after an Oct. 13 stop at Southwest Highway and Sproat Avenue, police said. ***     Nike V. Stevens, 18, and Marcel K. Porter, 18, both of Chicago, were charged with retail theft Oct. 15 after allegedly stealing goods from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said. ***     Timothy K. Malone, 30, of Orland Park, was charged with dis-

Man arrested with plethora of burglary tools

    The driver and passenger of a van fled on foot Oct. 15 after striking a wooden barricade and damaging a backstop at Peaks Park in Worth, police said.     The 2000 maroon Dodge Caravan struck the 18-inch barricade at 2:36 a.m. and continued into the park where it hit the chain link backstop of a baseball diamond located on the southeast corner of the park,

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10 after a disturbance at Christ Medical Center, 4440 W. 95th St., police said. ***     A purse was reported stolen Oct. 12 from a customer’s shopping cart at the Salvation Army store, 8732 S. Cicero Ave. ***     Steven J. Haase, 21, and Luis A. Nunez, 22, both of Oak Lawn, were charged with disorderly conduct Oct. 12 following a disturbance in the 5400 block of 95th Street, police said. ***     Tools valued at approximately $4,000 were reported stolen Oct. 12 or 13 from a garage in the 9700 block of Ridgeland Avenue, police said. ***

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obstructed windshield, driving on a suspended license and blocking an intersection after being stopped at the 111th Street and Cicero Avenue at 2:19 a.m., according to reports.     Townsend was clocked at 65 miles per hour near 103rd Street and Cicero Avenue, police said. She acknowledged that the speed limit was 35 miles per hour and believed she was driving about five miles over the limit, according to reports.     Police noticed an odor of alcohol on Townsend’s breath. She had bloodshot eyes and “thick tongued” speech, they said. She exited car without shoes and was told to put them on before police proceeded with field sobriety tests, police said.     Townsend said she was return-

    David Wesley Jr., 36, was stopped in the 7700 block of 95th Street for having an expired vehicle registration, according to reports.     Police subsequently learned ing from a birthday party at 147th that Wesley Jr. was wanted on Street and Burnham where she had warrants for failing to appear in three drinks. Her blood alcohol level court in Montgomery, Ill., and was .191, police said. Aurora and disorderly conduct     She laughed and said, “I failed. I in Kane County, according to drunk. I been drinking all night,” reports. police said.     Townsend later said she was driv-     When he was pulled over, ing much faster, police said. Wesley Jr. identified himself as     “I was only going about 80,” she David Wesley III, the name of his said, according to the report. “We 18-year-old son, police said. He were on the highway when you said he did not have any identifistopped me. Honestly, I shouldn’t cation. Police, however, believed have been driving. It was a long he was older than 18. night. But the speed limit was about 75, and I was going about 85 or     In fact, Wesley III was a pas90. It was real close. I’m confused. senger in the car, who also lied How can my license be suspended about his identity when quesif I’ve never had a license? That tioned by police. He was given doesn’t make sense. I never took a warning about lying about his name. the written test.”

Two Palos Hills cops promoted By Kelly White Correspondent     Two Palos Hills Police Officers hard work paid off by promotions granted earlier this month by Mayor Jerry Bennett and Chief Paul Madigan.     Sergeant Traci Hlado was appointed to the position of lieutenant and Patrolman Michael Collins was appointed to sergeant of the Palos Hills Police Depart-

ment.     Former lieutenant Sam Nelson has submitted his letter of resignation, retiring from the Palos Hills Police Department. This created a vacancy created in the lieutenant’s position and once a new lieutenant was appointed, the department would then have a vacancy in the sergeant’s position. After some deliberation, Bennett and the Palos Hills Police Department narrowed down to

whom they feel are the two most fit for the job.     Hlado was administered the Oath of Office by Bennett and was appointed into the office of Lieutenant for the Palos Hills Police Department.     “You have been around a long time with the city of Palos Hills and moved up in rank, especially through the Detective Division, which we are certainly going to (Continued on page 4)

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Thursday, October 24, 2013 The Reporter

Ty Cobb, Ted Williams and … Kara Kentner?     I wouldn’t suggest to the students or faculty members of Moraine Valley Community College that they should bow or say “I’m not worthy” when they pass sophomore volleyball player Kara Kentner in the hallway.     But it might be appropriate.     Earlier this month, the national junior college rankings came out and she was second in the country in hitting with a .427 hitting percentage. And she was hitting .541 in conference play as well.     For those who don’t follow volleyball statistics, those are just numbers.     For those who do, those are numbers that could make you want to bow or say “I’m not worthy” when you are in her presence.     See, hitting stats in volleyball are rougher than baseball hitting numbers.     In baseball, you get credit for a hit and no credit for an out. If you get a hit and then strike out and ground out, you are 1for-3 and are hitting .333.     In volleyball, you get credit for a hit. You get no credit for a ball that you hit but gets returned. It’s similar to baseball. But in volleyball, you also get penalized for a hitting error such as bashing the ball out of bounds, hitting it into the net or into a successful defensive block.     Thus, you can hit the ball

into the net, have one returned and then get the match-winning kill and be carried off the court as a hero, but your hitting

Editor’s Notebook by Jeff Vorva percentage is .000.     I compare these stats with baseball stats.     In major league baseball, just 28 players have hit .400 or better and no one has done it since 1941. Legends such as Ty Cobb, Ted Williams and Joe Jackson have done it.     But imagine if the criteria was more like volleyball…what if each of these .400 hitters were penalized a hit every time they struck out or hit into a double play?     Back in 1894, Boston’s Hugh Duffy set the all-time major league record for hitting with a .440 average. It’s a record that stands today and it’s unlikely that it will ever be broken unless some really wonderful miracle steroid is invented.     He was 237-for-519. Back then, the stat of grounding into double plays was not kept but

strikeouts were. He had 30. So subtracting 30 from his 237, he was 207-for-539, which is .384. That’s still pretty good, but no .400.     For those who think volleyball stats and baseball stats are apples and oranges, let’s go with the Joe Smalzer argument.     Smalzer is a former Marist volleyball star from Palos Heights who is now playing for Loyola. He is a 6-foot-8 hitting machine who was named firstteam All-America as a junior last year. He had 430 kills in 32 matches for 11.2 kills per matchto help the Ramblers reach the NCAA Final Four.     This kid is really good.     But this first-team AllAmerica stud had just a .261 hitting percentage because he made 188 hitting errors. And the Final Four Ramblers had a .291 hitting percentage at a team while opponents were held to .231.     So if one of the best volleyball players in the nation has that low of a hitting percentage, it makes me appreciate Kentner’s accomplishments even more. The Sandburg High School graduate had 316 kills in 657 attempts and just 40 errors a few weeks ago.     So, if anyone sees Kentner, you don’t need to bow.     But a high-five might be in order.

3

Supper with the Snakes

    My favorite excerpt from a press release this week comes from out of the area, but still made me sssssssnicker:     “October is a spook-tacular month at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum with a plentiful Halloween program schedule catering to guests of all ages. Young Frankensteins are invited to paint a pumpkin and get up close and personal with some of the ssssssslithery members of the Museum’s Living Collections for its popular dinner party, Supper with the Snakes.     Guests are encouraged to show off their Halloween costumes while enjoying asssssscrupmptious pizza dinner. Following dinner, the Museum’s biologists will introduce the evening’s guests of honor, their slithering counterparts. Attendees will have the chance to get up close and personal with more than eight species of native and exotic snakes and enjoy a variety of sssssseriously fun activities, including a relay, scavenger hunt, crafts and more. Plus, the Museum’s newest exhibit, Animal Secrets, will be open where kids can see more of the Museum’s slithering residents.”     The dinner is from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Museum, 2430 N Cannon Drive in Submitted Photo Chicago. The cosssssssst is $20 for non-members and $10 for Moraine Valley Community College volleyball star Kara Kentner has an incredible hitting percentage. children over 3.

EP woman arrested for concealing her role in 1969 terrorist bombing By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

Photo by Jeff Vorva

This will be the site of a new Mariano’s grocery store next year in Evergreen Park. A groundbreaking ceremony is set for next Thursday.

Binny’s

S. Kedzie Ave.     “We want to get this thing moving along,” Sexton said. (Continued from page 1)     Trustees in August authorized the village attorney with sushi bar, wine and cheese bar, Carson’s to negotiate so that salad bar and prepared meals to demolition of the mall, 95th Street and Western Avenue, take home.     As Binny’s and Mariano’s pre- can proceed. pare to join the Evergreen Park     The retailer is only one rebusiness community, Sexton is maining at the otherwise shuttaking the next step toward tered mall, which closed on May 31. Applebee’s, which is located resurrecting the Plaza.     An informational meeting on an out lot, and Planet Fitabout development plans for ness, remain open. the mall is scheduled for 7:15     Plans calls for an outdoor p.m. Nov. 4 at village hall, 9418 mall that would a feature a

variety of retailers and restaurants.     “The indoor thing is over,” Sexton said.     The 61-year-old shopping mall, formerly the Evergreen Plaza, has been in foreclosure since 2011. The property is currently in receivership.     DeBartolo Development wants to demolish the mall and replace it with a “lifestyle center,” Chicago Real Estate Daily. com reported. The development firm is owned by former San Francisco 49ers’ owner Eddie DeBartolo.

    A 66-year-old Evergreen Park woman who was convicted 43 years ago in Israel for participating in a terrorist bombing was arrested Tuesday morning by federal agents.     Rasmieh Yousef Odeh was arrested shortly after the unsealing of an indictment filed in federal court in Detroit and made an appearance in the afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Mason.     She was released on $15,000 bond after giving up her passports.     Odeh was charged with immigration fraud for concealing her arrest, conviction and imprisonment, which were material facts for the United States government in determining whether to grant her citizenship, the indictment said.     The indictment alleges that Odeh was convicted for her role in the 1969 bombings of a supermarket and the British Consulate in Jerusalem, which were carried out on behalf of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a designated terrorist organization.     Founded in the wake of the Six Day War of 1967, the organization is described as a Marxist-Lenin-

ist revolutionary group that was instrumental in the formation of the Palestine Liberation Organization.     Odeh and others placed multiple bombs at the British Consulate and in a supermarket, according to the indictment. One of the bombs at the supermarket detonated, killing two Israelis and injuring 20 others. The other bomb did not detonate. The bomb at the Consulate four days later caused structural damage to the facility.     Odeh was arrested several days after the bombings and sentenced by Israeli military authorities to life imprisonment but was released after 10 years as part of a prisoner exchange, and she then returned to the West Bank.     The indictment alleges that Odeh, who was a Jordanian citizen, immigrated to the United States in 1995 and became a naturalized citizen in 2004.     “The United States will never be a safe haven for individuals seeking to distance themselves from their pasts,” said William Hayes, acting special agent in charge for Homeland Security Investigations Detroit in a news release. “When individuals lie on immigration documents, the system is severely undermined and the security of our nation is put

at risk.”     “An individual convicted of a terrorist bombing would not be admitted to the United States if that information was known at the time of arrival,” United States Attorney Barbara McQuade said. “Upon discovery that someone convicted of a terrorist attack is in the United States illegally, we will seek to use our criminal justice system to remove that individual.”     If convicted of the charge, Odeh will be stripped of her United States citizenship. She also faces a maximum sentence of 10 years for naturalization fraud.     This case was investigated by special agents of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations with the assistance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.     Odeh was mentioned in an article, “Women’s Struggle in Occupied Palestine,” which was published on the website New Jersey Solidarity: Activists for the Liberation of Palestine.”     The article said Odeh and other women “were arrested, accused of planning and executing two of the greatest military operations at that time: the explosion at the Supersol supermarket and the attempted explosion at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.”

A healthy dose of arguing at Oak Lawn meeting Whacking board members’ health insurance and many hot issues dominate Tuesday’s gathering By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter     Several political hot-button issues dominated Tuesday’s Oak Lawn Village Board meeting as trustees bickered over transparency, the future of the senior center and political fundraising techniques.     A majority of trustees, however, expressed support for a proposal to eliminate health insurance for board members.     The proposal was put forth by Trustee Tim Desmond, who called for “shared sacrifice” at a time when the board is considering several significant cuts to balance the village budget.     Desmond, who joined the village health plan in April, asked that the proposal be placed on the Nov. 12 agenda.     Several trustees and Mayor Sandra Bury currently take full or partial health benefits.     Trustee Alex Olejniczak said he does not plan to participate in the village health insurance plan in the next fiscal year. Bury said she does not take her salary as liquor commissioner, which is comparable to the cost of her insurance and praised Desmond for his leadership in making the proposal.     “I think he sees the hypocrisy, as I did,” Bury said.     While Desmond’s proposal was met with approval, discussion on other topics was not as harmonious.     For example, Olejniczak took issue with Streit’s contention that he participated in a secret

meeting with Bury, Village Manager Larry Deetjen, Park Board Director Maddie Kelly and Park Board President Sue Murphy to discuss a plan to transition senior services to the district.     He said Streit misled people by saying that the meeting was attended by a majority of village board members.

make campaign donations. My campaign fund is in complete compliance with all laws.”     Streit, meanwhile, proposed an ordinance requiring website transparency, which would require a plethora of information such as videos of meetings, public records, budgets,

audits, contracts and salary and benefits be available on the village’s website.     The information is similar to items on the Illinois Policy Institute’s transparency checklist, which Bury is following in the development of a new website.

Trustee Tim Desmond

Mayor Sandra Bury

    Trustee Carol Quinlan, meanwhile, repeated her request for a meeting between the board and seniors to garner feedback regarding plans to outsource senior services and renovate the Memorial Park bathhouse into a senior center.     Quinlan, who previously called for such a meeting, did not receive a response to her proposal.     “I’d love to know what’s going on,” Quinlan said.

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    Olejniczak also chastised Streit for pressuring residents and businesses to attend his recent fundraiser by calling them numerous times in the days leading up to the event.     “You would think that if somebody said, ‘No, I’m not attending or no, I’m not going to be there,’ that would be enough,” he said.     Three people who placed the fundraising calls attended the meeting and said they were offended by remarks made at the Oct. 8 board meeting alleging that pressure tactics were used to convince people to attend the fundraiser.     “It never occurred,” Streit said. “People have a right to

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The Reporter Thursday, October 24, 2013

Our Neighborhood

Putting on the dog — Palos Hills pets dress up for Halloween By Kelly White Correspondent     It’s not just children who get to dress up in costumes for Halloween.     The Riviera townhome complex in Palos Hills held its first Halloween Pet Parade Oct. 12, where over 20 well-dressed dogs and their owners paraded around the town.     Costumes some of the pooches and pets wore included a shark, a bumblebee, a hotdog, a princess and a pumpkin.     The dogs and their owners met at the Riviera Business Office where together they sung — or, in some cases — barked the Star Spangled Banner, before taking off single-file down the street. The dogs were led to the Riviera Park where pumpkin water bowls were waiting for them before the judging began for the best costumes. Donuts, water and apple cider were also available for the dogs’ owners to enjoy while mingling with neighbors.     Dressed as a shark, Roxy, a three-year-old Shar-Pei/Beagle, took home the award for the Most Spooky Costume. Roxy was dressed with a shark around the body and it gave the appearance that the dog was being eaten by the shark.     “A lot of people were commenting on how much they liked

Photos by Kelly White

Roxy won the spookiest costume honor at the Halloween Pet Parade Oct. 12 in Palos Hills. her costume as we were walking up to the parade,” Roxy’s owner, Roger Schweikert, 30, of Palos Hills said. “I kind of had a feeling she was going to win.”     Judging was done by some of the Riviera residents who did

not participate in the parade. Each dog who participated in the parade was given a goody bag filled with bones and rawhide treats before leaving for the day. For four-year-old shih-tzu, Suzy-Q, dressed as a bumblebee, is seemed as if the

goody bag was better than winning an actual award.     The parade was organized by Riviera and Palos Improvement and officials are planning to Suzy-Q was more interested in earning a goody bag filled with continue the event again next treats rather than winning an award at the first Pet Parade in Palos Hills. year.

Shawty (Continued from page 1) has a son a little younger than my preschooler. Instantly, I began to miss my girls. They didn’t attend my marathon last year because it was cold. Knowing they were there this time made the race more meaningful. All I had to do was make it to mile 23, where they would be camped.     By mile 10, I was still feeling good. Taking in hydration at every water stop along with a couple Clif Shot Bloks helped. North Broadway was putting on a show that took my mind off the miles. The ROTC soldiers had batons that looked like rifles, flipping them around like a high school drill team alongside several other performances down that strip.     My enjoyment turned to dread mile 15 after seeing my friend, Angie Santana’s, son Nicholas Carter of Chicago.     Angie and I got separated at the start line. Tracy and I had been looking for her. I yelled, “Nicholas, have you seen your mom?” He smirked. “Yeah, she passed here 20 minutes ago.”     He may have said, “passed here” but my mind repeated, “passed YOU.” My competitive nature thought, “Oh yeah, I’ll

Photo by Jeff Vorva

From left, Adriana Carmona of Bridgeview, Maria (Angie) Santana of Chicago, Tracy Tryban of Chicago and Lily Tong of Chicago stand behind Evergreen Park’s Claudia Parker at a belated birthday party last week at TGI Fridays in Oak Lawn. Parker celebrated her birthday by running with her friends in the Chicago Marathon. show you.”     I then accelerated my pace.     Bad idea!     Everything began to ache. In

all my suffering, I knew seeing my kids would give me a boost. “Just get to mile 23,” I thought.

Retro

SUDOKU The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

    My quads burned, my calves felt like knots and my feet throbbed.     But I forged ahead.

    Once I arrived at mile 23, my eyes met my husband Don’s eyes.     Joy set in.     “Where are the kids?” I huffed. He began to jog alongside me. “At home.” He replied. “I’ve been tracking you. You’re estimated to finish during naptime. I know how you get about their schedule.”     I was a little shattered.     “But this is my birthday party…” I thought.     He proceeded to chat, as if I could carry on a conversation.     Tracy and I hadn’t said two words since mile 15. We used gestures. A course marshal directed him off the course as I arrived at mile 25. People screamed, “Almost there! One mile to go.”     It felt like five. I didn’t know where Tracy was. I just kept running until I crossed the finish line. Tracy finished one minute later. I found Angie. Our finishing time was exactly the same.     I set a personal record; finishing 17 minutes faster than last year. I credit my daughters. I may have started the race running away but they were the two faces I couldn’t wait to run back to.     I came in 33,501st place out of 45,000 in this race but at home, I came in first.

Compiled by Jeff Vorva

News and events from our archives.

Ridge man shoots guy in trailer court 50 years ago

From The Oct. 24, 1963 edition     The story: James Lovell of Chicago Ridge was charged with the murder of a man in a Harvey trailer court. Lovell told police he brought a 12-gauge shotgun to scare the man but the gun discharged accidentally, according to the police.     The quote: “I’m the man you are looking for,” — Lovell, after stopping a Harvey police officer a block away from the incident.     Fun fact: Oak Lawn’s football team knocked off Sandburg, 26-0 in what the un-bylined report called a “stunning upset.” It was Oak Lawn’s second win of the season.

Palos Heights dinner tab to taxpayers causes indigestion 25 years ago

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From the Oct. 27, 1988 edition     The Story: The Palos Hills City Council voted to approve a $1,206 dinner tab while at Artie G.s in Chicago after attending the Illinois Municipal League Convention. Alderman Pauline Stratton motioned to have the item taken off a list of expenditures they voted on and voted “no” for the tab.     The quote: “What she did was a cheap shot. All the aldermen could go out by themselves. But we think it’s an interesting fact that we went out as a group.’’ Palos Hills mayor Gerald Bennett on Stratton’s attempt to have the item stricken from the list.    Fun fact: MJ’s Grill in Worth offered a 99 cent breakfast of two eggs, breakfast potatoes, a choice of fresh baked muffins, buttered biscuit or toast.

Attendance down but beer sales up at RidgeFest 10 years ago

From the Oct. 23, 2003 edition     The story: The bad news — It was announced that lousy weather hurt the previous July’s RidgeFest 2003 as there was a 21 percent drop in profits from 2002, Village Clerk Charles Tokar said at a board meeting. The good news — Despite a dip in profits and attendance, sales of beer was up 25 percent. Pat Benatar and Poi Dog Pondering were entertainment headliners.    The quote: “It scared me!” Hickory Hills City Clerk Joann Jackson after touring the Halloween-themed Haunted Hall in town.    Fun fact: St. Xavier’s radio station, WXAV, won three first-place awards out of five categories at the Illinois Broadcast Association’s Silver Dome Awards.

Promoted (Continued from page 2) miss you in that part of it,” Bennett told Hlado. “But, I know your leadership on the street is going to go a long way with our police officers.”     Lieutenant Hlado thanked Bennett and the City of Palos Hills before Collins was called forward and administered the oath, appointing him to the office of Sergeant for the Palos Hills Police Department.     “Mike has been with us a long time and I know he looked forward, as all patrolmen do, in taking tests and wanting to get the opportunity for leadership and moving up in the ranks,” Bennett said. “Over the last four or five years, we have had openings that have become available and we have referred them to our officers to have the opportunity to be promoted. Mike did very well on his exam and he was next on the list for a promotion with our police department.”     Collins also thanked Bennett and the City of Palos Hills, admitting his hard work and determination with the Palos Hills Police Department has paid off through the good fortune of his promotion.

History of the World By Mark Andrews     Oct. 24: ON THIS DATE in 1861, the first transcontinental telegraph message was sent as Justice Stephen J. Field of California transmitted a telegram to President Lincoln. In 1962, the U.S. blockade of Cuba during the missile crisis began.     Oct. 25: ON THIS DATE in 1854, the ill-fated Charge of the Light Brigade took place during the Crimean War. In 1983, a U.S.-led force invaded Grenada to protect U.S. citizens.     Oct. 26: ON THIS DATE in 1949, President Truman signed a bill raising the minimum wage from 40 cents to 75 cents an hour. In 1958, Pan American World Airways flew its first Boeing 707 jetliner from New York to Paris in eight hours, 41 minutes.     Oct. 27: ON THIS DATE in 1787, the first of the “Federalist Papers,” a series of essays calling for ratification of the U.S. Constitution, was published in a New York newspaper. In 1954, Walt Disney’s first television program, titled “Disneyland” after his yet-to-be completed theme park, premiered on ABC.     Oct. 28: ON THIS DATE in 1492, explorer Christopher Columbus discovered Cuba for Spain. In 1962, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev ordered the removal of Soviet nuclear missiles from Cuba, ending the Cuban Missile Crisis.     Answer to last week’s ques­ tion: This week in 1836, Sam Houston was inaugurated as the first president of the Republic of Texas.     This week’s question: In 1800, who became the first president of the United States to live in the White House?     (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarqmail. com.)


Thursday, October 24, 2013 The Reporter

Former superintendent Smith hosts 35th Orland Open Spelling Bee By Jeff Vorva Reporter editor     Orland Park’s Brian Sullivan won his fourth Orland Open Spelling Bee with “tsunami” serving as his winning word.     Only the late Kathleen Foley (an eight-time champ) has more titles than Sullivan.     Sullivan beat out the field at the 35th running of the event Sunday

at the Orland Park Civic Center with Chicago’s Tracy Brockmeier claiming second and Orland Park’s Steve Lange taking third.     Bill Smith, who was the Alsip School District 126 Superintendent for 30 years, started the spelling bee in 1979.     “The idea of an open spelling bee came from “Little House On the Prairie” by Laura Ingalls Wilder,” Smith said. “In 1882, in DeSmet,

5

Dakota Territory, the town had an all-town spelling bee. Pa won and Laura finished third.”     Sullivan said this is the 12th time he has entered the event. He also won titles in 1991, 1995 and 2003.     “I make my living as an editor and writer for the American Bar Association Journal so I’m in tune with the language,” he said. “You see and use some big words and that helps a lot.’’     The top three in the 8-10 age group were Orland Park’s Michael Trombetta, Crestwood’s Olivia Sears, who attends Incarnation School, and Orland Park’s Adele Szaflarski.     The top three in the 11-14 age group were Matteson’s Indya GetPhotos by Jeff Vorva tings, Homer Glen’s Meghana Kamineni and Lockport’s Mehmood Bill Smith, a former school superintendent in the area, has run the Orland Open Spelling Bee for Haydar. all of its 35 years. The 35th running took place Sunday at the Orland Park Civic Center.

Orland Park’s Steve Lange says he doesn’t even want to guess at the word “roue” which he picked up in the late stages of the Orland Park’s Brian Sullivan is congratulated by runnerup Tracy Brockmeier of Chicago. Sullivan won his fourth Orland Park Spelling Palos Parks’ Bev Opelka ponders a word in Sunday’s spelling spelling bee Sunday. Officials urged him to guess and he guessed right. Lange went on to finish third. Bee Sunday at the Orland Park Civic Center. bee. She finished fifth this year, two years after winning it.

Community Briefs Palos Hills Leage of Voters Affordable Care information forum

    The League of Women Voters of the Palos Orland Area will participate with the Green Hills Library to provide a forum on the Affordable Health Care Act at 10 a.m. this Saturday, at the library, 8611 W. 103rd St. in Palos Hills.     As the registration process continues, more questions arise. Some who are currently insured and would like to keep their insurance plans are reporting large increases in their premiums. Those who are uninsured are having difficulty accessing information to fit their personal situations.     Anyone with questions about this new nationwide program and the impact it may have on your family may attend Saturday’s forum. A representative of Gov. r Quinn’s office will give a tutorial on how to proceed within ObamaCare in the

Cameras (Continued from page 1) of the key last week.     Meanwhile, a village camera upgrade is in the works and could be ready next May.     Mike Lewis, of Oak Lawn, former supervisory special agent for the Drug Enforcement Administration and U.S. Justice Department for 27 years, will help to update surveillance systems for multiple locations in Chicago Ridge.     Lewis told village officials during the Oct. 15 board meeting that new security cameras will be ready for instillation at the police station, village hall, fire department and library.     For the past months Lewis has vetted surveillance companies and has narrowed the search to four qualified vendors. Chicago Ridge officials asked Lewis if the system is compatible with the newly installed wireless infrastructure the village installed this year.     “I started with nine companies and I now have the search down to four and all four have done work similar to what we and are capable of handling this job,” Lewis said. “There are plenty of ways you can take an existing server and expand it.”     For 15 years Lewis worked as a supervisor of a special unit dedicated to security surveillance and physical security. He later helped to restructure the CTA’s rail service and bus

state of Illinois.

South suburbs Art Institute bus tour

    The Southland Community Associates of the Art Institute of Chicago invites the residents of the Southland to a bus tour on Wednesday. The trip includes visits to Graceland Cemetery, the Bohemian National Cemetery and lunch at Francesca’s. Al Walevich is the guide on this tour of two cemeteries.     The bus will leave at 9 a.m. from Flossmoor Country Club, 1441 Western and will return approximately at 4 p.m. Walking shoes are recommended. The cost is $80 for non-members of the Southland Community Associates. For more information, call Joyce Mistina at 708-567-9321.

