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Thursday, October 17, 2013

Transparency not all that clear in OL By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter     Transparency was a central theme in Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury’s campaign, and while her supporters insist she’s already taken steps to honor that pledge, opponents contend the mayor has been less than forthcoming on issues of importance to the village.     The topic was broached at the Oct. 8 village board meeting when a proposal by Trustees Bob Streit and Carol Quinlan calling for trustees to have greater access to village records, including emails, was Serving Chicago defeated.     The proposal lost 4-3 with Bury casting the deciding vote, but not before extensive debate by trustees.     Currently, only the mayor and Village Manager Larry Deetjan have access to the documents.     “You guys are going to tell me you’re going to restrict what

THE 2 SECTIONS Evergreen Park 22 PAGES stays unbeaten, Stagg rings up Volume XLVIIvs. No. 50 61 points Joliet West and other football action See Sports

A guy tells police his eyes were glassy and watery because he was concerned with the safety of passengers he hit. Did cops believe him? Page 2

Dominick’s in Palos Heights will be closing as parent company makes big slashes Tim Hadac reports on Page 5

Former Oak Lawn Mayor Dave Heilmann has a few things he wants to get off his chest about the new administration See Page 6

index Police News.....................2 Our Neighborhood..........4 Sudoku...........................4 Commentary...................6 Death Notices..................7 Crossword......................7 School.........................8 & 9 Consumer....................11 Calendar........................10

columnists Jeff Vorva........................3 Dee Woods....................12 Wine Guy......................12

can and can’t see,” Quinlan said. “I would think transparency would include providing general records to anyone.”     Village Attorney Paul O’Grady has ruled that the village is not required to share such emails with trustees.     “There’s no law that says sonnel matters, litigation, labor trustees have access to the relations, estate and highly Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills,real Oak Lawn, Palos emails of the manager and sensitive matters that are permayor,” Village Clerk Jane mitted to be kept confidential,” Quinlan said. Deetjen said. “Those who wish     Quinlan added that Deetjen to obtain unlimited data for reaand the mayor frequently are sons that are not objective and involved in negotiations and in the village’s best interests other sensitive matters and certainly should understand related emails cannot be made this balancing act.” public.     Trustees unanimously ap    “Under Illinois law, a number proved additions to the ethics of these emails deal with per- ordinance at the Oct. 8 meeting.

The ordinance prohibits village officials and employees from using their positions to influence board decisions that would result in financial gain.     The measure also prohibits elected officials from participating in discussions or voting on issuesand in Worth which they, their Hills spouses or domestic partners have received or expect to receive income or compensation for a period of one year.     Bury’s supporters believe the additions to the ethics ordinance are just one example of the mayor’s efforts to increase transparency.     “I think [transparency] has improved, but it’s such a big

R EPORTER

topic to tackle,” Trustee Alex Olejniczak said.     The veteran trustee pointed out that Bury has taken significant strides during her first six months in office to improve transparency, includUSPS 118-690 ing establishing the legislative, license and ordinance committee during her first board meeting. Streit and Quinlan voted against the formation of the three-member committee.     The committee currently is discussing term limits for elected officials, an issue that is expected to come before the full board before the end of the year. The board1,will deThursday, March 2007 termine whether to place the item as a referendum on the March ballot.     The committee was formed in part to help Oak Lawn to reach a 100 percent transparency score on a checklist compiled by the Illinois Policy Institute. The checklist requires contact information for elected and (Continued on page 3)

75¢

MVCC looks to go tobacco free By Kevin M. Coyne Correspondent     Moraine Valley Community College trustees are considering banning all tobacco products and creating a policy that would divorce state law, which currently governs all tobacco-related citations.     Moraine Valley currently has nine designated smoking areas on the main campus in Palos Hills. According to state law, anyone caught smoking outside the designated area or 15 feet from an entrance is subject to a $100 fine with $150 overdue fee.     During an October board meeting last Wednesday, MVCC Wellness Coordinator Lisa Wright proposed banning tobacco outright and reducing the fine to $30 with a $5 overPhoto by Jeff Vorva due fee. Wright’s proposal was supported by 291 of 324 staff and faculty members who were surveyed.     Palos Hills Mayor Jerry Bennett was a tough hitter and pitcher in Saturday’s first Battle in the Burbs charity softball game.     “When we surveyed the college     Police and fire chiefs beat the mayors of various communities, 26-12, in a 16-inch softball game to benefit Special Olympics of Illinois. we had a pretty good representaApproximately $4,000 was raised. tion across all areas of the college,”     For Jeff Vorva’s look at how Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury and Clerk Jane Quinlan had a tough job as third base coaches, see his Wright said. column on page 3. For more photos, see page 4.     Moraine trustees questioned how students responded to the survey. Wright informed the trustees that the students were not included in the survey but were placed into small 10-person focus groups.     “We sat down with the institutional research and planning group to create the focus group questions to limit it and make sure we are targeting the questions to get the feedback we needed to move forward.” she said. By Claudia Parker the following week.     If approved, the ban would go Correspondent     Carlene O’Connor, of Palos Hills into effect in the fall, 2014. Mois one person who is happy with raine Trustee Joseph Murphy     Inspiration lifted church mem- having her place dressed up. questioned the motives behind bers up from the pews and into     “These are tremendous peobanning tobacco on campus. their community to practice what ple,” she said. “They painted     “Is the motivation to get was being preached. my entire condo in one day. It smokers to quit or to protect the     The Palos Park Presbyterian was amazing. They had a team of non-smokers?” Murphy asked, Community Church gathered eight people. I’m a smoker, with after drawing a comparison bemore than 200 volunteers, and thick nicotine on my walls. You tween New York Mayor Michael hit the households of 23 residents can’t tell anymore. It’s beautiful Bloomberg’s failed attempt to on to conduct home improvement in here.” ban soda, salt and other fatty projects. They likened the project     She said she was given a quote foods. “We are talking about to “Extreme Home Maker” with a by a professional painting comyoung adults that have the splash of something off of Home pany months prior and the asking freedom of choice and I think and Garden TV. price was $3,000. She spoke soft it’s going to be impossible to     It’s called Serving Our Neigh- but rapid saying, “I could have enforce.” bors Weekend and it’s been hap- never afforded that. The church     Trustees Murphy and Tom pening annually, during the last didn’t ask me for anything. And, Cunningham questioned the weekend of September, for four they gave me a gift basket, lefthealthcare cost of approving the years. over paint, a t-shirt, and invited proposed tobacco-free program,     They replaced everything from me to a free breakfast the next saying students who choose to roofs to furnaces. They cleaned morning.” smoke must deal with the risks everything from gutters to carpets     As a thank you to the group, and costs associated with smokand trimmed everything outside she says she attended a worship ing. from trees to grass. service and gave a speech.     “If you can’t enforce our cur    If that’s not enough, some of     O’Connor said she worked for rent policy then why try to enthem painted, wall to wall, inside the Palos Olympic Health Club for force it when it becomes more and out. This is the short list 16 years. She added she had zero restricted?” Murphy asked. “I at zero cost to the homeowner. reservations about accepting help. hate smoking, but I don’t want SON Weekend took place over She said she “felt special.” three days. If the job couldn’t     SON Weekend was inspired by Palos Hills’ Carlene O’Connor had her house painted, received a kid to lose money for books be finished within the weekend, a disaster in New Orleans. a bucket of paint, a basket with a pumpkin inside and a t-shirt because of a fine he got for smoking.” a mop-up crew finished the work courtesy of the SON weekend in September. (Continued on page 7)

Palos Hills mayor a hitter and a hurler

Painting an inspiring picture

Palos Hills woman thrilled to have her house painted during Palos Park church’s SON Weekend


2

The Reporter Thursday, October 17, 2013

police news

were reported stolen between     Two iPhones were reported Oct. 1 and 8 from a shed in the stolen Oct. 7 from the T-Mobile 5900 block of 99th Street. store, 5141 W. 95th St. *** ***     A catalytic convertor was re    Mark J. Danielson, 23, of ported stolen between Oct. 7 Oak Lawn, was charged with and 10 from a car in the 4900 drunken driving, disobeying a block of 95th Street. stop sign and speeding Oct. 2 *** after a stop at 103rd Street and     A purse containing $1,400 Cook Avenue, police said. cash, a cell phone and three credit cards was reported stolen *** Oct. 8 from a customer’s shop    Tools and a GPS were re- ping cart at the Salvation Army ported stolen between Oct. 3-5 store, 8732 S. Cicero Avenue. from a car in the 4000 block of *** 91st Place.     Approximately $1,000 worth *** of jewelry was reported stolen     Three cars in the 9800 block Oct. 8 from the bedroom of of 53rd Avenue and fourth car a house in the 9600 block of in the 10000 block of 53rd Av- Brandt Avenue. enue were burglarized overnight Oct. 4-5. Two iPods and $50 cash was reported stolen from one of the cars, $70 cash was reported stolen from another car     Andrea C. Kline, 47, of Chiand loose change was reported cago, was charged with retail taken from the other two vetheft Oct. 12 after allegedly hicles. Another car parked in stealing merchandise from Kohl’s at Chicago Ridge Mall,     Someone keyed both sides the 9500 block of 53rd Avenue By Bob Rakow police said. of a car Oct. 12 while it was was burglarized Oct. 9. Staff Reporter *** parked in the 8100 block of ***     James C. Hank, 49, of Chicago 90th Street.     A Chicago man was charged     Robin C. Whiteside Jr., 26, with disorderly conduct Oct. 4 Ridge, was charged Oct. 12 with of Chicago, was charged with after falsely reporting an armed retail theft after allegedly stealbattery Oct. 5 after allegedly robbery to Oak Lawn police, acing merchandise from Home pushing a woman at the Mara- cording to reports. Depot, 300 Commons Drive, thon gas station, 9304 S. Cicero     Earl D. Chapman Jr., 24, police said. Ave., police said.     A laptop computer, two cell *** flagged down a police officer on ***     Amani Shededeh, 25, of phones, an alarm clock with 95th Street near Kostner Avenue Justice, was charged with re- an iPod docking station, a     Andree Reid, 36, of Chicago, at 12:25 a.m. and said he was tail theft Oct. 12 after alleg- gold chain, an Apple iTouch was charged with retail theft robbed at gun point by a man edly stealing goods from Kohl’s and $75 cash were reported and possession of a controlled who took his cell phone and $75, at Chicago Ridge Mall, police stolen Sept. 24 or 25 from an substance Oct. 5 after stealing police said. apartment in the 4700 block of goods from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th     Chapman said he worked in said. St., police said. 101st Street. Alsip and was given a ride by *** a co-worker to 95th Street and ***     Someone poisoned a dog Sept. Kostner Avenue. As he walked 27 in the 9200 block of Ridge-     A laptop computer and a east on 95th Street, he said he land Avenue. The dog’s owner stereo were reported stolen be- saw a black Honda four-door     Amanda Calafut, 18, of Ever- suspects a neighbor, who shot tween Oct. 5 and 7 from a house with three people inside drive green Park, was charged with BB pellets at the dog in the in the 9400 block of McVicker past him on northbound KostAvenue. battery Sept. 30 after a distur- past. ner Avenue. *** bance at Circle Park, 9600 block     Frederick J. Baker, 28, of of Homan Ave., police said. *** ***     Two bicycles, a generator, Midlothian, was charged with     Anthony A. Jones, 46, of a compressor/battery charger, drunken driving, speeding, Chicago, was charged with re- tools and gardening equipment improper lane use and no intail theft Oct. 4 after allegedly with a combined value of $5,400 surance Oct. 6 after a stop in By Bob Rakow the 4700 block of 111th Street, Staff Reporter police said. ***     A Worth man charged with     John J. Buttney, 35, of Oak drunken driving after striking Lawn, was charged with leaving an SUV told police his eyes were the scene of a property damage watery and glassy out of conaccident Oct. 6 after hitting a cern for the passengers of the Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills pickup truck in the 9700 block of vehicle he hit, police said. Mansfield Avenue, police said.     John J. Gubbins, 37, was Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth charged with drunken driving, *** failure to reduce speed to avoid Publisher Amy Richards     Tools, an electronic dog collar, an accident and having no inEditor Jeff Vorva fishing poles and tackle were surance following the accident, Sports Editor Ken Karrson reported stolen Oct. 7 from a which occurred at 6 p.m. near storage locker in an apartment 111th Street and Oak Park AvGraphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora in the 10300 block of Parkside enue, according to reports. Advertising Sales Val Draus Avenue. *** To advertise call (708) 448-6161 stealing items from Walk-Mart, police said. ***     Russell McCulloch, 28, of Chi-     Kelvon C. Streeter, 19, of Chicago, was charged with battery cago, was charged Oct. 5 with Oct. 8 after allegedly striking retail theft after allegedly steala juvenile in the head follow- ing merchandise from Wal-Mart, ing an argument in the park- police said. *** ing lot of Chicago Ridge Mall,     Carol C. Crotty, 52, of Palos police said. Hills, was charged with retail ***     Geraka Jones, 28, of Oak theft Oct. 5 after allegedly stealLawn, was charged with re- ing merchandise from Wal-Mart, tail theft Oct. 11 after alleg- police said. *** edly stealing merchandise from Kohl’s at Chicago Ridge Mall,     Zachary B. Hausner, 26, of Chicago, was with retail theft police said. Oct. 9 after stealing goods from ***     Shanell L. Arnett, 29, of Wal-Mart, police said. *** Oak Lawn, was charged with     Allen L. McKinzie, 21, of retail theft Oct. 11 after allegedly stealing goods from Kohl’s Chicago, was charged with tresat Chicago Ridge Mall, police passing Oct. 10 after refusing to leave Walgreens, 87th Street and said. Kedzie Ave., police said. ***

Chicago Ridge

***     A GPS unit and a portable DVD player were reported stolen Oct. 9 or 10 from a car     Mary A. Zaczyk, 35, of Worth, in the 10100 block of Kedvale was charged battery Oct. 1 after Avenue. a disturbance in the 11400 block of Natchez Ave., police said. ***     Marc A. Locascio, 45, of Worth, was charged with dis    A purse containing $500 was orderly conduct Oct. 6 after a stolen Oct. 12 from a car in the disturbance in the 7200 block of 113th Place, police said. 8900 block of 100th Place.

Worth

Palos Hills

***     Christine M. Burns, 41, of Palos Hills, was charged with battery Oct. 13 after allegedly pulling the hair and striking a passenger in a car in the 9700 block of 81st Avenue, police said.

Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

Wrong number — cops say man falsely reported phone robbery

Hickory Hills

Oak Lawn

Evergreen Park

    A moment later, Chapman said, he heard a man behind him ask, “What time is it?” He said he ignored the man and continued walking east on 95th Street. He said he then felt a tug on his jacket, turned around and saw a man holding a small, semiauto handgun. He said the man searched his pockets and took the phone and cash before entering the Honda, which traveled east on 95th Street, Chapman told police.     Police said Chapman did not seem shaken up. He refused a ride to the police station where he could arrange transportation home. Instead, he walked east on 95th Street. He subsequently called 911 three times to file a citizen complaint because he believed he was wronged by police, according to reports.

    He was detained by Evergreen Park police at 95th Street and Central Park Avenue. Oak Lawn police picked him up and asked how he called 911 if his phone was stolen. A search revealed that Chapman had two other cell phones.     At the police station, Chapman insisted he was the victim of an armed robbery, but he was unable to provide a number for the stolen iPhone. He later recanted his story about the stolen phone, police said.     Instead, he said, he saw a man smoking marijuana on 95th Street near Kostner Avenue and asked if he had more. Chapman gave the man money, but he got into the Honda and drove away. Chapman would not explain why he flagged down an officer to report an armed robbery that never occurred.

Concerned citizen? Police not buying it

THE

REPORTER

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    Police said he had an odor of alcohol on his breath and glassy, watery eyes. He denied that he was drinking but later admitted that he drank two beers. He failed or refused to perform field sobriety tests, police said.     He gave police an expired insurance card, but told officers, “I have insurance. I’ll pay for the damage. Can we get this done?” according to reports.

By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter     The assistant manager of an Oak Lawn grocery store was unsuccessful Oct. 1 in his attempt to stop a thief in the parking lot of the store, police said.     The offender placed $56 worth of meat into a cart at

Jewel-Osco, 8801 S. Ridgeland Ave., and walked along the back of the store before leaving without paying for the merchandise at 5:10 p.m., police said.     The assistant manager chased the offender into the parking lot and struggled with him until the assistant manager was shoved to the ground,

police said. The man wore a grey shirt, black pants and had a tattoo on his neck, according to reports.     The assistant manager was not injured and the merchandise was recovered. Another employee told police he recognized the man from high school and could identify him.

Florida man accused of stabbing two in Chicago Ridge By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

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Oak Lawn police investigate a meat retreat

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    The driver of the SUV told police he stopped at a red light at 111th Street and Oak Park Avenue. When the light turned green, he proceeded but had to slow down because the car in front of him made a right turn. When he stopped, he was hit from behind by the Chevrolet pickup truck driven by Gubbins.     Gubbins told police he had just left a liquor store and was driving east on 111th Street. When the light turned green, he proceeded but the SUV in front of him stopped and he rear

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    A Florida man was charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon Sunday after stabbing two men at a Chicago Ridge trucking company, police said.     Dmytro Zavarygin, 27, of Hol-

lywood, Fla., was arrested at 12:20 a.m. at HMD Trucking, 10031 Virginia Ave., according to reports.     Zavarygin was arrested at the trucking company shortly after the two men that he allegedly stabbed with a knife arrived at the Chicago Ridge fire department, which is located next to

the company, police said.     One victim, 28, told police he was stabbed in the arm during an argument with Zavarygin. The other victim, also 28, tried to separate the men and also was stabbed in the arm by the offender. Both men were treated at Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn.


Thursday, October 17, 2013 The Reporter

3

Oak Lawn bosses learn that waving runners home is no breeze     It is too easy to poke fun here.     Way, way too easy.     When Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury and her clerk Jane Quinlan volunteered to coach third base at Saturday’s first Battle of the Burbs charity softball game and one of their decisions almost maimed another mayor, the columnist in me had jokes filling throughout my head.    There was plenty of fodder for comparing that decision to the decisions they make to run their town. All in good fun, of course.     But then I started thinking about the one time I had to coach third base for my son’s Orland Youth Association game and some of the conversations I’ve had in 2003 and 2004 with Cub third base coach Wendell Kim (who some Cubs fans will say was the worst third base coach ever) and all jokes are off.     Setting the Saturday night scene, the Battle of the Burbs was a 16-inch softball game between area mayors (they called themselves the BigHitters) and area police and fire chiefs (they called themselves GunSmoke) at Standard Bank Stadium in Crestwood. The chiefs won, 26-12.     Bury and Quinlan, citing that they weren’t the best athletes around, volunteered to coach third base and if enthusiasm were the criteria, these two could be in the hall of fame.     With runners at first and second in the first inning, one of the mayors got a clean hit and the runners were off to the races.     The dynamic duo in the third base box windmilled their arms and cheered as Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin raced home with a run.     Then the dangerous duo waved

home Harvey mayor Eric Kellogg.     Uh, oh.     The ball came in to the catcher while Kellogg was trapped be-

Editor’s Notebook by Jeff Vorva tween third and home. He put on the brakes to retreat back to third and slipped and fell. He got up and ran out of the base path to avoid a tag and was ruled out.     This is a guy who was more athletic than most of the mayors as evidenced by him doing a bunch of pushups near the third base dugout the following inning. A tough guy.     Lucky for the third base coaches that it wasn’t one of the other brittle-boned bosses who took the tumble or there could have been an ambulance called in. Broken hips were waiting to happen.     What some people fail to realize is that the job of a third base coach can be pretty stressful.     Many years ago, I was called into duty for my son’s Orland Youth Association playoff game and let me tell you that it’s a lot easier to coach third base from the press box or the stands than it is from the third base box. I don’t remember making any big mistakes because I always assumed correctly that these kids were not good enough to throw and catch the ball so I was safe there.     But when I did hold up a stop

sign and a kid ran through it and was easily safe at home, I felt bad that a kid who hadn’t turned 10 had better sense than I did.     That brings us to the man known as “Wavin’ Wendell Kim. He may not be as unpopular to Cubs fans as Steve Bartman in that era, but he’s right up there.     Kim used to tell me about how much homework and research he had to do on opposing outfielders and knowing his own players’ health to make a bang-bang, split-second decision. And yes, sometimes he would get it wrong for all the world to see.     “Certain things you can’t control,” he said during a one-on-one interview with me for a feature for what was once known as the Daily Southtown in 2004. “If a runner makes a wide turn and I’ve already sent him from second base — it’s too late. If he makes a sharp turn, he makes it by two steps. It’s not all up to me. I can just send him because I know the speed of the guy. But if he makes a wide turn, that’s tough. You’re losing two or three steps. That could cost you the game.’’     You need thick skin to be a third base coach.     “I’ve already had a .38 (caliber gun) to my head,’’ the 53-yearold Kim told the media after he gaffed during a game against the White Sox and referring to an incident when he was in his 20s and a group of thugs thought he had given them up to the police. “That’s worse than anything I’ve ever known. This is still a game.’’     So, Bury and Quinlan deserve a salute for their work at third base and let’s give thanks that Kellogg’s bones didn’t turn into

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn Clerk Jane Quinlan and Mayor Sandra Bury almost got Harvey Mayor Eric Kellogg injured by sending him home during Saturday night’s Battle in the Burbs. They learned that coaching third base is no easy job. Rice Krispies.

Better Battle ahead

    Battle in the Burbs raised about $4,000 for Special Olympics and the event drew roughly 300 people.     Officials were happy with those numbers because they admitted they hastily put this event together in three weeks. They said that next year, with better planning, there should be more participants, more fans and, more important, more dough going into the charity coffers.

Jiggles and Jerry

    My favorite excerpt from a press release this week comes

Transparency Hot hoops topic in Oak Lawn to be delayed by park board until November (Continued from page 1)

administrative officials online, information about upcoming village meetings, copies of the minutes of meetings, information packets from previous meetings, publication of financial audits and budgets, salary and benefit information of public employees and access to public records through Illinois’ freedom of information law.

By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter     Oak Lawn residents who support the removal of basketball nets at Little Wolfe Park will have to wait until next month to voice their concerns to the park board.     Park commissioners delayed until their Nov. 11 meeting a decision on the controversial issue to allow more time to examine activity at the park at 107th Street and Laramie Avenue.     “We’ve been doing a lot of research into what’s come up,” Commissioner Mary Margaret Wallace said.     The investigation includes park district staffers passing by the park several times each day to track who’s using the facilities, including the basketball courts, Wallace said.     Commissioners also are keeping an eye on the park, the site of an Aug. 14 fight that led to two arrests.     “It’s hard to get a correct sampling because kids are back in school,” Wallace said.     The fight took place near a foot bridge that connects Little Wolfe Park with walking trails that stretch to the rear of Richards High School.     Stephen Hyde, 18, of Oak Lawn, and Hexadore Randall, 19, of Chicago, were arrested and charged with battery after they were picked out of a lineup by teenagers injured in the melee, police said.     There have not been additional incidents at the park since the Aug. 14 fight. Police have significantly stepped up patrols at the park since the incident, Police Chief Mike Murray said.     The issue gained momentum at the park board’s September meeting when Oak Lawn Trustee Carol Quinlan called on the park board to remove the two hoops at Little Wolfe.     Quinlan, who lives near the

    Orland Park was the first village to score 100 percent on under the institute’s guidelines.     Despite Bury’s early efforts to improve transparency, her political foes are quick to criticize her for failing to keep the board in the loop.

    The village of Worth wants to get out of the Worth Days business.     Trustees on Tuesday night agreed that the Worth Park District is better suited to sponsor the annual festival.     “I’ll contact (Park District Director) Carlo (Capalbo) and let him know that that’s the direction the village wants to go,” Mayor Mary Werner told trustees.     Werner said she met with Capalbo about one month ago, and the park district is open to taking over Worth Days.     The annual four-day festival has been held for nearly six decades, but trustees believe the work re-

    In fact, the ‘spooktacular’ night will be anything but ‘bash’ful as guests arrive decked out in their most creative costumes and evening attire to raise funds for the growth and expansion of Advocate Children’s Hospital — Oak Lawn. The event promises to be a scream, organizers say.     The evening of tricks-andtreats will include special guest mation was provided when Pat O’Donnell was appointed village treasurer or when Bury made appointments to other committees.     Additionally, they said they did not receive an advanced copy of the pre-budget village finance presentation presented by O’Donnell, nor were they notified in advance of a proposals to outsource 911 dispatch services, transition senior services to the park district or reorganize the department of business operations.     “In my 22 years of service, I can’t remember another presentation, other than litigation matters, that did not include documentation prior to the board meeting,” Streit said of the pre-budget presentation.

emcee Jerry Taft, meteorologist for ABC-7 Chicago.     Partygoers will glide, bump and jiggle throughout the night to music by the Ron Bedel Orchestra, which guarantees to get guests on the dance floor, grooving to the variety of musical genres the band performs…”     It’s been awhile — maybe even never — since I saw anyone gliding, bumping and jiggling all night. But tickets for this bad boy are 225 bones (see, I can do the Halloween puns, too) apiece so there better be a lot of jiggling going on for that kind of scratch.     Visit advocatehealth.com/halloweenbash for more of the gory details. which stifled debate over other alternatives, he said.     Olejniczak, a Bury supporter, said Streit has never before made such complaints or demanded greater access to village records.     “Did this go on before? The answer is ‘no,’” Olejniczak said. “It’s [done] to create issues.”     “You are now the conspiracy trustee,” Olejniczak told Streit at the Oct. 8 board meeting. “You have your own version on the truth.”     Trustee Terry Vorderer said opening up village records to trustees creates a security concern. He also questioned Quinlan and Streit’s motives.     “Is it a fishing expedition? It could be used for political purposes. Who knows,” Vorderer said.     Village Clerk Jane Quinlan, one of the village’s eight FOIA officers, said nothing is being hidden from trustees.

    Streit and Quinlan, for ex-     Streit said Bury and her supample, believe they have a legal porters did not want trustees right to examine all the docu- to have time “to dispute the ments that Bury and Deetjen figures, ask questions or suggest can access. proposals.” He said the board     “It’s not up to the mayor, and majority is more interested in     She added that trustees can Photo by Jeff Vorva Discussions about the hoops at Little Wolfe Park will be delayed it’s not up to the manager,” getting a “quick vote” on Bury’s submit FOIA requests. Requests Quinlan said. proposals. that are denied can be appealed by the Oak Lawn Park board until November.     The mayor’s opponents of-     Streit also criticized the to the Attorney General’s office, park, was joined at the meeting by the hoops to eight feet to accom- fered several other examples administration for reaching she said. The village must offer about 30 of her neighbors, many modate young children was not of a lack of transparency on an agreement with Advocate a reason for the FOIA requests Bury’s part. Christ Medical Center for per- it denies, such as personal inwho supported the proposal. feasible due to cost.     She told commissioners that the     But she said the district     For example, they said, no mit fees and a voluntary pay- formation related to employees fight was not an isolated incident. should consider other options to resume or background infor- ment without notifying trustees, or village officials. She said the community dealt make the park more attractive. throughout the summer with Among them are removing one inappropriate behavior. The poor hoop, which would put an end to conduct led other patrons, such full-court basketball games, and as parents with young children, adding a swing set for toddlers to avoid the park, she said. in order to attract families with     Quinlan’s comments that many young children. CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CLEANING of the basketball players were     Attracting more people to the UPHOLSTERY from outside the community led park might help lessen inapproANY ROOM WE CAN POWER WASH JUST ABOUT ANYTHING some to brand her a racist, an priate activity, Wallace said. SPECIALS: PER ROOM L-shaped rooms & Great rooms accusation she denies.     District officials said they $ are considered 2 rooms. 3 Cushions     Last week, the issue was dis- were unaware of problems at WHOLE HOUSE SPECIAL cussed on a Chicago talk radio the park other than the Aug. $ 2 Cushions Any 6 Rooms. station after stories appeared 14 fight until Quinlan raised L-shaped rooms $ in other Chicago media outlets. the issue. & Great rooms are considered 2 rooms. Quinlan refused the radio sta-     Park Board President Sue tion’s request to appear on the Murphy added that the district show. cannot prevent people from us    Quinlan said she continues to ing its facilities. receive calls and emails about the     “Parks are not private propissue, and has referred residents erty,” she said. “This is not a with questions and concerns to gated community. People can the park district. play where they want in pub    Wallace said a petition to lower lic places.”

Sofa Loveseat Chair

Village to pass Worth Days off to park district By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

from our pals at Advocate Children’s Hospital. Complete with fun puns:     “Witches, goblins and ghouls will invade the Zhou B. Art Center in Chicago at 6 p.m. Saturday when Advocate Children’s Hospital hosts its 15th annual Hearts for Hope Halloween Bash.

quired to make the event a success requires too much on the part of village employees.     “I think it’s time for the village to get out of the Worth Days business,” Trustee Mary Rhein said.     Trustee Colleen McElroy agreed and said the park district is better equipped to hold the festival.     “They’re in the business of recreation,” McElroy said.     Currently, the park district has a role in the festival running the children’s attractions, McElroy said.     The fest has a $70,000 budget and has broken even for the past three years, Werner said. The 2013 fest is expected to do the same, she said. The financials for this year’s fest have not yet been re-

leased.     “I feel pretty confident the village broke even again,” she said.     Turning the festival over to the park district does not mean the village won’t stay involved. Instead, village officials and employees will continue to volunteer at the event, McElroy said.     The 2014 edition of the festival will be especially significant as it will be part of the village’s 100th anniversary celebration, Werner said.     The village is planning a series of events throughout the year to celebrate its centennial, similar to neighboring Chicago Ridge, which is also celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2014.

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4

The Reporter Thursday, October 17, 2013

Our Neighborhood

GunSmoke smokes the BigHitters in the Battle in the Burbs

Oak Lawn Village Clerk Jane Quinlan and Mayor Sandra Bury wave Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin home during Saturday night’s Battle in the Burbs game at Standard Bank Park in Crestwood. Police and fire chiefs — known at GunSmoke — beat the mayors — also known as the BigHitters — 26-12.

Oak Lawn Police Chief Michael Murray takes a little rest after racing to first on a single.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn Villege Clerk Jane Quinlan, who served as a pinch runner, reacts after she scores a run for the BigHitters Saturday night. The Battle in the Burbs netted approximately $4,000 for Special Olympics of Illinois and drew a couple of hundred fans.

Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz’s back injury limited him to first base coaching duties in Saturday’s Battle in the Burbs event in Crestwood.

Retro

SUDOKU The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

Compiled by Jeff Vorva

News and events from our archives.

Runaway road grader heads toward Palos Hills home 50 years ago From the Oct. 17, 1963 edition     The story: A fire destroyed a home in Palos Hills but a widow and eight children living in the house were unharmed.     The quote: “We didn’t even invite it — at least it could have called,” Frank Eckert of Palos Hills who was eating dinner when an unmanned road grader was heading toward his picture window but was then stalled on the front steps. Speculation is that kids accidentally activated the machine.     Fun fact: The Bill Heller Band provided entertainment for Oak Lawn High School’s 11th homecoming dance.

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From the Oct. 20, 1988 edition     The story: The Oak Lawn Hilton hosted a political showdown between U.S. Congressman Marty Russo and challenger Joseph McCarthy in front of a crowd of 400-plus. Russo accused McCarthy of misused funds that were supposed to go to the poor and instead went to an office party.     The quote: “People will give you the finger but you can’t get mad. I can’t give anyone the finger back because a little kid might see you. Then he’ll do it to his mother and she’ll say ‘Where did you learn that?’ ‘From the clown,’ ’’ — Worth’s Dale Van Witzenberg a.k.a. DaeDae the Clown on having to show restraint to hecklers and critics.    Fun fact: Richards’ football team piled up 528 yards in a 34-0 win over Oak Lawn. The Bulldogs had 357 yards of rushing with Rich Albon leading the balanced attack with 92 yards.

10 years ago From the Oct. 16, 2003 edition     The story: Oak Lawn Trustee Ron Stancik was named interim mayor nearly three months after the death of Ernie Kolb. More than 60 people in attendance at the village board meeting gave Stancik a standing ovation after the announcement. Kolb served as mayor for 26 years.    The quote: “It was a good win for the program. We just wanted to show everybody that we could be as competitive as everybody else in the [Catholic League] Blue Conference.’’ — Brother Rice football coach Steve Nye after his team pulled off a rare 13-3 win over Mt. Carmel.    Fun fact: Richards High School’s fall play was “The Hobbit,” the prequel to “Lord of the Rings.”

History of the World By Mark Andrews     Oct. 17: ON THIS DATE in 1931, mobster Al Capone was convicted of income-tax evasion and sentenced to 11 years in prison. In 1933, physicist Albert Einstein arrived in the United States, a refugee of Nazi Germany.     Oct. 18: ON THIS DATE in 1892, the first long-distance telephone line between Chicago and New York was opened. In 1898, the American flag was raised in Puerto Rico shortly before Spain relinquished control of the island.     Oct. 19: ON THIS DATE in 1781, British troops under Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Va., as the Revolutionary War neared its end. In 1960, the United States imposed an embargo on most exports to Cuba.     Oct. 20: ON THIS DATE in 1944, during World War II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur stepped ashore at Leyte in the Philippines, 2 1/2 years after he had said, “I shall return.” In 1977, three members of the rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd died in the crash of a chartered plane.     Oct. 21: ON THIS DATE in 1805, a British fleet commanded by Adm. Horatio Nelson defeated a FrenchSpanish fleet in the Battle of Trafalgar. Nelson, however, was killed. In 1879, Thomas Edison invented a workable electric light at his laboratory in Menlo Park, N.J.     Answer to last week’s question: This week in 1964, the Soviet leadership forced Premier Nikita Khrushchev out of office and replaced him with Alexei Kosygin and Leonid Brezhnev.     This week’s question: In 1836, who was inaugurated as the first president of the Republic of Texas?    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarq mail.com.)


