Issuu on Google+

Congratulations, Class of 2013... all 8,800 of you!

THE 3 SECTIONS 56 PAGES

Volume LIV No. 9

R EPORTER Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

Chicago Ridge fire dept gets grant for new ambulance THE Knights and 2 SECTIONS 22 PAGES Spartans are cream of Volume XLVII No. 50 the crop Read Sports

EP Dist. 124 will hire community resource officer Story on Page 5

More from the marathon Page 3 Children’s clothing store opens in Worth Story on Page 7

Reader Poll What are your thoughts on the possibility of a bond issues referendum in EP Dist. 124? Vote on Facebook at The Reporter or at thereporteronline.net, call us at 448-6161 or email thereporter@comcast.net

    The Chicago Ridge Fire Department recently received a Department of Homeland Security grant that will allow them to purchase a new ambulance equipped with a battery-powered stretcher, which will reduce firefighter injuries.     Fire Chief Robert Muszynski said the ambulance will be a good investment Serving for the department. Chicago The $214,533 grant will cover 95 percent of the cost of the ambulance, and the department will pick up the other 5 percent, about $11,291.     The battery powered stretcher and oxygen bottle loader on the ambulance will help firefighters, Muszynski said. The department

currently has one other ambulance with a battery-powered stretcher. The stretchers are capable of holding up to 750 pounds.     “The old stretchers, you have to lift manually, and you need at least two people to lift it up and load it into the ambulance,” Muszynski said. “It wears on guys’ backs, and when you are lifting patients on it, some can be Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory fairly heavy. Over the years, they develop back issues from the constant stooping and bending. With the battery operated stretcher, you just push a button and the stretcher raises and lowers itself. It is a heavier-duty cot, and it saves the guys’ backs. There is (Continued on page 12)

OL senior dances the night away By Laura Bollin     An Oak Lawn Community High School senior can add one more extracurricular activity to her college applications: dancing queen.     Olivia Fuarez beat six teachers and a fellow student to take home the mirror ball trophy at the school’s “Dancing with the Spartans” competition.     “I really liked dancing, so I signed up,” Fuarez said. “When it was my turn to perform, I was really nervous, because I knew I was going to have to perform in front of the whole school, and I didn’t think I would be good enough.”     The competition paid homage to OLCHS media specialist and competition organizer Eileen Jones’ love of the television show “Dancing with the Stars.”     “Selfishly, I wanted to be on “Dancing with the Stars,” and I knew that wasn’t going to happen, so I thought of a way to bring it to me,” Jones said.     Everything from the mirror ball trophy to the Jumbotron screen in the gym to interviews with the dancers and the “green room” where contestants wait for their chance to perform is as close to the show as possible, Jones said.     “It’s amazing to see what was in my head played out,” Jones said. “They have such strong energy.”     More than just fun, the contest also raised money for The Parent Project, an organization that raises money for children with muscular dystrophy. This year, the school raised $16,300; and they’ve raised a total of $65,000 over the four years the competition has been held, Jones said.     “A math teacher has a son with muscular dystrophy, so we decided to do it for that cause,” Jones said.     “It just grew and grew, and became a bigger event because

we were doing it for something else.”     “The winners are decided 60 percent by judge votes and 40 percent by audience votes, and the audience votes with money,” Jones said. “One dollar equals one vote. Danvers can gather votes ahead of time form their family and friends, and through The Parent Project website, they can campaign for themselves and raise money. Some dancers have $600 or $700 before the show even starts. At the show, we have voting boxes, where people can vote with money, checks, or credit card slips.”     Fuarez raised $1,600 during the competition.     Dancers were paired with instructors from Burr Ridge’s Fred Astaire Dance, and each performed in a group routine and a routine with their dance partner. Fuarez said she and her partner, dance instructor Caleb Aleman, only had eight lessons to prepare. They performed the samba, a Brazilian dance.     Her dancing impressed the dancers at Fred Astaire, and they’ve asked her to dance in a competition as a Fred Astaire dancer, Fuarez said.     “I’d like to do the samba again, but it would also be nice to learn something more complicated,” Fuarez said.     Next year will be the final year of the OLCHS competition.     “It will have an all-star theme, and we want to go out with a bang,” Jones said. “There is only so much of the male staff that will dance in front of the entire school, and there are a lot of fundraisers at school, so people might have fundraiser fatigue. We will be inviting past dancers back and highlighting past winners.”     Jones hopes school Principal Joseph McCurdy will once again take to the dance floor.     “He did a dance last year that everyone loves, so hopefully, he will reprise that,” Jones said.

index

columnists Dee Woods...................12 Wine Guy......................12

Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

USPS 118-690

75¢

Thursday,

Jacqui Giuliano crosses the finish line as the winner of the women’s March 1, 2007 division of the First Midwest Half Marathon.

The First Midwest Bank Half Marathon featured heartwarming moments Sunday, such as Palos Hills’ Nitin Bhojraj crossing the finish line with his son, Nayan, in his arms (below) and the cold reality that police with machine guns were needed for security (right) in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15. Photos by Jeff Vorva

Ilyana Radeva of Palos Hills was among hundreds of area residents who ran the half marathon. Photo by Jason Maholy

Kira Vincent, of Carlsbad, N.M., gets some help from medics and fellow runner Phil Thiesen of Chicago as she struggles to stand after finishing the half marathon. Photo by Jason Maholy

Photo by Jason Maholy

Oak Lawn Community High School senior Olivia Fuarez holds the mirror ball trophy she won as the top dancer at the school’s “Dancing with the Spartans” competition. The event raised more than $16,000 for The Parent Project, an organization that helps children with muscular dystrophy.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Photo by Jason Maholy

Rold Talusan (left) of Tinley Park and Linus Pagusaro of Chicago clown around as they approach the finish line of the First Midwest Half Marathon, held Sunday beginning at Route 83 and 76th Avenue in Palos Heights.

Police News.....................2 Our Neighborhood..........4 Sudoku...........................4 School...........................5 Commentary...................6 Consumer.....................7 Crossword......................7 Death Notices.................8 Calendar........................11

75¢ $1.00

Running and Gunning at First Midwest Half Marathon

R EPORTER

By Laura Bollin

USPS 118-690


2

The Reporter Thursday, May 9, 2013

police news

Chicago Ridge     A 43-year-old man was charged with battery after he allegedly slapped and shoved a fellow employee at Flaming Grill, 101 Commons Drive.     Richard P. Magdaleno, of San Francisco, Calif. was arrested at 12:48 p.m. May 3. Magdaleno was reportedly seen on surveillance video getting into an argument and then slapping and shoving the other employee. ***     A 30-year-old man was reportedly charged with no valid commercial driver’s license and operation of a second division vehicle without a safety inspection after police stopped the vehicle he was driving at the intersection of 111th Street and Central Avenue.     Edgar Camacho, of Rosemont, was arrested on May 3. ***     A 34-year-old man was reportedly charged with no valid driver’s license after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 9900 block of Ridgeland Avenue.     Crecenzio V. Gonzalez, of Alsip, was arrested at 1:55 p.m. April 28.

Street and Western Avenue.     Carl Peterson, of Evergreen Park, was arrested at 7:29 a.m. April 29. He yelled at another driver, pounded on his vehicle and then punched him in the face when the man got out of his car, police said. ***     A 49-year-old man was reportedly charged with criminal trespass to vehicle and a 37-year-old woman was reportedly charged with operation of an uninsured motor vehicle, no driver’s license and failure to wear a seatbelt after police stopped the U-Haul truck they were driving at the intersection of 87th Street and Pulaski Road.     Robert Thomas, of Chicago; and Tenita Williams, of Phoenix, were arrested at 4:38 p.m. May 2. The truck they were driving was reportedly taken and never returned from a U-Haul facility in Oak Lawn. ***     A 46-year-old man was reportedly charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, expired driver’s license, operation of an uninsured motor vehicle, and obstructed windshield after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 2600 block of 87th Street.     Kenneth L. Crumb, of Evergreen Park, was arrested at 6:16 p.m. April 26. He possessed 0.3 grams of heroin and two cut straws, police said. ***     A 37-year-old man was charged with delivery of a controlled substance after he allegedly sold drugs to a police informant in the 3100 block of 87th Street.

California Avenue.     James Collier, of Chicago, was arrested at 11:12 a.m. April 30. ***     A 19-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took a backpack and a can of white Freon from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Jauquarin Satterwhite, of Chicago, was arrested at 8:21 p.m. May 1. ***     A 37-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took 16 packages of medicine with a retail value of $233 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Melvin Holloway, of Chicago, was arrested at 11:44 a.m. May 2. ***     Two people were charged with retail theft after they allegedly took sunglasses and other nine items with a retail value of $156 from a gas station in the 10200 block of Kedzie Avenue.     Ebony Richardson, 33; and Chiaka Davis, 40, both of Oak Lawn, were arrested at 5:31 p.m. April 28.

Hickory Hills

    A 26-year-old woman was charged with resisting a peace officer after police stopped her in the 8800 block of 87th Street.     Two Evergreen Park women     Sabrina L. Woods, of Justice, were reportedly charged with was arrested at 2:59 p.m. April battery after they got into an 30. She was reportedly involved in argument at an apartment builda retail theft from a dollar store, ing in the 9200 block of Kedzie and when detained by police, gave Avenue. them a false name and date of     Ebonnie Chapman, 19; and birth. Lakesha Nash, 21, were arrested *** at 4:54 p.m. April 28. Chapman reportedly struck Nash’s son in     Tony Banks, of Steger, was ar-     A 41-year-old man was reportthe hand with a belt, and Nash rested at 7:23 p.m. April 26. He edly charged with speeding and hit Chapman in the head with possessed 2.5 grams of heroin, driving with a suspended license after police stopped the vehicle he a hammer. police said. was driving in the 8700 block of *** ***     A 50-year-old man was charged     A 51-year-old man was charged Roberts Road. with battery after he allegedly got with retail theft after he alleg-     Ulis M. Booker, of Justice, was into an argument with another edly took a bottle of Jack Daniel’s arrested at 8:14 a.m. May 1. *** driver and punched him in the whiskey with a retail value of $27     A 30-year-old man was reportface at the intersection of 95th from a store in the 8800 block of edly charged with driving with a suspended license and failure to signal after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 8600 block of 84th Court.     Ray D. Hardwick, of Hickory Hills, was arrested at 9:15 p.m. Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills May 1. Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth ***     A 31-year-old man was reportPublisher Amy Richards edly charged with driving with an obstructed windshield, no valid Editor Jason Maholy driver’s license and no valid inSports Editor Ken Karrson surance after police stopped the Graphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora vehicle he was driving at the intersection of 89th Place and Advertising Sales Val Draus Roberts Road.

Evergreen Park

THE

REPORTER

To advertise call (708) 448-6161

To subscribe call (708) 448-6161 / Fax (708) 448-4012 Website: TheReporterOnline.net e-Mail: thereporter@comcast.net The Reporter is published weekly by the Regional Publishing Corp. 12247 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Worth, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Subscription rates: $37.00 per year by mail in Cook County. $47 per year by mail elsewhere. $1.00 per copy on newsstands and vending machines. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463.

— Founded in 1960 and Locally Owned — (© Entire contents copyright 2013 Regional Publishing Corp.)

Oak Lawn     Residential burglary was reported at 9:38 p.m. April 29 at a home in the 5200 block of 105th Street. More than $20,000 in jewelry, including several gold rings and bracelets and three gold watches; $800 in cash and $3,000 in Irish euros were taken from the home, police said. ***     Two men were reportedly charged with possession of a

Jack & Pat’s Old Fashioned Butcher Shop 10717 South Ridgeland Avenue Meat: 636-3437 Deli: 636-6203

SALE DATES: May 9th - May 15th

Boneless Butterfly Pork Chops

$

3

89 Lb.

Fully Cooked

BQ Back Ribs

$

6

29 Lb.

HAPPY AY MOTHER’S D s! to All Mother

Fancy Baby Back Ribs

$

349 Lb.

Extra Lean Have a Ground Round ! y a D t s e l B

$

Marinated

Pork Stix

$

4

59 Lb.

3

59 Lb.

Boneless Stuffed

Pork Chops

$

359 Lb.

controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia after police stopped the vehicle they were driving in the 5500 block of 99th Place.     Joseph D. Ofiara, 25, of Evergreen Park; and Robert William Jurgensen, 27, of Burbank, were arrested at 7:22 p.m. April 29. They possessed a plastic bag with cocaine, 11 ecstasy capsules, a glass pipe, several cut straws and a digital scale, police said. ***     A 40-year-old woman was reportedly charged with DUI and possession of a controlled substance after police stopped the vehicle she was driving in the 5000 block of 95th Street.     Rebecca Bennett, of Chicago, was arrested at 12:07 a.m. April 27. She possessed 0.6 grams of cocaine, police said. ***     A 30-year-old man was charged with retail theft, driving while license suspended operation of an uninsured motor vehicle and illegally tinted windows after he allegedly took two cell phones with a retail value of $1,450 from a store in the 4800 block of 95th Street and fled the scene.     Brian A. Jones, of Chicago, was arrested at 10:06 a.m. April 26. Police stopped the vehicle he was driving at the intersection of Central Avenue and State Road. ***     A 31-year-old man was reportedly charged with DUI, operation of an uninsured motor vehicle and speeding after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 5300 block of 95th Street.     Daniel C. Browne, of Orland Park, was arrested at 1:51 a.m. April 29. He was reportedly driving 52 mph in a 30 mph zone. ***     A 33-year-old woman was reportedly charged with DUI, illegal parking on the roadway and no insurance after she fell asleep behind the wheel in the 10100 block of Pulaski Road.     Sylvia Poncedeleon, of Burbank, was arrested at 2:15 a.m. April 27. ***     An 18-year-old man was reportedly charged with possession of a controlled substance, speeding, failure to wear a seatbelt and obstructed windshield after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 8700 block of 49th Court.     Justin J. Valecek, of Burbank, was arrested at 9:02 p.m. April 29.

Minced Ham or Old Fashion Loaf.............$5.29 lb. Scott Petersen Veal Bologna...................$3.29 lb. Jack & Pat’s (Sliced) Bacon...............................$3.29 lb. Kidney Bean or Combo Bean Salad.........$2.29 lb.

    Burglary to a motor vehicle was reported at 4:33 p.m. April 25 in the 4600 block of 100th Street. Sunglasses and $1 in change were reportedly taken. ***     Theft was reported at 11:01 p.m. April 29 in the 5500 block of 99th Street. A stroller worth $350 was reportedly taken.

Palos Hills     An 18-year-old man was charged with robbery and battery after he and a male youth allegedly threw a boy to the ground, hit him and took his cell phone when he got off of the school bus in the 10600 block of 81st Avenue.     Salvador Ayala, of Palos Hills, was arrested 3 p.m. April 30. The youth was also arrested, and charged with battery, robbery, and resisting arrest, police said. ***     A 22-year-old woman was reportedly charged with DUI, speeding, disobeying a no passing zone, no driver’s license on person and no insurance after police stopped the vehicle she was driving in the 8300 block of 103rd Street.     Brittany Sondelski, of Manteno, was arrested at 2 a.m. May 4. She was reportedly driving 53 mph in a 35 mph zone. ***     A 39-year-old man was reportedly charged with DUI, driving while license revoked, improper lane usage, and no rear plate after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 10300 block of Roberts Road.     Anthony Frederick, of Chicago, was arrested at 3 a.m. May 5. ***     An 18-year-old man was charged with disorderly conduct after he allegedly pulled down an 18-year-old man’s pants during gym class at Stagg High School, 8015 W. 111th St.     Tomasz Byrdak, of Hickory Hills, was arrested at 3 p.m. May 1. ***     Criminal damage to property was reported at 1:15 a.m. May 1 at a business in the 9900 block of Roberts Road. A glass door was reportedly broken. Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

Oak Lawn man charged with public indecency near school By Laura Bollin     An Oak Lawn man was charged with public indecency after he allegedly exposed and fondled himself while sitting in a car near a Mt. Greenwood Elementary School.     Daniel Vorberg, 30, was reportedly touching himself in his car at 4 p.m. April 30 in the 11200 block of Spaulding Avenue in Chicago. Cassell Elementary School is nearby, at 11314 S. Spaulding Ave. Two witnesses saw Vorberg, police said.     Vorberg was arrested at 3:45

p.m. May 1 in the 5000 block of Oakdale Avenue in Oak Lawn.     Chicago alderman Matt O’Shea (19th Ward) sent out an email blast to residents about the incident.     “In the coming months, I will work closely with the Chicago Police Department and the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office to ensure the aggressive prosecution of this matter,” O’Shea said.     O’Shea reminded residents to call 911 to report any suspicious behavior.

Daniel Vorberg

Dead infant found in cooler at recycling center in Chicago Ridge By Laura Bollin     A dead infant was found in a cooler on a conveyor belt at a recycling company May 1.     The baby boy was wrapped in a blue towel inside a small, soft red cooler and was found on the conveyor belt during routine refuse/recyclables separation at Resource Management Company, 10111 S. Anderson Ave. in Chicago Ridge. Employees said the load of refuse began to be loaded onto the conveyor belt at 2:15 a.m., and the cooler was found at 4 a.m. An employee noticed the cooler was heavier than it should have been, police said.

LEGAL NOTICE

Krakus Polish Ham......................$4.98 lb. Jack & Pat’s (Pork & Beef) Hot Dogs..........................$4.29 lb. Sara Lee Chicken Breast...............$6.09 lb. American or Mozzarella Cheese..........$4.39 lb.

***     A 30-year-old man was reportedly charged with DUI and speeding after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 7100 block of 95th Street.     Brendan Gerard Porter, of Burr Ridge, was arrested at 5:04 p.m. April 28. He was reportedly driving 55 mph in a 35 mph zone. ***     A 31-year-old man was reportedly charged with operation of an uninsured motor vehicle, no driver’s license and no rear plate after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 5500 block of 107th Street.     Laronnie C. Belk, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 3:45 a.m. April 27. ***     A 22-year-old man was reportedly charged with illegal transportation of alcohol, driving with a suspended license and operation of an uninsured motor vehicle after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 4200 block of 96th Street.     Remy Joseph Mutana, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 12:26 a.m. April 30. There was an open bottle of cognac in the car, police said. ***     A 19-year-old man was reportedly charged with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor, DUI and speeding after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 6000 block of 95th Street.     Edgar Ortega, of Burbank, was arrested at 12:22 a.m. April 27. ***     A 35-year-old man was reportedly charged with DUI, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident and texting while driving after he struck a pole in the 6300 block of 99th Street.     Ahmad A. Alshalabi, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 5:13 a.m. April 28. ***     A 37-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she allegedly took children’s and women’s shoes with a retail value of $141 from a store in the 4100 block of 95th Street.     Momina Sulehria, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 1:48 p.m. April 30. ***     A 33-year-old woman was cited with retail theft after she allegedly took a phone charger, clothing, tampons and diapers with a retail value of $47 from a store in the 4100 block of 95th Street.     Stephanie B. Hale, of Oak Lawn, was stopped at 7:28 p.m. April 30. ***

Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-9-13, a sale will be held at Pete’s Service Center, 6717 W. 79th Street, Burbank, IL. 60459, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Kimberly Mayfield & Ronald McCollum 1997 Chevrolet VIN# 3G1JF52TXVS849178 Lien Amount: $975.97

    The Cook County Medical Examiner’s Officer conducted an autopsy May 2, and determined the baby was born in the past seven days and would have survived if medical attention was provided. The baby was between eight and eight and a half months old. The cause of death has not been identified and is pending toxicology reports, police said. The cooler, towel, and DNA samples were taken and sent to the Illinois State Police laboratory for further analysis. If the medical examiner determines the infant was alive at birth, the case will be ruled as a homicide, police said.     The Advanced Disposal gar-

bage truck carrying the cooler made stops in Pleasant Prairie, Wisc., and North Chicago and Waukegan on April 29, police said. The loads were relocated to Kenosha, Wisc., and transferred to a truck which drove to the Chicago Ridge sorting facility on April 30.

    Police are working with police officers in those towns to see if they can determine who put the cooler in the trash.     Cmdr. Brian Galske said police are also contacting local hospitals.     “We are relying on the public,” Galske said. “We are looking to see if anyone knows a woman who was pregnant, and is now no longer pregnant and doesn’t have a child. We’re talkLEGAL NOTICE ing to medical centers to see if a female came in and looks like Notice is Hereby Given that she gave birth, but said she had on 6-23-13, a sale will be held at a miscarriage. It’s terrible.” Cool Flow Automotive, Inc., 1340 W. Ogden Avenue, Naperville, IL.     Cmdr. Galske said in Illinois, 60563, to sell the following articles the state has the Newborn to enforce a lien existing under Abandonment Protection Act, the laws of the State of Illinois to help abandoned babies. unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publica-     “Babies can be left as the tion of this notice. police station, a fire station or Raymone B. Kuykendall & Ray a hospital, and the baby will be Kuykendall cared for,” Galske said. “They 2006 Dodge can do that, and then we don’t VIN# 2B3KA53H96H174868 have to deal with something like Lien Amount: $4,225.00 this.”


Thursday, May 9, 2013 The Reporter

3

What do you say? “What is your favorite farmers market product?” (Asked at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market.) Photos by Laura Bolin

Lourdes Zavala, Chicago     “I just bought some items I’ve never tried, like a puttanesca pasta sauce and hormone-free skirt steak, so I’m hoping they are good finds.”

Esperanza Zavala, Noel Lopez, Chicago Chicago     “I like the desserts, like the “Fresh vegetables.” berry pies and apple strudel.”

Kristen Lopez, Chicago     “Cheese.”

John Askew, Chicago     “Flowers. I just bought some impatients.”

Oak Lawn has new top cop By Laura Bolin

Photos by Jeff Vorva Darryl Bingham, 43, of Oak Forest won the walk, run and Sandburg’s Eagle is pumped up after roll race. Running with him was his racing buddy, Anita winning the mascot race. Kunkes.

Half marathon ‘another fantastic race’ in Palos Day of triumphs and caution By Jeff Vorva

and FBI presence that included observers and marksmen on top of area buildings and cops with machine guns near the finish line. And a Chicago Police helicopter made a few rounds before the start of the 7:30 a.m. race for good measure.     “This is how we live now,” race co-director Mel Diab said moments after handing out the final awards. “It’s going to be like this for every major event — not only running. It could be a community festival. You will see more security. We had people inspecting bags and purses today. They do this at Disney. They do this at ballgames. It’s a part of life.”     Diab and more than 20 other area runners ran in the Boston

Marathon and the incident hit home for them, even though none of the area runners were injured. The Palos Heights resident was far away from the physical explosion but could feel the emotional impact.     “At mile 18, we saw all the volunteers hold hands, kneel down and start praying,” Diab said. “I knew there was something going on. I could see this was real.”     Meanwhile, back home the race’s other co-organizer, Jeff Prestinario was hopping mad about what happened in Boston and immediately started making calls and setting the wheels in motion to increase security and awareness for the Palos event. He declared “We need to make a statement here in Palos Heights…” by running a good and safe race. Area (Continued on page 11)

    There was plenty of joy when Nitin Bhojraj crossed the finish line of the sixth First Midwest Half Marathon Sunday with his 3year-old son Nayan in his arms.     The Palos Hills runner, who finished 435th, raised his right arm and made a fist while Nayan waved to the hundreds of fans who were cheering near the finish line. Oh, and Nitin wore a white T-shirt with a picture of him and his son crossing a finish line in a previous race. It was a moment to remember.     A few hundred yards north of that blissful moment, there were two people who weren’t cheering or waving. They had stern looks on their faces and carried machine guns. They were Cook County policemen performing security detail near the finish line.     The many heartwarming stories of the run in Palos Heights had a backdrop of cold reality. Less than a month after the bombing at the Boston Marathon killed three and injured hundreds on April 15, race officials were taking no chances on the remote chances of something similar happening on their watch.     So the 2013 version of the race featured beefed-up volunteer roster, bomb-sniffing German Race co-director Jeff Prestinario gives a prerace speech in front Shepherds roaming around and of a sign showing the sentiment of many of the racers at the a stronger police SWAT team First Midwest Half Marathon.

    Oak Lawn police chief Michael Murray is excited and apprehensive about his new job.     “It feels like my first day on the job again,” Murray said. It is a big responsibility. If you’d told me in August of 1987 that I was going to be sitting here, as chief, I wouldn’t have believed it. I felt it was the next step I needed to go.”     Murray’s most memorable case was in 1999, when he was the lead officer on a robbery and homicide case. Two clerks were shot and killed at a liquor store at 90th Street and Cicero Avenue, and two customers were shot and survived.     “The offender was found in North Carolina, and he’s serving the rest of his life in jail,” Murray said. “That was my most memorable case, and I hope it stays that way.”     Murray said he hopes to bring more technology to the department. Murray wants his officers to have easier access to information on suspects in their squad cars, and may also look into plate readers in the future, which let officers scan license plates and learn if a car is stolen or if a driver’s license is suspended.     “You can never have too much information,” Murray said.     The job is serious, but Murray also has a more humorous side. On a shelf behind his desk is a statute of a pig dressed up like a police officer. It was a Christmas gift and pays homage to his favorite movie, “The Blues Brothers.” In the movie, John Candy’s character pretends to

Oak Lawn Police Chief Michael Murray sits at his desk May 6. Murray has been with the department since 1987, and will be sworn in as police chief at the May 28 Village Board meeting. be a police officer, and the pig statue is on his desk. Another funny touch is the penholder on Murray’s desk: it’s made to look like a person being stabbed with a pen.     Murray said he was surprised when Village Manager Larry Deetjen told him he had gotten the job. Murray and four other Oak Lawn police officers had applied.     Murray attended Benedictine University, where he earned a degree in sociology with a criminology concentration. He has also attended the Northwestern University School of Police Staff and Command.     Murray will be officially

protect

sworn in at the May 28 Village Board meeting.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-9-13, a sale will be held at AVP Autobody, Inc., 2970 Wireton Road, Blue Island, IL. 60406, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Pro Trans Solutions, LLC. 2008 Volvo VIN# 4V4NC9GH08N481383 Lien Amount: $18,674.50

YOUR FUTURE

Estate Planning 101

Did you know that the majority of Americans don’t have a plan to direct the handling of their assets if they die or become incapacitated? Don’t let this happen to you. Take charge so that your wishes and goals are carried out to ensure your legacy. Observers and marksmen were atop buildings near the finish line during the sixth running of the First Midwest Half Marathon as extra security in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing.

Community Briefs Oak Lawn Congressman Lipinski to hold town hall

    U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski (IL3) will be holding a town hall meeting in Oak Lawn to let residents hear about his work in the village and in Washington. The meeting will be held from 9-10:15 a.m. Saturday at Village Hall, 9446 S. Raymond Ave.     Residents will be able to ask questions and give their thoughts on federal issues, and staff from the congressman’s office will be available 30 minutes before the start of the meeting to provide assistance with Medicare, Social Security and veterans’ benefits.     A second town hall meeting will be held from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. at European Cha-

let, 5445 S. Harlem Ave. in Chicago.

Worth Worth Farmers Market

“Colossal” vacation Bible school at Oak Lawn church

    The Worth Flea/Farmers Market is looking for vendors to fill some of its 48 seller spots. The full season rate is $85. For those that want to purchase a spot per week, the cost it $20 for the first time and $15 for the second, third and so on. Spots will be given on a first come basis. The market will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the third Sunday of every month from now until September at 110th and Depot streets. The market will open at 7 a.m. for vendors to set up. To purchase a spot, contact Joe Burke at 923-0140 or Rich Dziedzic at 508-4601 or rdziedzic@villageofworth.com.

    Oak Lawn Bible Church will be holding its annual free Vacation Bible School in July. The school will run from July 22-26, 2013 at the church, 9435 S. 54th Ave. This year’s theme is “Colossal Coaster World.” Classes will run from 9:30 a.m. to noon daily and are open to children in kindergarten through fifth grade. Children do not need to be members of the church to attend. For more information and to register, call 857.9800 or visit oaklawnbible.org. — Laura Bollin

Find out what you need to know about wills, trusts and gifts to family and favorite charities, plus learn how you can plan IRUDȴQDQFLDOO\VRXQGIXWXUH

Saturday, May 18, 2013 Seminar: 10 a.m. – Noon

Saint Xavier University Warde Academic Center, Butler Reception Room 3700 W. 103rd St., Chicago, IL 60655 Seating is limited. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. To register or for more information, go to www.sxu.edu, Keyword: Estate, or call (773) 298-3940. Presented by:


4

The Reporter Thursday, May 9, 2013

Our Neighborhood Fresh food for sale at EP farmers market     The first Evergreen Park farmers market of the season was held last Thursday, and area residents came out in search of fresh fruits, vegetables, flowers, herbs, sauces, breads, cleaning products, and more. This year, the market also features Smiling Clyde’s hot dog stand. The market will run from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Thursday from now through the end of October. The market is held at Yukich Field, at the intersection of 89th Street and Kedzie Avenue. Photos by Laura Bolin

Josh Dotson stands behind some of the dahlias and geraniums for sale at his farm stand at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market May 2. Dotson’s Farm, of Beecher, will be selling fruits and vegetable later this year, but is selling flowers and herbs at the first few weeks of the market.

Laura Fowlkes, of Chicago, shows off some of the Watkins extracts for sale at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market May 2. Watkins sells pure and imitation vanilla, lemon, almond and other extracts; Evergreen Park residents Evanne and James Kelly pay for falafel oils, spices and soup bases. at a stand at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market May 2.

Chicago resident Peggy Taylor tries some of the homemade pesto on fresh bread at the Parmesan’s Wood Fired Pizza stand at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market May 2. Parmesan’s offers cheesy bread, pesto, and pizza sandwiches at the market. The restaurant has locations in Tinley Park and Frankfort.

Mike Carrigan, of Merrionette Park, and Ginny Carrigan, of Chicago, look at some of the jams and jellies for display at the Martha’s Kitchen stand at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market May 2. Owner Katie Yoder, left, sells jam, jelly, cookies, fresh breads, pies, eggs, butter and cheese at the market, all of which were made on a farm in Shipshewana, Ind.

Norm DeYoung, seated, talks about beekeeping with Joe Hiemenz, of Monee at the Evergreen Park Farmers Market May 2. DeYoung runs Norm’s Apiaries in Beetown, WI, and sells clover and Windy Hill Farms owner Penny Lafin explains the benefits of hormone-free beef to a customer at dandelion honey at the market. DeYoung’s father was a beekeeper in Oak Lawn for more than 50 the Evergreen Park Farmers Market May 2. She and her family raise Black Angus steers on their years before DeYoung took over the business in 1994. farm in Grant Park, and sell their meat at farmers markets and to steakhouses in Chicago.

Oak Lawn hoping to get 100 years of life out of sewers By Laura Bollin     Oak Lawn’s Department of Public Works is working to renovate sewer lines this summer, and hopes to bring new life to the village’s sewer system.     The project will run from now until late June, and will include putting in and cleaning the sewers, conducting TV inspections of the sewer mains and putting new liners into the sewer

main pipes. Sewer main pipes will be lined on 109th Street on the north, 111th Street on the south, Kenneth Avenue on the west and Keeler Avenue on the east.     Sewer division crew chief Bill Meyer said the project was part of the village’s master plan, and would cost about $3.2 million.     “We will be able to turn a clay pipe or older main into a brand new plastic pipe with the

My mom is a good listener.