Worth USPS hosts business workshops

    The United States Postal Service invites small business owners to attend a “Grow Your Business Day” workshop at 10

cameras.     “Obviously his credentials are impeccable over the past 23 years,” said Mayor Chuck Tokar. “He’s going out of his way and should be compensated for his work and the hours he’s put in on this project.”     Although Lewis is a resident of Oak Lawn he’s been good friends with Chicago Ridge Trustee Bruce Quintos, who enlisted the help of Lewis to restructure the camera network.     “I’ve been very good friends with Bruce and at the end of the day my sole interest is here in Chicago Ridge,” he said. “My goal is to ensure that the areas the elective officials want covered have working cameras and that the data is sent directly to the police station.”     • In other police news, Chicago Ridge Police officer, Daniel Grant was selected to become a member of the Narcotics and Currency Interdiction Team, a specialized unit comprised of agents from the Drug Enforcement Agency, Boarder Patrol, U.S. Customs and other municipal police officers.     “These are sought after positions and the chief continued to push to get Officer Grant into NARCINT,” said Deputy Chief Paul Landry. “This is going to be very lucrative for the village of Chicago Ridge since the group that seizes monies that were obtained illegally is entitled to 10 percent of the seizure.”     Unlike other specialty units,

a.m. Friday at the Worth Post Office, 11114 S. Harlem Ave.     Seating is limited so those interested in attending are encouraged to register at eddmrsvpcid@usps.gov.     The Every Door Direct workshop will help entrepreneurs and proprietors to promote their businesses using direct mail, without the cost of mailing lists or permits. The new Every Door Direct service is the first in a series of U.S. Postal Service initiatives to help expanding a small business with the mail more efficient and affordable.     In this one-hour presentation postal experts will show participants how to select a campaign message, target an audience and prepare Every Door Direct mailings. Information will be provided on how small business owners can do it themselves, or use mailing house vendors. Attendees will also learn about the Postal Service’s new Direct Mail Hub, a website that has simple, cost-effective ways to tap into the marketing advantages of Direct Mail.

NARCINT will pay for the officer’s overtime, issued police vehicle and other expenses that typically fall on the department. The agents also return to their unit with a special set of skills the state or municipality is able to hone to improve the strength of their police force.     “What’s great is that the officer is going to return to the village with specialties that the village will be able to utilize,” Quintos said. “Also once he gets back from the unit we are able to put him in a supervisory role and allow him to teach other officers what he’s learned while on the task force.”     • In other village news, Chicago Ridge Mall will feature a new clothing line from Europe. The clothing line Nebbia-USA is expected to open next month and will feature a sporty set of clothing for both men and women.     Ridge officials have also prepared for the coming Christmas season by purchasing the various lights and decorations for a total of $20,000 over two years. The manufacturer offered the village a half-now-half-later deal where the village is able to save renting costs by simply owning the LED lights.     “If we purchase the lights now over the years we’ll save money by not having the rent the lights,” Trustee John Lind said. “We’ll also have the light for the next 10 years and we don’t have to pay any interest on the long-term agreement.”

Photo by David Piechalak

David Piechalak, of Palos Heights, snapped some photos of coyotes hanging out in his backyard on 123rd Place behind Palos Community Hospital. They were there on two separate occasions — once last week and once earlier this week. Both times, he said they stayed in the grass for several hours just hanging out.

Heights neighbors capture coyotes in their backyard

Photo by David Piechalak

The Piechalaks see coyotes almost every morning at about 10 a.m. to noon in the backyard. They appear to sniff, recline, rest and sleep a lot, Piechalak says.

Photos by Marvin Van Wyck

Marvin Van Wyck, of Palos Heights, gets coyote visitors in his backyard on the corner of 123rd Street and Harold Avenue. He took these pictures before 9 a.m. last Friday morning. Residents are advised never to feed coyotes, because it reduces their natural fear of humans.


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The Reporter

Thursday, October 24, 2013

commentary The

Reporter

An Independent Newspaper Jeff Vorva Editor

Amy Richards Publisher

Published Weekly Founded March, 16, 1960

Another View

For many reasons, watch what you eat this Halloween By Ill. Wesleyan University     Planning to indulge in a little chocolate this Halloween? You’re not alone; a new survey reveals nearly 75 percent of Americans choose chocolate as their favorite Halloween treat.     When Illinois Wesleyan University’s William Munro looks at a chocolate, however, he sees more than a tempting morsel wrapped in brightly colored paper. As an expert on international food economy, Munro uses candy to teach first-year students to think critically about what they eat.     “A candy is loaded not only with many calories, but with many different stories,” said Munro, who is the Betty Ritchie-Birrer ’47 and Ivan Birrer, Ph.D. Endowed Professor and a member of Illinois Wesleyan’s political science faculty. “Stories of taste and travel, of culture and economy, of empire and industry all converge in our mouths, making America quite literally a ‘melting pot.’     “Chocolate has a rich, dark history,” he added, pun fully intended.     Munro’s course “The Social History of a Candy Bar” is a Gateway Colloquia course designed to develop students’ proficiency in writing. It’s also one of the University’s cluster of liberal arts courses centered on the theme “Unraveling Inequality.”     Munro doesn’t want his students to feel guilty about eating chocolate for societal reasons, but instead wants to increase their understanding.     “It takes enormous resources, human and otherwise, to make chocolate,” he said. “We should look at everything we eat in the same way, with the understanding that what we eat and how we eat is shaped by a wide network of social, cultural and historical relationships.”     The course traces the complexities of chocolate’s journey in becoming a worldwide commodity. In its early recorded history (early 19th century), one-third of the world’s cocoa supply came from Venezuela, and half of it was consumed in Spain. Today, however, 70 percent of the world’s cocoa is grown in West Africa, and 40 percent of it comes from that region’s Côte d’Ivoire alone, Munro said.     “If you eat a chocolate kiss for Halloween, the cocoa almost certainly came from West Africa and it almost

certainly involved child labor,” Munro explained. “Some of it is coerced labor, and some it is children working on family farms.”     Large chocolate producers are now paying some attention to these conditions, Munro said, partly because civil wars in Côte d’Ivoire involved human trafficking, including child trafficking. Profits from cocoa production helped fund the conflict, Munro said.     The sugar that gives chocolate its sweetness likewise has a global history. Localized sources of sweetness such as honey gave way to the production of sugar as a commodity crop with the colonization of the Caribbean Islands in the mid-17th century, he said.     “Cocoa was brought from the New World, but sugar was taken to the New World and became established as a major slave crop in the Caribbean,” Munro said. Today sugar cane or beet is grown in over 100 countries, and the U.S. imports it from at least 26 countries ranging from Swaziland in southern Africa to Switzerland, Munro said.     Chocolate could only become a mass consumer commodity through the emergence of a capitalist world economy made possible by the advent of the Industrial Revolution, Munro said. In his course, he also introduces students to the history of Cadbury’s, the British confectionery company founded in 1824, as an example of the rise of multinational food corporations.     Munro grew up eating Cadbury’s chocolates in his native South Africa. As a political scientist during the dismantling of apartheid, his interest in state formation grew out of the questions his countrymen and women were asking in regard to what kind of social system should take its place.     “South Africans knew very little about state formation and politics in the rest of the continent,” Munro said. He then studied in Zimbabwe, where most citizens worked the land on small-scale farms.     “If you want to understand political change, you had to look at the agrarian system as most people were involved with that,” he added. His growing interest and expertise in the international food economy developed with his understanding of the influence of international markets and global commodity systems on African farms.

Inside the First Amendment

Public schools rethinking Halloween By Charles C. Haynes     Principal Orlando Taylor believed he was doing the right thing last week when he sent a letter home announcing to parents that Halloween celebrations will be banned this year at Inglewood Elementary School.     But Taylor underestimated how many parents in Towamencin Township, Pennsylvania are emotionally attached to the annual parties and parades featuring goblins, witches and ghosts. Outraged parents denounced the ban, calling it everything from ridiculous to un-American.     After the media got wind of the story, Taylor was transformed overnight from respectable school principal into the Grinch who stole Halloween.     Higher-ups in the school district scrambled to quell the controversy, announcing that Taylor had misstated the policy. It turns out that teachers are allowed to have Halloween parties, but schoolwide Halloween events such as costume parades must be held before or after school.     Although the “Halloween

Do you believe the Washington Redskins name is offensive and should be changed? (Asked at Palos Plaza, 127th Street and Harlem Avenue)

involving images of witches, demons and ghosts as offensive to their faith.     Non-religious objections to Halloween are also gaining traction in some school districts. Many educators want to reclaim time lost to Halloween activities during the school day. Others worry that school parades and parties leave out poor families who can’t afford the increasingly elaborate costumes.     None of these objections matter much to Halloween enthusiasts, as the brouhaha in Pennsylvania illustrates. Their basic message seems to be “don’t spoil the fun for my kid.”     But when Halloween-themed lessons and activities are ubiquitous in classrooms for weeks at a time — which is the case in many elementary schools — it isn’t much fun for parents who are trying to avoid Halloween. Kids assigned to color the witches green, sing spooky songs and read about haunted houses can’t opt out without opting out of school for much of October.     Eliminating Halloween altogether, as Principal Taylor

discovered, is too unpopular, unrealistic and counter-cultural to make sense for most school districts. But toning it down — as Taylor’s district is apparently trying to do — is a good idea. Pushing costume parades to after school hours, for example, makes them voluntary for families who want to participate.     If Halloween lessons and activities disappeared tomorrow from the October curriculum, little of educational value would be lost. On the contrary, less Halloween could mean more time to teach something that really matters.     Even better, dialing back Halloween during the school day would send a message of respect for the beliefs and values of many religious parents.     Yes, Halloween as currently celebrated in elementary school classrooms is constitutional. But just because it’s legal doesn’t make it right. Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum Institute in Washington, D.C. Web: religiousfreedomeducation.org. Email: chaynes@newseum.org

Letters to the Editor Tyranny is causing American angst

Dear Editor:     Today, we Americans are an unhappy lot. It’s because the man in the White House treats us with disdain, and our Constitution as being irrelevant. When he ran for this office he promised to “transform America.” Some thought of it as a positive while others were suspicious of the term.     The biggest thing right now is Obamacare which was passed in the middle of the night at Christmas time. It is 2,000 pages long and not one Republican voted for it. How oppressive is all that? Not only is it a government held insurance policy but we are forced to buy it or pay a penalty! What happened to our choice of private companies who would meet our specific needs and the costs thereof?

Experiment in “self-government”. So he is a socialist and some members of the American Communist Party are his advisers.     Yes, we are pessimistic because even when any one of our brave politicians protest this abuse of power they are trashed by our other politicians!     Yes, liberty is a fragile thing and must be strengthened by every generation for the next one, or we will no longer be a country where personal dreams of accomplishment can happen.     I wonder how many of us Americans remember from our history books that those men who signed that Declaration of Independence from England knew from the start that their lives and fortunes were at risk, and that many did suffer such tragedies?     And do most of us really appreciate the genius of the Constitution that they wrote eleven years later? One person did — the King of Spain — who at that time observed:” that pigmy of a nation will one day be a colossus.”     It is time for the schools to teach it well and adults to bone up. Mildred L. Para Evergreen Park

WMO a step in the right direction

Dear Editor:     Recently the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) Board of Commissioners unanimously approved the Cook County Watershed Management Ordinance (WMO). The WMO was adopted with an effective date of May 1, 2014.     The MWRD held five public meetings this summer throughout the district, offering the public the opportunity to voice their opinions regarding the proposed WMO. We listened to the public, and incorporated many of the suggestion received into our final draft.     The purpose of the WMO is to establish uniform stormwater management regulations for Cook County, in order to prevent future commercial, municipal, and residential development and redevelopment projects from exacerbating flooding. Paved roads, parking lots, walkways, and buildings make the city and the suburbs livable, but they also reduce the amount of land that rainwater can properly and efficiently be absorbed. This leads to increased flooding without sufficient regulation. The WMO ensures that commercial and residential development

will continue, but in a responsible manner that will help curb residential flooding.     Thank you to our staff, the technical committee, and to members of the community who worked so very hard to bring the WMO to our Board for approval. The WMO was truly the result of the collaboration of many different ideas and best practices we aim to deliver to the citizens of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago. Kathleen Therese Meany, President Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago

   The Reporter Newspaper

encourages letters to the editor.    Letters must be 350 words or less.  Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Writ­ ers must also include their address and telephone num­ ber for verification, but that information will not be pub­ lished and will remain other­ wise confidential. Mail letters to the editor to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 or e-mail us at thereporter@comcast.net

Photos by Bob Rakow

    This is tyranny and a severe blow to our personal liberty. But why are we surprised? When he was an Illinois Senator, Obama’s voting record revealed he voted “present” on most bills instead of “yes” or “no” which would reveal his political philosophy. He was educated by “left wing” professors who cared less about the American

What do you say?

banned” story turned out to be a bust, the media wouldn’t have to look hard to find many other districts that are moving away from Halloween-themed activities during the school day and either moving them to non-school hours or replacing them with “harvest festivals” without Halloween paraphernalia.     This trend to de-emphasize Halloween in elementary schools isn’t driven by fear of First Amendment lawsuits — or, at least, it shouldn’t be.     True, some images and symbols associated with “trick or treat” can be traced to ancient pagan and other religious practices. But Halloween in America has been so thoroughly secularized that no court in the land is likely to view school Halloween parties as an establishment of religion.     What’s actually pushing public schools to re-think Halloween is the recognition that growing numbers of Christian, Muslim and other religious parents are opting their kids out of Halloween celebrations at school. A judge may not see Halloween as “religious,” but many parents see activities

Andy Delenikas, Worth     “No. I don’t feel there is any need.”

Bob Stump, Orland Park     “No. It’s tradition. It’s not insulting to me.”

David C., Oak Forest     “No. It’s the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

George Rock, Palos Heights     “No. It’s been a tradition. There’s not been a history of complaining.”

Josh Degroot, Palos Heights     “Not really. The issue is blown up.”


Thursday, October 24, 2013 The Reporter

Crisis Center sponsors free concert, vigil for domestic violence awareness     In recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the Crisis Center for South Suburbia will sponsor a free concert this Saturday, Oct. 26, from 3 to 4:30 p.m., at Durbin’s of Tinley Park, 17265 Oak Park Ave.     The Password: Purple campaign will draw attention to the issues of domestic violence and the resources and services available to the community through the Crisis Center.     The free concert will feature The Ponyboys and also includes a candle lighting ceremony and vigil. The vigil pays tribute to survivors of domestic violence and honors those who have lost their lives to abuse. All community residents are invited to attend the free event.

    For more information, contact Kerri at 429-7255, Ext. 126, or at kerrit@crisisctr.org.     October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which evolved from the “Day of Unity” that started in October 1981. The idea was conceived by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, with an intent to connect advocates across the nation who were working to end violence against women and their children. The activities conducted were as varied and diverse as the program sponsors but had common themes: mourning those who have died because of domestic violence, celebrating those who have survived, and connecting those who work to end violence.

    In October 1987, the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month was observed. The tradition continues today as advocates honor, remember and come together to serve those in need.     The Crisis Center for South Suburbia’s mission is to provide emergency shelter and other essential services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence and address the societal issues that contribute to domestic violence.     Visit crisisctr.org for more information on the Crisis Center for South Suburbia, ways to support its mission, and the services it provides.

Crafts & Bazaars     A holiday bazaar and bake sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 at Evergreen Park Presbyterian Church, 8859 S. Francisco. The event features crafts, baked good and items from different vendors. A raffle featuring gift baskets will also be part of the event. Drawings will be held at 2 p.m. Lunch will be available at the “Deacons’ Diner”. For more information, call the church office at 422-7107. ***     The 28th annual bazaar, sponsored by St. Helen Women’s Philoptochos, featuring Greek food and pastries, as well as crafts and vendors, will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 and from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 3 at SS Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 11025 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills. For more information, call 974-3400. ***     St. Patricia School, 9000 S. 86th Ave., Hickory Hills, is hosting its annual craft and vendor show from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24. The event features dozens of crafters and vendors and such items for sale as candles, holiday decor, housewares, jewelry, and personalized items. Concessions, a bake sale, and a raffle are also part of the event. Admission is free. For more information, call (312) 804-9211 or (773) 742-0821. ***     Our Lady of Loretto is looking

7

for crafters for its annual holiday craft show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 1 at 8925 S. Kostner Ave. Rentals are $35 per table. For more information, call 708423-4206. ***     Hickory Hills Presbyterian Church is looking for crafters for this year’s Holiday Craft Bazaar on Nov. 2 at 8426 W. 95th St. The rental fee for a 6-foot table is $30. For more information call 708-423-6378. ***     VFW Post 177 McDonald-Linn in Chicago Ridge will hold a holiday craft fair Nov. 9. Table rentals are $30 per table. For more information call the post at 708636-3220.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Great cause, but miserable day to plant tulip bulbs

    It was cold. It was rainy. And there was some snow, too. But that didn’t stop dozens of firemen, patients and dignitaries from planting tulip bulbs at the Advocate Christ Center for Breast Care in Oak Lawn Tuesday afternoon. Thousands of bulbs were donated by Bruno Galatte Landscape of Tinley Park for the occasion.     Next spring, after the flowers have bloomed, the bulbs will be unearthed and given to those who purchased them. Proceeds from the sale of these bulbs will be used by the Center for Breast Care and the Christ Medical Center Cancer Institute for development and purchase of educational materials     The start/finish line will be at for cancer patients. Hickory Hills City Hall, 8652 W.     In the top photo, Oak Lawn 95th Street. For more information Fire Lt. Vince Griffin peeks out about the race: www.e-clubhouse. of foliage and helps Carrie Malloy of Oak Forest plant a bulb. In the right photo, Oak Lawn fireman org/sites/HickoryHills, or to signup Richard Kapitanek helps Theresa Downs of Lemont with her tulips. online: www.signmeup.com/93043.     If you would like to volunteer or become a sponsor please call Vince Cremation is one of those things some people Uzzardo 708-430-2210 or email just can’t see spending a lot of money on... hickoryhillslions@gmail.com.     Proceeds from the race will help the Hickory Hills Lions Club in their mission to provide programs     Neat Repeats Resale in Worth and assistance to aid people who and Orland Park are celebrating are blind or visually impaired. The their new look with expanded Hickory Hills Lions Club has served We know that not everybody hours at both stores. the needs of the community for feels they should have to empty     Starting on Sunday, Nov. 3, Neat more than 50 years. their savings account to pay for a Repeats will be opening from 11 memorial service. It’s only natural a.m. to 4 p.m. Volunteers are needed to want a funeral home that can to work a 5 Hour shift at either offer excellent service and match store. it with an excellent price. We are     For information, call the store that kind of funeral home. manager in Worth, at 7026 W. 111th St., 361-6860, or Orland Park, at 9028 W. 159th St., 364-7605.     All sales at Neat Repeats Resale benefit the clients served by the Crisis Center for South Suburbia. The 13401 South Ridgeland Ave. Crisis Center for South Suburbia is Palos Heights, Illinois 60463 an non-profit community organiza(708) 448-3530 tion that provides emergency shelter VanHenkelum.com VanHenkelum.com and other services for individuals Affordable Funeral & Cremation Services. and families victimized by domestic violence. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Benefits & Fundraisers     The American Legion Post 854 and their Auxiliary are hosting a spaghetti diner fundraiser on from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 at the post, 9701 S Kedzie Ave, Evergreen Park. Tickets are $7 in advance and can be purchased at the Post bar, or $8 at the door. Bake sales and raffles will be held during the event. ***     The 12th annual Multiple Sclerosis Fundraiser — Raising Awareness takes place from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 2 at 114 Bourbon Street. All proceeds are donated to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society — Greater Illinois Chapter in

Chicago. The event costs $30 and there will be a split the pot, raffle prizes and live entertainment.     This annual event was inspired by two women who have been fighting this disease for 30-plus years, Most Holy Redeemer parishioner Susan Berry and St. Linus parishioner Mary Fecht. ***     The Hickory Hills Lions Club will host the fourth annual Roar and Run for Fun 5K Run/Walk race. The race will be held at 9 a.m Saturday. All participants receive a long-sleeve shirt. There will be awards, door prizes, food and drink following the race.

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Class Reunions     The Kelly High School Class of 1963 is planning a 50th reunion for this fall. The planning committee is seeking classmates. For more information or to have your name placed on the distribution list for the formal invitation contact Bernadette (Bernie) Petrauskas at 630-469-9418 or bernptrsks@yahoo.com.

Across

1 Switchblade 5 French revolutionary who         was murdered in a tub 10 Hard to outwit 14 Trumpet muffler 15 Rolled out of bed 16 One-named Gaelic folk singer 17 Bear in two constellations 18 Pro cager 19 Folksy Joan 20 Behavior of a community 23 Martini liquor 24 AOL chat components 25 Turkish __: spas 28 24-hour auto race city 30 “Star Trek” catchphrase 33 Standing straight 34 Aim for pins 35 “How come?” 36 Storage items near outdoor         faucets 40 Satisfied sigh 43 Sox player, e.g. 44 Preface, briefly 48 Military officer’s ride 51 Attempt to cool, as steaming         hot soup 52 Prefix with foam 53 Maglie or Mineo 54 Unlock, poetically

55 Nurturing network of family         and friends, and a hint to the         starts of 20-, 30-, 36- and         48-Across 60 Corncob pipe part 62 “The First Time __ Saw         Your Face” 63 Speech problem 64 Stay fresh 65 Dig artifact 66 Send out, as rays 67 500-mile race, familiarly 68 Phones on stage, e.g. 69 Contradict

Down

1 Bring across the border         illegally 2 One in a rush 3 “Your money’s no good here!” 4 Calf meat, in Provence 5 Coated buttonlike candies 6 “Slicing Up Freshness”         fast-food chain 7 Reddish horse 8 On the ocean 9 __ paper: school composition 10 Device for a Skype chat 11 Very agitated 12 Soap ingredient

(Answers on page 11)

13 ’60s-’80s Red Sox legend,         familiarly 21 Ford named for a horse 22 Selectric maker 26 “Whadja say?” 27 Double agent 29 “Oh” de Cologne? 30 Drilling tool 31 Potter’s pitcher 32 Tavern brew 34 Lugosi who played Dracula 37 Cul-de-__ 38 Pharmaceutical giant Eli 39 __-Globe: shakable collectible 40 Balaam’s mount 41 Lawyer: Abbr. 42 Country bumpkin 45 Double-cross 46 Lures by phishing, say 47 Afraid of running out, gas         gauge-wise 49 Drably unattractive 50 Ascot wearer 51 Fundamentals 53 Word after comic or landing 56 Cop’s suspect 57 Eggs __ easy 58 Move, in brokerese 59 Winter toy 60 Tackle a slope 61 Olympic diver’s perfection

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The Reporter

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Grade schools

Submitted Photo

Haunts Against Hunger raises food donations     The Village of Worth hosted the annual Halloween event Haunts Against Hunger on Sunday. More than 250 participants — including many area grade school children — met to raise awareness for local food pantries. The event was sponsored by the Worth Police Department. Officer Tony Ritz organized the annual Halloween parade. The parade, led by the Grim Reaper and a parade of hears cars, followed by participants that visited five decorated homes in town. The event raised food for the local food pantry at the Worth Methodist Church.

Bulletin Board Chicago Ridge

    The Veterans Of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary No. 177 of Chicago Ridge is sponsoring a poster contest for first through third grade students and an essay contest for fourth and fifth graders.     The fourth and fifth graders graders will write on the topic “How do our veterans serve America?” The essay should be no longer than 200 words and

should be typed or neatly handwritten in black ink.     The cover sheet for the essay should contain: student’s name, school, age of student and grade. The deadline is Nov. 6.     The theme for the poster for first, second and third graders is “I am a proud American.”     The poster should be no larger than 14 by 22 inches. Students may use any type coloring agents like crayons,

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paints, markers, etc.     On the back of the poster please include: the student’s name, the age of the students and the grade.     The deadline is Nov. 6. For more information on either contest, contact Renee at 630-452-9447.

portunity to be a part of the show and get their picture taken and receive autographs with Belle, the Beast, and the other enchanted objects. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Tickets can be purchased through the ticket hotline at 424-5200 ext. 5920.

Mount Assisi

Central Junior High

    The Mount Assisi Booster Club presents its 10th annual Comedy Night Saturday, Nov. 2, at the school, 13860 Main St. in Lemont.     Doors open 6:15 p.m., dinner 7:15 p.m., show 8:30 p.m.     Featuring a night of comedy and dinner by Uncle Bub’s.     Tickets cost $35 and include buffet dinner, beer, wine, pop, water, and comedy show quests. Must be 21 or over to attend.     To register, contact Gail Andjulis andjul4@yahoo.com, or call 224-9922.

    Evergreen Park and area veterans are invited to a Veterans Day Breakfast and Program at 8 a.m. Nov. 8 at Central Junior High School, 9400 S. Sawyer, in Evergreen Park.     This event will be hosted by the students and faculty and is planned to honor the Evergreen Park and area residents who are U.S. Military Veterans for their service to our country during war or peacetime.     Those who wish to attend must call the school office at 708-4240148 by Nov. 1. Veterans are Oak Lawn welcome to bring a guest. The     Oak Lawn Community High building is handicap accessible, so School performances of “Beauty if you have special needs, please let and the Beast” will take place at them know when you are making 7 p.m. Friday through Sunday. your reservations. Some parking A special children’s matinee will is available on the school grounds also take place at 2 p.m. Sunday or street in front of the school where children will have the op- that day.

2x3 y 10-3-13 But Momm say didn’t you an sell that you c the anything in ? classifieds

Halloween Happenings     Get Spooky, a Halloweeninspired event, is being hosted from 2 to 4 p.m., Sunday, at the Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St., Chicago. Free arts activities will be offered to all participants, including learning the “Thriller” dance, spooky stories, pumpkin decorating, a face painting workshop and mask making. There will also be costume contests and a haunted house. For more information, call the center at 773-445-3838, or visit www.beverlyartcenter.org. ***     This is the final weekend for Worth Park District’s Nightmare at the Terrace haunted house being held from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday through Sunday inside the Terrace Center, 11500 S. Beloit Ave., Worth. The 12- room haunted house is recommended for ages eight and older. Admission is $8 per person. For more information, call the Worth Park District at 708-448-7080, or visiting www.

worthparkdistrict.org. ***     Palos United Methodist Church, 12101 S. Harlem is hosting a Halloween Party for children and families from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26. Participants are asked to dress up in their favorite costumes, but hold back on the gore. The afternoon will feature a costume contest, apple bobbing, crafts and snacks. For more information, call 708-448-0798. ***     Oak Lawn Park District’s Ice Arena (9320 S. Kenton Ave.) will host the Trick or Treat on Ice event on from 2 to 3:15 p.m. Sunday, October 27th.     Admission is $6 and there is a $3 skate rental. There will also be treats for all kids in costume! Music will be provided by CMT Productions.     For more information, contact 708-857-5173.

The Kid’s Doctor By Sue Hubbard, M.D.

Yes dear, but not your little brother.

Yes, the classifieds are a great place to buy or sell just about anything under the sun. And yes, you can make monet cleaning out those no longer used items from your attic, basement or garage and sell them for cash in the Classifieds. But please note: You cannot sell little brothers through the Classifieds. (For that you’d probably have to take out a full page ad) THE

REPORTER Newspapers 12247 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

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20 words for $25 Call (708) 448-6161

Open Weekdays 9-5 — Saturday 9-Noon

Toddlers and tantrums: Looking the other way has its virtues     I see toddlers for checkups nearly every day, and for both the 15-month and 18-month visit, there are many challenges for parents, pediatricians and kids. Toddlers are not at what I would call an EASY age.     As you know if you have a toddler, they’re quite moody and Submitted Photo they can “stop, drop and roll” into a tantrum in the blink of an eye. While I was examining an 18-month-old girl recently, she     Junior high students at St. Louis de Montfort School in Oak Lawn suddenly became infuriated (her wear their favorite novels for a day. Vanesa Perez, Xena Romo, and mother and I were clueless as to what triggered this), jumped off Juliana Rehnquist are pictured.     Some of the other students who participated include Anthony Mom’s lap and fell to the floor, Loera, Isabelle Hernandez, Celine DeJesus, Emory Duran, Lesli kicking and screaming.     For a first-time parent, this Garcia, Gabriella Accetturo, and Karen Navarro. might be alarming behavior, but for this seasoned mother of three, it was really no big deal. Appropriately, we simply ignored the child as she lay on the floor and screamed (no, the mother was not worried about germs on the floor), continuing our conversation about the youngster’s less than stellar sleep habits.     After a few minutes, the toddler calmed down, her older sisters got her a sticker and she left without a fuss. Her mother had already learned, like we all

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do, that the best way to stop tantrums is by ignoring them and letting the child have some time to “express her emotions” with age appropriate (although inappropriate for older children) behavior.     Several days later, the same mom sent me an email with a photo attached of the same child having yet another tantrum after the mother found her in her diaper with a sharpie pen, happily marking all over herself. Of course, the minute Mom took the marker away, her daughter fell to the floor to express her outrage! It was funny that the mother thought to document it.     By the way, this mother also told me that she’d taken my practical advice and was working on letting her daughter cry herself to sleep — and things were going well. Both the child’s tantrums and her sleep were improving just by ignoring her behavior. Back to those laws of natural consequences!     (Dr. Sue Hubbard is an awardwinning pediatrician, medical editor and media host. “The Kid’s Doctor” TV feature can be seen on more than 90 stations across the U.S. Submit questions at www.kidsdr.com.)