Thursday, October 17, 2013 The Reporter

5

Heights faces certainty of losing Dominick’s What future will bring, however, still unclear By Tim Hadac     Unease and uncertainty abound at 127th and Ridgeland in the wake of last week’s announcement that Safeway will close all 72 Chicago-area Dominick’s stores within the next few months.     “This is not a good time to be unemployed, and I have to say I’m scared,” said Dave, one of several Dominick’s employees who spoke only on condition of full or partial anonymity. “Over the years, there have been so many rumors [about Dominick’s stores closing], we’ve learned to live with that and almost ignore it. So in that light, this [announcement] hit us like a bomb.”     The Palos Heights Dominick’s had dodged bullets in the past.     In 2004 Safeway shut a dozen Dominick’s, including its Oak Forest store on 159th Street and an Oak Lawn store near 111th and Cicero.     In 2007, doors were closed at 14 Dominick’s, including the Crestwood store near 131st and Cicero and the Bridgeview unit at 89th and Harlem.     In 2011, Safeway closed the Dominick’s in Orland Park, near 151st and La Grange Road.     “I’ve worked at Dominick’s for years, and I’m not looking forward to losing all my seniority

and starting at the bottom of the ladder in some non-union grocery store — if I get a job, that is,” added another employee at the store. “This is not the type of news I was hoping for as we head towards Christmas.”     The dozens of employees at the store — long represented by the United Food & Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) Local 881 — have been working without a new contract for a year, according to Local 881 President Ronald E. Powell.     While four Dominick’s stores — including the one on Bell Road in Homer Glen — are being purchased by Jewel/Osco, most locations are question marks at the moment.     Regarding the Palos Heights unit and other stores with uncertain futures, Powell said, “We don’t know yet the status of those stores. But once we know who the new owners are, Local 881 will sit down and negotiate a collective bargaining agreement that will be fair to the new employers and importantly, will fairly compensate the employees who will be charged with building the business.”     Another Palos Heights Dominick’s employee called Powell’s prediction “posturing” and “cold comfort.”     “If Aldi or Food4Less or some joe-blow warehouse store comes

in here, we won’t even be in a union,” said the staffer as he gathered shopping carts in the parking lot. “I don’t think the union has done much for us — at least not that I can see.”     Customers expressed disappointment and even anger with Safeway’s decision.     “I’ve shopped at Dominick’s for 30 years. I rely on this place. I enjoy shopping here on Saturdays. This is my store,” said Palos Heights resident Joan Henkel. Ever since Safeway took over [in 1998], they’ve done nothing but tinker and mess things up.     “They got rid of the Dominick’s [house] brands and brought in new items that nobody wanted,” she continued. “Two years ago, they completely mishandled the Just 4 U coupon program. Then there was that scandal where [coupon blogger] Jill Cataldo found all the outdated food sitting on shelves at Dominick’s. The only thing that stayed the same was the friendliness of the workers — and sadly, they’re the ones who will suffer most.”     Echoing the assertion was Bill Davies of Worth. “[Dominick’s] used to have a slogan that ‘Our store is your store.’ I guess we learned that’s nothing but an empty advertising jingle. Where will I shop [after the store closes]? I have no idea,” he said.     Beyond the fate of the employees and the convenience of grocery shoppers, the coming shutdown poses yet another dilemma for the Indian Trails shopping center, already strug-

Photo by Tim Hadac

Dominick’s has anchored the Indian Trails shopping center at 127th and Ridgeland for more than 30 years. A Dominick’s gas station was added about a decade ago. gling in a continued sluggish economy and pocked with vacant storefronts and the black eye of a still-shuttered Bakers Square restaurant on a highvisibility outlot.     Palos Heights officials say they are on top of the situation.     “We have already spoken with Dominick’s corporate [officials], and we will work with them to market the property,” said Palos Heights City Administra-

tor Dan Nisavic. “We will also do some marketing ourselves. It’s early [in the process], but we are moving forward.”     Nisavic predicted that the Dominick’s store and gas station will be sold off separately. He added that the impact of the loss of sales tax revenue from Dominick’s will not be felt until months into 2014. Last year Alderman Jack Clifford said Dominick’s was in the top four among sales tax generators in the city.

    Some customers tried to find a silver lining in the cloud. “It’s not good that we’re losing Dominick’s, but I don’t think everyone needs to be so glum,” said Patti Quasny of Palos Park. “Hopefully, this is an opportunity to get an upgrade. I hope the people in charge [in Palos Heights] get on the phone with Mariano’s or some other top-quality company and get them in here. It can be done, I think.”

Neighbors go to bat for resident as oversized garage door permitted in Hickory By Kelly White Correspondent     A variance request passed by a 6-1 vote Thursday night allows for a 10-foot tall garage door to remain standing in Hickory Hills, although the city ordinance only permits garages with a maximum of eight-foot garage doors.     Yanena Staszec, 9225 85th Court, attended the Sept. 26th City Council Meeting where she pleaded with Mayor Mike Howley and city officials to allow her newly remodeled garage to be left alone.     “We are doing extensive remodeling on our home and we now have a 10-foot garage door, in addition to a two-car garage,” Staszec said at that meeting. “The work has already been done to the garage. We were not aware of the ordinance before the remodeling. If we have to change it, it will be difficult, because the work has already been done.”     Staszec added the heightened garage door is to accompany her

husband’s work vehicle, a van measuring nine feet in height. “We feel it is better to park the van in the garage rather than out on the street or in our driveway,” she said. She added neighbors might complain more about a commercial vehicle parked out on the public street or in her driveway rather than in her garage.     Building Commissioner, John Moirano, agreed with Staszec, saying: “It is better having the van in the garage rather than parked outside. You see so many of these work vans nowadays, and they are often too tall to fit in standard size garages. My only suggestion would be to eventually change the city ordinance to allow nine foot doors instead of eight, instead of just making one exception.”     Alderman John Szeszycki felt changing the ordinance to permit nine-foot garage doors with a 900-foot interior would be necessary in order to prevent future exemptions for variance requests

in similar cases as Staszec’s.     “If you just change it for one person, people are going to point out the fact that it was allowed for that one person and expect the same result,” he said.     Although Howley stated the city ordinance does not allow garage doors to stand at that height, no vote could be made at the September meeting. Alderman Deborah Ferrero noted she has polled Staszec’s surrounding neighbors and has not had one complaint about the heightened garage doors. Staszec commented she has also asked surrounding neighbors whether or not the size of the garage was an issue and said she has not received any negative feedback.     Staszec’s neighbor, Dan Reilly, addressed the city council Thursday night, in support of the garage staying as-is.     “I live directly north of her home and I am here to be the self-appointed spokesperson for all of our neighbors,” Reilly said. “The owners of the home

Community Briefs Chicago McDowell Settlement celebrates 25th anniversary

    The Mary E. McDowell Settlement Alumni Association will present its 25th Anniversary Dinner Dance from 6:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the Mayfield Banquet Hall, 6072 S. Archer Ave. Tickets are $45 and can be purchased by calling Vicky Arteaga at 773-238-2676.

    The late Michael J. Murphy, or Murph, devoted his life to music. Guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter, Murph played in four bands, all of which circulated through a variety of venues, pubs, and festivals throughout the Chicagoland area and beyond. His band, Leave, released three albums of original songs, was featured on Chicago radio station WXRT.

Palos Hills Cops take back drugs

Chicago Ridge Police accepting unused medication

    The Chicago Ridge Police Department will accept unused of expired medication from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 26 at 10425 S. Ridgeland Ave. Needles or liquids will not be accepted.

Hickory Hills Blood drive on Nov. 3

    The Hickory Hills Community Blood Drive takes place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 3 at 7800 West 89th place, Bring a photo ID. Walk-ins are welcome. There will be free food, raffles and gifts.

Merionette Park Murph’s Gift of Music fundraiser set for Saturday

    The third Murph’s Gift of Music fundraising event will be held from 3 to 8 p.m. Saturday at 115 Bourbon Street in Merrionette Park. Food, beer and wine will be served. There will be Chicago sports jersey raffles, basket raffles, silent auctions, bullet tickets and a grand raffle.     Coyote Riot, The Chancey Brothers, A Week Back and Friends and The Larkin and Moran Brothers will perform.

tive director of TWC. “To have their neighbors reach out and remember them this holiday is a very special gesture, and we are grateful to the Cobras Hockey Club for helping us to make this happen.”     The Cobras organization formed in 1997 and currently serves students from Andrew, Tinley Park, Oak Forest, Oak Lawn, Shepard, Stagg, Richards and Evergreen Park high schools.

Oak Lawn Cobras to collect turkeys

    South suburban high school students who play with Cobras Hockey Club will gather in Oak Lawn on Nov. 2 to collect turkeys (or cash donations that will be used to purchase turkeys) to benefit Together We Cope, a nonprofit agency based in Tinley Park that assists families in crisis from 22 south suburban communities.     The Saturday turkey drive will take place in front of Stacked Restaurant, 5273 W. 95th St. in Oak Lawn from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. The frozen turkeys will be distributed in November to families that receive food assistance from Together We Cope’s food pantry. On average, 65 south suburban families per day, five days per week, receive groceries from the TWC pantry.     “This gift of a holiday turkey will be greatly appreciated by families who might not be able to afford it this season because of a crisis in their lives such as unemployment or illness,” said Kathryn Straniero, execu-

are doing nothing but acting in good faith and they have made several renovations to improve the overall value of their home, which will improve the property value of the surrounding homes in the area.”     Reilly added he has also spoke with other neighbors who agree with his viewpoints and no one living on the same block as Staszek has any complaint with

the heightened garage door. “Before their renovation, the garage was in very poor condition, if anything bringing down the value of the neighborhood, but now that renovation is complete the garage, even exceeding its regulated size, looks great,” he added.     Ferrero made a motion to permit Staszec’s garage door to remain as-is at 10 feet but not to exceed 10 feet. “If there are

THE REGIONAL NEWS AND THE REPORTER ARE HAVING THEIR

9th ANNUAL

COSTUME CONTEST

Entries must be received by Monday, Oct. 21st at Noon.

Enter your favorite trick-or-treater today in our 9th Annual Costume Contest. Trick-or-treaters ages 0-14 may enter. 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners will receive prizes. The three winners will have their pictures printed in The Regional News & The Reporter on October 24th. Pictures printed with parental consent.

Prizes sponsored by Haunted Trails: 1st Place Winner - Family Fun Pack: Includes a large one-topping pizza, pitcher of your favorite soft drink, 4 Go Kart Rides, 4 Rounds of Miniature Golf, four rolls of 20 game tokens. 2nd & 3rd Place Winners - Family Fun Blast: Includes a large one-topping pizza, pitcher of your favorite soft drink, 4 rolls of 20 game tokens and choice of 4 Go Kart/Jr. Kart Rides OR 4 Rounds of Miniature Golf. The contest is only open to children who are permanent residents of Palos Heights, Palos Park, Orland Park, Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth. Photos must include your contact name and phone number, the child’s name, age and school he or she attends. Photos will not be returned.

    The Palos Hills Police Department will conduct a Drug Enforcement Prescription Drug Take Back Initiative from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 26 at 8555 W. 103rd St. No needles or liquids will be accepted.

TO ENTER—Send pictures via email to: Regionalads@regionalpublishing.com or send by U.S. Postal Mail to: The Regional News Costume Contest 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463

Tinley Park South Suburban Civil War Roundtable

    The South Suburban Civil War Roundtable will meet Thursday, Oct. 24, at 7 p.m., at Ed & Joe’s Pizza 17332 S. Oak Park Ave. in Tinley Park.     Jill Silbert will present Women in Camp, an inside view.     Arrive by 6 p.m. if coming for dinner before the meeting and program. For information, email SSCWRT@gmail.com, or call (815) 469-7015.

no complaints from surrounding neighbors with the size of the garage door, we should let it stay,” she said.     Szeszycki stood his ground, stating the ordinance should be changed to permit nine-foot garage doors, and Staszec should have to alter her existing door to match the city ordinance. He was overruled in the 6-1 vote among the council.

Capri

Ristorante Italiano & Banquets (708) 671-1657

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Worth Haunted Hayride Oct. 26     American Legion Marrs-Meyer Post 991 at 11001 S. Depot in Worth is having a Haunted Hayride October 26. The price per couple is $25 and for singles is $15. The price includes transportation to and from the post, beer or wine, hot dogs, hayride and campfire. The event is for adults only and reservations are required. Stop in to Legion Post for complete details.

Palos Health & Fitness Center (708) 226-0555

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Since members of our editorial staff will be judges, families of Regional Publishing employees and sponsoring advertisers’ families are prohibited from entering. Only one entry per child. Winners will have their picture taken as they receive their prize.


6

The Reporter

Thursday, October 17, 2013

commentary The

Reporter

An Independent Newspaper Jeff Vorva Editor

Amy Richards Publisher

Published Weekly Founded March, 16, 1960

Inside the First Amendment

Our free press has rights — and also responsibilities By Gene Policinski

What do you say? What will you miss most about Dominick’s, and where will you shop for groceries after they depart? (Asked outside the Dominick’s at 127th and Ridgeland, one of 72 Dominick’s slated to close in the weeks ahead.)

Gene Policinski is chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute and senior vice president of the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center. Contact him at gpolicinski@newseum.org.

Some OL officials can view vital emails but others can’t By Dave Heilmann     Why are Oak Lawn manager Larry Deetjen and village attorney Paul O’Grady fighting so hard to keep certain emails they exchanged hidden from board members? They have been asked seven times by elected board members to turn over these emails, but refuse to turn them over.     For some reason, now the mayor and certain trustees are helping them keep these records secret. At the last board meeting, [Mayor] Sandra Bury cast the deciding vote to keep these records hidden from other elected trustees.     O’Grady’s law firm has been paid $3 million over the past three years and Deetjen over $500,000. These are not personnel files or personal records. These are emails about village business on an email network owned by taxpayers. They both charged taxpayers for the time they spent creating those emails. The Attorney General has made it clear that emails on a municipality’s email network are public records. Despite this, they are now allowed to block access to their own emails on the village network?     Here is what happened.     Back in May when I was still in office, I asked for certain email records between Larry Deetjen and the village attorneys because I had received multiple complaints that Deetjen improperly interfered with a million dollar contract an Oak Lawn business had with a prospective tenant, possibly for racial reasons.     I was shocked when a village employee told me that Deetjen and O’Grady stepped in and told him not to turn over their records to me because the manager

and attorney have no authority said to turn over the records. over a mayor when it comes to That was June. Nothing was inspection of records. Mayors turned over. Why not? Did it have a statutory right to inspect matter that the trustees seeking records under Illinois law and, in records had opposed her in the Oak Lawn, also under the village last election? code. That law had always been     Then a trustee tried another followed the prior eight years. legal means and submitted a I guess they felt FOIA request to they could get Village Clerk Jane away with not Quinlan for those following that law records. This was because I had lost the fourth request. the election. I did That was denied. tell the attorney The clerk’s office and manager that said it was too they were breakburdensome even ing the law and though staff previviolating our code ously told me it’s and made a secquite simple to do. ond request, but Apparently this burthat was ignored. densome argument     I don’t think we came from their beshould look the lief that the village Dave Heilmann other way when attorney should be the village manpaid to review and ager and attorney break the law. screen his own emails (which he But that’s not why I write. The already charged for once) before point is that records should not turning them over to the board be kept from board members. that hired him. Those are the elected represen    The same trustee submitted tatives of residents, and if the a second FOIA, and the clerk’s manager is accused of harmoffice refused to turn over all ing an Oak Lawn business, the records, this time claiming atboard not only has every right torney client privilege. So now to, but should investigate this. Sandra Bury, Jane Quinlan     After my requests were and Larry Deetjen are the cliblocked, new requests were ent (because they can see the made for these records in May records), but other trustees are by a sitting trustee. While there not? Does it seem fair that only is no law which would permit certain officials — the mayor, the manager to deny a trustee clerk, manager, attorney — have access to these records, or give the privilege of seeing records, the manager authority to block while others elected by the same access, he did it again. residents do not? I had disagree    Attorney O’Grady then issued ments at times with trustees, but a legal opinion in early June I said publicly at the board table which stated that the mayor has that all trustees should always the right to inspect all records, be allowed access to records. basically acknowledging that he     After five efforts had been advised the village to break the blocked, two trustees placed on a law when denying me access. board agenda an item amending     After receiving that memo, the village code to clarify that Sandra Bury could easily have all trustees have the right to

inspect village records, not just the mayor. The board majority and Sandra Bury denied these trustees the right to even speak on the issue at the board meeting, in clear violation of Roberts Rules of Order. Despite the improper motion, the attorney said nothing. After all, it was his records that were being sought. This was the sixth effort blocked.     Then there was the seventh effort, again a request to amend the code to allow the elected representatives of Oak Lawn the right to review records of the village. Sandra Bury voted no. She and the majority voted to keep Deetjen’s emails hidden from trustees.     If the manager is working only for the betterment of the community, why would he care about trustees seeing his emails with the attorney?     The manager and attorney are on the same political side as the mayor. The attorney contributed to her political team. Now, when records are sought because an Oak Lawn business makes a serious allegation of misconduct, the mayor and board votes to keep the manager’s emails on the village network hidden from other elected officials? Isn’t there a duty to investigate the complaint openly and thoroughly?   The election is over. But what comes with that is the responsibility of those who are elected into office to follow the law. You are now accountable, and even though others may not be in the majority or even in office, it does not mean that we lose the right to stand up for what we believe is right. Whether or not I’m in office, I do still care about the community. Dave Heilmann was the Oak Lawn mayor for eight years before he was defeated by Sandra Bury in April.

Another Perspective

The ‘Soup Nazi’ Administration By Marta H. Mossburg     For the Obama administration, the shutdown is just one more political crisis it won’t let go to waste.     Take the park rangers who last week locked under armed guard a group of senior citizens that included visitors from Japan, Australia, Canada and the U.S. inside Old Faithful Inn in Yellowstone National Park. Gordon Hodgson, the guide of the 41-person tour group, told the Livingston, Montana Enterprise that officials told him they could stay at the hotel but could not do anything.     “All we could do was eat dinner in the dining room. It was like a ghost town,” he said.     A member of Hodgson’s group, Pat Vaillancourt, told her hometown paper the Newburyport News that, “They (the rangers) looked like Hulk Hogans, armed. They told us you can’t go outside.” She added that some of the foreign visitors with limited English were afraid and thought they were being arrested and that “A lot of people who were foreign said they wouldn’t come back (to America).”     Barricades surrounded Old

Faithful and the group was not even allowed to photograph bison as “recreating” was not allowed, according to an armed ranger who ordered the tour back onto their bus. Hodgson, the guide, called the behavior of the rangers “Gestapo tactics.” He added, “We paid a lot to get in. All these people wanted to do was take some pictures.”     And then there is the widely reported story about the National Parks Service barricading the open air monuments at the National Mall in Washington. That decision forced elderly World War II veterans who had traveled hundreds of miles to visit the memorial honoring their service to find a way around them.     Employees of the Parks Service even removed handles on well pumps along the C&O Canal towpath that runs 184 miles from Washington to Cumberland, Maryland preventing bikers from getting water, according to a report last week in The Cumberland Times-News.     Despite the shutdown, the Obama administration found a way to help political allies access the National Mall the rest of America is not allowed to visit, however. On Tuesday

a march for amnesty for illegal immigrants sponsored in part by Service Employees International Union and Casa de Maryland was allowed to take place with the imprimatur of the National Parks Service on “First Amendment grounds.” Labor Secretary Tom Perez, coincidentally, is the former head of Casa de Maryland’s board of directors.     One of the highlights of the rally was a concert by the band Los Tigresdel Norte, so apparently attendees were allowed to “recreate.”     According to a report in USA Today, the parks service is now allowing veterans to visit memorials, but “non-veterans not practicing free speech are still barred from the memorials and mall.”     Who gets to decide who is practicing free speech or not? Are there “essential” federal employees assigned to the task?     Not everyone who works for the Parks Service is happy about the way the shutdown is being handled. As one ranger told The Washington Times following the World War II veterans’ incident, “It’s a cheap way to deal with the situation. …We’ve been told to make life as difficult for

people as we can. It’s disgusting.”     It is disgusting. Especially because the Obama administration’s directives are geared to inflict as much pain as possible with no point other than to make life difficult for Americans. Barricading open air monuments? Preventing sightseeing at gunpoint? Taking well pumps? Who are these thugs — and who are the extremists here?     The ironic thing is that being mean is not helping the administration politically. Republicans are taking the most blame for the government shutdown according to polls, but President Barack Obama’s approval rating is only 37 percent, hardly a PR victory for him.     Ultimately the only thing he is proving through his nasty tactics is that he governs like the “Soup Nazi” of “Seinfeld” dispenses soup — arbitrarily and rudely. Shutdown or no shutdown, “No soup for you!” is not a way to run a country. Marta H. Mossburg writes frequently about national affairs and about Maryland, where she lives. Follow her on Twitter at @ mmossburg.

Photos by Tim Hadac

    The First Amendment is very clear in its 45 words that it protects a “free press” along with our rights to religious freedom, free speech and the rights to assemble and petition.     But the Founders, in effect, placed a responsibility on that free press in return for being the only profession named in the Bill of Rights: The news media were to be a “watchdog on government,” providing us with the facts, perspective and sometimes contrarian views that help citizens better chart the course of their government.     One of the latest version of that centuries-old daily duty is playing out now in a Wisconsin courtroom, where a coalition of news and freedom of information groups are trying to extract information from closed court records about a previously undisclosed e-mail system involving Milwaukee County officials.     This particular effort engages not only the watchdog role, but also the public’s right to information obtained in the course of judicial proceedings, and even implicates freedom of information laws intended to keep the public’s business “public.”     The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and others are seeking to access to public records collected during a sealed investigation of charges that included county employees campaigning on the public’s dime for nowGov. Scott Walker, then county executive and mentioned as a possible Republican presidential candidate. Convictions resulting from the investigation revealed a “private” email system by which certain trusted members of Walker’s staff could communicate outside official channels open to public view and inspection.     The use of such alternate e-mail arrangements, in which public officials conduct discussions about official business outside regular, known government e-mail systems, have been reported to have been used by federal agencies, Obama administration Cabinet officers, the New York City mayor’s office, and even by members of a New Jersey local library board.     Laws on public records and private e-mails vary greatly across the nation, and administrative decisions and court ruling also fail to draw clear lines.     In September, the National Archives told Congress that federal officials may use nonofficial addresses but that the exchanges have to be kept and made public in response to

freedom of information requests. But in July, in Illinois, an appellate court ruled in City of Champaign v. Madigan that under that state’s FOI laws, private e-mails and other electronic communications are not automatically public records just because officials discuss public matters — unless the messages are sent during a public meeting. In Wisconsin, courts have ruled that emails between officials conducting the public’s business are assumed to be public records subject to the State’s Open Records Law.     The “watchdog” role may at times require active tactics by the press, as in the court filing by The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, which believes the public has a right to know what kind of business county officials were conducting through an alternative email system.     The newspaper cites long-held legal standing for the public to know what is going on in its courts, citing even an 1849 state law guaranteeing citizens the right to attend court sessions, as well as later state and federal court rulings on open courts and open records.     “Our founders knew that citizens couldn’t make informed decisions about public policy and the job their elected representative were doing unless they knew what they were up to,’’ said George Stanley, Journal Sentinel managing editor. “We think these records belong to the public, not to government officials who might be embarrassed by what’s in them. But it’s a right you have to keep fighting for, over and over again. And all of the state’s Freedom of Information advocates, including the Associated Press, the state broadcasters and the Wisconsin State Journal are with us.”     If successful, the motion by the newspaper and its partners to unseal the investigation’s records will let the public in Wisconsin judge for themselves whether the state’s “sunshine” laws were violated. It will mark another opportunity to set a new “openness standard” for the nation in using new technology in conducting the public’s business.     But it already marks yet another example where a news organization — in this case, one that already has a number of Pulitzer Prizes in recent years for great reporting — also is living up to its constitutional duty to represent the public.

Guest View

Daniel Hack, Palos Heights     “[I’ll miss] that I have shopped here for the last 32 years of my life. We’ll see if they get bought out [by another grocer].”

Mary Jane Jennison, Oak Lawn     “I’ll miss the convenience, as well as their nice fruits and vegetables. I’ll probably shop at Jewel or Fairplay.”

Joe, Palos Heights     “[I’ll miss] the convenience. It’s close. I hope another place comes in here. If not, I’m not sure where I’ll shop.”

Patricia Prendergast, Palos Park     “I’ll miss the convenience, as well as the bakery. I’m not sure where I’ll shop. I have relied heavily on Dominick’s.”

Kathi Sterling, Palos Heights     “I’ll miss its proximity to my home, and I’ll miss the Starbucks. I may shop at Jewel.”


Thursday, October 17, 2013 The Reporter

Paint

7

(Continued from page 1)     The devastation of Hurricane Katrina caused an awakening for members of PPPCC. Bob Sneddon of Palos Heights has been with the church since 1972 and is the project coordinator for SON Weekend.     “We all wanted to board a plane and go to New Orleans but it was too costly,” he said. “We shifted our focus to helping right here, in our own community.”     James Tony, who has been the pastor of PPPCC since 1990 said knew this vision needed to be a collaborative effort and reached out to the Palos Township supervisor Colleen Schumann.     “Pastor Tony needed us to locate residents willing to accept help. I told him he’d have our full support,” Schumann said.     Schumann’s assistant, Bernadette Orr, of Palos Hills, became the liaison between the township and the church. Orr sent letters to current and past participants of their general assistance program, holiday basket drive and food pantry clients. Respondents’ specific needs were assessed and added to the site lists for service.     Over the span of eight weeks, PPPCC recruited volunteers, matching skills with the site specifications. Entire families signed up. Anyone with a desire to help, was deemed fit. For example, the church

Submitted Photo

An army of volunteers pose during SON Weekend in which the Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church helped paint and spiff up houses in the area. grandmothers prepared and delivered lunch to each work site.     Word began to spread throughout Palos Townships like a virus. Local businesses wanted in on the fun. John and Beata Vander

Veen of Palos Hills-based Diamond Temperature heating and cooling business donated service to 19 of the 23 sites. They’re third year participants. They said it’s their way of giving back.

Tulip ceremony honors those touched by cancer By Christ Medical Center     Advocate Christ Medical Center will be preparing the seeds of early cancer detection when patients and former patients of the medical center’s Cancer Institute and its Advocate Christ Center for Breast Care begin the planting of some several thousand tulip bulbs in a special ceremony at 12:30 p.m. on Oct. 22 in honor of all those whose lives have been touched by cancer.     “These tulips are intended to serve as a living reminder that screening increases the chances of detecting breast and other types of cancers early, when they are most curable,” said Barbara Krueger MD, medical director of the Advocate Christ Center for Breast Care. “Partnering with our patients

is one of the most powerful weapons we have to battle this disease.”     Area residents are welcome to attend the Christ Medical Center annual tulip bed dedication, which is being held on the grounds of the Center for Breast Care, 4545 W. 103rd St., Oak Lawn. Among those expected to be present at the program are local public officials and representatives of the Oak Lawn and Bedford Park fire departments.     “For cancer survivors, newly diagnosed patients and families, the flowers that sprout from the bulbs represent hope and courage,” said Peggy Kupres, coordinator of survivorship and external relations for the Cancer Institute and a 12-year breast cancer survivor. “Just as the bulbs must survive the

    Sneddon said, “The church funds the project but when businesses are willing to help, it allows us to do even more. [For example] Dan Harrison, Ace Hardware owner in Palos Heights, donated materials

1 Place for an old school tie? 11 Data of concern to privacy advocates: Abbr. 15 “My Word Is My Bond”         autobiographer 16 __ skirt 17 Ready for anything 18 “Being __: A Puppeteer’s         Journey”: 2011 documentary 19 Hit home? 20 Post 22 Odist’s contraction 23 Goes downhill fast 26 Scorn 28 O leaguemate 31 Major ending? 33 Tyrolean songs 34 Area of concern for FEMA 37 Li-ion cousin 38 Model Heidi who appeared         on “Ugly Betty” 39 Army leader’s nickname 41 Newsman’s asset? 42 Rialto sections 44 Philadelphia’s “P” and         Denver’s “D,” e.g. 46 Suspects 48 Test tube fluids

49 Divided terr. 50 Garment looked after by         Alfred 52 Fax button 54 Biker’s hazard 55 Shapeless thing 57 Maples in ’90s tabloid news 61 Rock Ôn’ roll middle name 63 Stretching out 66 Bum 67 Put great faith in 68 Strategic river of 1914 69 One to horse around with?

    The 12th annual Multiple Sclerosis Fundraiser — Raising Awareness takes place from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 2 at 114 Bourbon Street. All proceeds are donated to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society — Greater Illinois Chapter in Chicago. The event costs $30 and there will be a split the pot, raffle prizes and live entertainment.     This annual event was inspired by two women who have been fighting this disease for 30-plus years, Most Holy Redeemer parishioner Susan Berry and St. Linus parishioner Mary Fecht. ***     The Hickory Hills Lions Club will host the fourth annual Roar and Run for Fun 5K Run/Walk race. The race will be held at 9 a.m. Oct. 26. All participants

winter in order to bloom, so patients must go through oftentimes difficult treatments before they can blossom in freedom from cancer.”     In the spring, after the flowers have bloomed, the bulbs will be unearthed and given to those who purchased them. Unclaimed bulbs will be distributed to newly diagnosed breast cancer patients for planting in their personal gardens of hope, Kupres said.     Proceeds from the sale of the bulbs at Christ Medical Center will be used by the Center for Breast Care and the Cancer Institute for development and purchase of educational materials for cancer patients. Bruno Galatte Landscape of Tinley Park will donate the tulip     The St. Nicholas Greek Orthobulbs for the annual ceremo- dox Church presents its 41st artist, craft and vendor bazaar from nial plantings. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.     There will also be food available including homemade Greek food and pastries to eat in or take home. There will also be a free pastry raffle.     The bazaar will take place at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church Community Center, 10301 S. Kolmar Ave. in Oak Lawn. Admission is $1 and there is plenty of free parking. For more information, call 636-7874 or e-mail stnickphilo@yahoo.com. ***     The Oak Lawn Community High School PTSA will host its annual Holiday Craft Show along with the Oak Lawn Chamber of Commerce’s Business Showcase from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. This year’s event will also include a Community Health Fair presented by Jewel-Osco. Admission and parking are free. Handmade items from many area crafters will be on display. Proceeds benefit the PTSA student scholarship fund. ***     Our Lady of Loretto is looking for crafters for its annual holiday craft show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 1 at 8925 S. Kostner Ave. Rentals are $35 per table. For more information, call 708-423-4206. ***     Hickory Hills Presbyterian Church is looking for crafters for this year’s Holiday Craft Bazaar on Nov. 2 at 8426 W. 95th St. The rental fee for a 6-foot table is $30. For more information call 708-423-6378.

Down

1 Immortal archer 2 Singer Basil with the #1         hit “Mickey” 3 Hymn starter 4 Iberian infants 5 Complained underfoot? 6 Sacred syllables 7 Garage alternative 8 Device with a warp beam         and heddles 9 Metiers 10 Like varnished wood 11 Tongue twister pronoun 12 Breakaway hit?

(Answers on page 11)

receive a long-sleeve shirt. There will be awards, door prizes, food and drink following the race.     The start/finish line will be at Hickory Hills City Hall, 8652 W. 95th Street. For more information about the race: www. e-clubhouse.org/sites/HickoryHills, or to signup online: w w w. s i g n m e u p . c o m / 9 3 0 4 3 .     If you would like to volunteer or become a sponsor please call Vince Uzzardo 708-430-2210 or email hickoryhillslions@gmail. com.     Proceeds from the race will help the Hickory Hills Lions Club in their mission to provide programs and assistance to aid people who are blind or visually impaired. The Hickory Hills Lions Club has served the needs of the community for more than 50 years.

Crafts & Bazaars

13 Iditarod terminus 14 Bureau where stats abound 21 L.L. Bean’s first name 24 ChichŽn __ 25 Attack in a big way 27 Patsy’s “Ab Fab” pal 28 Boston attraction with a         permanent Space Race exhibit 29 Extinct carnivore whose         name means “different lizard” 30 1967 Neil Diamond hit 32 Town north of Shannon         Airport 35 Signs 36 Beethoven’s “some” 40 Raison d’__ 43 Short piece 45 Not natural 47 Persian Gulf fleet 51 Property manager’s sign 53 Factoid 56 Weighted weapon 58 2012 TV Land Awards host 59 Hot stuff 60 Youngest Bront’ 62 “Weekend Edition” airer 64 Tip for a writer? 65 Become more solid

served in an area you’re receiving, it makes some feel undeserving. Put pride aside. We’re just people, helping people. It’s the most rewarding and loving thing I’ve ever been a part of.”