This week in

REPORTER history

News and events from our archives

50 years ago

parked at George and Marie’s Tavern, 8300 W. 111th St. liner,” Meyer said. “It saves a lot May 9, 1963 of money. With this project, we     A six-person citizen and trustee     The dog’s owner agreed to foldon’t have to dig up the sewer committee was created in Chicago low the boy’s mother to Christ main pipes and replace them with Ridge to research the possibility Hospital, but fled instead. If the brand new pipes. This will add of condemning 46 acres of land dog is not found, the boy, who is 100 years of life to the village at the northwest corner of 107th suffering from a broken arm, will infrastructure.” Street and Ridgeland Avenue for have to undergo a series of Pasteur inoculation treatments.     Meyer said the project will use as a park. be a great addition to the com*** munity.     Palos Hills police are hunting a 25 years ago     “It’s great to see the infrastruc- large German shepherd who bit May 12, 1963 ture getting some of its due,” a 10-year-old boy after the dog     Friends of the Oak Lawn Library Meyer said. jumped out of a car while it was celebrated its 10th anniversary. The organization started in 1978 with 10 members, and since then, has purchased large stuffed animals for the children’s department, a projector, and in 1962, funded an The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares entire year of children’s programwith the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include ming when the library could not all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must because of budget cuts. include all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of *** the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.     Third graders from St. Germaine School participated in a medical “play day” at Christ Hospital in Oak Lawn. The event was held to lessen children’s fears of hospitals. The students were able to put finger splints and bandages on doctors and nurses pretending to be patients, and learned about health.

SUDOKU

Our Children     Several area residents finished among the top three in their age groups at Worth Township Youth Commission’s 36th annual Lenon Wisdom Memorial Spelling Bee held April 12.     Participants were divided into two divisions, the Senior Division for seventh-and eighth-graders and the Junior Division for fifthand sixth-graders.     Area students who placed in the Junior Division were Abigail Svilar, 12, of Chicago Ridge, first place; and Adeline Larsen, 10, of Palos Heights.     Students who placed in the Senior Division were Richard Godsel, 12, of Oak Lawn, first place; Tom Micun, 14, of Oak Lawn, second place; and Eleanor Tiemens, 13, of Worth, third place.     Winners received trophies and certificates along with checks donated by attorney John Z. Toscas. First place winners received $200; second place received $100 and third place received $75 check.     For pictures of the Spelling Bee visit worthtownship.com.

Duty, Honor, Country

Experience the difference that amplified hearing can make in your life. And start listening again. To learn about our clinically-proven hearing solutions, visit www.sertomacenter.org or call 708-599-9500.

Good communication. It becomes you. THE SERTOMA SPEECH & HEARING CENTER

THE

(Solution on page 11)

    Army Pvt. Theeraphong Konkrasang has graduated from basic infantry training at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga.     During the nine weeks of training, Konkrasang received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tac-

tics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid, and Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experiencing use of (Continued on page 8)


Thursday, May 9, 2013 The Reporter

schools

5

CLampus eaders Richards holds student improvement assembly By Bob McParland, D218

Champions of Conrady receive recognition From Jim Hook     North Palos School District 117     The evening had all the glitz and glam of an actual Hollywood event — without the egos or the pretense.     This night belonged to the champions — the Champions of Conrady. They were teachers, staff and students, and they represented the arts, music, science, math and the world of sports.     Conrady’s award-winning jazz band played and a talented group of chefs from nearby Stagg High School’s culinary arts department prepared the evening’s dinner of lasagna, focaccia bread and Caesar salad. The Conrady band is directed by Sue Clemons.     North Palos District 117’s boardroom served as the venue for the night’s event, and the room was decorated with balloons and ribbons in the black and gold colors of Conrady.     This year’s “champions” included: teachers Peg Draguesku (science), Will Thompson (music), Terry Evans (math) and students Jessica Tatar (walk-a-thon and dance team), Colin Cherie (band/ jazz band), Gabe Sanchez (antibullying projects) and MacKenzie Kazin (band/choir/drama).     “Champions of Conrady” is an annual recognition dinner that highlights those who have impacted others in positive ways. Recipients are nominated by their peers and reviewed by a committee.     The event is publicized at school through posters, announcements and word-of-mouth.

    Success in education comes in many forms. Many students perform well in every class, some excel in specific areas of intelligence, and others excel musically or in a different art form. Some students gather themselves after an initial stumble. They improve their grades, attendance record, and behavior to re-boot their academic lives.     In each case, students chose consciously and realized they must do better. Each deserves recognition.     Richards High School recently celebrated those success stories in the gymnasium with an assembly of the freshman and sophomore classes. Students appreciated that someone noticed.     “It’s an honor,” student Eyad Barakat said. “I feel really happy and, with all honesty, I do feel like I improved. I plan on improving throughout my life.”     The words of support and public staging of the recognition mat-

tered to students. Each student received a “Bulldog Pride” t-shirt as recognition of their improvements.     Student Shavona Fryer said her hard work paid off.     “I feel like a winner knowing I put my all into it,” Fryer said.     Student Omar Aladwan said making improvements was not as hard as it seemed.     “I’m proud of myself, but I knew I could do it,” Aladwan said. “All you need to do is stay off your phone, go to class, and just pay attention.”     Aladwan touched upon a key idea: change arrived for most of the honored students at the same time as focus and determination.     Student Maurice Coleman said making improvements now would help him in the future.     “I realized that in order for me to get into a good college my grades needed to improve,” Coleman said. “Also, I wanted to start taking my studies more seriously.”     In varied ways, students said they learned that shortcuts

    Central Junior High in Evergreen Park a school resource officer this fall to help with security issues.     Village officials approved a resolution Monday to provide a police officer at the school. The officer’s salary and benefits package will be between $42,000 and $45,000, based on experience, and will be split between the village and Evergreen Park School District 124, Superintendent Robert Machak said.     “It’s something we need to bridge the gap between the current layout of the building and the renovations that we

Richards High School Principal John Hallberg congratulated freshmen and sophomores who improved their grade point average at least a half point since spring of 2012. Some students also received recognition for noteworthy improvement in grades, attendance, and discipline.

D117 prioritizing roof, lighting upgrades at Conrady Jr. High By Laura Bollin     North Palos School District 117 officials hope to have a list of prioritized projects for a Conrady Junior High renovation project by their May meeting.     The renovation plans are necessary because a referendum to build a new junior high failed on the April ballot.The Submitted Photo referendum was a proposal to issue $30 million in building bonds for the construction of a new junior high school in the     Moraine Valley Community College Trustee Sandra Wagner swears district. The referendum would in Moraine student Trustee Noor Salah on April 17. Noor, a Chicago have covered three-fourths of Ridge resident and graduate of Stagg High School in Palos Hills, the cost of building a new school was elected by her fellow students in last month and will serve as to replace Conrady Junior High student trustee for the next year.     Noor, who plans to study medicine and eventually be a gynecologist, graduated high school in three years and was accepted into Loyola University’s honors program; however, learned what it would cost and looked at other options. She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa, the national honor organization for two-year colleges, as well as the Muslim Student Association, the Arab Student Union, Relay for Life Club, and Conversation Partners.     More than 30 students from Shepard High School met the rigorous qualifications for induction the national honor society for French language studies. Evergreen Park Dist. 124 Mother McAuley Criteria for admission to the     School District 124 provides free     Mother McAuley High School French honor society include vision, hearing, speech, language, will hold summer camps for completing three semesters of basic concepts knowledge, and fine grammar school and McAuley French language study, a grade and gross motor skills screenings students. Camps include includ- point average of 3.6 in French for children 3 to 5 years old who ing 13 for sports, two for music, classes, and an overall GPA of are not yet in kindergarten. Chil- one art camp and the Theatre 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. dren eligible can qualify for special “Kids Kamp.” programs. For more information     Athletic camps are taught by     Advanced Placement French call Jean Hector at 423-0951, McAuley coaches. Sports include students qualifying included basketball, bowling, dance, diving, Ext. 2140. golf, lacrosse, running, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball Moraine Valley     Business and community lead- and water polo. ers are invited to a free After     Music camps for guitar and Hours Open House from 4 to 7 fiddle are taught by McAuley p.m. Tuesday, May 21 in Building orchestra director Hannah LawM, on campus at 9000 W. College son. Kathy Gordon Davis, fine arts department chairperson will Pkwy. in Palos Hills.     Guests can sample food and head the two-week Art Camp. beverage options the center Kids Kamp, a three-week camp offers and tour the facility, with more than a 25-year history, which boasts 12,000 square will be run by McAuley auditofeet of meeting space, an execu- rium manager Patricia Haynes. A tive board room and breakout staff of theatre, dance and music rooms, on-site catering, Wi-Fi, professionals will work with the computer labs and a business students throughout the weeks. support center, and ample park-     For detailed camp descriptions, ing. Sign up at mbc copenhouse. dates, times and appropriate age eventbrite.com. For more infor- groups visit mothermcauley.org mation call 974-5690 or email and look for the Summer Camp ccce@morainevalley.edu. (Continued on page 8)

Put her on the board

in Hickory Hills.     School board member and buildings and grounds committee liasion Ronald Moran told the board that the committee and Conrady officials were working on creating a list of projects. Replacing the leaking roof, creating science labs and improving lighting were important projects, Moran said. The current lighting at Conrady, 7950 W. 97th St. in Hickory Hills, is so old that replacement parts are no longer made. Some of the other issues include hanging electrical wires, cracked floor tiles and overcrowded classrooms and faculty spaces.

    Conrady principal Andy Anderson told the board that the officials were trying to decide between “need” projects — what has to be done, and “want” projects for the school.     “We have to prioritize the needs of the structure against the curriculum needs of the students,” Anderson said. “When you walk through Conrady now, you see a band aid fix here and a band aid fix there. We want to take the time to think about this long term.”     Board member Chris Slowik commended those working on the Conrady project.

Shepard students qualify for National Honor Society for French studies

Bulletin Board

Dania Ballout, Matthew Cabel, Caroline Dunn, Rylea Fanning, Scout Garbaczewski, and Amanda Potenberg.     French IV students qualifying included Sabina Choragwicki, Bridget Curry, Jacqueline Evans, Jenifer Fitzgerald, Brendan Hermann, Kaley Lorch, Christian Wallace, and Natasha Wierzal.     French III students qualifying include Eva Adomaityte, Kourtney Bledsoe, Jilianna Bliss, Patricia Clohessy, Calie

Edwards, Jamie Frederick, Caleb Goggins, Natalia Goryl, Rhonda Habbal, Nicholas Heidinger, Cesar Jimenez, Rachel Libera, Nora McMahon, Brian Piszczek, Scarlett Quiroz, Lizette Rodriguez, Dulce Santoyo, and Stephanie Washington.     French II students who qualified include Dana Dooley, Elizabeth Gallegos, Briana Haugh, Sydney Horton, Terence Jones, Jonathan Kalabich, and Brianna Padecky.

Class Reunions     The Kelly High School Class of 1963 is planning a 50th reunion for this fall. The planning committee is seeking classmates. For more information or to have

your name placed on the distribution list for the formal invitation contact Bernadette (Bernie) Petrauskas at (630) 469-9418 or Teacher Kelly Karstrand appears with Shepard High School students who qualified for induction bernptrsks@yahoo.com. into the French national honor society.

Central Junior High hiring school resource officer By Laura Bollin

don’t exist.     “Doing my homework and paying attention in class helped my grades improve,” Fryer said. “Also, getting help and asking questions more often helped me understand.”     Getting rid of distractions was also an important step for students.     “I focused on my goals and realized what I’m here to do. I blocked out all the distractions and worked hard,” Hana Tulemat said.     When asked what advice they would give to peers who needed to make a change, students answered with candor.     “If you talk a lot in class, ask your teacher to move your seat to get rid of distractions,” Naturally, you’ll pay closer attention,” Donovan Davis said.     No one, however, expressed their thoughts more clearly than Steven Grant.     “If you want to have a good adult life, get yourself together and don’t be lazy,” Grant said. “Hard work always pays off.”

need,” Machak said. “Until we can change the physical layout of Central, we feel an on-duty police officer will be a presence to keep everybody in the building safer.”     Machak said the officer will help with traffic flow in the building and be in the hallways to monitor who is coming into and leaving the school.     “In some schools, people get buzzed into the building and enter into an office, where their ID is swiped through and measured against state and federal databases, like those for sex offenders,” Machak said. “We don’t have that ability at Central. A person could come in and say they were going

to meet with the principal, but if they are not going to be honest, they could be mad at a teacher or have a custodial parent situation. Then they’d have access to a hallway and a stairwell; and theoretically, staff and children, and we can’t have that. Until we have a more secure entrance, this is or next best step.”     Mayor James Sexton said Evergreen Park High School has had a community resource officer on staff for 10 years.     “The officer is with the kids every day,” Sexton said. “Kids get to know him at a younger age and become more comfortable with police officers. It is a (Continued on page 11)

Let us get rid of your carpet’s Dirty Little Secret! Household dust contains toxins and allergens harmful to your family that embeds in your carpets, upholstery and lives in your ventilation system. Majestic Steam’s deep extraction cleaning is one of your best safeguards when it comes to the quality of your home environment.

Whole House House Whole

79 65 $14 15

$$

Carpet Carpet Cleaning Cleaning or

Any Any Size SizeRoom Room

$

Any66Rooms Rooms Any

95

“L”Rooms&&Great GreatRooms Rooms “L”Shaped Shaped Rooms Considered Rooms Considered Two Two Rooms

Air Air Duct Duct Cleaning Cleaning

Upholstery Cleaning Upholstery

3 pieces Cleaning$ Sofa, Loveseat & Chair

Sofa Only Sofa only (3 Cushions)

(3 Cushions)

Cushions) Loveseat Loveseat (2(2 Cushions)

Chair (each) Chair (each)

59

Our Our Rotobrush Rotobrush “spins as as it cleans” “spins cleans”

$35 30 $ $30 25 $ 10 $20 $

79 80

$$

Single Furnace Home Includes up to 15 registers Additional registers $7.00 ea

For more offers visit: majesticsteam.com

Make Your Home Majestic Clean!

708-429-6200

J45163

    Kathleen Eck of Oak Lawn made the dean’s list for the fall 2012 semester at Dominican University in Lisle. ***     Oak Lawn residents Robert Dee, David Janet, Jessica Pacetti, Madalyn Phillips, Catherine Smith and Patrick Weisgerber made the dean’s list for the 2013 winter term at North Central College in Naperville. ***     The South Suburban Conference has included several Oak Lawn High School studentathletes among its Academic Achievement Award winners for seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher, and the IHSA has announced Scholastic Achievement Award winners for juniors and seniors meeting the same criteria.     Spartan honorees are boys’ basketball players Nick Contino, Lorenzo Gudino, Robert Kametas, Vincenzo Gudino, Ibrahim Samra, Mitchell Swatek and Justin Schutt; bowlers Katherine Kooyman, Brittani LaRusso, Kaitlyn Murbach, Nicolette Vanderwarren and Daniel McGrath; cheerleaders Madison Geraghty, Colleen Fahy, Bailey Kean and Lauren Misner; dancers Amanda Leone, Rebecca Mackowiak, Andrea Pacetti and Hannah Papaleo; girls’ basketball players Jessica Cosenza, Eliana LaSpina, Brooke Annerino and Kelsey Luckett; boys’ swimmers John Morgan, Steven Boetscher and David Le; and wrestlers Omar Jaber, Connor Niemiec, Musaab Bashir, Jeffrey Burzinski and Kyle M. Hayes.


6

The Reporter

Thursday, May 9, 2013

commentary The

Reporter

An Independent Newspaper Amy Richards Publisher

Jason Maholy Editor

Published Weekly Founded March, 16, 1960

Inside the First Amendment

When students protest abortion, can schools draw line? By Charles C. Haynes     Students with deep religious convictions are fast turning public schools into the newest battleground over abortion – much to the dismay of beleaguered school officials.     The most recent controversy involves Annie Zinos, a sixth grade student in Minnesota, who was prohibited by her school from sharing pro-life literature with her classmates. Last week, Annie and her family filed suit against school officials for violating her First Amendment rights.     Meanwhile in New Mexico, a group of evangelical high school students lost a round last month in their fight to give classmates “fetus dolls” with a pro-life message attached. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the school district’s authority to stop the doll distribution.     Pro-life protesters in schools are a recent development, but students protesting for what they believe during the school day are a familiar part of our history.     From Billy Gobitis refusing to salute the flag in the 1930s, to Barbara Johns organizing against miserable conditions in black schools in the 1950s, to Mary Beth Tinker wearing an armband to protest the Vietnam War in the 1960s, students of conviction have not been shy about exercising their First Amendment rights in public schools.     In every generation, school officials react (and often overreact) by attempting to keep the lid on student protests. And in every generation, the courts are faced with determining when and where schools may draw the line on student religious and political speech.     Now pro-life kids are taking their turn defining student rights by challenging school officials in court.     In the New Mexico appeals court decision, students have already bumped up against the limits of freedom allowed under the First Amendment — not because of the point of view they espouse, but because of the disruption they stirred by espousing it.     When the pro-life students first distributed the fetus dolls, chaos ensued. According to Education Week, teachers complained that students were throwing the dolls, using them to plug toilets, and in

other ways causing serious trouble.     Not surprisingly, the court sided with the school district by ruling that further distribution of the fetus dolls would likely cause major disruption.     Even the strongest U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding free speech rights of students, Tinker vs. Des Moines Independent School District, makes clear that school officials may draw the line of student expression when they can reasonably forecast that it would cause substantial disruption.     The censorship of Annie in Minnesota, however, is a very different case. The pro-life fliers she distributed — “Save the baby humans. Stop abortion.” — caused some students to complain that they were offended. But the school failed to show that the fliers caused any significant disruption.     Under the First Amendment, students are free to share their religious or political views, even if those views offend others. But they are not free to create mayhem in the school.     School officials at Annie’s school appear to have misread Supreme Court precedents to mean that schools may censor any distribution of literature by students they deem contrary to the school’s mission or not age appropriate for middle school.     It’s true that the Supreme Court has upheld the authority of schools to censor vulgar or obscene student speech and to censor student speech that occurs in a school-sponsored context such as the school newspaper.     But otherwise, Tinker still rules: School officials may not censor student religious or political speech unless they can show that such speech will substantially disrupt the school or interfere with the rights of others.     Chances are very good that Annie Zinos will prevail in her fight to distribute her pro-life fliers. And if she does, she’ll have Billy, Barbara, and especially Mary Beth to thank. Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Education Project at the Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C., 20001. (firstamendmentcenter.org)

Another Perspective

A broken bailout in Cyprus By Yuri Vanetik     The Cyprus bailout deal is now official.     Together with the International Monetary Fund, representatives from the European Central Bank and the European Commission just ratified a final rescue package totaling about $13 billion. In return, Cyprian officials are now obligated to install a broad variety of austerity measures, including financial industry reforms and restrictions on private banking transactions.     This deal is a capricious, economically illiterate mess certain to prolong the island’s suffering. It empowers parasitic public officials to pay off sovereign debts by raiding the savings accounts of private citizens. And it also hobbles local industry with intrusive new taxes and fees.     Eurozone officials should have aimed to ensure that any new rules would, over the long term, make the Cyprian economy an attractive place for international investment. The bailout package does little to accomplish such a goal.     For starters, it includes a $9.8 billion “bail in,” largely financed by simply siphoning savings away from affluent private citizens. Depositors with more than $130,000 in Cyprian bank accounts will immediately see 40 percent of their money spirited away, with any additional 20 percent set aside as “buffer” in case public bureau-

crats decide they need more.     Meanwhile, cash withdrawals are now indefinitely capped at $390. Daily business transactions are limited to $6,500. Moreover, there’s a $32,500 ceiling for commercial deals approved by the country’s central bank.     This brazen spread-the-pain strategy might satisfy the neosocialist sensibilities of euro zone officials. It might even achieve its ostensible purpose of preventing bank runs and keeping capital on the island.     But it’s a perfectly toxic cocktail from the vantage point of an international investor.     Of course, it would have taken several years of sustained fiscal discipline and regulatory reform before anyone would seriously consider injecting financing back into Cyprus. But these new capital controls will snuff out whatever sliver of confidence may have still been left in the Cyprian banking system.     Banks are essential intermediaries of commerce. If they break down — that is, if they can no longer be trusted to honor and protect deposits — so does the market. Ergo, the incentives for international investment collapse.     What’s more, these capital controls are actually outlawed by the EU’s own founding charter. It explicitly states that “all restrictions on the movement of capital between member states and between member states and third countries shall be prohib-

ited,” except in rare instances of “public security.”     This bailout sends the message that EU officials can’t be trusted to follow their own rules. They’ve injected even more uncertainty into the continental economy.     The aid package also ratchets up the Cyprian corporate tax rate from 10 percent to 12.5 percent and raises levies on alcohol, tobacco and some other consumer goods.     Pre-bailout, Cyprus’ chief selling point on the international market was its advantageous tax treatment of bank deposits. Savers from all over the world socked their money on the island.     Those savings drove a sprawling, vibrant domestic banking industry, supporting tens of thousands of jobs, including lawyers, tax accountants, bankers, notaries, trustees, IT personnel, and hospitality and administrative staff. The bailout deal is guaranteed to permanently contract the island’s core industry and put these positions in jeopardy.     So, now that EU officials have smothered the Cyprian economy with capital controls and new taxes, how exactly do they expect Cyprus will ever grow out of this mess?     Surely, the island nation can’t rely on perpetual handouts from Germany. International investors will have little interest in Cyprus. And the Cyprian government surely won’t jumpstart economic growth — it has

already proven itself galactically wasteful and corrupt.     It’s high time for a head check in the European Union. Officials need to radically reformulate their conception of the proper role of government.     Banks need to be seen for what they actually are — private companies. They should not be treated as pseudo utilities. They enter into voluntary exchanges with investors, creditors, depositors, and vendors. They deserve neither special treatment nor bailouts.     Meanwhile, public officials driving up sovereign debt should be held to account when that load breeds economic chaos. Public debts should be recouped with cuts in government expenditures. Meddling bureaucrats certainly shouldn’t be empowered to cover the tab they’ve racked up by stealing money from private citizens.     The essential elements for recovery are simple — a farsighted national regulatory framework conducive to private entrepreneurship and investment. Unless European Union officials recognize this reality, their partnership is destined to fail. Yuri Vanetik is a principal at Dominion Partners, a private equity real estate firm, and a Lincoln Fellow at the Claremont Institute. He also serves on the national boards of Gen Next and the Gen Next Foundation.

In Other Words

Sequester won’t work for elderly, children By Donald Kaul     I knew that Congress would come to its senses eventually, that it would realize that the ham-handed budget cuts ordered by the so-called “sequester” weren’t going to work, that some government functions were too important to be cut.     And I was right, kind of.     Last week it restored funds to the Federal Aviation Administration. There had been big lines and flight delays at airports around the country, you see, and we can’t have that.     Congress persons have to get back to their districts every Friday so they can beg for money and corporate executives have to get to their appointments on time so they’ll have the money to pay off the beggars. It’s called politics.     The way things were going at airports, however, was beyond inconvenient; it was a national crisis. Why, it was probably harming the war effort. I don’t know which war — terror, drugs, Afghanistan — pick one.     So, in a heart-warming example of bipartisanship, Republicans and Democrats joined hands to get the FAA back up

to strength and the Republic was saved.     Republicans, of course, could not resist using the occasion to take a whack at President Barack Obama.     “Why is President Obama unnecessarily delaying your flight?” tweeted House majority leader Eric Cantor. (Republicans are shameless in blaming Obama for things that are their fault.)     In truth, the Republicans foisted the farce of this sequester on the nation in 2011. That was when they demanded it in return for agreeing to raise the debt ceiling, which is nothing more than agreeing to pay the bills they’d already run up. The law further requires that agencies, the FAA included, cut all their programs equally on a percentage basis, making it impossible to move funds from nonessential functions to essential. That would be too sensible.     The idea was that this arrangement was such a monumentally stupid idea and would be so harmful to the economy that the parties would be forced to compromise on a real budget, which badly underestimated the monumental stupidity of the conservatives in Congress. They decided that we didn’t

need a real budget since we don’t need government anyway, so the sequester was just fine as it was. And they allowed the cuts to go forward.     Until they caved on air traffic. That’s undoubtedly a precursor to further cherry-picking among government programs. You can count on the well-lobbied programs getting exceptions. (The Agriculture Department has already gotten money to stay the furloughs of meat inspectors.)     It stinks.     The great victims of this sequester will be our children, the unemployed, the poor and the elderly — all groups with feeble lobbies or no lobbies at all.     The government had to cut housing vouchers to 140,000 low-income families, people already on the cusp of homelessness. Seventy thousand preschoolers are going to be turned away from Head Start programs. Unemployment benefits, the only thing standing between the families of millions of jobless workers and hunger, are being cut 11 percent. A program that provides free school breakfasts, sometimes the only decent meal poor kids get on a given day, is being cut by $25 million.     My city of Ann Arbor is a

high-tax Granola liberal place that’s proud of its superb schools. And our local officials considered doing away with 10 or more of the reading specialists in the lower grades before working cuts that would drop 80 other staff members into the latest budget proposal.     All in the name of deficit reduction.     The sequester is the economic equivalent of the Iraq War: a self-mutilating blunder undertaken for ideological reasons, rather than any that make sense.     The idea of improving the economy during a recession by cutting the budget harkens back to the days of Calvin Coolidge and Herbert Hoover. It didn’t work then; it doesn’t work now.     If you don’t believe me, ask the European nations that have been trying to deal with their punk economies by enforcing austerity measures on its Euro zone members with dismal results.     Did I mention that this stinks? It really does. OtherWords columnist Donald Kaul lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan. OtherWords.org


Thursday, May 9, 2013 The Reporter

consumer

7

Serendipity helps open children’s clothing store in Worth By Laura Bollin     A logo of two children smiling in the shape of the letter “I” is on the outside of Dippity Kids, a children’s clothing store in Worth.     Owner Susan Stazak, of Bridgeview, decided to open her own store after 30 years in the children’s retail business. The store, at 11425 S. Harlem, opened May 1, and plans to have a grand opening celebration in July.     “I felt it was time,” Stazak said. “The name comes from my 10year-old niece, Paige. My father, her grandfather, would always tell her that her life was serendipity. He was killed by a drunk driver, and Paige still said her life was serendipity. She said she wanted to have “dippity” as part of the name, because that was the fun part of the word serendipity.”     Stazak’s shop is decorated with brightly colored accents, and has

photos of her niece, Paige, and nephew, Nate, on the walls. A blank wall at the back of the store will feature photos of local children wearing Dippity Kids clothing, and a community bulletin board will have information on community events and contact information for babysitters and nannies. A neon green child-size table sits near the cash register, where Stazak will let kids color and create artwork.     “My nephew helped me create the display for the front window,” Stazak said. “He was climbing on the ladder and putting the clothes on mannequins. He was having a great time, but he said, “Auntie, I never knew you could put clothes on a pole! It’s not alive!” It was so funny.”     The store sells children’s clothing in sizes from newborn to 16, and has playwear, shorts and skirt sets, pajamas, hair accessories, sunglasses,

booties, and gift sets for baby showers, like a basket with a baby bathtub and other bath items.     “Merchandise for kids is a lot of fun,” Stazak said. “Kids, especially babies, are usually really happy. This is the most fun time of their lives. The brighter and more fun a piece of clothing is, the more fun I have with it.”     Stazak said the visitors to her shop have been climbing since the day she opened, and that everyone in Worth is friendly, living up to the village’s nickname as “the friendly village.”     “People walk by every morning and wave, or stop in and tell me that they’ve been waiting for a store just like this to open,” Stazak said.     The store will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Owner Susan Stazak shows off some of the children’s clothing for sale at Dippity Kids, her clothing on Saturdays, and from 10 a.m. store in Worth. The store, at 11425 S. Harlem Ave., offers children’s clothing in sizes newborn to to 5 p.m. on Sundays. 16, and accessories like sunglasses, booties, and hair bows.

Investors can learn from swimmers’ diets     Summer isn’t here yet, but it’s getting close. And for many people, the arrival of summer means it’s time for swimming at the local pool or lake. If you’re just a casual swimmer, you probably don’t have to adjust your diet before jumping in. But that’s not the case with competitive swimmers, who must constantly watch what they eat and drink, particularly in the days and hours preceding their races. While you may not ever have to concern yourself with your 400-meter individual medley “splits,” you can learn a lot from swimmers’ consumption patterns — particularly if you’re an investor.     For starters, to sustain energy and stamina for a relatively long period of time, competitive swimmers need to eat easy-to-digest carbohydrates such as whole wheat, whole grains, apples and bananas. When you invest, you want to build a portfolio that is capable of “going the distance.” Consequently, you need investments that provide carbohydrate-type benefits — in other words, investments with the potential to fuel a long-

term investment strategy. Such a strategy usually involves owning a mix of high-quality stocks, bonds, government securities and certificates of deposit (CDs). By owning these vehicles, in proportions appropriate for your risk tolerance and time horizon, you can help yourself make progress toward your financial goals — and lessen the risk of running out of energy “mid-stream.”     Of course, competitive swimmers have to be diligent not just in what they do eat but also in what they don’t. That’s why they avoid sweets, such as sodas and desserts, when it’s close to race time. These items do not provide

lasting energy — in fact, they actually sap energy once the sugar wears off. As an investor, you, too, need to avoid the temptation of “sweets” in the form of high-yield or “hot” investment vehicles. You may find some of these investments to be alluring, but you will need to carefully weigh the extra risks involved. For many people, these types of investments may not provide the long-term stability needed to help maintain a healthy, productive investment portfolio.     While what swimmers eat, or don’t eat, is important to them, their drinking habits are also crucial. The competitive environment — warm pool water, warm air temperatures and high humidity — can quickly lead to dehydration, so swimmers need to drink sizable amounts of water and sports drinks before and during practice. And you, as an investor, need your own type of liquidity, for at least two reasons. First, you need enough cash or cash equivalents to take advantage of new investment opportunities as they arise; without the ability to

add new investments, your portfolio could start to “dehydrate.” Second, you need enough liquid investments — specifically, lowrisk vehicles that offer preservation of principal — to create an emergency fund, ideally containing six to 12 months’ worth of living expenses. Without such a fund, you may be forced to dip into long-term investments to pay for unexpected costs, such as a major car repair, a new furnace or a large bill from the dentist.     So the next time you see competitive swimmers churning through their lanes, give a thought as to the type of diet that is helping propel them along — and think of the similarities to the type of “fueling” you’ll need to keep your investment strategy moving forward.

Mortgage Rates Around the Area United Trust Bank (as of May 7) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES 3.500 2.625 2.625

30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES 3.500 3.250 2.875

Flaming Grill opens in Chicago Ridge

    Edward Jones provides financial services for individual investors in the United States and Canada. The firm’s 12,000-plus financial advisors work with nearly 7 million clients to understand their personal goals and create long-term investment solutions that emphasize a well-balanced portfolio and a buy-and-hold strategy. The firm in January, for the 14th year, was named one of the best companies to work for by Fortune magazine in its annual listing. The firm ranked No. 8 overall. The 14 Fortune rankings include 10 top-10 finishes, consecutive No. 1 rankings in 2002 and 2003, and consecutive No. 2 rankings in 2009 and 2010.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-23-13, a sale will be held at Economy Transmission & Auto Repair, 3400 W. 159th Street, Markham, IL. 60428, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Yousef Ghusein & Mervat Ghusein 2008 Infiniti VIN# 5N3AA08CX8N906190 Lien Amount: $10,863.00

D IDSI SCCOOUUNN TT RRAT ATEESS withoutdiscount discount service. without service.