Thursday, October 24, 2013 The Reporter

High schools & College

9

Shepard speech team bonds in St. Louis By Bob McParland District 218

Submitted Photo

Marist High School seniors Rachel Folga (from left), Liam Gibbs, and Jim Costin were recently named National Merit Semifinalists; a distinction given to a small fraction of students who take the PSAT.

Three Marist students named National Merit semifinalists By Marist High School     Marist High School announced seniors Jim Costin, Rachel Folga, and Liam Gibbs were named National Merit Scholarship semifinalists. Three other students were named National Merit Commended students.     Costin (who resides in Oak Lawn) has balanced participation in the school’s football program, along with membership in the Spanish National Honor Society, National Honor Society, math team and student ambassadors. He also serves a peer leader, providing academic support to students in lower grade levels.     Gibbs (Evergreen Park) is a member of the school’s band, and is also a member of the math team, NHS, and SNHS. He also serves as a tutor for local grammar school students through Marist’s youth service group.     Folga (Oak Forest) is a peer mediator, helping students resolve issues or disputes. She, too, is a member of SNHS and NHS, and serves as a student ambassador.     All three have carried challeng-

ing course loads, taking advantage of Marist’s many advanced placement courses, which provide the opportunity to earn college credit while in high school. All three are considering highly selective universities in the Midwest.     They represent the highest scorers in each state based on results of the Preliminary SAT. Approximately 16,000 high school seniors in the nation receive the distinction of semifinalist from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation located in Evanston. That number is less than one percent of all students who take the PSAT. Semifinalists will be notified in February if they have advanced to the finalist level. At that time, they are able to compete for nearly 8,200 scholarships totaling $34 million.     Brenna Donegan (Oak Lawn), Sandra Hansen (Homer Glen), and Anna Schieber (Orland Park) were named National Merit Commended Students. These students will be referred to colleges as outstanding participants in the PSAT.

    As a test of unity, traveling together would seem the ultimate trial for any high school team.     Every waking minute requires conversation and activity — nonstop proximity and interaction that will make or break a group.     Shepard High School speech coaches and students seem to have discovered some secret. They keep traveling together, this year with a recent trip to St. Louis.     “The trip’s purpose is to have the team bond while experiencing theatre in a different city. The past two years, we’ve gone to Minneapolis, but this year, we wanted to try something different. I’m glad we went, as the kids had a blast,” said coach Jeff Vazzana.     Students seemed to love it.     “The trip was that perfect combination of exhaustion after a long and happy day and the little joy from realizing how cool people you never really talked to before really are,” senior Tasha Wierzal said.     “It was certainly a super memorable trip, with the most notable aspect being the team bonding that occurred. New relationships were made and old ones were reinforced. We all feel more prepared and confident for the upcoming speech season,” said added senior Mike Peretz.     The team left Shepard at 5 a.m. and drove to the Gateway Arch. The government shutdown prevented students from taking

the elevator to the top, but they still walked the grounds.     Then it was off to the City Museum.     “It’s a 10-story piece of interactive artwork. In other words, it’s a 10-story jungle gym. The kids really had a lot of fun crawling through the tunnels that connected floor to ceiling,” Vazzana said.     That first night, the group saw “Evita.” Despite the long day, “Not a single student fell asleep. All the way (to the hotel), they were singing on the bus, ‘Peron, Peron, Peron,’” Vazzana said of the characters in “Evita.”     “I know that even though it might annoy other kids in the hallways, it’s nice to have new friends that I can just start belting out “Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina!” when a week ago I only I had a vague idea of their names,” said Wierzal.     Like their previous trips to Minneapolis, the Shepard speech team participated in an improvisational theater workshop on the second day. Even the trip to Six Flags included some theater: The Shepard group visited Fright Fest.     The trip closed with a trip to the famed St. Louis Zoo.     Whatever their destination in the upcoming speech season, the Shepard students already have arrived as a team.     “Even kids I knew since freshmen year I feel like I left the trip knowing them better. It’s a great way to start the season and I think it got everyone more Submitted Photo excited for the rest of the year,” Shepard High School speech team members tunnel their way at Wierzal said. the City Museum in St. Louis.

Bulletin Board Moraine Valley

    The Ghost Hunting 101 noncredit course at Moraine Valley Community College takes place at 10 a.m. Saturday in Building T, on campus, 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills. The fee is $25.     The individuals who formed the Illinois Ghost Society will present basic ghost hunting skills as well as the terminology and scientific equipment used. Hear about the paranormal, and find out more about conducting an investigation and actual evidence collected during an investigation. The speakers also will talk about cleansing a property of negative energy.     This class is for anyone interested in parapsychology and is intended to create awareness of the possibility of an afterlife.     Register today in person at the Registration Office, located in S125 on campus, or by calling 708-974-2110 (TTY for the hearing impaired is 708-974-9556). Participants also can register online at morainevalley.edu by selecting Register for Noncredit Classes under Academic Focus and then Search, register and pay for noncredit classes.

evening or beforehand for $10. Proceeds go to the Media Center activity account. Please contact media specialists Eileen Jones at ejones@olchs.org or Jennifer Sidlow at jsidlow@olchs.org for more information. ***

Richards

    Richards High School will host its 11th annual Southland Model Railroad Show on Saturday and Sunday.     Richards, located at 10601 S. Central Avenue in Oak Lawn, will host the event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday.     Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens 65 and older, and free for children under age 12. Parking is free.     The train show will feature the largest HO layout of any model show in the Chicago area. The Richards event also includes many other model train displays and operating layouts, Lego trains, a riding train for children, train races for children, and a children’s activities area.     Last year, 23 area model railroad clubs displayed layouts. Oak Lawn     For more information, visit www.     Oak Lawn Community High railroadshow.com or contact RichSchool Media Center will host ards band director Charles Martin its first Family Reading Night at 708-499-2550, ext. 5096. on from 7 to 8 p.m. Nov. 21. The event will be an evening St. Xavier University book club for students, parents,     Saint Xavier University’s School staff, and the community. There of Nursing will launch of its new will be discussion and activi- 15-month Accelerated Bachelor of ties based around the popular Science in Nursing Option. novel “The Fault in Our Stars”     Starting in May 2014, the Aby award-winning author John BSN will allow students with Green. The book is an insightful, baccalaureate degrees to move ambitious, and heartbreaking through the pre-licensure prostory which explores the funny/ gram in a reduced time-frame. tragic business of being alive Students will begin nursing and in love. It’s a rare best seller coursework each May and comaimed at teens and adults. plete the fulltime program in 15     Family Reading Night is in months. Pre-requisite courses, if conjunction with Illinois Reads, needed, may be completed in ada new statewide campaign to vance at SXU prior to the May promote reading for all Illinois start. citizens created under the aus-     Qualified applicants for the pices of the Illinois Reading A-BSN option must possess an Council. Illinois Reads focuses earned baccalaureate degree from on reading at school, as well a nationally accredited institution as at home. Residents across of higher learning with a minithe state from Rockford to mum cumulative GPA of 3.0 on Carbondale will be partaking a 4.0 scale, which includes all in upcoming family literacy pre-requisite coursework. nights. The culmination event     More information about the Acis a statewide celebration of celerated BSN program is availliteracy on the same evening able by visiting www.sxu.edu, as the book club. keyword: nursing could not get     All book club participants this to work. For more information must register at www.olchs. about the nursing program or to org. schedule a visit, please contact the     A limited number of event T- Office of Admission at 800-462shirts will also be on sale that 9288 or admission@sxu.edu.

Submitted Photo

Queen of Peace freshmen tour Chicago     The Queen of Peace Arts without Borders program takes each class year on a specific trip and this year it took the school’s freshmen on the Architectural Foundation Chicago River Tour.     Chicago Architectural Foundation certified volunteer tour guides — called docents — interpreted more than 50 buildings along the Chicago River, revealing how the city grew from a small back-country outpost into one of the world’s most important crossroads in less than 100 years.     Following the tour they visited the sculptures at Millennium Park.

Pride athletes host Scoopie Night at Culver’s     The athletic department at Queen of Peace High School recently sponsored a Culver’s Scoopie Night. Culver’s in Bridgeview, allowed the school’s volunteers to come in and serve meals, clean tables, run orders out to cars and mingle with diners.     The event benefited the athletic department by returning 15 percent of the profits to the school. The homeroom with the most students and families in attendance was awarded an ice cream Sunday party, also sponsored by Culver’s.     Junior Mary Keenan became Scoopie for the night which meant she dressed in the Scoopie costume to generate business.     Some of the athletes who participated are shown in the photo.


10

The Reporter

Thursday, October 24, 2013

community calendar / Features hat’s W Going On Embroiderers Meeting     The Beverly Hills Embroiderers’ Guild will hold its regular monthly meeting Nov. 19 at the Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn.     The day meeting, featuring “Chicken Scratch Heart” presented by member Dana Pyzik,, will be held at 9 a.m. The evening meeting, featuring “Candy Cane Pendant and Candy Cane Necklace, Part 2” will be held at 7 p.m. For more information, call 708-425-6793.

Park Clips Photo by Jessica Loftus

Pumpkids Painting Party offers Halloween treats     The Pumpkids Painting Party and Harvest Corner of Treats sponsored by the Palos Heights Woman’s Club will be held Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.     Activities will be held at the plaza next to Chalet Florist at 123rd Street and Harlem Avenue and a few doors down at the nearby MidVilla Pizza, 12226 S. Harlem Ave.     Susan Shields, a member of the club’s Arts Committee and Lela Hansen are shown at MidVilla Pizza, where organizers are planning the event.     The activities for families and children will include decorating pumpkins with paints and stickers while enjoying pizza, popcorn, apple cider, pumpkin coffee and Halloween cupcakes for sale. Children will keep their pumpkin creations. The cost is $1 for mini pumpkins, $2 medium.     Face painting, a balloon artist and piñatas filled with candy will be among the featured activities. The event will take place rain or shine.

LEGAL NOTICE

Chicago Ridge

Focus on Seniors Alzheimer’s caregivers meeting

    Beverly neighborhood residents who care for seniors living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia will gather with others who have the same concerns at 6:30 p.m, Nov. 12 at Smith Village, 2320 W. 113th Pl., Chicago. Reservations are necessary for this free meeting. For more information, call 708-326-2300, or visit familyandfriends@smithcrossing.org     Smith Village’s Dr. Michael Thomas, medical director, will speak on the different medicines that people with cognitive impairments take, such as mental acuity drugs.     Questions and comments from the assembly will be taken. Before the hour-long gathering at the continuing care retirement community (CCRC) ends, light refreshments will be served.

Legal clinic at PLOWS     The Chicago Ridge Park District is taking team registration for 4th     PLOWS will host the next through 8th grade boys basketball and girls volleyball leagues. For registration information, please call 708-423-3959 or visit our website www.chicagoridgeparks.com. Evergreen Park

Evergreen Park

    The Evergreen Park Public Li    Evergreen Park will offer brary is at 9400 S. Troy Ave. The classes in tumbling, preschool phone number is 422-8522. open gym, kids boot camp, kids *** fitness, Irish dance, Taekwondo,     The library is offering a Learn color guard, drama, performing to Crochet class for adults and arts, cheer tumbling, cooking and teens on Tuesdays, through Oct. Yoga starting Tuesday. For more 29 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Begininformation call, 708-229-3373. ners bring an H/8 crochet hook. *** Yarn will be provided. All others     The Evergreen Park Office of should bring a current project. Citizens’ Services will take a sev- Registration required. For more en-day trip to “Christmas at the information, call 708-422-8522. Biltmore House and Dollywood” in Tennessee from Nov. 10 to 16. Cost includes transportation, hotel, some meals, and admission to Dollywood and Biltmore Estate. For more information call 422-8776.

Hickory Hills

    Open basketball for 5th through 12th grade boys and girls is available on Fridays through Dec. 20. The 5th through 8th graders attend from 4 to 6:15 p.m. The 9th through 12th graders attend from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Krueger Park Rec. Center, 9100 S. 88th Ave. The fee is $3 to $5 each session. ***     The Hickory Hills Park District has openings in its preschool classes. Five-day class is $1,540, three-day class (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) is $860, and two-day class (Tuesday and Thursday) is $695. Classes run through May 2014. Class times are 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 3:15 p.m. The office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for registration. Parents must provide child’s birth certificate and immunization records. For more information call 598-1233 or visit hhparkdistrct.org.

Oak Lawn

    Duplicate bridge will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mondays at the Oak View Center. Cost is $7 per person and includes a light lunch. For more information, call 8572200.

Palos Hills

    The department will be hosting a 5th Grade Fall Bash. This event will take place at the Palos Hills Community Center from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 8 at 8455 W. 103rd Street. Tickets for this event are $1 and they come with a hot dog and a bag of chips. Other refreshments will be sold for a nominal fee. This event is only for 5th graders that reside in the School District 117/118. There will be a DJ, dancing, games, foods, open gym, Nintendo Wii, ping pong and air Hockey. For more information about this event call 708430-4500 or email recreation@ paloshillsweb.org. ***     The City of Palos Hills will be honoring those who have served this country at 6 p.m. on Nov. 11. This event will take place at Town Square Park’s Veteran Memorial located at 8455 W. 103rd Street. There will be Toys for Tots donation boxes at this outdoor event. For more information please contact the Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Department at 708-430-4500 or email us at recreation@paloshillsweb.org.

Green Hills

    The Green Hills Public Library is at 8611 W. 103rd St. in Palos Hills. The phone number is 598-8446. ***     The library is hosting a number of events during November. For more information, call 708-5988446, or visit www.greenhills.lib. il.us.     The library will be closed on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 28.     The library also will be extending it’s Friday hours beginning Friday, Dec. 6 when it begins hosting special events on select Friday evenings. ***     Participants in Microsoft Word 2010 will learn how to create letterheads, charts, tables, and to customize layouts for flyers. The class, open to residents only, will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11. Registration is required and limited to four per class. Laptops will be provided. ***     Savvy Shopping is the name of the game when Clair Boone, a British stay-at-home mom, will teach registered patrons to coupon, meal plan, find bargains, and pay it forward on a budget. Registration is required and the class will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12. For more information on Boone, visit mummydeals.org.

***     Children ages six through eight can join Green Team Time with Miss Emilyat the library. The class features nature themed stories and activities for children. Registration is required and the Green Team will meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.13. ***     The holidays are nearing and the library, is getting into the spirit of the season. Chef Kate Bradley demonstrates how to make holiday appetizers such as artichoke bread, crab salad tea sandwiches, stuffed dates wrapped in bacon, white chocolate brie cups, and Worth     Worth Park District is offering white wine cheese balls. Samples three instructional sports classes will be provided to participants. for children four to six years of Registration is required and limage and include Little Kickers ited to 60. Classes will be held Soccer on Saturdays, Little Hoop- at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19 and stars Basketball on Mondays and Tuesday, Nov. 26. *** Parent/Tot Sports Extravaganza on Wednesdays. All classes begin     Those interested in Internet the week of Saturday, Nov. 2, and take place at the Terrace Centre, 11500 S. Beloit Ave., Worth. Registration for each of the classes is $29, $45 or non-residents, for six weeks. Registration deadlines are Friday, Monday and Wednesday respectively. Each class focuses on fundamentals and good sportsmanship.     This month, Worth Park District Senior Lunch Bunch is traveling to Pappadeux in Westmont (Continued on page 12)

monthly legal clinic presented by the Center for Disability and Elder Law (CDEL).     Low-income senior citizens may receive free assistance with a variety of legal matters including powers of attorney, wills, landlord/tenant issues, collections and consumer fraud.     Appointments are necessary and may be made by contacting CDEL at 312-376-1880, Ext. 22.

Double Nickel

    The Double Nickel Plus Chorus meets at the Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen Park, every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers are welcome. For more information call 422-8776.

Meals on Wheels

    The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services offers a Meals on Wheels program for village residents 60 years and older who are unable to pre-

pare their own meals. Meals are delivered Monday through Friday. For more information call 422-8776.

55 and Up

    Palos Hills residents 55 years and older meet from noon to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. Tickets for events must be purchased one week in advance. Entertainment includes musicians, singers, luncheons, movies, plays and bingo.

Pinochle

    The Worth Senior Pinochle club is seeking new members. Membership is free. Visit the group at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., every Monday and Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games begin at noon. Call 448-1181 for information.

Library Notes Basics will learn how to operate various search engines, and social media sites and bookmark their favorites. The class, for residents only, is limited to four and registration is required. It will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20. Registration is required and limited to four per class. Laptops will be provided. ***     The library is promoting family time with Family Bingo and Family Movie Time. Bingo will be played starting at 6 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 21. Registration is required and limited to 40. Prizes will be awarded to winners and trivia games will be played between rounds. During Family Movie Time, “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days” will be shown at 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22. Each person receives popcorn and lemonade. Registration is required. ***     Holiday Portraits will be snapped during 20-minute time increments from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24 on a first-come, first-served basis. The sittings will be held in the library reading room and a professional digital image for holiday cards will be given out. If a pet completes the photo, they will be allowed in between 9 a.m. and noon. There is a non-refundable $20 sitting fee due at registration, which may be paid via cash or check. Those getting a holiday portrait are asked to bring a 1gigabyte (minimum) flash drive. Proceeds from the event will benefit Friends of the Green Hills Library. ***     Teens can learn how to make candy sushi using different types of gummy candies and other sweet treats. Registration is required and limited to 25 teens. The candy making class will be held at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25. ***     The Green Hills Public Library District will be extending Friday hours to 9 p.m. starting Dec. 6. The library will host special events on select Friday evenings. ***     The Friends of the Green Hills Public Library will be hosting a fundraiser all of November. Stop in and pick up a Fannie May candy bar for just $1. There are a variety of flavors and no limit. Purchases can be made in the Friends Bookstore on the ground level or at the Circulation Desk on the 2nd floor. ***

    Learn basic computer skills including where to start, how to find programs and documents, and customizing your desktop from 5 to 8 p.m. Nov. 4. Registration is limited to four per class.

Laptops will be provided. ***     The library and offers astronomy bingo. It is a chance to play bingo to learn about stars, moons, planets, galaxies, and more. It takes place at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 6. All ages are welcome. ***     Share laughs and sing along to some of the greatest songs of the World War II era. Join Judy Garland, the Andrews Sisters, Abbott and Costello, and many stars entertaining the troops in this dazzling collection of showstopping scenes. Monents from “Buck Privates,” “Follow the Fleet”, “Anchors Aweigh,” and “For Me and My Gal.” The event is at 2 p.m. Nov. 7.

Oak Lawn

    The Oak Lawn Library is at 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The phone number is 422-4990. ***     The library will be hosting several events during the month of November. For more information, call 708-422-4990, or visit www. lib.oak-lawn.il.us. ***     Toddlers and preschoolers will hear a story, sing a song, make a process-oriented art project and dance Wednesdays, Nov. 6, 13 and 20. Toddler classes, for children ages two to three, will be held from 9:30 to 10 a.m. An adult must accompany a toddler at all times. Preschool (ages 3-5) classes, for children ages three to five, will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. and the child’s adult must remain in the library. Aprons are provided. Registration begins 10 days before each session. ***     Children ages three to eight are invited to bring their dads to the library from 11 to 11:45 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 9 for doughnuts, stories and craft time. Registration begins next Thursday. ***     The Oak Lawn Community Partnership will hold free health screenings from 10 to 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13. Performing blood pressure screenings are personnel from the Oak Lawn Fire Department. In addition, hearing tests will be available, but there is a limit of 15 people. The Oak Lawn Community Partnership is a cooperative alliance between the Village of Oak Lawn, Advocate Christ Medical Center, service organizations, educators, interested community members and business leaders. ***     Teens can play Kinect, Wii, DDR or board games will from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13. Participants are invited to test out the new PlayStation 4. Snacks and drinks will be provided. ***     Dr. Stan Pediziwiatr, RPH, CDE of Advocate Christ Medical Center will discuss various diabetes medications and what diabetics need to know at 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14. Blood pressure, oxygen and body mass index screenings will also be available. ***     Evil Baby Orphanage, Magic (Continued on page 12)


Thursday, October 24, 2013 The Reporter

consumer

11

Should you take a pension buyout?     Have you recently received a pension buyout offer? If so, you need to decide if you should take the buyout, which could provide you with a potentially large lump sum, or continue accepting your regular pension payments for the rest of your life. It’s a big decision.     Clearly, there’s no “one size fits all” answer — your choice needs to be based on your individual circumstances. So, as you weigh your options, you’ll need to consider a variety of key issues, including the following:     • Estate considerations — Your pension payments generally end when you and/or your spouse dies, which means your children will get none of the money. But if you were to roll the lump sum into an Individual Retirement Account (IRA), and you don’t exhaust it in your lifetime, you could still have something to leave to your family members.     • Taxes — If you take the lump sum and roll the funds into your IRA, you control how much you’ll be taxed and when, based on the amounts you choose to withdraw and the date

you begin taking withdrawals. (Keep in mind, though, that you must start taking a designated minimum amount of withdrawals from a traditional IRA when you reach age 70½. Withdrawals taken before age 59½ are subject to taxes and penalties.) But if you take a pension, you may have less control over your income taxes, which will be based on your monthly payments.     • Inflation — You could easily spend two or three decades in retirement — and during that time, inflation can really add up. To cite just one example, the average cost of a new car was $7,983 in 1982; 30 years later, that figure is $30,748, ac-

cording to TrueCar.com. If your pension checks aren’t indexed for inflation, they will lose purchasing power over time. If you rolled over your lump sum into an IRA, however, you could put the money into investments offering growth potential, keeping in mind, of course, that there are no guarantees.     • Cash flow — If you’re already receiving a monthly pension, and you’re spending every dollar you receive just to meet your living expenses, you may be better off by keeping your pension payments intact. If you took the lump sum and converted it into an IRA, you can withdraw whatever amount you want (as long as you meet the required minimum distributions), but you’ll have to avoid withdrawing so much that you’ll eventually run out of money.     • Confidence in future pension payments — From time to time, companies are forced to reduce their pension obligations due to unforeseen circumstances. You may want to take this into account as you decide whether to continue taking your

Beware of scams exploiting Affordable Care Act signup     Potentially, 50 million people could sign-up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.     That’s 50 million people who could potentially be scammed. With so little actually being understood about ACA “Obamacare” and the problems brought on by massive computer glitches during sign-up it’s become a perfect storm for scammers.     The Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois says there are a number of scams that consumers must watch out for. Leading the list are these:     • Fees For Service — Scammers pose as Affordable Care Act Advisors who will help you get enrolled through one of the exchanges. The scam: There are trained and

certified ACA Advisors, however, they are not allowed to accept money for their services.     • Medicare Coverage — Senior Citizens are being told they will need new Medicare Cards because of the ACA. The scam: They provide Social Security numbers and financial information for new cards that are not required.     • Medical Discount Plans — Scammers call offering medical discount plans that provide needed coverage and avoids penalties for lack of coverage. The scam: Medical discount plans are not insurance they are programs offered by specific clinics, doctors, and pharmacies. They are also a window to identity theft.     • Government Imposters — Individuals call acting as “govern-

ment officials” who offer assistance in enrollment or provide answers to questions about your insurance plan. To do this they will need your personal information. The scam: No government official will call, email, or text you about your insurance options.     “To avoid being scammed is simple” says Steve J. Bernas, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “Don’t engage in conversations over the phone, don’t give out personal information, and don’t provide any payment information unless you have checked out the business offering you services.”     For more tips and information about scams, visit bbb.org. — The Better Business Bureau

Talkin Poker

By Mark Newhouse

The WSOP hand that shocked me     By the time you get down to the final two tables at the 2013 World Series of Poker, you figure you’ve seen everything. Turns out you haven’t.     I played a hand against Anton Morgenstern, and when the cards were flipped over, I was shocked.     Morgenstern raised, and I called with 2h 2d. I was looking to flop a set: It was as simple as that. When he raised preflop, it was hard to put him on anything, but I was hoping he had an ace.     Everyone folded to his raise, and I got lucky on the flop when it came Ah As 2s. Morgenstern then made a continuation bet with a standard raise, and I decided to just call. I thought that if he didn’t have an ace, he might fold if I raised him right away. If he did have an ace and I raised, he would have just called. I was slow-playing my hand to try to win a bigger pot. My smooth-call was the right play in that situation.     The turn was the 3h. Morgen­ stern bet 750,000. With a bet of that size, it still didn’t mean he had anything. I thought that he could have just been trying

to apply pressure, but that he could also have an ace. I decided to raise to 2 million, and I was a bit surprised when he raised me to 3.9 million.     I paused for a moment and considered the possibility that my hand was no good. He realistically could have had A3. My raise on the turn was a very strong one. When he raised me again, it suggested that he had at minimum A-K or pocket 3s. I thought there was a chance that I was behind, but my hand was too strong for me to let go of it.     If he had me beat, then he had me beat. I decided to move all in. Morgenstern called and turned over Ac Jc. The river card was a harmless 4c, and I managed to take the chip lead in the tournament by scooping the pot.     I was very surprised to see what he was holding. I felt that he overplayed his hand. The reraise on the turn was, in my opinion, an awful play on his part. He should have just called me down. When he three-bet the turn, I could have been bluffing, or, more realistically, could have had him beat.     When I four-bet him on the turn, it was almost impossible

for me to be bluffing, I didn’t have enough chips for fold equity. He was basically drawing dead, based on my chip count and my previous play.     This was a spot where it seemed as if an otherwise great player sort of lost his thinking process in a hand and blew up. I don’t know what was going through his mind. It was close to impossible for him to have the best hand. However, it might be worth noting that I had just played several big pots against him, and he may have been tilting a bit.     The takeaway lesson is that you can never let previous hands affect your emotions. Always be conscious of what is going on in a hand and don’t get too carried away. Sometimes you just have to forget about the chips you’ve invested in a pot and let go of a hand.     (Mark Newhouse is a professional poker player living in Los Angeles and playing poker at the Commerce Casino. He is part of the 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event “November Nine” and will be playing for $8.5 million at the final table next month.)

SUDOKU Solution

Mortgage Rates Around the Area RATES 4.250 3.250 3.000

APR 4.224 3.319 3.049

POINTS 0 0 0

RATES 4.375 4.125 3.375

APR 4.413 4.177 3.440

POINTS .25 .25 .25

Prospect Federal (as of Oct. 18) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

Profits & Sense

Photo by Tim Hadac

Zounds franchisee Karen Liddell (with scissors), surrounded by family, friends, staff and local officials and business leaders, applauds after cutting the ceremonial grand opening ribbon at her new store in Palos Heights.

Zounds: Hearing aids ‘that can change lives’ Opens in Heights, its first in IL

    Marquette Bank, invites customers and neighbors to participate in its 7th annual Adopt-a-Soldier program, which sends care packages to U.S. soldiers serving overseas. Through Nov. 2, employees, customers and neighbors have the opportunity to donate items and to nominate Chicago area soldiers to receive the care packages.     You can fill out a form at any Marquette Bank location to nominate a soldier to receive a care package. Collection bins are also available and requested donation items are listed below by category. Food/Beverage     • Bumble Bee tuna kits; canned fruit (single serving); cereal/granola/power bars; hot chocolate packets; microwavable mac & cheese and popcorn; Mi0 or Crystal Light drink mix; nuts (small bags); oatmeal (individual packets); Slim Jim beef jerky; snacks (individually wrapped); and soup (single serving). Drugstore     • Anti-itch/antibiotic creams; disposable razors; nasal spray; eye drops; and Tums/Rolaids. Miscellaneous     •Batteries (AA or AAA); Christmas cards/letters; crossword puzzle books; iTunes gift cards; mechanical pencils; new DVDs or CDs; playing cards; and socks.     In the past, local classrooms along with Girl and Boy Scout troops have made cards and wrote letters of gratitude to soldiers. The Adopt-aSoldier program is part of the Marquette Neighborhood Commitment, where each quarter the bank focuses on a different area of need — shelter, hunger, education and health/wellness. For more information about Marquette Bank and the Adopt-aSoldier program, call 1-888-254-9500 or visit www.emarquettebank.com.