Benefits & Fundraisers

Crossword Puzzle

Across

for cost, saving us thousands.”     Orr has since retired from Palos Township but still volunteers for this project.     “It was hard for people to let us help at first. When you haven’t

Church Corner     Neat Repeats Resale in Worth and Orland Park are celebrating their new look with expanded hours at both stores.     Starting on Sunday, Nov. 3, Neat Repeats will be opening from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Volunteers are needed to work a 5 Hour shift at either store.     For information, call the store manager in Worth, at 7026 W. 111th St., 361-6860, or Orland Park, at 9028 W. 159th St., 364-7605.     All sales at Neat Repeats Resale benefit the clients served by the Crisis Center for South Suburbia. The Crisis Center for South Suburbia is an non-profit community organization that provides emergency shelter and other services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Death Notices Shirley M. Budz     Shirley M. Budz (née See), 84, of Hickory Hills died Oct. 8. Visitation was Monday at Schmaedeke Funeral Home and the service followed at St. Patricia Church. Burial was at Resurrection Cemetery.     Mrs. Budz was survived by her children Kristine Richardson, Kimberly Granzoa, Kelly Arrendondo and Lenn Budz and her sister, Florence Gaweda. Mrs. Budz was born in Chicago and was a stenographer and attorney. Donald E. Mayer     Donald E. Mayer, 60, of Chicago Ridge died Thursday at his home. Services were held Monday with interment at Evergreen Cemetery.

    Mr. Mayer was survived by his wife Denise (née Bucina) and children Eric Petrusevski and ***     VFW Post 177 McDonald-Linn Danny and Jason Mayer plus sibin Chicago Ridge will hold a holi- lings Andy Mayer, Kathy Ingles, day craft fair Nov. 9. Table rent- Ruth Mayer, John Mayer and als are $30 per table. For more Mark Mayer. Mr. Mayer was born information call the post at 708- in Chicago and was a Con-Way truck driver. 636-3220.

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8

The Reporter

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Grade schools Bulletin Board Central Junior High

    Evergreen Park and area veterans are invited to a Veterans Day Breakfast and Program at 8 a.m. Nov. 8 at Central Junior High School, 9400 S. Sawyer, in Evergreen Park.     This event will be hosted by the students and faculty and is planned to honor the Evergreen Park and area residents who are U.S. Military Veterans for their service to our country during war or peacetime.     Those who wish to attend must call the school office at 708-4240148 by Nov. 1. Veterans are welcome to bring a guest. The building is handicap accessible, so if you have special needs, please let them know when you are making your reservations. Some parking is available on the school grounds or street in front of the school that day.

Chicago Ridge

    The Veterans Of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary No. 177 of Chicago Ridge is sponsoring a poster contest for first through third grade students and an essay contest for fourth and fifth graders.     The fourth and fifth graders Submitted Photo graders will write on the topic “How do our veterans serve America?” The essay should be no longer than 200 words and     Thirty-seven Worth Junior High students were treated to a pancake breakfast on October 5 as a result of being chosen by their teachers as students who best exempli- should be typed or neatly handfied the Character Counts trait of respect during September. written in black ink.     Students honored were:     The cover sheet for the essay     Sixth graders: Mohammed Abdelhamid, Fadi Abour, Steven Delaney, Roxana Delgado, Alyssa Gonzales, Katie Hogan, Trent Moran, Nancy Nguyen, Tyler Picl-Ludwig, should contain: student’s name, Suaad Rashid, Neda Yacoub and Laila Zatar. school, age of student and grade.     Seventh graders: Dareen Abdelhadi, Sabreen Ballout, Timothy Kopec, Rudy Krastin, Marco Lara, Younes Omar, McKenzie Reh, Gabriel Salas and Susan Zarebczan. The deadline is Nov. 6.     Eighth graders: Ariel Burns, Jackson Busch, Jemina Doon, Aldo Gallegos, James Iannatone, Jenna Marello, Jacob Nowobilski, Olivia Perera, Anna Petriekis, Fiona     The theme for the poster for Rohan, Cole Urban, Paulina Witek, Firas Yacoub and Thamer Yasin. first, second and third graders is “I am a proud American.”     The poster should be no larger than 14 by 22 inches. Students may use any type coloring agents like crayons, paints, markers, etc.     On the back of the poster please include: the student’s name, the age of the students and the By District 123 plastic packages. Each plastic grade. package can feed six children.     The deadline is Nov. 6. For more     Feed6, a charity serving the These meals are then distributed information on either contest, conhungry and homeless, will pack- locally through food banks to the tact Renee at 630-452-9447. age millions of nutritious meals hungry in area communities. for hungry children and their     Students that are interested Mount Assisi families in collaboration with in participating in this volunteer     The Mount Assisi Booster Club Outreach. opportunity are asked to raise presents its 10th annual Com    On Nov. 2, Oak Lawn Home- a minimum donation of $25 edy Night Saturday, Nov. 2, at town Middle School will host a and turn it into their advisory the school, 13860 Main St. in day of community service. The teacher to secure a spot. Once Lemont. charities Feed6 and Outreach the money is turned in, students     Doors open 6:15 p.m., dinner will come together to trans- will be assigned a 10 a.m. to noon 7:15 p.m., show 8:30 p.m. form the school’s gymnasium or 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. time slot.     Featuring a night of comedy into a meal packaging produc- Anyone interested in volunteerand dinner by Uncle Bub’s. tion center. ing or donating, please contact     Tickets cost $35 and include     Volunteers will come together Heather McCarthy athmccarbuffet dinner, beer, wine, pop, to package nutritional meals in thy@d123.org. water, and comedy show quests. Submitted Photo Must be 21 or over to attend.     To register, contact Gail Andjulis andjul4@yahoo.com, or call 224-9922.     Six Oak Lawn Hometown Middle School band students were selected to perform in the Illinois Music Education Association Honor Band and Jazz Band. They auditioned this weekend alongside Oak Lawn nearly a thousand other students from schools throughout the Chicagoland area for the opportunity     Oak Lawn Community High School performances of “Beauty to perform with a guest conductor at a prestigious concert in November.     Members selected were Kayla Luznicky (french horn) and Jonathan McLawhorn (trumpet) Rafal and the Beast” will take place at Czech (trombone), Cole Kareta (bass), Matt Lagioia (tenor sax), Jonathan McLawhorn, and Lukas 7 p.m. Oct. 25 through Oct. 27. A special children’s matinee will Williams (alto sax). also take place at 2 p.m. Oct. 27 where children will have the opportunity to be a part of the show and get their picture taken and receive autographs with Belle, the By Sue Hubbard, M.D. Beast, and the other enchanted objects. Tickets are $10 in advance Plate size could curb logical. everyone use the same plates and and $12 at the door. Tickets can childhood obesity,     So, the hypothesis was correct: bowls. Perhaps it would make more be purchased through the ticket study shows When children were given larger sense to continue to have our chil- hotline at 424-5200 ext. 5920.     While I’ve been trying to change bowls, plates and cups, they served dren use child-sized dishware until Queen of Peace up my eating habits a bit and talk- themselves larger portions and, in they reach puberty! ing to patients about trying some turn, consumed more calories. In     It certainly wouldn’t hurt, and     Queen of Peace and St. Launew foods, I came across an inter- the study, 80 percent of the children if schools did the same thing we rence high schools will be hostesting study in the journal Pediat- served themselves more calories at might be able to impact the obesity ing a Mass for first responders at rics. The hypothesis for the study, lunch when using adult-size plates problem among children simply 10 a.m. Sunday. Family, friends     All four corners of the gym were filled Sept. 26 at Covington conducted among school children and bowls. just changing one behavior. It is and the community are invited to School in Oak Lawn during a Bingo night. in Philadelphia, was: “Can smaller     This is great news, in that by definitely a technique worth try- honor all active and retired police     Children had a huge selection of prizes and books to pick from plates promote age-appropriate changing the size of the plate, we ing! officers, firefighters/EMS and all as Bingo and raffle winners were announced throughout the night. portion sizes in children?” branches of the military. might be able to affect a child’s An ice cream social followed.     Previous studies in the adult portion size without them even    (Dr. Sue Hubbard is an award-     Queen of Peace High School     Second grader, Anna Driscoll, and fifth grader, Jocelyn Vail, are literature that have shown that being aware! winning pediatrician, medical edi- is located at 7659 S. Linder pictured playing the game. dishware size influences self-serve     I remember that our kids all had tor and media host. “The Kid’s Ave. in Burbank. Refreshportion sizes and caloric intake. children’s bowls, plates and cups Doctor” TV feature can be seen on ments will be served immeWhether the same conclusions that they loved to use. Eventually, more than 90 stations across the diately following Mass. RSVP with children were valid had yet of course, these either broke, got U.S. Submit questions at www. by Oct. 18 to 708-458-7600 or gardast@queenofpeacehs.org. to be examined but this seemed lost, or we just decided to have kidsdr.com.)

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Thursday, October 17, 2013 The Reporter

High schools & College

9

Spuds and thuds are a part of STEM learning at Shepard By Bob McParland District 218     When Brian Sievers hit the launch trigger, his homemade cannon emulated the acoustics of the real thing. The echoes reverberated off the northern face of Shepard High School, returned off surrounding homes, and back.     Students squinted in the morning sun to catch a glimpse of the potato fired from the launcher. The spud landed with a thud, and everyone smiled and clapped.     Beyond the visual and audio candy of launching potato-mortars, the activity taught physics concepts and, ideally, opened a few students’ minds to the idea of STEM careers.     “The demonstration was an exciting way to explore projectile motion,” Sievers said.     Students watched, share conversations, answer Sievers’ questions, and eventually

applauded as the potatoes flew over the softball dugouts.     “In class it is often difficult to have students observe something like the time a projectile is in the air. With our projectile traveling a couple of hundred feet, it was easier for them to see the difference in time of flight for various angles.”     Launching from a low angle, students could see the potato travel away but hit the ground quickly. When Sievers raised the angle of the cannon, the class could see that the potato stayed in the air longer.     “While observing the increase in flight time for an increase in launch angle, students also observed that the reverse was true to the horizontal distance traveled by the potato, or the range. If we tried to use small equipment in class they would not have time to make these observations,” he said.     Interesting, unconventional experiences like these inspire

curiosity and, hopefully, get kids to consider careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.     In recent years, the number of students in the U.S. earning college degrees in STEM areas has decreased. Many who initially declare a major in STEM areas change their course of study once they realize the work involved.     “Students love to build things and see how they behave. They have an innate curiosity. The potato cannons demonstrate that you can build things to explore science,” Sievers said.     Such experiences spark creativity in building and testing designs.     “Then they can form solid conclusions based upon results. This is the core of all science and research. It is a way to develop thinkers, and that is what the American education system must do to regain its Submitted Photo prominence in the world,” Siev- Shepard High School physics teacher Brian Sievers readies one of his homemade potato launchers. ers said. Sievers fired potatoes over the softball field to illustrate the various concepts of projectile motion.

D230 Relay for Life one of the biggest in nation at the conference, the success of the District 230 Relay For Life was apparent. The two individuals who organized the conference     The 2013 High School District were Kyle Polk and Zach Doman, 230 Relay For Life was recog2011 graduates of Sandburg and nized for being the most sucAndrew. cessful and largest high school     There were three guest speakRelay in the nation. Raising more ers including retired Sandburg Principal Debbie Boniface, Sandburg student Maureen Strode and an American Cancer Society representative.     Also, two of the three breakout sessions were led by Sandburg students Justin McCurdy and Barrie Chileen.     Throughout the conference, District 230 students gave tips and advice to representatives from top-notch universities such as Northwestern University, the University of Illinois, DePaul University and the University of Chicago on how to make their Relay For Life events successful.     “The District 230 Relay For Life has become world-renown due to the success, dedication and ingenuity of the students and staff over the past 17 years,” said Kruchten. “In that time, District Submitted Photo 230’s Relay has raised more than Accepting the District 230 Relay for Life award for the largest high school event in the country are $3.35 million for cancer research Justin McCurdy (Sandburg), Julie Zielinski (Stagg), Nora Chlum (Andrew), teacher Jake Kruchten and support for those undergoing (Sandburg) and Maureen Strode (Sandburg). treatment.” By Carla Erdey District 230

than $350,000 last year, it was only surpassed by Virginia Tech University for youth relays in the country.     Representing the District 230 All-Youth Relay for Life team at the Illinois Relay For Life Leadership Conference at Concordia

University were students Justin McCurdy from Sandburg, Julie Zielinski from Stagg, Nora Chlum from Andrew, Maureen Strode from Sandburg and teacher Jake Kruchten from Sandburg.     In addition to the current students leaders’ participation

Submitted Photo

New leaders at Oak Lawn High School

Marist grad shares his vocation story

    Oak Lawn Community High School started the school year with two new leaders: Lauren May began her year as Chairperson of English, Social Studies, Foreign Language and Media Center and Kevin McKeown began his year as a Dean of Students.

By Marist High School

    McKeown has taught social studies at Oak Lawn for 10 years. Hehas taught U.S. government, U.S. history and Law. During those ten years he served as assistant football coach and eight seasons as the head boys bowling coach. Kevin said.

    Marist High School graduate Adam Gonzalez, who graduated this spring, returned to school this week to share his vocation story with freshmen religion classes.     Marist schools across the country are participating in the Year of Marist Vocations. During his talk he spoke about the four vocations within the     Marist High School’s service group will host Think Pink, a celebra- Catholic Church: marriage, Holy tion of breast cancer survivors and a remembrance of those who Orders, religious life, and sacred have lost their battle with the disease. The event will take place on single life. from 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 30 in the school’s main gym.     Gonzalez of Oak Lawn said     There will be a variety of craft vendors, an all-pink fashion show, he was first inspired by his dad, raffle baskets, mini spa treatments, food and beverages. The cost Joseph, who is a deacon, and is $10 with all proceeds to benefit Little Company of Mary’s Com- the pastor of his parish, Rev. prehensive Breast Health Center. Michael Furlan at St. Germaine.     For tickets, contact Colleen Pochyly at pochyly.colleen@marist.net He saw the good work they were or 773-881-5359. This event is open to the public. doing for others.     Pictured are Marist teacher Denise Bromberek and former student     Now a full-time undergraduColleen Biebel of Alsip who got into the spirit of Think Pink with ate student at St. Joseph Semitheir big hair in a previous event. nary, a college of Loyola Uni-

    May served the Spartans for 14 years as an English teacher, data coordinator, dean of students, Scholastic Bowl coach and Relay for Life sponsor.

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    Members of the Oak Lawn Community High School Journalism Team will host the South Suburban Conference Publications Workshop Friday at Moraine Valley Community College. Nearly 400 students from 14 schools will attend the annual event and participate in various workshops designed to improve a wide range of skills — writing, editing, interviewing, photography and layout. In addition to the workshops, select students from each school will participate in a variety of Illinois High School Association mock competitions. The keynote speaker for this year’s conference is FOX Chicago sportscaster, and Oak Lawn.     Canellis is the TV host for all five of the TV shows the Bears own and produce. Canellis anchors Bears Game Day Live and Bears Game Night Live on FOX Sunday mornings and Sunday nights, along with Bears Recap and Bears Blitz on Mondays,

Wednesdays, and Thursdays on Comcast Sportsnet.     He was inducted in the Oak Lawn Community High School’s Alumni Hall of Fame in 1998.

Richards

    Richards High School will host its 11th annual Southland Model Railroad Show on Saturday and Sunday, October 26 and 27.     Richards, located at 10601 S. Central Avenue in Oak Lawn, will host the event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday.     Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens 65 and older, and free for children under age 12. Parking is free.     The train show will feature the largest HO layout of any model show in the Chicago area. The Richards event also includes many other model train displays and operating layouts, Lego trains, a riding train for children, train races for children, and a children’s activities area.     Last year, 23 area model rail-

road clubs displayed layouts.     For more information, visit www.railroadshow.com or contact Richards band director Charles Martin at 708-499-2550, ext. 5096.

Shepard

    Coaches and cheerleaders from Shepard High School will host a youth camp on Oct. 22 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.     Shepard is located at 13049 S. Ridgeland Avenue in Palos Heights. Parents can bring their children to the gymnasium.     The camp will include instruction on jumps, stunts, motions, and chants. As a group, the campers will perform what they’ve learned a halftime of the Shepard sophomore football game on Friday, October 25.     Registration is $25 and includes a T-shirt. Parents can send a check to the athletic department at Shepard High School, 13049 S. Ridgeland Avenue, Palos Heights, IL 60463.

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10

The Reporter

Thursday, October 17, 2013

community calendar / Features

OL Chamber bash coming Saturday     The Oak Lawn Chamber of Commerce will host the 14th Annual Business Showcase & Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Oak Lawn Community High School.     Flu shots will be available from Advantage Pharmacy for a fee, along with free blood glucose testing and blood pressure screen. We will also have a full spectrum of healthcare providers, financial & banking representatives, home improvement specialist and more.     The Business Showcase is held

in conjunction with the Fall Arts and Crafts Fair, sponsored by the Parent-Teacher School Association. The Oak Lawn Chamber will use a portion of the proceeds from the Showcase to provide college scholarships to eligible Oak Lawn Community seniors.     For more information, or for an exhibitor application, please call the Chamber office at 424-8300 or email office@oaklawn chamber.com. Booth fees are $85 for Chamber members and $150 for non-members.

Park Clips Chicago Ridge

    The Chicago Ridge Park District is taking team registration for 4th through 8th grade boys basketball and girls volleyball leagues. For registration information, please call 708-423-3959 or visit our website www.chicagoridgeparks.com.

Evergreen Park

    Evergreen Park will offer classes in tumbling, preschool open gym, kids boot camp, kids fitness, Irish dance, Taekwondo, color guard, drama, performing arts, cheer tumbling, cooking and Yoga starting Tuesday. For more information call, 708-229-3373. ***     The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services will take a seven-day trip to “Christmas at the Biltmore House and Dollywood” in Tennessee from Nov. 10 to 16. Cost includes transportation, hotel, some meals, and admission to Dollywood and Biltmore Estate. For more information call 422-8776.

at the Palos Hills Community Center located at 8455 W. 103rd Street, Palos Hills. If you would like more information about this event please call us at 708-4304500 or email us at recreation@ paloshillsweb.org. ***     The department will be hosting a 5th Grade Fall Bash. This event will take place at the Palos Hills Community Center from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 8 at 8455 W. 103rd Street. Tickets for this event are $1 and they come with a hot dog and a bag of chips. Other refreshments will be sold for a nominal fee. This event is only for 5th graders that reside in the School District 117/118. There will be a DJ, dancing, games, foods, open gym, Nintendo Wii, ping pong and air Hockey. For more information about this event call 708-430-4500 or email recreation@paloshillsweb. org. ***

Hickory Hills

    Open basketball for 5th through 12th grade boys and girls is available on Fridays through Dec. 20. The 5th through 8th graders attend from 4 to 6:15 p.m. The 9th through 12th graders attend from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Krueger Park Rec. Center, 9100 S. 88th Ave. The fee is $3 to $5 each session. ***     The Hickory Hills Park District has openings in its preschool classes. Five-day class is $1,540, three-day class (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) is $860, and two-day class (Tuesday and Thursday) is $695. Classes run through May 2014. Class times are 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 3:15 p.m. The office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for registration. Parents must provide child’s birth certificate and immunization records. For more information call 598-1233 or visit hhparkdistrct.org.

Oak Lawn

    Duplicate bridge will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mondays at the Oak View Center. Cost is $7 per person and includes a light lunch. For more information, call 857-2200.

Palos Hills

    The Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Dept. will be hosting the Haunted Hills of PalosHaunted Hayride from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The hayride goes through a wooded area that is haunted by ghouls and goblins that have been haunting these woods for many years. Tickets are $5 per person and $3 for children 10 and under. Tickets are on sale at the Palos Hills Community Center located at 8455 W. 103rd Street. Tickets can be purchased on the grounds both nights. For more information, please call 708-430-4500 or email us at recreation@paloshillsweb.org. ***     The department will also host the Not So Scary Hayride on from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday. This event is located at 108th and Roberts Road. Children’s tickets are $5 and children under 1 year old and adults are free. Activities include a Not So Scary Hayride, a bounce house, entertainment, crafts, face painting, goodie bags and a story teller.     Tickets are on sale for this event

    The City of Palos Hills will be honoring those who have served this country at 6 p.m. on Nov. 11. This event will take place at Town Square Park’s Veteran Memorial located at 8455 W. 103rd Street. There will be Toys for Tots donation boxes at this outdoor event. For more information please contact the Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Department at 708-430-4500 or email us at recreation@paloshillsweb.org. ***     The Palos Hills Community Resource & Recreation Dept., will host its annual Haunted Hayride, on 108th& Roberts Road in Palos Hills from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The cost is $5 for adults and $3 ages 10 and under. Scary Volunteers are needed for this event please call or stop into the Community Activity Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. The phone number is 708-430-4500. There will be mandatory meeting for all volunteers at the Community Activity Center Oct. 14th. Forms will be available to sign by parents or adults attending as volunteers.

    Pickle Ball will be at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., from 6 to 8 p.m. every Tuesday. Pickle Ball is a cross between tennis and ping-pong and involves strategies such as lobbing, drive shots and overhead slams. Cost is $1. ***     Open gym basketball is offered at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $1. ***     The Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., has an indoor playground featuring slides, a climbing wall, tree house and more for children who can walk through 4 years old. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for non-residents. For more information call 4487080 or visit worthparkdistrict. org.

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Legal clinic at PLOWS

    PLOWS will host the next monthly legal clinic presented by the Center for Disability and Elder Law (CDEL).     Low-income senior citizens may receive free assistance with a variety of legal matters including powers of attorney, wills, landlord/tenant issues, collections and consumer fraud.     Appointments are necessary and may be made by contacting CDEL at 312-376-1880, Ext. 22.

Double Nickel

    The Double Nickel Plus Chorus meets at the Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen Park, every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers are welcome. For more information call 422-8776.

Meals on Wheels

    The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services offers a Meals on Wheels program for village residents 60 years and

older who are unable to prepare their own meals. Meals are delivered Monday through Friday. For more information call 422-8776.

55 and Up

    Palos Hills residents 55 years and older meet from noon to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. Tickets for events must be purchased

one week in advance. Entertainment includes musicians, singers, luncheons, movies, plays and bingo.

Pinochle

    The Worth Senior Pinochle club is seeking new members. Membership is free. Visit the group at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., every Monday and Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games begin at noon. Call 448-1181 for information.

Library Notes Evergreen Park

    The Evergreen Park Public Library is at 9400 S. Troy Ave. The phone number is 422-8522. ***     The library invites children of ages 3 to 5 years to Preschool Story Time on Mondays, Wednesdays or Fridays through Oct. 25. Children will try to have fun with engaging books, songs and activities as they build their early literacy skills. ***     On Tuesdays or Wednesdays through Oct. 23 kids ages 18-35 months are invited to Toddler Time, an interactive story time. Registration is required. For more information, call 708-422-8522. ***     On Thursdays through Oct. 24 kids ages birth to 17 months are invited to enjoy songs, action rhymes, and stories, during Baby Bookworms. The program is offered at either 9:30 a.m. or 6 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, call 708422-8522. ***     The library is offering a Learn to Crochet class for adults and teens on Tuesdays, through Oct. 29 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Beginners bring an H/8 crochet hook. Yarn will be provided. All others should bring a current project. Registration required. For more information, call 708-422-8522. ***     The library is accepting applications for exhibits at its Mini Maker Faire to be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday. The event will celebrate the do-it-yourself mind set by showcasing various projects in a show-and-tell format. Submit projects at evergreenparklibrary.org.

Green Hills

    The Green Hills Public Library is at 8611 W. 103rd St. in Palos Hills. The phone number is 5988446. ***     The Green Hills Public Library District will be extending Friday hours to 9 p.m. starting Dec. 6. The library will host special events on select Friday evenings. ***     The Friends of the Green Hills Public Library will be hosting a fundraiser all of November. Stop

in and pick up a Fannie May candy bar for just $1. There are a variety of flavors and no limit. Purchases can be made in the Friends Bookstore on the ground level or at the Circulation Desk on the 2nd floor. ***     Learn basic computer skills including where to start, how to find programs and documents, and customizing your desktop from 5 to 8 p.m. Nov. 4. Registration is limited to four per class. Laptops will be provided. ***     The library and offers astronomy bingo. It is a chance to play bingo to learn about stars, moons, planets, galaxies, and more. It takes place at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 6. All ages are welcome. ***     Share laughs and sing along to some of the greatest songs of the World War II era. Join Judy Garland, the Andrews Sisters, Abbott and Costello, and many stars entertaining the troops in this dazzling collection of showstopping scenes. Monents from “Buck Privates,” “Follow the Fleet”, “Anchors Aweigh,” and “For Me and My Gal.” The event is at 2 p.m. Nov. 7. ***     Award-winning astrophysicist and national lecturer Kevin Manning will guide both young and old on an educational and entertaining exploration of the universe, the stars, and other celestial wonders at 6:30 p.m. tonight. Manning uses an engaging style, hands-on activities, and assorted visuals throughout this fascinating exploration.

Oak Lawn

    The Oak Lawn Library is at 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The phone number is 422-4990. ***     Learn how to navigate Media on Demand and Axis 360 quickly and easily. Bring your devices for the second half of the program, and Library staff will answer patron questions about downloading eBooks at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 22 at 2 p.m. ***     The library will host a free concert featuring The Midway Ramblers Cajun Band on from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday. Cajun and zydeco, swamp pop and Louisiana

blues will be feature. The event is sponsored by the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library. No advance registration is required. For more information about this and other adult programs at the Library, call 708-422-4990 or visit www. oaklawnlibrary.org. ***     The library’s bi-monthly book group Day & Night Reads will discuss Orson Scott Card’s “Ender’s Game” at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Wednesday. Seventy years after a horrific alien war, an unusually gifted child is sent to an advanced military school in space to prepare for a future invasion. The movie version will be released Nov. 1.     Card was awarded the 2008 Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in Young Adult literature from the American Library Association.     The Library will order extra copies of each title approximately one month before the discussion. Questions should be directed to the Help Desk. For a full list of Day & Night Reads titles, visit www.oaklawnlibrary.org. ***     The library will host a free movie screening of “The Company You Keep” at 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Thursday. A former Weather Underground activist goes on the run from a journalist who has discovered his identity. ***     The library will host “Baby Time!” from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Oct. 24 and Oct. 31. Stories, music and free-play are available for ages 6 months to 23 months with an adult. Registration is not required.

This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. For more information about this and other youth programs at the Library, call 708-422-4990 or visit www. oaklawnlibrary.org. ***     The library will offer a “Science Club” for ages 4-13 that will specialize in math and science. Students will be completing hands-on activities in a variety of areas that utilize science, technology, engineering and math topics starting Monday. For more information about this and other youth programs at the Library, call 708-422-4990 or visit www. oaklawnlibrary.org. ***     Due to changes with the Village of Oak Lawn’s battery recycling program, the library will now only accept rechargeable batteries. Alkaline batteries do not need to be recycled anymore, since they no longer contain mercury. Rechargeable batteries should be dropped off at the first floor reception booth. ***     The library sponsors three adult writers groups that meet yearround. A general interest group meets from 10 a.m. to noon on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. Writers interested in screen-writing meet from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. Budding children’s authors meet from 10 a.m. to noon on the third Thursday each month. Meetings include readings, critiques and writing exercises. New members are welcome anytime. No registration required.

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Focus on Seniors

Mayo Clinic Scleroderma treatment usually most effective when started right away     DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’m a 50-year-old woman recently diagnosed with scleroderma. What causes it, and can anything stop its progression? What medications are available, and at what point should I begin taking medication?     ANSWER: Scleroderma is a disease that causes the body’s connective tissue and skin to harden and tighten. In some cases, only the skin is involved. But the disease can also damage other organs, including the kidneys, lungs, digestive tract and heart. The cause of scleroderma is unclear. Depending on the organs involved, medication may effectively slow or stop the disease’s progression.     Scleroderma results from an overproduction of collagen in body tissues. Collagen is a fibrous type of protein that makes up your body’s connective tissues, including your skin. Connective tissues are the fibers that provide the framework and support for your body.     It is not known what triggers the abnormal collagen production that leads to scleroderma, although the body’s immune system appears to play a role. Scleroderma can run

in families, but in most cases it occurs without any known family tendency for the disease.     Scleroderma can produce a variety of symptoms, depending on which organs it affects. One common symptom of scleroderma is a heightened response to cold temperatures or to emotional distress. This condition, known as Raynaud’s episode, causes blood vessels in the hands and feet to constrict. That leads to transient numbness, pain or color changes in the fingers or toes. Scleroderma can also cause persistent skin changes, such as swollen fingers and hands; thickened patches of skin, particularly on the fingers; and tight skin around the hands, face or mouth.     As a progressive disease, scleroderma typically gets worse over time. Currently, no known cure will halt the overproduction of collagen.     A variety of medications are available that may be able to control the symptoms of scleroderma. For example, angiotensin-converting enzyme, or ACE, inhibitors can be used to help relax and open blood vessels, thus relieving some

kidney problems associated with scleroderma. Calcium channel blockers may decrease the symptoms of Raynaud’s episodes. Several other drugs are being studied to learn if they may stop the lung inflammation that can be caused by this disease.     Some people with scleroderma may develop pulmonary hypertension. This type of high blood pressure affects the arteries in the lungs and the right side of the heart. Several medications are available that can treat pulmonary hypertension. But to be most effective, treatment must begin right away, while the condition is still in its early stages.     Treating the skin symptoms of scleroderma can be a challenge, but you can take steps that may help. Protecting yourself from cold can lower your risk of Raynaud’s episodes. For example, wear mittens anytime your hands are exposed to cold — even when you reach into a freezer. When you’re outside in the cold, cover your face and head and wear layers of warm clothing.     Staying active can help, too. Exercise keeps your body flexible, improves circulation and relieves

stiffness. Range-of-motion exercises can help keep your skin and joints flexible. Finally, don’t smoke. Nicotine causes blood vessels to constrict further and that can make symptoms of scleroderma worse. Smoking can also cause permanent narrowing of your blood vessels.     A variety of other treatments — such as stem cell transplants, the medication paclitaxel and a group of drugs known as cytokine blockers — are under investigation to see if they may be effective in reducing skin symptoms of scleroderma. Talk to your doctor to find out if any of these treatments could be right for you. Also, discuss with your doctor the best timing of treatment. In many cases, the earlier treatment begins after symptoms appear, the more effective it is in managing scleroderma. — Thomas Osborn, M.D., Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.    (Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic is an educational resource and doesn’t replace regular medical care. To submit a question, write to: medicaledge@mayo.edu. For health information, visit www. mayoclinic.com.)


Thursday, October 17, 2013 The Reporter

consumer

EP business lauded by MVCC

Pofits & Sense     Marquette Bank, invites customers and neighbors to participate in its 7th annual Adopta-Soldier program, which sends care packages to U.S. soldiers serving overseas. Through Nov. 2, employees, customers and neighbors have the opportunity to donate items and to nominate Chicago area soldiers to receive the care packages.     You can fill out a form at any Marquette Bank location to nominate a soldier to receive a care package. Collection bins are also available and requested donation items are listed below by category. Food/Beverage     • Bumble Bee tuna kits; canned fruit (single serving); cereal/granola/power bars; hot chocolate packets; microwavable mac & cheese and popcorn; Mi0 or Crystal Light drink mix; nuts (small bags); oatmeal (individual packets); Slim Jim beef jerky; snacks (individually wrapped); and soup (single serving).

Drugstore     • Anti-itch/antibiotic creams; disposable razors; nasal spray; eye drops; and Tums/Rolaids. Miscellaneous     •Batteries (AA or AAA); Christmas cards/letters; crossword puzzle books; iTunes gift cards; mechanical pencils; new DVDs or CDs; playing cards; and socks.     In the past, local classrooms along with Girl and Boy Scout troops have made cards and wrote letters of gratitude to soldiers. The Adopt-a-Soldier program is part of the Marquette Neighborhood Commitment, where each quarter the bank focuses on a different area of need — shelter, hunger, education and health/wellness. For more information about Marquette Bank and the Adopt-a-Soldier program, call 1-888-254-9500 or visit www.emarquettebank.com. ***     The Oak Lawn Chamber of Commerce will host the 14th

Annual Business Showcase & Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Oak Lawn Community High School.     Flu shots will be available from Advantage Pharmacy for a fee, along with free blood glucose testing and blood pressure screen. We will also have a full spectrum of healthcare providers, financial & banking representatives, home improvement specialist and more.     The Business Showcase is held in conjunction with the Fall Arts and Crafts Fair, sponsored by the Parent-Teacher School Association. The Oak Lawn Chamber will use a portion of the proceeds from the Showcase to provide college scholarships to eligible Oak Lawn Community seniors.     For more information, or for an exhibitor application, please call the Chamber office at 4248300 or email office@oaklawn chamber.com. Booth fees are $85 for Chamber members and $150 for non-members.