By Scott Fischman guy saying, “I would have won that pot with my J-6 offsuit.” This site details the steps that need to be taken to do the math yourself. It’s imperative that you understand the process and not just the answer.     Take note of how unlikely it is to actually hit the flop. When I started to play cash games, I found myself playing many, many hands. I soon came to the realization that while the average strength of a winning hand seemed to be one pair, I was only comfortable risking a lot of money with two pair or better. When I learned that the chances of flopping two pair are a measly 2 percent, I knew it was time to tighten up my game and make some changes.     My first order of business was to find a way to win pots without actually hitting my hand (i.e., bluffing). That’s one way to turn the odds in your favor. The best way to do that is by taking advantage of late position. “Position, position, position!” is another commonly heard poker cliché, but this one holds water. Begin to curb the

POINTS 0 0 .25

Edward Jones ranked for fifth straight year

    Marquette Bank will host a business networking after-hours event from 5 to 8 p.m. WednesPhoto by Laura Bollin day, May 15 at its branch at 8855 Ridgeland Ave. in Oak Lawn. There will be refreshments, a prize drawing and networking     Flaming Grill and Supreme Buffet co-owner, Qin Guo (left) mayor-elect Chuck Tokar, Mayor Gene Siegel and co-owner Matthew Chung opportunities. Businesses are cut the ribbon in front of the restaurant, 101 Commons Drive in Chicago Ridge. The Chinese, Japanese and American buffet features welcome to attend. To register sushi, pasta, rice, pizza, desserts and a hibachi grill. call 599-5431.

players to “learn how to learn.”     I want to teach novice players in a way that allows them to learn the advanced “thinking” concepts of poker on their own. There is an element of the game that is unteachable. However, once the fundamental building blocks are in place, a new player can begin to grasp more advanced poker strategy.     When I first started playing poker, the main game was limit hold ‘em. If you stand around a limit hold ‘em game long enough, you’ll hear somebody say, “Any two can win,” or, “You can flop the nuts with any two cards.” A player might hold 8c 3h and flop comes out 8s 8h 8d. There is a 1 in 9,800 chance of that occurring, or about 0.01 percent.     You want to be the guy saying, “You gotta be in to win,” not the guy actually believing it.     Every beginner should study the analysis of poker odds on the Web page www. homepokergames.com/odds. php, especially if you’re the

APR 3.537 3.301 2.939

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

Profits & Sense

Don’t make the mistake of playing too many hands Scott:     I enjoy reading your weekly poker column in the Sun Sentinel down here in South Florida. I am fairly new to poker, having been playing for about three months.     I feel as if most hands shouldn’t be folded until I see the flop. You never know how potentially good the two cards in your pocket are until at least seeing the first three pool cards. But I can’t stand having to spend a lot of money in order to see the flop, especially if I’m holding something like 9-10 suited or a pair of 5s.     What are your thoughts on seeing the flop before folding most hands - even if that means betting before the flop? — Russ Dear Russ:     One of the most troubling things for me when I’m teaching new players the game is that there are infinite ways to approach the strategy and theories of poker. My method of coaching encourages new

POINTS 0 0 0

Prospect Federal (as of May 6)

Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones     The J.D. Power and Associates financial advisor. 2013 Financial Advisor Satisfaction Study has ranked Edward Jones highest in employee advisor satisfaction among financial investment Firms.     Edward Jones financial advisors gave the highest satisfaction ratings in eight of the nine study factors, which placed the firm 212 points ahead of the industry average. Financial advisors also scored high the support they receive from their branch office administrators and the firm’s home office associates.     Edward Jones ranked highest in the 2007, 2010 and 2012 studies and tied for the highest ranking in 2008. The study was not conducted in 2009 or 2011.

Talkin Poker

APR 3.507 2.687 2.641

It’s accident no accidentmore morepeople people trust It’s no trustState StateFarm. Farm. desire to see a lot of flops in hopes of making a big hand. Instead, use your late position to make an aggressive move at the pot when your opponents check to you. This type of adjustment will turn the odds of winning a hand in your favor.     When you don’t have the luxury of late position, take time to evaluate the chances of improving your hand, and make sure you’ll have the opportunity to win additional money later in the hand if one of your cards (outs) comes up. In other words, the reward of drawing has to meet the risk of your investment.    (Scott Fischman is a professional poker in both the live and online poker worlds. He has won two World Series of Poker bracelets and has accumulated nearly $3 million in career earnings. He is also the author of the poker book “Online Ace.” Send your poker questions to him at pokerquestions@ gmail.com or on Twitter: @ scottfischman88.)

ErikR RNelson, Nelson, Agent Agent Erik 10200S SRoberts Roberts Road Road 10200 Palos PalosHills, Hills,ILIL60465-1539 60465-1539 Bus: Bus:708-430-7575 708-430-7575 erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com

P040036 P040036 02/04 02/04

StateFarm FarmMutual Mutual Automobile Insurance Company in NJ), Bloomington, IL State Automobile Insurance Company (Not in (Not NJ), Bloomington, IL

We Print Newspapers — 15% Discount to New Customers — • 67 years of experience • 149 satisfied publishers • One-day service • Quality Goss presswork • We can print from your Mac or other disks

• Typesetting & layout • 500 to 250,000 copies • We have newsprint & 50 lb. white paper • Pickup & delivery service available

REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. • Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

Hours: Monday thru Friday 9 am - 5 pm • Sat. 9 am - Noon

Call (708) 448-4000

Visit us online: www.regionalprinting.com


8

The Reporter

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Conrady students walk for a cure From Jim Hook North Palos School District 117     Gabe Sanchez isn’t alone when he walks around the track outside Conrady Junior High School. He carries with him the memory of a grandmother who died of cancer before Gabe was even born.     “All my family members have said what a wonderful woman she was,” said Gabe, an eighth grader at Conrady. “She died of cancer before I had a chance to ever meet her. I wish I could have had that chance.     “I’m doing the next best thing,” he said. “I’m helping raise money to find a cure for the disease. Hopefully, we can find a cure and help others with cancer.”     Gabe was among hundreds of students who took part in Conrady’s annual “For the Cause” Walk-a-thon to raise money for cancer research.     The brainchild of teacher Samantha Liddell, the Conrady event has raised more than $75,000 in the last four years,

Church Corner Church Rummage Sale

    Trinity Evangelical Covenant Church, 9230 S. Pulaski Road in Oak Lawn will hold a rummage sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, May 17 and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, May 18.     The sale will feature clothing for all, infant items, shoes, toys, books, linens, kitchenware, jewelry, small appliances, electronics, furniture, tools, sports equipment and more.     Proceeds from the sale will go towards camp scholarships for youth.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-23-13, a sale will be held at Ray’s Towing & Auto Repair, 17356 Burnham Avenue, Lansing, IL. 60438, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Lucy Dillard 2005 Buick VIN# 2G4WC532451214024 Lien Amount: $7,239.73

including some $18,000 this year. Liddell said she was moved by the outpouring of support she has received over the years from teachers, staff, students and parents.     Joining Liddell the last two years has been teacher Jackie Hausman, whose aunt donated dozens of carnations that were being sold for $1 each. Hausman’s aunt owns “Flowers by Steen” in Lockport. The Conrady Parent-TeacherStudent Association was doing its share by selling cups of lemonade for 25 cents. Liddell received a canister with donations from the district’s bus drivers.     “We’re so fortunate to have such a great group of people in this district,” Liddell said. “People are so supportive. It’s awesome.”     She said that probably 75 percent of the Conrady student body participated in the walk-a-thon. Students needed to raise a minimum of $5 to walk. Students walked outside on the track during their regu-

(Continued from page 5) Information link. ***     Mother McAuley Liberal Arts High School offers summer camps.     Grammar school and current McAuley students have a wide range of camps to choose from, including 13 sport camps, two music camps, an art camp, and the Theatre Kids Kamp.     McAuley summer camps offer athletes, artists, actresses and musicians from kindergarten through high school age the opportunity to develop skills by learning from and interacting with staff.     Athletics camps are taught by McAuley coaches,     The music camps, Guitar and Fiddle, are taught by Orchestra Director Hannah Lawson.     Kathy Gordon Davis will head the two-week Art Camp, while Kids Kamp, a three-week camp with over a 25 year history, will be run by 99th Street Theatre Company Director Patricia Haynes. A staff of theatre, dance and music professionals will work with the students throughout the weeks.     Sports camps reflect the interscholastic sports that McAuley offers its students during the year: basketball, bowling, dance, diving,

Palos-Gaidas

sons, David, Daniel, Dennis and Duane; her daughters, Deborah Liebendorfer, Denise Neubauer and Darlene Londo, 22 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.     Mrs. DiPietro was born in Dixmoor. She worked as a homemaker.

Christ Cancer Institute earns ‘outstanding’ tag     The Cancer Institute at Advocate Christ Medical Center is outstanding.     At least, that’s the word from the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons, which has named Advocate Christ Teachers Jackie Hausman, left and Samantha Liddell inspired one of 84 recipients of its national students to “walk for a cure” at the Conrady Junior High “For Outstanding Achievement Award. a Cause” walk-a-thon that helped raise money for cancer The award “recognizes cancer programs that strive for excellence in research. providing quality care to cancer lar gym classes. raising money is nothing com- patients.”     Liddell said incentives — like pared to what people dealing     To be eligible for the award, a a free breakfast — were offered with cancer go through every facility had to demonstrate a “comto get students to participate. day,” said Megan, an eighth mendation-level of compliance” with     Students like Megan Val- grader. “They got such a tough seven key standards encompassing lance didn’t need an incentive road ahead of them. If we can cancer programs including cancer to walk. do anything to help them out, leadership, data management, clinical services, research, community     “I just feel that walking and we need to do it.”

outreach and quality improvement. The hospital or medical center must have received a compliance rating for 29 other standards.     The commission awarded a threeyear re-accreditation with commendation to the Christ Medical Center Cancer Institute following surveyors’ on-site review of the campus’ cancer programs last year. During the past several years, the Institute has successfully recruited worldclass cancer specialists; expanded its gynecologic oncology program, including growth in the use of minimally invasive technology; launched development of a major melanoma treatment program; and acquired advanced technology, like intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

golf, lacrosse, running, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball, and water polo.     All fine arts camps, which consist of guitar, fiddle, art, and the theatre Kids Kamp, are open to both girls and boys.     For detailed camp descriptions, dates, times and appropriate age groups, visit mothermcauley.org and look for the Summer Camp Information link.

No. Palos Dist. 117

    North Palos School District 117 is offering online programs to parents for registering students for the 2013-14 school year. The district will move to an online registration process and fee payment system that will replace the mail-in registration option that was used in the past. Mail-in registration will no longer be accepted. For more information call Dianne Hasler at 233-5758. ***     District 117 is holding registration for the 2013-14 pre-kindergarten and kindergarten programs continuing through August. Parents of pre-kindergarten students can pick up information packets at Sorrick School, 7825 W. 103rd St. in Palos Hills, and Dorn School, 7840 W. 92nd St. in Hickory Hills. Parents of kindergarten students are asked to pick up information packets at the Dr. Ken Geraghty Administrative Center adjacent to Sorrick School. Identification is required.

Submitted Photo

Books help build House     Three-year-old preschoolers at St. Louis de Montfort School, 8840 Ridgeland Ave. in Oak Lawn, have established a service project through which they donated used books to The Ronald McDonald House in Oak Lawn. Eleven students donated more than 120 books. Seen here are Sophia Perez (clockwise, from bottom left), Cameron Burnette, Aidan Lee, Caelyn McDonough, Oliver Slodyczka, Nathan Cantrall, Reese Cano, Fatima Juarez and Suzana Pojasek.

Crossword Puzzle

    For more information on prekindergarten registration call Sorrick School at 233-8200 or Dorn at 233-5600. For more information on kindergarten registration call Diane Hasler at 233-5758. Visit npd117.net for registration forms and other information.

LEGAL NOTICE

FUNERAL HOME

708-974-4410 David Gaidas, Jr. Director

11028 Southwest Highway Palos Hills, IL 60465

HILLS FUNERAL HOME, LTD.

“Family Owned & Operated” 10201 S. Roberts Rd. Palos Hills, Illinois 60465

(708) 598-5880

Personalized Funeral Choices

9236 ROBERTS ROAD HICKORY HILLS, IL

708-430-5700

Call About Our ‘VALUE PLAN’

For Information About an Affordable Full Funeral Service with Burial or Cremation Since 1916

Frances DiPietro     Frances DiPietro, née Zurek, of Worth died April 30 at home. Visitation was held May 3 at Schmaedeke Funeral Home in Worth. A funeral Mass was held May 3 at Our Lady of the Ridge Church in Chicago Ridge.     Mrs. DiPietro is survived by her

Bulletin Board

Funeral Directory

Serving All Faiths

Death Notices

www.lackfuneralhome.com

“Your Neighborhood Funeral Home”

Cremation Service

Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-16-13, a sale will be held at Belair Auto Collision & Restoration, 11320 S. Pulaski Road, Chicago, IL. 60655, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Toure/Torey Thompson 2005 Ford VIN# 1FTPW145X5FA27364 Lien Amount: $14,236.82

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-9-13, a sale will be held at AVP Autobody, Inc., 2970 Wireton Road, Blue Island, IL. 60406, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Pavlin D. Dimitron & Lovlin Trucking 2006 Volvo VIN# 4V4NC9GH26N415284 Lien Amount: $8,144.68

LEGAL NOTICE     Notice is hereby given, pursuant to “An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,” as amended, that a certification was filed by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. File No. D13134288 on the April 29, 2013.     Under the Assumed Name of PAS Enterprises with the business located at 11164 Southwest Hwy., Suite ‘D’, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The true name(s) and residence address of the owner(s) is: Philip A. Schaafsma, 8797 Flint Ln., Orland Park, IL 60462.

Across

1 Party leader 5 ___ Sea, off Siberia 9 Short-necked European fruit 14 Neutralizer of a sort 16 Theater name 17 Ben Franklin, e.g. 18 City on the Aar 19 Solutions for unfair situations? 20 Not so tough 21 Modern address 22 “1-2-3” singer Barry 23 Tracker or Canyon 24 Fifth-century date 25 Haberdashery item 27 Brand for which Garfield         was once spokescat 28 Patricia Neal’s Oscar film 29 Fountain output 30 They fall in war films 33 One may go over your head 35 Space-saving display 38 Brothers 42 Lucy of “Kill Bill” 43 Body protector 44 Worn out

46 Gives a thumbs-up 47 Antiquity, quaintly 48 Old televangelism letters 49 Burden 50 Adjust at the garage, perhaps 52 Composer for whom an annual         violin competition is named 54 Nonreactive 55 Deadpan features 56 Suit material 57 Woman in a tree? 58 Suit material 59 Give away 60 Tablets from docs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Down

Shows nerve London’s setting Conked out One of the Jacksons Carnegie Deli offering Dismissive sorts? Narrow inlets “Barbara __”: Beach Boys hit White meat source Rejections

(Answers on page 11)

11 Bible’s City of Palm Trees 12 Confessed 13 They get you in 15 Magnetic induction unit 20 Hockey game clincher 23 Driving problem 26 Currency with King Mongkut         on the fifty 27 “As You Like It” forest 31 Secret rival 32 “O Fortuna” composer 34 Agreed 35 Wedding arranger? 36 Perfectly restored 37 Stark 39 Attendants 40 Done 41 Many Suffragette opponents 45 Half a legendary bluegrass duo 48 Advisory group 51 Press 52 Minute opening 53 First name in linguistics 55 Co. heads


Thursday, May 9, 2013 The Reporter

Features

9

Travel Troubleshooter By Christopher Elliott

Dinged for invisible damage on my rental car     Q: My husband and I rented a car from Hertz in Munich last summer. The rental process was incredibly time-consuming and after 45 minutes at the rental desk, a five-minute walk to the garage and then another 30minute wait in the garage, we finally received our vehicle.     It was parked in the travel lane, so we hurried to load our luggage and ourselves into it and get out of the way. We were not offered the opportunity to examine the car. It was also dark in the garage and the car was black.

Mayo Clinic

Social anxiety disorder goes beyond occasional nervousness     DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’m often nervous around people and sometimes avoid social situations. How can I tell if I’m just shy or if what I’m experiencing is actually social anxiety disorder?     ANSWER: It’s natural to feel some nervousness in certain social situations, such as talking in front of others, confronting a problem with someone or being among strangers. But social anxiety disorder goes beyond this, causing an excessive anxiety or fear of activities and situations in which you believe that others are watching you or judging you. In addition, you may fear that you’ll embarrass or humiliate yourself. This may lead to:     1. Intense fears of being in situations in which you don’t know people. This can make it hard to interact with strangers or initiate a conversation.     2. Anxiety to the level that it interferes with day-to-day living. This can make it difficult to use a public restroom, return an item to a store or order food in a restaurant.     3. Avoiding speaking to people out of fear of embarrassment.     4. Avoiding situations where you might be the center of attention.     5. Worry about reacting in ways that you know are out of proportion to the situation, or being afraid that others will notice that you look anxious.     The anxiety you feel may cause physical signs and symptoms of nervousness and fear. These may include blushing, sweating, trembling, nausea, stomach upset, confusion, heart palpitations, diarrhea and cold, clammy hands.     When interacting with other people affects you in this way, over time it may hurt your social skills,

or lead to extreme sensitivity to criticism and low self-esteem.     Symptoms of social anxiety disorder tend to persist over time, but they can change. Symptoms may flare up if you’re facing a lot of stress or demands. You may have fewer problems if you can avoid situations that would make you anxious.     Talk to your doctor if your symptoms disrupt your life, such as by making you feel distressed, affecting your daily functioning or causing you to avoid activities.     Diagnosis of social anxiety disorder typically involves having a detailed discussion with your doctor or mental health care provider and often filling out psychological questionnaires or self-assessments. If a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder is reached, initial therapies — which are often used in combination - include cognitive behavioral therapy and certain anti-depressant medications.     Cognitive behavioral therapy improves symptoms in up to 75 percent of people with social anxiety disorder. It’s based on the idea that social situations generally won’t change or go away. However, you can decrease your anxiety by changing your patterns of thinking and acting.     In therapy, you may learn to recognize and change negative thoughts about yourself. You may also practice exposure therapy, which involves gradually working up to facing situations that you fear. Social skills training, role-playing, relaxation training and stress management techniques may be part of your treatment plan.     First line choices of anti-depressant medications include citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluvoxamine (Luvox CR), fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft),

and venlafaxine (Effexor). Be patient with these medications. It may take some trial and error to find the best medication for you, and it may take up to three months of therapy for symptoms to noticeably improve.     Additional short-term medications that may be recommended include anti-anxiety drugs and a class of drugs called beta blockers that can help calm your cardiovascular system.     Living with social anxiety disorder can be challenging. In addition to appropriate treatment, consider coping methods, such as:     1. Reaching out to people with whom you feel comfortable.     2. Working to maintain connections and build relationships.     3. Joining a support group.     4. Engaging in healthy, pleasurable activities when you feel anxious.     5. Getting adequate sleep, including physical activity in your daily routine and eating a healthy diet.     6. Avoiding excessive alcohol or other substances that may be used to counteract intense anxiety.     Although social anxiety disorder tends to persist over a lifetime, expert medical or psychological help can make it easier for you to learn to manage your anxiety and become more comfortable and relaxed in social settings. — Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.    (Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic is an educational resource and doesn’t replace regular medical care. E-mail a question to medicaledge@mayo.edu, or write: Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic, c/o TMS, 2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 75038. For more information, visit www.mayoclinic.org.)

The Kid’s Doctor By Sue Hubbard, M.D.

Norovirus is still going around     Another on call weekend just completed, it seems that gastroenteritis, also known as the “tummy bug” or “stomach flu,” is still hanging around.     I walked into a lot of exam rooms with tired parents and kids, all of whom had been vomiting and having diarrhea, not elements of a fun family weekend. The most likely culprit is norovirus.     Norovirus causes about 21 million cases of “gastro” per year and leads to about 70,000 hospitalizations. While you can get norovirus at any time of the year, it’s most common during the winter — and it seems to be lingering into spring this year. This has been a particularly bad year for norovirus, as there was a new “strain,” so even more people seemed to get sick. That includes my own husband!     Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis in pre-school children. In a recent study, about 21 percent of cases of acute gastroenteritis in children

younger than age 5 were due to norovirus. That compares to 12 percent due to rotavirus, which used to be the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccine over 5 years ago, the rates of rotavirus disease have steadily been dropping, and now norovirus has taken its place. You know those viruses; they’re smart!     Norovirus causes inflammation of the lining of the stomach and intestines, resulting in severe nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. These symptoms begin soon after exposure and typically last 1-3 days. Many children also run a low grade fever (around 101) and complain of tummy cramps.     The only treatment is symp­ tomatic: Begin frequent sips of clear liquids after vomiting and no solid foods while vomiting (not even a cracker or the pretzels I saw one mother give her child soon after the child had vomited; and guess what, we saw them again.).     Once vomiting has stopped, you can start some bland solid foods like crackers, soup, or noodles,

and then advance to other foods. I recommend staying away from dairy for a day or two, as I think this may lead to more cramping. Since kids do love dairy products, think macaroni, no cheese; or Gatorade or Pedialyte rather than milk with meals.     The problem with norovirus is that it’s easily spread via hands, surfaces and maybe even the air. Studies have shown that even after using hand sanitizer, norovirus may still be present. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends using bleach or hydrogen peroxide to wipe off surfaces. (I took bleach to our bathroom after my husband was so sick; TMI, perhaps?).     The good news is, researchers are now working on a vaccine for norovirus. In the meantime, we need to pray for warmer weather so we can all get outside and stop spreading these viruses around!    (Dr. Sue Hubbard is a nationally known pediatrician and co-host of “The Kid’s Doctor” radio show. Submit questions at www.kidsdr. com.)

    When we returned the car an attendant took a flashlight and examined the underside of the car, bending down so her eyes were about six inches off the ground. She stated that there were “scratches.” She also pointed out a depression near the right side of the back window.     It looked like a design feature to us, not a dent since no paint was scratched or cracked. To see that it didn’t belong there, you had to walk back and forth to the other side of the car to see that the two sides were slightly different.     We were asked if we had been in an accident or any incident. We said no and wrote that on the sheet they presented us. We asked what the next step was and were told that we “may hear” from Hertz.     Months went by and we heard nothing, so we assumed there was no problem. Almost three months after we returned the car, we received an email from

Hertz in Ireland stating that we owe nearly 1,200 euros for the damage. Photos and an itemized bill in German were attached. They suggested we contact them with any questions.     I replied stating that we had not caused the damage, and asking for an English translation of the bill and an explanation as to why the company waited more than 80 days to contact us. I received no response. Since then, we’ve heard from a collection agency.     We didn’t damage the car. Can you help us? — Diane Mikulis, Ellicott City, Md.     A: Well, you had me with the employee and the flashlight. That’s too much. Unless part of the undercarriage somehow came loose and was dragging on the floor — and after reading the bill, I can tell you it wasn’t — then this would have made my scam alert go off. Big time.     But let’s pan back a little from this damage claim. You picked up a black car in a dark garage without inspecting it or taking photographs. Come on. When you’re renting a car, you have to take “before” and “after” photos because if they find damage, you’re guilty until proven innocent.     So much about the Hertz side of this case was wrong that it made you look almost blameless. The confusion when you picked up the car, the dark garage, the employee examining the underside of your rental, the long wait and then, instead of answering your questions about

Retire Smart By Jill Schlesinger

What do proposed Social Security changes mean to me?     There’s nothing like proposed changes to Social Security limits to get readers of this column going. After President Obama released his fiscal 2014 budget, a number of you wrote in asking, “What will this mean to me?”     Well, let’s start with a quick refresher on the current system. To qualify for Social Security retirement benefits, you need to have worked and paid payroll taxes for at least 10 years. You can check your online benefits statement at www.socialsecurity. gov/mystatement/ to determine where you currently stand.     Full retirement age varies from 65 to 67 depending on the year of your birth. The general rule is that if you can afford to do so and are in good health, it pays to wait to retire until your full retirement age (FRA) before you claim benefits (and it’s even better if you can delay until age 70). While you can choose to tap into the system as early as age 62, your benefit will be permanently lower — for some as much as 25 percent less, which also could affect a non-working spouse, who also will claim based on your work history. Unfortunately, many Americans can’t afford to delay — they need the income as soon as possible.     There is one more part of the equation. The government adjusts the amount of your retirement benefit annually to account for rising prices. In 2013, the cost of living adjustment, or “COLA,” was an increase of 1.7 percent.     But let’s hit the pause button here. Social Security is not going broke any time soon. Yes, there are fewer workers paying into the system today than in the past, and indeed, more and more baby boomers retire every day. The Social Security 2012 trustee report projected that in 20 years (after 2033), payroll tax income would pay only about three-quarters of scheduled benefits through 2086.     But the trustees’ report also offered a different way to think about Social Security - as a share of Gross Domestic Product, or the economy as a whole. Social Security costs equaled 4.2 percent of GDP in 2007, and the trustees project that these costs will increase gradually to 6.4 percent of GDP in 2035 before declining and remaining at about 6.1 percent of GDP from 2055 through 2086.     Many argue that 6 to 6.5 percent of GDP is a small price to pay to fund a program that provides about 37 percent of all income for Americans 65 and older, and a whopping 85 percent for those in the bottom 20 percent of incomes.

That’s why legislators and pundits have been floating so many ideas for enhancing the current system, which include increasing full retirement age, raising the Social Security wage base from the current level of $113,700 of earned income, increasing the Social Security payroll tax for high earners, means-testing Social Security benefits for retirees who have incomes above a certain threshold and/or changing the cost-of-living adjustment.     The president’s budget focuses on that last option by tinkering with the COLA calculation as a means to slow down the cost of the Social Security over the next decade. The proposal would replace the current measure of inflation (a consumer price index for wage earners, or CPI-W) with one called “chained CPI,” which the government has only been calculating since 2002. Advocates claim that chained CPI is a more accurate measure because it takes into account the fact that consumers respond to the rise in the price of one good by shifting to cheaper alternatives.     Chained CPI has shown an average rate of inflation that’s 0.3 percent lower than the government’s current measure, according to the AARP Public Policy Institute. The Obama administration says that this change in calculation would shave $110 billion from the budget over 10 years.     However, what would be the net effect of this change on retirees? According to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, the switch to chained CPI could reduce benefits for the average worker who retires at age 65 by about $650 per year by age 75, and by over $1,100 per year by age 85.     So, while some combination of these proposed changes could be made to bolster Social Security over the long term, many of them will shrink the already meager benefits of most retirees. Like it or not, this appears to be the new reality of retirement. We should all pay attention and plan accordingly.    (Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Emmy-nominated, Senior Business Analyst for CBS News. A former options trader and CIO of an investment advisory firm, Jill covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated radio show), the web and her blog, “Jill on Money.” She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney.com.)

the bill, sending the matter to a collection agency. It just didn’t look right to me.     I contacted Hertz on your behalf. A representative responded to you, insisting that the bill was correct, but offering to reduce the bill by 25 percent. The company continued to refuse to provide you with a translation of the bill, so it’s unclear to me how someone at Hertz in the United States could be so sure the bill was right.     That didn’t seem right to me. Either you damaged the car or you didn’t. I asked if Hertz was absolutely certain that the charge was correct. A representative contacted you and said it would drop its claim.    (Christopher Elliott is the author of “Scammed: How to Save Your Money and Find Better Service in a World of Schemes, Swindles, and Shady Deals” (Wiley). He’s also the ombudsman for National Geographic Traveler magazine and the co-founder of the Consumer Travel Alliance, a nonprofit organization that advocates for travelers. Read more tips on his blog, elliott. org or e-mail him at chris@ elliott.org. Christopher Elliott receives a great deal of reader mail, and though he answers them as quickly as possible, your story may not be published for several months because of a backlog of cases.)

History of the World By Mark Andrews     May 9: ON THIS DATE in 1896, the first horseless carriage show in London featured 10 models. In 1980, 35 motorists plunged to their deaths off Florida’s Sunshine Skyway when a freighter rammed a support structure for the tall bridge over Tampa Bay.     May 10: ON THIS DATE in 1869, a golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, marking completion of the first U.S. transcontinental railroad. In 1963, Decca Records signed the Rolling Stones to a recording contract on the advice of Beatle George Harrison.     May 11: ON THIS DATE in 1946, the first packages from the relief agency CARE arrived in postwar France. In 1949, Israel was admitted to the United Nations as the world body’s 59th member.     May 12: ON THIS DATE in 1908, Nathan B. Stubblefield patented “wireless radio broadcasting”. In 1932, the body of the kidnapped son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh was found in a wooded area of Hopewell, N.J.     May 13: ON THIS DATE in 1110, Crusaders marched into Beirut, causing a bloodbath. In 1959, the Diners Club issued its first credit cards.     May 14: ON THIS DATE in 1948, the independent nation of Israel was proclaimed in Tel Aviv as British rule in Palestine came to an end. In 1998, the last episode of “Seinfeld” aired on NBC.     May 15: ON THIS DATE in 1602, English navigator Bartholomew Gosnold discovered Cape Cod. In 1911, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the dissolution of Standard Oil Co., ruling it was in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act.    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarq mail.com.)


10

The Reporter

Thursday, May 9, 2013

WORLD’S GREATEST BARGAIN!

for $25

Sell A Car for $25, Sell A House for $25, Sell Anything for $25,

Find A Job for $25, Hire Someone for $25, And A Lot More for $25

When You Place $25 Ad in the Classified Section THE

REGIONAL NEWS 12243 South Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Phone: (708) 448-4000

THE

&

REPORTER

12247 South Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Phone: (708) 448-6161 YOUR AD WILL APPEAR IN BOTH PAPERS FOR ONE LOW PRICE!