By Tim Hadac Staff reporter     A hearing aid company promising revolutionary new technology that can change people’s lives has opened shop in Palos Heights — its first unit in Illinois.     “We are the new kid on the block, and we hope to be here for a long time,” said Karen Liddell, franchisee of Zounds, at 7202B W. 119th St., in the Tiffany Square shopping center, Route 83 and Harlem.     Based in Phoenix, Ariz., Zounds designs, manufactures and sells hearing aids for people with mild to profound hearing impairments.     The company was founded by electrical engineer Sam Thomasson, whose daughter, Kate, lost much of her hearing due to an illness when she was a toddler and later struggled — as many do — with the limitations of conventional hearing aids. Thomasson and his team of engineers searched for solutions, amassing more than 50 patents and fitting Kate with her first Zounds prototype at age 16.     The “breakthrough” technology, according to Thomasson, changed his daughter’s life. Today, according to a company brochure, she is a college student studying electrical engineering.     That life-changing technology is a key to the success of Zounds, Liddell noted.     “I fell in love with the ‘Sam and Kate’ story,” she said. “It’s a story of father’s love for his daughter. How great is that? I want to be in a position to make that kind of a difference in people’s lives, and I believe I am.”     Liddell, an accountant, said she became a Zounds franchisee because she “was facing a layoff in my industry, and I’m too young to retire.”

    She decided to go into business for herself and started shopping for a franchise opportunity with several companies, “but I wanted to go into business with people you can trust and make a connection with. That’s why I chose Zounds.”     She said that Zounds offers several clear advantages over others.     “First, we are the leader in technology,” she added. “Second, we are buying hearing aids directly from the manufacturer, so we’re the price leader — offering hearing aids at $999 each when others’ cost several times more. Third, we offer same-day fittings. So people come in here with hearing loss, and within two hours they’re going to leave hearing better, and that can change their lives. That’s what sets us apart from our competitors.”     Zounds also offers free hearing exams, remote-control programming, and rechargeable batteries and charging station.     A native of Chicago’s South Side and current resident of Homewood, Liddell is quick to credit and praise her staff — Jeff Clark, a state-licensed hearing instrument specialist, and Rachel Nelson, customer service representative. “I am blessed to have a real A-Team here, and I am certain our clients will agree.”     Clark, with nearly a decade’s experience in the field, said he has found a real home at Zounds.     “Most places are about selling hearing aids,” he said. “I wanted to work at a place where we’re about caring for people. [At Zounds] I don’t have to worry about selling a hearing aid, because our prices are lower than everyone else’s. I can focus on what’s important, which is making it work for that customer. We take that very seriously here.”

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monthly pension payments, but it’s an issue over which you have no control. On the other hand, once your lump sum is in an IRA, you have control over both the quality and diversification of your investment dollars. However, the trade-off is that investing is subject to various risks, including loss of principal.     Before selecting either the lump sum or the monthly pension payments, weigh all the factors carefully to make sure your decision fits into your overall financial strategy. With a choice of this importance, you will probably want to consult with your financial and tax advisors. Ultimately, you may find that this type of offer presents you with a great opportunity — so take the time to consider your options.

Photo by Andrew Eccles

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12

The Reporter

The

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Lemon balm can keep you calm Back Page     Quite some time ago, I wrote about an herb known as lemon balm.     Lemon balm has been known throughout history as having calmative and relaxing powers and as having anti-viral qualities. I felt it might be helpful to revisit and update regarding the usefulness of lemon balm as we enter that time of year, when stress seems to multiply and magnify.     In speaking of lemon balm, it is “good against the biting of venomous beasts, comforts the heart, and driveth away all melancholy and sadness,� wrote Elizabethan-era herbalist John Gerard in 1597.     Even more recently, psychiatrist, Henry Emmons wrote an amazing book: “The Chemistry of Calm.� In the book, he covers many simple changes and additions to both diet and

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT?     Once again, it’s hard to fool the WHATIZIT wunderkinds as we had a handful of people correctly guess the top of an upright that you see in the end zone at football games.     The red thing-a-ma-bobber on top of it is a wind indicator flag.     We had five correct guesses by people from five different towns.     Those football heroes who guessed right were Worth’s Robert Solner, Oak Lawn’s Maline Zolna, Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald, Evergreen Park’s Jen Merchantz, Hickory Hills’ Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis.     Wrong guesses were football slalom poles and a soccer corner kick stick.     This week’s photo is not sports related. The clue is that this thing can cause a buzz.     Send those guesses to thereporter@comcast.net with Whatizit? on the subject line by Monday night. Provide your name and home town as well.

Park Clips (Continued from page 10) Wednesday, Nov. 20, and Aodake in Romeoville Wednesday, Dec. 18. Registration is required one week prior to each trip and will cost $8 for residents and $12 for non-residents. Trip-goers leave at 10:30 a.m. and return by 2 p.m. from the Terrace Centre 11500 S. Beloit Ave., Worth. For more information, call 708-448-7080 or visit the Terrace Centre. ***     Pickle Ball will be at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., from 6 to 8 p.m. every Tuesday. Pickle Ball is a cross between tennis and ping-pong and involves strategies

such as lobbing, drive shots and overhead slams. Cost is $1. ***     Open gym basketball is offered at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $1. ***     The Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., has an indoor playground featuring slides, a climbing wall, tree house and more for children who can walk through 4 years old. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for non-residents. For more information call 448-7080 or visit worthparkdistrict.org.

Library Notes (Continued from page 10) the Gathering, Apples to Apples and Monopoly challenges will be part of International Games Day which will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 in the Young Adult area. ***     A free concert featuring Eddie Korosa, Jr. and the Boys from Illinois will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17. The band, which has been together since 1976, plays polkas and favorite standards, including Big Band waltzes, swing, rock and roll, and country from the 1920’s to 70’s. No advance registration required. Sponsoring the event are the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library. ***     The library will host “Baby Time!� from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. next Thursday. Stories, music and free-play are available for ages 6 months to 23 months with an adult. Registration is not required. This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. For more information about this and other youth programs at the Library, call 708-422-4990 or visit www.oaklawnlibrary.org. ***     Due to changes with the Village of Oak Lawn’s battery recycling program, the library will now only

accept rechargeable batteries. Alkaline batteries do not need to be recycled anymore, since they no longer contain mercury. Rechargeable batteries should be dropped off at the first floor reception booth.

supplementation in helping to maintain or attain emotional balance. Emmons covered lemon balm as having calmative

Mixing it up for good health By Dee Woods

powers. As I sought additional information, I found the herb is being studied as having neuroprotective powers as well as providing its calming effects.     Lemon balm has been used in studies in the United Kingdom as aromatherapy (rather than as a tea), in helping to resolve agitation among patients with dementia and Alzheimer’s dis-

ease. Amazingly, we associate certain fragrances and aromas with Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner. The smell of turkey and dressing, tends to elicit warm and comfortable memories, and the fragrance of lavender tends to relax, so it’s pretty obvious that such aromatherapy itself can be, at least to some degree, calming.     I also learned that initially in Europe, and now in the United States, lemon balm has been used for stomach upsets and spasms when made into a tea from the leaves of the lemon balm plant. It has also been suggested for use as a tea for the common stomach flu because of its anti-viral properties that work along with anti-spasmodic properties.     Lemon balm is considered to be a mood enhancer as well as working to relieve everyday

Dee Woods is available to give presentations about alternative health treatments and healthy living. She can be reached at deewoods@comcast.net.

Best of The Wine Guy

Good food and drink: A gift of life     If you’re interested in bettering your health and your life, an excellent way to start is by adjusting your diet to include only whole, natural foods.

berries, a peeled and seeded apple and whatever else you wish. Add 2 or 3 tablespoons of parsley — flat or curly — and some water or your favorite 100percent fruit juice. Liquefy this and drink it and you will almost immediately start feeling the invigorating effects of all those nutrients. The puree is easy to digest and will be processed almost immediately by the body, sending the goodness throughout your body within minutes. Experiment to find your favorite recipe.     For lunch have something a little heavier, perhaps a few thin slices of turkey with tomatoes, lettuce, sprouts and avocado on whole wheat bread. Add to this a bowl of hot soup made with carrots, celery, onions, garlic, brown rice and diced tomatoes. What wonderful flavors for the palate, and what an infusion of nutrients as you continue your day.     You should at some point also have a cup or two of green tea, which contains numerous antioxidant properties. In layman’s terms this means it protects your cells from particles known as free radicals that can damage and destroy them. When cells are destroyed it ages you inside and out; so, in short, green tea keeps you looking and feeling young.

    It doesn’t matter how old you are, these foods from nature provide the vitamins and minerals necessary to sustain life at its highest and healthiest level. We have been conned into believing that when we get to be a certain age we need prescription drugs to treat our various conditions. We take pharmaceuticals for high cholesterol, high blood pressure, arthritis and a myriad of other ailments, when in fact revolutionizing your diet can go a long way toward treating and perhaps even curing these conditions. At the very least, you will improve your health and feel better. There is not a pill on the market that can provide the same benefits as whole foods.     Whole foods are designed to provide us sustenance, and have evolved to feed, purify and maintain our health on atomic levels. Nothing man has made can do this, and the remedies man has developed to help us mask illness and pain have side effects that render negligible any benefits they do have. Fruits, herbs and vegetables have no side effects, only benefits, when consumed in the proper amounts. They are the medicine our creator     Dinner should be lighter than has provided us. lunch, contrary to the popular     For starters, and by that I belief that dinner should be the mean breakfast, put in your most filling meal of the day. Eat blender a banana, a few straw- a reasonable portion of whole

The Wine Guy

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cress and Romaine salad with lemon and olive oil dressing.     Oh, and don’t forget the wine. Have one before dinner to help aid digestion, then one after to help relax you as you wind down for the day. This great food and drink will help you sleep soundly so that the body can regenerate and be ready to live another day.

Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an 86-year-old Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the wheat pasta with a sauce made opinions of Mr. Scarano based on with tomatoes, onions, garlic, years of independent study and green peppers and herbs such as personal experience, and may thyme, rosemary and oregano. not be beneficial to health. Wine On the side have about a cup should be consumed in moderaof broccoli and perhaps a small tion, as overindulgence may be bowl of spinach, endive, water- harmful to health.

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stress, especially when used along with another calming and neuroprotective amino acid, ltheanine.     While lemon balms is said to be slightly useful in helping with overactive thyroid, there have been reports that it may interfere with thyroxine for underactive thyroid. Those taking such medications may want to avoid lemon balm, but otherwise, it appears to be helpful for those with mild anxiety and stress as well as digestive distress and stomach spasms.     As always, it’s best to check with your physician before taking any substance or medicinal herbs.

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor

outhwest

sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

The big payback

Mustangs turn tables on Astros in huge win By Ken Karrson     The late James Brown only sang about it, but Shepard was forced to live through it Friday night.     The big payback — it’s what Evergreen Park gave to the Astros, who had won five consecutive games against the Mustangs. That list of victories included a crushing one in 2012, when Shepard established a school standard for single-game points behind the exploits of former all-area receiver Londell Lee.     Lee may be gone from the prep scene, but still very much in evidence was the bad feelings that had enveloped Evergreen players and coaches after last fall’s ravaging. And not even the winless ledger the Astros carried with them into the South Suburban Conference Red rematch was going to lessen the desire to retaliate in kind. Photo by Jeff Vorva     “We went over there last year Sandburg’s Marty Micek slams into Stagg’s Jack Duffner and halts his progress on a play Friday and got embarrassed,” Mustangs night in Orland Park. The Eagles won a defensive struggle, 14-0, and became playoff eligible for coach Dan Hartman said. “They the fifth straight year. played their stud the whole game and broke all kinds of conference records. We also told our players, ‘You’re playing an 0-7 team, and you can make their season by not being focused and letting them pull off an upset.’”     Whether the additional encouragement was necessary or for the fifth straight year. They ish drives. Those things come back not is debatable; what isn’t is By Ken Karrson can guarantee themselves a berth to bite you.”     Friday night’s SouthWest Sub- in the Class 8A tournament by     Indeed, Stagg made a number urban Conference Blue showdown knocking off SWSC Blue leader of forays inside the Eagles’ 40, between Sandburg and Stagg Bolingbrook this Friday. including a couple times in the was all about substance instead     The Chargers, meanwhile, need fourth quarter. Both of those posto beat Homewood-Flossmoor in sessions ended on interceptions, of style.     In an era when lots of scor- Week 9 simply to warrant postsea- however, as Lavelle Johnson and ing is deemed necessary to make son consideration. Nevertheless, Adam Nash each picked off an football appealing to the casual it’s a much more favorable posi- Adam Pilota aerial, the former fan, the Eagles and Chargers har- tion than Stagg (4-4, 2-4) found doing so at his own 4-yard line. By Ken Karrson kened back to an earlier time, itself in a season ago, when it had     Making the turnovers especially when defenses ruled the gridiron. already been eliminated from the critical was that Sandburg (5-3,     This time, there was no 4-2) was nursing a 7-0 lead at doubt. Aesthetically, there was nothing playoff hunt. particularly attractive about the     But neither that realization, nor those junctures.     When Richards and Oak Lawn contest, but that mattered little to the fact his club finally gave Sand-     “I expected our guys to play well met last fall, a projected mismatch Sandburg players and coaches. burg a battle after years of beat- [and] it was a one-possession game never occurred. Despite the fact     The result that style of play pro- downs could completely placate the whole game,” Fahey said. the teams were traveling in dif    The Eagles struck on their ini- ferent directions from a win-loss duced looked beautiful to them. Chargers coach Mike Fahey.     By virtue of a hard-fought 14-0     “We played good enough football tial series of the evening after standpoint, the Spartans rendered decision over Stagg at Seliga Field, to win the game,” the first-year Dennis Bresingham returned a the discrepancies moot by going (Continued on page 5) the Eagles became playoff eligible leader said. “We just couldn’t fintoe-to-toe with their more her-

Substance over style

Eagles outlast Chargers in SWSC Blue dogfight

that Evergreen exacted its revenge on Shepard by doling out a 61-16 whipping and, in the process, guaranteed itself at least a share of the divisional title. The Mustangs can win an outright SSC Red crown and complete an undefeated regular season by beating Reavis Friday night in Burbank.     “It’s a tough road game and Reavis needs to win to make the playoffs, so we’re looking at it as basically a dry run at a playoff game,” Hartman said.     Left hung out to dry in Week 8 was the Astros (0-8, 0-5), who were victimized by a pair of Keyshawn Carpenter touchdown runs right away. Carpenter’s 16-yard dash that handed Evergreen (8-0, 50) a 14-0 advantage followed the block of a Shepard punt.     By the time intermission arrived, the Mustangs had amassed 300 total yards and erupted for 54 points. Carpenter collected a third TD, Jacquet McClendon and reserve tailback Xavier Reyes both scored twice, and Eric Gurrister and Ilias Sullivan each grabbed one touchdown pass before the contest mercifully concluded.     “It kind of got out of hand rather quickly,” Hartman said. “I didn’t expect it to happen like that, but I think it was huge [for us].     “For the first time, the kids

were able to put it all together for an extended period [of time]. It took long enough [to happen], but it helps out for them to see it all come together finally.”     Interestingly, this was the first instance where Evergreen could downshift into cruise control. Despite their unblemished record, the Mustangs had not bagged a win by more than 11 points, and four of their first six on-field victories had been secured by three points or less.     “Nothing has come easily and they know how quickly a game can turn,” Hartman said of his athletes. “They know we’ve got room for improvement.”     Not on this night, however. Shepard did manage to avoid a shutout, as Kyle Dye and Shane Javorski both reached the Evergreen end zone in the second half, but that was of small consolation to coach Dominic Passolano.     “I don’t have any sour grapes about it,” he said, referring to the Mustangs’ large margin of success. “What are you going to tell them — to quit playing? But [our] kids were put in a tough situation.     “Since I’ve been head coach at Shepard, we’ve hung it on [Evergreen] pretty good, but I think they’re one of the most physical teams we’ve played. It was an (Continued on page 5)

Neighborhood menace Bulldogs continue surge by blasting Spartans alded cross-town neighbor.     The Bulldogs did win, but by just 11 points and only after surviving a scoreless second half. So when Oak Lawn arrived at Korhonen Field for another encounter Friday night, Richards coach Tony Sheehan didn’t want his guys assuming circumstances would be any different.     But they definitely were. The Bulldogs saw to that by tally-

ing five times in the opening half while holding the Spartans without a first down, and then completing a rout by crossing the goal line twice more after intermission.     Richards’ resounding 45-0 South Suburban Conference Red victory was the latest in a growing list of dominant performances as it steams toward the Class 6A (Continued on page 3)

In the Nic of time

Weishar’s heroics catapult RedHawks over Benet By Ken Karrson     Nic Weishar was not a complete stranger to playing defense for Marist prior to Friday night.     Benet Academy no doubt wished he had been.     Weishar, the Notre Dame University recruit who is best known for his pass-catching exploits, put those hands to a different use against the Redwings. While he still did his fair share on behalf of the RedHawks’ offense, Weishar made himself quite a familiar face to Benet’s too.     He specifically did so by stealing two of Redwings quarterback Jack Beneventi’s first-period passes. One of those Weishar took down to Benet’s 1-yard line, which set up a touchdown plunge by JaWill Aldridge, while the other he ran back 15 yards into the visitors’ end zone.     The latter score gave Marist a

21-7 lead less than 10 minutes into the East Suburban Catholic Conference contest, and the home team never wavered after that. With Weishar serving as its spiritual leader, the RedHawks’ defense forced seven turnovers in all — six of them before halftime — and used those as the underpinnings to a surprisingly lopsided 49-21 triumph in Mount Greenwood.     The outcome made Marist (5-3, 4-2) playoff eligible for the sixth consecutive year and kept it in the hunt for the ESCC crown. Benet (6-2, 3-2), meanwhile, relinquished its share of the conference lead.     “That’s what we needed,” RedHawks coach Pat Dunne said. “We’ve got to keep this momentum going.     “The defense played tremendously, and so did our special teams. A lot of those [turnovers]

were created [by us] and gave us unbelievable field position.”     While its record indicates Marist has certainly enjoyed a number of positive moments this fall, it had yet to register what could be construed as a signature win. Taking down the defending ESCC champs in the manner they did gave the RedHawks that sort of victory, but adding to the eye-opening nature of it was that they were coming off a loss to Notre Dame.     “Guys can go one way or the other when that happens,” Dunne said, referring to the Week 7 setback. “I’m glad we chose to go this way.     “Every team has their bumps during the course of a season, but [these guys] keep believing. Our leaders stood up, they really challenged themselves, and I’m Photo by Jeff Vorva proud of the team effort.” Richards quarterback Hasan Muhammad-Rogers stays clear of Oak Lawn defender Joe Dodaro     One of those individuals step- while trying to complete a play Friday night. The Bulldogs blasted the Spartans 45-0 in the South Suburban Conference Red game, Richards’ third shutout in a row. (Continued on page 6

FOOTBALL FORECAST    Do you smell that? That’s the smell of desperation. Reader Wally

  Findyz, who either led or was tied for the lead in the first seven   weeks, is down to Sports Editor Ken Karrson by one game heading   into the final regular season week. So Wally admitted he was picking   William Penn over St. Xavier with the slimmest of hopes of catching   Double K. In case of a tie, the tiebreaker will be the point differential   between Richards and Eisenhower this week. By virtue of picking the   same 11 teams as Karrson this week Jason Maholy joins fellow   chumps Jeff Vorva and Anthony Nasella in Jabroni-ville. Next week   we will literally crown the regular season champion and will pick   playoff games of area teams as well as teams that play in area   conferences who are still alive.

Last week: Overall: Richards at Eisenhower Evergreen at Reavis Argo at Shepard Brother Rice at Providence Marist at Moline Sandburg at Bolingbrook Oak Lawn at Bremen Immaculate Conception at Chicago Christian Homewood-Flossmoor at Stagg St. Laurence at Fenwick William Penn at St. Xavier

Ken Karrson 8-0 62-14 Richards by 21 Evergreen Park Argo Providence Marist Bolingbrook Bremen IC H-F Fenwick St. Xavier

Jeff Vorva 7-1 58-18 Richards by 10 Evergreen Park Argo Providence Marist Bolingbrook Bremen IC H-F Fenwick St. Xavier

Anthony Nasella 7-1 53-23 Richards by 17 Evergreen Park Argo Providence Marist Bolingbrook Bremen IC H-F Fenwick St. Xavier

Jason Maholy 7-1 61-15 Richards by 33 Evergreen Paek Argo Providence Marist Bolingbrook Bremen IC H-F Fenwick St. Xavier

Wally Findysz 7-4 61-15 Richards by 20 Evergreen Park Argo Providence Marist Bolingbrook Bremen IC H-F Fenwick William Penn


2

Section 2 Thursday, October 24, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Don’t take me back out to this ballgame Bartosh     This could only happen with the Chicago Cubs.     Most professional sports franchises routinely acknowledge anniversaries of notable accomplishments. It may be the winning of a World Series or Super Bowl, or the eclipsing of a thought-to-be-unbreakable individual record, but all of those feats have something in common.     They identify greatness. No one celebrates non-achievement, and downright forgettable moments are treated in an appropriate manner: They’re forgotten.     Ah, but not in Wrigley Land. That’s the price to be paid for a century-plus of on-field ineptitude.     Cubs fans, unless they’re 110 years old, have no recollection of monumental exploits. How could they, unless they’re delusional or prone to fabricating events to make themselves feel better about their favorite major-league baseball team?     (And, by the way, please don’t argue on behalf of Sammy Sosa’s homer barrage in the late 1990s as a noteworthy happening. Strong suspicions that Sosa’s power displays were artificially aided render the long balls meaningless.)     Here’s the best way to illustrate the Cubs’ never-ending mediocrity — their ill-fated 1969 team that spent much of that summer in first place before squandering a large lead in the final six weeks, to this day, receives more recognition than a slew of other MLB squads that have won titles since then.     Inexplicable? On the surface absolutely, especially since other teams that collapsed in a similar manner as the ’69 Cubs routinely faded into oblivion before the passage of very much time.     But we’re talking about a ballclub that wears the nickname “Lovable Losers” with nary a shred of embarrassment, so nothing should shock us. Embracing a near miss instead of being disgusted by it is oh-soCub-like.     Being second-best seems to be the best for which the Cubs can ever hope, and part of the reason for that is probably traceable to another abject failure. I refer to the 2003 National League Championship Series.     If ever a Cubs team seemed destined to end decades of frustration, it was the 2003 edition. Led by young fireball pitchers Mark Prior and Kerry Wood, those Cubs appeared to have all the necessary ingredients to

make a serious run at a world championship.     Of course, being the Cubs, you suspected that somehow, in some way, the whole thing would ultimately blow up in their faces. And sure enough it did in Game 6, when a disastrous eighth inning turned a 3-0 Cubs lead into an insurmountable 8-3 deficit.     The reasons for the shocking meltdown were plentiful, but one still stands out above all others in some people’s minds: Steve Bartman. Fairly or not — and I choose the latter — the beleaguered Bartman became the biggest scapegoat because of his supposed interference with an allegedly catchable foul ball.     To this day, he maintains a very low profile. Bartman disappeared from view right after the incident because some idiots issued death threats to him, and he has stayed hidden in an attempt to elude nosy media folks who’d want him to recall those infamous few moments if they ever succeeded in hunting him down.     Bartman, though, recently became news again anyway, as last week marked the 10th anniversary of the Cubs’ collapse against the Florida Marlins. So even those of us who reveled in what unfolded that night at Wrigley Field, but long ago packed it away as nothing more than a fond memory, must be subjected anew to the entire episode.     Various local media personalities made sure to remind us of the anniversary, and some of them still cling to the notion that Bartman was the main cause of the negative effect on the Cubs. Nothing, however, could be further from the truth.     And one reader of a recent Internet story about Bartman put everything into the most sensible perspective. He listed the chain of events in descending order of importance, and Bartman didn’t even make his top five.     First and foremost, this reader placed the biggest share of blame on then-Cubs shortstop Alex Gonzalez, a normally surehanded fielder who botched a routine double-play grounder. And, inarguably, the misplay flung open the floodgates on the Marlins’ series-turning rally, but physical errors happen.     Instead, the major culprit was left fielder Moises Alou, not because he didn’t catch the “Bartman ball” — and remember, there was no guarantee of that since Alou was not a defensive whiz and the catch would have been somewhat difficult

— but because of his over-thetop reaction when Bartman got to it first. Had Alou remained calm, there’s a very good chance Prior wouldn’t have unraveled on the mound, which was another contributor to the Cubs’ implosion.     Manager Dusty Baker’s donothing approach to the free-fall happening in front of his eyes wasn’t what the club needed at that juncture, either. Certainly, the situation called for cooler heads to prevail, but evidently Baker’s head was already on ice.     Oh, and lest we forget, there was still a Game 7 to play. None of what happened the evening before should have dogged the Cubs the next night, but it did, as Wood was unable to protect a 5-3 lead.     So in retrospect, there were myriad guilty parties who made the Cubs’ monumental fold possible. But this is not news to anyone who was around a decade ago.     In the same vein, Steve Bartman long ago ceased being a newsmaker. Heck, he shouldn’t have been one in 2003, but what else would we expect from a franchise and fans that have kept each other company in misery?     Bartman wasn’t unique, but merely a biologically advanced version of the billy goat and black cat. Funny, isn’t it, how Cubs players are never to blame for the team’s stumbles?     The one exception was Leon Durham, who caught heat for not catching a ball in Game 5 of the 1984 NLCS against San Diego. But even he didn’t fly solo in that instance — Chicagoans also made National League officials objects of disdain for giving the Cubs, who owned a better record than the Padres, only two home games instead of three because of Wrigley’s lack of lights at the time.     How dare a team be punished simply for not realizing electricity had already been invented?     You have to admit, though, that some of the excuses concocted over the years have indeed been novel ones. But while the goat and cat never cared what was said about them, Bartman did.     So everyone should cease referring to Game 6 as the “Bartman game.” It never was, but I guess only one thing will be able to ensure that stops happening.     Too bad we’ll have to wait till next year — and probably a lot longer.

Vikings OK in OT Win keeps St. Laurence alive for playoffs By Ken Karrson     Working overtime on Friday night didn’t fatten St. Laurence athletes’ wallets, but it paid off in another way.     The Vikings have something important for which to play in Week 9.     By virtue of its 28-27 Chicago Catholic League White victory over St. Ignatius in OT at Kavanagh Field, St. Laurence remained alive for a Class 7A playoff berth. The Vikings (4-4, 1-2) must defeat Fenwick Saturday afternoon at Morton West in order to become eligible for tournament consideration, but it’s a better position than they’ve found themselves in for a while.     St. Laurence will no doubt enter its encounter with the Friars as an underdog, but coach Harold Blackmon has no intention of playing up that aspect to his guys. In fact, he wants the Vikings to feel the pressure attendant to a must-win game.     “I’m not going to avoid it,” Blackmon said. “Even if I wanted to downplay it, it’s there, and there’s no need to make it anything different than what it is. I want them to embrace the situation, not shy away from it.     “Our backs are against the wall, so it’s time to turn up the heat on them. We told the players, ‘Call your parents and tell them practice is going to run a little later [this week] because we’re going to stay out there until we get it right.’ If we don’t do it now, there’s nothing else.”     Of course, in order for Week 9 to be meaningful, St. Laurence had to take care of business in Week 8, which it did. The Vikings didn’t have it easy against St.