CNB Bank & Trust branches into Palos Heights     CNB Bank & Trust, N.A., head­quartered in Carlinville, has announced plans to open a new, full-service banking center in Palos Heights in late 2013. The Palos Heights Banking Center will be located at 12727 S. Ridgeland. CNB currently has a banking center in Oak Forest at 5459 W. 159th St.     “We’re excited to be opening a new banking center in Palos Heights,” said Andrew Tinberg, Regional President of CNB. “The Palos Heights Banking Center will be part of CNBs continued

commitment and approach to providing outstanding service and convenience to the communities that we serve.” Palos Heights will be CNB’s 13th banking center.     “The opportunity to open a new facility was finalized when CNB was able to hire Bob Straz as Market President, to manage the Palos Heights banking center,” Tinberg states. “Over the last year it has become very clear that the Palos area consumer continues to demand a true community bank presence and we are excited about delivering just that!” says

Straz.     The long-time mayor of Palos Heights brings years of banking experience in the area. He has also shown his commitment to the Palos area with his involvement in the Sertoma Centre, Rotary, and Saint Alexander Parish among other organizations.     For more information about CNB or its many banking services, please visit its website at cnbil.com, or call the Oak Forest facility at 535-8905. — CNB Bank & Trust

By Moraine Valley Community College     Moraine Valley Community College’s Corporate, Community and Continuing Education subdivision has selected the winners of its 2013 Business Champion Awards, which recognize the valuable contributions businesses and their advocates make to the economic development of Chicago’s southwest suburbs.     Awards are presented in six categories: Training and Development, Sustainability, Excellence in Government, Philanthropy, Entrepreneur/Small Business Person of the Year, and Women in Business/Leadership Award.     This year the Philanthropy Award will be presented to William Keyser, owner of Florida Plastics/ Keyser Retail Solutions, for a $1 million donation to Advocate Hope Children’s Hospital in Oak Lawn. The donation helped open a $3.5 million pediatric cancer center at Advocate Christ Medical Center. The Keyser Group is a familyowned business in Evergreen Park that offers expertise and products for local store marketing and merchandising solutions.     The Training and Development Award will be presented to Priscilla Steinmetz, founder and executive director of the Bridge Teen Center in Orland Park. She is being recognized for the grassroots community center’s work in training seventh through twelfth grade students to develop mentally, physically, emotionally, and

    At many places of work, it’s open enrollment season — the time where you get to make changes to the various benefits you receive from your employer. As you review your overall benBy Christopher Elliott efits package, what areas should you focus on?     Here are three possibilities:     • Life insurance — If your employer offers life insurance as a benefit, and you haven’t An airline will tell you that you a rule for itself. always have the option of buying     I see that you tried to contact already signed up for it, consider a more expensive ticket that can Aer Lingus by phone and then in adding it during your open enbe refunded, but those tickets can writing, but the airline wouldn’t rollment period — because life cost twice as much as the non-re- budge for you. I sent you some insurance can be important to fundable variety. For most leisure higher-level contacts at the airline, your family’s financial security. travelers, that’s impractical (indeed, but that didn’t work either. The If you already have life insurance with your employer, you the tickets are meant for business answer remained a firm “no.” travelers on a corporate expense     I contacted Aer Lingus on your may want to take the time, duraccount). behalf and asked it to review your ing open enrollment, to review     Airlines sometimes waive their request one more time. It did, and your beneficiary designations. If you’ve experienced a change ticket restrictions, issuing refunds decided to issue a full refund. in your family situation, such when a passenger dies or a close relative of a passenger dies, or when    (Christopher Elliott is the author as divorce or remarriage, you’ll you’re in the military and your or- of “Scammed: How to Save Your want to update your beneficiaders change. But again, they are not Money and Find Better Service in ries, as needed. required to do that. A serious illness a World of Schemes, Swindles, and     However, the amount of life like lung cancer can be a reason for Shady Deals” (Wiley). He’s also the insurance offered by your emrefunding a non-refundable ticket. ombudsman for National Geo- ployer in a group policy may not In my opinion, it should be. graphic Traveler magazine and the be sufficient for your needs, so     Incidentally, airlines let them- co-founder of the Consumer Travel you may want to consult with a selves off the hook from their Alliance, a nonprofit organization financial professional to deteragreements with passengers for that advocates for travelers. Read mine if you should add private, all kinds of reasons, including bad more tips on his blog, elliott.org or individual, coverage. You may weather or events “beyond their or e-mail him at chris@elliott.org. find that individual coverage is control.” They aren’t required to Christopher Elliott receives a great comparable, in terms of cost, to operate a flight on time, or at all, deal of reader mail, and though he your employer’s coverage. Also, and the penalties — if any — are answers them as quickly as possible, individual coverage is “portanegligible. I don’t have a problem your story may not be published for ble” — that is, you can take it asking an airline to waive its rules several months because of a backlog with you if you change jobs.     • Disability insurance — Your when it has little problem waiving of cases.) employer may also offer disability insurance as a low-cost benefit. The coverage can be invaluable. In fact, nearly one in three women, and about one in four men, can expect to suffer a disability that keeps them out By Corwin Cole of work for 90 days or longer at some point during their working reply of “all-in” for $90 more to off asking himself not what hands years, according to the Life and call. As he was telling me this, his opponent could have, but what Health Insurance Foundation Andy remarked, “I was sure I was his gut was telling him. That much for Education (LIFE). Again, as beaten, but what could he have? was clear: He was sure he had was the case with life insurI was only losing to pocket twos the losing hand after his opponent ance, your employer’s disability or pocket fours.” went all in. In this case, Andy’s policy may not be enough for     In fact, the opponent had Kd 8c, instinct was spot-on, and trusting your needs, so you may need to having picked up two pair on the it would have saved his stack. turn, and scooped the pot, leaving     Over the years, I have seen time Andy frustrated and reloading with and again that these gut feelings a fresh buy-in. are stunningly accurate for experi(Continued from page 9) enced players. The logical brain is     In this case, Andy’s reasoning easily fooled by the right numbers failed due to a fallacy common and tricky arguments. The instinc- and balancing school with a among players who focus on math. tive brain, on the other hand, learns social life.     He looked into other college He had the idea in his head that from raw experience. options, but said he would not because the number of hands that could possibly beat him was small,     When you face decisions at the know for sure if he was called to his opponent probably didn’t have table, remember to simply ask be a priest if he did not explore one of those hands. That is not yourself whether you think you his vocation at the seminary. necessarily the correct conclusion. are beaten. Chances are, whatever If ordained, Gonzalez said he hopes to show the youth the In fact, it’s almost never valid. It your answer, it is the right one. love he found in Jesus when he is quite common to find yourself with a very strong hand and still    (Corwin Cole is a poker coach was their age. Gonzalez said the be able to fold correctly, knowing whose instructional videos can be support for his vocation explothat your opponent’s hand is even found at CardRunners.com. He ration he received from faculty stronger. can be reached at corwin.cole@ and students while at Marist was a huge help.     Andy would have been far better cardrunners.com.)

No refund for a sick passenger?

    A: Good for United for refunding your non-refundable ticket. Aer Lingus should have done the same, but it didn’t have to.     You booked a non-refundable ticket with significant restrictions.

Talkin Poker When your gut talks to you, listen     Great poker stories feature two types of heroes: bold players with impeccable instincts and mathematical geniuses capable of performing amazing calculations. You may have heard tales of Doyle Brunson running over his opponents no matter what cards he was dealt, or Stu Ungar memorizing every card drawn from a six-deck shoe. But which strength is superior in the long run?     The surprising truth is that gut feelings are often more useful than mathematical reasoning, and that most players’ instincts are sharper than they know.     Andy, a friend of mine who plays poker regularly, recently told me about a hand that perfectly demonstrates how it can be costly to rely too heavily on numbers and ignore your instincts. He was playing $1/$2 no-limit hold ’em at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, and he raised to $10 after being dealt Ac Kh in first position. One player called from middle position, and everyone else folded.     On a flop of Ks 4d 2h, Andy felt safe with top pair, top kicker, and he decided to check, hoping his opponent would then overplay his hand. After the middle position player bet $15, Andy called, then checked again when the turn brought the 8s. Now, his opponent bet $40.     At this point, Andy took control of the aggression and raised to $100, which got him an immediate

Vocation

SUDOKU Solution

Crossword Answers

spiritually in a safe environment. Steinmetz has dedicated her life to working with teens by transitioning a struggling youth program with less than 10 students into a multi-tiered operation serving the interests and needs of 400 suburban teens through afterschool programs.     Phil Shea, vice president of salesat Prairie Material, will accept the Sustainability Award. Prairie Materials, located in Bridgeview, has established sustainable best practices, including operating several recycling centers that accept used and returned concrete, developing innovative concrete products that partially replace cement with industrial by products which prevents industrial waste from clogging landfills, reusing process water, controlling dust, and incorporating a company-wide environmental management system to document best practices.     The Excellence in Government award will be presented to Daniel McLaughlin, mayor of Orland Park, for progressing the village economically, environmentally, culturally, socially, and recreationally. Mayor McLaughlin has attracted a number of new businesses to the village, and created the Residential Rewards Program, Ninety7Fifty on the Park project, the Taste of Orland, and many other events. Under his leadership, the village has grown and maintained its vitality and low crime rate.     Marc Golden, owner of Golden Shoes in Palos Heights, will be

presented with the Entrepreneur/ Small Business Person of the Year award for celebrating 50 years in business. The store’s longevity speaks to his care, concern and business ethic of always making the customers feel important, and being sincere and devoted to them. He truly cares about his clientele.     The Women in Business/Leadership Award will be presented to Andrea Ramirez-Justin, vice president of Old Plank Trail Community Bank. At the bank, she manages governmental and public entity relationships with the bank’s community outreach services. Ramirez-Justin is involved in many civic and community activities, is the president of the Mokena Chamber of Commerce, past president of the Professional Women’s Network, a member of the Illinois State Treasurer’s Office’s Banking advisory board, and serves on the Moraine Valley Foundation board. She also has received “The Business Ledger’s” Entrepreneurial Excellence Award.     The awards will be presented at the 18th Annual Business Champion Awards dinner on November 6, from 4 to 7 p.m., at the Moraine Business and Conference Center, Building M, on campus, 9000 W. College Pkwy., Palos Hills. Tickets are $50 each or $380 for a table of eight.     For more information or to purchase tickets, call 708-9745714 or email schrimplee@morainevalley.edu.

Take advantage of open enrollment season

Travel Troubleshooter

    Q: I have tickets on Aer Lingus to fly from Dublin to Paris. I was diagnosed with lung cancer a few weeks before we were due to leave.     I had no problem getting a refund for our transatlantic flight with United Airlines, but Aer Lingus was only willing to refund the taxes unless I could reschedule within 30 days. Given the situation, that was not possible. They said the ticket would still have been good until the end of April, which is when we bought them, but who can make a commitment at a time like this?     I have no idea what my situation will be in April or any time before. Not yet, anyway, and certainly not in the 30 days they were willing to give me. Thanks for anything you can accomplish. — Merrill Hakim, Philadelphia

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 11-17-13, a sale will be held at Custom Auto Specialties, 410 Vista Avenue, Addison, IL. 60101, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Ronald K. Shaw, Jr. 2006 Dodge VIN# 1B3EL46X96N250682 Lien Amount: $4,910.95

consider boosting your contributions during open enrollment. Also, take this opportunity to review the array of investments you’ve chosen for your 401(k) or other plan. If you feel that they’re underperforming and not providing you with the growth opportunities you need, you may want to consider making some changes. You might also think about making adjustments if your portfolio has shown more volatility than the level with consider additional coverage.     • Retirement plan — Your which you are comfortable. Your employer may offer a 401(k) or financial professional can help similar retirement plan, such you determine if your investas a 403(b) plan, if you work ment mix is still suitable for for an educational institution your goals, risk tolerance and or a nonprofit organization, or time horizon. a 457(b) plan, if you work for a governmental unit. All these     Open enrollment season gives plans offer the chance to con- you the perfect opportunity to tribute pretax dollars; so the maximize those benefits offered more you put in, the lower your to you by your employer. So, taxable income. Equally impor- think carefully about what tant, your earnings can grow you’ve got and what improvetax deferred, which means your ments you can make — it will money can accumulate faster be time well spent. than if it were placed in an account on which you paid taxes Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, every year. 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills,     Consequently, try to contrib- 974-1965. Edward Jones does ute as much as you can pos- not provide legal advice. This sibly afford to your 401(k) or article was written by Edward other employer-sponsored plan. Jones for use by your local EdIf you’ve gotten a raise recently, ward Jones financial advisor.

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The Reporter

The

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Bac to back — bacteria could be causing back pain

Back Page

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT?     Ahh, we have some sharp sports fans in this group of WHATIZIT? wizards.     While we had a few wrong guesses of soccer, lacrosse and hockey nets from last week’s photo, a good chunk correctly identified it as a kicking net that athletes use to warm up on the sidelines for field goals, extra points and punts.     Those with game-winning kicks were Worth’s Jerry and Carol Janicki, Robert Solner, Celeste Cameron, Theresa and George Rebersky and Gene Sikora, Oak Lawn’s Steve Rosenbaum and Jane Foley, Evergreen Park’s Liam Lyons and Chicago Ridge’s Patty Vandenberg, Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis and Dana Oswald.     This week’s clue: More sports equipment.     Send those guesses to thereporter@comcast.net with Whatizit? in the subject line by Monday night. Give us your name and home town as well.

Health Scan vices is hosting a “raising healthy Shoulder Pain families� workshop at 4:30 p.m. free presentation Thursday, Oct. 24 at the Orland     Palos Community Hospital is Township Activity Center, 14807 offering a free presentation led by S. Ravinia Ave. Orthopaedic Surgeon Edward Joy, M.D., where he will discuss basic     Doug Tansor of “Health From shoulder anatomy, prevention of Within�of Orland Park will discuss and common causes of shoulder how parents can make informed pain, along with conservative and decisions regarding the health of surgical treatment options avail- their family. Topics to be discussed include how healthy childhoods can able for shoulder pain.     The program will take place prevent chronic diseases, nutrients from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5, and anti-nutrients, how to build at Palos Health & Fitness Center, health, nutritional myths, and how 15430 West Ave., Orland Park. to save thousands of dollars a year Light refreshments will be served. on medical expenses. Registration is required; call 226-     Registration is required. For details, phone 403-4222. 2300.

Affordable care information Workshop

reading the suggestion in the study, that bacterial overgrowth that masked inflammation, may be the cause of between 35 to 40 percent of cases of chronic

Mixing it up for good health By Dee Woods

low back pain. Fuchs’ friend had that particular infection that migrated to several of her discs creating the inflammation that left her in a semi-helpless state. Her doctor ordered an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan. The MRI scan is the only way at present, to pick up the infection, according to Fuchs.     She writes that while there are numerous other causes of chronic low back pain, such as pressure on nerves in the spinal canal, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, the bacterial infection factor has

never been considered.     Her friend was on numerous pain-killers and due to the medication, her thinking became more and more muddled.     Her friend’s chronic back pain presented after a hip surgery. An infection set in during her hip surgery and no one was aware of it. One would suspect such a surgery could have thrown her system off balance, which may have created her pain, however, after six months, it most likely would have resolved. It was discovered by her friend’s physician, that the infection she developed during hip surgery had, indeed, migrated from the hip, down into the discs in her lower back. The bacterial infection settled in, hence; the strong drugs didn’t help much because the real cause of her pain, specifically, infection, was not being addressed.     As much as we all dislike the thought of antibiotics, this was a case where they were totally necessary. She was placed on three months of amoxicillinclaculanate 500 mg/125 mg. Her pain gradually became

bearable and her follow up MRI showed the swelling and inflammation in her vertebrae was subsiding.     Fuchs warns: “Don’t even consider antibiotics if you don’t have a bacterial overgrowth along with bone swelling.� If you do, and if antibiotics are your best choice, you have another option with herbal antibiotics—but always remember, they take longer to kick in and must be administered under the supervision of a qualified integrative health care provider.     To reiterate, Fuchs says an MRI is the only way to confirm such an infection and it’s essential to clear up the infection. This is exactly why it is not recommended to take antibiotics for every cough or cold. It’s important they be available to do their job effectively when they are needed. Antibiotic overuse can lead to less than effective results. Dee Woods is available to give presentations about alternative health treatments and healthy living. She can be reached at deewoods@comcast.net.

Best of The Wine Guy

Protein doesn’t only come from meat     Warning! Studies show you have a greater risk of death if you eat a diet high in red or processed meat.     As if we haven’t been told that for years, but you know what? It’s true.     The latest study was the largest ever of its kind and found that older Americans who consume high amounts of such foods are at greater risk than others of developing cancer and heart disease. More than 500,000 men and women participated in the study and confirmed that regularly eating hamburgers, hot dogs, bacon and cold cuts is not good for you.     The study found that men who eat the daily equivalent of one-quarter pound of hamburger were 22 percent more likely to die from cancer and 27 percent more likely to die from heart disease than men who ate just 5 ounces per week. Women who ate the most red meat were 50 percent more likely to die from heart disease than those who ate the least amount.     The increased risk was

slightly less for those who ate processed meats, but the fact is we should only be eating small amounts of the leanest meats. Lean meat as part of a balanced diet can actually help you as long as you exercise and avoid smoking.

The Wine Guy

    So what to do about protein, which some people fail to understand is not exclusively available in meat? Eat beans and lentils, either canned or fresh. These can be eaten in so many ways. Lentils and smaller beans can be mixed into brown your favorite wine. Eat your vegrice or pasta, and larger beans etables, keep your colon clean can be incorporated into soups, and live to be 100. stews and chilies. If you are really industrious you can even make hummus or protein patties that can be grilled like a burger. Try combining beans with a can of chicken broth, a can of diced tomatoes, onions, garlic, celery and carrots for a fantastic soup. Simmer this for 30 minutes until it is near boiling; your craving for meat will disappear.

with Anthony Scarano

Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an 86-year-old Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the opinions of Mr. Scarano based on years of independent study and personal experience, and may not be beneficial to health. Wine should be consumed in moderation, as overindulgence may be harmful to health. Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter

    Whatever you eat, supplement it with a glass or two of

Don’t Miss These Upcoming Events!

Do you have a CD Renewing?

    State Sen. Bill Cunningham and state Reps. Fran Hurley and Kelly Burke will sponsor two workshops on Tuesday, Oct. 29, for individuals and small business owners in Illinois to assist residents obtain health care.     The sessions will aid with enrollment questions and provide as much information as possible. Local residents are invited to attend either the afternoon workshop between 3 and 5 p.m. or the evening workshop between 7 and 9 p.m., at Worth Township, 11601 S. Pulaski Road in Alsip.     Learn more about the health insurance exchanges that are being implemented in the state. Representatives from the Illinois Health Insurance Marketplace will be on hand to answer individual questions and to make appointments for personal assistance.     For more information, contact Rep. Hurley’s office at: (773) 445-8128 or email her at repfranhurley@gmail.com.

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    Last week, I found one of the most amazing discoveries regarding a little-known condition that may affect from 30 to 35 percent of chronic low back pain sufferers. I would never have guessed and I would suppose most physicians and surgeons would never have guessed.     Nan Kathryn Fuchs, PhD, writes in her October 2013 issue of “Women’s Health Letter,� about a friend of hers who suffered excruciating back pain.     She was treated for months with various pain-killers, yet, her pain continued. Her physicians discussed back surgery to attempt to resolve the pain, but because of having only a 50 percent chance for success with the surgery, she decided against it.     It was now six-months post op and her friend spiraled into a brain-fog condition from the heavy drugs. Thankfully, her friend’s doctor had remembered a study out of the University of Denmark that suggested vertebral swelling caused by a bacterial infection, may be the cause of the chronic low back pain. He remembered

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor

outhwest

sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, October 17, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

Perfectly placed Mustangs stage another great escape By Ken Karrson     Jacquet McClendon’s football future will probably be at wide receiver, but he’s presently making foes miserable as a defensive standout.     The Evergreen Park senior is still doing much as a pass-catcher to warrant attention; his five receptions versus Eisenhower Friday night, for example, included two that went for touchdowns. McClendon also gained a total of 121 yards.     However, when the Cardinals threatened to erase the last part of what had once been a 21-0 Mustangs lead, it was McClendon coming to Evergreen’s defensive rescue late in the fourth quarter. His interception thwarted Eisenhower’s final possession with un-

der a minute to go and preserved the Mustangs’ 21-13 South Suburban Conference Red win that kept their ledger perfect.     McClendon had performed a similar act of thievery near the end of a Week 5 clash with Richards, and that steal nailed down Evergreen’s 35-34 triumph back then. Amazingly, the Mustangs (7-0, 4-0) have collected five of their six on-field wins to date by single digits, four of them by no more than two points.     And even in its biggest victory, 21-10 over Oak Lawn, Evergreen had to fight back from a 10-0 halftime deficit.     No rally was necessary against the Cardinals, as McClendon Photo by Jeff Vorva scored on Sean Ryan pass completions of 47 and 49 yards in the Evergreen Park receiver Jacquet McClendon is all alone after making one of his two touchdown catches Friday night against Eisenhower. The Mustangs’ unbeaten season continued with a 21-14 win over the Cardinals. (Continued on page 6)

Southern comfort In this case, it’s ‘Argo-nots’ Crusaders keep momentum going vs. Irish By Ken Karrson     As the southernmost school among Chicago Catholic League institutions, Bishop McNamara has frequently taken advantage of travel-weary opponents.     A trip to Kankakee typically requires at least 90 minutes even for those schools closest to Bishop Mac geographically, which meant that Brother Rice had to avoid any bouts of fatigue if it wanted to have a realistic chance of subduing a decent Fightin’ Irish gridiron squad Friday night.     Crusaders coach Brian Badke admitted that “Bishop Mac’s not an easy place to play,” but Rice had two big things going for it: momentum and something important for which to play. A record-setting victory over St. Joseph one week before had created the former, as it snapped a four-game Crusaders skid and kept them alive for a Class 8A playoff berth.     And the latter fact is what Rice used as emotional fuel against Bishop Mac. While Badke felt his guys were a bit flat at the outset, the Crusaders quickly shifted into gear and went on to garner a 38-

28 win that made this Friday’s Catholic League Blue showdown with longtime rival St. Rita bigger than usual.     Rice (3-4) meets Providence Catholic next week in its regular-season finale.     “We’ve got to win out, so we’ll see what happens,” Badke said. “Playing at home against St. Rita — what could be better? The key for me [right now] is our [younger] guys are really growing up and the seniors are really rallying [all] these guys.”     As far as keys in beating the Irish, one of the most indisputable was the Crusaders’ ability to better protect the football. Rice’s offense did commit one turnover and its special teams had another, and both miscues eventually led to Bishop Mac points.     But Crusaders quarterback Alex Alarcon was mistake-free while completing 18-of-24 passes for 169 yards and three touchdowns. The junior has struggled with interceptions this year, so this unquestionably ranked as one of his finest hours.     “Alex played very well,” Badke said. “Not turning the ball over,

we’re going to be in great shape. We could have won a couple [more] games [earlier] if we had played like this.”     Also playing a pivotal role was junior running back Marcus Jones, who averaged nearly 11 yards per carry while accruing 250 rushing yards. Jones tallied on runs of 38 and 88 yards in the second half and helped Rice stretch a 17-14 halftime lead out to 38-14 before the Irish tacked on a couple cosmetic TDs in the late going.     “Marcus had a breakout game,” Badke said. “He really came into his own.     “The offensive line played very well in opening holes for him, and when Marcus gets to that second level, not too many people are going to catch him. He’s had some lingering injuries, but he’s an explosive runner.”     Badke cited Jones’ shorter dash as a turning point in the contest. It occurred shortly after Andrew Dyke recovered Brian Kane’s onsides kickoff that opened the second half and enabled the visitors to build a 10-point edge. (Continued on page 5)

Bulldogs run roughshod over Argo, secure playoff berth By Ken Karrson

    Richards players understood Argo’s pain. Then they proceeded to add to it.     A week after dropping a gutwrenching one-point verdict to South Suburban Conference Red leader Evergreen Park — just as the Bulldogs had in Week 5 — the Argonauts were forced to try and remedy themselves against Richards. That proved to be mission impossible.     The Bulldogs had to journey to Summit Friday night, but being the road team was about the only thing that didn’t directly benefit them. Its visitor status was of little consequence, however, to Richards.     Foremost among the Bulldogs’ batch of home wreckers was a defense that completely stifled an Argo offense that had amassed 44 points versus Evergreen and averaged slightly more than five touchdowns per contest through the season’s first six weeks. Against the Bulldogs, the Argonauts netted only 42 total yards, a number that was greatly affected by minus-58 rushing yards on 18 carries.     “We’re an attacking defense

and we wanted to amp up the pressure,” Richards coach Tony Sheehan said. “We wanted to send guys from everywhere, confuse [Argo players] a little bit and put them in positions they didn’t want to be in.”     The strategy obviously worked, as the hosts became the ’Dogs’ second shutout victim in as many weeks. Richards beat the Argonauts 27-0 and, in the process, nailed down its fifth consecutive Class 6A playoff berth and the 28th in 29 years.     “We’re happy that we’re back in,” Sheehan said. “Obviously, [capturing] the conference [title] is out of the question unless somebody beats Evergreen, but getting win No. 6 and knowing you’re in [the state tournament] is good.”     Good wasn’t a strong enough adjective to describe the Bulldogs’ show of defensive dominance, which included a half-dozen quarterback sacks. Lineman Savon Robinson recorded half of those, along with two tackles for loss and eight total stops. Romel Hill (10 tackles), Andrew Venerable (six) and Dwayne Jiles (six) were other key figures.     “They were swarming and it

was impressive,” Sheehan said. “Twenty-seven-to-nothing over a team averaging over 35 points a game [means] the defense played really, really well. We were never in danger of them scoring.”     Not once did the Argonauts even venture inside Richards’ red zone, which made the latter’s 130 halftime lead loom large. The Bulldogs (6-1, 3-1) had gained it on touchdowns by Dedrick Shannon (25-yard pass from Hasan Muhammad-Rogers) and Chrishawn Ross (1-yard run) in the first and second quarters, respectively.     What made Ross’ TD important was that it successfully culminated an eight-play, 70-yard march. Constructing lengthy scoring drives has not been a Richards staple this fall.     “The last two games, we’ve gotten a little better at that,” Sheehan said. “We need to take what [opposing defenses] give us, [both] by being able to run the ball and completing some short passes.”     But while the Bulldogs were seemingly in a comfortable position, Sheehan didn’t want his guys to become complacent and imagine a win was secured after (Continued on page 5)

Tigers get Adam-bombed QB leads Chargers to huge win over Joliet West By Ken Karrson     Call Stagg’s weapon of choice Friday night the Adam bomb.     The description fit Chargers quarterback Adam Pilota in more than one way. Not only did the senior blow up any chance visiting Joliet West had of claiming a SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue victory, but he accomplished that by being the architect of several big plays, including three long touchdown passes — more commonly known as “bombs” in gridiron vernacular.     The most impressive aerial hookup was one between Pilota and Jack Duffner, which covered 80 yards and came soon after the Tigers had wasted a prime scoring opportunity of their own by fum-

bling the football into the Stagg end zone. The Chargers’ ensuing recovery resulted in a touchback that preserved a 13-7 lead, which was then increased by the PilotaDuffner duo.     Duffner caught a second TD throw from Pilota, Tyler Mackessy grabbed two others totaling 115 yards, and for good measure Pilota also crossed the goal line twice himself, including on a 50-yard sprint.     And that still wasn’t the full extent of Stagg’s assault. Two touchdown runs by fullback Austin Kelly and sophomore Gary Kopca’s school-record 99-yard interception return inflicted more damage upon Joliet West and sealed the deal on a resounding 61-35 triumph for the Chargers

in Palos Hills.     Coach Mike Fahey wasn’t certain if the point total established a single-game standard for Stagg, but he couldn’t remember anything bigger. That included during the Chargers’ 2002 run to the Class 7A semifinals, a season punctuated by three 50-plus-point contests.     “Our stat guy said the scorebook caught on fire,” Fahey joked of this latest barrage. “One year, I don’t know if we scored that many points for the season.     “Adam is running the option Photo by Jeff Vorva [offense] very well and we were clicking. We scored on all but one possession.”     More important than the points     St. Laurence’s Ed Sadowski runs a kick back into Mt. Carmel territory Friday night, but the Vikings themselves was what they allowed were unable to take advantage of the field position. The Caravan routed St. Laurence 55-0 in Burbank. See story page 3. (Continued on page 3)

Running room

FOOTBALL FORECAST Holy Maholy! We have a three-way tie for first place in our     picks. After last week’s so-so performance from the gang,   Ken Karrson and Jason Maholy have caught up and tied reader   Wally Findyz with two weeks to go in the regular season. Jeff   Vorva is still magnificently mediocre and is three games off the   pace. Anthony Nasella, who usually is the last to get his picks in,   thus should have the edge on the rest of the goofs, stayed in last   place and is looking up at Vorva’s behind, which is not a pleasant   sight. Only eight games in week eight and Maholy and Findysz have   identical picks with Karrson agreeing with them on seven but picking   Marist over Benet. Will we have a new leader next week? Or   co-leaders? Karrson is Weisch-ing for a Redhawks win.

Last week: Overall: Shepard at Evergreen Park Oak Lawn at Richards St. Rita at Brother Rice Benet at Marist Stagg at Sandburg Wheaton Academy at Chicago Christian St. Ignatius at St. Laurence St. Xavier at Waldorf

Ken Karrson 8-3 54-14 Evergreen Park Richards St. Rita Marist Sandburg Wheaton Academy St. Laurence St. Xavier

Jeff Vorva 7-4 51-17 Evergreen Park Richards St. Rita Brenet Sandburg Wheaton Academy St. Laurence St. Xavier

Anthony Nasella 6-5 46-22 Evergreen Park Richards St. Rita Benet Sandburg Wheaton Academy St. Laurence St. Xavier

Jason Maholy 8-3 54-14 Evergreen Park Richards St. Rita Benet Sandburg Wheaton Academy St. Laurence St. Xavier

Wally Findysz 7-4 54-14 Evergreen Park Richards St. Rita Benet Sandburg Wheaton Academy St. Laurence St. Xavier


2

Section 2 Thursday, October 17, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Sorry to be curt, but no pity for Schilling Bartosh     Those of us with a conscience try very hard not to revel in someone else’s misfortune.     That’s easily done when the person in question is an average Joe or Josephine. In those cases, most of us can sincerely sympathize with the affected person because we envision his or her plight as something that could conceivably happen to us as well.     But even in other, difficultto-fathom instances we still attempt to play the role of concerned fellow citizen and at least voice public regret over unfavorable circumstances. And so I did with Curt Schilling — for a brief moment anyway.     Then I came to my senses. Mind you, while I’m not gleeful about the former major-league pitcher’s state of financial affairs, my crying towels are staying packed away in the linen closet.     You likely heard about Schilling’s latest undertaking — perhaps you even got in on his estate sale, which was held in Medford, Mass., this past Saturday as a means by which to clean up some clutter. The clutter in Schilling’s world is monetary.     Being an ex-athlete, you’d reasonably assume Schilling had plenty of money. By normal-person standards, he does, but clouding the picture — and, thus creating his personal clutter — is the fact he owes a bunch of it to others.     Specifically, Schilling is being sued by Rhode Island’s economic development agency. According to previously published reports, the state had approved a $75 million loan in 2010 to get Schilling’s video-game company to move there.     Only one problem popped up: His profits didn’t do the same. The venture ultimately failed and Schilling’s company collapsed into bankruptcy in 2011.     Schilling reportedly made about $114 million during his playing career, and he is currently employed by ESPN as an analyst. Offsetting that is the $50 million investment he lost in 38 Studios, plus the money Rhode Island wants reimbursed to it.     These are Monopoly numbers, folks, and ones to which none of

us can possibly relate. Journalists, for example, would have to work several more years than Schilling did in the majors to equal his career income — about 4,000 more.     Now, I don’t profess to be a business-world whiz, but this much I know: Anyone I’ve ever met could live quite satisfactorily, thank you, on Schilling’s baseball earnings alone.     So why the need to enter into high-stakes gambling, which is basically what Schilling did when he sank money into 38 Studios? According to an indepth article written by Jason Schwartz for Boston Magazine, Schilling, among other things, apparently sought to attain Bill Gates-style wealth.     Gates is well known for his philanthropic endeavors, and evidently Schilling had something similar in mind for himself. That part’s certainly commendable, especially since Schilling has an autistic child. Being in a financial position to, say, underwrite a foundation designed to promote scientific research and maybe one day arrive at a cure for that affliction would have benefited a great many families.     But Schilling could have also done quite a bit of good with a personal donation of $5 or $10 million to whatever worthwhile cause he chose. He didn’t need to try to become Bill Gates, a pursuit that has since turned him into Bill(s) I Owe.     According to an Associated Press story about it, Schilling’s recent estate sale featured more than 150 items, including a baby grand piano, vintage Coca-Cola machine and — my personal favorite — a Hummer golf cart. What’s the matter — just any old golf cart wasn’t good enough to get Schilling to the next hole?     Let me reiterate that if this tale involved an anonymous Everyman who had unexpectedly fallen on hard times and did not in any way set himself up for failure, it would truly be a sad one. And even if Schilling’s situation had resulted from an unavoidable medical emergency or something similar in nature, then we’ve got plenty of room for sympathy.     But how do you feel bad for someone who got greedy and evidently was ill prepared to

properly run a company? That was Schilling’s choice to make, he made it, and now he’s paying dearly for his ineptitude.     Why couldn’t he have invested a smaller amount into someone else’s company, one being operated by a more experienced businessperson? Or Schilling could have played the stock market, as multitudes of other citizens do.     What I’m guessing happened is that Schilling, like many athletes, became a victim of his own excellence.     Though we have a tendency to criticize professional jocks for the insanely high incomes they realize for playing a “kid’s game,” the fact is they represent a pretty rare breed. If it were that simple to make the peewees-to-pros journey, we’d all do it.     And that’s just to get there. To achieve Schilling-like star status, one needs the perfect combination of ideal timing, natural talent and inner drive.     Not surprisingly, notable accomplishments in any field tend to inflate egos. Healthy egos are OK; what makes them unhealthy is when they convince individuals that their level of expertise extends beyond the obvious.     If Curt Schilling had the ingredients necessary to become an all-star pitcher, why wouldn’t those same traits apply to make him an all-star businessman, too? That’s what his ego probably said to him, and he was foolish enough to listen.     Schilling should have been content with what he did on the diamond — heck, how many guys have been famous enough to rake in over $92,000 for a bloody sock, which Schilling did when he auctioned off the one he wore in the 2004 American League Championship Series? Any bloody sock I owned would be burned long before it was bought.     So, Curt, for the sake of your family, I hope you get your financial mess straightened out someday. Even though you pretty much did it to yourself, I’m willing to ignore that long enough to give you good wishes.     Giving you any sympathy, however, is out of the question.