Email: debrap@regionalpublishing.com


Thursday, May 9, 2013 The Reporter

community calendar Focus on Seniors

Library Notes Chicago Ridge

    The Chicago Ridge Library is at 10400 Oxford Ave. The phone Double Nickel number is 423-7753.     The Double Nickel Plus Chorus *** meets at the Community Center,     The library, in partnership with 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen the Southside Garden Novices, Park, every Wednesday at 9:30 will kick off a series of gardening a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers programs at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May are always welcome. For more 14. Learn about upcoming events information call 422-8776. and hands-on workshops. Bring Rules of the Road gardening tools. Dark Star Sharp    The Worth Township Seniors ening will be sharpening shovels will hold a free Rules of the Road and hand clippers for a fee. class from 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Evergreen Park June 5, Aug. 7 and Oct. 2. Ap    The Evergreen Park Public Lipointment must be made to atbrary is at 9400 S. Troy Ave. The tend; call the Worth Township phone number is 422-8522. Senior Room at 371-2900, Ext. 28. Worth Township Center is at Green Hills     The Green Hills Public Library is 11601 Pulaski Road in Alsip. at 8611 W. 103rd St. in Palos Hills. Meals on Wheels The phone number is 598-8446.     The Evergreen Park Office of *** Citizens’ Services offers a Meals     A Flamencotrio will perform on Wheels program for village at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 14. Visit residents 60 years and older spanishguitar.org to sample some who are unable to prepare their of the music before attending. Regown meals. Meals are delivered istration required. Monday through Friday. For more *** information call 422-8776.     Persons 5 years and older can 55 and Up make designs for the back of the     Palos Hills residents 55 years fish tank in the youth services and older meet from noon to 2 p.m. area at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 16. the second and fourth Wednesdays Registration required. of each month at the Palos Hills *** Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd     Family Movie Time featuring St. Tickets for events must be “Madagascar 3,” popcorn and purchased one week in advance. lemonade for all ages will be at 4 Entertainment includes musi- p.m. Friday, May 24. Registration cians, singers, luncheons, movies, required. plays and bingo. ***     The library will be closed MonPinochle     The Worth Senior Pinochle club day, May 27th. *** is seeking new members. Membership is free. Visit the group at     Tasty Tapas with chef Kate Bradthe Worth Park District Terrace ley will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., every 28. Bradley will introduce spicy Monday and Wednesday from almonds, vegetable paella, pata11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games be- tasbravas, Spanish meatballs and gin at noon. Call 448-1181 for lemon bar dessert. Samples will be provided. Registration required. information. ***     Tie Dye for Teens will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29. A white t-shirt will be provided; participants may (Continued from page 3) bring their own clothing. Event police consulted with the FBI on may be held outdoors, weather pera gameplan and the result was mitting. Registration required. *** a security presence that wasn’t overbearing, but wasn’t invisible     The library is collecting Legos to be used in a Lego club that will either.     With cool weather and no rain begin this summer. Bring donations during the three-hour run, the to the library. *** race went well from a runners standpoint. Best of all, for Pres-     The library offers the eBook tinario, there were no safety is- platform 3M Cloud Library, and has a touch-screen Discovery Stasues.     “We had about 2,000 runners tion where patrons can browse and and maybe another 2,000 specta- checkout eBooks. Cloud eBooks can tors,” he said. “We’re thrilled to be read on most eReaders, comdeath to put on another fantastic puters, tablets and smart phones. race. There were no incidents. It Check out a 3M eReader at the was a beautiful day. We did it. It circulation desk. Visit greenhillsliwas a great show today. Everyone brary.org to get started. *** should be very proud.”     Woodstock’s Dan Kremske won     The library has an eBook service, the 13.1-mile event with a time of Axis 360, through which users can 1 hour, 6 minutes and 16 seconds, download bestselling eBooks for as beating out Kenya’s Elly Sang by many as 21 days directly onto a 17 seconds. Jacqui Giuliano, of device using the Blio software appliOakwood Hills, was the top female cation. Titles automatically expire finisher with a 1:20.49. Darryl Bing- at the end of the lending period ham, 43, of Oak Forest, won the and there are no late fees. Place walk, run and roll race sponsored holds on items that are checked by the South West Recreation As- out. Service is only available to sociation. Sandburg High School’s Green Hills cardholders. To start browsing visit http://ghpl.axis360. Eagle won the mascot race.     U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski finished baker-taylor.com. For more infor107th with a 1:37.28, ABC-7 TV mation call 598-8446. *** reporter John Garcia claimed 147th with a 1:40.32 and state     The library is collecting firstSen. Bill Cunningham was 457th person accounts of stories of with a 1:56.51. There were 1,465 military service to be donated to runners who finished the race in the Veteran History Project of the at least 3:32 and a few hundred Library of Congress. The library who were taken back in vans be- is seeking photos, memoirs, and wartime diaries from World War II, cause of time limits.     Lipinski said he wasn’t bothered Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, and the conflicts in Afghanistan by the heavy security.     “I only really thought about and Iraq. Call 598-8446 for more it when he had the moment of information. *** silence for the people in Boston,” said Lipinski, who said he ran in     The library offers TumbleBooks!, all six half-marathons in Palos a collection of animated talking picHeights. “A Part of the reason is ture books with fiction, non-fiction that I’m used to being in Wash- and foreign language titles, and read-alongs (chapter books with ington and I’m used to it.” sentence highlighting and narration but no animation). Visit greenhills.lib.il.us or call 598-8446, Ext. 117, for more information. (Continued from page 5)

Race

Central

wonderful resource, and we have had real good luck with it at the high school. It is a good investment.”     Machak said the officer will not be a permanent position at the school, but a short-term measure until a renovation plan is created. A referendum to build a new junior high failed on the April ballot, and the district’s board of education has been working with architects to come up with a renovation plan, which could cost between $5 and $10 million.

Duty, Honor, Country (Continued on page 9) various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman.     Konkrasang is the son of Terayut and Srisuda Konkrasang of Chicago. He is a 2006 graduate of Richard High School in Oak Lawn.

11

Oak Lawn

    The Oak Lawn Library is located at 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The phone number is 422-4990. ***     High school students can prepare for final exams with friends at the Oak Lawn Public Library from 2 to 9 p.m. May 20 to 23. Snacks will be provided in the lower level meeting rooms, but extra study supplies will be available throughout the library at the reference, youth services and Help Desk. A schedule of tutor times and a list of available textbooks will be available shortly.     All high school students are welcome to study throughout the entire library. Staff will assist with wireless access and tracking down project sources. ***     The library will be closed May 26 and 27 for the observance of Memorial Day. The Library’s regular hours are: Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. ***     Donate your “gently used” books, magazines, CDs and videos

to the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library ongoing book sale. The Friends will not accept Readers Digest Condensed Books, encyclopedias and older text books. The donation drop-off area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the Reception Booth to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their donation.     The Friends Ongoing Book Sale provides an ever-changing variety of books, magazines and other forms of media at bargain prices. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents and magazines cost five cents each. Audio visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programming and purchases that are beyond their regular budget. ***     Oak Lawn Artists Group Show.     The Oak Lawn Public Library will host its sixth annual Oak Lawn Artist Group Show from June to August 2013. Oak Lawn artists who wish to participate in this special exhibit can print an application from www.oaklawnlibrary.org or pick one up at the reception booth or art gallery. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, May 15. ***     Maura Maloney, licensed clinical professional counselor with Genesis Therapy Center in Oak Lawn, will present “Parenting Children with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD) on Wednesday, May 15 at 7 p.m. at the library. She will discuss the challenges that accompany parenting a child diagnosed with ADHD or other autism spectrum disorders including obtaining a diagnosis, how to advocate for your child at school, when and what form of therapy is appropriate, long-term expectations for your child, and reflecting on your own feelings as a parent.     The Oak Lawn Public Library will host a free concert featuring “The Convertibles” on Sunday, May 19 from 2 to 3 p.m. This talented barbershop quartet will present ballads from the 1940’s; doo-wop from the 50’s and pop music from the 60’s — plus a few jokes and surprises. Sponsored by the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library. No advance registration required. ***     A free movie screening of “The Impossible” will be at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 24. An account of a family caught, with tens of thousands of strangers, in the mayhem of one of the worst natural catastrophies of our time. Starring Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor. ***     Steve Darnall — host of “Those Were the Days” and publisher of “Nostalgia Digest” — looks back at old time radio and the Great American Songbook at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 9 at the library. Darnall will feature rare radio appearances and clips by some of America’s greatest songwriters, including George Gershwin, Irving Berlin and Cole Porter. ***     An evening of good food and fellowship awaits you at the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library 35th Annual Dinner Meeting on Thursday, June 6 at the Hilton Oak Lawn, 9333 S. Cicero Ave. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the dinner program begins at 6 p.m. The cost is $25 per person.     This event includes a full dinner, early summer trip registrations and the annual free book raffle drawing. Registration is required. The registration deadline is Wednesday, May 22. ***     The Friends of the Oak Lawn Library will see “Oklahoma!” Wednesday, May 15. Witness the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s production of “Oklahoma!” Main floor seating. Bus leaves at 12:30 p.m., returns at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $82 for Friends members, $87 for others. Members must present current membership card or receipt to receive discount. Two-ticket limit. Trip is not wheelchair accessible. ***     The library has the newest and most popular titles and resources in its collection of eBooks, Blu-Ray and DVDs (movies and TV series), CDs for a range of music interests, and hard copy books. The library also has a language learning program and databases. During September, new library card-holders will add a leaf to the tree in the Cook Avenue foyer and be eligible to enter a drawing for a book of their choice (one child prize and one adult/young adult prize up to $35 value each). Cards are available to Oak Lawn residents at the Circulation Desk. Bring an ID and proof of address. ***     Books, tapes and CDs not found at the library can be requested online from another library. For more information call the Interlibrary Loan department or stop by the Help Desk on the first floor. *** (Continued on page 12)

Photo by Glenn Hering

Orland Park resident and Beverly Theatre Guild member Tom Fagan gives notes to the opening number performers for The Beverly Theatre Guild’s Fabulous @ Fifty Musical Revue. From left: Eileen Cosgrove Casey, Wayne Wendell, Janis Dignan, Karen VanDevelde,Julie Spencer, Jim Seeberg and Susie Giampaolo

Beverly Theatre Guild celebrates 50 years

From Barbara Moore Beverly Theatre Guild     Beverly Theatre Guild will be celebrating 50 years of live theater with an anniversary gala on Friday, May 17.     Since they began in 1953, the guild had performed more than 50 productions for more than 65,000 patrons. The guild is the fourth-oldest theater company in Chicago, after the Goodman Theater, Court Theater, and Second City.     The gala will include dinner, cocktails, a “Fabulous @ Fifty” musical revue, gift bags, raffle basket and a grand raffle worth $1,500 that includes two roundtrip airline tickets from Southwest Airlines.     Fabulous @ Fifty features a cast of 50 performers, consisting of talented performers drawn from the Beverly area, Chicago

and suburbs. Song and dances are drawn from the musicals the guild has presented over the past 50 years along with a number from the upcoming premiere of Monty Python’s “Spamalot.     For those who cannot attend the gala, there will be two more performances of “Fabulous @ Fifty,” held at 8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 19.     Tickets to the gala are $51. Tickets to the performances are $21. To purchase tickets, visit beverlytheatreguild.org or call (773) BTG-TIXS (284-8497).     The gala and both performances will be held at Baer Theatre at Morgan Park Academy Arts Center, 2153 W 111th Street in Chicago.     The guild was incorporated as a not-for-profit community theatre in 1963, although their roots go back to 1929 when the guild be-

gan as a program of the Chicago Park District. In 1963, when CPD decided not to fund the program any longer, a group of theatre regulars decided to branch out in the belief that they could experiment and prosper independently. On May 17, 1963, the Beverly Theatre Guild was launched with the production of “The Desk Set,” presented at St. Xavier College. In the early years, productions were at schools and restaurants as the Guild looked for a permanent home. The guild was one of the community organizations that supported the creation of the Beverly Arts Center in the late 1960s, and also performed at the arts center building at 111th Street and Western Avenue, which was completed in 2002. In 2008, the guild moved to their space at Baer Theater on the Morgan Park Academy Campus.

Park Clips Hickory Hills

    The Hickory Hills Park District has openings in its preschool classes. Five-day class is $1,540, three-day class (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) is $860, and two-day class (Tuesday and Thursday) is $695.Classes start in September and run through May 2014. Class times are 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 3:15 p.m. The office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for registration. Parents must provide child’s birth certificate and immunization records. For more information call 598-1233 or visit hhparkdistrct.org.

Palos Hills

    A trip to “Anderson Japanese Gardens” in Rockford will be Thursday, May 16. Cost is $30 per person, advanced registration is required. For more information call 4304500 or visit paloshillsweb.org.

Oak Lawn

    The park district offers duplicate bridge every Monday at 11:30 a.m. at Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St. Cost is $7 per person and includes a light lunch. All ages are welcome. For more information call 857-2200. ***     Registration is underway for before- and after-school FLASH (Fun & Learning After School Hours). The park district has partnered with Ridgeland School District 122 and Oak Lawn-Hometown School

District 123 and is in all of those districts’ elementary schools — Columbus Manor, Harnew, Kolb and Lieb in District 122, and Covington, Hannum, Hometown, Kolmar and Sward in District 123. For more information call the FLASH director or the FLASH assistant director at 857-2420.

Worth

    Little Club offers benefits such as free indoor playground usage. Fee is $10 resident, $15 non-resident. For more information call the park district. ***     Jazzercise for persons age 16 years and older will be from 9:20 to 10:20 a.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, and 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Saturday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave. Fee is $37 monthly for an Easy Fit Ticket and a registration fee of $25. For more information call 448-7080 or visit worthparkdistrict.org. ***

    The Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., has an indoor playground featuring slides, a climbing wall, tree house and more for children who can walk through 4 years old. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for non-residents. For more information call 448-7080 or visit worthparkdistrict.org. ***     The Worth Park District Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. every fourth Wednesday of the month at the Worth Historical Museum, in the Terrace Centre at 11500 Beloit Ave. Meetings are open to the public. Membership is free but is not required to attend.     Volunteers are welcome to come to the museum from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesdays to assist with projects. The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Curator hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday. For group visits call 448-7080, Ext. 107.

SUDOKU Solution

HEALTHY EYES WEAR SUNGLASSES Crossword Answers

Every day that you’re outside, you’re exposed to dangerous, but invisible, ultraviolet (UV) sunlight. Left unprotected, prolonged exposure to UV radiation can seriously damage the eye, leading to cataracts, skin cancer around the eyelid and other eye disorders. Protecting your eyes is important to maintaining eye health now and in the future. Shield your eyes (and your family’s eyes) from harmful UV rays. Wear sunglasses with maximum UV protection. For more information, visit www.thevisioncouncil.org/consumers/ sunglasses. A public service message from The Vision Council.


12

The Reporter

The

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Back Page

Allergy meds may cause adverse reactions     It has been reported that last year was the worst year ever for allergies. This year is very rough. Next year, the rising pollen counts may be even worse. In fact, by 2040, allergies are expected to double.     According to an article in Health Sciences Institute magazine, scientists expect pollen seasons to be longer than ever. They report ragweed pollen season is already between 13 and 27 days long in the Northern U.S. and Canada.     You see the ads on television for numerous drugs and antihistamines to combat allergy season. Some people’s allergies are so bad, they need the immediate relief.     As is always pointed out, every drug has its drawbacks. Again, it comes to a risk versus benefit issue. The problem is many of us really are unaware of the risks of some of these medications because it takes years to compile data and the adverse reaction reporting system is less than desirable. Fewer than 10

    It looks like we have a lot of gardeners out there in Reporterland, because plenty of people knew that last week’s photo was a dandelion. Bella Fruendt, Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis, Janice Maestro and Al Kasper, all of Hickory Hills; Mike O’Shaughnessy, Frank and Donna Hirsch, George and Theresa Rebersky, Robert Solner, Gene Sikora, Nanette Pociask, Eddy and Jackie Wilch and Linda Martin and Robert Solner, all of Worth; Oak Lawn residents Patricia Blankeship, Kristen Gute, Dan and Laura Heneghan, James Wucka, Rick and Lara Groll, Jane Foley and Steve Rosenbaum; and Chicago Ridge folks Kathy Higgins, Patty Vandenberg, Dan Higgins and Dana Oswald; and Jan Merchantz, Kelly Fitzpatrick and Ellen Reddington of Evergreen Park and Lois Faragher and Marilyn Gutierrez of Palos Hills all got it right.     This week’s clue is: most important meal of the day. Send your guesses to thereporter@comcast.net under the subject Whatizit, or call 448-6161. Please include your first and last names and where you live. Also, if you get a chance, log on to Facebook and “like” us. Once you do, you’ll receive notifications on your timeline about news, community events and other happenings in your towns. Thanks!

(Continued from page 1) no twisting your body to put the stretcher into the ambulance.”     The department has had no firefighter injuries in the last two years, but prior to that, injuries were not uncommon, Muszynski said. The department has 19 paid firefighter/paramedics and 12 part-time on-call firefighters.     Oxygen bottles can weigh up to 100 pounds, and loading it into the ambulance can be tricky, Muszynski said. The oxygen bottle loader will pick up the bottle and put it into a compartment inside the ambulance.     Muszynski said battery-powered

By Dee Woods

ated with drugs, while others are not reported because the association to the drugs has not yet been established. Some of the reactions seem unrelated to the drugs in the minds of both patients and doctors. Who would have thought breaking bones would have been related to Fosamax and other such drugs that are supposedly prescribed for strengthening our bones? It takes many years to connect the dots in many cases. Then there was last week’s column about taking non-steroid anti-inflam-

mulas that are created for “pollen specific” areas. One remedy is specifically for the Great Lakes area and the pollens known to be most troublesome in that area. Another is for residents of Hawaii, while, yet another regional formula is strictly for desert locations.     Cagan wrote of the regional formulas, “Most people feel better right away, but in some complicated cases (like people with multiple allergies,) it can take as long as three weeks to make a difference, so give it time.”     For me, it’s worth investigating. The price isn’t bad- it’s about $20 and it’s considered safe. Regional Allergies Formula is made by KingBio Company. For more information, visit kingbio.com or call (888) 827-6414. As always, I would like to hear from anyone who has tried it. Dee Woods is available to give presentations about alternative health treatments and healthy living. She can be reached at deewoods@comcast.net.

Alfalfa underrated little rascal of superfoods The Wine Guy

    Much has been said about food and the vitamins and minerals they contain, yet many people still do not understand these nutrients are the natural medicines we require to prevent and fight off illnesses.     Most people know foods such as carrots, apples and oranges are “good for you,” but what they may not understand is the mechanism by which they and other whole, natural foods help maintain good cell health.     What even more people don’t know are the medicinal benefits of forgotten foods like alfalfa, which many of you reading this probably think of as food for livestock. The truth is, alfalfa has 10 times the mineral magazine published to entertain, content of more common grains inform and educate women of such as wheat and barley. This is America. The Civil War collection because alfalfa roots can grow as is noteworthy and presents cov- deep as 125 feet into the ground, erage based on various historical where they can access vitamins and minerals forgotten by time. perspectives. These nutrients have remained ***     The Freegal music service is untapped for possibly centuries available on the library’s website, because the roots of other plants oaklawnlibrary.org. Patrons may don’t get to them. download up to three songs a week from the Sony catalog with their library card. Freegal includes millions of songs and requires no software to install. Files that can WellBeingMD classes be played on any device including iPods. For more information visit with personal trainer oaklawnlibrary.org.     WellBeingMD is offering three Worth classes with personal trainer,     The library subscribes to Zinio, Christine Duba, ACE, AFAA. an online magazine stand that en-     Functional fitness — six Tuesables patrons to read magazines on days May 14, 21, June 4, 11, 18, computers, tablets or phones using 25 4:30 — 5:30 p.m. or 6 — 7 web browsers and apps. Must have p.m. $72 for six weeks drop-in Worth Library card. Zinio is acces- $15. sible at worthlibrary.com.     Zumba Gold and Fitness Lite *** — eight Wednesdays May 15,     The library offers Try-It Illi- 22, 29, June 5, 12, 19, 26 and nois, which allows access to 300 July 3. free databases from more than     Zumba Gold at 9:30 — 10:15 40 vendors. Access Try-It at a.m. worthlibrary.com (login and pass-     Fitness Lite — 10:30 — 11:15 word is available at the library). a.m. $40 for eight weeks $7

Library Notes

Ambulance

Mixing it up for good health

matories with some blood pressure medications. Only recently have we learned they may cause kidney injury.     What does this have to do with antihistamines and allergy preparations?     Well, the warnings of drowsiness have always been labeled, but two studies of more than 1,400 patients, showed other stunning associations, according to Michele Cagan, author of the article on allergies in HSI.     “Researchers pooled the results from two studies, which included more than 1,400 patients—610 with brain tumors, and 831 without,” Cagan wrote. “The scientists discovered that regular use of antihistamines increased the risk of developing low-grade glioma brain tumors by 86 percent.”     She pointed to other potential side effects such as decreased libido, increased appetite, cognitive impairment, depression, dry mouth and dizziness.     She further discusses new homeopathic remedies of allergy for-

Best of the Wine Guy

Whatizit?

(Continued from page 11)     “Images of America: Oak Lawn” by Oak Lawn Library local history coordinator Kevin Korst contains more than 200 photographs with captions and chapter introductions, and highlights the many aspects of Oak Lawn’s history including Round-Up Days and the 1967 Tornado. The book is available for purchase at the library’s Reception Booth for $21.99 (cash or check). Book sales benefit the Oak Lawn Community Library Foundation. A corresponding photo exhibit is on display and features more than 100 historic Oak Lawn images and dozens of artifacts. The display is in the Local History Room on the library’s second floor. For more information contact Korst at 422-4990. ***     The library offers “Accessible Archives,” an electronic resource available at oaklawnlibrary.org. Click on the “Research” tab and select the icon for “Accessible Archives.” The collection features historic periodicals and books and provides eyewitness accounts and editorial observations of events, genealogical records, county histories and Godey’s “Lady’s Book” — a

percent of adverse reactions are reported. Some go unreported because doctors refuse to admit various reactions may be associ-

devices in ambulances are becoming more and more common. The Bridgeview Fire Department also has battery powered stretchers.     The department currently has three ambulances, and Muszynski intends to get rid of the two oldest ambulances when the new ambulance is purchased. The oldest is 17 years old, and the other ones are 12 and 13 years old. An ambulance is considered old when it has been in use for 10 years, Muszynski said. The department did 2,400 ambulance runs last year.     “We’ll only have two, and we’ll use one for ambulance runs,” Muszynski said. “The other one will be kept in reserves in case one breaks down. It will reduce

    Alfalfa is a rich source of vitamin K, also known as the metallic element potassium, which aside from being essential to life is good for the heart and has antihemmorrhagic properties. It may also help treat skin eruptions, arthritis, rheumatism, jaundice, insomnia, anxiety, anemia and constipation, as well as more severe illnesses such as diabetes, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), syphilis, gonorrhea and tuberculosis. As a great cell-builder it is also good for the blood, teeth and bones, and helps nursing mothers produce rich milk. It is also regarded as excellent for helping eliminate poisons, such as those produced by the metabolism of pharmaceuticals, from the body.     Alfalfa can be eaten raw in combination with salad greens, or can be chopped and cooked with spinach and other greens that aren’t sensitive to heat. Its dried, finely chopped leaves and seeds can produce a powerful tea or tonic that is good for the kidneys and for peristalsis

with Anthony Scarano of the bowels — the involuntary muscular contractions that move waste through and out of the body. The tea can be drunk hot or cold, and sweetened with honey, but note that when taken hot it often causes one to perspire.     Other lesser known and under appreciated foods are almonds and apricots. Almonds are packed with protein, which makes them great muscle builders, as well as potassium and B vitamins. They are also good for teeth and bones, and indicated as useful in treat-

ing emaciation and for nursing mothers.     Apricots are higher in iron and other minerals than most other fruits. They contain vitamins A and B, and are excellent body cleansers. They are helpful in treating anemia, constipation, pimples, bronchitis and diarrhea.     Eating these foods and other fruits, vegetables and plants can help revolutionize your diet and get you on the road to good health and long life. Eat well, love your friends and family, exercise and drink wine, and you’re more than halfway there. Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an 88-year-old Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the opinions of Mr. Scarano based on years of independent study and personal experience, and may not be beneficial to health. Wine should be consumed in moderation, as overindulgence may be harmful to health.

Health Scan drop-in fee.     Call 448-9450 to reserve your spot.     WellBeingMD — Center for Life is at 11950 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights.

Free skin cancer screening

    May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Palos Community Hospital is sponsoring a free skin cancer screening from 8 to 11 a.m. this Saturday, May 11, at Palos Immediate Care Center, 7340 W. College Drive, in Palos Heights.     Screenings will be performed by practitioners from Southwest

Dermatology. Participants should have a specific mole or marking to be examined as this is not a full-body exam. Since this is a screening, no diagnosis will be given. Follow-up will be recommended for any questionable growths.     Appointments are required. Call 226-2300 to schedule an appointment.

Orland Twp. Kids’ nutrition seminar     Orland Township will offer a free health presentation on Wednesday, May 15, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on healthy eating for

kids at the Orland Township building at 14807 S. Ravinia Ave.     Parents and students in grades 5th through 8th are invited to attend. Learn facts on basic nutrition and how that translates into food on one’s plate.     A cooking seminar will conclude the presentation and participants will have the opportunity to prepare and sample simple and healthy snacks, including ants on a log and more.     Registration is required, Call 403-4222.

our fleet, which will reduce our maintenance costs.”     The old ambulances will go to the Chicago Ridge Emergency Management Agency, which works with the village’s police and fire departments. One will be used as a traffic vehicle to carry lights and cones; and the other will be used as a mobile command post.     “If we have a large scale incident, like a large fire, flood or tornado, it will be a mobile command post — like an office with radios and cameras,” Muszynski said.     The Emergency Management Agency is looking for grants to cover the cost of retrofitting the ambulances, Muszynski said. Photo by Laura Bolin

New board takes over in Worth     The new Worth Village Board was sworn in May 7 in front of a crowd of more than 140 residents at the gymnasium in the Terrace Center, 11500 Beloit Avenue. Seen here are trustees Pete Kats (left) Mary Rhein, Colleen McElroy, Village Clerk Bonnie Price, Village President Mary Werner, and Trustees Tedd Muersch, Jr., Warren Soldan and Rich Dziedzic. Soldan was appointed to fill Werner’s vacated board seat.

The LATCH system makes it easier to be sure your child’s car seat is installed correctly every time. Just clip it to the lower anchors, attach the top tether, and pull the straps tight. To find out more, visit safercar.gov.

Chicago Ridge firefighter/paramedic Bob Smart loads a battery-powered stretcher into an ambulance. The fire department recently received a $214,533 grant from the Department of Homeland Security to purchase a second ambulance with a battery-powered stretcher and an electric loader to put an oxygen bottle in the ambulance.


Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Thursday, May 9, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

Fit to be tied

Knights guaranteed share of SCC Blue title By Ken Karrson     When it came to securing a Suburban Christian Conference Blue title, Chicago Christian was fit to be tied last week.     One more win this week, however, and the Knights won’t have to share.     Christian entered the current week one game in front of Aurora Central Catholic in the divisional standings, a gap created by the outcome of two contests last Thursday. Thus, the Knights guaranteed themselves no worse than a share of the SCC Blue crown, but if they defeated Marmion Academy this past Monday, the championship would belong to them alone.     “We had three goals for the year, and the only baseball goal was being conference champs,” said Christian coach Eric Brauer, whose first four Knights clubs all topped the 20-win mark but did not lay claim to an SCC title.     “It feels really good to accomplish it. It’s been fun.”     Brauer placed renewed emphasis on Christian’s conference well-being for reasons beyond just regular-season gratification. He also felt it would aid the Knights in their quest to seriously pursue a Class 2A championship.     “We want to take that next step [in the state tournament],” said Brauer, whose squad reached the sectional-final round last spring. “We felt the best way to do that was to have our best pitchers go

in the conference games and attack those like they were playoff games. It was good to get in some of those dogfights.”     Although its gaudy ledger may seem to indicate otherwise, Christian (24-3, 13-2) hasn’t coasted its way to the top of the SCC Blue. That much was evident last week, as both St. Edward and Aurora Christian held the Knights’ normally robust offense in check.     The Eagles, in fact, flat-out stymied Chicago Christian on Thursday. The latter collected only one hit, but that double by Wally Findysz brought in a third-inning run for the Knights.     They also drew four free passes in the stanza and benefited as well from two wild pitches. It all added up to a 3-0 triumph that, when coupled with an Aurora Central Catholic setback on that same day, handed Chicago Christian sole ownership of the divisional penthouse.     “Usually when you put that little together, you lose the game,” Brauer said. “If that’s your pregame stats line, you’d think that if you were going to win, it’d be 1-0. To scratch out three runs was huge.     “We felt very fortunate to win this game. It was one of our better wins, and we didn’t do a whole lot to deserve it. We fought hard, but we just didn’t have a lot of [statistical] numbers to show for it.”     One number that favored the Knights was 115, which was the

amount of pitches they forced Aurora Christian’s hurler — a University of Iowa recruit — to throw. Sharing the mound chores for Chicago Christian were Martin Johnston, Chris Lyle and Corey Bulthuis. Lyle earned his fourth win without a loss, while Bulthuis recorded his eighth save. Chicago Christian 2-11 St. Edward 0-1     The Knights had faced a similarly tough challenge three days earlier, when Josh Novak and the Green Wave’s starter hooked up in another superb pitchers’ duel. Between them, the duo allowed just three hits.     Chicago Christian had two of them, including Brodie Meyer’s RBI single in the third inning that staked the Knights to a 2-0 lead. The locals also tallied on Sean O’Meara’s sacrifice fly, which followed a pair of bases-on-balls and St. Edward error.     The Green Wave’s only decent scoring opportunity came in the seventh, when Novak issued two walks with one out. Bulthuis relieved and set down the next two St. Edward batters without incident to save Novak’s sixth straight victory on the hill. The latter struck out five during his 6 1/3-inning stint and, according to his coach, “threw a phenomenal game.”     Novak was backed by an error-free defense, and he and his teammates were aboard the bus and ready for the return trip home (Continued on page 4)

Crowded at the top Vikings create logjam atop CCL Blue By Ken Karrson     Three’s a crowd in baseball, too.     St. Laurence coach Pete Lotus would have preferred his team occupying a less-congested spot atop the Chicago Catholic League Blue standings, and for a while it appeared as if his wish would be granted. By knocking off St. Rita twice in the same season for the first time, the Vikings shot past both the Mustangs and Mt. Carmel and into first place by themselves.     But that Wednesday gain became a Saturday loss when Loyola Academy handed out the latter to St. Laurence. The Ramblers didn’t have any baserunners against Vikings pitcher Zach Lewis through 5 1/3 innings, but two St. Laurence errors, a walk and pair of hits led to two runs in the sixth and Loyola went on to claim a 3-1 triumph in Burbank in a contest that didn’t get underway until 4:30 p.m. because of SATs.     “Those are games you’ve got to win,” Lotus said. “That was a pretty bad inning at a bad time, especially for as dominating as Zach was before that. We didn’t play terrible, but we made some really bad mistakes and we didn’t hit as well as we have been, and that came back to haunt us.”

    Lotus felt his squad wasted a couple early opportunities. The Vikings (18-6, 11-2) placed runners at the corners in the first inning to no avail, and they were also unable to put a leadoff double to maximum use in the second.     “If we get one [run] early, with the way Zach was throwing, it’s a different ballgame,” Lotus said. “We’ve got to do a better job of sticking to it and continuing to have good at-bats when we don’t get out to a lead right away.”     St. Laurence didn’t score until the fifth, but it grabbed the first lead after Brad Wood singled home Ryan Rybakowski, who had also gotten aboard with a base hit. Rybakowski then stole second and moved to third on a wild pitch.     However, Loyola responded with its deuce and then tacked on an insurance run in the seventh, using three hits and a sacrifice fly to hit the final payoff. While Lotus credited the Ramblers for their performance, he wondered if his own athletes had perhaps basked in the glow of their twin wins over St. Rita a bit too long.     “We tried to talk about not treating this game any differently,” Lotus said. “[Loyola was] just as competitive, and all the games are like that in the Blue. Everybody has players capable of beating you.”