Ignatius, however, as they let a 14-7 edge slip away and had to fight back from a deficit in the fourth quarter.     The Wolfpack had moved in front for the first time on Brendan McNally’s 4-yard touchdown run, which successfully capped an eight-play, 59-yard march. The visitors scored with only 47 seconds remaining in the third period.     St. Laurence pulled even five minutes into the final stanza on a 66-yard Bob Kelly-to-Pete Kopacz pass completion, then prevailed in overtime when senior tailback Frank Miller tallied on a 3-yard run and Eric Sadowski added the conversion kick.     St. Ignatius had its chance with the ball after that, and McNally crossed the goal line on a 10-yard dash. Opting to immediately try for the win, the Wolfpack called McNally’s number again on the two-point conversion, but he lost his grip on the ball and Joe Prudden recovered it for the Vikings to nail down the decision in their favor.     “It was just a gut-check time for our guys,” Blackmon said. “We hadn’t played good football for a while, but we have to learn how to win close games and games that we’re ‘supposed’ to win.”     Mission accomplished here, in large part because of Miller. Held under wraps by Mt. Carmel the week before, Miller supplied St. Laurence with 215 rushing yards and scored three times in all. In addition to his OT touchdown, he also reached the St. Ignatius end zone on runs of 1 and 87 yards in the first half.     “We’re still working at getting a fully functioning offense, but it was good to see Frankie have a good game,” Blackmon said.

    The Vikes also benefited from Kelly’s appearance on the field, something that initially had been in question following a hard hit suffered against Mt. Carmel. But what was feared to be a broken nose wound up simply being some broken blood vessels, so the senior quarterback was ready to go and completed half of his 14 passes for 135 yards to complement Miller’s ground-gaining input.     Something else Blackmon liked was St. Laurence’s ability to steer clear of turnovers.     “I really got on the team about our lack of attention to detail the last several weeks,” he said. “If you trust the system [we have], you’ll be fine. Don’t leave the field saying, ‘I should have listened [more] to Coach.’”     Although the Vikings’ defense bent to the tune of 372 total yards given up, it did have its moments of glory. Nothing was bigger than when St. Laurence held the Wolfpack out of the end zone after the latter began a fresh series of downs at the hosts’ 4.     The Vikings’ stops included two from the 1-yard line, with Chris Doherty and Mike Sterna joining forces to repel St. Ignatius on fourth down. Other key individuals for St. Laurence on that side of the ball throughout the evening were Sadowski (nine solo stops, four assists), Tom Lyons (four solos, seven assists), Tyler Snee (three solos, six assists) and Prudden (three solos, two assists).     Sadowski also delivered a critical play on special teams in the late going. After gathering in the ball following a bad punt snap, Sadowski dashed 16 yards to the Vikings’ 40 to keep a drive moving. (Continued on page 3)

Volleyball roundup

Lady Spartans lock up SSC Red title By Anthony Nasella     In a showdown last Tuesday night between the two best teams in the South Suburban Conference Red, Oak Lawn and Shepard engaged in a back-and-fourth battle that could be described by many different adjectives.     In the end, the Lady Spartans emerged victorious by a 25-20, 14-25, 29-27 count over the Lady Astros, thereby separating themselves from Shepard atop the division. Oak Lawn officially sealed the conference title two nights later with a win over Evergreen Park.     Becky Bradshaw (11 kills, nine digs), Simona Tomczak (eight kills, nine digs), Jamie Fionda (seven kills), Tara Hill (seven digs) and Bree Markusic (four kills) paced the Lady Spartans, who overcame four Lady Astros match points to prevail on Tuesday.     “I think Shepard is a team that you always have to prepare for,” Oak Lawn coach Dennis McNamara said. “I really felt like the girls were ready to go and had some idea about what they wanted to do.”     McNamara said he adjusted his starting lineup early in the match due to some girls who visited colleges on Monday. The results exceeded expectations.     “Instead, I went with some younger girls in the first couple of games [and] they did a very nice job,” McNamara said. “They went out and made plays. It was good to see.”     In the end, however, it was McNamara’s acknowledged leaders who rose to the occasion by taking the Lady Astros’ best shots and coming out successfully. The Lady Spartans fought back from a 21-17 deficit in the third game.     “My top players really stepped up,” McNamara said. “I shot Becky a text [message] after the match and told her that she really played an excellent match. She and Simona really carried the load on the outside, and they really went out and played well for us to get that win.”     Briana Haugh (16 kills), Abby Graham (nine kills, 14 digs), Kendall Yerkes (eight kills, 11 digs), Caroline Graham (34 assists) and Brianna Volpentesta (20 digs, 11 service points) were the key performers for Shepard. ***     The Lady Spartans racked up their second win of the week on Thursday and clinched the SSC Red championship in the process by defeating Evergreen 25-21, 2518.     Bradshaw recorded eight kills and six digs to steer visiting Oak

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn’s Bree Markusic (12) makes a diving save while teammates Tara Hill (left) and Simona Tomczak watch during the Spartans’ 25-20, 14-25, 29-27 win over Shepard last Tuesday. The match pitted two teams vying for the South Suburban Conference Red lead. Lawn (18-5, 11-1). Tomczak further aided the Lady Spartans’ cause with 10 digs, four kills and four aces.     The Lady Mustangs’ headliners were Maddie Vojacek, who totaled four kills and three blocks, and Nicole Larkin, who registered four blocks. SHEPARD     The Lady Astros rebounded from their loss to Oak Lawn to upend Argo 25-15, 23-25, 25-12 in another SSC Red clash. Yerkes led the way for Shepard (16-8, 9-3) with eight kills and three aces. EVERGREEN PARK     Like Shepard, the Lady Mustangs (10-17) fared better when their opponent didn’t hail from Oak Lawn.     Evergreen beat Rich South 1825, 25-19, 27-25 this past Monday behind big days from Emma Przeslicke (nine kills), Sarah Klawtitter (13 digs) and Larkin (four kills, four blocks). MOTHER MCAULEY     Capturing the championship of

Glenbard West’s Autmnfest Tournament culminated a perfect week for the Mighty Macs, who racked up a total of seven wins.     Mother McAuley (32-2) collected three of its victories on Saturday, as it stormed past Loyola Academy (25-17, 25-12), outlasted Waubonsie Valley (2518, 16-25, 25-13) and then rolled over the host school (25-10, 2513) in the tourney finale. A total of 24 schools participated in the two-day event.     Tournament MVP honors went to Western Illinois recruit Courtney Joyce, who had 23 assists, three kills and six digs for the Macs in the title match. Also pitching in to that triumph were Kayla Caffey (seven kills, one block), Ryann DeJarld (six kills, six digs, three aces) and Kelsey Clark (five kills, one block).     McAuley’s active week got underway with a 25-10, 25-11 Girls Catholic Athletic Conference win (Continued on page 4)

First makes it last Opening barrage carries Cougars past Waldorf By Ken Karrson     One quarter was enough to make an acceptable whole for St. Xavier University Saturday afternoon.     Using the term “period piece” to describe the Cougars’ performance against Waldorf College would certainly be appropriate, seeing as how their overall success pretty much resulted from their exploits during the Mid-States Football Association Midwest League game’s first 15 minutes. By the time the initial stanza at Bolstorff Field had elapsed, the host Warriors’ chances at an upset were collapsed, courtesy of a 27point SXU uprising.     The visitors’ 20-point edge stayed in place through intermission and gave them enough cushion to deal effectively with a so-so second half. Waldorf actually outscored the Cougars after halftime, but the latter still walked away from Forrest City, Iowa, in possession of a 37-21 triumph.     Not only did the win snap a rare two-game skid for SXU (43, 1-1), it also set the NAIA No. 17-ranked Cougars up for a slight bump in the next national poll. SXU coach Mike Feminis thought maybe his club caught a break from voters in the previous poll because of the Cougars’ 51-5 record — which includes a national championship in 2011 and a total of 10 postseason wins — over the past four years, but he wasn’t complaining.     Nor was he going to beef too loudly about SXU’s failure to more thoroughly dominate a struggling opponent.     “It wasn’t a Picasso,” Feminis joked of the Cougars’ game-long exhibition. “The first quarter was good, but we’re not going to win with style points this year. We’re not going to [regularly] put up 50 or 60 points, or be shutting everybody out.     “Mentally, I think the guys thought they were going to coast [after the first period] because Waldorf has been down for a long time. I think all that played into it, but [the Warriors] gave us their

best shot.”     Waldorf didn’t make a habit of constructing time-consuming scoring drives, but it did amass over 400 offensive yards, a total largely built on three big plays. All three of the Warriors’ touchdowns covered at least 65 yards, with Emmanuel Osuchukwu’s 75-yard sprint representing the longest one.     “If you’re going to be a good defense, you can’t let things like that happen,” Feminis said. “Two of the three were just the result of missed tackles. There’s a certain expectation level we have, and we’ve got to do things the right way.”     Osuchukwu’s gallop put Waldorf on the board in the opening period, but the TD was sandwiched between four SXU scores. Fifth-year senior quarterback Joe Gill threw for three of them, collaborating with Nick DeBenedetti on completions of 60 and 16 yards and with Austin Feeney on a 23yard hookup. Both of DeBenedetti’s six-pointers were set up by Warriors miscues.     DeBenedetti and Feeney evenly split eight receptions between them while gaining 150 combined yards, the former doing so before going to the sidelines with a case of turf toe. John Frederickson (seven catches, 66 yards), Ryan Carroll (seven for 46) and Stephen Simms (five for 52) were other favorite targets for Gill, who was 33-of-51 passing for 353 yards and, most importantly, did not toss an interception.     Feminis was effusive in his praise for his signal-caller, who had lost the starting job to John Rhode before getting it back when Rhode went down with an injury.     “I thought Joe did a real nice job of running the offense,” Feminis said. “He’s been a good soldier and great teammate all year. He’s a team player, and if he doesn’t have such a great attitude, we would be in a world of trouble [right now].”     Not all was perfect for the Cougars’ offense, however, as SXU was guilty of a couple fumbles

and also failed to capitalize on a first-and-goal situation in the third quarter. The visitors still racked up almost 540 yards, but they were never able to pull ahead of Waldorf by a more comfortable margin.     “I was hoping to be able to play everybody a lot, but it didn’t unfold that way,” Feminis said. “It was a tough environment to play in — there weren’t a lot of people there and there wasn’t a lot of enthusiasm. It was a seven- or eight-hour trip to get there, and you just want to play, get it over with and go home.”     The Cougars’ only second-half noisemaking was provided by Feeney (11-yard touchdown catch) and Spencer Nolen (37-yard field goal). Accounting for SXU’s other score before halftime was Joshua Hunter (1-yard run).     Standouts on the defensive side included Alex Walters (six solo stops, one assist, one tackle for loss), Dave Marciano (six solos, three tackles for loss) and Zach Dolph (three solos, five assists, one-half tackle for loss, two pass breakups, one interception, forced fumble, fumble recovery). Alex Hamilton (fumble recovery), Joe DeMarco (interception) and Jacob Ghinazzi (interception) also lent a hand, although the latter left the contest prematurely because of a pulled hamstring.     The Cougars’ prevention crew registered 14 tackles for loss and four sacks, and it also broke up five Waldorf passes.     SXU returns home to face William Penn University, and another must-win game, on Saturday at Bruce R. Deaton Field. The Cougars have to run the table over the last four weeks of the regular season in order to have any chance for another appearance in the NAIA tournament.     “We’re in territory we haven’t been in for a long time,” Feminis said. “We can’t change what’s happened already; we just need the wins [now]. The last four games are winnable games — we’re not going to be a huge favorite or huge underdog in any of them. (Continued on page 5)


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, October 24, 2013 Section 2

A Crum-my way to end Bulldogs St. Rita player’s three TDs help dispatch Crusaders By Ken Karrson     Simply put, it was a Crum-my way for Brother Rice’s postseason dreams to die.     Needing two more victories to become eligible for the Class 8A playoffs, the Crusaders were poised to take another step forward Friday night at Joe Johnston Field. When Sal Perez scored on a 3-yard run with 3:41 remaining, the touchdown pushed Rice in front of visiting St. Rita by four points.     That marked the fourth lead change in the Chicago Catholic League Blue contest, but it wasn’t to be the last. Forced to respond quickly, the Mustangs did exactly that when quarterback Tommy Mister fired a 17-yard TD pass to John Ladd less than one minute later.     The Crusaders positioned themselves for an answer, but Julian Crum ruined it. Crum, who had already burned Rice for three touchdowns, sealed the deal for St. Rita by blocking Brian Kane’s game-tying field-goal try with 14 seconds left and securing a 38-35 triumph.     The loss was the Crusaders’ fifth, which will relegate them to the Prep Bowl playoffs. Perhaps even more frustrating to everyone within Rice’s football program is that the Crusaders came agonizingly close to writing a far different script.     Besides the Mustangs, Rice (35, 0-3) has squared off against three other big-time foes this season: Catholic League Blue leader Loyola Academy, defending Class 8A champ Mt. Carmel and Catholic White front-runner Fenwick. The Crusaders’ average margin of defeat in their four most pivotal matchups was only eight points.     “The kids we have at Brother Rice are going to work hard and give you everything they’ve got,” Crusaders coach Brian Badke said. “I feel extremely bad for the seniors, but I’m very proud of my kids. They’ve improved every week.     “This gives them real confidence and something to really work for in the offseason. We’re not that far away [from the elite teams] — maybe we need to focus on little things we can improve on, but there’s not much [between us].”     Although Rice didn’t have a divisional win to its credit heading into the contest, Badke was certain St. Rita was not anticipat-

ing a romp.     “We beat them twice last year, so they didn’t come in underestimating us,” he said of the Mustangs. “I think Rita knew we were going to bring our best, and our guys played very well.”     That didn’t prevent the Mustangs from staking themselves to a 24-14 halftime lead as Mister tallied once on a 16-yard keeper and threw a pair of touchdown passes to Crum. The latter’s second-quarter scores, which covered 47 and 8 yards, were delivered within three minutes of one another.     “Did we want it to be a shootout?” Badke said. “No, but they have a lot of weapons. Mister’s a threat every time he touches the ball and Crum had a great game.”     John Kelly also kicked a 31-yard field goal for St. Rita, which trailed 7-0 early on after Dan Scanlon recovered a Mustangs fumble in their end zone. The miscue was one of two caused by the Crusaders’ defense, which featured Andrew Dyke (five solo stops, two assists), Bryan Boyd (five solos, one assist, one sack), Greg Bernier (four solos, two assists, blocked pass), Matt Cusack (four solos, one assist, fumble recovery), Mike McGinley (four solos, one assist) and Trea Pierce (four solos, three quarterback hurries) all making a statistical impact.     Bernier narrowly missed picking off a Mister pass during St. Rita’s last scoring trek. He knocked the third-down throw aside, but the Mustangs retained possession and then converted a fourth-and-9 play when Mister took advantage of a man being out of position in the Rice secondary.     But the Crusaders weren’t going down without a fight — in fact, Badke didn’t think they were going down at all after Alex Alarcon guided Rice into St. Rita territory. Alarcon accounted for more than 200 yards between his passing (136 yards) and running (71), and tailback Marcus Jones (21 carries, 138 yards; seven receptions, 27 yards) and wideout Luke Mueller (seven catches, 80 yards) also did their part to aid the Crusaders’ attack.     And when Rice got within Kane’s range in the final halfminute, Badke eschewed taking a shot at the end zone in favor of a field-goal attempt.     “I felt really confident about [the prospect of] going into overtime,” he said.     That didn’t happen, but Rice

still demonstrated plenty of grit as it converted three fourth-down plays during the game and nine others on third down. Badke hopes the Crusaders carry that same kind of crisp execution into their regular-season finale versus Providence Catholic on Friday in New Lenox.     While the varsity squad didn’t reach its goal of state-playoff qualification, Badke pointed to Rice’s success at the lower levels as proof that things are indeed moving in the right direction. The Crusaders’ sophomores are undefeated through eight weeks, while the freshmen are 7-1.     “There are a lot of great things going on,” Badke said. “[All] the kids understand what our expectations are, and they believe in the system and what we’re doing.”     Jones (3-yard run, 6-yard reception) and Mueller (10-yard catch) supplied Rice’s other touchdowns against St. Rita.

Statistics St. Rita Brother Rice First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

10 14 7 7

7 7 - 38 7 14 - 35

SR 18 270 186 456 18-8 2 0 5-50 4-37.5

BR 24 252 136 388 35-16 0 1 4-25 5-33.4

Scoring     BR — Dan Scanlon, recovers fumble in St. Rita end zone (Brian Kane kick)     SR — Tommy Mister, 16-yd. run (John Kelly kick)     SR — Kelly, 31-yd. field goal     BR — Marcus Jones, 3-yd. run (Kane kick)     SR — Julian Crum, 47-yd. pass from Mister (Kelly kick)     SR — Crum, 8-yd. pass from Mister (Kelly kick)     BR — Jones, 6-yd. pass from Alex Alarcon (Kane kick)     SR — Crum, 12-yd. run (Kelly kick)     BR — Luke Mueller, 10-yd. pass from Alarcon (Kane kick)     BR — Sal Perez, 3-yd. run (Kane kick)     SR — John Ladd, 17-yd. pass from Mister (Kelly kick) Brother Rice Rushing: Jones 21-138, Alarcon 17-71, Lieser 5-35, Desmond 1-4, Perez 1-3, Mueller 1-1. Passing: Alarcon 35-16-136. Receiving: Mueller 7-80, Jones 7-27, Butler 2-29.

Hurts so bad Injuries pile up, lead to Knights’ downfall By Ken Karrson     What’s up, Doc?     When Bugs Bunny uttered the phrase, it was usually good for a laugh. That doesn’t hold true, though, when Chicago Christian football players are the ones posing a similar question.     And the Knights certainly are keeping trainers and other medical personnel busy these days. Already minus linebackers Jack De Vries (concussion), Dan Lawler (broken hand) and Brandon Schmidt (shoulder) entering Friday night’s Suburban Christian Conference Gold contest against Wheaton Academy, Christian saw two other regulars go down during the game.     Jeff Oprondek and Christian Clark both sustained injuries that were feared to be concussions, and their absences further depleted the thin-roster Knights on both sides of the ball. While Chicago Christian’s offense actually coped fairly well with the negative circumstances, the same thing couldn’t be said about the defense.     Evidence of the Knights’ faultiness was the presence of two Warriors running backs who reached the 100-yard plateau in rushing. With that production serving as its foundation, Wheaton amassed almost 450 yards of total offense.     Christian accrued 391 yards of its own, but it couldn’t quite keep pace on the scoreboard. There, the Warriors used a 20-point third quarter to pull away from the Knights and eventually bag a 4827 triumph in Palos Heights.     “We have some serious injuries and we had to shuffle some people around, [but] we had zero defense,” Christian coach Jim Bolhuis said. “Walther has a good running back and he had a lot of success.”     John Gemmel indeed made his presence felt by gaining 184 yards on just 11 carries and scoring on runs of 9, 56 and 16 yards. However, Gemmel didn’t have to go it alone, as Camden Meade backed him with 100 rushing yards on six totes and two touchdowns.     Wheaton ran 22 fewer offensive plays than the Knights, but the Warriors averaged nearly 11 yards

on their 42 snaps. By contrast, Christian averaged 6.1 yards per play.     “It got worse for us on defense [than it has been],” Bolhuis said. “That was the better turnaround for us this year — the defense was much better [than in 2012], but this was a big step backwards.     “They were going through us like they were going through wet paper. We were happy the kids kept playing hard, but it was the same kind of game we would have had last year.”     The Knights’ inability to adequately slow Wheaton’s attack rendered their own something of an afterthought, even though Bolhuis called it Christian’s “best offense of the season.”     “We were throwing the ball well and we were running hard,” he said. “We had a little bit of a slow start, but it was basically three good quarters of play. They made steps to improve and everything clicked.     “On one side of the ball, we were able to make some [satisfactory] adjustments, but not on the other.”     Junior quarterback Christian Bolhuis and junior running back Colby Roundtree were Christian’s ringleaders. Bolhuis completed 16of-27 throws for 245 yards, and his 52- and 7-yard passes to Roundtree resulted in the Knights’ first two TDs of the evening.     Roundtree, who tallied in both the second and third periods, had 139 total yards, with 72 of those coming on five receptions. His 67 rushing yards topped Christian (26, 1-3). Justin Downs caught six passes for 123 yards to lead the home team in that category.     Luke Rattler backed Roundtree with 63 yards on the ground, and the former’s rushing touchdowns of 4 and 26 yards in the fourth stanza enabled the Knights to make the final score more respectable.     Christian was fighting an uphill battle almost from the outset, as a punt block set the Warriors up for their initial touchdown, which Meade scored on a 13-yard dash. Wheaton’s special teams redirected another Knights punt a short time later, and the visitors wound up adding a second TD before the

(Continued from page 1) playoffs. The Bulldogs (7-1, 4-1) have outscored their last three opponents by a combined 112-0 margin.     “Anytime you can shut out a team three weeks in a row, you’re doing well,” Sheehan said. “The defense has been showing what they’re made of. For us to do what we did [the last three games] is a credit to our kids and our staff.     “Our defense has been locked in and it’s fun to watch. It’s a nice crutch to lean on.”     Richards has not been scored on since it suffered a 35-34 loss to Evergreen Park in Week 5, its lone blemish to date.     “It was one bad night, but I think they’ve got a chip on their shoulders [because of that],” Sheehan said of his athletes. “They definitely got [ticked] off and they’ve got a little bit of their swagger back. Our juniors are playing a lot faster and the sky’s the limit for them.     “And we’ve been getting a little healthier, which is good. We haven’t had every one of our starters [in the lineup] since the second week against Batavia.”     The Bulldogs were still down three regulars here, but that didn’t seem to matter as the Spartans (2-6, 2-4) managed to cross midfield only twice. Neither of those series advanced Oak Lawn into the red zone, and one of them materialized because of a Richards fumble.     The Spartans wound up with just 69 total yards, all but 3 of which were garnered on the ground. Ray Howard’s 44 rushing yards on nine carries was Oak Lawn’s best individual performance.     “Our offense has struggled the last few weeks, but we embarrassed ourselves,” said Spartans coach Sean Lucas, whose squad ran just 16 offensive plays in the first 24 minutes.     “That’s the only way to put it. Their speed got us and they stonewalled us, and we didn’t keep our defensive team off the field [enough].”     Among the Bulldogs’ prevention-side stars were Romel Hill (12 total tackles), Ramonta Hill (10), Savon Robinson (eight tackles, two pass breakups, fumble recovery) and Dwayne Jiles (six stops). Robinson’s recovery of a ball knocked loose by Nick DeMarco set up Richards’ first TD of the second half, which quarterback Hasan Muhammad-Rogers notched with his 43-yard bootleg.     That six-pointer expanded the hosts’ edge to 39-0 and satisfied Sheehan, who didn’t want his athletes to simply go through the motions during the final 24 minutes.     “You’re feeling good [before that], but at the same time, you want your team to have that killer instinct,” he said. “You want to put that nail in the coffin.”     Muhammad-Rogers had tallied on a 4-yard keeper in the opening half following a 53-yard burst by Ryan Willet, and the junior quarterback also threw a 21-yard scoring strike to Tacari Carpenter. Spencer Tears hit the end zone twice on runs of 2 and 15 yards — the latter coming on a reverse — and Chrishawn Ross scored on a 1-yard plunge immediately after Dedrick Shannon hauled in a 34-yard pass from MuhammadRogers.     Shannon accounted for the home team’s final touchdown of the night on a 59-yard sprint in the fourth quarter.     A vivid illustration of Oak Lawn’s misfortune was seen between Richards’ third and fourth TDs, which were connected by the hosts’ recovery of their own, unintentional onsides kick. Lucas, however, felt the Spartans’ downfall was traceable to something far more basic.     “We didn’t tackle well,” he said, “and we blocked even worse. You leave those two things at home and you’re not going to beat anybody, let alone a good team. And they’re a good team.     “It actually mirrored the game two years ago at Richards. We have to get over [any fear of] the black jerseys and gold helmets, but we’re trying to change the mind-set of 49 kids.”     Scott Quinn (five solo tackles, two assists, one sack), Joe Dodaro (four solos, four assists), Ahmad

first quarter ended on Gemmel’s 9-yard run.     The Warriors then held 21-0 and 28-7 advantages during the second period, but Christian had a promising opportunity to slice into that deficit just before halftime. A drive down to Wheaton’s 5-yard line bore no fruit, however, as time ran out on the hosts.     Coach Bolhuis faulted himself for the Knights’ inability to prosper there. He had called his last timeout with 15 seconds remaining, which became unnecessary when Chicago Christian was awarded a first down. The clock would have automatically stopped while the chains were moved.     “It didn’t look like he had gotten the first down, but put that one on the coach,” Bolhuis said. “I could have had a play called and still had a timeout left.     “It sure would have been big [to score then]. It should have been a two-touchdown game.”     Although somewhat beleaguered, the Knights’ defense did boast a few solid individuals. Before he departed, Oprondek recorded three solo stops, two tackles for loss and one sack, and both Christian Bolhuis (one solo, four assists) and Clay Bouquet (two solos, two assists) also played well in a losing effort.     Chicago Christian will conclude its 2013 campaign Friday night against Immaculate Conception, and Coach Bolhuis views the matchup as an excellent chance for his athletes to evaluate themselves.     “This is a good school of our size that’s doing things right,” he said of IC. “Our younger guys (Continued from page 2) are stepping up and starting to come around, and it’s a great op-     He eventually got to try a 24portunity for them to measure yard field goal, which was blocked themselves against the best in with no time left in regulation, the conference. but that play couldn’t overshadow     “And it’s a last chance for the Sadowski’s earlier rescue job. seniors. They want to go out in     “Had he not gotten that first style and do right by the team, down, it would have been a bad so it’s not that hard to get the situation for us,” Blackmon said. kids motivated.” “I’ve never seen such an inspired run for a first down.”     And now Blackmon hopes that Statistics inspiration can be tapped into Wheaton Acad. 14 14 20 0 - 48 once more on Saturday. Chgo. Christian 0 7 7 13 - 27     “We’re looking for a statement win — hopefully we can get it in Week 9,” he said. “It’d be a great (Continued on page 4)

Vikings

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Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards running back Ramonta Hill is flipped upside down after making a first-quarter gain Friday night versus Oak Lawn.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn’s Ray Howard looks for running room against a staunch Richards defense Friday night at Korhonen Field. Zain-Al Dean (four solos, three assists, forced fumble) and Howard (three solos, three assists) were Oak Lawn’s best players on the prevention side. Ryne Melnik intercepted a Muhammad-Rogers pass.     While his own club had no trouble vanquishing the Spartans, Sheehan didn’t believe Oak Lawn’s lopsided loss was an accurate reflection of its capabilities.     “They’re probably one of the best 2-6 teams around,” he said. “They’re very disciplined and play very well — Sean does a great job with them. If a couple balls bounce the other way, they’re sitting at 4-4 or 5-3.”     Instead, the Spartans will close up shop on their 2013 season Friday night versus Bremen in an SSC crossover contest. The Braves currently sit atop the Blue Division.     “Bremen’s tough and resilient, so we don’t have time to dwell on [this setback],” Lucas said. “It was a teachable game [against Richards], and we’re going to address the issues we had and try to get them fixed.”     Although Oak Lawn hasn’t generated the sort of on-field success Lucas had hoped to witness, he’s still sad to see his upperclassmen departing soon.     “It’s too bad the season’s ending [because] I like this group,” Lucas said. “There’s a lot of great kids and I’ll be sorry to see them go.”     The ’Dogs wind up their regular-season slate Friday against District 218 sister school Eisenhower in Blue Island. While Richards’ berth in the 6A tournament is secure, the Cardinals need one more win to become playoff eligible.     “We’re approaching this as play-

off week No. 1,” Sheehan said. “We learned in 2009 that one loss can change the whole setup, so we’re trying to improve that seed and our playoff stock.”