No thrill in the chase After falling behind, RedHawks can’t catch Dons By Ken Karrson     Those who claim life’s real thrill occurs during the chase and not in the conquest may want to speak with Marist football players.     Certainly, the RedHawks will offer a differing opinion on that theory. And chances are, they’d point to Friday night’s clash with Notre Dame in Niles as a prime example to the contrary.     Marist spent most of the evening in hot pursuit of the Dons, who had established an early 130 lead, but that game of chase ended in frustration rather than satisfaction for the locals.     The RedHawks never could quite catch up to Notre Dame, although they kept things interesting by answering every bit of Dons noisemaking from the second quarter on with some of their own. When senior wideout Nic Weishar snared a 13-yard pass from Jack Donegan in the late going, the touchdown brought Marist within 38-35.     However, only about 3 1/2 minutes remained at that point, and Notre Dame cemented the decision in its favor by tallying one final time on the last of Chris James’ five TD runs. The Dons’ 45-35 triumph, coupled with Nazareth Academy’s upset of previously unbeaten Benet Academy, created a huge logjam within the East Suburban Catholic Conference.     Notre Dame, Benet and Joliet Catholic Academy share the top spot in the league, while Marist and Nazareth are a half-game in arrears. St. Patrick is in sixth place, but within one game of the leaders.     “It was another wild one across the conference,” RedHawks coach Pat Dunne said.     Dunne’s club has engaged in almost nothing but wild, highscoring contests this season. This latest one featured big input from Weishar, a two-time all-area selection who will attend Notre Dame University next fall.     With his reputation preceding him, Weishar faces double-team

coverage every time he steps on the field. That didn’t change against the Dons, but Weishar still made his presence felt by hauling in a total of 11 throws from Donegan and gaining 141 yards He also had touchdown receptions of 34 and 11 yards in addition to his 13-yarder.     “He was blanketed here, but he made all the plays,” Dunne said of Weishar. “He was even triple-teamed once, but he jumped over them to catch the ball and he stiff-armed his way into the end zone.     “He’s competitor, and it doesn’t matter what situation he’s in. He wants to help his team in whatever way he can.”     Weishar’s exploits, plus those of fellow receiver Flynn Nagel (11 catches, 113 yards, one TD) probably would have been enough to carry Marist (4-3, 3-2) to victory had James not made sure the Dons boasted a formidable offensive figure of their own. James scored on runs of 88, 6, 14, 35 and 8 yards and finished with 253 yards on 30 totes.     He became the third opposing runner to pile up at least 250 yards against the RedHawks in the past four weeks. Also producing big performances during that span were St. Patrick’s Anthony Molina and JCA’s Mike Ivlow.     James’ longest dash and Pat Cravens’ 17-yard end around staked ND to its early edge. Before that happened, Marist posed a serious scoring threat until its initial possession of the night was choked off at the Dons’ 6 when a fourth-and-1 play failed.     “That’s something we’ve been stressing to the guys: trying to consistently come away with points on every series,” Dunne said. “We were proud of our guys’ effort all night, but we talk about finishing [strong]. That’s something we’ve got to get better at.     “Obviously, it was a very good [defensive] play on their end. Football’s a game of momentum, and that [sort of thing] gives a team a lot of momentum and a lot of confidence.”

    The RedHawks did hit paydirt twice in the second stanza, as Weishar (34 yards) and Nagel (10 yards) made scoring catches, but James sandwiched his second TD in between to maintain a lead for ND. Both teams had passes intercepted shortly before intermission, with Marist’s occurring inside the Dons’ 20.     “I second-guessed myself about [not] kicking a field goal [then],” Dunne said, “but I believe in our offense.”     That offense wasn’t done doing damage, either, as Weishar and Mark Ferguson (49 yards) supplied TD catches in the second half. The ubiquitous James refused to let the RedHawks build any steam, though, as he delivered his last three touchdowns to hold the visitors at bay.     “I thought Notre Dame played a good football game, but we were right there [with them],” Dunne said. “This was one of those that went right down to the wire and we could have won it.”     In spite of James’ impressive exhibition, Marist’s defensive unit included some notable individuals. Foremost among them was Marcus Pitts, who had a hand in 14 tackles. Marco Weidman (11 stops, two tackles for loss), Adam Miller (nine stops, one tackle for loss) and Ryan Mishka (five tackles, interception, one pass breakup) also made an impact.     Mishka’s swipe was the lone turnover caused by the RedHawks.     “Offense helps defense and defense helps offense, and in tight ballgames you’re looking for those turnovers,” Dunne said.     Marist hosts Benet on Friday in an ESCC matchup that will have major implications on the conference race. The RedHawks also need one more triumph to become a Class 8A playoff qualifier for the sixth year in a row.     “Every game is a playoff game [now],” Dunne said. “We should come out with that same intensity, energy and focus [needed for those]. Controlling your own des(Continued on page 5)

Volleyball roundup

Lady Eagles take care of conference business By Anthony Nasella     After a solid effort at the previous weekend’s highly competitive ASICS Challenge, Sandburg coach David Vales was hoping his team would be mentally prepared last Tuesday for its yearly showdown against District 230 mate and SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue rival Stagg.     A convincing 25-18, 25-18 victory over the Lady Chargers dismissed any concerns on that front. The Lady Eagles then added a 25-12, 25-14 triumph over Joliet Central on Thursday to improve their season record to 19-7 and conference mark to 3-0.     “Playing a sister school like Stagg is always a big match for us,” Vales said. “They had a strong outside hitter that we had to key in on.     “Coming off the ASICS Challenge the previous weekend, we didn’t want to have a downfall on our home court. That was our focus: to be ready for our sister school and to have a good performance on our home court, and the girls did that very effectively.”     Kelly McGovern’s 13 digs and Julia Borschel’s six kills led host Sandburg versus the Lady Chargers. Lexi Mantas’ eight kills topped Stagg.     Borschel stepped forward again with five kills opposite the Steelwomen, while Alyssa Kijewski had 10 digs. The Lady Eagles, however, had to overcome a slight obstacle against Joliet.     “We lost one our middle hitters, Kristina Stoncius, to an injury in the match,” Vales said. “The girls really picked it up in her absence and really pulled through strong in the victory. We always try for a fast start and a stronger finish, and we did that.”     Vales also credited his team’s success on offense to the play of junior setter Sami Knight, who passed out 16 assists in the win over Stagg.     “This is Sami’s third year on varsity,” Vales said. “This year, I

turned over the entire reins of the offense to her, and she’s proving to be a valuable part of the team. She’s an offensive weapon on the second attack as well.     “It’s her team, and yet she defers to the seniors because she’s a junior. When it comes to offense, she runs it effectively.”     Vales said one characteristic that best defines Sandburg is that it has succeeded despite the absence of a high-tier player.     “This is one of the best overall teams I’ve had in many years,” he said. “We may not have the players that reporters go wild over, but they play and they play together. They’re a tough team to beat.”     And that was definitely the case at the ASICS Challenge, where the Lady Eagles’ three losses were close affairs against national power Sacred Heart, Marist and Florida Berkley Prep.     “We had Sacred Heart at set point and they won 26-24,” Vales said. “The three losses were heartbreakers and very close matches that could have gone either way. I’d like to think the experience is going to count for something down the stretch and into the playoffs. I hope we can learn from those close matches.”     Sandburg, to be sure, will have plenty of chances to learn in the days leading up to the start of the state tournament, starting with a road match at Lockport. Also to be contested this week were the regular-season home finale against Joliet West and Maine West Invitational over the weekend.     As the defending champion at Maine West, the Lady Eagles will compete against schools such as Lake Zurich, Hersey and 2011 champ Lyons Township. The regular season concludes next week with SWSC Blue matches at Lincoln-Way East and Homewood-Flossmoor.     “We’re reaching the gauntlet of our conference [in the last four matches], and those teams are all playing well,” Vales said. “Joliet

West had a good three-set match against a very strong opponent. It’s a tough group of [matches], and that’s what you want heading into the state tournament.     “Those matches will all be a great test for us, and we’re looking forward to stepping it up. We felt like we peaked at the right time last year, and that’s our goal again this year: to be clicking on all cylinders.” STAGG     The Lady Chargers didn’t fare any better in another conference outing last week, as they fell to a 25-16, 25-17 defeat against Lincoln-Way East on Thursday. Playing well for Stagg in a losing cause were Ari Mantas (seven kills), Lexi Mantas (five kills, 11 digs) and Hannah Henderson (six kills).     Funds were raised for breast cancer research in this Volley For The Cure match. MARIST     The Lady RedHawks (19-7, 6-0) took down two East Suburban Catholic Conference foes last week, as neither Marian Catholic (25-8, 25-19) nor Fenwick (2512, 25-16) could get the better of Marist.     Leah Gbur’s six kills and two blocks spearheaded the Lady RedHawks’ effort last Tuesday versus the Lady Spartans, but Ann Marie Stifter (five kills), Bridget Krasowski (four kills), Molly Mayo (15 assists, three kills), Sarah Lowery (three kills) and Carolyn Yerkes (11 digs) all chipped in as well. Marist raced out to an 18-5 lead in Game 1 and never really lost the momentum.     In Thursday’s conquest of the Lady Friars, the Lady RedHawks’ win was made possible by solid performances from Lizzie Zaleski (12 kills), Mayo (19 assists), Krasowski (five kills, four digs) and Shannon McKevitt (eight digs). MOTHER MCAULEY     The Mighty Macs had little trouble vanquishing a couple of Girls Catholic Athletic Conference opponents last week. (Continued on page 5)

At odds with being even Second straight loss puts Cougars on playoff brink By Ken Karrson     An annual objective for St. Xavier University’s football team is extending its season beyond the 11 regularly scheduled games.     And while the NAIA playoffs are once again a primary goal, the Cougars are facing a slightly different scenario in 2013.     “This year, we’re starting them in October,” SXU coach Mike Feminis said.     Not officially, of course, seeing as how the 16-team national tournament doesn’t actually get underway until the latter part of November. However, if the Cougars want to be included, they’ll have to sweep their last five opponents — and then hope for the best.     SXU currently finds itself with a .500 record and on the postseason brink after dropping consecutive contests for the first time since 2008, which, coincidentally, is also the last time the Cougars failed to receive a playoff invitation. Their latest defeat came Saturday night in Fort Wayne, Ind., where host University of St. Francis used a third-quarter surge to distance itself from SXU and ultimately collect a 45-20 Mid-States Football Association crossover victory at D’Arcy Stadium.     USF was ahead just 10-7 after 30 minutes, but then tallied three times in less than nine minutes to seize command. The home team’s second and third touchdowns of the third period were sandwiched by its recovery of a squibbed kickoff.     “I don’t know if the kid nubbed it or did it on purpose,” Feminis said, referring to USF place-kicker Emerson Ueber. “Even after seeing it on film, I’m not sure, but I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt.”     What wasn’t debatable was the impact USF’s flurry had on the Cougars (3-3).     “Before we blinked, it was 317,” Feminis said. “We needed to play a near-perfect game, and we did that for one half. Unfortunately, it’s a 60-minute game, and in about a 7½-minute span, it got away from us.”     Feminis had no immediate explanation for why things suddenly went south for his club, but for sure it wasn’t helped by its reduced depth. Quarterback John Rhode and tailback Nick Pesek were missing from the offensive lineup, while SXU’s defense had to function without deep backs Mark Williams and Jacob Ghinazzi.     Compensating for Rhode’s and Pesek’s absences was especially tricky, since Feminis and his staff had decided to steer the Cougars away from their standard method of attack.     “We were playing shorthanded on both sides of the ball,” Feminis

said. “[Lack of] depth really was an issue, so to give us a [better] chance to win this game, we thought we’d shorten the game. People probably couldn’t believe it, but we went to a slowdown mode and [were] running time off the clock.     “We were really pleased with the first half. Everything we talked about doing, we did.”     Feminis wanted SXU to still be in contention when the fourth quarter arrived, but USF’s thirdperiod blitz made that impossible. Joshua Hunter’s 2-yard touchdown run, which followed Alex Hamilton’s recovery of a USF fumble at the hosts’ 38, narrowed the gap a bit, but the Cougars couldn’t score a two-point conversion and were left to chase 18 points.     Hunter had also accounted for SXU’s lone first-half TD with his 7-yard dash in the second stanza. USF wrapped Ueber’s 37-yard field goal and David Yoder’s 1yard touchdown plunge around Hunter’s tally.     Any hopes the Cougars had of Hunter’s second six-pointer serving as a comeback igniter were ruined quickly by Yoder’s 75-yard pass to Matthew Noll that handed USF a 38-13 cushion. The home squad reached SXU’s end zone once more after that and then Nick DeBenedetti completed the evening’s production with a 4-yard catch of a Joe Gill toss.     “I thought Joe Gill, for the most part, played a good game,” Feminis said of his senior signal-caller, who completed 21-of-38 passes for 156 yards. “He ran the offense the way we wanted it.     “You look at the stats, and in a lot of ways we did exactly what we wanted. At halftime, we felt so good going into the third quarter, but sometimes you can’t explain what happened.     “There were plays to be made, and we made them at times, but not enough to beat a good team. It’s really frustrating — they’re a very good team, but I just don’t know if they’re that much better than us.”     For the second week in a row, the Cougars were outgained, but the differential against USF was only 95 yards. SXU forced the only turnover. Cougars standouts on the prevention side included Zach Dolph (three solo stops, six assists, one quarterback hurry), Tyler Hoeg (four solos, four assists, one pass breakup), Alex Walters (six solos, one assist) and Dave Marciano (five solos, two assists, one tackle for loss).     Danny Lombardo, who returned to action after missing the previous week’s clash with Grand View, broke up two USF passes and Greg Hayward recorded a sack. Stephen Simms (119 rushing yards) and Robyn Pondexter (63

yards), meanwhile, joined Hunter (39 yards) in giving the visitors’ ground game some punch.     The Cougars are back on the road Saturday, but the foe is struggling Waldorf (Iowa) College. Waldorf will be SXU’s first opponent this season that has not been ranked in some poll at the time it squared off against the Cougars.     “There’s no more margin for error,” Feminis said. “It’s about as black and white as it can be. These are uncharted waters [because] our seniors have lost more in the last month than they have in the past couple years combined.”     That being said, Feminis wants his guys’ focus to be on simply taking care of the business at hand. Doing so, he said, should be good enough to earn them a berth in the national tourney.     “We’ve still got five weeks left,” Feminis said, “and we’ve got to win one before we can win five. But I’m not really concerned about the issue of if we win out, will we make it? If we win out, I firmly believe we’re looking at getting an at-large bid.”

Statistics St. Xavier Uni. of St. Fran. First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

0 7 6 7 - 20 3 7 21 14 - 45 SXU 25 241 159 400 40-22 1-0 0 9-109 5-31.2

USF 25 134 361 495 41-23 1-1 0 7-78 5-48.4

Scoring     USF — Emerson Ueber, 37-yd. field goal     SXU — Joshua Hunter, 7-yd. run (Spencer Nolen kick)     USF — David Yoder, 1-yd. run (Ueber kick)     USF — Garrett Harvey, 4-yd. run (Ueber kick)     USF — Seth Stuart, 23-yd. pass from Yoder (Ueber kick)     USF — Akeim Kelsaw, 14-yd. run (Ueber kick)     SXU — Hunter, 2-yd. run (pass failed)     USF — Matthew Noll, 75-yd. pass from Yoder (Ueber kick)     USF — Steven Espinoza, 6-yd. pass from Wesley Hunsucker (Ueber kick)     SXU — Nick DeBenedetti, 4-yd. pass from Joe Gill (Nolen kick) St. Xavier Rushing: Simms 8-119, Pondexter 6-63, Hunter 8-39, Ferguson 9-17, Carroll 1-8, Gill 2-1, DeBenedetti 1-1, Kelso 1-(-7). Passing: Gill 38-21-156, Pondexter 2-1-3. Receiving: Jones 6-20, Simms 5-39, DeBenedetti 3-34, Feeney 3-33, Carroll 3-13, Vilimek 1-22, Hunter 1-(2).


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, October 17, 2013 Section 2

End of the line

3

Rams knock Spartans from playoff picture By Ken Karrson     The playoff picture for Oak Lawn was somewhat hazy before its encounter with South Suburban Conference Red foe Reavis Friday night.     Now, it’s crystal clear: The Spartans won’t be part of the postseason field.     The visiting Rams saw to that by knocking off Oak Lawn 20-6. The loss was the Spartans’ fifth of the season, which is one more than the maximum allowed for playoff consideration. Reavis, meanwhile, improved its tournament possibilities by winning for the fourth time in seven tries.     “Whether we end up 2-7 or 4-5, that’s our legacy, but we’re not a bad football team by any means,” Oak Lawn coach Sean Lucas said. “If we had won out, we’d have been in the playoffs, [but] we can’t live in the past. We didn’t take care of business.”     That included against the Rams, although the Spartans (2-5, 1-4) remained within striking distance the entire way. As in several other contests this fall, Oak Lawn’s fate seemed to rest on a handful of plays that didn’t tip its way.     Three that Lucas immediately cited involved an interception, fumble and touchdown that got erased, respectively. Ray Howard’s second-quarter pickoff actually stalled a Reavis drive, but the Spartan was ruled down at his own 1-yard line.     Lucas thought Howard was in the end zone and the play should have resulted in a touchback, and that 19-yard disparity wound up being costly when Oak Lawn was unable to make much headway

on its ensuing possession. Thus, the Rams got the ball back in good field position and eventually capitalized by scoring their second touchdown.     The Spartans’ aforementioned drop around midfield set in motion Reavis’ clinching TD drive in the fourth period, which was supplied by Matthew Kopp on a 29-yard reception. As for the expunged score, that one briefly belonged to Oak Lawn in the third stanza before being removed by what Lucas deemed a questionable offensivepass-interference ruling.     “Everything about Friday night seemed like a labor,” Lucas said.     The third-year boss felt neither squad exhibited the kind of intensity he expected to see in a rivalry game that carried added importance for both. Lucas called that occurrence “surprising.”     “I can’t really explain it,” he said. “Like every team, you have some letdowns, but for our kids to be a little emotionless was frustrating.”     Frustrated obviously described the Spartans’ offense, whose scoreboard production consisted solely of a pair of field goals by freshman place-kicker Adnade Laanati. Oak Lawn threatened to add to its total midway through the fourth quarter, but a promising march was stopped at the Rams’ 11.     Reavis tallied twice in the opening half, doing so on quarterback Jose Romero’s 4-yard run and a 3-yard dash by Travis Liszewski. One of Laanati’s three-pointers was the Spartans’ only response to those touchdowns before intermission, but Lucas felt reasonably comfortable with his team’s situ-

ation at that juncture.     “We talked to our kids about playing harder, but I actually thought we were in a good spot,” he said. “It was a defensive game and our defense was doing a good job.”     Oak Lawn’s prevention-side group continued to hang tough in the second half, but a prolonged stay on the field likely took an eventual toll. By evening’s end, Reavis had run over 70 offensive plays, or about 30 more than the Spartans.     “They did a little more slanting than what we expected,” Lucas said. “They confused our kids and we missed some blocks.”     Oak Lawn winds up its season as a road team. After tangling with neighboring Richards on Friday, the Spartans travel to Midlothian for an SSC crossover game with Bremen next week.     Oak Lawn gave the Bulldogs all they could handle a year ago, going so far as to shut them out in the second half. Richards’ 18 first-half points were enough to guarantee success, but Lucas hopes his guys display a similar level of intensity this time around.     “We’d better get our emotions together [better than they were versus Reavis],” he said. “I haven’t felt we’ve played tight all year, so maybe it’ll be something good [for us].”     Joe Cosenza (fumble recovery) and Khalid Norvell (leading rusher) were other contributors for the Spartans against the Rams.

Statistics Reavis Oak Lawn

6 6 0 3

0 3

8 - 20 0 -  6

Bested again by Bengals Oak Forest continues dominance over Astros By Ken Karrson

Tommy Gattuso.     “I feel we did better on him,” Astros coach Dominic Passolano said, referring to Barry, “but we couldn’t contain the ball. Both wingbacks hurt us.”     Oak Forest’s ability to pop runs to the outside led to a 433-yard rushing day for the hosts. The Bengals had 12 plays that generated double-digit yardage, including 11 on the ground. Among Oak Forest’s big gainers were ones covering 80, 79, 49 and 37 yards.     The Bengals’ point blitz could have easily caused Shepard (0-7) to simply mail in the second half, but, much to Passolano’s satisfaction, the Astros went down swinging. Emmanuel Williams netted a rushing touchdown for Shepard, Rafael Williams caught a scoring toss from Shane Javorski, and the visitors finished with 252 total yards.     Emmanuel Williams rushed for 130 of those while averaging nearly 12 yards per carry and Kyle Dye paced the aerial attack with nine receptions that went for 70 yards’ worth of pickups.     “Offensively, we moved the ball all night, [but sometimes] you shoot yourself in the foot,” Passolano said.     Starring on defense for the Astros were Dye (six solo stops, one assist), Jake Nelson (four solos, three assists), Khali Mitchell (three solos, three assists) and Mark Seigers (one solo, four assists). Although Oak Forest managed to amass a healthy amount of yardage against Shepard, Passolano wasn’t unhappy with his troops since they “were banged up. We had a number of injuries, especially on defense, where we were missing a couple key kids.”     “[But] the kids we have with us,

I don’t see them falling apart or not finishing what they started,” Passolano said. “All the juniors coming back [in 2014], there are a lot of solid football players [among them], but the [current] seniors are going to stay out there. The seniors we have are working hard, so they deserve to keep playing.”     The Astros square off with SSC Red leader Evergreen Park on Friday before closing their campaign against Argo in Week 9. The Mustangs will no doubt be seeking revenge on Shepard, which handed out a lopsided loss in 2012 behind the heroics of former allarea athlete Londell Lee.     “With these last two games, they’re having good seasons,” Passolano said, referring to Evergreen and the Argonauts. “[The Mustangs’] running back [Keyshawn Carpenter] is probably the best player in the conference.     “We want to play the role of spoiler and pull off an upset. That’s what we’re going to try and sell the kids on.”

    “Stagg’s last win [against them] was in 2005,” he said. “Our kids understand what’s at stake and I know it’s an important game (Continued from page 1) for both of us, but they definitely Stagg to do. By virtue of their have had the upper hand. They’ve win, the Chargers moved within been beating us handily the last one step of playoff qualification. six or seven years.” Encounters with Sandburg and     Doing the same thing to Joliet Homewood-Flossmoor are still on West didn’t seem plausible for the the docket for Stagg (4-3, 2-3). Chargers, who finished off a 40-0     “This is special because the triumph over Joliet Central on games in October mean some- Oct. 7, two days after it had begun thing,” Fahey said. “It keeps the and only four days prior to Stagg’s kids interested and it’s good for matchup with the Tigers. the school, so we’re happy. To get     “Maybe the short week [of prepto the five wins would be a big aration] is good for us because it accomplishment.” cuts out all the fluff and you get     Defeating either the Eagles or down to business,” Fahey said. Vikings, of course, won’t be a sim- “The kids answered the challenge ple task. Sandburg has dominated and we had good tempos on [all Stagg in recent years, which leads three] days of practice.” Fahey to wonder if the Eagles will     A fast tempo is what Joliet West really “see it as a rivalry game” prefers while in possession of the this Friday in Orland Park. ball, and Fahey admitted dealing with that rapid pace wasn’t always easy for his defenders. ���������������������������     “They’re snapping the ball two �������������������������� ����������������������������� � or three seconds after the ref puts ����������������������������� the ball in play,” he said of the Tigers. “They’ve been putting points up against some good teams.”     Between them, Joliet West and Stagg ran about 170 plays on Friday and accumulated nearly

900 total yards, over 500 of which belonged to the Chargers. Pilota figured in 380 of that with his 260 passing yards and 120 more on the ground. Kelly also eclipsed the 100-yard plateau in rushing.     “If you like offense, this was the game for you,” Fahey said.     Even though the Tigers racked up a hefty amount of yardage, Fahey had good things to say about his defensive unit, which was spearheaded by Kopca, Chris Grabowski (three sacks) and Ryan Slager. The coach pointed out that three of Joliet West’s scoring treks didn’t require the chewing up of much real estate, due to a couple long kick returns and a bad punt snap by Stagg.     “They didn’t really get big plays,” Fahey said of the Tigers. “We tackled a little bit better [after halftime] and we made some stops when we had to, so we kept a comfortable margin.”     The Chargers outscored Joliet West 34-15 over the last 24 minutes.

    One of these days, Oak Forest will disappear from Shepard’s football schedule.     For the Astros, that day probably can’t arrive soon enough.     The Bengals have been in control of the teams’ series for quite some time, including in 2012 when they triumphed twice. The second of those wins ended Shepard’s stay in the Class 6A playoffs in Round 2.     The present-day Astros will spend 2013 outside the tournament, and their personnel ranks have been thinned considerably by injuries. Ten players were sidelined for Friday night’s South Suburban Conference crossover affair, including starting linebacker Jabari Jones, one of Shepard’s leading tacklers.     That didn’t leave the Astros with much ammunition to fire at Oak Forest, which was dealing with some physical maladies of its own. But even with quarterback Nick Ciufra and wingback Nick Cszewski idled, the Bengals had more than enough weaponry at their disposal to dispatch Shepard with little resistance.     Oak Forest piled up 40 firsthalf points to institute a running clock for the final 24 minutes, and the two touchdowns Shepard mustered in the remaining time couldn’t alter the outcome. The Astros’ 40-14 loss to the Bengals was their eighth a row, dating back to that aforementioned playoff contest.     Shepard actually kept fourthyear Oak Forest fullback Matt Barry from hurting it too badly, but the Bengals had other people to pick up the slack. Most prominent were Connor Rago and

Chargers

Statistics Oak Forest Shepard Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Punts/avg.

Final 40 14 ABS 146 106 252 25-13 0-0 1 4-27.0

OF 433 39 472 4-3 0-0 0 —

Shepard Rushing: E. Williams 11-130, Javorski 4-16. Passing: Javorski 24-13106, Dye 1-0-0. Receiving: Dye 9-70, E. Williams 2-15, Rueck 1-19, R. Williams 1-2.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Mt. Carmel quarterback Christian Searles can’t escape St. Laurence’s pass rush on this play Friday night.

Caravan on cruise control Minus two starters, Mt. Carmel crushes Vikings By Ken Karrson     That certainly wasn’t very much fun.     Knowing his team would be a heavy underdog against visiting Mt. Carmel Friday night in Burbank, St. Laurence coach Harold Blackmon had stressed one main thing to his athletes in the days leading up to the Chicago Catholic League crossover contest: just have fun playing football. Regrettably for the second-year leader, the Caravan had far more of it than the Vikings.     Playing without University of Illinois-bound tailback Matt Domer and starting quarterback Marko Boricich should have slowed Mt. Carmel a bit, but no such luck for St. Laurence. Instead, the Caravan scored on the initial play of an offensive series five different times, tallied eight touchdowns in all and cruised in with a 55-0 triumph at Kavanagh Field.     No doubt making the Vikings’ assignment increasingly difficult was the fact Mt. Carmel was coming off a rare loss. But that wasn’t the only thing bothering St. Laurence.     It also lost two players, receiver Matt Gurgone and quarterback Bob Kelly, to injury during the game. The latter’s nose was broken on a second-quarter play after he had already given up possession of the football, a circumstance that irritated Blackmon.     “It happened a few times,” he said. “Unfortunately, the refs don’t recognize that. Some teams are expected to make [certain] plays, so they’re letting this go with those teams.     “It’s definitely tough to lose a senior quarterback so early in the game.”     Into Kelly’s spot stepped sophomore signal-caller Alex Martinez, who was no match for the deep and experienced Caravan defense. No one else really was, either, as Mt. Carmel held the Vikings (34) to negative total yardage for the night.     St. Laurence’s only real scoring opportunity presented itself in the second period. Martinez led the hosts to the Caravan 18-yard line, but his second-and-9 pass was intercepted by Colin Knusta at the 1 and returned a couple yards. Jaquan Buntyn then broke free on a 97-yard run to up the visitors’ edge to 41-0 before halftime and establish a running clock for the game’s final 24 minutes.

    Jimmy Mickens had TD runs of 93, 54 and 34 yards for Mt. Carmel, while Justin Peebles tallied on gallops of 63 and 42 yards. The Buntyn-Mickens-Peebles trio more than made up for Domer’s absence as they combined for 409 rushing yards on just 17 carries.     “They are what they are right now,” Blackmon said of the Caravan. “They haven’t changed anything [scheme-wise in years]. Mt. Carmel runs what they run, and as long as they have the bodies they get they’ll run it well because they’re used to it.     “It’s just tough [for us]. We want to get to where they are, and if we get blessed with more bodies [in future years] maybe we can.”     Supplying the Caravan’s other two TDs were Nadir Cornish (26yard pass from Christian Searles) and Anthony Thompson (11-yard run). Mt. Carmel finished with 517 total yards, all but 26 of which were generated on the ground.     Frank Miller’s 23 rushing yards topped St. Laurence, but his work was offset by four players who registered negative net yardage and another who gained no yards. In addition to causing four Vikings turnovers, the Caravan’s prevention crew recorded five quarterback sacks.     Despite the outcome, St. Laurence had a few individual notables among its own defenders. Eric Sadowski (six solo tackles, three assists; 85 yards on three kick returns) was the headliner, but also performing adequately were Justin Booker (three solos, three assists, fumble recovery), Tom Lyons (one solo, four assists, one sack) and Tyler Snee (fumble recovery).     “I think our defense has played well,” Blackmon said. “[But] we have not played really good [offensive] football, what I expect us to play, for a couple of weeks now. We’re not making the plays we need to be making.”     One bright spot for the Vikings was Saturday’s freshman contest against Mt. Carmel. There, St. Laurence prevailed over the Caravan for the first time in at least three decades.     “They’re a good group — they play hard and play together,” Blackmon said of the Vikings’ yearlings. “I’m proud of their effort. We need to keep building on the success we have at any level.

    “The freshmen have played a tough schedule and they’re not intimidated by anyone. We always say that you respect everyone, but you fear no one, and at some point that message is going to filter down to someone. It’s player belief more than anything else that determines how well you do.”     As for St. Laurence’s varsity squad, hope still exists for a playoff berth. The Vikings host St. Ignatius on Friday and then finish up with Fenwick in Week 9, and they must defeat both in order to merit consideration for an at-large invitation to the tournament.     “I hope we can get this thing back on track,” Blackmon said. “We always have a rule that says, ‘Flush it.’ That [last] game happened, but we have to refocus — our focus now is on St. Ignatius. We still have something to play for.”

Statistics Mt. Carmel St. Laurence First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

14 27 0 0

7 0

7 - 55 0 -  0

MTC 10 491 26 517 2-1 4-2 0 4-50 0-0

SL 3 (-25) 7 (-18) 10-3 1-0 4 0-0 8-28.3

Scoring     MTC — Jimmy Mickens, 54-yd. run (Zach Mirabelli kick)     MTC — Justin Peebles, 63-yd. run (Mirabelli kick)     MTC — Nadir Cornish, 26-yd. pass from Christian Searles (Mirabelli kick)     MTC — Mickens, 34-yd. run (Mirabelli kick)     MTC — Peebles, 42-yd. run (run failed)     MTC — Jaquan Buntyn, 97-yd. run (Ante Rogic kick)     MTC — Mickens, 93-yd. run (Rogic kick)     MTC — Anthony Thompson, 11-yd. run (Rogic kick) Mt. Carmel Rushing: Mickens 8-186, Peebles 6-122, Buntyn 3-101. Passing: Searles 2-1-26. Receiving: Cornish 126. St. Laurence Rushing: Miller 10-23, Novak 2-1, Topps 1-0, Sterna 1-(-3), Gonzales 3-(-5), Kelly 1-(-10), Martinez 7-(-31). Passing: Martinez 8-2-4, Kelly 2-1-3. Receiving: Sterna 2-1, Miller 1-6.

Statistics Stagg Joliet West

Final 61 35

Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Laurence tailback Frank Miller’s progress gets halted by a Mt. Carmel defender Friday night.