    Lewis finished with 10 strikeouts while getting tagged with his second setback in seven decisions this spring. St. Laurence 7-5 St. Rita 0-4     While Lewis couldn’t complete his gem on Saturday, Wood was able to stun the Mustangs by firing a no-hitter last Monday. Wood struck out five and also issued five walks, but the Vikings compensated at least a little for the latter by turning two double plays.     Even with the free passes factored in, though, Lotus couldn’t say enough about Wood’s effort.     “It was tremendous,” Lotus said. “He was dominant, and it was one of the best games I’ve seen pitched in my eight years here. I don’t know if there’s ever been a better one against a toplevel opponent.     “Brad has three quality pitches. If he throws strikes, he’s very, very tough to hit.”     Lotus had no preconceived notion as to what expect from Wood that day, since he never watches any of his pitchers in pregame warm-ups. Adam Lotus does that, but Pete doesn’t ask his brother for any report.     Wood got the only run he’d really need when Lewis singled home Nate Tholl (single) in the (Continued on page 7)

Photo by Jason Maholy

Evergreen Park first baseman Kyle Venhuizen stretches for the throw from across the diamond during last week’s game versus Oak Lawn.

Look of a leader Spartans blast Mustangs to remain in first By Ken Karrson     Looks again proved to be deceiving.     After Evergreen Park sprang a 6-2 surprise on Oak Lawn last Monday and ran its win streak to seven, the Mustangs were optimistic about their chances for a sweep of their two-game set with the Spartans. Evergreen would be at home for Tuesday’s rematch, it would have its No. 1 pitcher available and, of course, it still had plenty of momentum on its side.     “Everything was kind of going into, ‘We should be able to get these guys again,’” Mustangs coach Mark Smyth said. “We had our ace [Kyle Venhuizen] going and I thought we kind of had the book on how to pitch to their hitters after Monday.”     What Evergreen didn’t have, however, was Venhuizen at his peak. The Mustangs have leaned heavily on their senior thus far, so much so that Smyth admitted to “running his pitch count pretty high.”     “We’ve been depending on him

and it seems like every game is high pressure.     “[But] I think our kids are getting used to it a little bit and it’s nice to see [positive] results, especially so quickly. It’s great to be in this position, where we control our own destiny.”     Billy Thome and Matt Witkowski both contributed two-run singles to the Spartans’ huge inning, but there’s little question Kametas was Oak Lawn’s man of the hour. Gerny praised the senior both for his statistical presence and his emotional one.     “He was pumped up for the game,” Gerny said. “After he hit his homer, he said, ‘Do I have to do all this by myself?’ Everybody on the bench got angry and fired up, and it was impressive.     “I told them, ‘Just let me know what gets you mad and I’ll do it to you.’”     The Spartans’ scoring barrage allowed Gerny to lift Kametas from the mound and save him for Thursday’s SSC crossover contest with Bremen. Mitch Swatek threw the final four innings and met up (Continued on page 5)

Up and at ’em Eagles get on another win streak By Ken Karrson

    Reports of Sandburg’s demise have been greatly exaggerated.     In truth, nobody was writing the Eagles off as a lost cause, even in the face of some recent late-game meltdowns. However, there was also little doubt that all was not right in Sandburg’s baseball world.     So when Reavis scored four times in its final plate appearance last Monday to dramatically reduce an 11-5 deficit, some onlookers might have wondered if the Eagles were in the midst of yet another implosion. Not counted among that group were Sandburg athletes and coaches.     “You’re bound to lose leads during the course of a season,” Eagles assistant coach George Fear said. “Ours just happened to come three games in a row. That might have been in the back of [our players’] minds, but I think our guys are pretty loose and pretty confident. I think they know they’re capable of finishing [games successfully].”     That’s what Sandburg managed to do here, and the victory over the Rams kicked off a perfect week on the diamond. The Eagles picked up four other wins along the way, including two in SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue play that kept them alive in the chase for a divisional title.     “We feel like we’ve got to run the table and there are no gimmes out there,” Fear said. “Everybody’s got a pitcher who can beat anyone. Hopefully, some teams will beat up on each other and we can slip in there.”     Sandburg (16-5, 5-4), which has Photo by Jason Maholy now won six in a row, actually features more than one quality arm on its staff. That much was proved on Saturday, when little-used Alec     Marist junior shortstop Brooke Wyderski has the ball in her glove as she waits to make the tag on Martinez limited Glenbard South a Loyola base runner attempting to steal second during a game last week. For more softball news, to a pair of hits over the first five see Page 2. innings and set the Eagles up for

Dead to rights

a lot,” Smyth said, “and unfortunately, he didn’t have it here. Give [Oak Lawn] credit — he fell behind and had to put [pitches] in the zone, and they hit them.”     Indeed, the Spartans did, well enough to pile up 11 second-inning runs and turn the South Suburban Conference Red encounter into a rout. Bob Kametas’ threerun homer and double and Marcin Krzysiak���s two-run dinger were the most telling blows administered during the uprising, and Oak Lawn rode those to a 15-4 victory in five frames that assured it of remaining in first place within the SSC Red.     The Spartans entered the current week with a 10-4 conference ledger. Reavis had the same amount of defeats, but three fewer wins. Shepard was one behind in the loss column, while both Evergreen and Richards were two in arrears.     “It seems like every week I can look at a game and say, ‘This was a huge win,’” Oak Lawn coach Bill Gerny said. “Every week, we have a game that puts our standing in the conference on the brink,

a 7-2 triumph.     “It was nice to see Alec, who hadn’t pitched in a while, come out and compete and give us a chance to win,” Fear said. “He pumped the strike zone and got a lot of ground balls [for outs].”     Backing Martinez at the plate were Austin Cangelosi, David Cronin and Chris Stearns, who combined to provide seven hits and four RBI. Cangelosi had three of the safeties, while both of Cronin’s were doubles. Also getting into the act was Dan Santiago, who smacked a double and tallied twice.     Sandburg broke a 1-all tie in the third inning and had garnered the remainder of its runs by the end of the fifth frame. Sandburg 2 Joliet Central 0     Two days earlier, Bryan Pall, the Eagles’ acknowledged mound ace, stonewalled the Steelmen and made it possible for his own squad to survive its only lackluster offensive display of the week.     While Sandburg had only five singles through the first seven stanzas, that total was four more than Joliet Central managed off Pall, who fanned 11 and threw first-pitch strikes to 21 of the batters he faced. For the season, the junior boasts a 5 ½-to1 strikeouts-to-walks ratio (40-7) and minuscule 1.30 earned-run average.     “He put us on his back and kept us in the game,” Fear said of Pall. “He was just dominating.”     The lone difficulty Pall encountered occurred in the sixth, when the Steelmen placed runners on second and third with one out after hitting safely for the first time and taking advantage of an Eagles throwing error. But Pall rang up a strikeout and second baseman Cronin made a diving stop of a grounder, which was turned into the inning’s final out.

    “We could have lost the game there,” Fear said. “We couldn’t get anything going offensively, but that’s what good teams do: win when they don’t play their best.”     Joliet Central then became the first team to blink when it gave up two runs in the eighth. Adam Zehme and Martinez each belted an RBI double to key the contest’s only rally. Sandburg 11 Bolingbrook 1     The Raiders had played the Eagles tough the week before, and for the first five innings last Tuesday that was again the case.     Bolingbrook, which had fallen to a 2-0 defeat previously, trailed 4-1. But in the bottom of the sixth, Sandburg suddenly shoved its SWSC Blue foe into an inescapable hole.     A.J. Giron blasted a pinch-hit two-run homer, Alec Nelson drove in two other teammates with a double, and the Eagles plated seven runs in all to turn the contest into a full-blown rout. Sandburg ended the day with 14 hits, four of which went for extra bases.     “We’ve been waiting to get out of that funk and get into a rhythm offensively,” Fear said. “We’ve really been swinging the bats well [of late]. We were striking out with guys on base [before], but we’ve done a better job of putting the ball in play and putting more pressure on defenses.     “The fields are hard, everything’s rock solid, and we made the third baseman and shortstop have to go after hard-hit balls. We had some quality innings where we fought and got guys on base, and we felt we had control even when the score was 4-1. It was a nice effort against a good pitcher.”     Nelson registered three hits, including a second double, and (Continued on page 4)


2

Section 2 Thursday, May 9, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Your right to say no more

Bartosh     Freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose.     Kris Kristofferson wrote that line and Janis Joplin made it famous more than 40 years ago, but it still rings true. For anyone with a family to keep together or career worth saving, there is no such thing as complete freedom.     There are rules to follow, both written and unwritten, and violating them often results in severe consequences. Some of the rules are obvious and have understandably become actual laws, but what about those times when the demarcation line between right and wrong is blurred?     The surest bet is to err on the side of conservatism and follow the safest route, which is, of course, what the world’s explorers and inventors have always done. That’s why, in 2013, we Americans all hail the queen and I’m using a quill pen to write this column.     However, there is little room for that same independent, consequences-be-damned kind of thinking these days, especially in those areas that involve human behavior. To dispute means to despise; to grow irritated translates into intolerance.     Thus, for anyone with a public forum at his or her disposal, being cautionary means treading very lightly, regardless of topic.     The latest individual learning that lesson is Chris Broussard, a former New York sportswriter who covers the NBA for ESPN and whose name has suddenly become much more well known to the masses than he could have imagined. Creating the notoriety was Broussard’s refusal to mince his words when commenting on the biggest basketball story of the past couple weeks: Jason Collins.     Collins has been an NBA journeyman for over a decade, but it’s likely that the only people aware of him before this were fans of whatever team employed him at a particular moment. And he might have remained anonymous even to some of them,

seeing as how Collins has spent more time on the bench than a toolbox.     Basically, Collins was the classic case of someone carving out a lengthy pro sports career primarily by being a good team guy. He knew his limitations, played within them when called upon, and he kept his mouth shut so he didn’t rock the boat.     Until recently, that is. In an edition of Sports Illustrated, Collins became the first non-retired athlete in any of America’s four major team sports to ever admit to being gay. That admission, not surprisingly, engendered a great deal of discussion.     Among the parties who entered into it was Broussard, who stated his views on homosexuality from a Christian viewpoint during a conversation on TV. Broussard said God sees it as a sin, just as He sees intimate relations between non-married heterosexual couples as sinful.     Broussard never belittled Collins, didn’t say he should be kicked out of the league or banned from it, or profess any personal dislike toward the player. Broussard was asked for his opinion, he gave it, and suddenly in some circles he’s being touted as a homophobe.     And this is where everything jumps the track. For some reason, a simple disagreement no longer can be just that, but must immediately morph into hatred, especially when the point of dispute involves a hot-button, politically correct issue.     Frankly, this is ridiculous. If Collins had the right to declare his sexual preference in a national magazine — thereby opening the revelation up to public discussion in the process — why is Broussard castigated for commenting on it while holding a contrarian’s viewpoint?     Just to ensure that everything remains non-toxic, though, perhaps we should start eliminating all words that might put one at risk of being offensive. Imagine some of the interviews we’ll be treated to in the future:     Announcer: “Wow, that’s some contract you signed there,

Joe.”     Player: “Oh, yeah, it’s a big one. Man, it’s all about gettin’ the green and...”     Announcer: “Uh, Joe, please don’t use any colors when you speak with me.”     Player: “Come on, I said ‘green.’ What the heck is wrong with that?”     Announcer: “Look, Joe, most of the fans watching this broadcast will never make the amount of money you do, so they’re envious — and you know what color is associated with that. By mentioning it, you’re insulting them and their meager earning power.”     Player: “Sorry. I didn’t know...”     Announcer: “And, by the way, try not to ever mention again that adjective you used to describe the size of your contract. People with dietary issues may take offense.”     Player: “Well, OK, can I talk about the touchdown I made by running right over that tackler...”     Announcer: “Nope, because it’ll sound like you’re advocating physical abuse.”     Player: “But it’s football, and it’s a physical sport. What am I supposed to do — tip-toe past a defender?”     Announcer: “Don’t say ‘tiptoe.’ Folks who face podiatric challenges every day may think you’re mocking the way they walk.”     Player: “Well, then, can I at least say, ‘Hi,’ to my mom who’s watching the telecast?”     Announcer: “You’d better not. How do you think those people whose moms have abandoned them will feel about that? They’ll think you’re rubbing it in.”     Player: “So what can I say?”     Announcer: “Good-bye is OK, but don’t direct it toward anyone specific because that’ll make everyone else feel left out.”     Player: “So that means I can say, ‘Good-bye everyone?’”     Announcer: “Sure. After all, we live in the land of the free...”     Player: “And the home of the muzzled.”

Hitless won-ders Astros find success without base hits By Ken Karrson     Losing a game by being no-hit is uncomfortable.     Winning a game while being no-hit is unheard of.     That, however, is what transpired last Thursday in Palos Heights, when Shepard hosted TF South in a South Suburban Conference crossover contest. The Astros did not manage a single hit off Rebels hurler Alex Schell, but that didn’t prevent them from triumphing.     Shepard did so by coaxing five walks in the fifth inning. One of those baserunners got picked off, but when Brendan Hermann drew a free pass with the bags filled, the Astros garnered the only run they’d require to register a 1-0 victory.     “It was a unique sight,” Shepard coach Frank DiFoggio said. “If we play this game two weeks earlier, we lose, but some of the breaks are going our way now.     “We’ve gone two straight weeks where we’ve played pretty well, and we’re riding that right now and building off it. We’re getting healthy and our confidence is starting to come back because we’re winning some games.”     The Astros won against TF South only because Jeremy Dryier was every bit Schell’s equal. Dryier did allow one hit, but Schell’s first-inning double didn’t harm Shepard because Dryier rang up one of his 12 strikeouts to bring the stanza to a close and leave two Rebels stranded.     “They had no chance against Jeremy,” DiFoggio said. “That was one of the best-pitched games I’ve seen in a long time.     “He was very Mike Recchiaesque in how he went after hitters, and he hit every spot I called except the one that was the double. It was unbelievable.”     Although the Astros (10-11, 7-5) went without a hit, they had a total of 13 baserunners, thanks to nine walks, three TF South errors and a hit batsman. They also made solid contact throughout the day.     A diving catch by the Rebels ruined a potential scoring opportunity for the home team in the third inning. In another instance, Shepard placed runners on second and third with just one out, but

could not break through.     Besides being unusual, the win was also pivotal for the Astros because it kept them nipping at Oak Lawn’s heels in the SSC Red. The Spartans and Reavis both have four losses in league action, but Oak Lawn has an edge in the number of SSC games already played.     Shepard is just one behind the duo in the loss column, and it had a chance to throw the divisional race into mass confusion when it tangled with the Spartans twice during the current week. While the Astros are breathing down the leader’s neck, DiFoggio insists he hasn’t taken notice.     “If we start looking ahead instead of at what’s right in front of us, we’ll slip up,” he said. “We buried ourselves early with that 1-5 start [in conference games], so we said we’re going to take care of ourselves, play one game at a time and not pay attention to anything else that’s going on. I’m not going to change that philosophy now that we’re close.     “Our road is still challenging. It’s not going to be an easy task to do.”     In addition to its two-game set with Oak Lawn, Shepard was slated to meet Reavis and Hillcrest this week in two more conference encounters. Shepard 5-13 Argo 1-1     Matt Schmeski and Nick Medlicott pitched the Astros to a sweep of the Argonauts last Monday and Tuesday, respectively.     Schmeski was reached for only three hits and he fired third strikes past 11 Argo batters. In spite of that, the Argonauts went ahead in the top of the third.     That 1-0 lead was short-lived, however, as Shepard answered with a deuce in the bottom of the same inning and then put up a three-spot in the fifth to establish the final margin. The first of those uprisings materialized without a base hit, as three walks, a hit batsman and sacrifice fly did the trick. Adam Samad and Hermann were the Astros’ RBI men.     “Us scoring without getting a hit and responding right away was very much continuing the pattern of the week before: We got punched, but we punched right

back,” DiFoggio said. “We’ve started to get into a comfort zone.”     Hermann came through for Shepard again in the fifth with an RBI single, a ball that got misplayed into a triple by Argo. Samad also hit safely during the inning, while two other Argonauts errors led to more Astros scoring. ***     Medlicott threw a six-hitter at Argo on Tuesday while whiffing six and walking one. Since returning from an injury, the senior has not given up an earned run in three starts.     By the time the Argonauts scratched out an unearned run against Medlicott in the bottom of the fourth, they were staring up a 10-0 deficit. Shepard created it by staging big rallies in both the second and fourth frames.     Matt Scott (two-run double) had the key hit in the earlier inning, and he, Jake Hart and Mark Albrecht (double) all stroked RBI hits as part of the Astros’ ensuing eruption. RBI from Schmeski (single) and Samad (groundout) capped Shepard’s production in the fifth.     Samad also knocked in the Astros’ initial marker with his firstinning single. Shepard wound up with nine hits.     “This one had a little bit of everything,” DiFoggio said. “It was one of the few games all year where we hit the whole game. It was nice to see it was actually a balanced game, in that we scored early, scored in the middle and scored at the end.”

Statistics Argo Shepard

001 000 0 - 1 002 030 x - 5

Shepard RBI: Hermann 2, Samad. WP: Schmeski (2-2). Shepard Argo

150 43 - 13 000 10 -   1

Shepard 2B: Albrecht, Dryier, Scott. RBI: Scott 3, Albrecht 2, Samad 2, Hart, Hermann, Schmeski. WP: Medlicott (3-3). TF South Shepard

000 000 0 - 0 000 010 x - 1

Shepard RBI: Hermann. WP: Dryier (22).

Photo by Jason Maholy

Marist’s Erica Nagel slides safely second with a stolen base during last week’s game against Loyola.

Softball roundup

Perfect week keeps Lady RedHawks rolling By Anthony Nasella     After a week that featured five wins for her team in as many games, Marist softball coach Denise Bromberek can say with confidence the ongoing success is a result of nothing more glamorous than plain, old hard work.     She credits her players with putting in the necessary time to improve both on an individual basis and as a collective unit, and that resulted in recent successes against Loyola Academy (4-3), Mother McAuley (11-8), Sandburg (9-2) and Nazareth Academy (10-3 and 13-1).     Offensively, Brooke Wyderski was unstoppable all week. Marist’s junior shortstop slugged four homers, a pair of two-run doubles and totaled 15 RBI. In the pitcher’s circle, freshman Lizzie Annerino, sophomore Zariya Gonzalez and senior Audra Hecker all shone.     “I couldn’t ask for much more from the girls this [past] week,” Bromberek said. “The hours that the girls are putting in at practice and during the games, it’s starting to all come together. They’re working hard outside of practice, too, in order to improve and help the team out — and it’s showing in the results.”     Wyderski went 1-for-2 with an RBI and sacrifice fly against the Lady Ramblers, but was just getting started. The Mighty Macs felt the full brunt of big stick as she swatted two three-run homers and an RBI single. Her second round-tripper, which came with two outs in the fifth inning off relief pitcher Dara Sanders, enabled the Lady RedHawks to regain their footing after McAuley had expunged an 8-1 deficit and pulled into a tie.     Scoring ahead of Wyderski were Angela Sorrentino and Erica Nagel, both of whom had gotten aboard via singles. Madison Naujokas, Haley Richy, Julie Trellicoso and Kaitlin Kenny backed Wyderski with two hits apiece versus the Macs.     Marist pounded out 15 hits in six innings and scored in four of the frames, including four times in the fourth.     Hecker, meanwhile, allowed just

one run through four innings, that coming on a towering homer over the right-field fence by the Macs’ Meg Bush. After McAuley staged its rally against Hecker and Gonzalez, Hecker rediscovered her early form and retired six of the final seven batters she faced. ***     Wyderski played long ball again on Friday, as she blasted two solo homers and totaled three RBI in Marist’s rout of Sandburg. She finished with three hits, while Richy counted a double among her two hits and knocked in two runs.     Nazareth had no real answer for Wyderski, either, as she hit a two-run double in each game of the twinbill and went 4-for-6 on the day with three two-baggers in all. She tallied three times. Trellicoso also was 4-for-6 at the plate with three runs and three stolen bases.     Wyderski’s weeklong impact did not surprise her coach.     “Offensively and defensively, she’s been dependable for us all season,” Bromberek said. “She’s definitely made some great plays on defense. She comes to play and she’s determined to contribute to the win.”     Bromberek also said that “coachable moments,” those things that don’t necessarily show up in box scores, have also factored into her squad’s success.     “It’s been in those moments where the girls have taken advantage of, learned from and persevered — like [with] defensive communication,” Bromberek said. “When a runner is on second and a ball is hit to the outfield, they’re making sure the batter doesn’t get an extra base. Or like when a batted ball is in play and it goes between two or three girls — the girls are communicating with each other and giving each other confidence, and letting them know that there’s backup.     “Small things like that are sometimes taken for granted. The girls are continually striving to capitalize on that so that we can continue to improve. They’re determined to play, and it’s very fun to watch.” CHICAGO CHRISTIAN     The Lady Knights improved to

11-6 overall and 9-2 in the Suburban Christian Conference Blue after posting a 4-0 record in league encounters last week.     Chicago Christian blanked Rosary 3-0 on Tuesday, routed St. Edward 13-3 on Thursday, nipped Montini 7-6 on Friday and rolled over Walther Lutheran 11-1 on Saturday. Davina Gutierrez fired a three-hitter and struck out 13 to register the shutout versus Rosary.     Assisting at the plate in that contest were Ashley Quinlan and Kaycee Pittman, both of whom had an RBI. Pittman then went 3-for-4 and drove in four runs to lead the Lady Knights past the Lady Green Wave in six innings two days later.     Theresa Kraiss’ two-out single in the ninth chased in Abbie Bulthuis with the deciding tally against Montini. Bulthuis (4-for-5, one RBI) was also a key figure for Christian in that game.     Gutierrez was a two-pronged weapon for the Lady Knights on Saturday, as she fanned five and tossed four scoreless innings at the Lady Broncos and also assaulted them with a 4-for-4, four-RBI effort as a hitter. One of her safeties was a solo homer.     Kraiss went 4-for-5 with two RBI as Christian dispatched Walther in six stanzas. OAK LAWN     The Lady Spartans drew closer to the .500 mark last week as they notched a trio of South Suburban Conference victories, including two in Red Division play.     Oak Lawn downed Bremen 5-2 on Monday in an SSC crossover contest, then defeated Argo 5-2 on Tuesday and crushed Eisenhower 10-0 on Wednesday. Alexis Rothman’s five-hitter propelled the Lady Spartans (7-11, 6-8) past the Lady Braves, but Sam Dillon lent a hand with her RBI single.     Rachel Burba and Riley McTeague were Oak Lawn’s heroines on Tuesday as they delivered a solo homer and two-run single, respectively. Morgan Jozsa’s twohit, three-RBI display backed Rothman’s one-hit pitching effort versus the Lady Cardinals, who were vanquished in only five (Continued on page 3)

Perfect no more

Biondic, Crusaders hand Phoenix first setback By Ken Karrson     Four years after seeing its own streak spoiled, Brother Rice switched gears and played the spoiler’s role on Friday.     Lincoln-Way North entered the matchup with 23 consecutive victories in tow, a run of perfection similar to the one the Crusaders pieced together in 2009. Rice extended its unbeaten string to 27 before stumbling for the first time that season, and the current Crusaders made sure the Phoenix would not eclipse that achievement.     They did so by riding Kevin Biondic’s three-hit pitching gem to a 1-0 triumph at the Stevie Bujanski Invitational. While the win wasn’t more critical to Rice than its two-game sweep over Chicago Catholic League Blue rival Providence Catholic earlier in the week, it might have been the most important to date in terms of making everyone outside the Crusaders’ program sit up and take notice.     The success paid psychological dividends within the team as well.     “It gives us a ton of confidence and allows them to know we can

beat anybody,” Rice coach John McCarthy said of his players. “But it begins with our intensity and willingness to compete. I’m happy with the way our guys came out with great intensity.”     No one possessed more of that trait than Biondic, who held a potent Lincoln-Way North lineup in check the entire day. In addition to their handful of hits, the Phoenix received three free passes from Biondic, but he refused to crack.     “Kevin Biondic is just so tough,” McCarthy said. “He was more or less the story here and he just rises up to any situation. [Lincoln-Way North] is so dangerous — every spot in the order is [filled with] a guy who can beat you — but he just believes he can get it done.”     Biondic did indeed get it done, but the game was a nail-biter all the way, thanks to mound counterpart Kyle Ostrowski. The Phoenix’s Purdue Universitybound hurler matched Biondic’s goose eggs through the first six innings, but the dual shutouts actually had McCarthy thinking positive.     “We’re a young team, so when you get late in the game and

you’re still in it, you start building confidence,” McCarthy said. “Just trust in the system and play the game.”     The Crusaders collected only one hit off Ostrowski through six stanzas, but Kevin Sullivan led off the top of the seventh with a single to center. A wild pitch moved him up to second and he then got to third on Biondic’s single.     Biondic pulled into second when Lincoln-Way North threw home to prevent Sullivan from scoring and an intentional walk to Wendall Ferguson filled the sacks. Following a strikeout, Kyle Hilliard singled to right-center to produce the contest’s lone marker.     “In a game like this, that run feels like 10,” McCathy said. Brother Rice 2-8 Providence Catholic 1-7     The closest the Crusaders came to actually scoring that many runs happened last Wednesday, when they erupted for eight against the Celtics. Rice needed that kind of outburst, though, to erase a 6-0 deficit.     Providence constructed it after just two innings, using five hits, one walk and a Crusaders error to do damage. McCarthy admitted (Continued on page 4)


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 9, 2013 Section 2

Down, but not yet out

3

Bulldogs still alive in SSC Red race By Ken Karrson     There’s not yet been a knockout, but Richards is rubberlegged.     Thirteen rounds into a 19-round baseball fight, the Bulldogs are still standing, albeit somewhat unsteadily, as they try to retain ownership of the South Suburban Conference Red crown. A threetime defending division champ, Richards looked the part at various moments last week.     Piling up a total of 28 runs in a two-game sweep of District 218 sister school Eisenhower definitely was impressive; not so noteworthy was the defensive leak the Bulldogs sprang on Thursday, which Lemont used to its advantage. With six errors aiding their cause, the Indians outlasted Richards 8-5 and put the latter in a rather dire predicament.     Numerically, the Bulldogs (1015, 7-6) have not been eliminated from contention, but, as veteran coach Brian Wujcik declared, they’re “certainly going to need help.” Nevertheless, he has no intention of prematurely waving a white flag.     “I think it’s completely up in the air,” Wujcik said. “It could be any combination of Oak Lawn, Shepard, Evergreen Park or Reavis [ending up on top], with us on the outside. If it goes to six losses, it could be a three-way tie.”     One thing Richards has working in its favor is a lighter schedule down the stretch. Its remaining conference contests are against TF South, Bremen, TF North, Hillcrest and Argo, with the Argonauts matching up against the Bulldogs twice.     “On paper, we might be better than those teams,” Wujcik said. “But we still have to show up [and play well]. We have to execute and we can’t make six errors, or we won’t beat anybody.”     The defensive slip-ups unquestionably proved costly versus Lemont, which outhit Richards by only a 12-10 margin.     “We hit with them, but we gave a good team too many extra baserunners,” Wujcik said. “It’s a little disappointing because we were right there with them. We had our chances — we had the tying run up in the bottom of the seventh — but the problem was we had too many errors.”     A Bulldogs miscue let in the first of the Indians’ runs in the top of the second, but just as detrimental was a mistake that prolonged Lemont’s fifth-inning at-bat. Instead of being retired, the Indians scored on a mishandled grounder

and tallied once more after that to cap a five-run uprising.     That left Richards chasing seven runs, and it could only pick up four before time ran out on it. Jim Wujcik’s single and Shane Mills’ sacrifice fly plated two markers in the bottom of the fifth, while singles by Charlie Zeschke and Shawn Chiaramonte did the same two stanzas later.     A called third strike brought the final rally, and the game, to an abrupt halt, however.     “Needless to say, that was a big one [to lose],” Coach Wujcik said.     Harley Miller and Eric Hall both had three hits to pace the Bulldogs, and Hall also notched an RBI when he doubled home Miller in the third. Hall (.378, eight homers) has been a seasonlong bright spot at the plate for Richards, as has Zeschke (.424, .613 on-base percentage, 25 walks), but there’ve been a few too many gaps in the order this spring in Wujcik’s opinion.     “Although we are having some very good individual performances, we’re still batting under .300 as a team,” he said. “We’re not an offensive juggernaut by any means. We’ve stranded more runners than we’ve brought in.” Richards 11-17 Eisenhower 1-0     The Bulldogs’ inefficiencies were nowhere to be found against the Cardinals, who suffered slaughter-rule losses last Monday and Tuesday.     The first of those was relatively surprising, seeing as how Richards held just a 4-1 edge after 4½ innings. The tide turned dramatically in the bottom of the fifth, though, when the ’Dogs plated seven runs as Miller (two-run double), Mills (two-run double) and Zeschke all had RBI hits. Also credited with RBI were Jim Wujcik (sacrifice fly) and winning pitcher A.J. Sanchez (bases-loaded free pass).     “We’re not putting innings like this together [very often],” Coach Wujcik said, referring to Richards’ fifth stanza. “We did have 11 hits, but we kind of spread the hits around a little bit and didn’t do anything much offensively. We got helped this game by walks and hit batsmen.     “I certainly wasn’t expecting this [wide a margin], but it was more relief than surprise when it happened.”     Zeschke’s RBI single gave Sanchez a lead to protect in the bottom of the first and then the Bulldogs stretched the advantage out to four runs by scoring three times in their third plate appear-

ance. An Eisenhower throwing error led to one of the runs, while Jim Wujcik (groundout) and Sanchez (hit by pitch with the bases filled) had RBI.     On the hill, Sanchez struck out five and gave up only three hits while going the distance. He didn’t walk any batters. ***     Five runs in the second inning put Richards in control on Tuesday, and the Bulldogs scored in each of their next three at-bats as well to steamroll the Cards in Blue Island. The visitors culminated their day with an eight-run eruption in the fifth.     That latter round of noisemaking featured only one hit bigger than a single, although Nate Natividad supplied Richards with two RBI singles in the inning. Anthony Smith (double, RBI single) also stroked a pair of safeties, while Ryan Thompson and Sanchez contributed a two-run single and RBI hit, respectively.     The Bulldogs’ other explosion was highlighted by Smith’s tworun dinger and Jim Wujcik’s three-run, inside-the-park homer. Jake Kendryna (two doubles, tworun single) was yet another key ingredient in Richards’ offense during the contest.     Thompson and Justin Naval joined forces on the mound to Marist’s Broke Wyderski drives silence Eisenhower on one hit. Between them, the two hurlers fanned eight.     After traveling to Lansing to square off with TF South this past Tuesday, Richards was scheduled to host Bremen and TF North in (Continued from page 2) two other SSC crossover affairs. innings the next day. Completing the week will be a SHEPARD road game at Lincoln-Way West     A 4-0 week for the Lady Astros on Saturday. included SSC Red conquests of Richards, Eisenhower and EverStatistics green Park, plus a nonconference triumph over Queen of Peace. Eisenhower 000 01 -   1     Stephanie Brand improved her Richards 100 37 - 11 pitching ledger to 7-1 by going the distance last Monday versus the Richards 2B: Miller, Mills. RBI: Miller 2, Lady Bulldogs in what became a 9Mills 2, Sanchez 2, Wujcik 2, Zeschke 5 Shepard win. She also slugged a 2. WP: Sanchez (2-2). two-run homer. The Lady Astros’ Richards 052 28 - 17 offensive ringleader was Breanna Eisenhower 000 00 -   0 Graffeo, who was a perfect 5-for5 at the plate and belted a solo Richards 2B: Kendryna 2, Smith. HR: round-tripper. Smith, Wujcik. RBI: Smith 3, Wujcik 3,     Molly Pohrebny went 4-for-4 Kendryna 2, Natividad 2, Thompson 2, with a homer, three RBI and two Sanchez, Zeschke. WP: Thompson (2- runs to lead Richards.     After downing Eisenhower 7-1 3). on Tuesday, Shepard (15-4, 11Lemont 012 050 0 - 8 3) rode another solid outing in Richards 001 020 2 - 5 the circle by Brand to an 11-0 five-inning romp past the Lady Richards 2B: Hall. RBI: Chiaramonte, Mustangs on Wednesday. In claimHall, Mills, Wujcik, Zeschke. LP: Ken- ing her ninth victory in 10 decisions, Brand struck out seven and dryna (3-1). limited Evergreen to four hits. Grace Mihalek (3-for-3) powered a three-run homer and totaled five RBI to spearhead the Lady Astros’ offense.     Shepard wrapped up its successful week by outlasting the Pride 127 on Thursday behind Melissa Kelly,     “That kind of set the tone,” who went 4-for-4 with a homer O’Neill said of the huge deficit and four RBI while also gaining facing his squad at the outset. her sixth pitching win. Graffeo was “We had been playing pretty good perfect in four at-bats as well and defensively, but there’s not much knocked in a pair of runs. to say about this one.”     Jazmine Ramirez homered in     Getting tagged with the pitch- a losing cause for Peace. ing loss was sophomore Jeff Goral, who had thrown a no-hitter QUEEN OF PEACE against Lincoln-Way West in his     Prior to getting tagged with previous assignment. a loss by Shepard, the Pride Stagg 11 Thornton 3     The Chargers (9-16, 5-4) picked up an SWSC Red win on Thursday by rolling over the Wildcats. Stagg scored a run in six of its seven plate appearances and never trailed.     Thornton, which beat the Char- By Ken Karrson gers twice in 2012, surrendered 10 hits on this occasion, but also     Recent statistics, such as a 2-7 assisted Stagg with several gifts. record over the past two weeks, Included among them were six would seem to indicate that Marist walks, five passed balls, three wild remains a baseball team in the pitches and two errors. midst of struggle.     “It hasn’t happened a lot [for us]     RedHawks coach Tom Fabrizio this year, but we’ll definitely take refuses to have his thinking colit,” O’Neill said. “Thornton’s got ored by numbers, however. some talent, but they just helped     Mind you, Fabrizio would love to us out.” see Marist flying high right now,     The Chargers also did their part not languishing with a sub-par to make the triumph possible. ledger, but the present doesn’t Among the individual standouts always serve as an accurate bawere Peter Angelos (three hits, rometer for the future -- even the including two doubles, one RBI), immediate future. For reference, Nick Novak (two hits, one RBI) he can simply point to 2012. and Farnan (double). Other RBI     A year ago around this same suppliers were Brett Stratinsky time, the RedHawks didn’t appear (single), Duffner (single) and Ku- poised to make much noise in the biak (groundout). state tournament, but a dramatic     Kubiak went the distance on turnaround was on the verge of the mound as well and tossed a taking place. Marist closed out the six-hitter to gain his second vic- regular season with a rush, captory of the spring. tured regional and sectional titles Oak Forest 5 in Class 4A, and narrowly missed Stagg 1 advancing to the Final Four.     Five errors undermined a cred-     While Fabrizio isn’t yet ready to ible mound effort by Dwyer and proclaim his current club fit for a saddled both him and the Char- similar surge, he’s also in no hurry gers with a hard-luck defeat on to write it off, regardless of what Friday. The senior surrendered six some numbers might say. hits over six innings and fanned     “We’re finally starting to get four, but fell behind in the first healthy,” Fabrizio said. “We’re inning and fought a losing battle starting to get into a little rhythm the rest of the way. and I like where we’re heading     “He actually didn’t pitch that now. We want to pitch the idea bad — all their hits were to right [to our athletes] of playing our or right-center by right-handed best baseball at the end of the batters,” O’Neill said. “[But] then year — that’s the plan.” we start to play a little defensively     The RedHawks offered a and it starts to go bad for us.” glimpse of what they’re capable (Continued on page 7) of doing in the opener of an