Statistics Oak Lawn Richards First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

0 0 6 26

0 7

0 -  0 6 - 45

OL 2 66 3 69 15-1 1-1 0 — —

HLR 14 278 145 423 20-10 2-2 1 6-55 3-32.0

Scoring     HLR — Spencer Tears, 2-yd. run (kick failed)     HLR — Hasan Muhammad-Rogers, 4-yd. run (Shawn Chiaramonte kick)     HLR — Tacari Carpenter, 21-yd. pass from Muhammad-Rogers (Chiaramonte kick)     HLR — Tears, 15-yd. run (kick failed)     HLR — Chrishawn Ross, 1-yd. run (kick failed)     HLR — Muhammad-Rogers, 43-yd. run (Chiaramonte kick)     HLR — Dedrick Shannon, 59-yd. run (kick failed) Oak Lawn Rushing: Howard 9-44, Norvell 11-15, McCarthy 2-2, Lach 1-2, Wagner 1-2, Gipson 2-1. Passing: Lach 12-1-3, Wagner 3-0-0. Receiving: Wagner 1-3. Richards Rushing: Muhammad-Rogers 10-58, Shannon 2-56, Willett 1-53, Ross 7-49, Hill 7-29, Tears 6-27, Carpenter 2-4, McClellan 2-2. Passing: Muhammad-Rogers 18-8-128, Tears 2-2-17. Receiving: Carpenter 3-55, Tears 3-23, Shannon 2-43, Willett 1-16, Marchione 1-8.

story for the seniors. This is why Sadowski kick) we play the game [of football].”     SIG — Nicholas Bradley, 6-yd. run

Statistics St. Ignatius St. Laurence

7 0 14 0 7 7 0 7

First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

SIG 20 219 153 372 14-10 1-1 0 3-35 1-44.0

6 - 27 7 - 28 SL 17 238 135 373 14-7 0-0 0 5-63 2-47.0

Scoring     SL — Frank Miller, 1-yd. run (Eric

(Michael Christy kick)     SL — Miller, 87-yd. run (Sadowski kick)     SIG — Joe Ford, 24-yd. pass from Daniel Moore (Christy kick)     SIG — Brendan McNally, 4-yd. run (Christy kick)     SL — Pete Kopacz, 66-yd. pass from Bob Kelly (Sadowski kick)     SL — Miller, 3-yd. run (Sadowski kick)     SIG — McNally, 10-yd. run (run failed) St. Laurence Rushing: Miller 31-215, Sadowski 1-16, Kelly 3-6, Sterna 1-1. Passing: Kelly 14-7-135. Receiving: Kopacz 3-83, Miller 2-15, Sterna 1-21, Gamboa 1-16.


4

Section 2 Thursday, October 24, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Community sports news

Getenet Timmermans

Timmermans becomes career goals leader at Chicago Christian

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn libero Haley Hiljus makes a save in the Lady Spartans’ SSC Red match versus Shepard last Tuesday.

Volleyball roundup

McGovern (17 digs) were the Lady Eagles’ ringleaders last Tuesday as Sandburg defeated Lockport 25-18, 25-22. Stepping forward the next day in a 25-7, 25-23 conquest of Joliet West were Meghan (Continued from page 2) Hutchinson (five kills) and Katie over visiting Queen of Peace on Makina (four kills, 20 assists). Tuesday. Joyce dished out 21 assists and Maddie Meyer produced STAGG 11 kills and 12 digs in the Volley     The Lady Chargers (12-16, 1for the Cure match. 4) started last week off with a     Trinity offered the Macs little three-set SWSC Blue loss to Joliet resistance on Wednesday, as it Central (28-26, 19-25, 25-14) on succumbed 25-6, 25-11. Joyce Tuesday, bounced back with a (15 assists) and Clark (nine three-set win over Bolingbrook kills) were the spark plugs for (25-19, 21-25, 25-20) in another McAuley, which won for the sev- conference clash on Wednesday enth straight time in GCAC Red and then reached the Bronze Division title match at Saturday’s play. Knights Invitational before falling short of TF South (23-25, 25-22, SANDBURG     Also going 7-0 last week were 25-19). the Lady Eagles, whose tourna-     Gianna Petrelli was Stagg’s ment title was claimed Saturday headliner versus the Steelwomat the Maine West Pumpkin In- en as she contributed 10 service points and 10 assists, while Lexi vitational.     Sandburg upended Oak Park- Mantas (14 kills, eight digs), HanRiver Forest 25-23, 25-12 in nah Yandel (18 assists) and Hanthe championship match. Sami nah Henderson (11 digs) all played Knight (72 assists in three Sat- pivotal roles for the Lady Chargers urday matches) and Leah Lane versus the Lady Raiders. (21 kills) played starring roles for the Lady Eagles. MARIST     Prior to its arrival at Maine     The Lady RedHawks improved West, Sandburg (26-7, 5-0) took to 20-7 overall and 7-0 in the down a pair of SouthWest Subur- East Suburban Catholic Conferban Conference Blue foes. ence with a 25-20, 25-14 victory     Knight (29 assists), Julia over Joliet Catholic Academy last Borschel (nine kills) and Kelly Tuesday.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Shepard’s Kendall Yerkes elevates for a kill during the Lady Astros’ three-game loss to Oak Lawn last Tuesday.     Molly Mayo’s 21 assists and seven digs powered visiting Marist. Anne Marie Stifter added eight kills for the Lady RedHawks, while Colleen Reilly chipped in five kills and two blocks. MT. ASSISI     The Screeching Eagles squared their season ledger at 17-17 with a 25-19, 25-16 victory over Chicago Agricultural Science last Thursday. MaryKate Wetzel contributed 14 assists and Kelly Magliano put down six kills to spur the visitors.     Season leaders for Mt. Assisi include Wetzel (545 assists), Magliano (278 kills, 58 blocks),

Anna Broadhurst (155 kills, 39 blocks, 202 digs) and Jessica Jakubowski (230 digs). RICHARDS     Shannon Gardner’s five kills and three blocks helped the Lady Bulldogs (19-7, 9-3 SSC Red) bag a 25-15, 25-7 conference triumph over Eisenhower last Thursday. CHICAGO CHRISTIAN     The Lady Knights (24-9) enjoyed a four-win week and claimed each of those victories in straight sets. Defeated were Aurora Central Catholic, Oak Lawn, TF North and Plainfield Central.     Chicago Christian lost to Lincoln-Way Central.

SXU sports summary

Cougars runners poised for big finish ised for big finish     A return to Kansas wasn’t only part of Dorothy and Toto’s agenda.     Some St. Xavier University male athletes want to do the same. The only difference is that, in place of a yellow-brick road, they plan to follow a green-grass course.     It was on that latter surface where the Cougars shone at the NAIA Pre-Nationals Invitational, which was held Oct. 12 in Lawrence, Kan. Pitted against 33 other top-tier NAIA cross country teams at Rim Rock Farm, SXU fashioned quite an impressive showing.     Buoyed by senior Brian Corcoran’s 12th-place individual effort, the Cougars ran fifth overall. Corcoran, who was named the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Men’s Cross Country Runner of the Week a couple days after the race, posted an 8K time of 25 minutes, 28 seconds, which was only eight seconds behind the No. 7 finisher in a 272-competitor event.     Lawrence will also be the site of the NAIA National Cross Country Championships in November.     SXU’s other scorers at the Pre-Nationals included sophomore Eric Hancock (27th place in 26:04), senior Chris Shellenberger (58th, 26:40), junior Kyle Counter (61st, 26:42) and senior Chris Sarna (62nd, 26:42). Also competing on the Cougars’ behalf were senior Brian Meyer (111th, 27:23), senior Shane Kenney (121st, 27:34) and freshman Abel Hernandez (141st, 27:53).     SXU coach Ed McAllister was

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elated with what his squad, which wound up ahead of four top-25 programs and five others receiving NAIA poll votes, accomplished.     “This was undoubtedly the finest performance of this season, and probably many seasons past,” he said. “The real telling point for our success was the three-man combination of Shellenberger, Counter and Sarna. By running as a pack, this group really created great depth for us.     “Much of the credit for the success [that] Saturday must be given to [assistant coach] Arturs Bareikis. Coach Bareikis created a race plan that proved to be on the money. Everyone followed it perfectly, and we enjoyed our greatest success of the year.     “It will be necessary to continue our serious work and training for each of our next two extremely challenging meets. However, for one day, we can rest on our laurels and be proud of our accomplishments.”     The Cougars, who garnered votes in the most recent national poll, will take part in the Great Lakes Invitational on Saturday at Riverside Park in Grand Rapids, Mich. WOMEN’S SOCCER     Two first-half goals by freshman forward Mariana Hoerr enabled the Cougars to pull out of their tailspin and register a CCAC victory over Calumet College of St. Joseph last Tuesday at Bruce R. Deaton Field.     Behind Hoerr’s performance, SXU defeated the Crimson Wave 3-0 to snap a four-match losing streak. Along with Hoerr’s offense, the Cougars benefited from freshman keeper Alex Perry’s work, as she made eight saves en route to recording her third shutout of the season.     Hoerr tallied in the 41st minute on a breakaway to give SXU the only marker it needed to prevail. Junior Marissa Graves and freshman Delanie Bosworth earned assists on the goal. Junior Morgan Graves and sophomore Lexi Cozzi then set up Hoerr’s second score just three minutes later.     Marissa Graves completed the Cougars’ production in the late going on a header following a free kick from sophomore defender

Rachel Didier.

***     Morgan Graves finished with a pair of shots on goal, but the Cougars could not find the back of the net on Saturday as they dropped a 3-0 verdict to Trinity Christian College at Schaaf Field.     SXU (4-9-1, 2-6) unleashed just eight total shots, compared to 24 for the Trolls, who placed half of those on target. Besides Graves’ shots, the Cougars had only two others that required Trinity netminder Becky Gold to make saves.     The Trolls tallied twice in the opening half, with freshman midfielder Kayla Diemer converting in the 29th minute and freshman midfielder Abby McDonald slipping the ball past Perry with less than two minutes remaining before intermission after receiving a pass from junior forward Rachael Webb.     Perry turned aside four other Trinity attempts in the first half. Junior Danielle Koncius (Stagg) manned the nets after intermission and was credited with five saves. Webb scored the Trolls’ second-half goal in the 86th minute, off an assist from Diemer.     SXU faced Cardinal Stritch in a CCAC match this past Tuesday in Milwaukee. MEN’S SOCCER     Sophomore forward Marco Gutierrez continued his scoring magic and junior midfielder Brandon Simoes also found the back of the net last Wednesday night at Deaton Field, as the Cougars slipped past Calumet College of St. Joseph 2-1 in a CCAC encounter.     Gutierrez, who had a four-goal output and hat trick in two recent matches, put SXU ahead in the 22nd minute by converting a Simoes pass into a score. Simoes supplied the difference-making marker in the 52nd minute on a free kick from 10 yards out after getting a feed from junior midfielder Tom Lojek.     In between, the Crimson Wave’s Stewart Thur ruined Kyle Held’s whitewash bid by redirecting Andrew Yousif’s free kick. However, the Cougars’ senior netminder stopped seven other Calumet College shots on goal.

    SXU, which remained in a second-place tie within the CCAC by winning, got off 12 shots in all, 10 of which were on target. Gutierrez, Lojek and Simoes combined for eight of those shots on goal. ***     Simoes’ hat trick gave the Cougars all the juice they needed to defeat Trinity Christian College 31 on Saturday at Schaaf Field.     Simoes snapped a 1-all tie in the 70th minute on an unassisted shot from the top of the box, then tacked on an insurance marker 18 minutes later after receiving a pass from senior defender Dale Judickas. Simoes’ initial goal was set up by Lojek and scored in the 33rd minute.     The Trolls created the halftime stalemate with under two minutes remaining in the opening session on senior forward Noe Quirarte’s tally, which was assisted by senior forward Joey Bahena.     Netminder Held earned the victory after making three saves for SXU (6-7, 6-2), which won for the fifth time in its last six outings. The Cougars met Cardinal Stritch this past Tuesday in Milwaukee. VOLLEYBALL     Junior middle hitter Marie Hackert notched a career-best 17 kills and equaled another personal high with eight blocks, an effort the Cougars rode to a grueling 25-11, 23-25, 25-15, 21-25, 18-16 triumph over Illinois Institute of Technology last Thursday night at the Keating Center.     Sophomore middle blocker Heidi Gregerson backed Hackert with 13 kills and nine total blocks, both of which were season-high numbers for her. In all, SXU (11-10) registered 57 kills and 28 blocks in the nonconference match.     Also contributing to the win were junior setter Kelli Shaffer (career-best 47 assists, five kills, eight digs), junior outside hitter Jessica Galotta (10 kills, season-high 18 digs), junior libero Dominique Aramburu (25 digs) and sophomore right-side hitter Meghan Falsey (career-high 22 digs).     The Cougars returned to CCAC play this past Tuesday versus North Division leader Cardinal Stritch in Milwaukee.

    There’s nothing left for Getenet Timmermans to prove on the soccer field.     The Chicago Christian senior became his school’s all-time leader in goals earlier this season, and with the Knights winning their own Class 1A regional last Saturday, Timmermans has a chance to add to his career total of 95.     He’s already seven goals ahead of Christian’s previous standard, and his 37 markers during the 2013 campaign also represent the most for a Knights player in a single season. But Timmermans’ soccer excellence came about in a rather unorthodox manner.     Orphaned at a young age in Ethiopia, Timmermans was excited about being adopted and becoming an American high school student. He knew this would be a place of great opportunity for himself and his younger brother, Fukado. Getenet didn’t speak English well, but he did play a great game of soccer.     “When I got to the school, all I wanted to do was get on the soccer team,” Timmermans said. “I’d show up every day and ask the coach if I could play.”     He wasn’t able to do so right away, as he had to wait weeks before he was cleared. But even with part of his freshman season lost, Timmermans scored goals at a rapid enough pace that he entered the current campaign with designs on breaking Christian’s scoring record.     “I just kept working,” Timmermans said. “My team made it so easy for me. They are so good at getting me the ball so I can score.”     And having his younger brother alongside him while it happened was icing on the cake.     “Having Fukado on the field has made this the best season ever,” Getenet said. “He is the best freshman player CCHS has had.”

Oak Lawn golfers Cuculich, Murley claim regional honors

    For the second year in a row, Oak Lawn High School golfers Joe Cuculich and Brandon Murley achieved all-regional status.     Cuculich, a four-year varsity player, was also an All-South Suburban Conference Red selection as both a junior and senior. Murley was a three-year performer for the Spartans.     “Joe, Brandon and another senior, Matt Dunne, have carried the team all year,” Oak Lawn coach Pat Mayer said. “The seniors were real leaders this year and we will miss them. They were like assistant coaches to the younger players.”

    Evergreen Park High School’s boys’ golf team completed its conference-winning season with a fifth-place regional finish at The Meadows Golf Club in Blue Island.     J.R. Wazio, who earned medalist honors in the Mustangs’ charge to the South Suburban Conference Red championship, shot an 83 to lead them at the regional. Brendan Walsh (84) and Mark Martin (85) were right behind Wazio, and all three golfers advanced to sectional play at Broken Arrow Golf Club last Monday as individuals.     The weather was somewhat uncooperative, but Wazio fought through the brisk and windy conditions to card a 91 that led the trio. He, Walsh, Martin and

Knights (Continued from page ) WA 14 360 89 449 13-6 1-1 0 7-65 0-0

Oak Lawn High School to host baseball camp in January

    Oak Lawn High School will host a six-week baseball camp, in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy, starting Jan. 5, 2014.     Former Spartans varsity coach Brian Clifton will direct the program, which has classes available for players in grades 1-12. Sessions will be offered in advanced hitting, pitching, catching, fielding and baserunning, but space is limited.     Registration is currently underway. For more information, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com or call 1-866-622-4487.

Southside Shooters to hold tryouts

    The Southside Shooters Girls’ Basketball Club will conduct tryouts on Oct. 29, Nov. 5 and Nov. 7 at Stagg High School.     Each session will run from 6:308 p.m. For more information, call Gary Ferguson at (630) 935-1150 or visit the website at www.shootersbball.com.

District 218 to host Bulls youth camps

    District 218 will host Chicago Bulls FUNdamentals youth basketball camps for ages 5-14 on Saturday and Nov. 2, 9 and 16.     The camps will be held at the administrative center, 10701 S. Kilpatrick Ave., in Oak Lawn, and divided into two age groups. Ages 5-8 will meet from 9-10 a.m., while ages 9-14 will go from 1011:30 a.m.     The cost is $60 for kids under age 8, $75 for older individuals, and includes a camp T-shirt and replica-autographed photo of Bulls star Derrick Rose. Registration is being accepted online at www. bullssoxacademy.com.     Additional details can also be found on that same website.

Winter-season tryouts for Illinois Hoopla

    Illinois Hoopla is hosting basketball tryouts for its winter season during the month of October at Orland Junior High School.     Tryouts are held from 7-9 p.m. and are open to players in grades 3-8. For complete details, contact Rick Palmer at 460-6513 or Hooplamr@gmail.com, or visit the website at www.illinoishoopla. com.

Shimko basketball to run tryouts

Mustangs wind up fifth in boys’ golf regional

First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

fellow junior Sean Miller will form the nucleus of Evergreen’s 2014 team, but sophomore Danny Smith could become a pivotal figure as well.     Graduating from the Mustangs’ 15-3 squad will be Aaron Green Van Zee, Joe Steen, Andrew Ottenfeld and Luke Sals.     Another young notable this fall was freshman Elizabeth Stalla, currently the lone female on any boys’ athletic team at Evergreen.     Stalla is only the second girl to ever play golf alongside Mustangs boys, but coach Scott Pasek said she has been the more productive of the two as she consistently beat most of Evergreen’s frosh-soph boys this season. She fired a 99 in regional play at Bensenville’s White Pines Golf Course, which ranked as the fifth-best score at that frosh-soph event and earned Stalla a sectional berth.

CC 15 146 245 391 27-16 1-1 0 7-45 2-8.0

Scoring     WA — Camden Meade, 13-yd. run (Graham Cote kick)     WA — John Gemmel, 9-yd. run (Cote kick)     WA — Marino Costello, 20-yd. pass from David Thrasher (Cote kick)

    The George Shimko Basketball School will conduct tryouts for players in grades 4-8 on Saturday, at the Oak Lawn Pavilion, 9401 S. Oak Park Ave.     A boys’ session will run from 1-2:30 p.m., while two girls’ tryouts will be held. Female players in grades 4-5 will go from 2:30-4 p.m., with players in grades 6-8 to follow from 4-5:30 p.m. There is no cost to attend the tryouts, but parents must register players and sign a waiver form 20 minutes prior to an evaluation session.     The GSBS winter season will run from November-February. For more information, contact GSBS at 802-GSBS or at Gshimko@gsbsbasketball.com. Interested parties can also visit the website at www.GSBSBASKETBALL.com.

    CC — Colby Roundtree, 52-yd. pass from Christian Bolhuis (Jeremy Slager Evans kick)     WA — Gemmel, 56-yd. run (Cote kick)     WA — Meade, 5-yd. run (Cote kick)     WA — Gemmel, 16-yd. run (Cote kick)     CC — Roundtree, 7-yd. pass from Bolhuis (Slager Evans kick)     WA — Mike Silfugarian, 2-yd. run (kick blocked)     CC — Luke Rattler, 4-yd. run (kick failed)     CC — Rattler, 26-yd. run (Slager Evans kick) Chicago Christian Rushing: Roundtree 18-67, Rattler 10-63, Bolhuis 6-16. Passing: Bolhuis 27-16-245. Receiving: Downs 6-123, Roundtree 5-72, Starostka 3-23, Santarelli 1-24, Bruinius 1-3.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, October 24, 2013 Section 2

5

Sports wrap

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sandburg kicker Jonathan Milazzo watches the flight of the ball after attempting a 46-yard field goal during Friday night’s SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue game against Stagg.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sandburg’s girls’ golf team qualified for the state meet for the first time in school history and finished 11th in the Class 2A field.

Lady Eagles place 11th at state golf By Anthony Nasella     When Sandburg’s girls’ golf team qualified for the state tournament by capturing last Monday’s Class AA HomewoodFlossmoor Sectional championship, the Lady Eagles broke new ground.     No other Sandburg golf squad had ever made the downstate trip as a team.     And while the Lady Eagles didn’t fare as well they would have liked in last weekend’s finals at Hickory Point in Decatur, they still finished 11th overall. That was accomplished with a roster completely devoid of seniors, which means big hopes exist for a return appearance next October.     As she has been all season, junior Frankie Saban — who shot a state-best 69 in the sectional round — was Sandburg’s big gun as she carded a two-day total of 166. Close behind her was sophomore Emily Cosler, whose 36-hole score was 170. Freshman Emilyee McGiles (186) and junior Patty Meza (199) were the Lady Eagles’ other scorers, while sophomore Erin Cronin gave them a 210.     Sandburg coach Todd Allen said his young players were very grateful to reach the state meet, which he admitted came earlier than expected.     “We’re really a year ahead of schedule,” Allen said. “They would have liked to have scored a little bit higher, but it was a great experience for them. We have no seniors, so I’m very excited that they got the experience. We had a great time and it was valuable for us.     “I really thought that next year would be our year to qualify for state because we’re so young, [but] we now have more of an edge for next year. We had a fantastic year — we were [SouthWest Suburban Blue] conference champs, regional champs, and we went 13-1 in dual meets.”     Allen said the course in Decatur was longer than his team was used to playing, a circumstance that was intensified by cold and windy conditions. The thrill of being the first Sandburg team to reach state was more than enough to overcome any disappointment, however.     “I think they all came away feeling good about the whole experience,” Allen said. “They were all saying on the bus that they’re all excited about being able to put in the work over the next year to not only be able to get down there again next year, but to also improve their finish.     “We already talked about going down to that course once or twice in the summer. It will be good to play it, and all [the girls] will be back next season to build on our success.”     Saban’s 69 at the H-F Sectional established a school record and bettered her previous personal best by four strokes. She had four

CORRECTION In last week’s sports section, Stagg tennis player and SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue champion Nicole Pamphilis was misidentified in a photo caption. We regret the error.

Cougars

birdies on the back nine and shot a blistering 31 on the second half of the round.     Sandburg carried a team score of 329. BOYS’ GOLF     Chicago Christian’s Jay Timmer, the area’s lone male golfer to make the journey to Decatur last weekend, wound up 93rd among 110 competitors at the Class 2A boys’ state meet.     Timmer was an individual qualifier for state out of the Nazareth Sectional. He fired a round of 80 there last Monday. GIRLS’ CROSS COUNTRY     Shepard’s Alondra Delfin ran a winning time of 19 minutes, 20 seconds for three miles to lead the Lady Astros to the South Suburban Conference Red team title on Saturday at North Creek Meadow in Lansing. ***     Cassidy VandeKamp placed 25th for Chicago Christian in 21:27.9 at Saturday’s Suburban Christian Conference meet, which was hosted by Marmion Academy. Wheaton Academy scored 59 points to rate as the top team. ***     Lockport bested Sandburg 2754 on Saturday at Channahon Community Park to claim the SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue championship. The Lady Eagles had two runners finish among the top five, as Casey Jensen was the individual runner-up in 18:23 and Grace Foley was four seconds behind her in the No. 5 position.     Stagg placed seventh at the meet. BOYS’ CROSS COUNTRY     Behind Josh Meier’s winning effort of 15:33 for three miles, Shepard’s boys matched the school’s girls’ squad by running to a team championship at North Creek Meadow. Aiding the Astros’ cause as well were Mike Evancich (16:11), Nick Heidinger (16:17) and Caleb Washington (16:18), all of whom landed among the top five. ***     Sandburg (29 points) was dominant at Saturday’s SWSC Blue race at Channahon Community Park as it finished 61 points ahead of second-place Joliet Central. The conference crown was the Eagles’ fourth in a row.     Making it possible was five scorers within the first eight runners to hit the chute. Greg Burzinski’s third place in 15:15 led Sandburg, but clustered right behind him were Sean Torpy (fifth in 15:24), Tom Brennan (sixth, 15:32), Will Becker (seventh, 15:38) and Chris Torpy (eighth, 15:39).     Stagg (215 points) was eighth in the team standings. GIRLS’ TENNIS     Stagg captured its own sectional on Saturday with 25 points, which put the Lady Chargers four ahead of District 230 sister school Sandburg.     It was an all-Stagg final in singles play, as Nicole Pamphilis defeated Lady Chargers teammate Jillian Atkenson 6-2, 6-2 for the title. The Lady Eagles, meanwhile, boasted the championship doubles tandem after Priya Sharma-Allia Abunaim notched a 6-1, 7-5 victory over Chicago Christian’s team of Grace Furlong-Raquel

Hamstra in the last match.     The Furlong-Hamstra duo was responsible for all eight of the Lady Knights’ sectional points.     Also taking part in the Stagg Sectional was Shepard, which got its only two points from singles player Rhonda Habbal. BOYS’ SOCCER     Shepard gained a share of the South Suburban Conference Red title by edging Bremen in an overtime shootout last Monday and then romping past Evergreen Park on Tuesday.     A one-goal loss to Tinley Park had put the Astros in a mustwin situation both days and they responded, albeit in nail-biting fashion versus the Braves. Bremen held a 1-0 lead until just 4:53 remained, which is when Shepard’s Ivan Magana forged a tie and eventually forced OT after receiving a throw-in from Will Somerfield.     The Astros (9-7-1, 8-3) prevailed 4-3 in the shootout, with Somerfield booting home the deciding marker. Magana, Colm McGee and Edgar Madrigal also scored for Shepard.     Astros keeper Fuad Abuzerr made two saves during the shootout, including one on Manny Esparza that set the stage for Somerfield to become the hero.     Beating Evergreen required far less drama, as a pair of goals from Casey Bledsoe laid the groundwork for a 7-0 Shepard triumph. ***     Chicago Christian won its own Class 1A regional by slipping past Beecher 5-1 in the championship match on Friday. Key performers for the Knights (11-9-3) included Getenet Timmermans (one goal, two assists), Noah Friesen (one goal, one assist), Fiki Timmermans (one goal) and Jake Robertson (one assist).     Christian reached the finale on the strength of a 5-1 victory over Peotone in last Tuesday’s semifinal. Timmermans registered a hat trick, giving him a school-record 35 goals this season, while Sean O’Meara delivered the Knights’ other two markers. ***     Goals by Mike Staunton and Manthey lifted Sandburg (13-6) to a 2-0 win over Thornton co-op last Wednesday. ***     Stagg beat Joliet West 4-1 last Tuesday behind Tom Krumpolc and Tim Buss, each of whom tallied in the SWSC Blue match.     Lincoln-Way North edged the Chargers (11-5, 4-3) 1-0 last Wednesday. GIRLS’ SWIMMING     Shepard defeated Bremen 11170 in a South Suburban Conference crossover dual meet last Tuesday.     Mary Lippert won the 50-yard freestyle in 27.67 and the 100backstroke in 1:11.36 to pace the Lady Astros. Other event winners included Annie Rangel (200-free in 2:15.84; 100-free in 1:01.56), Christina Calderon (diving) and Grace Spindler (500-free in 6:17.33). ***     Sandburg’s Ann Girlich (320.60) finished 14th in diving after completing 11 attempts off the 1-meter board at Saturday’s Evanston Diving Invitational.