4

Section 2 Thursday, October 17, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Better, but not all right Eagles under pressure after losing to Griffins By Ken Karrson

    From a performance standpoint, things got better for Sandburg Friday night.     From a results perspective, however, nothing tangible was realized.     No one connected with the Eagles football program was happy about how badly HomewoodFlossmoor roughed up Sandburg in Week 6. Making a 38-point defeat sting even more was the loss of senior quarterback Sean Leland to a shoulder injury.     Thus, the Eagles, though shorthanded, felt they had something to prove against one of the SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue’s traditional powers, Lincoln-Way East. And in the opinion of Sandburg coach Dave Wierzal, his Submitted photo squad managed to do that. Moraine Valley College’s Kara Kentner (in black) ranks second nationally among NJCAA Division     “To use coaches’ slang, I think II volleyball players in hitting percentage. (Photo provided) they emptied the buckets,” he said of his athletes. “We still made some costly mistakes, but they improved. I was proud of how the kids played — I thought we played really, really hard.     “The frustrating part was that they didn’t get to enjoy the fruits By Maura Vizza *** VOLLEYBALL of their efforts. I felt bad for our     Moraine’s run of good luck     In a battle of conference un- kids because to have that final     A first-place finish in the Illinois ended last Wednesday, when beatens last Tuesday, the Cy- score the way it was really was Skyway Collegiate Conference is a Waubonsee College put the Cy- clones knocked off Waubonsee a letdown.” statistical impossibility, but that’s clones on the wrong end of a 6-0 25-15, 25-20, 25-15 to bag their     Although the Eagles frustrated about all Moraine Valley College’s final in their last regular-season 20th triumph of the season. the Griffins on more than one soccer-playing women have been encounter. The loss meant Mo-     Autumn Seiler was Moraine’s occasion, the latter managed to denied in recent weeks. raine will be on the road when the ringleader with 10 kills, 17 digs construct a lead that topped out     A late-season surge continued National Junior College Athletic and two blocks, but others con- at 31-7. Sandburg collected one last Monday, as the Cyclones Association Region IV playoffs tributed as well. Also chipping more touchdown after that, but blanked Prairie State College 4- get underway. in for the Cyclones were Gina its 31-13 setback placed a renewed 0. The win squared Moraine’s     Despite surrendering a half- Ryan (eight kills, two blocks), emphasis on this Friday’s SWSC season ledger and improved its dozen goals, Lozano still played Kara Kentner (seven kills, 12 Blue clash with District 230 sister record to 5-1-1 over the last seven commendably between the pipes assists), Alex Bojan (seven kills, school Stagg. matches, a stretch during which as she turned aside 15 other eight blocks), Joanna Curtis (19     The Eagles (4-3, 3-2) have held it has outscored its foes 22-5. Chiefs shots. assists) and Kayla Manthei (18 the upper hand in recent head    Aiding netminder Diana LoMEN’S SOCCER digs, 19 good receptions, one to-head matchups by a sizable zano in her quest for this latest     After rallying to take a 3-2 service ace). margin, but the Chargers are shutout were defensive players halftime lead, the Cyclones were     Kentner currently ranks sec- no longer bottom-feeders. In fact, Patricia Tuxford, Jill Kossifos, victimized by a pair of penalty- ond nationally with a .427 hitting Stagg put itself in a divisional tie Samantha Reyes and Kathleeen kick goals in the second half percentage, while her .541 mark with Sandburg after administerGribbon. Starring on offense for and wound up suffering a 4-3 in conference play makes her No. ing a 61-35 thrashing to Joliet the Cyclones were Yesenia Galvan setback to unbeaten Waubonsee 1 within the ISCC. As a team, No. West last weekend. (two goals), Leticia Diaz (one) last Tuesday. 20 Moraine is third in NJCAA     Therefore, the winner on Friday     Also hurting Moraine was a Division II with an average of will take a giant step forward toand Antonia Zaper (one).     Earning assists were Reyes and red card handed out to Patryk 12.43 assists per set and fourth ward postseason inclusion, while Stephanie Aimone. with 13.05 kills per game. Paprocki. the loser will be forced to triumph in Week 9 just to become playoff eligible.     “We find ourselves in a position we didn’t anticipate being in back in August,” Wierzal said. “It makes this game coming up a lot more interesting because we’re in the same boat [as the our best blocker, but he takes a Knights didn’t really right them- Chargers]. They have really made By Ken Karrson beating half the time. He’s al- selves until the rain ceased. progress.     In this case, the Broncos did ways the clutch receiver, but he     Interestingly, the rather lopsid-     “We know what is at stake in the busting. hadn’t scored a touchdown in two ed final score belied the two teams’     What host Walther Lutheran years.” statistical closeness. Christian’s wrecked Saturday afternoon in     Colby Roundtree’s recovery of four turnovers certainly didn’t aid Melrose Park was Chicago Chris- a well-placed Chicago Christian its cause, but it managed to outtian’s dreams of a strong finish kickoff set up De Vries’ scoring gain the Broncos by 30 total yards, to the regular season and, along play. The younger Bolhuis’ TD, thanks largely to Roundtree’s 136 with it, a spot in the Class 3A meanwhile, resulted from his alert rushing yards. playoffs. Granted, the postsea- reaction to a pass play that was     Bolhuis, however, gave a great By Tim Cronin deal of credit for that numerical son plans ranked as something rapidly breaking down. of a long shot seeing as how the     While Coach Bolhuis praised his advantage to the Knights’ defense,     The bigger they are, the harder Knights could garner only five son’s ability to salvage something a group spearheaded by Justin they fall. wins at most and, thus, would positive in that instance, he also Downs (four solo stops, two as-     Unless they beat you. have to rely on an at-large invita- thought it illustrated a few of the sists, 2 ½ tackles for loss, one     Trinity Christian College’s sack), Roundtree (four solos, two volleyball team was part of both tion to the tournament, but they Knights’ shortcomings.     “We were winning [at halftime], assists, one-half tackle for loss), the axiom and its mirror image did still exist.     No more, however. The Bron- but we weren’t shining,” Coach Dan Lawler (four solos, one tackle over the weekend. The Trolls won cos saw to that by flexing some Bolhuis said. “Our scores came for loss) and Jeff Oprondek (three matches against Carroll and Vitfourth-quarter muscle and finally in a short burst, but in a critical solos, three assists). erbo, but then dropped decisions putting a dogged Chicago Chris- [overall] view, we set ourselves     “They played much stronger in to fourth-ranked Madonna and tian bunch to rest, 43-21, in a up in the first half for what hap- this game and put us in a posi- Doane in the Big Guns Classic Suburban Christian Conference pened [later]. tion to win,” Bolhuis said. “The at the University of St. Francis Gold encounter.     “It was a tale of two halves, defense played well, but we didn’t in Joliet.     The defeat was the Knights’ definitely. There were penalties, help them out [enough]. You make     Saturday’s losses meant Trinity fifth of the year and officially miscues, we were missing blocks, bad calls [on offense] when you carried a 26-6 overall mark into locked them out of the postsea- jumping offsides — so many of our fall three touchdowns behind.” this past Tuesday’s resumption problems were coming up to bite     Christian will be at home for its of Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic son.     “We’re playing for pride [from us. Our kids were running hard, last two games of the campaign. Conference play against Olivet here on],” Christian coach Jim getting plays, and then getting First up is Wheaton Academy, Nazarene University. The Trolls which visits Palos Heights Fri- are 11-0 in the league. Bolhuis said. “We’re working on plays called back.” improving things in this program     Despite the obstacles, Christian day night.     Playing Madonna for the very and having the kids keep making entered the second half with confirst time cost Trinity its 14-match corrections and getting better. fidence, but a long homecoming Statistics winning streak, as the Crusad    “In some ways, we’re stronger halftime show did it no favors. ers prevailed 25-21, 16-25, 25-22, [than at this same juncture in When the Knights were stopped Chgo. Christian 0 13 0 8 - 21 25-18. The Trolls’ victory in the 2012], but we’re also less experi- on their initial series of the third Walther Luth. 0 6 8 29 - 43 second set was almost duplicated enced. We have a lot of kids who period, Bolhuis was left to wonder, in the third, but a block and serare new to the game and still learn- “Where has our energy gone? We CC WL vice ace put Madonna up 2-1 in ing, and they don’t have a lot of got nothing done.” First downs 9 9 games, and the school from Liexperience to build on. They’ve     In a scoring sense, that re- Yds. rushing 186 192 vonia, Mich., ran away with the had to learn the hard way.” mained the same until the latter Yds. passing 65 29 fourth set.     And that included in the stages of the fourth quarter, when Total yds. 251 221     Trinity took Doane to the limit Knights’ latest tilt. What made Roundtree’s 60-yard dash set the Att./comp. 15-6 7-3 before falling in five games. The this setback particularly difficult table for Luke Rattler to tally on a Fumbles/lost 2-1 1-0 22-25, 25-23, 25-21, 13-25, 13-15 for Christian (2-5, 1-2) to handle 15-yard run. Before that occurred, Had intercepted 3 0 outcome saw the Trolls win the was that, for a large chunk of though, Walther had taken control Penalties/yds. 5-45 4-35 opening dance, then come close in the contest, it was every bit the of the proceedings. Punts/avg. 5-24.2 3-46.7 the next two games before fading Broncos’ equal.     The Broncos did so by scoring five in the fourth.     In fact, the Knights were ahead times in the second half, an eruption Scoring     It was close in the deciding set, of Walther after 24 minutes, as that began with quarterback David     WL — David Walton, 16-yd. run (run which requires only 15 points for quarterback Christian Bolhuis Walton’s 13-yard keeper following failed) a win, but Doane made it a bitter scored on a 45-yard bootleg and a Christian fumble. Walton’s TD,     CC — Christian Bolhuis, 45-yd. run pill to swallow in the end. then fired a 26-yard touchdown plus his two-point-conversion toss (Jeremy Slager Evans kick)     The Trolls had rolled to a pass to Jack De Vries during the to Kenneth McNeil pushed Walther     CC — Jack De Vries, 26-yd. pass from straight-set win against Carroll second quarter. Coach Bolhuis was in front for good. Bolhuis (kick failed) (25-22, 25-18, 25-20) and were especially pleased to see De Vries     That same duo stepped forward     WL — Walton, 13-yd. run (Kenneth extended to four against Viterbo net his initial six-pointer. again in the fourth stanza, Walton McNeil, pass from Walton) (25-10, 24-26, 25-17, 25-22). Trin    “We owed him that for two by recovering a bad punt snap in     WL — Walton, recovery of bad punt ity registered the last six points years,” Bolhuis said of his ju- the Knights’ end zone for a TD snap in Chicago Christian end zone (Mc- of the fourth set in the latter ennior tight end. “He’s our go-to and McNeil with an interception- Neil, pass from Walton) counter to collect its 26th victory receiver in third-down situations, return touchdown. Another pickoff     WL — McNeil, 30-yd. interception of the season. he’s made great catches and he’s eventually led to Antwan Morri- return (Trent Nordberg, pass from Wal-     The 16 sets meant the Trolls son’s 28-yard scoring gallop. ton) piled up more numbers than usu    “We went from winning to get    WL — Antwan Morrison, 28-yd. run al. Kaitlin Feddema’s 59 kills — SIGN UP TO GET FREE ting killed, and it wasn’t a slow (Kurtis Duff kick) including 17 against Carroll and AMBER ALERTS process,” Bolhuis said. “There was     WL — Brett Willis, 13-yd. run (kick 18 against Doane — led the way ON YOUR CELL PHONE. an eight-minute segment where blocked) offensively, while Ellie Raebel’s 73 everything blew up on us. We were     CC — Luke Rattler, 15-yd. run (Bol- digs paced the defensive work. wirelessamberalerts.org giving it away. huis run) ***     “There were no minor mistakes.     • Record: 26-6 overall, 11-0 When it rains, it pours.” Chicago Christian Rushing: Roundtree CCAC, 7-0 home, 6-1 away, 13-5     Rain also had an influence on 21-136, Bolhuis 7-33, Rattler 5-20, Downs neutral. Leaders: Kaitlin Fedthe events, as Christian’s troubles 1-0, Slager Evans 1-(-3). Passing: Bol- dema 284 kills; Erynn Schuh 41 A child is calling for help. started in earnest after the bad huis 15-6-65. Receiving: De Vries 3-45, aces; Ellie Raebel 393 digs; Jessica weather had done the same. The Roundtree 2-2, Bruinius 1-18. Wiltjer 117 blocks.

Moraine athletics wrap

Cyclones stay hot on soccer field

Busted by the Broncos

Loss to Walther wrecks Knights’ playoff dreams

this game, and we need to play good football and work toward great football. We have to focus on being the best we can be, and I hope we get over our shell shock from this game.”     What made the outcome against Lincoln-Way East somewhat surprising is that, for a good portion of the contest, the Eagles appeared pretty evenly matched with their heralded foe. The Griffins did hold a significant edge in total yardage by game’s end, but the hosts were ahead only 10-7 as time wound down in the opening half.     Sandburg scored with 1:09 remaining in the second quarter on Brian Langowski’s 3-yard run, a touchdown set up by Dennis Bresingham’s punt return to Lincoln-Way East’s 27. But before intermission arrived, the Griffins delivered a critical blow.     Marcus Cosby’s would-be kickoff-return TD got expunged by an unsportsmanlike-conduct penalty called on the hosts, but the infraction only backed Lincoln-Way East up to the Eagles’ 24. After a 1-yard loss, the Griffins hit paydirt on Jordan Wirtz’s 25-yard pass completion to Colin O’Connell.     The play didn’t give LincolnWay East an insurmountable lead in a numerical sense, but its impact was more than a little harmful to Sandburg psyches.     “You hate to pin a game on one play, but this is a problem,” Wierzal said, referring to the long runback that set up the Griffins’ second TD of the half. “To give up that touchdown [later on] definitely took some wind out of our sails.     “You really feel like the first half should have been over [before that]. I know we were all thinking that way.”     Lincoln-Way East squandered an opportunity to add three points to its total when it missed a field goal on its initial possession of the third quarter, but the Eagles didn’t receive a boost from that play. Instead, their own offense fizzled when it got the ball back, then the Griffins struck for six more points on a 54-yard pass from Wirtz to Paul Gossage.     “It’s not even remotely how we saw that series going,” Wierzal said.     Sandburg did make a later foray deep into Lincoln-Way East territory, but got stopped 3 yards shy of the goal line. The Griffins then ballooned their margin to 31-7 at the onset of the fourth period on Brian Casey’s 13-yard

TD dash.     Langowski tallied on a 1-yard run after Lincoln-Way East lost a fumble at its own 24, but the touchdown was too little and came far too late to save the Eagles here.     Langowski’s 41 rushing yards represented Sandburg’s high-water mark in that category, while Aidan Muno-Kohn’s two catches and 30 receiving yards paced that facet of the attack. Wierzal thought substitute quarterback Julian Gutierrez “did a heck of a job coming into this situation under that pressure,” but the Eagles’ 169 total yards paled considerably next to the Griffins’ 411.     Nevertheless, Sandburg’s defense featured a few respectable exhibitions. Junior Graham Hevel paced the Eagles with seven solo tackles and two assists, but Alante Walker (five solos, one assist), Adam Nash (five solos, one assist), Dan Trentacoste (five solos), Louis Paleothodoros (four solos) and Matt Taylor (three solos, two assists, one sack) also made their presences felt to a measurable degree.

Statistics Sandburg L-W East First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

0 7 3 14

0 7

6 - 13 7 - 31

CS 12 100 69 169 15-5 1-0 1 4-28 6-38.0

LWE 20 223 188 411 27-14 3-1 0 7-69 3-29.7

Scoring     LWE — Anthony Sciarini, 22-yd. field goal     LWE — Brian Casey, 3-yd. run (Sciarini kick)     CS — Brian Langowski, 3-yd. run (Jonathan Milazzo kick)     LWE — Colin O’Connell, 25-yd. pass from Jordan Wirtz (Sciarini kick)     LWE — Paul Gossage, 54-yd. pass from Wirtz (Sciarini kick)     LWE — Casey, 13-yd. run (Sciarini kick)     CS — Langowski, 1-yd. run (pass failed) Sandburg Rushing: Langowski 16-46, Johnson 5-22, Gutierrez 11-21, MunoKohn 3-11. Passing: Gutierrez 15-5-69. Receiving: Muno-Kohn 2-30, Carney 1-22, Langowski 1-12, Johnson 1-5.

Trinity sports report

Trolls volleyball team splits against big guns     • Schedule: Tuesday, vs. Calumet College of St. Joseph, 7 p.m.; Oct. 25-26, CCAC crossover at Purdue-North Central; Oct. 29, at Purdue University Calumet, 7 p.m.; Oct. 31, vs. Indiana University-South Bend, 7 p.m. CROSS COUNTRY     A wrong turn may have cost Andy Reidsma a top-three finish at the Bethel Invitational in South Bend on Friday at St. Patrick’s Park, but it definitely cost the Trolls one spot in the team standings.     For some reason, Reidsma went one way while most of the rest of the pack went another, and the others were right. By the time Reidsma retraced his steps, he had fallen farther back and ultimately finished 24th, nearly a minute behind freshman teammate Cody Velthuizen, Trinity’s fastest competitor on this day.     Velthuizen posted a time of 26 minutes, 41.1 seconds for 8K, which landed him in sixth place overall. Reidsma ran a 27:37.6. In between them came Michael Potter (13th in 27:09.9), Chris Koutavas (17th, 27:12.3) and Tyrell Natewa (21st, 27:17.6).     As a team, the Trolls were third in a 14-school field with 81 points. Trinity trailed only Taylor (49) and Siena Heights (80).     The women’s race had no such incidents, and junior Anna Bos raced to a fourth-place finish for the Trolls in the 6K test with a season-best time of 19:10.1. That was less than three seconds off the 19:07.7 of Davenport’s Stacey Baron, the second-place runner. Nobody in the field was going to touch Judson’s Meaghan Ciochon, whose 18:24.4 clocking was out of sight.     Trinity’s Ashley Jordan was 14th after hitting the chute in 19:51.6. She and Bos led the Trolls to seventh place in the team standings. ***     • Men’s top times (8K): Andy Reidsma, 25:18.1, Sept. 13; Michael Potter, 26:28.8, Sept. 13, Tyrell Natewa, 26:39.7, Sept. 13; Cody Velthuizen, 26:41.1, Oct. 12; Chris Koutavas, 27:00.98, Sept. 6; Mark Bohdan, 29:52.0, Oct. 5.     • Women’s top times (5K/6K): Anna Bos, 19:10.1, Oct. 12; 24:04.5 (6K), Oct. 5; Jessica Disselkoen, 19:24.1, Sept. 13; 24:10.1 (6K), Oct. 5; Hannah Schwab, 19:44.7,

Sept. 13; Ashley Jourdan, 19:51.6, Oct. 12; 25:08.3 (6K), Oct. 5; Justin VanDyk, 20:29.1, Sept. 13; 26:08.1 (6K), Oct. 5.     • Schedule: Oct. 26, at Great Lakes Invitational, Riverside Park, Grand Rapids, Mich., 10 a.m. CT. MEN’S SOCCER     They shoot, they score.     That hasn’t always been the case for the Trolls this season, but it was on Saturday against Robert Morris University. With Richie Carrillo setting up Mauricio Salgado in the first half and Caleb Steele in the second half, Trinity was able to best the Eagles 3-1 in a CCAC match.     The outcome provided the Trolls with their first conference victory of the campaign and stopped their losing streak at five matches.     Jesus Arciga added Trinity’s third goal, while netminder Gabe Fennema made four saves. Only Bobby Hurwitz’s marker with 2:03 to play stood between Fennema and a shutout.     Winning made the rest of the week a bit easier to forget. The Trolls dropped a 3-0 decision to Olivet Nazarene on Tuesday, then saw a reversal of form against Roosevelt University lead to a 3-1 defeat on Thursday.     Trinity led the Lakers the previous weekend, only to see thunderstorms wipe out the upset bid. Sunny skies appealed to Roosevelt the second time around.     Trinity had a 1-0 lead at intermission, thanks to Alex Tien’s goal, but second-half goals by John Franco, Jamie Zepeda and Leo Rodriguez in a span of 10:06 turned the tables. Trolls keeper Rick Fawkes had made three saves in the first half and would notch another, but the barrage was too much and the losing streak climbed to five.     It had reached four 48 hours earlier, when Olivet scored early, late and in between to post its triumph. Fennema was in the Trolls’ net for this one, and so, on three occasions, was the ball.     Todd Bevan maneuvered his way into the middle and ripped a shot past Fennema 36 seconds after the kickoff. Michael Da Sliva made it 2-0 at 28:39 and Paddy Hoepp finished the scoring on a penalty kick with 17:22 left to play. (Continued on page 6)


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, October 17, 2013 Section 2

Palos AYSO teams enter stretch run     Palos AYSO soccer teams approached the stretch run of the 2013 season last week, although a few matches were interrupted by inclement weather.     Following is recap of reported activity.

UNDER-14

Lightning 5, Team #2 1     Josh Pappas’ hat trick provided the Lightning with more than enough scoring thunder to dispatch Team #2. Jake Yerkes and Ali Elmosa tallied once apiece for the winners, while Noelia Perez was credited with an assist.     Also contributing to the Lightning’s victory were Alyssa Barraco, Abby Becker, Jack Forden, Joshua Gregoriou, Kelsey Kelly, Darek Michniak and Samantha Michniak.     Martin Kizialtle notched Team #2’s marker. Lilly Corso also played well in a losing cause.

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Silver Soldiers 2, Frostbite 0     Matthew Bogner accounted for the match’s only two scores, as the Soldiers blanked Frostbite in a defensive battle. James Hunt assisted on one of Bogner’s tallies and Griffin Sterling joined those two in preserving the whitewash. Blue Bombers 3, Smurfs 1     Bart Nowobilski’s goal wasn’t enough to keep the Smurfs from suffering a defeat against the Bombers. Gianna Damacopolous

Crusaders (Continued from page 1)     “That kind of deflated them,” Badke said of Bishop Mac. “Kane is one of our best players. He’s done a great job this year on kickoffs and field goals.     “It wasn’t a last-minute decision, [but] something we prepared for. We saw some things on film we thought we could take advantage of, and I thought it was a great thing to do at that time.”     Sandwiched between Jones’ two scoring bursts was a 12-yard touchdown catch by Luke Mueller. Mueller also hauled in a 7-yard TD toss from Alarcon in the first half, while Sal Perez brought his 9-yard grab into the Irish end zone to account for the Crusaders’ initial six-pointer of the game.     Perez’s score came after Kane’s 29-yard first-period field goal and gave Rice a 10-7 lead. The home team inched back in front one last time on an 80-yard Jared Marcotte-to-Robbie Odeneal aerial strike, but Mueller’s first TD with 28 seconds left in the opening half regained the edge for the Crusaders once and for all.     Rice tallied four times in a span

Bulldogs (Continued from page 1)

(Continued from page 2)     First to tumble was Resurrection, which suffered a 25-9, 25-15 GCAC Red setback on Tuesday, thanks largely to input from Gabby Ennis (five kills) and Jenny Phelan (five digs). Mother McAuley (25-2, 2-0) also upended St. Ignatius 25-13, 25-15 on Thursday, as Courtney Joyce (six kills, 20 assists) and Carla Cahill (12 digs) both played pivotal roles.

Sports wrap

(assist), Matt Huston and Amelia daya Hassanelm, Madelyn HolPempek also performed admirably mstrom, Ryan Jirka, Caera Kenfor the Smurfs, the latter two do- nedy, Grace Kennedy, Oscar Miller and Lily Thielmann. ing so in the nets.

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UNDER-8

Blue Thunder 5, Blue Flames 0     Malachy Mohan, Troy Ogarek, Kol Shields, Aiden Foertsch and Kate Forden were the losing-side notables as the Flames were extinguished by the Thunder. Piranhas 2, Neon Lights 1     Goals by Lily Ceretto and Jacob Nowobilski offset one from Kaesy King and lifted the Piranhas to a triumph over the Lights. Ceretto assisted on Nowobilski’s marker.     Others contributing to the Piranhas’ success were keeper Adrian Burkowski, Isabella Bacerott, Livaro Hucker, Connor LeBeau and Greg Sawertailo. Delivering solid efforts for the Lights in addition to King were Jimmy Navarrete (assist), Daniel Sweeney, Dylan Gumtow, Erik Knutson, G.G. Navarrete, Jana Elmosa, Luke Lisiecki, Maggie McHugh, Nate Tran, William Hardison and Grace Anderson. Killing Bees 4, Team #2     Aydan Wilson accounted for all four of the Bees’ goals as they swarmed over Team #2. Garnering assists were Michael Jeffers, Lucas Kopec and Jakub Mierzwa.     Also doing their part for the Bees were Kazeed Haleem, He-

Sharks 10, Green Machine 1     Julian Ruiz established a single-match season-high with seven goals, and the Sharks used that memorable effort as the linchpin in a rout of the Machine.     Lost in the hoopla were two tallies by Brian Manns and one from Dante Bonafilia. Brendan Carroll passed out a couple assists and Frank Ryan distributed one. Providing the Sharks with reliable defense were Mari Jarmoszka, Kayla Kalousek, Jackson Natenek and Adam Ramadan. Green Dragons 5, Midnight Thunder 1     Ellie White and Lizzy Ellsworth both booted in two goals and Annie Olsen added one to propel the Dragons past the Thunder.     Sebastian Magiera supplied the Thunder’s lone marker. Oliver Levy, Yasine Gorchene and Bryan Abuhanoun also gave solid performances for the losing club. Team # 5 5, Orange Knights 3     Jude Welsch’s two scores and one goal from Tagan Bumstead weren’t enough to save the Knights from a setback versus Team #5.     Welsch, Emily Purtill and Kari Freimuth each doled out an assist.

of less than 18 minutes between the second and fourth quarters.     Defensively, Bryan Boyd (six solo stops, four assists, fumble recovery) and Trea Pierce (six solos, one assist, one sack, interception) were the top performers. Also lending a hand for the Crusaders on that side of the ball were Robert Woods (five solos, two assists, one sack), Greg Bernier (five solos, one assist, blocked pass), Mike McGinley (five solos, one quarterback hurry), Dyke (four solos, four assists) and Julian Davis (four solos, three assists).     Boyd’s recovery short-circuited an early Irish series that had brought them inside Rice’s 20-yard line. Bishop Mac was ahead 7-3 when the turnover took place.     “They could have gone up by two scores, but they didn’t,” Badke said. “Then Marcus Jones really got going. It was a must-win [situation] and the kids responded.”

Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

Statistics Brother Rice Bishop Mac First downs

3 14 7 7

7 14 - 38 0 14 - 28 BR 20

BM 17

to Evergreen as the impetus for its revival the past two weeks. The Bulldogs have outscored two plus.500 foes 67-0 over that span.     “Week 5 still itches at us,” Sheehan said. “You’re dealing with 16and 17-year-olds and they don’t focus as well as they should sometimes. We know we didn’t play our best that night, and the last two weeks we’ve shown that.”     Richards tangles with cross-town rival Oak Lawn Friday night. While the 2-5 Spartans might not appear a very big hurdle to clear, Sheehan will assuredly remind his athletes that Oak Lawn gave the Bulldogs one of their toughest battles last season before falling by 11 points.     “They’re a big, physical team, they’re sound and they’re wellcoached,” Sheehan said. “It’s our homecoming, which can be a coach’s nightmare, but we want to keep momentum going. Eightand-one is still a good season, and we can get a high [playoff] seed if we do that.”

5only 24 minutes.     “They’ve got some athletes,” he said of Argo. “In the back of our minds, that was our thought — we’ve got to put some [more] points on the board.”     So that’s exactly what Richards did. The Bulldogs tallied twice in the third period to sew up the win, using a pair of Tacari Carpenter receptions to finish off the Argonauts. Carpenter latched onto throws of 40 and 31 yards from Muhammad-Rogers.     “You’re feeling pretty good at that point,” Sheehan said. “[Argo] had an emotional game the week before [on Saturday afternoon], and coming back on a short week isn’t easy.”     Richards wound up with 249 total yards, 152 of which were collected by Shannon and Carpenter on a combined seven catches. The Bulldogs did not commit any turnovers.     Sheehan harkened back to the Statistics disappointment of Richards’ loss Richards

Volleyball

5

7 6 14

0 - 27

mona Tomczak, who put down 19 kills and had six digs opposite Reavis. CHICAGO CHRISTIAN     The Lady Knights improved to 20-7 overall and 6-1 in the Suburban Christian Conference Blue by beating Marian Central Catholic 25-20, 25-21 last Wednesday.     Anna Kamp and Leah Kamp both had six kills to pace Chicago Christian, while Emily Workman doled out eight assists. Also stepping forward was Jessica Krygsheld, who registered nine digs. RICHARDS     The Lady Bulldogs split a pair of SSC matches last week, as they topped Evergreen Park 25-17, 2519 on Tuesday before losing 25-19, 25-16 to Lemont on Thursday.     Leading the charge for Richards in its win over the Lady Mustangs were Shannon Gardner and Dana Wujcik, both of whom recorded seven kills.

OAK LAWN     Christina Egan enjoyed a productive week for the Lady Spartans, who took care of South Suburban Conference business against Reavis (26-24, 23-25, 2522) last Tuesday and Bremen (2522, 25-14) on Thursday.     Egan totaled 23 assists and 16 digs to guide Oak Lawn (16-5, 9-1) past the Lady Rams, then distributed 18 more assists in the MT. ASSISI victory over the Lady Braves. Offering support for Egan in the     Kelly Magliano (seven kills, first of those encounters was Si- eight digs) and Anna Broadhurst

285 169 454 24-18 2 0 8-65 3-37.0

149 191 340 14-8 1 1 8-65 2-41.5

Scoring     BM — Jonathan Ward, 3-yd. run (Trevor Drazy kick)     BR — Brian Kane, 29-yd. field goal     BR — Sal Perez, 9-yd. pass from Alex Alarcon (Kane kick)     BM — Robbie Odeneal, 80-yd. pass from Jared Marcotte (Drazy kick)     BR — Luke Mueller, 7-yd. pass from Alarcon (Kane kick)     BR — Marcus Jones, 38-yd. run (Kane kick)     BR — Mueller, 12-yd. pass from Alarcon (Kane kick)     BR — Jones, 88-yd. run (Kane kick)     BM — Josh Ramirez, 4-yd. pass from Marcotte (Drazy kick)     BM — Craig Butler, 40-yd. fumble return (Drazy kick) Brother Rice Rushing: Jones 23-250, Alarcon 5-30, Smith 1-4, Desmond 2-1. Passing: Alarcon 24-18-169. Receiving: Mueller 7-77, Perez 6-50, Butler 4-33, Jones 1-9. Argo First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds. Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

0 0

0

0 -  0

HLR 12 89 160 249 15-8 0-0 0 8-85 6-40.0

Argo — (-58) 100 42 29-13 1-0 0 6-50 —

Scoring     HLR — Dedrick Shannon, 25-yd. pass from Hasan Muhammad-Rogers (Shawn Chiaramonte kick)     HLR — Chrishawn Ross, 1-yd. run (kick failed)     HLR — Tacari Carpenter, 40-yd. pass from Muhammad-Rogers (Chiaramonte kick)     HLR — Carpenter, 31-yd. pass from Muhammad-Rogers (Chiaramonte kick)

Richards Rushing: Muhammad-Rogers 8-37, Ross 9-22, Carpenter 4-22, Tears 2-17, Demma 3-(-9). Passing: Muhammad-Rogers 15-8-160. Receiving: Shannon 4-81, Carpenter 3-71, Tears 1-8.