Not-so-(g)lovely experience

Shaky defense returns to haunt Chargers in busy week By Ken Karrson     There’s no love for the gloves right now in Palos Hills.     Just when it seemed as if Stagg’s defensive woes had finally vanished, back they came with a vengeance last week. Bouts of shoddy fielding were the main reason the Chargers didn’t fare better during a five-games-in-fivedays span.     Not all the news was bad — against Hinsdale South on Wednesday, for example, Stagg backed starting pitcher Max Strus with rock-solid defense, which allowed the Chargers to bag a 32 win over the Hornets in nine innings. Offsetting that, though, was a nightmarish nine-error exhibition versus Andrew last Monday, which went a long way toward propelling the Thunderbolts to a resounding 19-2 victory in a shortened SouthWest Suburban Conference Red matchup.     Five more miscues were part of Stagg’s performance on Friday, which led to a 5-1 defeat against Oak Forest. And while the actual numbers weren’t quite so bad on Saturday, a critical seventh-inning error enabled Lincoln-Way East to eventually plate the deciding run in a 7-6 conquest of the Chargers.     “It’s frustrating in that aspect,” Stagg coach Matt O’Neill said of his club’s recent error-plagued displays. “We’ve been talking a lot about freebies and allowing guys to advance by not throwing to the right base, missing pickoffs, throwing wild pitches and having passed balls.     “You can only play perfect defense in high school for so long, but when you don’t score a lot — like us — it puts so much more emphasis on every little thing. We’re only hitting .243 as a team and that makes it tough on the pitchers.”     Without question, the highlight of the Chargers’ week was their effort versus Hinsdale, which plated its only runs in the bottom of the third. That rally pulled the Hornets into a tie, as Stagg had scored once each in the second and third frames.     Steve Kubiak (sacrifice fly) and

Sean Dwyer (single) drove in the Chargers’ runs, and both uprisings were helped along by stolen bases. Stagg didn’t really threaten again until its final at-bat, when Jack Duffner’s two-out triple and a Hinsdale error combined to put the Chargers back in front.     The Hornets, who were held to six hits by Strus, weren’t any more productive than their opponent. Their best chance at a breakthrough occurred in the bottom of the seventh, when a one-out triple put Strus in hot water.     But the junior induced the next two batters to hit the ball on the ground, and the first of those plays resulted in a putout at the plate. The other ended the inning.     “He did a great job of keeping them off-balance,” O’Neill said of Strus, who got Hinsdale hitters to ground out a total of 16 times. “And Kubiak and [Mike] Rankin played as well on the left side of the infield as I’ve seen.”     Making Stagg’s success particularly impressive was that it happened just one day after Andrew crushed the Chargers.     “We talked about putting it behind us and taking care of business the next day,” O’Neill said. “We [also] talked about expecting things to go well. I don’t know if it affected anything [or] where we’re at mentally when we get in the [batters’] box, but when we score first, we’ve done pretty well. Falling behind early has killed us.” Andrew 19 Stagg 2     That was certainly true last Tuesday, as the T’bolts racked up nine first-inning runs and quickly took the fight out of the Chargers. While Andrew produced a total of 12 hits to go along with Stagg’s myriad defensive mistakes, the latter was held to three hits: doubles by Brandon Campbell and Mike Farnan, plus Duffner’s two-run single in the second frame.     This marked the third time in four years that the T’bolts responded to an earlier loss to the Chargers with a mercy-rule victory in the rematch.

Softball roundup

Photo by Jason Maholy

a pitch into center field during last week’s game versus Loyola. bounced St. Joseph 12-2 in a five-inning Girls Catholic Athletic Conference matchup. Emily Janozik (two RBI) and Nicole Carli (triple, one RBI) both had a pair of hits for Peace, while Kayla Rybolt chipped in a single and two RBI.     Carli also bagged the pitching win while registering six strikeouts. STAGG     The Lady Chargers’ lone success in a four-game stretch came against Bradley-Bourbonnais, which split a two-game SouthWest Suburban Conference Red with Stagg last week.     The Lady Chargers edged the Lady Boilermakers 4-3 on Wednesday as pitcher Alexis Minet scattered six hits and survived six bases-on-balls in collecting her first victory. Lizzy Rapacz (double) and Kyla Frain (one hit, one RBI, one run, stolen base) led Stagg’s offense.     That triumph avenged a 4-2 setback suffered against Bradley the day before. Rapacz (double, two RBI) and Kelly Sistos (two hits, one run) were the Lady Chargers’ batting notables on Tuesday.     Lyons Township pinned another tough loss on Stagg last Saturday, as it made off with a 6-5 decision. Minet had two hits and scored a run for the Lady Chargers, but she also absorbed the pitching defeat. Ashley Bartkowiak contributed a double, two RBI and a run to Stagg’s attack.     Also getting the better of the Lady Chargers (4-12, 4-5) in an SWSC Red encounter last week was Lincoln-Way North, which prevailed 14-2 in six innings last Thursday. Joey Crockett went 2for-3 with a homer for Stagg, while Frain smacked a double.

pick up a pair of convincing SSC Red victories.     Richards (13-5, 13-2) whitewashed Reavis 10-0 in five frames last Tuesday as Stephanie Waller fired a no-hitter. Offering her batting support were Emily Wetzel and Sara Tobin, who totaled five hits and eight RBI between them. In addition, Wetzel tallied once.     Argo was routed 10-1 on Wednesday, thanks to big performances from Tobin and Vicky Nemic. Tobin keyed the offense with three hits, three runs and an RBI, while Nemic tossed a four-hitter and fanned six as the winning pitcher. SANDBURG     A 1-4 week dropped the Lady Eagles’ season ledger below the .500 plateau.     Sandburg’s lone success was a 4-0 SWSC Blue shutout of Bolingbrook last Monday. Sarah Herold threw a one-hitter and whiffed 11 on the Lady Eagles’ behalf.     Things slid downhill from there, though, beginning with a 9-2 conference loss to Joliet West. Eleven stranded baserunners haunted Sandburg on Wednesday as it suffered a 1-0 setback versus Beecher, which used three pitchers to frustrate the Lady Eagles (10-11). The Lady Bobcats pushed across the game’s lone run in the sixth on a suicide squeeze.     Ellie Forkin’s two-run homer was all Sandburg had to show for itself in a 9-2 SWSC Blue loss to Lincoln-Way Central on Thursday, and Marist kept the Lady Eagles reeling with another 9-2 defeat on Saturday.

MOTHER MCAULEY     Trinity handed the Mighty Macs just their second setback of the season last Monday when it notched a 6-5 GCAC Red win. RICHARDS Bush (three hits, two RBI, two     After falling short of Shepard, runs) was the top performer for the Lady Bulldogs rebounded to Mother McAuley (13-2, 7-1).

Not colored by numbers Coach thinks RedHawks poised for breakthrough East Suburban Catholic Conference doubleheader with Carmel on Saturday. The league-leading Corsairs entered Game 1 with a 9-1 record in ESCC play; they exited with a second entry in the “L” column as senior Ian Woodworth and sophomore Rich Kairis tossed a combined five-hitter.     That lack of offense saddled Carmel with a string of goose eggs, and Marist rode the strong mound effort and a relatively mistake-free overall performance to a 4-0 victory.     “We played good that day,” Fabrizio said. “Our kids threw strikes and we picked the ball up. We maybe could have done a little more offensively, but we kind of put the three phases together a little bit.”     The RedHawks’ leader didn’t think his guys were too shabby in Game 2, either, although that outcome favored the Corsairs by a 5-3 count. Cody Bohanek (three hits, one RBI), Marty Mehalek (RBI triple) and Blake Bieniek were Marist’s ringleaders, and Fabrizio also felt Matt McKenzie “pitched well enough to win.”     Besides day-to-day consistency in all areas, one missing ingredient for the RedHawks (7-13, 4-7) has been steady input from the underclassmen on the roster. While Fabrizio claims to “like what some of these young guys are doing,” he admitted Marist would be well served by the same kind of topto-bottom productivity that was evident in 2012.     “We haven’t had that and that’s

definitely hurt us,” said Fabrizio, who added that the RedHawks are also waiting for senior Bryan Polak to bust out. A pivotal individual in last spring’s lineup, Polak hasn’t been able to settle into a comfortable groove.     “We kind of go as he goes,” Fabrizio said, “and he’s been in a season-long funk. We know what he’s capable of doing, and when he shows glimpses of that, we do well.” St. Viator 8-4 Marist 5-1     Marist’s up-and-down attack was at both ends of the spectrum versus the Lions last week.     In the first of the teams’ ESCC clashes on Monday, the RedHawks knocked out 10 hits, which pleased their coach. Not so desirable was the fact that Marist was trailing 81 after three innings and couldn’t complete a full comeback.     St. Viator amassed five runs in the first frame and received plenty of unexpected assistance from the RedHawks, who offered up three free passes and plunked three other batters with pitches. Marist fought back to within 8-4 in the fifth inning, but could tack on only one more run before time ran out on it.     “I told the boys we can’t get off to a start like that and expect to win many games,” Fabrizio said. “But we did do a good job of chipping away at their best pitcher.”     Bohanek (RBI), Mehalek and Jack Gainer all had two hits (Continued on page 7)


4

Section 2 Thursday, May 9, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

McHenry County duo set the pace Locals also fare well at First Midwest Half Marathon By Jeff Vorva     The sixth running of the First Midwest Half Marathon had a McHenry County and University of Illinois feel attached to it.     The men’s winner on Sunday was Woodstock’s Dan Kremske, who covered the 13.1-mile course in 1 hour, 6 minutes, 16 seconds a week after turning 24. His pace-setting time was 17 seconds ahead of runner-up Elly Sang of Kenya.     The women’s champion was 26year-old Jacqui Giuliano of Oakwood Hills, whose 1:20:49 clocking was close to a minute better than that of Lisle’s Kristen Heckert. Giuliano was 19th overall.     Both Kremske and Giuliano live in McHenry County and graduated from Illinois. Each of them ran track in college.     “This was my first race here and it felt good,” Kremske said. “I wasn’t sure how well I would do. I was in the [McHenry County] Shamrock Shuffle recently and

felt good.”     Kremske said he was a late bloomer in the sport and started to blossom his senior year at Woodstock High School. He walked on at Illinois and ran both cross country and distance events in track.     Giuliano is a Crystal Lake South graduate who was chosen as an Athlete of the Year by one local publication a decade ago. She won seven prep letters in cross country and track, and was all-state runner three years in a row.     Giuliano didn’t enjoy a stellar collegiate career, however, because she said she “was the queen of the stress fractures.”     Giuliano wasn’t very confident about winning the half marathon. She had been on the Palos course before, taking fifth in 2011 and third in 2012, but climbing up two more spots to the top didn’t seem to be in the cards.     “I just ran in a half marathon in Champaign [and finished second among more than 3,000 women

on April 26], so I didn’t know how I would feel [Sunday],” Giuliano said. “I was nervous, but I’m happy I could go from fifth to third to first in three years here.”     Darryl Bingham, 43, of Oak Forest won the walk, run and roll race sponsored by the South West Recreation Association. Sandburg High School’s Eagle won the mascot race.     U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski finished 107th in the main race with a 1:37:28, ABC-7 TV reporter John Garcia claimed 147th with a 1:40:32 and state Sen. Bill Cunningham was 457th with a 1:56:51. There were 1,465 runners who finished the race in at least 3 hours, 32 minutes, and a few hundred who were taken back in vans because of time limits.     Area runners enjoyed some success at their respective age levels.     On the men’s side Hickory Hills’ Mark Schall won the 50-54 age group, Orland Park’s John Hanley

was first in the 55-59 division, Orland Park’s Larry McDonough claimed the 60-64 age-group title, Palos Park’s Jurgen Daartz won the 70-plus division and Palos Park’s Mike Yuhasz won the veterans’ competition.     On the woman’s side, the Nelligans of Orland Park dominated the younger divisions as Kara won the 1-14 group and Caitlin was tops in the 15-19 group. Palos Park’s Ashley Shares won at 2024, Palos Heights’ Cassidy Wall took the 35-39, Evergreen Park’s Phyllis Hansen was first in the 70-plus division and Palos Park’s Mary Rosner won the veteran’s division.     Other area runners in the top 100 were Oak Lawn’s Daniel Regalado (21st), Orland Park’s Jose Amador (34th), Orland Park’s Dimitri Dimizas, Oak Lawn’s Elizabeth Lemrise (47th), Hickory Hills’ Grzegorz Dziubek (53rd), Palos Hills’ Dariusz Lisowski (65th), Palos Heights’ Annabelle Winters (68th), Palos

Photo by Jason Maholy

Ashley Rampick of Oak Lawn crosses the finish line. Heights’ Keith Budinger (69th), Hickory Hills’ Alex Tarasiewicz (71st), Evergreen Park’s Chris Ward (74th), Palos Hills’ Phil

Culbertson (75th), Oak Lawn’s Steve Rice (82nd), Palos Heights’ Nadine Antonini (83rd) and Oak Lawn’s Dan Krasich (93rd).

Photo by Jason Maholy

Jakub Zajac (from left) of Hickory Hills, Elizabeth Lemrise of Oak Photo by Jason Maholy Lawn and Grzegorz Dziabek of Hickory Hills step off from the Worth residents Liz Werner and her father, Kevin, join hands as Photo by Jason Maholy starting line. Lemrise was second in the female 25 to 29 division they approach the finish line of the First Midwest Half Marathon. Dan Kremske of Woodstock blows a kiss to the crowd as he and Zajac was eighth in the men’s 30 to 34 division. Kevin ran the race in a personal best 2 hours, 18 minutes. approaches the finish line of the First Midwest Half Marathon.

Crusaders (Continued from page 2) the uphill climb his club faced was a steep one.     “Our backs were against the wall,” he said. “Ninety-five percent of the people at the game probably thought it was over, except for the kids in our dugout. I’m really, really proud of them to bounce back like they did.     “Sometimes you just will [your way to] wins. You just want to battle every at-bat. Take walks if they’ll give them to you and chip away at them.”     Rice (16-9, 8-5) sliced the Celtics’ advantage in half by erupting for three runs in the top of the fifth. The rally began with Luke Liebforth’s one-out single and a walk to Sullivan, and continued with RBI hits from Biondic and Brian Musielak (double). Ferguson also drove in a run with his groundout.     The Crusaders then roared in front one inning later by plating four runs, the last two of which raced home on Musielak’s single, a hit McCarthy called “absolutely huge.” Biondic and Liebforth also stroked RBI singles.     Liebforth delivered one more run-producing single in the top of the seventh, which proved key because Providence tallied once itself in its final plate appearance. Liebforth and Musielak both collected three hits to pace Rice’s attack, while Mike Enriquez threw 3 1/3 innings of one-hit relief to secure the pitching victory. ***     Last Monday’s clash between the Crusaders and Celtics bore a resemblance to the Rice-Lincoln-Way North matchup that took place later in the week. In the earlier game, the Crusaders’ Ian McGinnis and Providence’s Jake Gottfried hooked up in a masterful mound exhibition, one that tipped Rice’s way when it scored a run in the sixth inning to snap a 1-all deadlock.     “It was just a good test for us to face a good arm, which will help prepare us for the playoffs,” McCarthy said. “All the games are going to be tight, but our guys are competing, playing hard and believing in themselves.”     McGinnis silenced the Celtics on five scattered hits and the run garnered off him was unearned. He struck out five in a route-going performance.     Musielak’s two-out single broke the tie by chasing in Sullivan (single, stolen base). Ferguson accounted for the Crusaders’ initial marker when he singled in the fourth inning and eventually crossed the plate on a Providence

throwing error. St. Rita 11 Brother Rice 0     The Crusaders’ smooth sailing ended on Saturday, when they ran afoul of a Mustangs crew that had just suffered two defeats against St. Laurence. One of those setbacks was doled out on a no-hitter.     “They came out with a chip on their shoulder,” McCarthy said of St. Rita players, “and we didn’t match that. We’ve got to do a better job of bouncing back from a big win and being ready to compete.     “That was tough for me to watch, but hopefully we learned a lesson from it.”     Andrew Dyke provided Rice with its lone hit when he smacked a leadoff double in the opening stanza. Liebforth also walked in the inning, but both players were picked off base.     The Mustangs then struck for five runs, with a three-run homer serving as the crushing blow. St. Rita exploded for six more tallies in the fourth, using six of its seven doubles to fuel the uprising.     The Crusaders, meanwhile, put runners aboard in only one other frame. That was in the top of the fourth, when Sullivan and Biondic drew walks, but the would-be threat died on a strikeout.     Another contest with St. Rita, two versus St. Laurence and one opposite De La Salle at Benedictine University were on tap for Rice this week. The Crusaders step outside the Catholic League Blue today to square off with Andrean (Ind.) at the University of Notre Dame.

Statistics Providence Catholic Brother Rice

000 100 0 - 1 000 101 x - 2

Brother Rice RBI: Musielak. WP: McGinnis (3-3). Brother Rice Providence Catholic

000 034 1 - 8 510 000 1 - 7

Brother Rice 2B: Musielak. RBI: Musielak 3, Biondic 2, Liebforth 2, Ferguson. WP: Enriquez (1-1). Brother Rice Lincoln-Way North

000 000 1 - 1 000 000 0 - 0

Brother Rice RBI: Hilliard. WP: Biondic (1-2). Brother Rice St. Rita

000 00 -   0 500 6x - 11

Brother Rice 2B: Dyke. LP: McGinnis (3-4).

Eagles (Continued from page 1) three RBI to pace the Eagles’ potent attack. Matt Shimonis had two hits, including a tworun homer, and four RBI in all, while Cronin contributed a pair of hits and one RBI.     That was more than enough support for Sandburg pitcher Sean Leland, who improved his ledger to 3-0 by throwing five of the game’s six innings and whiffing 10. His ERA dropped to 2.50 on the strength of this latest exhibition. Sandburg 11 Reavis 9     Except for allowing the Rams to gain some life in the seventh, the Eagles’ Monday outing earned a thumbs-up from Fear and the team’s other coaches.     Certainly, Sandburg’s offense was in high gear, as evidenced by the four- and six-run outbursts it produced in the third and sixth frames, respectively. Headliners for the Eagles included Martinez (two doubles, three RBI), Nelson (two-run double, three RBI), Shimonis (two doubles, one RBI), Santiago (RBI single), Cangelosi (one hit, two walks, three runs) and Zehme (double).     Being able to escape with a win in spite of Reavis’ late noisemaking also reinforced Sandburg coaches’ claims to their players that not too much should have been read into the earlier stumbles versus Lockport and Lincoln-Way Central.     “That was kind of the message we sent,” Fear said. “We played a very good baseball game against Lockport, but we didn’t pitch well in the seventh. We’ve played well in most of our games and we know we’re pretty good, so hopefully the kids don’t put added pressure on themselves because this sport is tough enough to play as it is.” Sandburg 9 Oak Forest 7     The Eagles’ bats were booming last Wednesday, as Cangelosi, Nelson and Santiago all powered homers to lift Sandburg past the Bengals in a nonconference affair.     “It’s warming up and the wind was blowing out, but there weren’t any cheap ones,” Fear said. “They’ve got a little pop — Cangelosi’s got some of the

SIGN UP TO GET FREE AMBER ALERTS ON YOUR CELL PHONE. wirelessamberalerts.org

fastest hands I’ve seen in high school and Nelson’s a big kid.     “And guys are getting more aggressive by not being in twostrike situations. It’s a snowball effect — we get better pitches to hit by being aggressive and not falling behind [in the count], and then pitchers try to be too fine [in locating their offerings].”     Oak Forest jumped out to a 4-0 lead in the top of the first, but Sandburg immediately responded with a three-spot in its initial atbat. After the Bengals went up 5-3 in the second, the Eagles tallied the game’s next six runs and moved in front to stay.     Santiago and Nelson both slugged two-run round-trippers and totaled three RBI, while Cangelosi’s solo shot was one of two hits for him. The latter also reached base on a walk. Matthias Dietz was the winning pitcher.     Two SWSC Blue dates with Lincoln-Way East and one more matchup against Joliet Central were on tap for Sandburg this week. Also scheduled were conference crossover tilts versus Andrew and Lincoln-Way West.

Statistics Reavis Sandburg

030 101 4 -   9 014 006 x - 11

Sandburg 2B: Martinez 2, Shimonis 2, Nelson, Zehme. RBI: Martinez 3, Nelson 3, Santiago, Shimonis. WP: Shelhamer (3-1). Bolingbrook Sandburg

000 100 -   1 101 027 - 11

Sandburg 2B: Nelson 2. HR: Giron, Shimonis. RBI: Shimonis 4, Nelson 3, Giron 2, Cronin. WP: Leland (3-0). Oak Forest Sandburg

410 002 0 - 7 311 220 x - 9

Sandburg HR: Cangelosi, Nelson, Santiago. RBI: Nelson 3, Santiago 3, Cangelosi. WP: Dietz (3-2). Sandburg Joliet Central

000 000 02 - 2 000 000 00 - 0

Sandburg 2B: Martinez, Zehme. RBI: Martinez, Zehme. WP: Pall (4-1). Sandburg Glenbard South

102 220 0 - 7 100 001 0 - 2

SIGN UP TO GET FREE AMBER Sandburg 2B: CroninALERTS 2, Santiago. RBI: Cangelosi 2, Cronin, Stearns. WP: MarON YOUR CELL PHONE. tinez (1-0). wirelessamberalerts.org

Knights

the second and seven times in the fifth to conclude the contest via the mercy rule.     Novak was the winning pitcher after tossing a one-hitter and striking out six in his fourth complete-game performance within conference play. He also lent a hand at the plate, as he singled, coaxed a pair of free passes and drove in four runs. Mike Santarelli (two hits, including a two-run double, three RBI), Meyer (two hits, two RBI) and Marinec (two-run double) were the Knights’ other ringleaders.     As has been true far more often than not this season, the Knights made maximum use of their baserunners. Through walks and hits, Christian put 19 men aboard and all but three of them eventually crossed the plate.     “We’ve got a lot of really unselfish guys,” Brauer said. “They’re doing their little piece to keep the team winning and they’re willing to sacrifice personal stats for the team’s benefit.”     In addition to their meeting with Marmion Academy, the Knights were slated to clash with Christian Liberty, University High, Shepard and Evergreen Park this week.

(Continued from page 1) after wrapping up a win in just 88 minutes. ***     The Green Wave jumped out in front of Christian right away in last Tuesday’s rematch, but their first-inning homer soon got buried beneath a Knights scoring blitz. The hosts were ahead 6-1 after only two at-bats and St. Edward had no adequate answer for that assault.     “It was tough, I’m sure, for them to bounce back [mentally],” Brauer said of the Wave. “It was tough traveling an hour after losing 2-0. [Monday’s game] could have been 0-0 going into the seventh, where a bloop hit could have won it for them. That would have made things entirely different.”     Spearheading Christian’s offensive performance were Findysz and O’Meara, who went a combined 6-for-7 with six RBI and four runs scored. O’Meara included a bases-clearing triple among his hits, while Findysz swatted a two-run double. Also chipping in were Dylan Marinec (two hits, one RBI), Bulthuis (two hits) and Meyer (one hit, two sac- Statistics rifice flies, three RBI).     “We came out swinging the bats Chicago Christian 002 000 0 - 2 [well] — even most of our outs St. Edward 000 000 0 - 0 were hard-hit,” Brauer said. “It was a drastically different game Chicago Christian RBI: Meyer. WP: Nothan Monday’s. The wind was vak (6-0). blowing in at St. Ed’s and it was cooler, so it was a much friendlier St. Edward 100 00 -   1 hitting day on Tuesday. Chicago Christian 240 23 - 11     “And their pitcher just couldn’t locate [the plate]. He was a little Chicago Christian 2B: Findysz. 3B: erratic and pitching from behind O’Meara. RBI: Findysz 3, Meyer 3, [in the count] a lot.” O’Meara 3, Marinec. WP: Bolhuis (8    Knights hurler Christian Bol- 2). WITH NO WATER. huis didn’t have that problem, as he gave up just one other Aurora Christian 000 101 0 - 2 “ I FEEL –JACOB, AGE hit besides the early homer. In Chicago Christian 003LIKE 000 x5- 3 DESCRIBING ASTHMA raising his season record to 8-2, the sophomore fanned five and Chicago Christian 2B: Findysz. RBI: Finwalked one. dysz. WP: Lyle (4-0). WITH NO WATER.” Chicago Christian 16 Wheaton Academy 2 Chicago Christian –JACOB, 540 AGE 07 - 516 DESCRIBING ASTHMA     The Knights were also on cruise Wheaton Academy 000 20 -   2 control last Friday after erupting for five first-inning markers Chicago Christian 2B: Marinec, Santarelli. “ I FEEL LIKE and shoving the Warriors into a RBI: Novak 4, Santarelli 3, Marinec 2, rather deep hole. Christian went Meyer 2, Bielecki, Findysz, Kerfin. WP: on to score four more times in Novak (7-0).

“ I FEEL LIKE

A FISH ”

A FISH

A FISH WITH NO WATER.”

“ I FEEL LIKE

A FISH WITH NO WATER.”

You know how to react to their asthma attacks.

–JACOB, AGE 5 to prevent them. Here’s how DESCRIBING ASTHMA

1- 866 - NO -ATTACKS You know how to react

to theirIS asthma EVEN ONE ATTACK ONE attacks. TOO MANY. Here’s how to prevent them.

For more information log onto 1866 - NO -ATTACKS www.noattacks.org or call your doctor. EVEN ONE ATTACK IS ONE TOO MANY. For more information log onto www.noattacks.org or call your doctor.

–JACOB, AGE 5 A child is calling for help.