First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

WC 16 129 290 419 44-25 2-2 3 9-61 7-36.6

(Nolen kick)     SXU — DeBenedetti, 60-yd. pass from Gill (kick failed)     SXU — Nolen, 37-yd. field goal     WC — James Loydd, 65-yd. pass from Oscar Robles (Stack kick)     SXU — Feeney, 11-yd. pass from Gill (Nolen kick)     WC — Lashawn Chapman, 59-yd. pass from Robles (Stack kick)

    SXU — Nick DeBenedetti, 16-yd. pass from Gill (Nolen kick)     WC — Emmanuel Osuchukwu, 75-yd. run (Brennan Stack kick)     SXU — Joshua Hunter, 1-yd. run

St. Xavier Rushing: Hunter 19-79, Pondexter 4-38, Ferguson 3-24, Vilimek 217, Simms 5-16, Carroll 2-10, Gill 1-0. Passing: Gill 51-33-353, Pondexter 1-1-2. Receiving: Frederickson 7-66, Carroll 746, Simms 5-52, DeBenedetti 4-88, Feeney 4-62, Vilimek 2-11, Dye 2-8, Hunter 1-9, Jones 1-7, Ferguson 1-6.

SXU 31 184 355 539 52-34 2-2 0 8-40 3-40.0

(Continued from page )     “I was not real happy with the way we played on Saturday, but I have to stay positive. Our guys were a little bit down [during the losing streak], but I don’t think they’ve ever lost their confidence. They know the taste of winning games in the postseason, and the Scoring goals we had before the season     SXU — Austin Feeney, 23-yd. pass are still there.” from Joe Gill (Spencer Nolen kick)

Statistics St. Xavier 27 0 10 Waldorf College 7 0 14

0 - 37 0 - 21

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sandburg’s Mike Howard sacks Stagg quarterback Adam Pilota during Friday night’s SWSC Blue contest at Seliga Field.

Eagles (Continued from page 1) punt across midfield. Brian Langowski culminated a 44-yard drive with a 1-yard touchdown run.     From there, the game settled into a defensive struggle, much to Sandburg coach Dave Wierzal’s delight.     “I was hoping for one [of those],” he said. “This is one of the best Stagg teams we’ve seen in a while. After they put up 61 points against Joliet West, I was afraid we’d get into another shootout and I didn’t know if we could get enough points to keep up.     “This is probably more like we’ve played offense [in the past] — the old-fashioned, grind-it-out type of ballgame.”     The Eagles wasted another scoring opportunity on a possession that bridged the first and second quarters. Graham Hevel’s interception had given the ball back to Sandburg and the hosts eventually set themselves up in a first-and-goal situation at the Chargers’ 7-yard line, but they were then stopped on fourth down at the 2.     “I think this was only the third time all year we’ve been in the red zone and come away with zero points,” Wierzal said.     Fahey was pleased to see his guys’ show of resistance at that moment.     “They could have gone up two scores early and put us in chase mode right away,” he said of the Eagles. “We kept getting them to punt, and we thought we could catch them [being down by only one touchdown].”     Sandburg’s defense returned the slam-the-door favor a bit later after Stagg had marched inside the Eagles’ 20. Mike Howard’s sack of Pilota pushed the Chargers backwards 8 yards and then Stagg misfired on a field-goal attempt, something Sandburg also did prior to intermission.

Mustangs (Continued from page 1) avalanche [against us] and we were just on our heels.     “But you can’t yell at the kids. You just do the best you can to salvage what you can in the second half.”     That’s essentially what the Astros did, as they finished with more than 250 total yards of offense. Javorski passed for 161 yards and also ran for a team-high 83. Between them, Dye and Jake Nelson hauled in 15 balls for 136 yards’ worth of gains.     Both were also effective on defense, as Dye registered three solo stops and five assisted tackles and Nelson produced two and four, respectively. Mark Albrecht was Shepard’s headliner on that side of the ball with six solos, six assists, two interceptions and a forced fumble. Jake Disbrow (two solos, two assists, two tackles for loss) and Isaiah Lopez (one solo, five assists, one interception) chipped

    More of the same occurred after halftime, with Leith Sadi’s interception ruining a third-period Eagles series that had entered Chargers territory and an incomplete pass on fourth down leaving the visitors stranded at Sandburg’s 13. Sadi, Roger Boylan and Ryan Slager were Stagg defenders cited by Fahey for their strong play, while Marty Micek (eight solo stops, four assists, two sacks), Alante Walker (eight solos, two assists), Louis Paleothodoros (six solos, two assists), Nash (six solos, one assist), Howard (five solos, one sack), Hevel (three solos, six assists) and Matt Taylor (four solos) all made their presences felt on the Eagles’ behalf.     “We had a feeling they were trying to pound us,” Fahey said of Sandburg’s prevention corps. “They play that frantic style [of defense] that kind of leads to shutouts.”     The Eagles’ whitewash was their first of 2013, but it obviously occurred at an opportune time for them.     “We had some concerns about our defense early in the season, but they’ve steadily improved,” Wierzal said. “They definitely proved that this [past] week. I was really happy with how the defense played. [Their performance] was special and it’s a big step for us.”     Langowski finally gave Sandburg some additional breathing room when he raced 45 yards for another TD with just over 2½ minutes remaining in the game. Langowski finished with 119 rushing yards, which offset a solid display by Stagg’s Austin Kelly (18 carries, 105 yards).     While Fahey had originally wondered how seriously the Eagles would view the Chargers — “If you look at the 54-7 score [of last year], I could see from a kid’s perspective where you don’t see much of a rivalry there,” he said — Wierzal made sure his guys

weren’t underestimating Stagg.     “That was definitely part of our conversation during the week — trying to reinforce the message this is this year, they’re playing with renewed energy and they’re playing some good football,” Wierzal said of the Chargers. “And it was [also] hard not to think in terms of playoff eligibility and where the seedings will put us.”     As for Stagg, Fahey hopes its strong showing versus Sandburg laid the groundwork for a competitive exhibition against H-F.     “Obviously, it’s a big challenge ahead of us, but anytime you play a four-quarter football game, it’s a good test [to ready you],” he said. “I thought our preparation and focus was good, and I thought we got better on defense. That gives you a chance to win.”

in with solid displays as well.     Evergreen defensive standouts included James Jackson, Tremane Holt, Brian Pall, Don Oresky and Dan Oresky. Offensively, both Carpenter (six carries, 120 yards) and McClendon (five catches, 115 yards) topped the century mark in gains.     Included among the Mustangs’ plays were 59- and 36-yard pass completions and a 52-yard run.     Hartman wasn’t sure if Evergreen’s point total represented a school record for one game, but he is certain of what one more victory can do for Evergreen.     “We can be hitting our stride going into the playoffs,” he said.     There are obviously no playoffs in the Astros’ immediate future, but they’ll try to dodge a winless campaign when they host Argo Friday night in Palos Heights.     “I feel like we have a very disciplined program,” Passolano said, “and there are certain things we expect, whether we’re 8-0 or 0-

8. We’ve just got to finish it off [strong].”

Statistics Stagg Sandburg First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

0 0 7 0

0 0

0 -  0 7 - 14

AAS 12 110 81 191 21-8 2-0 3 7-52 2-28.5

CS 15 164 66 230 15-6 1-0 1 8-70 3-37.7

Scoring     CS — Brian Langowski, 1-yd. run (Jonathan Milazzo kick)     CS — Langowski, 45-yd. run (Milazzo kick) Stagg Rushing: Kelly 18-105. Passing: Pilota 21-8-81. Receiving: Mackessy 6-65. Sandburg Rushing: Langowski 19-119, Gutierrez 8-21, Muno-Kohn 4-13, Johnson 2-7, Walker 1-4. Passing: Gutierrez 156-66. Receiving: Johnson 3-48, Carney 2-12, Bresingham 1-6.

Statistics Evergreen Park Shepard Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Punts/avg.

Final 61 16 ABS 96 161 257 28-20 2-2 0 4-20.5

EP 325 176 501 16-11 1-0 3 —

Shepard Rushing: Javorski 10-83, Dye 11-14, Albrecht 1-(-1). Passing: Javorski 28-20-161. Receiving: Nelson 8-50, Dye 7-86, Vitello 3-16, Lopez 1-5, McCormick 1-4. Evergreen Park Rushing: Carpenter 6120. Passing: Ryan 16-11-176. Receiving: McClendon 5-115, Gurrister 2-40.


6 Section 2 Thursday, October 24, 2013 Moraine athletics wrap

The Regional News - The Reporter

Trinity sports report

Cyclones tennis team headed back to nationals By Maura Vizza     Next May, Moraine Valley College tennis players will experience the joy of six.     While Paris in the spring appeals to many, spending time in Tyler, Texas, instead will be just fine with the Cyclones. That’s the site of the 2014 National Junior College Athletic Association national tournament, and it’s where Moraine is headed for the sixth time in program history.     The Cyclones punched their latest ticket to the NJCAA event by placing second in the Region IV Tournament on Oct. 12. Moraine hosted the two-day event, and eight of its nine entries won a first-round match.     Leading the way were singles players Claudia Maka (No. 4) and Tricia Poremba (No. 6), each of whom emerged as a champion. Maka won her title match by coming from behind against an opponent who had defeated her during the regular season.     Both Poremba, who was unbeaten this fall, and Maka earned all-region recognition.     Finishing as runners-up were Alexa Armon (No. 3 singles) and Lindsey Walker (No. 5 singles), while the doubles tandems of Maka-Kelley Grzych (No. 2) and Walker-Poremba (No. 3) both took third. Walker pushed hard before suffering a 6-4, 6-4 loss in her singles encounter.     Turning in fourth-place showings were Grzych and Liz Dominguez at second- and first-singles, respectively.     “I cannot be more proud of each and every one of my girls throughout this season,” Cyclones coach Nicole Selvaggio said. “From Day 1, they worked their butts off, and I was not easy on them. To be able to go back to the national tournament, this time as a coach, absolutely means the world to me.     “This was a team effort. Seeing it all come together when it counted — well, words cannot describe how amazing that felt, not only for me, but also for all of us.     “I know what to expect at the national level. It’s not going to be easy competition. However, we are resilient and excited for our chance to be a part of, and play against, the nation’s best.” MEN’S GOLF     The golf team’s Region IV Tournament appearance wasn’t as satisfying as their tennis-playing counterparts at Moraine.     The Cyclones linksters had to settle for a ninth-place finish at the two-day, three-round event, which concluded Oct. 12. John Yerkes fired a 78 to pace Moraine through the first 18 holes, but that score couldn’t be duplicated at any other time.     Jeff Cizek (82-87-85) and Joe Knight (83-87-84) actually wound up as the Cyclones’ overall leaders. Besides Yerkes (78-94-98), Pat Neylon (84-94-84) and Jack Misheck (88-92-86) rounded out the Moraine lineup.     “Almost all our guys ran into problems at the worst time of the season,” Cyclones coach Bob Freudenthal said. “But we didn’t finish last, which is good.     “I warned them of the faster greens, but they had trouble adjusting. Of all the [negative] factors, that was No. 1 in our performance, [but] it is what it is.”     Despite the disappointing conclusion, Moraine had a decent 2013 campaign. The Cyclones were second in the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference and three golfers — Knight, Misheck and Neylon — were chosen as members of the All-ISCC squad.     “It was a respectable season overall,” Freudenthal said. “Anytime you come in second in conference, that’s noteworthy. It just wasn’t [completely] satisfying because we didn’t get first or qualify anyone for nationals

[in May].     “But I look forward to next year. We should have a few of our freshmen back and [some good] prospects, all of which could put us back in the mix next season.” CROSS COUNTRY     In their final tune-up before the postseason begins on Saturday, the Cyclones prospered from being part of a highly competitive field at the University of WisconsinOshkosh’s Brooks Invitational last weekend as they posted some of their lowest times of the fall.     Although both the men and women wound up near the bottom of their respective race standings, Moraine was the lone junior college represented at the meet. The Cyclones men took 34th among 37 schools, while the women were 35th.     Dawid Palac once again led the way for the guys as he covered the 8K distance on the Lake Breeze Golf Club course in 27 minutes, 55 seconds, which was good for 332nd place among 566 finishers. Brandon Ceh clocked a 28:29 and was the next Cyclone down the chute as he occupied the 387th position.     Thomas Cira (443rd in 29:13), Anthony Briante (502nd, 30:42) and Justin Briante (503rd, 30:50) were Moraine’s other scorers. Alejandro Montes (516th, 31:14) and Larry Byrd (548th, 33:06) also competed for the Cyclones.     “Most of the guys took advantage of good racing weather, a fast field and a fast course to turn in their best times so far,” Moraine coach Mark Horstmeyer said. “This is a tremendous race, and it gives our guys the experience to know what it’s like to compete against NCAA Division III-ranked teams, as well as top NAIA teams from the Midwest.     “Most of the guys thought they could have done better, but this meet served its purpose: getting them ready for conference and regionals, and hopefully nationals.” ***     Aileen Gorman was once again the Cyclones’ female pacesetter as she completed the women’s 5K event in 24:34. That landed the Marist grad in the 214th spot in a 509-runner field.     Moraine’s other scoring placers included Tiffany Huntley (378th in 26:44), Jessica Flores (386th, 26:51), Miranda Reyes (437th, 28:04) and Maritza Najera (461st, 28:54). Rounding out the Cyclones’ lineup were Lex Mindock (471st, 29:28) and Sury Rosete (507th, 38:34).     “This was the biggest meet of the regular season and a great final tune-up for the women,” Horstmeyer said. “It was a great racing day at a great race.     “The team gained experience in what it’s like competing against some elite teams. I was really pleased with their effort and gamesmanship.”     Moraine will host Saturday’s ISCC meet at Pioneer Woods Forest Preserve.     “This is our new course, and it will be challenging,” Horstmeyer said. “It truly is a ‘cross country’ course — it has hills and flats, and it will demand smart running. We’re excited that we can host our conference meet.” MEN’S SOCCER     Although they suffered a 3-2 loss in their regular-season finale last Tuesday, the Cyclones still took second in the ISCC. A 2-0 win over Kankakee Community College three days before helped clinch the deal.     Keying Moraine’s victory on Oct. 12 were sophomore Marko Enciso and freshman Leonides Lezama, who tallied the Cyclones’ goals. Joe Mastej set up Lezama’s score, while Enciso’s marker was unassisted.     Greg Healy found the back of the net for the Cyclones in their setback against Daley College, off an assist from Patryk Paprocki. A Daley own goal was responsible

for getting Moraine on the board initially.     The Cyclones immediately avenged their loss to Daley College by notching a 4-0 win in the opening round of the Region IV playoffs. WOMEN’S SOCCER     The Cyclones get postseason play underway on Saturday. VOLLEYBALL     Two more wins made it six in a row for the Cyclones, whose latest dual-match conquests came against McHenry College (25-11, 25-15, 25-18) and Illinois Valley College (25-19, 25-16, 25-15) last Tuesday and Thursday, respectively.     Moraine, which was ranked 20th in the latest NJCAA Division II poll, improved its ISCC ledger to 6-0 by beating McHenry. Taylor Serrano, Autumn Seiler and Kara Kentner all put down 10 kills to pace the Cyclones, and the threesome also registered 10 blocks between them. In addition to her kills and five blocks, Serrano served an ace, while Kentner augmented her other statistics with 19 assists.     Lending a hand as well was Oak Lawn grad Olivia Lindner, who donned the libero shirt for two sets and had five digs. ***     Kentner and Serrano were key figures along the net again on Thursday, as the former notched a team-best 13 kills and Serrano recorded nine. Neither player was guilty of any hitting errors. For good measure, Kentner also passed out 20 assists.     Other notable contributors for Moraine versus Illinois Valley were Gina Ryan (10 kills, 14 digs) and Joanna Curtis (team-high 25 assists, two service aces).     Following the Cyclones’ Game 1 victory, Kentner was presented a ball in recognition of a career achievement. During an Oct. 5 match against Joliet Junior College, Kentner distributed her 1,000th assist for Moraine. ***     In their final tournament appearance of the regular season, the Cyclones faced top teams at Kishwaukee College last weekend and came away with a four-match split.     Friday’s action began with Moraine absorbing its second loss of the year to NJCAA Division II No. 5-ranked Muskegon (Mich.) College, 25-14, 25-22, 25-19. Kentner (seven kills, two blocks), Seiler (five kills) and Serrano (four) were the Cyclones’ key performers.     After a short break, Moraine was back at it versus Owens Community College. Following a 2517 defeat in the opening set, the Cyclones roared back to capture the next three by scores of 25-15, 25-14, 25-23.     Kentner was at the top of her game as she registered 17 kills with no hitting errors, 18 assists and 12 digs. Serrano added 12 kills and three blocks, Ryan chipped in eight kills and 15 digs, and Alex Bojan supplied five kills and three blocks.     No. 4-ranked Oakland Community College outlasted Moraine 2516, 25-20, 21-25, 25-16 in Saturday’s first match. As was the case against Muskegon, the Cyclones were forced to cope with a bigger opponent along the net.     Kentner (14 kills, 15 assists, one block, one ace), Serrano (nine kills), Seiler (six), Ryan (six) and Curtis (23 assists) were Moraine’s notables.     The Cyclones then squared their tournament ledger at 2-2 by downing No. 8 Rock Valley College 25-17, 25-22, 17-25, 25-16 in Saturday’s second encounter behind strong efforts from Serrano (12 kills, four blocks, service ace), Ryan (10 kills, 14 digs) and Kentner (nine kills, 21 assists, two blocks, one ace).     Today’s nonconference match against Elmhurst College completes the Cyclones’ regular schedule.

Trolls benefit from untangled Webb By Tim Cronin     Memo to the other women’s soccer teams in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference: Feel free to try to stop Trinity Christian College’s Rachael Webb one of these days. Your squad would be the first to shut her down.     Webb, more and more, is the linchpin in the Trolls’ big season. Despite being closely marked — opponents are trying, after all — she scored twice last week and had three assists in Trinity’s victories over the University of St. Francis and St. Xavier University.     Webb had a goal and two assists in a 5-2 victory at USF, then added one of each in Saturday’s 3-0 whitewash of the Cougars at Schaaf Field. Her gaudy totals through 14 matches are 12 goals and six assists for 30 points.     Even better, Trinity’s glittery record was 10-2-2 entering this past Wednesday’s match at Cardinal Stritch, the first of four CCAC encounters that will conclude the regular-season schedule.     With defenses collapsing on her, Webb is finding open teammates when she isn’t getting an open shot. That was the case in her feeding Abby McDonald for the Trolls’ second goal late in the first half against SXU.     With four minutes left, Webb then took Kayla Diemer’s pass and scored the final marker, the capper to Senior Day festivities.     The story was similar in the week’s first match, when Trinity overwhelmed USF. Webb gave the Trolls a 1-0 lead before four minutes had elapsed, fed Diemer for the second goal in the 16th minute and — after Diemer had poured in two more goals for a hat trick, the third one coming on a nifty rebound — set up Katie Linehan for the final score of the match.     Keeper Becky Gold (8-2-2) picked up her fifth shutout of the season against the Fighting Saints, while netminder Liz Shutte scored her second victory in as many starts versus the Cougars. ***     • Record: 10-2-2 overall, 5-1-1 CCAC, 6-1-1 home, 4-1-1 away, 0-0 neutral. Leaders: Rachael Webb 12 goals, 6 assists, 30 points; Becky Gold, 0.92 goalsagainst average, .863 save percentage (69 saves, 11 goals against, 5 shutouts).     • Schedule: Saturday, at Holy Cross College, 11 a.m. CT; Wednesday, at Cardinal Stritch University, 7 p.m.; Nov. 2, vs. Judson University, noon. VOLLEYBALL     A quiet week for the Trolls is one in which they play only one match, and that week finally arrived.     They won it with a three-set

RedHawks (Continued from page 1) ping forward was Weishar, who had played only sporadically on defense since opening week. Dunne, however, “knew [Friday] he was going to have a bigger role,” and Weishar’s first pickoff was the initial indicator of the impact he would have on this occasion.     The interception occurred one series after Marist’s offense had coughed up the football after driving inside the Redwings’ 25.     “You have to have amnesia on those kinds of plays,” Weishar said, referring to the fumble. “I think [the interception] was a huge momentum play. It wasn’t all me — guys threw some great blocks for me [on the runback].     “The defense played a great game, and it had to do with the way we practiced. We had a great week of practice — the best we’ve had all season — and it was a

Palos AYSO soccer season hits home stretch     The 2013 Palos AYSO soccer season hit its home stretch, as teams jockey for position in anticipation of the upcoming playoffs.     Following is a recap of reported matches from last week.

setback against Icy Hot.

Taila and Lenny Kobilca gave the Duckies more than enough scoring punch to down the Orange UNDER-12 Silver Soldiers 7, Green Monsters 4 Team. Faith Duggins distributed     The Monsters got solid offensive an assist for the Duckies. production, but it wasn’t enough     Anchoring their defense were to counter the Soldier’s explosive- keepers Kobilca and Peyton ness as five different players tal- Lenarz, Kate Boyle, Anthony Galan, Aidan O’Hara and Eamonn lied for the winners. UNDER-14     Matthew Bogner and John Boyle. Navy Seals 2, Lightning 1     Darek Michniak’s goal was all Kennedy each scored twice for Purple Piranhas 5, Blue Flames 2 the Lightning could muster versus the Soldiers, while James Hunt     Jacob Nowobilski and Alvaro the Seals, which resulted in a loss registered a goal and assist. Also Hucker both scored twice and finding the back of the net were Maddy Meehan added one marker, for the former.     Also playing well for the Light- Eddie Sutkus and Omar Gad. as the Piranhas extinguished the ning in the defensive struggle Flames. Connor LeBeau (two), were netminders Connor Casey, Nightmares 4, Blue Smurfs 3 Adrian Bukowski and Greg SawTyler Winkelmann and Jake Yer-     The Smurfs were indeed blue ertailo were the assist people. kes, plus Abby Becker, Ramiz Fak- after goals by Bart Nowobilski,     Contributing on the defensive houry and Samantha Michniak. Aidan O’Leary and Ryan Thoma- end were Isabella Bacerott, MatOthers chipping in were Alyssa son weren’t enough to prevent thew Gilhooly, Lily Ceretto and Barraco, Jack Forden, Joshua a defeat versus the Nightmares. Emmett O’Brien. Gregoriou, Kelsey Kelley, Josh Ethan Zickert passed out an assist     Troy Ogarek and Kol Sheilds Pappas, Noelia Perez, Jaime Ryan on one of the scores. both booted home goals for the and Ali Elmosa. Flames. Julia Chapman (assist), UNDER-10 Amelia Kuna, Aiden Foertsch, Icy Hot 7, Team #2 1 Green Rubber Duckies 3, Orange Alex Talbott, Mowaz Sayed and     Wael Gad (goal) and Lilly Corso Team 0 Margaret Keane also played well were Team #2’s top players in its     Goals by Brendan Arnold, Laith in a losing effort.

Team #2 2, Neon Lights 0     A couple defensive miscues in the third period saddled the Lights with a loss, even though they had several earlier opportunities to break through on the scoreboard. Bridget Stroner, Daniel Sweeney, Dylan Gumtow, Erik Knutson, G.G. Navarrete, Jimmy Navarrete, Kaesy King, Luke Lisiecki, Maggie McHugh, Nate Tran, William Hardison and Grace Anderson helped the Lights keep the match close. Team #3 6, Red Bull 4     Red Bull fell short of Team #3 despite good outings from Daniel Bafia (two goals), Joseph Dajani (one goal, two assists), Grace Compagner (one goal, one assist) and John Vasiliades (two assists).     Ryan Farkas also performed credibly for the losing squad.

sweep of Olivet Nazarene University, 25-23, 25-16, 25-13. The victory kept Trinity unbeaten (120) in CCAC play and advanced its overall record to 27-6.     More important was the chance to rest. The match against Olivet was followed by a week without one, and while there was practice, there was also the opportunity for players to take a breath before this past Tuesday’s match against Calumet College of St. Joseph.     The volleyball season began Aug. 20, and this was the first time since the end of September that there were as many as six days between matches. Now, the schedule ramps up again.     The last conference crossover weekend is Friday and Saturday, when the Trolls will play Judson University, Cardinal Stritch and Illinois Institute of Technology at Purdue-North Central. Two more conference matches take place next week, with another week off before the regular-season final against the University of St. Francis.     But that’s the prelude to the CCAC playoffs, which could see Trinity playing three matches in as many locales in five days.     The Trolls beat Olivet with their time-tested formula of a strong frontal attack — Kaitlin Feddema, Kaitlyn VanDellen and Jessica Wiltjer had 10 kills each from the team total of 41 — and keeping plays alive. The top diggers were Lauren Macaldo (nine) and Feddema (eight).     Only in the first set did the Tigers threaten, leading 14-10 before Trinity tied the set and then took the lead at 22-20. The second and third sets were routs. ***     • Record: 27-6 overall, 12-0 CCAC, 7-0 home, 7-1 away, 13-5 neutral. Leaders: Kaitlin Feddema 329 kills; Erynn Schuh 41 aces; Ellie Raebel 399 digs; Jessica Wiltjer 119 blocks.     • Schedule: Friday-Saturday, CCAC crossover at Purdue-North Central; Tuesday, at Purdue University Calumet, 7 p.m.; Oct. 31, vs. Indiana University-South Bend, 7 p.m.; Nov. 7, vs. University of St. Francis, 7 p.m. MEN’S SOCCER     It’s never easy for the Trolls.     That was proven again last week, when the momentum of a come-from-behind, suddendeath victory over St. Francis was doused a few days later by a stinging defeat to St. Xavier.     The 2-1 road win over the Fighting Saints required overtime. USF had opened the scoring on Christian Ontiveros’ goal via a 20-yard free kick in the 10th minute, but Trinity fought back after the intermission. Joey Bahena’s 7-yard rip from the right wing beat Adam Elshalakany at 46:13 to tie the match.     The score remained 1-1 through the rest of the second half and great team win.”     Weishar’s second steal countered a 90-yard kickoff return by Ryan Parks that had given Benet a jolt. That was to be the Redwings’ lone highlight before intermission, as they fumbled the ball away on two other returns and also had two more passes intercepted.     Ryan Mishka and Flynn Nagel both made their swipes in Marist territory, which prevented Benet from mounting an early comeback bid.     “That was a comedy of errors,” Redwings coach Pat New said. “I don’t know what else to really say about it. The last time I saw something like that was when I played at Northwestern [University] in the mid-’80s.     “We can overcome a touchdown or two. Once you get down by 21 or 28 [points], it’s tough.”     Touchdown catches by Weishar (23 yards) and Nagel (77 yards) in the second stanza actually put Benet in arrears by 35 points by halftime. Nick Surges breathed a bit of life into the Redwings by going 70 yards with a thirdquarter pickoff, and Benet tallied another time on Brad Sznajder’s 3-yard dash, but that was as far as the rally went.     Nagel completed the game’s scoring with a 31-yard TD catch early in the fourth period. He finished the evening with 12 receptions and 196 yards, while Weishar caught eight balls from quarterback Jack Donegan and turned them into 90 yards’ worth of gains.     Donegan completed 23-of-31 throws for 309 yards and scored once himself on a 6-yard keeper. That play followed Marty Ryan’s fumble recovery at the Redwings’ 31.     Peter Andreotti also delivered a six-pointer for the RedHawks on a 50-yard gallop, part of a 150yard performance for the senior tailback. Marist’s complete body of work didn’t go unnoticed.

    “Hat’s off to Marist — that’s a first-class organization,” Surges said. “Those guys at Marist like Team #8 6, Orange Knights 0     Ryan Doyle, Jude Welsch, Tessa Weishar and Nagel and Donegan Welsch and Tegan Bumsted were are great football players, they’re the Knights’ standouts in a loss extremely well-coached, and they came out with more energy than to Team #8.