(seven kills, five digs) both supplied strong play on the Screeching Eagles’ behalf last Thursday, but that couldn’t keep Mt. Assisi (16-17, 4-3) from getting tagged with a 25-23, 25-12 GCAC Red loss by Loyola Academy.     Broadhurst (151 kills, 39 blocks, 194 digs) and Magliano (272 kills, 57 blocks) continued to be among the Eagles’ season leaders, along with MaryKate Wetzel (531 assists), and Jessica Jakubowski (215 digs). SHEPARD     The Lady Astros suffered a 25-19, 25-12 SSC setback to TF South last Thursday.     Kendall Yerkes, Abby Graham and Amanda Carberry had four kills each for Shepard, while Caroline Graham passed out 17 assists. Making their presences felt as well were Brianna Volpentesta (eight digs) and Briana Haugh (seven). QUEEN OF PEACE     The Pride dropped a 25-21, 2514 GCAC Red decision to De La Salle last Wednesday.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Stagg’s Natalie Pamphilis serves during her No. 1 singles match at the SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue meet on Saturday. Pamphilis beat Homewood-Flossmoor’s Allison Lessner 6-2, 6-1 to win the singles title. By Anthony Nasella     After losing a total of 10 seniors to graduation, it would have been easy for Shepard girls’ swim coach Barb Larson to accept the fact that the 2013 season would be strictly a rebuilding one.     However, a 7-2 dual-meet record from a Lady Astros squad with just two seniors is giving Larson hope for more than just the future. Shepard won both of its encounters last week, defeating Thornton Fractional co-op (6727) and Oak Forest (103-82) in a pair of South Suburban Conference crossovers on Tuesday and Thursday, respectively.     “We have some pretty solid young girls,” Larson said. “We have a good bunch this year. We lost many seniors from last year’s team, but this young group is very talented and hard working. We have very versatile swimmers [and] I’m happy with them.     “It’s been the whole combination of them working together. I had a talk with my juniors and told them that they were going to take leadership roles because we don’t have any seniors to fall back on, as we did last season. The juniors are stepping it up on that.”     Against Thornton Fractional coop, sophomore Grace Spindler prevailed in the 200-yard freestyle (2 minutes, 19.65 seconds) and 500free (6:19.88) for visiting Shepard. Spindler notched a victory in the 50-free versus Oak Forest.     “Grace swam varsity as a freshman, and she’s doing even better this season,” Larson said. “She also competes in the 100-fly. Though she doesn’t like it, she still does it pretty well.”     Junior Joanna Rangel notched a pair of triumphs against the Lady Bengals, doing so in the 100-breaststroke (1:22.50) and 200-individual medley (2:35.32). Also scoring victories for the Lady Astros were freshman Annie Rangel (100-butterfly) and junior Mary Lippert (100-free).     Shepard figures to get tested this coming weekend at the nineschool Tinley Park Invitational, which will include teams such as Richards, Oak Lawn, Kankakee, Joliet co-op and Argo in the field.     “Tinley Park will be a good test and give the girls some competitive exposure,” Larson said. “We’ll be missing Grace [because of a leadership commitment], so that will hurt.”     As for the Lady Astros’ chances of competing for a conference title, Larson said it all hinges on the girls’ continued level of dedication.     “I think they’re looking strong right now,” she said. “We’re still getting in shape to the place that they need to be. They have a shot at conference, [but] it’s really going to depend on who wants it the worst. When you get down to it, that’s what it is.”     Larson said one benefit for Shepard is that two swimmers, Rangel and Marley Weist, came to the varsity squad with previous swimming experience. Larson said Weist has been good in the backstroke, where she has secured some third- and fourth-place finishes.     “All the girls have a good attitude,” Larson said. “They’re taking cues and are very receptive to learning. They’re working hard, getting their morning practices in and keeping good attitudes. We’re working on their mental training — that’s something we’re really focusing on right now.” ***     Sandburg began last week with a 94-87 SWSC Blue victory over Stagg on Thursday. The Lady Eagles concluded the week with

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Shepard’s Gaby Jusczak returns a shot during a first-round match at Friday’s South Suburban Conference Red match. a fourth-place finish at the St. Charles North Invitational on Saturday, while Sandburg divers took fifth at the Hinsdale Central Diving Invitational that same day.     Clare Lawlor was a prominent figure for the Lady Eagles as she chalked up wins in the 200 IM (2:17.29) and 500-free (5:18.97) versus Stagg, then captured the 100-free (53.74) at St. Charles. Sandburg totaled 216 points at the invitational. ***     Sophia Shalabi was a bright spot for Stagg in its loss to Sandburg, as she garnered a pair of event victories. Shalabi touched out first in the 50-free (25.80) and then did the same in the 100-breaststroke (1:07.62).     At Saturday’s Andrew Invitational, Adrienne DiFoggio helped the Lady Chargers notch wins in four events. As a solo swimmer, DiFoggio set the pace in both the 200-free (2:00.4) and 500free (5:20.70).     Then as part of two Stagg relay teams, DiFoggio led the Lady Chargers to two more triumphs. Stagg prevailed in the 200-free (1:42.84) and 200-medley (1:55.28) races.     On the strength of those showings, the Lady Chargers took second overall in a 13-school field with 246 team points. BOYS’ GOLF     Stagg advanced to the Marist Sectional in Homer Glen by finishing third among 15 teams with a score of 332 at last Tuesday’s Class 3A Brother Rice Regional at Silver Lake Country Club.     Dean Abate shone for the Chargers by shooting a 75 over 18 holes. Joe Zaremba finished with an 82, Brendan Kiblehan carded an 84 and Trace Moustakas fired an 89.     “We have some momentum going for us,” Stagg coach David Podkul said. “We received solid scores from everyone on the team. They’re all playing well and we’re extremely happy to advance to the sectional. This really feels good.”     The feelings weren’t quite so elated this past Monday, however, as the Chargers placed 11th in a 12-team field at the Marist Sectional. Stagg shot a cumulative 362. ***     At last Tuesday’s Class 3A Lemont Regional, Sandburg finished fifth with a score of 317, which was just five shots behind fourth-place Lemont and 18 off the pace set by champion Providence Catholic.     Sectional qualifiers for the Eagles included Michael Mishek (76), John Calzaretta (80) and Ronny Drabek (80). None of the

three, however, was able to advance out of this past Monday’s Pekin Sectional. ***     Chicago Christian’s Blaine Wright was the individual runner-up with a score of 76 at last Tuesday’s Class 2A Oak Forest Regional. He finished just one stroke in arrears of meet medalist Dave Karwoski, who played for the host Bengals.     Wright’s teammate, Jay Timmer, contributed a round of 79, which helped the Knights take second as a team with an overall score of 339. And it was Timmer heading to state out of this past Monday’s Nazareth Academy Sectional, where he carded an 83 to move on as an individual.     Chicago Christian was eighth in the sectional team standings.     Also included among the individual state qualifiers was St. Laurence’s Jordan Velez, who fired a 77. GIRLS’ GOLF     Despite having no seniors in its lineup, Sandburg was the team no one could beat at last Wednesday’s Class AA Marist Regional.     Leading the way for the Lady Eagles at Green Garden in Frankfort was junior Frankie Saban, whose 8-over-par 80 tied her for the runner-spot spot among individual golfers. Highlighting her round was an eagle on the par-5 third hole of the Blue course.     Also contributing to Sandburg’s 344 score and its first regional championship since 2002 was sophomore Emily Cosler, who fired an 81 and placed fourth overall. Completing the Lady Eagles’ scoring were Emilyee McGiles (88) and Erin Cronin (95).     Sandburg’s season didn’t end at this past Monday’s HomewoodFlossmoor Sectional, either; in fact, Saban earned medalist honors with her 18-hole score of 69 at Coyote Run. And Saban won’t be alone this weekend in Decatur, as the Lady Eagles will make the trip to state as a squad after placing third in the sectional.     McGiles shot an 81 in support of Saban, while Alex Kappel (87) and Cosler (92) rounded out Sandburg’s scoring. ***     Stagg tied Homewood-Flossmoor with 405 points at last Wednesday’s Marist Regional. Lady Chargers golfers Natalie Collina (83) and Jena Pietrowski (98) qualified for this past Monday’s H-F Sectional as individuals, but did not advance to state.     One athlete who did was Marist’s Ashley Kay, who carded an 83 at Coyote Run. GIRLS’ CROSS COUNTRY     Shepard finished second with (Continued on page 6)


6

Section 2 Thursday, October 17, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Mustangs

SXU sports summary

Cougars men pick up another soccer win

(Continued from page 1) opening stanza. The shorter of those TDs featured McClendon making a circus catch, while he had no Eisenhower defenders anywhere in the vicinity when he crossed the goal lone to notch the other.     Eric Gurrister (five receptions, 82 yards) was another favorite target for Ryan, who again filled in admirably for injured signal-caller Jonathan O’Brien, while running back Keyshawn Carpenter surpassed the 100-yard rushing mark once more by grinding out 119. Carpenter also delivered the Mustangs’ third touchdown.     With Evergreen’s defense routinely harassing Eisenhower’s skill people, a comeback by the visitors didn’t seem likely. Eleven of the Cards’ offensive plays resulted in lost yardage.     But just when it appeared as if the Mustangs would finally get a breather, back came Eisenhower. T.J. Skelton got the Cardinals on the board with a touchdown run, then Michael Morrison hauled in a 50-yard pass to slice his club’s deficit to eight points.     Eisenhower could get no closer, though, so Evergreen — which has already clinched a Class 4A playoff berth — took one more step toward both an unbeaten regular season and SSC Red championship.     The Mustangs can guarantee themselves at least a share of the latter on Friday by defeating winless Shepard. And in case Evergreen coach Dan Hartman seeks an additional reason for his athletes to take the Astros seri-

Photo by Jeff Vorva

A number of Evergreen Park defenders bury an Eisenhower ball at the end of a play Friday night.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Evergreen Park quarterback Sean Ryan hands off to Keyshawn Carpenter during Friday night’s South Suburban Conference Red game. ously, he can point to the 2012 Reavis in Week 9. matchup between the programs, a contest Shepard won by establish- Statistics ing a single-game school record for points. Eisenhower 0 0 7 6 - 13     The Mustangs will then visit Evergreen Park 14 7 0 0 - 21

Community sports news Southside Shooters to hold tryouts

    The Southside Shooters Girls’ Basketball Club will conduct tryouts on Oct. 29, Nov. 5 and Nov. 7 at Stagg High School.     Each session will run from 6:30-8 p.m. For more information, call Gary Ferguson at (630) 935-1150 or visit the website at www.shootersbball.com.

District 218 to host Bulls youth camps

    District 218 will host Chicago Bulls FUNdamentals youth basketball camps for ages 5-14 on Oct. 26 and Nov. 2, 9 and 16.     The camps will be held at the administrative center, 10701 S. Kilpatrick Ave., in Oak Lawn, and divided into two age groups. Ages 5-8 will meet from 9-10 a.m., while ages 9-14 will go from 1011:30 a.m.

    The cost is $60 for kids under age 8, $75 for older individuals, and includes a camp T-shirt and replica-autographed photo of Bulls star Derrick Rose. Registration is being accepted online at www.bullssoxacademy.com.     Additional details can also be found on that same website.

Shimko basketball to run tryouts

    The George Shimko Basketball School will conduct tryouts for players in grades 4-8 on Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Oak Lawn Pavilion, 9401 S. Oak Park Ave.     A boys’ session will run from 1-2:30 p.m., while two girls’ tryouts will be held. Female players in grades 4-5 will go from 2:30-4 p.m., with players in grades 6-8 to follow from 4-5:30 p.m. There is no cost to attend the tryouts, but parents must register play-

ers and sign a waiver form 20 minutes prior to an evaluation session.     The GSBS winter season will run from November-February. For more information, contact GSBS at 802-GSBS or at Gshimko@gsbsbasketball.com. Interested parties can also visit the website at www.GSBSBASKETBALL.com.

Winter-season tryouts for Illinois Hoopla

    Illinois Hoopla is hosting basketball tryouts for its winter season during the month of October at Orland Junior High School.     Tryouts are held from 7-9 p.m. and are open to players in grades 3-8. For complete details, contact Rick Palmer at 460-6513 or Hooplamr@gmail.com, or visit the website at www.illinoishoopla. com.

Sports wrap (Continued from page 5) 51 points at Saturday’s De La Salle Invitational. The Lady Astros’ Alondra Delfin took fourth individually by clocking a 20:27 for three miles. ***     Casey Jensen (19:21.70) was seventh in the 3.1-mile race as Sandburg (109 points) placed fourth in the 13-school West Aurora Invitational on Saturday. Meghan Mokate was the Lady Eagles’ next-best finisher as she reached the chute in 19:41.60, which netted her the No. 15 position. BOYS’ SOCCER     Stagg dropped a 2-1 SWSC Blue decision to Lockport last Thursday after getting outscored 3-0 in a shootout. However, the Chargers bounced back on Saturday with a 1-0 win over Sandburg.     Stagg scored first in the match against the Porters, doing so with 31:04 left after a corner kick. Beto Torres’ crossing pass found Phil Kolesinski at the far post and the latter headed the ball across the box to Alfonso Avila, who found the net.     Matt Kois scored the Chargers’ goal on Saturday, while keeper Erick Estrada recorded the shutout. ***     Shepard went 1-2 last week, as it fell short of both Marist (41) and Tinley Park (1-0) while routing Oak Forest (7-0) on Tuesday.     Ivan Magana was the Astros’ ringleader versus the Bengals, as he notched a hat trick and also dished out assists on two of the other goals. Colm McGee provided Shepard with its lone goal against the RedHawks. ***     Chicago Christian improved to 9-7-3 overall and 4-3 in the Suburban Christian Conference Gold with a 2-1 victory over WheatonSt. Francis last Tuesday.     Getenet Timmermans scored his school-record 89th career goal for the Knights, while his brother, Fecadu, accounted for the team’s other marker. Getenet Timmermans earned an assist on the latter play. ***     Behind a goal by Tom Nie and Alan Garcia’s sharp netminding, Sandburg (11-5, 3-2) recorded a 10 SWSC Blue victory over Boling-

    Suddenly, that slow start seems as if it never occurred.     St. Xavier University’s men soccer team continued its recovery from some early season woes by powering its way past Trinity International University last Tuesday. Hours after being named the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Men’s Soccer Offensive Player of the Week, sophomore forward Marco Gutierrez notched a hat trick and dished out an assist to help the Cougars defeat the Trojans 5-0 at Bruce R. Deaton Field.     The win was SXU’s fourth in its last five matches, all of which have been conference affairs. As a result, the Cougars are vying for first place within the CCAC.     Gutierrez, who booted home four goals in SXU’s recent victory over Judson University, began his latest scoring barrage in the 16th minute of play by collecting a goal off a deflected ball. He then tallied twice within a 12-minute span of the second half, off a Brandon Simoes assist and on a penalty kick.     Thanks to his latest eruption, Gutierrez is in the CCAC’s top 10 in both goals and points.     Simoes also set up the Cougars’ second marker, which senior midfielder James King provided just after Gutierrez converted for the first time. For good measure, Gutierrez passed off to Simoes late in the opening half, and the junior midfielder knocked in a shot that gave the hosts a 3-0 lead at that juncture.     SXU senior keeper Kyle Held made four saves en route to registering his third shutout in five matches. ***     Senior defender Yonda Abogunrin’s goal late in the second half snapped a scoreless tie and sent Olivet Nazarene University on to a 1-0 victory over the Cougars in a CCAC showdown for first place.     Saturday’s outcome at Deaton Field allowed the Tigers to take over sole possession of the conference lead. SXU (4-7, 4-2) trails Olivet by one in the CCAC standings. The loss was just the Cougars’ second in their last six outings.     Abogunrin scored on a header in the 82nd minute, a play set up by freshman midfielder Miguel Fierro’s throw-in. Five other ontarget Tigers shots were stopped by SXU keeper Held.     Gutierrez had five shots to lead the Cougars, but none was among SXU’s four that were put on goal.     The Cougars faced Calumet College of St. Joseph this past Wednesday in the last of three straight home matches. WOMEN’S SOCCER     While the men have found their scoring groove for the most part, the Cougars women have fallen into an offensive funk.     SXU was kept off the scoreboard for the second straight time and wasted a superb effort by fresh-

man netminder Alex Perry, who stopped 10 Trinity International shots last Wednesday at Deaton Field. The Trojans managed to slip one past her, however, and that lone tally pinned a 1-0 CCAC defeat on the Cougars.     Trinity sophomore forward Samantha Yasatan garnered her team’s goal in the 22nd minute, a shot set up by sophomore midfielder Morgan Elzinga. SXU finished with just four shots on goal. ***     Junior Morgan Graves’ penaltykick goal ended a long scoring drought for the Cougars, but that marker in the 22nd minute was the only one SXU could manage Saturday against Olivet. As a result, the Tigers made off with a 4-1 CCAC win at Deaton Field.     The Cougars (3-8-1, 1-5), who had been shut out in their previous two matches, spotted NAIA No. 19-ranked Olivet a 2-0 edge before Graves tallied. Sophomore forward Elizabeth Hetrick notched both of the Tigers’ early goals as she scored in the seventh and 18th minutes.     After SXU sliced its deficit in half, Olivet responded with a pair of second-half goals to establish the final margin. Sophomore forward Elisabeth Wahl and junior forward McKenzie Hengesh found the back of the net for the Tigers in the 53rd and 68th minutes, respectively.     Perry stood tall between the pipes for the Cougars in a losing effort as she was credited with 11 saves.     SXU hosted Calumet College of St. Joseph this past Tuesday to conclude a three-match homestand. WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY     Junior Leslie Rosario took sixth individually, and the Cougars rode that performance to a second-place team finish at Friday’s Bethel College Invitational in South Bend, Ind.     Rosario covered the 5K course at St. Patrick’s Park in 19 minutes, 21.8 seconds. Freshman Nicole Watkins followed Rosario down the chute in the No. 11 position, a spot garnered on the strength of a 19:45 run.     Two other SXU competitors managed top-20 showings, as sophomore Dana Martin (19:58.2) wound up 15th overall and senior Jordan Wallace (20:01.8) was 18th. Completing the Cougars’ scoring was sophomore Ann Kolker, who completed the race in 20:23.3, which was good for 30th place.     Delivering a solid effort as well for SXU was junior Ali Proffitt, who clocked a 20:47.1 and finished 39th. Seven Cougars in all posted season-best times, and SXU’s runner-up showing was its highest of the season to date. Only fellow CCAC member Judson University placed ahead of the Cougars.     SXU’s next event will be the NAIA Great Lakes Invitational, hosted by Aquinas College at Riverside Park in Grand Rapids, Mich., on Oct. 26.

MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY     Brian Corcoran’s 12th-place performance sparked the Cougars to a fifth-place team finish at Saturday’s NAIA Pre-Nationals Invitational, which was held at Rim Rock Farm in Lawrence, Kan.     A total of 30 squads and 272 runners took part in the event. Corcoran completed the 8K race in 25:28.3 and was just eight seconds behind the No. 7 finisher. SXU’s other scorers included sophomore Eric Hancock (27th in 26:04.3), senior Chris Shellenberger (58th, 26:39.7), junior Kyle Counter (61st, 26:41.5) and senior Chris Sarna (62nd, 26:41.6).     Also competing on the Cougars’ behalf were senior Brian Meyer (111th, 27:22.6), senior Shane Kenney (121st, 27:33.7) and freshman Abel Hernandez (141st, 27:52.7).     The only schools ahead of SXU (213 points) in the final standings were Aquinas College, Lewis-Clark, Shawnee State and Oklahoma Baptist. After taking this weekend off, the Cougars return to action at the Great Lakes Invitational in Michigan on Oct. 26. VOLLEYBALL     Sophomore right-side hitter Meghan Falsey supplied nine kills, two service aces and 14 digs, but the Cougars couldn’t capitalize on her performance as they dropped a 33-31, 25-19, 25-20 CCAC verdict to Judson University last Tuesday night at the Lindner Fitness Center in Elgin.     Junior middle Marie Hackert added seven kills for SXU, while junior setter Kelli Shaffer totaled 18 assists, three aces and 17 digs. Also contributing in the losing cause was junior libero Dominique Aramburu, who had 18 digs.     The Cougars had their chances in the first set to gain some momentum as they led 22-17 and 24-22, but they were unable to finish off the Eagles. ***     Sophomore middle blocker Heidi Gregerson helped SXU (10-10) get back on track last Thursday, as her 11 kills, six total blocks and three aces led the way to a 22-25, 25-18, 25-18, 25-16 nonconference victory over Illinois Institute of Technology at the Shannon Center.     Junior outside hitter Jessica Galotta (Mother McAuley) was an able accomplice for Gregerson, even equaling her teammate’s number of kills. In addition, Galotta registered 16 digs and three assisted blocks. Hackert (10 kills, match-best seven assisted blocks), Shaffer (38 assists, seven digs, five assisted blocks) and Falsey (18 digs, six kills, four aces) were other principal figures for the Cougars, who posted a .394 attack percentage during the momentum-turning second set.     SXU is back in action tonight, again versus the Scarlet Hawks. The match at the Keating Sports Center is a makeup of one that was postponed on Sept. 10.

Trinity

week was the naming of keeper Becky Gold and forward Rachael Webb as the CCAC’s Players of the Week for their efforts the previous seven days. Gold’s near-perfect work in the nets — one goal allowed in 155 minutes — and Webb’s four scores earned them the recognition.     But the laurels didn’t equal victories last week. Trinity and Olivet Nazarene played to a 0-0 tie at mid-week, and the Trolls dropped a 3-2 decision to Robert Morris on Saturday, putting a halt to their six-match (5-0-1) unbeaten streak.     The former decision was acceptable. It spotlighted Gold, whose 16 saves against the Tigers’ highoctane attack over 110 minutes were a season-high. She picked up her fourth shutout of the season and Trinity collected its second tie, the first in league play.     But on Saturday, the Eagles dared to score once, twice, thrice on Gold, including two goals from Karina Munoz in the first 20 minutes. That set the Trolls back on their heels, and while Amy Tadla

tallied early in the second half to trim the locals’ deficit to 2-1, Robert Morris pushed back as Florence Dadson beat Gold at 79:52 to put the verdict on ice.     The outcome left the Trolls 01-1 for the week and fifth in the league standings at 3-1-1, with a match at formidable University of St. Francis (8-3, 3-1) slated for this past Tuesday in advance of Saturday’s neighborhood clash with St. Xavier University (3-81, 1-5) at Schaaf Field. ***     • Record: 8-2-2 overall, 3-1-1 CCAC, 5-1-1 home, 3-1-1 away, 0-0 neutral. Leaders: Rachael Webb 10 goals, 23 points; Bekah Gonzales 4 assists; Becky Gold, 1.01 goals-against average, .855 save percentage (65 saves, 11 goals against, 4 shutouts).     • Schedule: Saturday, vs. St. Xavier University, noon; Wednesday, vs. Calumet College of St. Joseph, 4 p.m.; Oct. 26, at Holy Cross, 11 a.m. CT; Oct. 30, at Cardinal Stritch University, 7 p.m.; Nov. 2, vs. Judson University, noon.

Att./comp. Fumbles/lost Had intercepted Penalties/yds. Punts/avg.

    MAR — Weishar, 11-yd. pass from Donegan (pass failed)     ND — James, 14-yd. run (pass failed)     MAR — Mark Ferguson, 49-yd. pass from Donegan (Ferguson, pass from Donegan)     ND — James, 35-yd. run (Rodriguez kick)     MAR — Weishar, 13-yd. pass from Donegan (Gambla kick)     ND — James, 8-yd. run (Rodriguez kick)

(Continued from page 4)     Trinity’s offense was negligible in Bourbonnais. Joey Bahena registered the only shot Olivet netminder Zach Chambers had to make a save on, and the Trolls managed only four other sorties the rest of the way. ***     • Record: 4-7-1 overall, 1-4 CCAC, 3-3 home, 1-4-1 away, 0-0 neutral. Leaders: Mauricio Salgado 4 goals, 10 points; Emmanuel Yanquaye 3 assists; Rick Fawkes 1.71 goals-against average, .769 save percentage (20 saves, 6 goals against, 1 shutout).

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards’ doubles tandem of Alyssa Van (front) and Caitlin O’Sullivan try to win a point from their conference opponents on Friday. brook on Saturday. GIRLS’ TENNIS     A fourth-place team showing at Saturday’s SWSC Blue meet was adequate, but the real highlight of Stagg’s appearance was the individual title garnered by No. 1 singles player Nicole Pamphilis. Pamphilis defeated HomewoodFlossmoor’s Allison Lessner 6-2, 6-1 in the championship match.     Behind Pamphilis, the Lady Chargers chalked up a total of 21 points.     Prior to the conference clash, Stagg beat Tinley Park (4-1) on Monday and Lincoln-Way Central (3-2) on Tuesday. Pamphilis triumphed at No. 1 singles on both days, while Jillian Atkenson did likewise at second-singles. ***     Caroline Kruszewski gave Sandburg (25 points) a win at

No. 3 singles on Saturday and helped the Lady Eagles finish second, while first- and secondsingles players Molly Traverso and Natalie Schultz keyed an SWSC Blue victory over Lockport last Monday. ***     Aurora Central Catholic edged Chicago Christian 3-2 last Tuesday despite a winning performance from the Lady Knights’ No. 3 doubles tandem of Jill Dowdy-Bre Vollan. ***     Shepard took third at Saturday’s South Suburban Conference Red meet with 16 points, one more than fourth-place Richards and just six behind champion Reavis.     Taylor and Kelsey Domina captured a victory for the Lady Astros at No. 2 doubles.

    • Schedule: Saturday, vs. St. Xavier University, 2:30 p.m.; Tuesday, vs. Calumet College of St. Joseph, 3:30 p.m.; Oct. 26, at Holy Cross, 2:30 p.m.; Oct. 30, at Cardinal Stritch University, 5 p.m.; Nov. 2, vs. Judson University, 2:30 p.m. WOMEN’S SOCCER     The Trolls’ highlight of the

RedHawks (Continued from page 2) tiny is what you want, and we’re just zeroing in on the [next] day and play.”

Statistics Marist Notre Dame First downs Yds. rushing Yds. passing Total yds.

0 14 6 15 - 35 13 6 12 14 - 45 MAR 19 93 328 421

44-26 0-0 2 7-90 3-34.0

Scoring     ND — Chris James, 88-yd. run (Zavier Rodriguez kick)     ND — Pat Cravens, 17-yd. run (kick failed)     MAR — Nic Weishar, 34-yd. pass from Jack Donegan (Kyle Gambla kick)     ND — James, 6-yd. run (pass failed)     MAR — Flynn Nagel, 10-yd. pass from Donegan (Gambla kick)     ND — Dan Proano, 10-yd. pass from Ryan Greene (pass failed)

Marist Rushing: Andreotti 16-81, Donegan 3-12. Passing: Donegan 44-26-328. Receiving: Weishar 11-141, Nagel 11113, Holland 2-5, Ferguson 1-49, Neal 1-20.

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2 Thursday, October 17, 2013

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W 0 9 0 4 9 4 � IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS TRUSTEE, F O R � CWMBS, INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH T R U S T � 2007-18, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH C E R T I F I C A T E S � SERIES 2007-18; Plaintiff, v s . � MICHAEL P. CODY; KELLI L. CODY; STATE BANK O F � COUNTRYSIDE; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MICHAEL P. CODY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS A N D � LEGATEES OF KELLI L. CODY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 09 CH 9909 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 20, 2010 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, November 15, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 24-30-323-006-0000. Commonly known as 12555 South 69th Avenue, Palos Heights, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff's Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W 0 9 0 4 9 4 . � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565136

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N , � P l a i n t i f f � V . � UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF DONALD S. MAROSITZ, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MARY L. MAROSITZ, DECEASED; RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; RIVIERA REGAL ASSOCIATION; ANGELA JONES, AS INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF DONALD S. MAROSITZ, DECEASED; ANGELA JONES; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 36775 Property Address: 11106 SOUTH 84TH AVENUE UNIT 2A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 10-043819 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 30, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on October 30, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 11106 South 84th Avenue, Unit 2A, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-23-101-116-1021 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $ 133,700.10. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I548416

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-FF4, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-FF4 Plaintiff, -v.SAWSON HADDAD A/K/A SAWSON R. HADDAD, RAJAEI HADDAD A/K/A RAJAEI J. HADDAD A/K/A RAY HADDAD, CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, INLAND BANK AND TRUST, MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC, INTEGRA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 028055 17128 POINTE DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 15, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 7, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17128 POINTE DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-29-313-003. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-18640. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-18640 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 028055 TJSC#: 33-21935 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I566268

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Jessica Wojtysiak; The Hills Homeowners Association; The Hills of Palos Condominium Association; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 34350 Sheriff's # 130744 F12080312 CHOH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on November 26, 2013, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 3 Cinnamon Creek Drive Unit 32S and G1-D-15 and P-1-9-15, Palos Hills, 60465 P.I.N: 23-10-200-015-1015; 23-10-200-015-1041 Improvements: This property consists of a Residential Condominium Unit with parking space. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of a condominium unit, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments as required by 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1) Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I563985

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., P l a i n t i f f � V . � ELIZABETH PACURA; STONY CREEK CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 25926 Property Address: 6 WEST STONEBRIDGE COURT UNIT A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 10-036585 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 22, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on November 18, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 6 West Stonebridge Court, Unit A, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-14-400-071-1055 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $ 244,902.07. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I560239

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For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST 2006-3 Plaintiff, -v.ALEKSANDRA ZWOLEN, TOMASZ ZWOLEN, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS A POSSIBLE SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO NATIONAL CITY BANK SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO MIDAMERICA BANK, FSB, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 015464 8810 W. 100TH PLACE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 7, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on October 25, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8810 W. 100TH PLACE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 2310-413-001. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-12857. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-12857 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 015464 TJSC#: 33-19846 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I563216

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � John Martin Simone aka John M. Simone; Regina J. F l i n t ; � Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � Case # 12CH16229 Sheriff's # 130712 F12030344 CHOH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on November 12, 2013, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 8920 West Maple Lane, Hickory Hills, Illinois 60457 P.I.N: 23-03-211-016-0000 Improvements: This property consists of a Single Family Home. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments. Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney Anthony Porto FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I560530

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOHN CHRISTOPHER O'CARROLL A/K/A JOHN O'CARROLL, KATHLEEN O'CARROLL A/K/A KATHLEEN M. O'CARROLL D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 040864 12023 S. 72ND COURT PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 14, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12023 S. 72ND COURT, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-25-213-013. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-32700. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-32700 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 040864 TJSC#: 33-18731 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I562497

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10-17-13

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, -v.SCOTT REYNOLDS, DONNA BRAZAS REYNOLDS, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. ASSIGNEE OF E-LOAN, INC., UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 28207 10057 WEST 151ST STREET Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 19, 2011, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on October 28, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10057 WEST 151ST STREET, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-16111-001-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $167,292.74. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD., 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105, CHICAGO, IL 60603, (312) 372-2020. Please refer to file number 10-2222-14608. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction. com or call (800-280-2832) HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105 CHICAGO, IL 60603 (312) 372-2020 Attorney File No. 10-2222-14608 Attorney Code. 4452 Case Number: 10 CH 28207 TJSC#: 3321138 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I564074

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, -v.MICHAEL C. GIORANGO, NATIONAL CITY BANK, SALVATORE BALSAMO TRUST, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 09 CH 17973 11380 SHADE COVE COURT Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 21, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on October 25, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 11380 SHADE COVE COURT, Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-18-104-023-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $1,115,148.17. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD., 39 South LaSalle Street Suite 1105, CHICAGO, IL 60603, (312) 372-2020. Please refer to file number 09-2222-11390. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction. com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800280-2832) HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105 CHICAGO, IL 60603 (312) 372-2020 Attorney File No. 09-2222-11390 Attorney Code. 4452 Case Number: 09 CH 17973 TJSC#: 33-21091 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I563499

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The Regional News - The Reporter

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For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � DOROTA KOMAR, KRZYSZTOF KOMAR D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 25489 8230 WEST 85TH STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 11, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 21, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8230 WEST 85TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 18-35-409-037-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story single family home with an attached two car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1015126. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1015126 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 25489 TJSC#: 33-20544 I565486

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOHN MCKEE A/K/A JOHN F. MCKEE, RUTH MCKEE A/K/A RUTH MARIE MCKEE, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. S/B/M TO WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A. FKA WACHOVIA MORTGAGE FSB FKA WORLD SAVINGS BANK, F S B � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 14680 11904 SOUTH 93RD AVENUE PALOS PARK, IL 6 0 4 6 4 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 7, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 12, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 11904 SOUTH 93RD AVENUE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-27-102-002-0000. The real estate is improved with a one story single family home with a two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1206369. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1206369 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 14680 TJSC#: 33-17776 I563895

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BANK ONE, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK AND T R U S T � CO. OF CHICAGO; Plaintiff, v s . � ACE-CHICAGO GREAT DANE CORP., AN ILLINOIS CORPORATION; FIFTH THIRD BANK, S U C C E S S O R � TRUSTEE TO OLD KENT BANK AS TRUSTEE U N D E R � TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1985 AND K N O W N � AS TRUST NO. 8459; WHALER LTD; GERALDINE R. GORAL AS REPRESENTATIVE FOR DENNIS G O R A L ; � GERALDINE R GORAL; AND UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 02 CH 10672 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on March 18, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, November 12, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 12411 South Nashville, Palos Heights, IL 60463. P.I.N. 24-30-421-014-0000. The mortgaged real estate is a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Ms. Jennifer E. Frick at Plaintiff's Attorney, Crowley & Lamb, P.C., 221 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 670-6900. 9 5 0 6 0 2 0 2 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565036

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � VIVIAN PFEIFFER A/K/A VIVIAN A PFEIFFER, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 44719 8800 WEST 103RD STREET Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 14, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8800 WEST 103RD STREET, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-410-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a 1 story home with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1225287. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1225287 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 44719 TJSC#: 3 3 1 8 2 6 3 � I564431

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION P l a i n t i f f , � v . � TIMOTHY AYRES A/K/A TIMOTHY M. AYRES, HICKORY OAKS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION UNIT I Defendants 13 CH 05561 9430 GREENBRIAR DRIVE APT 1G HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 11, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 4, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9430 GREENBRIAR DRIVE APT 1G, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-303-109-1007. The real estate is improved with a 12 unit condominium with a detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1302888. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1302888 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 05561 TJSC#: 33-21721 I565299

Home for Sale? Call today to place your ad!

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v s . � MARY PAWLAK A/K/A MARY MARGARET PAWLAK; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD C L A I M A N T S ; � D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 9550 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on July 31, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, November 15, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-14-202-004-0000. Commonly known as 10515 SOUTH 84TH AVENUE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1305642. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565207

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WORLD SAVINGS B A N K , � FSB; Plaintiff, v s . � SCOTT ELLIOTT; ANNA M. ELLIOTT; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 11 CH 38261 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on August 12, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, November 15, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 27-22-203-018-0000. Commonly known as 16048 South Haven Lane, Orland Hills, IL 60487. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1122375. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I565160

Do you have AN apartment for RENT? Call to place your ad today!

9

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Spruce up your home’s exterior    With winter gone and spring finally here, there’s no better time to spruce up your home. But while most families are reorganizing closets and making trips to Goodwill, they are neglecting the part of their home that guests see first-its exterior. And after this year’s harsh, long winter, the outside of your home probably needs more than a little T.L.C.    “This was one of the worst winters America has seen in decades, and unfortunately, snow, sleet and freezing rain can be damaging to the exterior of any home,” says Rust-Oleum brand manager Dirk Sappok. “Moisture can create the perfect conditions for the growth of mold and mildew. Dirt, grime and salt residue can also be damaging if left unchecked. But fortunately, there are products available that can make the outside of your home look brand new.” Make your home’s siding shine    After getting hit with recordbreaking snowfalls this winter, the exterior of most homes took a beating. Now that it’s getting warmer, it’s the perfect time to freshen up your home’s siding-and you don’t need to hire a professional or rent a power washer to make your home look like new. Try a cleaner like Jomax House Cleaner and Mildew Killer. It is guaranteed to kill mold and mildew and remove tough stains and stubborn dirt without scrubbing or power washing. Plus, it’s safe for use around plants and shrubs. Or for quick and easy routine cleaning, try Jomax House Wash. Just hook it up to a garden hose, spray, wait 5-10 minutes for dirt and stains to loosen, and rinse off-it’s really that easy! Put life back into your driveway    A cracked, weathered driveway doesn’t do much for a home’s curb appeal, and it’s often the first thing that guests see when they visit your home. Unfortunately, driveway resealing is a project that many homeowners neglect due to the mess and time it requires. But resealing a driveway doesn’t have to be a time-consuming and messy

It’s easy to revive worn sidewalks, porches and entryways without spending a small fortune on replacing them. project. Thanks to breakthrough technology, homeowners can rejuvenate their driveways in one easy step with EPOXYSHIELD Blacktop Coating. Unlike other blacktop sealers that must _be applied with a squeegee, EPOXYSHIELD Blacktop Coating can be rolled onto the surface just like paint. It’s drive ready in just four hours, leaving a jet-black finish, and it lasts longer than traditional driveway sealers. Don’t forget your walkways    It’s easy to revive worn side-

walks, porches and entryways without spending a small fortune on replacing them. Select a product like EPOXYSHIELD Concrete Resurfacer. It comes in a kit complete with all the tools you need to renew and restore aged, patched and cracked concrete surfaces. The best part is it can be rolled on, eliminating the mess of replacement or traditional application.    For additional spring spruce-up ideas and outdoor cleaning tips, visit www.rustoleum.com.