DESCRIBING ASTHMA

You know how to react


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 9, 2013 Section 2

5

Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella     In the words of Sandburg girls’ water polo coach Jane Caliendo, one of her team’s primary aims each season is to begin building momentum when May commences.     Based on the Lady Eagles’ 4-1 record last week — which was constructed upon wins over highly ranked Lincoln-Way Central, Lockport, Neuqua Valley and Homewood-Flossmoor, plus a loss to Naperville Central — they seem to be fulfilling that goal quite convincingly.     “Our goal every year is to peak in May,” Caliendo said. “This is the first week of May and we went 4-1. We defeated the No. 6 team in the state and we solidified a piece of the conference title for us.     “I think everything is coming together, and anything can happen on any given day in high school sports.”     And in each of last week’s five matches, Sandburg demonstrated its offensive depth as a different player scored in each game.     “It’s been a great season in the fact that any one of the six field players is an offensive threat,” Caliendo said, “and everyone has had one or two games to shine this season where they were the leading scorers. It’s a great thing to have when you have six players who aren’t afraid to shoot, and you can go to the hot hand and depend on any one of them. That has been an awesome luxury.”     Sandburg started the week with a 6-5 SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue victory over host Lockport as Maggie Foley scored three goals to propel the Lady Eagles. In a 9-2 victory over Neuqua Valley, Cara Hayes scored three times to lead Sandburg.     “We squeaked out the win against Lockport, which we were happy to do because it was the Monday after prom,” Caliendo said. “It was a long weekend for all of the seniors. Just to come away with a win, in any way we could do it, was just fine with me.”     With Wednesday’s 6-4 upset of Lincoln-Way Central, the Lady Eagles were able to avenge a 149 loss suffered against the Lady Knights back in early April. Brittany Kamper scored four goals and Alona King was solid in goal as Sandburg denied Lincoln-Way Central’s quest for its first outright conference title.     The Lady Eagles built a 6-2 lead as Kamper scored the first three goals of the second half, converting a breakaway with 6:12 left in the match to create the four-goal edge. The Lady Knights closed to within 6-4 with 2:35 left, but that’s as close as they would get.     Kaitlyn Randich and Hayes each scored once for Sandburg. The former then tallied four times on Thursday to fuel a 10-3 SWSC Blue triumph over H-F. King did her part by making 12 saves.     The Lady Eagles’ final regularseason match ended in a 7-6 defeat to Naperville Central.     “The loss wasn’t for a lack of trying,” Caliendo said. “We just went cold and couldn’t find the back of the net — we were 6-for39. Not only that, [but] we had at least seven shots that hit the crossbar and went straight down and floated near the goal line. We were an inch too high.     “We love playing Naperville Central. We beat them two weeks ago 6-5 and they beat us this time 7-6, [so] it was two evenly matched teams.”     But for all of the Lady Eagles’ offensive contributions, Caliendo said that one player has stood out among the bunch.     “The star of the show all season for us has been our goalie Alona King,” she said. “She has come up huge.     “In the Lincoln-Way Central game, she was amazing. She made so many key saves in that game. She went one-on-one with the best player in the state, Danijela Jackovich, and stuffed her a few times. I just can’t say enough about her.”     Caliendo is also quick to point out, however, that team chemistry is making a big difference this season.     “They’re definitely strong team — they all get along,” she said of her athletes. “They really enjoy each other’s company. When you coach a group of girls, that’s half the battle. They have great team chemistry, and it shows in how we play.     “They’re extremely unselfish. If somebody has stepped up, there’s no animosity. If somebody is having a good game or scoring more goals, all the girls have the same goal together, and that’s for the team to be successful.”     As the state tournament kicks off, Sandburg will face Argo at Stagg. With a victory, the Lady Eagles will likely take on a Bremen team that handed them a 9-5 defeat earlier this season. Awaiting the winner of the semifinal will most likely be Mother McAuley.     “We’re going to take it one game at a time and see what happens,”

Caliendo said. “If things work out, we’ll surely see McAuley on Saturday.     “In the loss to Bremen, we had just one bad quarter. They’re a pretty remarkable team; they don’t have a weak link in the bunch. They’re very talented, and they have one of the best goalies in the state, so it’s going to be a tough game, but we’re up for the challenge.     “We’re tenacious. We’ve haven’t gotten blown out once this season, and we’ve played one of the tougher schedules in the state: McAuley, St. Ignatius, Naperville Central, Lincoln-Way Central, New Trier. We’ve defeated everyone in the top 10 except Fenwick and Stevenson.”     And the prospect of facing the Mighty Macs is always a formidable one due to the experience that their water polo players possess.     “The advantage for them is most of their girls have been playing polo since fifth or sixth grade,” Caliendo said. “We don’t have that luxury. Our girls never played polo before high school.     “Is that a disadvantage? Sure it is, but we always come in with a good solid plan and do what we can to compete and succeed.” ***     Stagg dropped a 23-3 SWSC Red decision to Andrew last Monday. BOYS’ WATER POLO     Stagg went unbeaten in three SWSC Red matches last week as it downed Andrew (14-9) on Monday, Lincoln-Way West (15-13) on Wednesday and Bradley-Bourbonnais (15-11) on Friday.     Ryan Petersen’s five goals powered the Chargers past the Thunderbolts and then notched nine in Stagg’s win over the Warriors. In that latter match, Peter Krivanec made 11 saves.     Six more goals from Peterson, plus five from Nick Amendola, boosted the Chargers past the Boilermakers. Krivanec turned aside 11 Bradley shots. ***     Sandburg won both of its matches last week, 13-8 win over Naperville Central on Thursday and 16-9 over Homewood-Flossmoor on Friday.     Kevin Tunney scored six times and Mike O’Malley added four goals to lift the Eagles over Naperville, while Tunney’s five tallies were the key ingredients in Sandburg’s triumph over the Vikings. ***     Shepard dropped a pair of matches last week, 14-10 to Morton on Tuesday and 19-7 to Andrew on Wednesday.     Mitch Pearl notched four goals to pace the Astros versus Morton, while Neil Slowinski scored five times against the Thunderbolts. GIRLS’ SOCCER     Chicago Christian halted an extended losing streak with a hard-fought 2-2 tie against Eisenhower last Monday, but the Lady Knights were unable to keep the momentum going the rest of the week as they suffered setbacks against Marian Central Catholic (4-0 on Tuesday), St. Edward (9-0 on Thursday) and Argo (3-1 on Saturday).     Chicago Christian coach Timmy Dustin said his team accomplished three things against Eisenhower.     “Our offense stepped up and scored after being shut out for 240 minutes,” Dustin said. “We didn’t drop off in the second half [and] we broke our 11-game losing streak.     “We were in desperate need of a goal. Our offense was frustrated. Over the last two games, we had chance after chance and didn’t put any away, [but here], despite some misses in the first half, we fought on and scored.”     Emily Lemmenes tallied for the Lady Knights off an assist from Jamey Walsh, and Stephanie Lang dribbled around the goalie and found an open shot. Then Christian hung tough.     “It’s been our tendency this season to play a strong first half and then come out tired in the second half, but we didn’t do that,” Dustin said. “We played an impressive second half [by] playing a full 40 minutes. We came out strong, putting some early shots on goal, and didn’t let up. Because of that, we were able to find two goals.     “Soccer is a game of momentum, and going into any game with a big losing streak completely breaks your confidence. Obviously, we were looking for the win, but I’m completely satisfied with a tie. The girls showed me intensity and desire on the field, something we’ve been lacking recently.”     Dustin admitted the Lady Knights also had a little bit of luck on their side for the first time all year, as Eisenhower missed some easy chances.     “On the same side, we missed a couple easy chances, too,” he said. “So, with three games left in our regular season, I want to

see more of what we did here. I want to see us score, play hard in the second half and compete to the best of our abilities.”     The loss to Marian Central, in Dustin’s view, represented almost a complete turnaround for the Lady Knights in comparison to their performance against Eisenhower.     “We weren’t staying with our marks, we were constantly chasing, we had little-to-no offense, our communication to each other was negative, and we got dominated in the possession game,” he said.     Dustin said Christian’s first touch was also extremely weak.     “If we can’t trap and bring the ball down to feet, we can’t possess,” he said. “If we can’t possess, we’re going to chase. When we chase, we let the other team control the pace of the game, we get tired, we make mistakes, and then they score goals.     “I don’t want to take anything away from Marian — they have a very talented team, especially with their small numbers — but we self-destructed. We got lazy and undid everything we accomplished [against Eisenhower].     “However, teams have off days. I still believe we’re a capable team. I believe we can play 10 times better than we did, [but] I also believe we can make it to our regional final. We just need to turn up our performance, get aggressive and not give up until the official blows the whistle to end the game.”     Dustin knew Lady Knights had a lot to improve on after their 9-0 loss to St. Edward. He said Christian devoted much of its practice sessions working on fundamentals.     “We worked on our first touch, how to drop the ball back, and going one-on-one to goal,” he said. “We obviously lost, but it was a complete turnaround from Thursday. We improved on everything we worked on in practice.     “Argo was a physical opponent, and they were also quick with a deep bench. We were missing our captain, Anica Pausma, so other girls needed to step up and be leaders, and they did. We stepped on the field as a team and walked off the field as a team, not as individuals.”     Katie Goudzwaard registered Christian’s lone goal against Argo, while Lemmenes played a strong defensive game as a fill-in for Pausma in the Lady Knights’ final regular-season outing.     “We’re on to regionals and will play Mt. Assisi,” Dustin said. “Our results over the regular season will mean nothing. We get a fresh start to prove ourselves. It’s up to the girls to take this opportunity against an opponent we’re very capable of beating.” ***     Sandburg went 4-1 last week, an effort that included a thirdplace finish at the Lemont Cup Tournament.     The Lady Eagles (12-5-3, 3-1) opened with a 6-0 SWSC Blue win Joliet Central on Tuesday, as Morgan Manzke’s hat trick led the way. Also scoring for Sandburg were Sarah Dewolf, Emily Osoba and Carly Katalinic.     Netminder Nicole Kulovitz earned the shutout with help from Katalinic, Amanda Kester, Jayna Kozlowski and Sam Jacobs.     Meghan Carmody had two goals to lead the Lady Eagles past Lincoln-Way East 5-0 in another conference match on Thursday. In Friday’s Lemont Cup, Sandburg claimed a 3-1 win over Plainfield Central behind two goals from Carmody and one from Dewolf.     Waubonsie Valley got goals from Jenna Romano and Paige Filipek to top the Lady Eagles 2-0 in Saturday’s semifinal. In the third-place match versus Hinsdale South, Sandburg rode goals from Carmody and Manzke to its own 2-0 triumph. ***     Stagg defeated Thornwood Coop 8-0 last Tuesday and BradleyBourbonnais 2-1 last Thursday before settling for a 1-1 tie with Plainfield East on Saturday.     Jillian Atkenson and Paulina Stafira each scored twice for the Lady Chargers (7-3-2, 2-2) against Thornwood Co-op, while Janus chipped in three assists. Featured in Stagg’s SWSC Red victory over Lady Boilers were markers from Janus and Atkenson, as well as solid defensive efforts by Allison Stefan, Alex Abed and Hannah Henderson.     Joanna Gawlik delivered the Lady Chargers’ goal against Plainfield East off an assist from Ann Marie Gal. BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL     Shepard (10-13, 5-7) split a pair of matches last week as it topped Illiana Christian 25-21, 25-23 on Monday before losing to Oak Lawn 25-14, 25-22 on Tuesday.     Kyle Joy had 13 kills and James Donohue passed out 12 assists to pace the Astros in their win. Jose Reyes contributed four kills, while Hussein Al-Rashdan finished with (Continued on page 6)

Photo by Jason Maholy

Evergreen Park’s Mark Martin drives a pitch into left field during last week’s game against Oak Lawn.

Photo by Jason Maholy

Evergreen Park’s Mark Martin slides safely into third base as Oak Lawn’s Bob Kametas awaits the late throw during last week’s game between the South Suburban Conference Red rivals.

Spartans (Continued from page 1) with only minimal resistance.     The Mustangs’ best showing was in the fourth frame, when Sean Miller slammed a threerun homer. Dan Duh singled in Evergreen’s initial marker two innings before that, but the hosts finished with only six hits.     “I was surprised by that,” Smyth said of the Mustangs’ relative shutdown on offense. “But [the divisional race] is still pretty darn close and we still have an outside chance.” ***     Evergreen put itself in a contending position by posting a triumph over Oak Lawn on Monday behind a complete-game pitching effort from Frank Meisl, who limited the Spartans to four hits and upped his record to 4-2.     “He’s been a really bright spot,” Smyth said of Meisl. “He doesn’t have overpowering stuff, but he has a good mound presence and he mixes up speeds well. He kept his pitch count to a minimum.”     “We couldn’t do anything with what he was throwing,” Gerny said.     Oak Lawn (11-9, 10-4) tallied once in the fourth and again in the sixth, with Brandon Quillin supplying the two RBI on a sacrifice fly and double, respectively. The Spartans threatened to do more harm, but Meisl was able to work his way out of danger.     “We had one inning that got sloppy and it could have gotten ugly for him,” Smyth said. “But he regained his composure and gutted it out at the end.”     The Mustangs (10-11, 7-6) established some breathing room for themselves in their last atbat, when they tallied three times. Highlighting the seventh-inning spurt were doubles by Duh (two RBI) and Mark Martin. An Oak Lawn error led to another run.

    Duh also singled home a teammate in the fourth, while Miller followed up hits by Mike Reuter and Duh in the sixth with an RBI single. Miller went 3-for-4 in the contest, but Smyth is also excited about seeing Duh begin to flourish.     “Duh is starting to get hot and swing the bat like we knew he could,” Smyth said. “[Several] guys are coming through with the big hits and being patient at the plate, so hopefully we’re turning the corner and getting consistent offensively.”     Two SSC Red clashes with Eisenhower and a conference crossover game against Lemont were on tap for Evergreen this week. Oak Lawn 3 Bremen 2     Kametas and Matt Dunne teamed up on the hill to stop the Braves on three hits and pave the way for an important Spartans win last Thursday. Between them, Oak Lawn’s two hurlers struck out four, and they managed to overcome three bases-on-balls and three hit batsmen that benefited Bremen.     The Spartans and Braves were locked in a 2-all tie from the second inning through the fifth. Finally, Witkowski pushed Oak Lawn in front with his sacrifice fly in the sixth. He had brought in one of the Spartans’ earlier runs in the same manner and Thome also drilled an RBI single in the second. Oak Lawn 13 Hillcrest 1     The Hawks weren’t expected to pose a threat to the Spartans’ well-being last Wednesday, and the pitching trio of Ray Walker, Lee Baxa and Chris Donato made sure of that by joining forces on a one-hitter and fanning nine.     “We were not putting too much stress on our fielders,” Gerny said.     Hillcrest scraped together a run

in the fourth, but by that time it was hopelessly buried. Oak Lawn saw to that by scoring in all five frames it batted, including five times in the fifth. Among the hitting heroes were Kametas (tworun homer, RBI double), Dunne (RBI double), Quillin (RBI double) and Krzysiak (RBI single).     Gerny is especially pleased to see Kametas emerging as a force at the plate as his senior season heads toward the finish line.     “He was struggling a little bit at the plate,” Gerny said. “We said, ‘It’s time for you to step,’ and he stepped up.”     Pivotal conference games with Shepard and Oak Forest awaited the Spartans this week.

Statistics Evergreen Park Oak Lawn

001 101 3 - 6 000 101 0 - 2

Evergreen Park 2B: Duh 2, Martin, Miller. RBI: Duh 3, Miller. WP: Meisl (4-2). Oak Lawn 2B: Quillin. RBI: Quillin 2. LP: Dunne (4-3). Oak Lawn Evergreen Park

0(11)4 00 - 15 010 30 -   4

Oak Lawn 2B: Kametas. HR: Kametas, Krzysiak. RBI: Kametas 3, Krzysiak 2, Thome 2, Witkowski 2. WP: Swatek (2-2). Evergreen Park 2B: Reuter. HR: Miller. RBI: Miller 3, Duh. LP: Venhuizen (23). Oak Lawn Bremen

020 001 0 - 3 020 000 0 - 2

Oak Lawn RBI: Witkowski 2, Thome. WP: Kametas (4-1). Oak Lawn Hillcrest

212 35 - 13 000 10 -   1

Oak Lawn 2B: Dunne, Kametas, Quillin. HR: Kametas. RBI: Kametas 3, Dunne, Krzysiak, Quillin. WP: Walker (1-0).

The LATCH system makes it easier to be sure your child’s car seat is installed correctly every time. Just clip it to the lower anchors, attach the top tether, and pull the straps tight. To find out more, visit safercar.gov.


6

Section 2 Thursday, May 9, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

SXU sports summary

Community sports news

Nonnemachers honored by CCAC

Submitted photo

Maritza Varela, the manager of the 7-Eleven in Palos Heights, presented a grant check to Palos Baseball Organization president Jim Lizzio and Mike Kamholz during the league’s 2013 season-opening ceremonies in April.

PBO kicks off 2013 season

    The Palos Baseball Organization kicked off its 2013 season on April 20 with its annual parade that ran through the Palos neighborhood and concluded at the PBO/Power fields.     Alderman Jeff Key threw out the ceremonial first pitch, Cub Scout Troop 3337 led the reciting of the Pledge of Allegiance and Ashley Hughes sang the national anthem. Also highlighting the event was the presentation of a check to PBO from 7-Eleven and local store manager Maritza Varela.     On April 21, PBO players and coaches attended a baseball game at Notre Dame University. The Fighting Irish, who have former PBO player and Marist High School standout Mike Hearne on the 2013 roster, beat Quinnipiac 5-1 behind a 12-hit attack.

St. Laurence to host annual golf outing

    The St. Laurence Alumni Association will host its 24th annual golf outing on Friday, May 31, at Water’s Edge Golf Club in Worth.     The event begins at 1:30 p.m. with a shotgun start. Tee times are limited to the first 144 golfers and all reservations must be received by May 27.     The cost is $150 per golfer, which includes 18 holes of golf in a scramble format, lunch and beverages on the course, dinner, contests, giveaways and a raffle. Sponsorship opportunities are available for both individuals and businesses.     For more information, call Ed Kozak at 458-6900, ext. 244, or email him at ekozak@stlaurence. com.

Summer sports camps coming to Moraine Valley

    Moraine Valley College will host youth basketball and volleyball camps July 15-18.     The basketball camp, which will be conducted by Moraine athletic director and former men’s basketball coach Bill Finn, will run from 9-10:30 a.m. each day and is open to youngsters entering grades 3-8 in the fall. The program is designed to develop and improve fundamental basketball skills through group and individual drills, instruction and

team play.     Cyclones volleyball coach Gloria Coughlin will head up the volleyball camp, which will be held from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily and is open to youngsters entering grades 5-9. The teaching of fundamental skills needed to play the sport will be emphasized.     The cost of each camp is $70. Participants must register through Moraine Valley’s Athletics Department.     For more information, call 9745727 or visit www.morainevalley. edu/Athletics.

Marist outlasts St. Viator in boys’ volleyball

    Three games were required, but Marist was finally able to subdue St. Viator last Tuesday in a battle of unbeaten East Suburban Catholic Conference boys’ volleyball squads.     John Yerkes’ 13 kills and three service aces were key elements in the RedHawks’ 25-23, 21-25, 2511 match triumph. Morty Berglind backed Yerkes with 12 kills and one ace, while Matt Munro made eight blocks and Mike Schreiber dished out 41 assists. Schreiber also had seven digs.     Other contributors for Marist (15-8, 4-0) included Jake Moran (nine kills), Bill Kennedy (five blocks, three aces) and Brendan Hopkins (12 digs).

Rice tennis team rolls over Eisenhower

    A sweep of the double matches helped Brother Rice’s tennis team notch a 4-1 victory over Eisenhower last Wednesday.     None of the Crusaders’ three doubles pairs allowed the Cardinals to score more than two points in any set. Colin and Sean Burton won 6-2, 6-1 at No. 1 doubles, the second-doubles tandem of Jimmy Gallagher-Jack Gorman collected a 6-2, 6-1 triumph, and the No. 3 duo of Tom Saas-Dan Rooney were 6-2, 6-2 victors.     Also successful was No. 2 singles player Jeremy Tryan, who defeated Eisenhower’s Kevin Aguirre 6-2, 6-3.     The news wasn’t as good for Rice versus St. Ignatius, which captured a 5-0 Chicago Catholic League win last Monday. No Crusader was able to force a third

set, and only Gallagher-Gorman seriously challenged their opponent as they dropped a 7-5, 6-4 decision in doubles play.

Illinois Hoopla hosting tryouts

    Illinois Hoopla Boys and Girls Basketball Club is hosting tryouts for its spring/summer session for youngsters in grades 3-12.     For more details, call Rick Palmer at 460-6513 or email him at hooplamr@aol.com. Additional information can be found at www. illinoishoopla.com.

Basketball camps being offered at SXU

    Individual basketball camps for both boys and girls will be held at St. Xavier University during the month of June.     Cougars men’s coach Tom O’Malley will host his annual boys’ summer basketball camp for ages 9-15 in two sessions: June 10-13 and June 17-20. Sessions will run from 9:30 a.m.-noon daily in the Shannon Center.     SXU assistant coaches and players will also be on hand to help instruct campers in a variety of fundamentals, including shooting, passing, rebounding, defense and dribbling. The cost is $95 for one session, $160 for both, and includes camp T-shirts, full-sized SXU basketballs and special awards.     Cougars women’s coach Bob Hallberg will host his annual basketball camp for girls aged 7-15 June 10-14.     Unlike in past years, the camp will run in just one session, from 1:30-4 p.m. daily in the Shannon Center. Participants will be grouped according to age and ability, and Hallberg will actively teach each day. SXU assistant coaches and players will also be on hand to instruct campers.     The cost is $135, and all participants will receive a camp Tshirt.     Enrollment for both camps is being conducted on a first-come, first-served basis. Applications are available at the SXU Athletics Department or online at www. sxucougars.com under the Summer Camps link.     For further information or questions regarding either camp, contact Laura Kurzeja at (773) 298-3785.

    Sisters Megan and Nicole Nonnemacher, who’ve combined to lead St. Xavier University’s softball team to one of its best seasons ever, were recently recognized for their efforts by the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference.     Megan Nonnemacher, a junior, was chosen as the conference’s Pitcher of the Year. Heading into last week’s CCAC Tournament, Nonnemacher boasted a 22-2 record with a 1.05 earned-run average and 182 strikeouts. Her win total was tops in the CCAC, as were her 23 complete games and 159 1/3 innings pitched.     Nonnemacher’s ERA and nine shutouts both ranked second, while her number of strikeouts was third.     Nicole Nonnemacher, meanwhile, was voted the CCAC Freshman of the Year after positively impacting the Cougars as both a pitcher and everyday player. In the circle, the younger Nonnemacher went 21-3 during the regular campaign with a schoolrecord 238 strikeouts.     She augmented her pitching by pacing SXU in several offensive categories, including average (.418), hits (56), runs scored (39) and doubles (10).     Senior third baseman Kate Mollohan was also selected as an AllCCAC first-teamer, while senior shortstop Ashley Sullivan and sophomore first baseman Amanda Hainlen were second-team picks. Mollohan batted .378 with 51 hits, a team-best 33 RBI, three doubles and a homer.     Sullivan has been the Cougars’ defensive anchor in the infield, as she posted a .983 fielding percentage during the regular season with 70 putouts, 49 assists and just two errors. She batted .258 with 25 runs and 18 RBI. Hainlen led SXU with seven homers while batting .343 and totaling 46 hits.     Rounding out the list of honored Cougars was coach Myra Minuskin, who was named the CCAC Coach of the Year. ***     The Cougars opened CCAC Tournament play last Thursday by edging Robert Morris University 4-3 at Tiger Field in Bourbonnais. Mollohan scored the deciding run on junior DH Ariel Hinton’s single.     Megan Nonnemacher earned the pitching victory by scattering eight hits and fanning five. Mollohan, Nicole Nonnemacher and freshman second baseman Kasey Kanaga all had two hits, and the latter also tallied twice.     The Eagles grabbed a 2-0 lead in the third inning on senior shortstop Andrea Falco’s single, but SXU answered in its ensuing atbat as Kanaga doubled and eventually scored on a Robert Morris throwing error.     The Eagles’ Madlyn Joyce restored a two-run advantage with her solo homer in the top of the sixth, but another Robert Morris miscue enabled SXU to draw back within one in the bottom of the same frame.     Down to their last three outs, the Cougars opened the seventh with back-to-back singles by Kanaga and Nicole Nonnemacher. Following a double play, Mollohan’s single up the middle knotted the score at 3-all.     After a walk to Hainlen, Hinton brought Mollohan home with a single to left. ***     Kanaga’s two-out RBI single to left-center in the bottom of the fifth inning proved to be the difference as the NAIA No. 11-ranked Cougars overcame an early 4-0 deficit to capture a 5-4 victory over No. 15-ranked Olivet Nazarene University in a tournament semifinal contest last Friday.     Nicole Nonnemacher logged her 22nd pitching win of the season by tossing 5 1/3 innings of twohit relief. She struck out five and

Sports wrap You’ll ask him about the side dish. You’ll ask him about the side dish.

But you won’t ask him about the side effects. But you won’t ask him about the side effects.

WeWe askask questions everywhere clam up. up. questions everywherewe wego, go,yet yetatatthe thedoctor’s doctor’s offi office, we clam questions. For a listofof1010everyone everyoneshould shouldknow, know, go go to AHRQ.gov. AHRQ.gov. Questions AskAsk questions. For a list Questionsare arethe theanswer. answer.

(Continued from page 5) 10 assists and six points.     Joy (six kills) and Doug Nelson (five) were Shepard’s mainstays against the Spartans. ***     Matt Meyering dished out 27 assists and Kamil Barnas totaled eight kills and seven digs to push Stagg past Joliet West, 25-20, 2518 in an SWSC match last Monday. Also heard from were Mike Scatena (five kills, seven digs) and Sean Runyon (15 digs).     Lincoln-Way North got the better of the Chargers by a 24-26, 25-13, 25-13 score last Wednesday. Stagg is 15-10 overall and 5-2 in conference play. ***     Paul Chmura’s six kills, plus five apiece from John Hodul and Kyle Van Stedum helped Sandburg (19-5, 5-2) knock off Lincoln-Way West 25-16, 25-21 last Monday. The Eagles then picked up a 25-13, 25-23 victory over Homewood-Flossmoor last Wednesday as Hodul (10 kills, five

walked no one after taking over for her sister Megan, who surrendered four runs over the first two innings as RBI doubles by Jordyn Truelock and Hannah Gardner served as the clutch blows against her.     SXU got three of those markers back in its half of the second, thanks to two Tigers errors and sophomore catcher Megan James’ RBI single. The Cougars then pulled even in the fourth on a wild pitch, which brought Sullivan in from third base.     Sullivan, Kanaga and sophomore center fielder Shannon Lauret combined to produce seven of SXU’s 11 hits and tally four of its runs. Lauret went 3-for-3 with a double and scored twice. ***     After winning the regular-season CCAC title, the Cougars (46-6) collected their first conferencetournament crown since 2009 by defeating Olivet 4-3 last Saturday afternoon. That victory followed a 6-1 loss to the Tigers earlier in the day, SXU’s first in the doubleelimination event.     Once again, the Cougars needed to stage a rally in order to win. This time, they fought back from a 3-0 deficit, with Kanaga’s sixthinning single snapping a 3-all tie. Megan Nonnemacher pocketed the pitching victory.     SXU managed only two singles over the first four innings of Game 2, during which time it fell behind 3-0. The Cougars’ offense finally exhibited signs of life in the fifth, and RBI from sophomore DH Sarah Saunders (bases-loaded walk) and sophomore Holly Hilden (tworun single) pulled SXU even.     Game 1 featured Kanaga going 2-for-3 with a double and Lauret providing an RBI single, but the Cougars had little else to show for their efforts. SXU finished with just four hits and Nicole Nonnemacher suffered the pitching defeat.     The Cougars will begin play in the opening round of the NAIA national tournament on Monday. Winners from 10 geographic sites will then meet in Columbus, Ga., May 24-30 to determine the 2013 national champion. MEN’S TRACK     Despite having a relatively small number of athletes available to them, the Cougars nevertheless performed well at the Gina Relays, which were held the last weekend in April at Hillsdale (Mich.) College.     The meet, which was spread out over three days, featured SXU taking fourth in two events. Freshman Eric Hancock occupied that finishing position in the 10,000meter run by completing the race in 32 minutes, 20 seconds. Also landing in fourth was sophomore John Stancato, who did so in the 100-dash as he covered the distance in 10.98.     In addition, Stancato gave the Cougars a sixth-place showing in the 200 (22.33). Grabbing seventh in the 400 was sophomore Matt Krakowski (Marist), who crossed the finish line in a personal-best time of 50.90.     “All of our men finished with personal bests,” SXU coach Ed McAllister said. “This was the first weekend that we have had any good weather, so I believe that this shows just where we are going. We have a corps of good runners who will be ready for the ‘Last Chance’ meet at North Central College.”     That meet, officially known as the Dr. Keeler Invitational, gets underway today in Naperville. It is the Cougars’ final outing of the regular season. ***     A huge day at the CCAC Outdoor Track & Field Championships helped Stancato get selected as the World Hyundai-St. Xavier Athlete of the Month for April.     Stancato won three events at the meet, including the 100-dash,

where his time of 10.99 represented a conference standard. He also captured the 200 (22.58) and anchored the Cougars’ triumphant 1,600-relay unit, was runner-up in the javelin, third in the pole vault and a member of SXU’s third-place 400-relay quartet.     Besides his work at the conference meet and aforementioned Gina Relays, Stancato also took second in the 100 at Benedictine University’s Eagle Invitational on April 13 and ran a personal-best 10.84 in that same race during the preliminaries of the Chicagoland Championships on April 6. WOMEN’S TRACK     By helping the Cougars record two “A”-standard qualifying times at the Gina Relays in Hillsdale, Mich., senior Rachael Dean garnered CCAC Women’s Track Athlete of the Week honors for the seven-day period ending April 28.     Dean established a school record with her individual qualifying time of 4:36.53 in the 1,500-run. She also anchored SXU’s 3,200relay unit that took first with a 9:18.40 clocking.     Dean will represent the Cougars in both events at the NAIA Outdoor Track & Field National Championships later this month. In 2011, she gained All-America status as a member of SXU’s 3,200-relay quartet who finished sixth overall at the national meet with a school-record time of 9:05.90.     Also competing for the Cougars at the May 23-25 meet at Indiana Wesleyan University in Marion, Ind., will be senior Ashley Shares in the marathon and 10.000-run, senior Mercedes Mancha in the 5,000-race-walk and junior Jordan Wallace. BASEBALL     He’ll pitch no more in 2013, but Scott Vachon ended his junior season in strong fashion.     The Plainfield North alumnus was named the CCAC Baseball Pitcher of the Week for the final week of the regular season. Vachon earned the honor by winning twice on the hill and raising his pitching ledger to 7-0.     He threw all seven innings of the Cougars’ 3-2 road win over Robert Morris University and struck out 11 batters while scattering seven hits and walking just two. The next time out, Vachon went the distance versus the University of St. Francis, which fanned twice, drew one free pass and managed six hits.     Along with his unblemished record, Vachon carried a team-best 3.19 earned-run average for the year and topped SXU in strikeouts with 51.     The Cougars (23-18) wound up in a tie for sixth in the CCAC standings, but Trinity Christian College secured the final berth in the conference’s postseason tournament on the strength of winning its season series with SXU. MEN’S SOCCER     Xavier Corona, a Morton East High School graduate and former National Junior College Athletic Association All-Region IV selection, recently signed a letter of intent to continue his education and athletic career at SXU.     Corona played soccer the past two years for Morton College in the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference. He plans on continuing work toward a degree in criminal justice.     “Xavier is a great addition to our roster because he brings some qualities that you can never have too much of,” Cougars coach Ed Vucinic said. “He is a hard, relentless defender who has the ability to get forward and be dangerous in wide attack positions. Beyond that, Xavier comes in with collegiate experience and, most importantly, a discipline and mind-set that are all geared on winning.”