15 minutes of overtime. But at 15:09, with the Trolls flooding the box, Noe Quirate headed a shot past Elshalakany for the victory. That goal, Quirate’s first of the season on Trinity’s 15th shot of the match, made the difference.     What the Trolls couldn’t do was carry the excitement over to Saturday’s showdown with the Cougars at Schaaf Field.     SXU tallied first, on Brandon Simoes’ boot at 32:11. Quirate notched his second goal in as many matches to knot the score at 43:20, but from that point forward, it was the Cougars getting better chances, even though the Trolls outshot their guests 12-9.     Simoes completed his hat trick with a pair of second-half goals, the last with 2:34 left.     Gabe Fennema, in the nets for both matches, is the favored goalkeeper now, and his stats are almost equal to those of Rick Fawkes, the starter in the early going. Fennema improved his goals-against average to 1.74, and has a .698 save percentage. ***     • Record: 5-8-1 overall, 2-5 CCAC, 3-4 home, 2-4-1 away, 0-0 neutral. Leaders: Mauricio Salgado 4 goals, 10 points; Emmanuel Yanquaye, Richie Carillo 3 assists each; Rick Fawkes 1.71 goals-against average, .769 save percentage; (20 saves, 6 goals against, 1 shutout).     • Schedule: Saturday, at Holy Cross College, 2:30 p.m.; Wednesday, at Cardinal Stritch University, 5 p.m.; Nov. 2, vs. Judson University, 2:30 p.m. CROSS COUNTRY     This Saturday’s Great Lakes Invitational in Grand Rapids, Mich., is the last regular-season meet for the Trolls. A fortnight later comes the CCAC Championship, hosted by Calumet College of St. Joseph in Valparaiso, Ind., and a week after that, on Nov. 16, is the National Christian College Athletic Association national meet in Ohio.     Andy Reidsma and Anna Bos are expected to lead the Trinity qualifiers for that latter engagement, and they may have a shot at qualifying for the NAIA Championship on Nov. 23 as well. BASKETBALL     Joe Hehir (Lemont) and Trey Johnson (Manteno) have completed the recruiting puzzle for men’s coach Brandon Nicol. Hehir was a key cog in the Indians’ 48-7 record the last two seasons, while Johnson shot 58.5 percent from the floor and pulled down nine rebounds a game at Manteno. The season begins Nov. 1, when the Trolls host Indiana-Kokomo. ... Trinity’s women’s team also begins Nov. 1 with a road game at Indiana-Northwest. A pair of JV games precede the opener, including a Tuesday visit by Moraine Valley College. us.”     “When we play a full four quarters [well], they can see where we can go,” Dunne said of his athletes.

Statistics Benet Academy Marist

7 0 14 28 14 0

0 - 21 7 - 49

First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

BA 15 16 171 187 30-14 3-3 4 4-30 2-34.0

MA 23 194 309 503 31-23 2-2 1 10-95 2-49.0

Scoring     MA — JaWill Aldridge, 1-yd.run (Kyle Gambla kick)     MA — Jack Donegan, 6-yd. run (Gambla kick)     BA — Ryan Parks, 90-yd. kickoff return (John Duvic kick)     MA — Nic Weishar, 15-yd. interception return (Gambla kick)     MA — Peter Andreotti, 50-yd. run (Gambla kick)     MA — Weishar, 23-yd. pass from Donegan (Gambla kick)     MA — Flynn Nagel, 77-yd. pass from Donegan (Gambla kick)     BA — Ryan Surges, 70-yd. interception return (Duvic kick)     BA — Brad Sznajder, 3-yd. run (Duvic kick)     MA — Nagel, 31yd. pass from Donegan (Gambla kick) Marist Rushing: Andreotti 19-150, Aldridge 9-38, Donegan 5-5, Schmidt 1-3, Skalitzky 1-(-2). Passing: Donegan 3123-309. Receiving: Nagel 12-196, Weishar 8-90, Ferguson 1-15, Andreotti 1-8, Neal 1-0.

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Section 2 Thursday, October 24, 2013

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�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� �������������� For Sale W 0 9 0 4 9 4 � IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS TRUSTEE, F O R � CWMBS, INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH T R U S T � 2007-18, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH C E R T I F I C A T E S � SERIES 2007-18; Plaintiff, v s . � MICHAEL P. CODY; KELLI L. CODY; STATE BANK O F � COUNTRYSIDE; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MICHAEL P. CODY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS A N D � LEGATEES OF KELLI L. CODY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 09 CH 9909 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 20, 2010 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, November 15, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 24-30-323-006-0000. Commonly known as 12555 South 69th Avenue, Palos Heights, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff's Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W 0 9 0 4 9 4 . � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565136

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-FF4, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-FF4 Plaintiff, -v.SAWSON HADDAD A/K/A SAWSON R. HADDAD, RAJAEI HADDAD A/K/A RAJAEI J. HADDAD A/K/A RAY HADDAD, CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, INLAND BANK AND TRUST, MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC, INTEGRA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 028055 17128 POINTE DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 15, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 7, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17128 POINTE DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-29-313-003. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-18640. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-18640 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 028055 TJSC#: 33-21935 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I566268

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����������������� For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Jessica Wojtysiak; The Hills Homeowners Association; The Hills of Palos Condominium Association; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 34350 Sheriff's # 130744 F12080312 CHOH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on November 26, 2013, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 3 Cinnamon Creek Drive Unit 32S and G1-D-15 and P-1-9-15, Palos Hills, 60465 P.I.N: 23-10-200-015-1015; 23-10-200-015-1041 Improvements: This property consists of a Residential Condominium Unit with parking space. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of a condominium unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments as required by 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1) Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I563985

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., P l a i n t i f f � V . � ELIZABETH PACURA; STONY CREEK CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 25926 Property Address: 6 WEST STONEBRIDGE COURT UNIT A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 10-036585 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 22, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on November 18, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 6 West Stonebridge Court, Unit A, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-14-400-071-1055 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $ 244,902.07. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I560239

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N , � P l a i n t i f f � V . � EIAD Z. MATARIYEH A/K/A EIAD MATARIYEH; HUSSAM ALKHATIB A/K/A HUSSAM A. ALKHATIB; FIA CARD SERVICES, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A MBNA AMERICA BANK, N.A.; MARTA M. A L K H A T I B , � D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 1291 Property Address: 8327 WEST 105TH STREET PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 12-064873 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 26, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on December 2, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 8327 West 105th Street, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-14-203-001-0000; 2 3 - 1 4 - 2 0 3 - 0 0 2 - 0 0 0 0 � The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $319,115.71. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I562164

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � LELA DEMETER; WESTGATE VALLEY ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 11 CH 39841 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on August 23, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, November 26, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 24-31-214-045-0000. Commonly known as 414 SHADOW CREEK DRIVE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1124744. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I567491

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � HOMESTAR BANK AND FINANCIAL SERVICES, P l a i n t i f f , � v . � PAULA MATWICHUK N/K/A PAULA KWAINS A/K/A PAULA A. KWAINS A/K/A PAULA A. M A T W I C H U K , � EAGLE RIDGE CONDOMINUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 29922 17929 ALASKA CT., UNIT 12 Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 22, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17929 ALASKA CT., UNIT 12, Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-32-301-016-1012. The real estate is improved with a condominium. The judgment amount was $134,630.13. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD., 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105, CHICAGO, IL 60603, (312) 372-2020. Please refer to file number 12-3554. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105 CHICAGO, IL 60603 (312) 372-2020 Attorney File No. 12-3554 Attorney Code. 4452 Case Number: 12 CH 29922 TJSC#: 33-22987 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I568484

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ANTHONY S. MAJEWSKI; JENNIFER L. MAJEWSKI A K A � JENNIFER SKALA-MAJEWSKI; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants, 11 CH 38276 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on October 25, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, November 25, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 27-27-105-040-0000. Commonly known as 16758 Haven Avenue, Orland Hills, IL 60487. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1123787. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I567451

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � THOMAS SIEMECK A/K/A THOMAS R SIEMECK, JOSETTE SIEMECK, BMO HARRIS BANK, N.A. F/K/A HARRIS N.A., UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 33849 7900 WEST 92ND STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 6 0 4 5 7 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 23, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 26, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7900 WEST 92ND STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-01-306-020-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family home with a detached 2 car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1208385. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1208385 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 33849 TJSC#: 33-18946 I566671

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST 2006-7 Plaintiff, v s . � IWONA SZOSTEK AKA IWONA F SZOSTEK AKA I W O N A � FELICIJA SZOSTEK AKA SZOZTEK IWONA; PNC B A N K , � N.A. S/B/M TO NATIONAL CITY BANK S/B/M TO MIDAMERICA BANK, FSB; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 31534 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on August 22, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, November 26, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-12-103-026-0000. Commonly known as 7836 WEST 98TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1211069. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I567496

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10-24-13 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION NORTHERN TRUST BANK COMPANY, P l a i n t i f f � V . � JOSEPH R. REESE; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 4901 Property Address: 8401 SOUTH 83RD COURT HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 10-033639 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 26, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on December 2, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 8401 South 83rd Court, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Permanent Index No.: 18-35-408-029 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $234,971.26. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I562140

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Ryszard Kiwacz; Krystyna Kiwacz; JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 1 2 C H 1 2 9 0 7 � Sheriff's # 130795 F12020300 CHOH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on December 2, 2013, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 8750 West Taos Drive, Palos Hills, Illinois 60465 P.I.N: 23-14-103-002-0000 Improvements: This property consists of a Single Family Residence. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I565379

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Thursday, October 24, 2013 Section 2

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For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � DOROTA KOMAR, KRZYSZTOF KOMAR D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 25489 8230 WEST 85TH STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 11, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 21, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8230 WEST 85TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 18-35-409-037-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story single family home with an attached two car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1015126. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1015126 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 25489 TJSC#: 33-20544 I565486

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOHN MCKEE A/K/A JOHN F. MCKEE, RUTH MCKEE A/K/A RUTH MARIE MCKEE, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. S/B/M TO WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A. FKA WACHOVIA MORTGAGE FSB FKA WORLD SAVINGS BANK, F S B � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 14680 11904 SOUTH 93RD AVENUE PALOS PARK, IL 6 0 4 6 4 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 7, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 12, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 11904 SOUTH 93RD AVENUE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-27-102-002-0000. The real estate is improved with a one story single family home with a two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1206369. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1206369 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 14680 TJSC#: 33-17776 I563895

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BANK ONE, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK AND T R U S T � CO. OF CHICAGO; Plaintiff, v s . � ACE-CHICAGO GREAT DANE CORP., AN ILLINOIS CORPORATION; FIFTH THIRD BANK, S U C C E S S O R � TRUSTEE TO OLD KENT BANK AS TRUSTEE U N D E R � TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1985 AND K N O W N � AS TRUST NO. 8459; WHALER LTD; GERALDINE R. GORAL AS REPRESENTATIVE FOR DENNIS G O R A L ; � GERALDINE R GORAL; AND UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 02 CH 10672 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on March 18, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, November 12, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 12411 South Nashville, Palos Heights, IL 60463. P.I.N. 24-30-421-014-0000. The mortgaged real estate is a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Ms. Jennifer E. Frick at Plaintiff's Attorney, Crowley & Lamb, P.C., 221 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 670-6900. 9 5 0 6 0 2 0 2 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565036

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � VIVIAN PFEIFFER A/K/A VIVIAN A PFEIFFER, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 44719 8800 WEST 103RD STREET Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 14, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8800 WEST 103RD STREET, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-410-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a 1 story home with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1225287. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1225287 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 44719 TJSC#: 3 3 1 8 2 6 3 � I564431

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION P l a i n t i f f , � v . � TIMOTHY AYRES A/K/A TIMOTHY M. AYRES, HICKORY OAKS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION UNIT I Defendants 13 CH 05561 9430 GREENBRIAR DRIVE APT 1G HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 11, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 4, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9430 GREENBRIAR DRIVE APT 1G, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-303-109-1007. The real estate is improved with a 12 unit condominium with a detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1302888. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1302888 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 05561 TJSC#: 33-21721 I565299

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v s . � MARY PAWLAK A/K/A MARY MARGARET PAWLAK; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD C L A I M A N T S ; � D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 9550 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on July 31, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, November 15, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-14-202-004-0000. Commonly known as 10515 SOUTH 84TH AVENUE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1305642. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565207

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WORLD SAVINGS B A N K , � FSB; Plaintiff, v s . � SCOTT ELLIOTT; ANNA M. ELLIOTT; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 11 CH 38261 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on August 12, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, November 15, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 27-22-203-018-0000. Commonly known as 16048 South Haven Lane, Orland Hills, IL 60487. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1122375. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565160

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Section 2 Thursday, October 24, 2013

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Caregiver Over 23 years of experience; loving, caring, reliable and dependable. Looking for a job as a caregiver. Part-time, full-time, weekdays and week-ends available. References and resume are avaiable on your request. Please call Eva at: 926-4034

For Sale NEW FACTORY SALE WHY PAY MORE? Queen Pillow Topset $48 Mo Daybed w/Mattress $48 Mo Bunkbed w/Mattress $56 Mo 8pc. Living Room Set $111 Mo 8pc. Bdrm w/Mattress $95 Mo EZ Credit • No Credit Check Needed

FREE Layaway Factorybeddingfurniture.com Call for details

Phone: (708) 371-3737 FLOOR TILE 490 sq. ft. of 12” x 12” glazed ceramic floor tile. Ice Cap Brown (light brown). Will sell individually or all together. $.75 per tile. Please TEXT or call Call (708) 921-8056

Garage Sales SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26th 9 A.M. to 5 P.M.

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10312 S. Kathy Ct. Palos Hills 2 Family Moving Sale THURSDAY & FRIDAY OCTOBER 24th & 25th 10 A.M. to 4 P.M. Household items, Jim Beam decanters. 12400 S. 71st Ave. (2 blocks E. of Harlem Ave.) Palos Heights

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���������������������������������������������������������� Help Wanted Full-Time Commercial Loan Processor

FirstSecure Bank and Trust Co. is looking for a Full-Time experienced Commercial Loan Processor. Applicant should have 5+ years preparing Laser-Pro documents for commercial mortgage loans, lines of credit, guidance lines, and construction loans. Additional skills should include: payment processing and professional customer service skills to follow-up on financial documentation and insurance information. Medical, 401(k) and additional benefits are available. Please forward your resume to: FirstSecure Bank and Trust Co. Attn: Human Resources, 10360 S. Roberts Road Palos Hills, IL 60465

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The Regional News - The Reporter

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Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Broaden Your Horizons This week Spiritual memoir luncheon     A book review by the author of a spiritual memoir will be featured at a luncheon program on Tuesday, Oct. 29, from noon to 2 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     Dr. Dorothy May will discuss her 80-year spiritual journey in a memoir that reads like a novel, as she juxtaposes her story against historical and cultural events of the 19th and beginning of the 21st century. The book tells of one woman’s path out of organized religion into a spiritual identity Submitted photo Palos Village Players to perform the musical “Once Upon a Mattress” include Rudy Chavez (from left), of her own. The book’s major theme is that while the events Molly Ricker, Kim Brines, Janice Marco-Bottger and Joyce Eddy. of our lives move us along, it is the underlying “God-moments,” the voices of our souls, that connect and interconnect us with the Divine. Dr. May is a clinical and psycho-spiritual psychologist.     The luncheon begins at noon, costs $17 per person, and requires reservations. Call The Center at David Bell (Chicago); Kim Brines 361-3650. by Jan Mitchell and Molly Ricker (Evergreen Palos Village Players Park); Nick and Tom Greanias, Womantalk discussion     The Palos Village Players will mother has thwarted all efforts and Kathy Janik (Lemont), Sarah Callis, Kelly Carevic and Bob     The Center, 12700 Southwest present their final play of the to find a suitable bride. 2013 season, the fairy tale musi-     After a long and arduous effort, Szczpanski (Orland Park); Joyce Highway, Palos Park, will host its cal Once “Upon a Mattress” with the young nobleman, Sir Harry, in- Eddy (Palos Heights); Janice monthly Womantalk coffee hour music by Mary Rodgers, lyrics by troduces a prospective bride to the Marco-Bottger (Palos Hills) and and discussion on Tuesday, Oct. Marshall Barer and book by Jay Prince. She is Princess Winifred of Lucy Mahoney, of Worth. The di- 29, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Thompson, Marshall Barer and the swamps. Immediately stricken rector is Steve Bell, of Evergreen     Led by MaryAnn Grzych, ladies Dean Fuller. by the Princess, Prince Dauntless Park, and the musical Director are invited to join the discussion of     The play will be performed at sets into motion plans for a lavish is Michael Barr, of Beverly. The Simple Abundance by Sarah Ban 7:30 p.m., Nov. 8, 9, 15 and 16 wedding, as his scheming mother producer is Christine Haines, of Breathnach or other inspirational readings that participants wish and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10 and cooks up a test that’s sure to set Burbank.     Tickets for the show are $15 for to bring. There is no cost, but 17, at the Palos Park Recreation his marital plans awry. Center, 8901 W. 123rd St.     Princess Winifred is played by adults and $12 for students and reservations are required.     It is the story of a love-sick Aimee Jarzembowski (Chicago) seniors. They can be reserved in     Call The Center at 361-3650. nobleman seeking to marry his and Alex Earhart, of Orland Park, advance by calling (1-877) PVPsweetheart. Unfortunately the is Prince Dauntless. The conniv- TIXS. There is also a $25 combiIntroduction to Reiki rule of the land is that no one ing Sir Harry is Dan Nivenger, of nation lunch/theater ticket avail    An introductory Reiki experican marry until the ruling prince Orland Park, and his prospective able for both Sunday matinees at ence will be offered on Sunday, has taken a bride. However, the bride, the Lady Larkin, is played Hackney’s Restaurant, 123rd and Oct. 27, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. situation is hindered by the fact by Denise Wargowski, of Tinley La Grange Road. Call Hackney’s at The Center, 12700 Southwest that the Prince’s overprotective Park. Others in the cast include at 448-8300 for reservations. Highway, Palos Park.     Reiki is a gentle form of energy healing, reported to be especially beneficial for those suffering from physical or emotional pain. Reiki that will delight the whole family, Prince Herbert’s Father and Sing- practitioners led by Sharon Butler by Jeff Vorva but there is some cussing, bawdy ing Monk, Joe Collins (Chicago) as will offer their healing services to Reporter editor humor and a little religious sac- The Historian, Eileen Casey (Al- participants, asking a donation of     How do they do it? rilege including God calling King sip), Laurie Videka Krizka (Homer $10 per participant. Registration     How do the actors, orchestra Arthur a female anatomy part. Glen), Bonnie Ryniec (Palos Hills) is necessary, as the monthly Reiki members and those who work in     Hey, this is Monty Python, after as Mrs. Galahad; Jim Seeberg program is limited to 10 particithe background in the Beverly all. But those who might be easily (Orland Hills) as Finland Mayor pants each month. (361-3650) Theatre Guild put on a show with offended might want to check out and Vita Bender (Orland Park) so much singing, dancing, comedic another show. as Mrs. Finland Mayor. The Bridge Teen timing and other elements as they     The musical uses the storyline     Other members include Larry Center events did last week with their premier of from the movie “Monty Python Symanski (Evergreen Park) as “Monty Pythons SPAMALOT”? and the Holy Grail” and those Sir Bors; James O’Connor (Ever-     • Monopoly for Real — to    These are regular folks with day who are expecting magic from the green Park) as The Black Knight, day (Thursday), 4:30-6 p.m. The jobs and limited rehearsal time scene in which the Black Knight Kathy Cargill (Palos Heights) as Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. putting on a show with some real gets his arms and legs cut off Frenchie, Jennifer Collins (Ever- 71st Court, Orland Park, wants punch. Are these folks in the might be disappointed. But the green Park) as a Laker Girl, Andie to see how you’d do in the real league of Broadway performers rest of the humor and sight gags Zaragoza (Orland Park) as a Laker world by playing Monopoly with and workers? Probably not — oth- work out quite well. Girl; Lauren Krull (Orland Park) a twist and learning about real     A big-laugh scene was when as a Laker Girl, Mark Dillon (Oak estate development. erwise they would be there.     But this is an ambitious piece King Arthur was trying to explain Lawn) as Sir Not Appearing in this     • 1980s Costume Contest — of work that comes off very well. something to one of his dimwit- Show; and Kristopher Symanski 7:30-10:30 p.m. Oct. 25, Dress up in your best ’80s apparel, eat, Anyone who scoffs at commu- ted Knights and was getting (Evergreen Park). nity theater would have to be exasperated and shouted “It’s a     This production of SPAMAimpressed with the Guild gang’s symbol!” That caused drummer LOT will be dedicated to the Joe McKee in the orchestra to late Cynthea “Cindy” McKown efforts.     “It really is pure love of the- smash his cymbal to give the king of Palos Heights who died earlier atre that we do this crazy thing to break character and stare the this year. She was a member of the Guild starting in 1985 and as adults,” BTG Official Barbara drummer down. Moore said. “There are so many     Glenn Hering of Beverly is became a mainstay of the orga-     1. The 20/20 Experience (2 of wonderfully talented people from the director with musical direc- nization. 2), Justin Timberlake, RCA the production staff, artistic staff, tion by Terri Lenz of Beverly and     There are three more perfor-     2. Nothing Was the Same, tech staff, and of course the actors choreography by Tom Fagan of mances this weekend at the Baer Drake, Cash Money ... that do this for just the sake of Orland Park. Theatre at Morgan Park Academy     3. Pure Heroine, Lorde, Mo­ the art. We get the biggest kick     King Arthur, played by Rob So- Arts Center, 2153 W. 111th St. in town/Universal hearing the audience reaction to renson, was in BTG’s “Camelot” Chicago. Friday and Saturday’s     4. Crash My Party, Luke what we hoped we did for them. as Lancelot, then Prince Charm- curtain time is 8 p.m. and Sun- Bryan, Capitol Nashville (Univer­ This is the most rewarding gift ing in “Cinderella” and now is day’s curtain is at 2 p.m. sal) we could ask for.” King in “SPAMALOT.”     Tickets are $20 per person.     5. Redneck Crazy, Tyler Farr,     After Saturday night’s show at     Other performers include Season Subscribers save 20 per- Sony Nashville/Columbia Morgan Park Academy, the audi- Wayne Wendell (Beverly) as Sir cent with guaranteed reserved     6. Days Are Gone, HAIM, ence pretty much went crazy at Lancelot, Jeannie Rega Markionni seats and the ability for Ticket Columbia the end as the cast went into a (Chicago Heights) as The Lady of Exchange of each production.     7. Mechanical Bull, Kings of reprise of “Always Look on the the Lake, Tim Casey (Alsip) as     For ticket information call Leon, RCA Patsy, Mike Neary as Sir Galahad, (773) 284-8497 or visit Beverly     8. Closer to the Truth, Cher, Bright Side of Life”     The BTG hawks this as a show Mike Maty (Evergreen Park) as TheatreGuild.org. Warner Bros/Elektra/Atlantic     9. Crash My Party, Luke Bryan, Capitol Nashville (Univer­ sal)     10. The Diving Board, El­ton John, Capitol Records (Universal)

Palos Players’ season finale presents musical ‘Mattress’ Shows Nov. 8-17

dance and win prizes.     • Guys vs. Ladies Night — 7:3010:30 p.m. Oct. 26, free food from Jimmy John’s. This event is exclusively for students in 10th-12th grade and is free with a student membership application or $5 with a school ID. For more information call 532-0500 or visit thebridgeteencenter.org.     • Scary Movie Makeup — 4:306 p.m. Oct. 29, learn how to use makeup, paint, and wax to create life-like injuries such as a gunshot wound, scars, and zombie makeup.     • Leadership POD: True to you — 4-5:30 p.m. Oct. 30, for high schoolers only to participate in leadership pods designed to develop the leader within you. This session will focus on getting to know yourself better, find out what your strengths are, how you see the world, and most importantly — how you see yourself. (532-0500)

to choose individual projects and to learn more advanced knitting skills.     The class fee is $84. Beginning students should bring a fall of Sugar n’ Cream yarn in a light solid color and a pair of size US 9/5.5mm, preferably aluminum, knitting needles to the first class. After the first project, students will purchase yarns and patterns after consultation with the instructor.     Registration is required. Call The Center 361-3650.

Center Stargazers

    A new Stargazers group will meet at The Center, at 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park on Friday evening, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m.     The new star gazing group is intended for anyone interested in exploring the night sky. The group will begin with a discussion in The Center lodge on the west side of Southwest Highway, and then drive to the farm on the east side for relatively dark-sky viewing. Participants should bring Knitting classes a chair and flashlight.     The Log Cabin Center for the     No fee is charged, but pre-regArts, 12700 Southwest High- istration is requested. Call The way, Palos Park, will offer six- Center at 361-3650. week knitting classes on Friday mornings, beginning Nov. 1, from Civil War 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., and on Monday Lincoln discussion evenings beginning Nov. 18, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.     South Suburban Civil War     Master knitter Georgann Ring Roundtable member Don White, welcomes both beginners and ex- author of “Facts, Quotes and Anperienced knitters to her classes. ecdotes of the Civil War,” will be Beginners will learn to use the at the New Lenox Library, 120 knit and purl stitches, to cast on Veterans Parkway in New Lenox and bind off, to manage simple in- on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 1 p.m. for creases and decreases, and to read a discussion on “Abraham Lincoln a simple pattern while competing — the War Years.” their first two knitting projects, a     Register for this event by calling dishcloth and then a scarf. Ring (815) 485-2605 or visit newlenox will help those with experience library.org.

Upcoming

A lot of work goes into SPAMALOT

Top Pop Albums

Top DVD Rentals

Submitted photo

The BTG cast of “Monty Python’s SPAMALOT” enjoys the applause after a weekend performance.

    1. Iron Man 3, Walt Disney Studios, PG-13     2. World War Z, Paramount Pictures, PG-13     3. Scary Movie 5, Dimension Films, PG-13     4. Star Trek Into Darkness, Paramount Pictures, PG-13     5. The Great Gatsby, Warner Bros., PG-13     6. The Croods, DreamWorks, PG     7. This is the End, Sony Pictures, R     8. Now You See Me, Summit Entertainment, LLC, PG-13     9. Olympus Has Fallen, FilmDistrict, R     10. Pacific Rim, Warner Bros., PG-13

Submitted photo

Weaving class in Log Cabin    A new six-week weaving class begins at The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, Wednesday, Nov. 6, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.    Weaver Nettie Botts of Palos Park teaches each new student to create a sampler on portable table looms during their first three weeks in her class. For those who continue, Botts then helps them to design a project of their own choosing. Experienced weavers design projects in the pattern weave of their choice, using either the table looms or the large floor looms. Weavers make projects such as scarves and table linens of their own color scheme and design.    Here, weaving student Carol Looby uses one of the four-harness table looms.    The cost of the weaving class is $84, plus a $10 materials fee for new weavers’ samplers. Students will purchase their own threads and yarns for future projects.    Registration is required. Call 361-3650.


12

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Section 2

The Regional News - The Reporter

Halloween   Costume Contest Winners prizes Provided by haunted trails

1st Place - Kevin Jendrzejak, Billy the Exterminator Age: 5 Palos Hills

2nd Place - Donovan Rodriquez, Scary Jester Age: 12 Oak Lawn Hometown Middle School

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Monthly dues still apply. Some restrictions may apply. Re-activation fee applicable to former members. Offer valid through Nov. 12, 2013. Must be 18 years of age or older to redeem.

Like us on Facebook for the latest news!

Visit frightmare.org for info, schedule & coupons! $10 Haunted House Admission!

Mayor Robert Straz GO-KART RIDE, MINI-GOLF GAME City Clerk Thomas Kantas -ORfor info, schedule &FRIGHTMARE coupons! Treasurer Frank Oswald HAUNTED HOUSE ADMISSION Aldermen NOT VALID ON SATURDAYS. Limit 1 coupon

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Hours: Mon 4-10; tues - thur 4-10 Fri 11-2 Lunch & 4-11 Dinner; sat 4-11; sun 3-10

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3rd Place - Mikey Galason, Super Mikey Age: 3 mos. Palos Heights

Our 77th Year! www.rileystrickshop.com

Shirley’s Place on Harlem in Palos Heights 12343 S. Harlem Avenue • ShirleyNeumann@sbcglobal.net Open 7 Days A Week 10:30 - 5:30 • Evening Hours By Appointment

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