Publisher’s Notice    All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1 (800) 927-9275.

Thinking about having a garage or yard sale? Cleaning out your attic, garage or basement can add up to extra cash! Gather up those old or unused items now! Advertise your sale in the Classifieds. Call today to place your ad.


10

Section 2 Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Caregiver

Garage Sales

Over 23 years of experience; loving, caring, reliable and dependable. Looking for a job as a caregiver. Part-time, full-time, weekdays and week-ends available. References and resume are avaiable on your request.

friDAY, October 18 only 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.

Please call Eva at: 926-4034

Something for everyone— new, unused items. 10609 S. Tripp Oak Lawn friDAY & SATURDAY OCTOBER 18th & 19th 9 A.M. to 3 P.M.

Estate Sale

Refrigerator, player piano, organ, furniture. Lots of stuff.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19th (Weather Permitting) 8 A.M. to NOON

12730 S. 69th Ct. Palos Heights

Something for Everyone! 404 Feldner Ct. (Parking on Circle Dr. only) Palos Heights

Help Wanted Full-Time Commercial Loan Processor

For Sale NEW FACTORY SALE WHY PAY MORE? Queen Pillow Topset $48 Mo Daybed w/Mattress $48 Mo Bunkbed w/Mattress $56 Mo 8pc. Living Room Set $111 Mo 8pc. Bdrm w/Mattress $95 Mo EZ Credit • No Credit Check Needed

FREE Layaway Factorybeddingfurniture.com Call for details

Phone: (708) 371-3737 The original Nordic Track Sequoia ski machine/cross country skier. Sturdy solid pine framing with redwood finish, adjustable arm and leg resistance and monitor. Folds down for storage. Barely used, excellent condition. $100. Call (708) 458-9233 leave message FLOOR TILE 490 sq. ft. of 12” x 12” glazed ceramic floor tile. Ice Cap Brown (light brown). Will sell individually or all together. $.75 per tile. Please TEXT or call Call (708) 921-8056

Call today to place your ad!

FirstSecure Bank and Trust Co. is looking for a Full-Time experienced Commercial Loan Processor. Applicant should have 5+ years preparing Laser-Pro documents for commercial mortgage loans, lines of credit, guidance lines, and construction loans. Additional skills should include: payment processing and professional customer service skills to follow-up on financial documentation and insurance information. Medical, 401(k) and additional benefits are available. Please forward your resume to: FirstSecure Bank and Trust Co. Attn: Human Resources, 10360 S. Roberts Road Palos Hills, IL 60465

Hairdresser Hairdresser with following wanted in Chicago Ridge area. 60% commission. Daytime: (708) 425-2299 Evenings: (708) 448-4080 Ask for Annie Experienced cleaning lady wanted for immediate start. Must be licensed driver with dependable vehicle. Good pay. Call (708) 636-4030

Unused items for sale? Call today to place your ad in the Classifieds!

Novena Prayer to the Blessed Virgin (Never known to fail) Oh, most beautiful flower of Mt. Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. Oh, Star of the Sea, help me and show me herein you are my mother. Oh, Holy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of Heaven & Earth! I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to succor me in this necessity. There are none that can withstand your power. Oh, show me herein, you are my mother. Oh, Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee (3x). Holy Mother, I place this cause in your hands (3x). Holy Spirit, you who solve all problems, light all roads so that I can attain my goal. You who gave me the divine gift to forgive and foget all evil against me and that in instances in my life you are with me. I want in this short prayer to thank you for all things as you confirm once again that I never want to be separated from you in Eternal Glory. Thank you you for your mercy toward me and mine. The person must say this prayer 3 consecutive days. After 3 days, the request will be granted. This prayer must be published after the favor is granted. D.G.

Wanted Small engines, snowblowers, regular and riding lawnmowers, bicycles. Reasonably priced or free. Call (815) 468-7819

ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK ADVERTISING SERVICES Need to place your ad in more than 300 newspapers throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-241-1700 or visit www.illinoispress.org

BOATS THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-793-7300 theboatdock.com

CAMPERS/RVS Colman’s RV - We Buy And Consign Used RV’s And Campers 217-787-8653 www.colmansrv.com

CAREER/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312.

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE Government Owned Real Estate Auction Selling to the Highest Bidder Sharp Corner School, Skokie, IL on November 12. 312.789.4864 or www.SkokieSchoolBoard Auction.com

HELP WANTED DRIVERS Flatbed Drivers New Pay ScaleStart @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus Home Weekends Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800-648-9915

FROM YOUR DISK

• Sales Manuals • Training Manuals • Parts Books • Condominium

• Employee Handbooks • Manuscripts • Rulebooks

REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

Call (708) 448-4000

NEW TRUCKS ARRIVING EXPERIENCED OTR DRIVERS VAN DIVISION: Runs 48 States, heavy from WI to Philadelphia- BaltimoreMD area. Flex home time. 99% No-Touch, Top Pay! Vacation/401K/Vision/Dental/ Disability/Health. Require Class A CDL, 2yrs OTR exp. good MVR/ References. Call Ruth/Mike TTI, Inc. 1-800-558-2664 www.TTItrucking.com NEED CLASS-A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Class" training. *New Academy Classes Weekly *No Money Down or Credit Check *Certified Mentors Ready and Available *Paid (While Training With Mentor) *Regional and Dedicated Opportunities *Great Career Path *Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (602) 648-5307

Automotive $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $$$ TOP CASH $$$ $ $ $ $ FOR YOUR JUNK $ $ $ CAR, TRUCK, VAN $ $ $ $ (708) $ $ $ 448-9155 $$ $ $ $10 off any tow service $ $ $ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Boswell Blacktop Paving Driveways • Parking Lots Resurfacing • Sealcoating FREE ESTIMATES

708-423-9594 Cleaning Services

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Drivers HOME WEEKLY & BIWEEKLY EARN $900$1200/WK Class A CDL & 6 Mos. Exp. Req. No Canada, HAZMAT or NYC! SMITH TRANSPORT 877-705-9261 Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www.primeinc.com Drivers - CDL-A SOLO & TEAM DRIVERS NEEDED! Top Pay & Full Benefits Even MORE Pay for Hazmat! New Trucks Arriving Daily! CDL Grads Welcome! 888-928-6011 www.TotalMS.com ATTENTION REGIONAL & DEDICATED DRIVERS! Averitt offers Excellent Benefits & Hometime. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A, 1-6/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Local Driving Positions Available, Thornton, IL area. HOME DAILY! Salaried with full benefits including premium-free family insurance. Call Sharkey 800.354.8945 www.SharkeyDrivingJobs.com

EARN $500 A DAY: Insurance Agents Needed: Leads, No Cold Calls; Commissions Paid Daily; Lifetime Renewals; Complete Training; Health/Dental Insurance; Life License Required. Call 1-888-713-6020

LEGAL SERVICES

LAND FOR SALE HOMESITES JUST OUTSIDE CHATTANOOGA! 10-25 Acres Starting at Only $56,000. Located on Signal Mountain in Tennessee. Gated Community Phase 2 Just Released. Call 877-282-4409

LOTS & ACREAGE Foreclosed Cabin On 4 Acres! Just $89,900. Bring your hammer & nails. Great fixer upper on beautiful wooded rolling land. Enjoy wildlife, creeks, ponds, lake access. Must see! Call 877-888-0267, x 435.

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LANDSCAPING Lawn Maintenance Hedge Trimming Retaining Walls Snow Removal Complete Landscaping

EDWARD SIEARS Cell:

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and each program. It’s reflected in the research our faculty spearhead, the patents we earn, and the awards our students win. We don’t do any of these things for the accolades. We do them because we think there’s no such thing as too ambitious.

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Blacktop

• Club Bylaws On-site binding, plus mailing and pick-up services

99¢ a gallon diesel fuel, $6,000 Sign On Bonus and a great lease purchase program are what you get at Hirschbach Motor Lines 888-514-6005 www.drive4hml.com

HELP WANTED SALES

Chicagoland ICANS - Run Date Week of 10/13/2013

Documents • Handbooks

DRIVERS: Excellent Local Positions Available for Spotters in the Montgomery area. Several shifts available, full benefits including premium-free family health insurance. Call Sharkey 800.354.8945 www.SharkeyDrivingJobs.com

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BOOKLETS PRINTED IN ONE DAY FROM YOUR COPY

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in the Service Directory!

708.952.1833

Give your unused items a new home... Call today to place your ad in the Classifieds!


Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Broaden Your Horizons This week New yoga class     A Gentle Yoga class will be offered at The Center on five Tuesday evenings beginning Oct. 22 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The class will meet at the Anderson Activity Center of The Children’s Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     Instructor Valerie Lindstrom will lead the yoga sessions, which will include discussion and practice on breathing, relaxation, and centering, as well as movement and poses.     Yoga newcomers are welcome. Students should dress in comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat and water bottle. The five-week class costs $50. Preregistration is required. Call The Center: 361-3650.

Stretching luncheon

Submitted photo

Fine arts classes at Log Cabin Center     The Center is offering new six-week sessions of lapidary, silver jewelry, and calligraphy classes at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.     Beginning Monday, Oct. 28, Marge Boyd teaches the art of lettering in a calligraphy class at 1 p.m. Also on Oct. 28, two silver jewelry classes are offered. Dan Snyder teaches a 2 p.m. class for intermediate to advanced silver jewelry students and a 6:30 p.m. class for those interested in learning to set polished gemstones into sterling silver pendants.     Here, calligraphy student Joyce Kasmer practices her letters.     Registration is required for all classes at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts. Call The Center at 361-3650, or visit thecenterpalos.org.

    The health benefits of stretching will be the focus of a luncheon program on Tuesday, Oct. 22, from noon to 2 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     Movement therapist Jan Sylkatis will talk about the benefit of stretching to awaken the senses, increase circulation, and enliven the joints and glands. She’ll invite participants to practice some simple stretches and discuss how to incorporate them into your daily self-care routine. Jan encourages all to participate, as the stretches can even be done from a chair. These are not intended for rigorous athletic training, but to help anyone feel more invigorated and comfortable. Sylkatis is an Illinois licensed massage therapist and friend of The Center.

Videoview by Jay Bobbin     (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)     STARTING THIS WEEK: “THE HEAT”: Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy merge their comedic styles as seemingly mismatched law enforcers in writer Katie Dippold’s action comedy that reteams McCarthy with her “Bridesmaids” director, Paul Feig. The action isn’t shortchanged as Bullock plays an uptight FBI agent teamed with an earthy Boston cop (McCarthy) to find a violent drug kingpin. Co-stars include Demian Bichir (“The Bridge”), Marlon Wayans and Jane Curtin. A sequel was ordered even before the first film was released. DVD extras: eight “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by McCarthy and Feig; deleted, extended and alternate scenes. *** (R and unrated versions: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “PACIFIC RIM”: Monsters from the sea are opposed by robots so colossal they need pilots in director Guillermo del Toro’s (“Pan’s Labyrinth”) expectedly scenic and loud fantasy. “Sons of Anarchy” co-star Charlie Hunnam — who now has added fame through his “Fifty Shades of Grey” casting — plays one of the pilots, who struggles with personal troubles to rise to the challenge of vanquishing the invading creatures. Idris Elba (“Luther”), Rinko Kikuchi and Charlie Day also appear. DVD extras: audio commentary by Del Toro; five “making-of” documentaries; deleted scenes; outtakes. *** (PG13: P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “KEVIN HART: LET ME EXPLAIN”: The comedian has followed in the footsteps of such other humorists as Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy in being successful with concert films. He tackles a wide range of subjects in this one, compiled from two performances he gave at New York’s Madison Square Garden. Hart is quite candid in talking about his divorce, and he touches on other aspects of family and relationships as well. DVD extras: two “making-of” documentaries; three music videos. *** (R: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “VIKINGS: THE COM­ PLETE FIRST SEASON”: The

Dine out tonight...

cable channel History had one of its biggest successes to date with this fact-inspired drama series, following the path of one Viking who decides to venture beyond the boundaries of the land he’s always known in a quest to raid other territories. Travis Fimmel (“The Beast”) has the central role; Katheryn Winnick, Nathan O’Toole, Gustaf Skarsgard, Ivan Kaye and Alyssa Sutherland also star. DVD extras: three “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by executive producer Michael Hirst; deleted scenes. *** (Not rated: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray)     “SHREK: THE MUSICAL”: The lovable ogre was brought to life in a stage show - presented here as performed on Broadway - that won a Tony Award for its costume design. The story goes back to the roots of the animated screen saga, detailing how Shrek (Brian d’Arcy James, “Smash”) won the heart of the princess Fiona (Sutton Foster, “Bunheads”) while learning that life isn’t always a fairy tale ... yet sometimes can be. DVD extra: sing-along songbook. *** (Not rated) (Also on Blu-ray)     “SUPERHEROES: A NEVER-ENDING BATTLE”: In the same week it makes its broadcast debut on PBS, this documentary looks at such iconic characters as Superman, Batman, Spider-Man and Wonder Woman from the perspective of their effects over the years on the public ... and, in some instances, even on governments. “Ray Donovan” star Liev Schreiber, who played Sabretooth in “X-Men Origins: Wolverine,” is the host of the program; interviewees include Adam West, Lynda Carter and Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee.

DVD extras: additional interviews; Marvel theme songs. *** (Also on Blu-ray)     COMING SOON: “BEFORE MIDNIGHT” (Oct. 22): Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy, also credited as writers of the film along with director Richard Linklater, reprise their roles as the couple from “Before Sunrise” and “Before Sunset.” (R: AS, N, P)     “THE INTERNSHIP” (Oct. 22): “Wedding Crashers” stars Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson team again as newly unemployed men who vie for internships at Google. (PG-13 and unrated versions: AS, P)     “THE WAY, WAY BACK” (Oct. 22): A youngster (Liam James) finds a way to deal with an unusual family trip through a new friend (Sam Rockwell). Steve Carell and Toni Collette also star. (PG-13: AS, P)     “MONSTERS UNIVER­ SITY” (Oct. 29): The schooldays roots of the link between Mike and Sulley (voices of Billy Crystal and John Goodman) are traced in the animated DisneyPixar sequel. (G)     “R.I.P.D.” (Oct. 29): Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds play deceased lawmen who continue their crusade to uphold justice, even in the afterlife. (PG-13: AS, P, V)     “WHITE HOUSE DOWN” (Nov. 5): A Washington, D.C., cop (Channing Tatum) tries to save the president (Jamie Foxx) when terrorists take over America’s most famous residence. (PG-13: AS, P, V)     FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

    The noon presentation will be followed by a 1 p.m. luncheon, which costs $17 per person and requires reservations. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Nature photography workshops     Two nature photography workshops for adults will be hosted on Saturday mornings Oct. 19 and 26, at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     Instructor Rick Steffen has timed this class to take advantage of outdoor walks to shoot the colorful autumn foliage. Students should bring either a film or a digital camera and dress to be outdoors.     The class fee is $15 for each session. Registration is required. To register, call The Center at 361-3650, or visit thecenterpalos. org for more information.

The Bridge Teen Center upcoming events     • Friday Night Live — 7:3010:30 p.m. Oct. 18, The Bridge Teen Center will host their Friday Night Live event with live music from Ashleigh Ashton with a free popcorn bar. This free event is for teens in 7th through 12th grade at The Bridge, 15555 S. 71st Court in Orland Park.     • Saturday Night — 7:30-10:30 p.m. Oct. 19, live music from Blond Moment. This event is exclusively for students in 10th12th grade and is free with a student membership application or $5 with a school ID. For more information call 532-0500 or visit thebridgeteencenter.org.     • Chicken and Waffles — 4:306:00 p.m. Oct. 22, make your own version of Chicken and Waffles, traditionally served with butter and syrup, similar to breakfast. This free program is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     • Creative Writing — 5-6 p.m. Oct. 23 and 24, spend two days exploring a variety of creative writing styles from poetry to short story. Submit pieces from this to our first expressive arts magazine. This free program is for teens in

Free ion! m d a iss

Oct. 19 & 20, 2013 Sat. & Sun. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

raffles

    ARIES (March 21-April 19): You could need to see an optometrist because you may mistake the carrot for the stick. In the week ahead, you should avoid giving in to temptations or making changes on the spur of the moment.     TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Consider what’s best for everyone before you take action in the upcoming week. A generous spirit will act as a shield against competitors and offers an ambitious partner necessary assistance.     GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You are as good as you think you are. At the same time, your confidence about your abilities might lead you to be overly generous or careless with cash in the week to come. Spread good will but not money.     CANCER (June 21-July 22): Rise above petty issues or irrational fears. You could yoyo between optimism and pessimism. Put on your thinking cap later this week to make a wise decision that will have a long-range positive effect.     LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You

Saturday SPeaker Space Program by nASA, Ambassador Joel Knapper Scouts Earn Your Badges! (approx. 1½ hours) Science Teacher Information.

PraIrIE CEnTEr GYm @ Prairie State College 202 S. Halsted St., Chicago Heights, IL 60411

Support your local restaurants!

Proceeds go to Prairie State Science Scholarship Program.

2x4

Bratwurst Brothers performs at BACtoberfest     The Beverly Arts Center hosts BACtoberfest from 4 to 10 p.m. Saturday in the BAC courtyard, 2407 W. 111th St., Chicago.     The music performance line-up includes the Bratwurst Brothers, Oktoberfest music and contemporary favorites, from 5 to 6 p.m.; Brown Bag, and organic rock and roll band with influences of folk, rock, jam, jazz and more from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Terriers, folk/indie from 7:45 to 8:45 p.m. and The In-Laws, country rock, from 9 to 10 p.m.     In addition to regular bar offerings, the BAC will be serving Goose Island Oktoberfest for a special price. Food and desserts

might not be a ballerina but you should still stay on your toes. Your ability to act with a creative flair is enhanced in the week ahead. Write down inspirations and ideas, as they may be useful in the future.     VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

    The Moraine Valley Community College flute choir will host Flutes Internationale at 7 p.m. Friday at the Fine and Performing Arts Center. Admission is free. For more information, call 974-5636.

Upcoming Spooky nights at Children’s Farm     Tickets are on sale now for “The Haunting” evenings of spooky fun at the Children’s Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25 and 26.     Guests will be entertained with a frightful story revealing the haunted past of the Children’s Farm and then take a hayride around the farm trails, where the past will come alive, with volunteers dressed as scary ghouls and ghosts.     Advance tickets are required, cost $10 per person, and are available for 6:30, 7:15, and 8 p.m. each evening. For more information, call The Center at 361-3650.

Comedy night at Mount Assisi     The Mount Assisi Booster Club presents its 10th annual Comedy Night Saturday, Nov. 2, at the school, 13860 Main St. in Lemont.     Doors open at 6:15 p.m., dinner 7:15 p.m.; show 8:30 p.m.     Featuring a night of comedy and dinner by Uncle Bub’s.     Tickets cost $35 and include buffet dinner, beer, wine, pop, water and comedy show. Must be 21 or over to attend.     To register, contact Gail Andjulis andjul4@yahoo.com, or call 224-9922.

Secrecy and trust can work together. Prove your worth to allies by remaining discreet. Sometime after the middle of the week is the best time to launch key strategies and make your move for career success. (Continued on page 12 )

oak lawn VFW

Craft & Vendor fair Sunday, October 20th 10:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Food admFRiSeSeion! RaFFle Bake Sale 9514 S. 52nd Ave., Oak Lawn 2x3

*CuStOmer O&A

aPPreCatiOn DaY!

10-17-13 Oct. 18th • noon to 4pm Friday,

*Palos Heights Location Only

!

EduCAtiOn demonstrations, interactive Children’s Area, tour the Science Labs, View Sunspots, (Weather Permitting) & identify Your Fossils & Rocks

    The 44th annual fossil, gem, mineral and jewelry show will be held this Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 19 and 20, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Prairie Center Gym at Prairie State College, 202 S. Halsted St. in Chicago Heights.     Exhibits include fossils from Mazon Creek and Thornton Quarry, minerals, jewelry, lapidary, crystals, artifacts, Illinois meteorites and fluorescent stones.     Dealers will also provide demonstrations, an interactive children’s area and science labs. View sunspots (weather permitting) and identify your fossils and rocks.     Free admission. Raffles will be held. Proceeds go to Prairie State College Science Scholarship program.

Flutes Internationale at MVCC

by Jeraldine Saunders

ng Our Celebrati ersar y niv 1 Year an eights! H in Palos

Outstanding Exhibits, dealers and Educational Opportunities For All Ages! ExhibitS Fossils from Mazon Creek and thornton Quarry, Minerals, Jewelry, Lapidary, Crystals, Artifacts, illnois Meteorites and Fluorescent Stones

Fossil, gem, mineral and jewelry show

will be served by Sweet Freaks. Admission is $10. Call (773) 4453838 or purchase tickets online at beverlyartcenter.org.

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast

44th Annual

Fossil, Gem, Mineral & Jewelry Show

7th through 12th grade.     • Monopoly for Real — 4:30-6 p.m. Oct. 24, play Monopoly with a twist and learn about real estate development. This free program is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     To sign up call 532-0500 or visit thebridgeteencenter.org.

monSter team truck & Free monSter DrinkS from 3 ~ 4pm

Giveaways Prizes & Fun Free SamPLeS

¢ 5 2

HOt DOgS SLurPeeS anD Big guLPS

(Friday, Oct. 18, from noon to 4:00 pm only)

(10/18/13 only)

11900 S. Harlem avenue, PaloS HeigHtS


12 Section 2

Thursday, October 17, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Beverly Theatre Guild ready to Spam its audience by Beverly Theatre Guild     The Beverly Theatre Guild is the first community theatre company to premier “Monty Python’s SPAMALOT,” directed by Glenn Hering (Beverly), musical direction by Terri Lenz (Beverly), and choreography by Tom Fagan (Orland Park). Performances will run for two weekends this Friday through Oct. 25 to Oct. 27.     “SPAMALOT” is lovingly ripped off from the classic film comedy, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail.” It retells the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table featuring a bevy of beautiful showgirls, not to mention cows, killer rabbits, and French people. This outrageously funny musical will delight the entire family.     King Arthur, played by Rob Sorenson, was in BTG’s “Camelot” as Lancelot, then Prince Charming in “Cinderella” and now is King in “SPAMALOT.”     Other performers include Wayne Wendell (Beverly) as Sir Lancelot, Jeannie Rega Markionni (Chicago Heights) as The Lady of the Lake, Tim Casey (Alsip) as Patsy, Mike Neary as Sir Galahad, Mike Maty (Evergreen Park) as Prince Herbert’s Father and Singing Monk, Joe Collins (Chicago) as The Historian, Eileen Casey (Alsip), Laurie Videka Krizka (Homer Glen), Bonnie Ryniec (Palos Hills) as Mrs. Galahad; Jim Seeberg (Orland Hills) as Finland Mayor and Vita Submitted photo Bender (Orland Park) as Mrs. The Finland People enjoy doing the traditional “Fisch-Schlapping Song.” From left: Hanah Remes (Tinley Park), Kate Rolette (Tinley Finland Mayor. Park), Larry Symanski (Evergreen Park), Mia Taylor (Chicago), Ashley Lenihan (Westmont) in Beverly Theatre Guild’s production of the     Other members include Larry musical Monty Python’s “SPAMALOT.” Symanski (Evergreen Park) as Sir Bors; James O’Connor (Ever- (Orland Park) as a Laker Girl, late Cynthea “Cindy” McKown Baer Theatre, at Morgan Park Season Subscribers save 20 pergreen Park) as The Black Knight, Mark Dillon (Oak Lawn) as Sir of Palos Heights who died earlier Academy Arts Center, 2153 W. cent with guaranteed reserved Kathy Cargill (Palos Heights) as Not Appearing in this Show; and this year. She was a member of 111th St., Chicago. Fridays seats and the ability for Ticket Frenchie, Jennifer Collins (Ev- Kristopher Symanski (Evergreen the Guild starting in 1985 and and Saturdays curtain time is Exchange of each production. ergreen Park) as a Laker Girl, Park). became a mainstay of the orga- 8 p.m. and Sundays curtain is     For ticket information call Andie Zaragoza (Orland Park)     This production of SPAMA- nization. at 2 p.m. (773) 284-8497 or visit: Beverly as a Laker Girl; Lauren Krull LOT will be dedicated to the     All performances are in the     Tickets are $20 per person. TheatreGuild.org.

Wolfgang Puck’s Kitchen

    LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Truth and honesty will take you far in the upcoming week. Activities within the community may bring satisfaction. Be cautious about spending, but don’t be bashful about displaying your talents.     SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t fall prey to unfounded fears. You may worry that too many ears are connected to too many mouths. Put important plans into motion later in the week, when your confidence is at a higher point.     SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Carry on and carry through on contracts, promises and agreements in the week ahead. Your bank account can move into the black if you play your cards right. New contacts upgrade your social life.     CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Make yourself into a money magnet. You could be intuitively at the right place at the right time to score big time in the world of commerce if you don’t take unnecessary risks in the week ahead.   ��� AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Ignore unsubstantiated feelings of discomfort or worry. You could seem too high strung or changeful to others in the upcoming week. Find some quiet time to meditate and return to your solid center.     PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look for opportunities to upgrade your public image in the coming week. To do this, concentrate on developing viable and worthy goals rather than trying to be a shrewd business person.

9th ANNUAL

Spice up your eggplant contain any meat (especially if you opt to use vegetable broth). It’s a perfectly fresh, yet traditional, way to celebrate Columbus Day around your dinner table. SPICY EGGPLANT FETTUCCINE WITH DOUBLE-BLANCHED GARLIC Serves 4 4 garlic cloves 3 Asian eggplants, about 1 pound total weight, ends trimmed 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt Freshly ground white pepper 1/2 cup well-drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves 1/2 to 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 2 cups organic chicken broth or vegetable broth, heated 12 ounces store-bought fresh or dried fettuccine 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley 4 ounces fresh, creamy goat cheese, cut into small pieces 6 fresh basil leaves, stacked, rolled up lengthwise, and cut crosswise to make thin strips     First, double-blanch the garlic: Bring a small saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil and, on a counter nearby, place a bowl filled with ice cubes and water. With a small, sharp knife, trim the ends off of each garlic clove, leaving the peels on. Carefully drop the cloves into the boiling water and cook for 30 seconds. With a slotted spoon, remove the cloves from the water and immediately plunge into the ice water.     Remove the cloves and carefully drop them again into the boiling water for 30 seconds more; then, drain and immediately plunge them again into the ice water. Drain the garlic well and pat the cloves thoroughly dry. Slip off the peels. With the knife, very thinly slice the garlic and set aside.     Fill a large stockpot or pasta pot with water. Bring to a boil over high heat.     Meanwhile, cut the eggplant into 1/2-inch cubes. In a large saute pan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the eggplant, season lightly with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown on all sides, 7 to 10 minutes. Add the sliced garlic and saute just until it takes on a little color, 1 to 2 minutes.     Stir in the sun-dried tomatoes and rosemary, along with red

(Continued from page 11)

The Regional news and The RepoRTeR aRe having TheiR

by Wolfgang Puck

    I love to cook Italian-inspired food. Part of that love comes from the fact that my hometown in Austria is only about 75 miles from the border with Italy. So I grew up familiar with Italian flavors. I’ve always loved pasta and pizza, which have long featured prominently on my menus at Spago and my other restaurants.     One of my favorite Italian ingredients has always been eggplant, or melanzana as they call the vegetable there. Of course, eggplant didn’t originate in Italy. The vegetable comes from the Indian subcontinent. But Arab traders brought it to the Mediterranean more than 1,000 years ago, and Italian cooks eventually adopted it as their own.     Think even briefly about that nation’s cooking, and a delicious range of dishes come to mind, like baked eggplant stuffed with meat or sausage; the sweet-andsour summer vegetable stew called caponata; and eggplant alla parmigiana, in which the vegetable is sliced, breadcrumb-coated, fried and layered with tomato sauce and Parmesan cheese. (The vegetable’s English name, by the way, comes from the fact that early varieties that came to Europe, including some you can still find today in farmers’ markets, resembled ivory-colored goose eggs.)     I like to make all those dishes, but my love of eggplant doesn’t stop there. Although the vegetable tastes wonderfully rich and meaty when fully cooked (a dramatic contrast to its slightly unpleasant taste and texture when raw), its slightly spongy consistency enables it to soak up all sorts of seasonings. Just think of the wide variety of lively eggplant dishes you’ve probably enjoyed in Indian, Chinese and Middle Eastern restaurants.     So I enjoy getting creative with eggplant, as you’ll see in the recipe I share here for a spicy eggplant sauce to serve with pasta. I start with the longer, more slender Asian varieties of eggplants you’ll find in many markets today, because they tend to have fewer seeds, more tender skins, and a finer flavor. I saute them in extra-virgin olive oil, along with sliced garlic cloves that I’ve first double-blanched in boiling water to eliminate their harshness, and then add a touch of red pepper flakes for spice, sun-dried tomatoes, broth and fresh rosemary.     After only about 20 minutes of cooking, you’ll have a sauce ready to toss with fettuccine for a dish so delicious and satisfying that no one may notice it doesn’t

Omarr’s Weekly Forecast

Costume Contest

Fotolia.com

I use the longer, more slender Asian varieties of eggplant you’ll find in many markets today. They have fewer seeds, more tender skins, and a finer flavor. pepper flakes to taste. Pour in the broth. Raise the heat slightly, bring the liquid to a boil, and boil until it reduces and thickens slightly, about 5 minutes.     Meanwhile, season the boiling water with salt. Add the fettuccine and cook until al dente, tender but still slightly chewy, following suggested cooking times on the packaging. Drain the pasta thoroughly and add it to the eggplant mixture, stirring to coat all the pasta with the sauce. Sprinkle in the butter, parsley, and goat cheese, and stir until combined and the cheese is partially melted. Adjust the seasonings to taste with salt and pepper.     To serve, divide the pasta among 4 large serving bowls. Garnish with basil and serve immediately.

Entries must be received by Monday, Oct. 21st at Noon.

Enter your favorite trick-or-treater today in our 9th Annual Costume Contest. Trick-or-treaters ages 0-14 may enter. 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners will receive prizes. The three winners will have their pictures printed in The Regional News & The Reporter on October 24th. Pictures printed with parental consent.

Prizes sponsored by Haunted Trails: 1st Place Winner - Family Fun Pack: Includes a large one-topping pizza, pitcher of your favorite soft drink, 4 Go Kart Rides, 4 Rounds of Miniature Golf, four rolls of 20 game tokens. 2nd & 3rd Place Winners - Family Fun Blast: Includes a large one-topping pizza, pitcher of your favorite soft drink, 4 rolls of 20 game tokens and choice of 4 Go Kart/Jr. Kart Rides OR 4 Rounds of Miniature Golf. The contest is only open to children who are permanent residents of Palos Heights, Palos Park, Orland Park, Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth. Photos must include your contact name and phone number, the child’s name, age and school he or she attends. Photos will not be returned.

TO ENTER—Send pictures via email to: Regionalads@regionalpublishing.com or send by U.s. postal Mail to: The Regional news Costume Contest 12243 s. harlem ave. palos heights, il 60463

Top Pop Albums     1. Nothing Was the Same, Drake, Cash Money     2. Mechanical Bull, Kings of Leon, RCA     3. Closer to the Truth, Cher, Warner Bros/Elektra/Atlantic     4. The Diving Board, El­ ton John, Capitol Records (Uni­ versal)     5. From Here to Now to You, Jack Johnson, Universal Republic

Top DVD Rentals     1. Iron Man 3, Walt Disney Studios, PG-13     2. Scary Movie 5, Dimension Films, PG-13     3. World War Z, Paramount Pictures, PG-13     4. Star Trek Into Darkness, Paramount Pictures, PG-13     5. The Great Gatsby, Warner Bros., PG-13     6. The Croods, DreamWorks, PG

Capri

Ristorante Italiano & Banquets (708) 671-1657

(708) 671-0600

(708) 598-8580

Palos Health & Fitness Center (708) 226-0555 (708) 226-0555

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(708) 361-1800

(708) 361-0087

’S ShirleyPlace

Riley’s TRick shop 1-800-4-RILEYS

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Antiques Collectibles Gifts

(708) 388-6200

(708) 361-6053

Since members of our editorial staff will be judges, families of Regional Publishing employees and sponsoring advertisers’ families are prohibited from entering. Only one entry per child. Winners will have their picture taken as they receive their prize.


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