blocks), Kyle Burke (11 digs) and Shepard (173) to a first-place finJoe Marchese (nine assists) all ish in the eight-team Richards lent a hand. Invitational last Thursday. ***     Chicago Christian (72 points) GIRLS’ TRACK     Lauren Loomis won the mile finished fourth among 10 teams run in 5 minutes, 37.5 seconds in Class 1A at the Carlin Naland the two-mile race in 12:23.3 ley Invitational. Colby Roundtree to lead Shepard (188 points) to won the long jump (19-7 1/2) for a first-place finish in the South the Knights and also contributed Suburban Conference Red meet at to their victory in the 800-relay Eisenhower last Wednesday. The (1:34.99). Lady Astros easily outdistanced runner-up Reavis (119 points) BADMINTON and third-place Evergreen Park     Sandburg finished second with 10.5 points and wound up just (63). seven points in arrears of cham    Other event winners for Shepa- pion Downers Grove South at last rd included Courtney Dalton in Thursday’s Downers Grove North the 300-meter low hurdles (46.2), Sectional. Veronica Pierce in the triple jump     Sarah Crowley was fourth for (34 feet, 4 inches), and its 800- the Lady Eagles in singles play, and 1,600-relay teams (1:44.7 and while the teams of Jenna Ciaccio4:12.3, respectively). Julie Meza and Kathleen Ensa*** laco-Nicole Davids took third and     Grace Foley took first for Sand- fourth, respectively. burg in both the 1,600 (5:17.55) *** and 3,200 (11:46) at Saturday’s     Stagg finished fourth with 2.5 SWSC Blue meet. points at Thursday’s TF South Sectional. BOYS’ TRACK     Wins by Abel Hernandez in the BOYS’ TENNIS 800-run (2:34), Mike Evancich in     Stagg dropped a 4-3 decision the mile (4:40.8) and Londell Lee to Lincoln-Way East in an SWSC in the long jump (22-6½) guided crossover match last Thursday.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 9, 2013 Section 2

7

Trinity sports report

Moraine athletics wrap

Trolls make NAIA Tournament

Cyclones baseball team getting hot at right time

By Tim Cronin

    Moraine Valley College’s baseball season is adopting a betterlate-than-never feel.     And, as coaches in any sport will attest, a team playing its best late in a campaign could become a genuine postseason factor.     That’s what Cyclones players and coaches are hoping as Moraine continued to enjoy a fair amount of success on the diamond. All was not perfect — Kankakee College, for instance, doled out a humbling 12-2 loss last Tuesday — but overshadowing the glitches were a few definite high points.     Topping the list of noteworthy feats was 7-2 triumph last Wednesday over powerhouse Joliet Junior College, the Cyclones’ second win this spring against the 2012 National Junior College Athletic Association Division III national champions.     Moraine was ahead of the Wolves from the second inning on, but it broke the contest open by scoring three times in the fifth. Joe Lyons (Richards) and Mike Habas both belted RBI doubles to key the rally, which was also given a boost by two Joliet errors.     Habas ended the day with three hits, including two doubles. Mario Hernandez also slugged an RBI two-bagger for the Cyclones, who made a winner of pitcher Bob Wilmsen. Wilmsen went the distance on the hill. ***     Moraine also pocketed victories over Morton College (8-3) and the College of DuPage (7-4) later in the week, giving it seven wins in its last 11 outings. COD earned a triumph over the Cyclones by edging them 6-5 in the opener of a Saturday doubleheader.     Lyons (two hits), Habas and pitcher Mike Levigne (five strikeouts) all performed admirably for Moraine against Kankakee. SOFTBALL     A year ago in the NJCAA Region IV playoffs, Prairie State College halted the Cyclones’ run, but this time around Moraine would have

    Plucky — that’s an apt description of — Christian College’s baseball team.     The Trolls battled all season, and last week they won the games they needed to win to advance to the NAIA’s national championship tournament for the first time.     They nearly captured the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference title along the way. Only an 11-3 loss to Judson University, a school Trinity would have needed to defeat twice to claim conference honors, prevented the locals from continuing that quest.     But with Judson having won the regular-season title, the Trolls’ advancement to the CCAC championship round earned them a berth in the 45-team national-tourney field, a feat heretofore unaccomplished by a Trinity nine.     “It was a surreal experience for all of us,” Trolls coach Justin Huisman said. “We’ve been talking from the beginning of the year about making the tournament. We believed in ourselves.”     Trinity (25-22) knocked off Olivet Nazarene University in the final game of the regular season to make the CCAC Tournament’s six-team field, then beat Robert Morris University and the University of St. Francis the next day to earn a berth opposite Judson in the tournament finale.     At that juncture, the Trolls were already assured of playing on.     Conveniently, Trinity, seeded fifth, was assigned last Monday to the NAIA bracket playing at Silver Cross Field in Joliet. The Trolls open against North Dakotabased Mayville State, a school with a gaudy 34-6-1 record, but seeded fourth in the five-team bracket because of the level of competition. The Trolls and Comets meet at 10 a.m. today.     “They’ve got a couple of good pitchers and some guys who can swing the bat,” Huisman said of his preliminary scouting of Mayville State. “It’s tournament time. You take it an inning at a time.”     That was the case in the victory over Olivet, without which Trinity’s season would have ended. Rick Tilquist’s seven-inning stint on the mound and big hits by John Pikes (a two-RBI double in the first) and Joseph Presutti (solo homer in the fourth) staked Tilquist to a lead he would not relinquish.     “Tilquist threw a good ballgame and our hitters did what they had to do,” Huisman said.     Olivet had cut the lead to 3-2 in the fifth, but the Trolls extended it on Peter Krygsheld’s two-RBI single in the sixth and then hung on for the victory.

Chargers

    This time, there was no 24-hour celebration rule. It was more like 24 minutes.     “We knew we might have to play twice on [last] Tuesday,” Husiman said.     Only by winning the first game in CCAC Tournament play would a second game be necessary, and the victory came about in big fashion. A 16-8 triumph over thirdseeded Robert Morris was set in motion by Trinity’s scoring of six first-inning runs on five hits, the first of three such stanzas for the Trolls on the day.     Two-run singles from Bill Miller and Ryan Kiesel sandwiched Peter Cupery’s two-run homer and helped Trinity get off to its rapid start.     It was 9-2 after six innings, with Presutti’s solo clout in the third inning — the first of two homers on the day for him — being counted among the run-producing plays. The Trolls then put the game out of reach with another six-run splurge in the eighth, which featured two-run homers by Kiesel and Miller.     Trinity totaled 22 hits in the contest, but didn’t even have 24 minutes to celebrate as a matchup with fifth-seeded USF awaited.     Again, the Trolls scored first, and often. A six-run second inning rocked the Saints, with back-toback two-RBI doubles Chris Tidmore and Steve Brewer doing most of the damage.     It was 8-0 through 4 1/2 innings, but USF’s offense arrived in the bottom of the fifth in the form of three runs on five consecutive hits. Two more Saints markers in the sixth narrowed the gap to 85, but Presutti’s second homer of the afternoon helped the Trinity end the argument by establishing an 11-5 margin and collecting its invitation to the NAIA soiree.     But the quest was not yet complete. There was the conference championship game, and top-seeded Judson, with which to deal.     To win the crown, Eagles would have to beat the Trolls once, but Trinity would have to defeat Judson twice to accomplish the same goal.     The former occurred, and only one game was necessary. The Trolls had a 3-0 lead after three innings, built on station-to-station offense, but Judson scored six times in the fifth, three times in the sixth and added four runs in the seventh to take command and set the 13-3 final score.     Nevertheless, Husiman’s crew was headed to the NAIA Tournament with the idea that anything could happen.     If the Trolls beat Mayville State today, they would come back later against top-seeded York (Neb.), which boasts a 41-10 record. A

victory over York would move Trinity into Friday’s semifinal round.     A loss to Mayville in the doubleelimination tournament would put the Trolls back on the field Friday morning and needing to win out in order to get to the bracket championship games, scheduled for Saturday and, if necessary, Monday.     The winner of the Joliet bracket, one of nine around the country, advances to the NAIA World Series, which starts May 24 in Lewiston, Idaho. That’s a long way off, but so was Joliet before the Trolls took the field against Olivet.     “We’re playing with confidence,” Huisman said. “We’ve got a better approach at the plate, a better approach on the field. If we play to our potential, we can be a great team.” ***     • The Numbers: 25-22 overall; 18-12 CCAC; 7-8 home; 9-8 road; 9-6 neutral. Leaders: Ryan Kiesel, .386 batting average, 68 hits, .517 slugging percentage, 28 steals; Bill Miller, 48 RBI; Joseph Presutti, 7 home runs; Mike Diebold, 1.37 ERA, 4 saves; Danny Britt, 6 wins, 61 strokeouts.     • Next: NAIA Joliet Bracket: Thursday, vs. Mayville State, at Silver Cross Field, Joliet, 10 a.m.; second game Thursday (if Trinity wins) or Friday (if Trinity loses). TRACK & FIELD     Andy Reidsma’s triumphant performance in the 5,000-meter run at the National Christian College Athletic Association Championship, held last weekend in Joliet, was the highlight of the meet for Trinity.     Reidsma, as he has his entire career as a Troll, outclassed the field in the distance race. His time of 14 minutes, 48.92 seconds not only won the race, but it also set a school record in the event and was well under the qualifying standard for the NAIA Championship.     Reidsma’s showing was the only victory for Trinity in the meet. Courtney Samudio took third in the women’s javelin with a throw of 113 feet, 1 inch, and also made it to the long jump finals, where she placed ninth.     The women’s 3,200-relay squad of Hannah Schwab, Justine VanDyk, Hannah Schaap and Kasey Zaremba clocked a 9:47.68 and took sixth, while the male quartet of Reidsma, Chris Koutavas, Jason VanDeraa and Michael Potter ran seventh in their race after finishing it in 8:02.39. Speedster Marcus Devers’ 400 time of 49.76 was good for the seventh spot.     The Trolls travel to Naperville today and Friday to compete in North Central College’s Dr. Keeler Invitational.

    Stagg plated six runs over its final two at-bats, with Kubiak (single, groundout) and Dwyer (bases-loaded walk, fielder’s choice) garnering five RBI between them. While O’Neill liked that show of resiliency, he wasn’t quite so pleased about seeing five Chargers left on base during that stretch. A strikeout concluded the sixth inning and a groundout ended the game.     Another meeting with Thornton and two SWSC Red clashes with Thornridge were part of Stagg’s schedule this week. Also on the docket were nonconference tilts with defending Class 3A champion Marian Catholic and South Suburban Conference Red leader Oak Lawn.

Stagg 2B: Campbell, M. Farnan. RBI: Duffner 2. LP: Goral (2-3).

(Continued from page 3)     Offensively, Stagg collected just four hits and tallied only in the fifth on a Bengals throwing error. A double play kept the Chargers off the board in the first inning, and they failed to capitalize upon a two-on, one-out situation in the third as both runners were stranded in scoring position. Lincoln-Way East 7 Stagg 6     Goral suffered another setback on Saturday after giving up four runs in the fourth frame and being forced from the contest. The Griffins followed that up by scoring once in each of their last three plate appearances and creating just enough room between them- Statistics selves and the Chargers to withstand some late-game rumblings Stagg by the latter. Andrew

Vikings (Continued from page 1) opening stanza. Kevin White (RBI single) increased the edge to 2-0 in the second, then T.J. Marik went deep with a two-run shot in the fourth and Wood chased in another run with his fielder’s choice.     Wood (single) and Tholl (sacrifice fly) drove in St. Laurence’s last two runs in the sixth.     “We did a tremendous job,” Lotus said. “We played very good defense behind Brad and I was very happy with our approach with everything.”     As for Wood — who tossed a onehitter versus Providence Catholic the week before — he is conjuring up memories of his older brother Kyle, a former two-time Player of the Year who was recruited by Purdue University.     “They do things a little bit differently,” Lotus said. “But as far as how they play the game, they are both very competitive kids and do things the right way on the baseball field. ***     Lotus knew beating the Mustangs a second time would be no easy feat, given both the nature of St. Rita’s earlier loss and the fact the Vikings had never vanquished

Stagg Hinsdale South

011 000 001 - 3 002 000 000 - 2

Stagg 2B: Stratinsky. 3B: Duffner. RBI: Dwyer, Kubiak. WP: Strus (4-2). Stagg Thornton

112 032 2 - 11 010 001 1 -   3

Stagg 2B: Angelos 2, M. Farnan. RBI: Angelos, Duffner, Kubiak, Novak, Stratinsky. WP: Kubiak (2-3). Stagg Oak Forest

000 010 0 - 1 104 000 x - 5

By Maura Vizza

RedHawks (Continued from page 3) for the RedHawks, while Luke Daniels (double) and Kairis each drove in a run. Ryan Donegan also banged out a two-base hit. ***     In Fabrizio’s opinion, Marist “played much better” on Wednesday, but Gainer’s third-inning single represented the team’s only run-producing hit. As a result, the RedHawks squandered a credible pitching display from Bohanek.     Dogging Marist, too, was some shaky infield defense, which Fabrizio said has happened with some frequency whenever Bohanek moves to the mound. A couple errors assisted the Lions during their three-run third stanza that put the game firmly in their grasp.     Mehalek (two), Bohanek (two), Bieniek and Conor Funk all hit safely for Marist, but those hits were fairly well scattered.

none of that.     At the start of the Region IV quarterfinals last Wednesday, the Cyclones took two of three from their conference rival to advance to last weekend’s semifinals. Moraine ace Emily Kurek (Mt. Assisi) held the Pioneers in check in the first and third games, which the Cyclones claimed by scores of 2-0 and 12-4. Kurek allowed just four hits in the shutout.     “She hit all her spots and kept jamming them at the plate,” Moraine coach Mike Veen said. “These were the two best games she’s pitched all season. We shut the door on them.”     Kurek struck out two in the opener and got nine batters to pop out. She received help at the plate from Ari Bulthuis (Mother McAuley), who stroked a two-run double, and the tandem of Courtney Wheaton and Amie Raynor (Sandburg).     The Cyclones were up 5-2 in the second game before Raynor’s arm gave out and the Pioneers’ bats came alive in the fifth inning. It was a struggle for Moraine to come back, and it wound up dropping a 7-5 verdict.     Raynor went 3-for-4 and tallied twice. Kurek (RBI) and Bulthius also scored for the Cyclones.     Once Moraine grabbed the lead in the tiebreaking third game, it kept on pounding out the hits. Several times this season, the Cyclones would build a lead, go on cruise control and eventually lose the game, or come close to losing, but not this time.     In a rare softball moment, Moraine even ended the game with a double play. Key hits came from Bulthius (3-for-4, double, three runs), Kurek (3-for-4, one run), Mother McAuley grad Jenny Vanek (homer, two runs) and Melanie Gerhardt (one hit, one run). ***     The competition was even fiercer in Friday’s semifinals, where the Cyclones’ scrappy performance wasn’t enough to keep their 2013 season alive. Andrean (Ind.) 13 Marist 4     The 59ers from Merrillville, Ind., have pitted themselves against several area schools this spring. It was the RedHawks’ turn to tangle with them on Friday, but it was a forgettable afternoon for Marist as it surrendered runs in all but one inning and got tagged with a resounding defeat.     Just as was the case in the first meeting with St. Viator, the RedHawks spotted their foe a lead that proved insurmountable over the long haul. In this instance, Andrean was ahead 8-1 after four innings and then snuffed out any hopes for a late Marist revival by plating four runs in the top of the seventh.     Four errors hampered the RedHawks and rendered somewhat meaningless decent offensive outings by Gainer (two hits, including a double, two RBI), Bohanek (two hits, including a double, one RBI) and Mehalek (two hits, one RBI).     Two ESCC confrontations with Nazareth Academy and one with St. Patrick were among Marist’s on-field assignments this week.

    Raynor’s three-run homer got Moraine off to a fast start against Kankakee, but the Cyclones couldn’t sustain momentum and ultimately fell to a 9-7 setback. The Cavaliers then knocked off Moraine a second time, 9-4, to bring the latter’s campaign to a close.     Vanek and Danielle Stark also hit safely for the Cyclones in the semifinal opener. MEN’S TENNIS     It’s another season in the books for the Cyclones, who took third in both the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference and Region IV and earned a berth in the national tournament as a result.     However, despite advancing to the NJCAA Tournament for a ninth consecutive season, Moraine chose not to compete. Typically, the Cyclones only allow their firstand second-place finishers to take part in the national event.     It may not be the way Moraine wanted to finish, but the season was still filled with accomplishments.     The Cyclones faced solid competition in the ISCC, particularly from Elgin and Prairie State colleges. Moraine also had to move several matches indoors due to cold and rainy weather, including its first scrimmage against Seward Community College, a school not typically found on the schedule.     Despite the challenging slate, the Cyclones posted a 7-2 overall record and 4-2 mark in the ISCC. Individual standouts included All-Region IV singles player Tim Stewart (Stagg), 2012 allconference pick Kevin Davenport and No. 1 singles player Dave Smith.     “To finish in third in regionals is respectable — it played out how I thought,” Moraine coach Bill Finn said. “We lost to two very good teams, but we had a successful season with a good record.     “These were the nicest bunch of kids we’ve had on the team [and] it was great coaching this group. I’m happy with the season.”

Statistics St. Viator Marist

Marist 2B: Daniels, Donegan. RBI: Bohanek, Daniels, Kairis. LP: Reed (2-2). Marist St. Viator

000 411 1 - 7 000 002 4 - 6

020 00 -   2 904 6x - 19

Stagg RBI: Kubiak 3, Dwyer 2. LP: Goral (2-4).

the Mustangs on the road during his coaching tenure.     But Mike Kornacker ended St. Laurence’s drought by pitching it to another victory last Wednesday. The Vikings needed an extra inning to finalize the verdict in their favor, but did so on Tholl’s sacrifice fly. That followed Rybakowski’s single, a hit batsman, walk and errant pickoff attempt.     St. Laurence was ahead 2-0 after four stanzas, as White and Wood each delivered an RBI single. St. Rita, however, was not going to roll over a second time, and two Vikings errors aided the hosts during a fifth-inning plate appearance that resulted in four runs.     Down for the first time in either contest, St. Laurence quickly responded with a game-tying deuce in the bottom of the fifth as Mike Miller stroked a two-out single and Marik swatted a two-run round-tripper.     “It was great to see us come back that way,” Lotus said. “Ninetynine percent of the games are tight between us, and we had to make sure we didn’t get too big-headed [after Monday] and had the same intensity and focus we had then. For the most part, we did that.”     The Vikings finished with 11 hits in support of Kornacker, who gave up that same number of safe-

ties but was relatively effective in scattering them. He fanned five and none of the runs scored off him was earned.     A rematch with Loyola awaited St. Laurence this past Monday, and the Viking were also due to meet up twice with Brother Rice this week.

Andrean Marist

Marist Carmel

Carmel Marist

000 203 0 - 5 100 000 2 - 3

Marist LP: McKenzie (1-2).

arm yourself with information. Do you know what to do if there’s a chemical or biological attack in your community? How about a radiological explosion? In an emergency like that, knowledge and common sense will help you stay calm and safe. To find out what you need to know and do, visit www.ready.gov. Or, call 1- 800 -BE -READY (1- 800 -237- 3239) for a free brochure.

000 000 0 - 0 110 302 x - 7

010 120 01 - 5 000 040 00 - 4

St. Laurence 2B: Marik. HR: Marik. RBI: Marik 2, Tholl, White, Wood. WP: Kornacker (4-1). Loyola Academy St. Laurence

100 020 1 - 4 000 000 0 - 0

Marist 3B: Mehalek. RBI: Bohanek, Mehalek. WP: Woodworth (2-2).

St. Laurence 2B: Marik. HR: Marik. RBI: Marik 2, Wood 2, Lewis, Tholl, White. WP: Wood (4-1). St. Laurence St. Rita

131 310 4 - 13 001 021 0 -   4

Marist 2B: Bohanek, Gainer. RBI: Gainer 2, Bohanek, Mehalek. LP: Hnatusko (0-1).

Statistics St. Rita St. Laurence

001 000 0 - 1 103 000 x - 4

Marist RBI: Gainer. LP: Bohanek.

Stagg 2B: M. Farnan. LP: Dwyer (0-2). Lincoln-Way East Stagg

512 000 0 - 8 010 030 1 - 5

000 002 1 - 3 000 010 0 - 1

St. Laurence RBI: Wood. LP: Lewis (52).

Part of a campaign from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and The Advertising Council.


8

Section 2 Thursday, May 9, 2013

������������ ����������

The Regional News - The Reporter

���������������

������������ ����

�������������

�����������

����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

�����������������

For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION ONE WEST BANK, FSB Plaintiff, -v.PHILLIP CAVAZOS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES FOR ANNA MARIE CAVAZOS, RONALD CAVAZOS, GERALD NORDGREN AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR ANNA MARIE CAVAZOS (DECEASED) Defendants 10 CH 045796 10531 S. 81ST AVENUE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 21, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 23, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10531 S. 81ST AVENUE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 2314-208-006. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certiďƒžed funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certiďƒžed funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS ISâ€? condition. The sale is further subject to conďƒžrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certiďƒžcate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conďƒžrmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court ďƒžle to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court ďƒžle or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to ďƒžle number 14-10-34941. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1410-34941 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 045796 TJSC#: 33-6014 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I528063

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION METLIFE HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF METLIFE BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO EVERBANK REVERSE MORTGAGE LLC FKA BNY MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC Plaintiff, -v.UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS AND LIENHOLDERS AGAINST THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS AND LIENHOLDERS AGAINST THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, VILLAS OF PALOS HEIGHTS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, WILLIAM BUTCHER, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, PATRICK FELDNER, ERIN BRACE, JOSEPH T. FELDNER Defendants 10 CH 03935 202 FELDNER CT. Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 19, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 202 FELDNER CT., Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-31-201-063-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $246,152.32. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certiďƒžed funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS ISâ€? condition. The sale is further subject to conďƒžrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certiďƒžcate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conďƒžrmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court ďƒžle to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 10 CH 03935 TJSC#: 337647 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I522097

5HDO(VWDWH

7HAT 7HAT CAN CAN

5HDO(VWDWH

FGUKIP QRVKQPU %QORNGVG EQORQUKVG FGEMKPI CPF TCKNKPI U[UVGOU CTG PQY CXCKNCDNG VQ ETGCVG C EQPUKUVGPV HKPKUJGF NQQM HQT JQOGQYPGTUĹŽ FGUKIP QWVFQQT QRVKQPU URCEGU #PF %QORNGVG EQORQUKVG TGRWVCDNG NKPGU OGGV FGEMKPI CPF TCKNKPI PCVKQPCN U[UVGOU DWKNFKPI CTG PQY EQFGUHQTUC HGV[ CXCKNCDNG VQ ETGCVG C 0GYJKFF EQPUKUVGPV GPHCUVGPGT HKPKUJGF  NQQM HQT U[UVGOU JQOGQYPGTU CTG CNUQ ĹŽ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ĹŽUDG[QPF ITGCV CFFKVKQP OQTGYCNNUUNKRTGUKUVC VQ CP[ RNCUVKEU PVCPF HKPKUJ UWTHCEGU UCYFWUV FGEMPGY YQQFITCKP CHHQTFCDNG CPF KPVQ VJG RNCPM VJCPITGCVVJCV EQORQUKVG DGECWUG CTG EQOHQTVCDNG KV FGEMU QWVFQQTU DWKNFKPI CFFKPI CVQ RTQXKFG   (CUEKC C PGYD[ RTQXKFGU TQQO KU CPQVJGT URNKPVGTHTGG C JCPFNG ENGCP  CPF +VĹŽ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ĹŽV VQWEJ NCUV +PHCEVEQO NQPIGT CPF YQPĹŽV CRRGCNKPI CPF RQUKVGUCTG +PHCEVEQOR  VQ VJG URNKVURNKV QUKVGUCTG QT TQV G[GG[G VQ VJG 6JGTG QT TQV KU KU CTG CRRGCNKPI 6JGTG TCRKFN[ TCRKFN[TGRNCEKPI TGRNCEKPICNUQ CNUQ VCMKPI CTG VCMKPI OQTG PQ PGGF OQTG PQ PGGF VQ RCKPV VQ RCKPV YQQFYQQF CU JQOGQYPG CU JQOGQYPGTU JQOGQYPGTU ĹŽQT UVCKP TUĹŽ QT UVCKP  KPVQ TU KPVQ VJGVJG EQORQUKVG JQOGQYPG EQORQUKVG RTGHGTTGF RTGHGTTGF ITGCVQWVFQQT FGEMKPIOCM FGEMFGEMFGEMKPIO QTU U KPIVJGO ITGCVQWVFQ OCVGTKCN CMKPIVJGO (QTOQTGKPHQTOCVKQP OCVGTKCN GCU[VQOCKPVCKP  (QTOQTGK PHQTOCVKQP   %QORQUKVG RTQFWEVUGCU[VQOC  ĹŽU KPVCKP %GTVCKP6GGF   #U   %QORQUKVG FGOCPF HQT QP QP %GTVCKP6GG QHHGT  RTQFWEVU TGNKGH EQORNGVG FGOCPF HQT VQ  #U EQORQUKVG NKPGFĹŽU QH QHHGT JQOGQYPGTU FGEMU EQORNGVG TGNKGH D[VQ DWKNFKPI NKPGRTQFWEVU IGVVKPIEQORQUKVG KPETGCUGU UQ QH FGEMU FQ VJG DWKNFKPI JQOGQYPGTUD[IGVVKPI XKUKV YYYEGTVCKP KPETGCUGU UQ FQ VJG RTQFWEVU XKUKV YYYEGTVCKP

DOFORYOU DOFORYOU 7HETHERYOURE

7HETHERYOURE

LOOKINGTOBUY

LOOKINGTOBUY ORLOOKINGTOSELL 2EAL%STATECANHELP ORLOOKINGTOSELL YOUGETWHATYOU 2EAL%STATECANHELP WANT

YOUGETWHATYOU

For Notice Sale

For Sale Notice

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC Plaintiff, -v.REMIZ MEHOVIC A/K/A RAMIZ MEHOVIC, MARIANNA MEHOVIC, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA, PINEWOOD EAST UNIT FIVE ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 036041 14368 CREEK CROSSING DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 26, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 30, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 14368 CREEK CROSSING DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-07-205-002. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-28655. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1410-28655 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 036041 TJSC#: 33-5609 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I529193

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-OA3 Plaintiff, -v.BOZENA U. GARVAZ, ROBERT GARVAZ A/K/A ROBERT GARBACZ, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 021163 8447 ROB ROY DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 31, 2012, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 23, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8447 ROB ROY DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-313-016. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certiďƒžed funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certiďƒžed funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS ISâ€? condition. The sale is further subject to conďƒžrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certiďƒžcate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conďƒžrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court ďƒžle to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court ďƒžle or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to ďƒžle number 14-12-03205. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1412-03205 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 021163 TJSC#: 33-9431 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I527271

For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L . P . , ďż˝ P l a i n t i f f ďż˝ V . ďż˝ HENRY M. PERILLO A/K/A HENRY MORTON A/K/A HENRY PERILLO, D e f e n d a n t s ďż˝ 10 CH 28143 Property Address: 9740 SOUTH 90TH AVENUE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 09-022266 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) ďż˝ PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 14, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on June 17, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 9740 South 90th Avenue, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-10-202-034 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 449,164.94. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . ďż˝ For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I522237

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PROVIDENT FUNDING ASSOCIATES, L.P., P l a i n t i f f , ďż˝ v s . ďż˝ ARTUR KRASOWSKI, BARBARA KRASOWSKA, L A W N V I E W ďż˝ CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION ORLAND PARK F / K / A ďż˝ LAWNVIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, U N K N O W N ďż˝ OWNERS, NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, AND U N K N O W N ďż˝ TENANTS AND OCCUPANTS, Defendants, 12 CH 19937 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on October 11, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, May 31, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 7935 West 92nd Street, #3C, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. P.I.N. 23-01-309-030-1013. The mortgaged real estate is a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Matthew C. Abad at Plaintiff's Attorney, Blommer Peterman, S.C., 165 Bishops Way, Brookfield, Wisconsin 53005. (219) 793-9680. 2 0 1 1 - 0 6 1 9 5 - 1 ďż˝ INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I526031

Do you have a VACATION home for RENT? Call to place your ad today!

Serving Your Community for 30 Years

Tom Maloney, Selling or Buying?

1 in Sales in Palos Park & Palos Heights

#

Call Tom Maloney at

(708) 903-9865 RUN 10 13 11 LIKE SPACIOUS ROOMS? Then see this attractive, move-in condition ranch with basement in Worth! 3 BIG main floor bedrooms plus another big one downstairs. Newly insulated attic, siding, appliances & more! Relax & enjoy the lovely landscaping from the deck. $191,500

L.T. Blount, REALTORSÂŽ Serving the Palos area for over 50 years

Call to place your ad today!

(708) 448-4000

Just Listed

8100 W. 119th Street Palos Park, IL 60464 (708) 448-6100 www.prublount.com

Run 5 9 13 For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, -v.RICHARD S. DOMINICK A/K/A RICHARD DOMINICK A/K/A RICHARD STEVEN DOMINICK, CAROL DOMINICK, UNIFUND CCR PARTNERS ASSIGNEE OF PALISADES ACQUISITION XVI, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 008790 14430 MASON LANE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 21, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 23, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 14430 MASON LANE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-10-215-016. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certiďƒžed funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certiďƒžed funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS ISâ€? condition. The sale is further subject to conďƒžrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certiďƒžcate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conďƒžrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court ďƒžle to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court ďƒžle or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to ďƒžle number 14-11-04821. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-04821 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 008790 TJSC#: 33-8976 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I528395

Publisher’s Notice    All

Do you Have a home for sale?

Expect the Best

RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.� Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1 (800) 927-9275.

Salefor Rent VacationFor Notice Home

• DOOR COUNTY • Woodland Vacation Home Book now for Fall & Winter! This four bedroom, two full bath home offers privacy on a lovely wooded 1+ acre lot. Large kitchen and open living room area. The backyard features a large patio, stone fireplace, propane grill & firepit. The serenity of the front porch will beckon after a busy day on the Peninsula. Fish Creek & Egg Harbor are just minutes away — an ideal location for all Door County adventures. Many amenities. $175-$225+ per nite. Photos online, Trip Advisor: Shared Serenity Vacation Home or call: (708) 704-8972

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF NOVEMBER 1, 2005, FREMONT HOME LOAN TRUST 2005-D Plaintiff, -v.WAYNE A. ADAMS A/K/A WAYNE ADAMS, MARJORIE D. ADAMS A/K/A MARJORIE ADAMS, CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Defendants 09 CH 028039 12401 S. 91ST AVENUE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 8, 2012, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 17, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12401 S. 91ST AVENUE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 2327-402-007. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certiďƒžed funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certiďƒžed funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS ISâ€? condition. The sale is further subject to conďƒžrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certiďƒžcate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conďƒžrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court ďƒžle to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court ďƒžle or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to ďƒžle number 14-09-24045. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1409-24045 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 028039 TJSC#: 33-9012 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I526234


The Regional News - The Reporter

������������ ���������� ����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

Thursday, May 9, 2013 Section 2

���������������

�������������

�����������

9

������������ ���� ����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

�����������������

For Sale Notice

For Sale Notice

For Sale Notice

For Notice Sale

For Sale Notice

For Sale Notice

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, -v.JERZY OGRODNIK, ALICJA OGRODNIK, PALOS POINT TOWNHOMES OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION Defendants 11 CH 001967 11794 LIGHTHOUSE LANE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 21, 2012, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11794 LIGHTHOUSE LANE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-24-300-237. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-10-42227. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1410-42227 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 001967 TJSC#: 33-9263 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I527010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.CHRISTIE M. SKIBINSKI, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., TREETOP CONDOMINIUM #55-56, INC., UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 024463 9900 SHADY LANE UNIT #2NE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 7, 2012, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 28, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9900 SHADY LANE UNIT #2NE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-16-209-043-1004. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-11-21030. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-21030 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 024463 TJSC#: 33-10005 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I528817

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.AMEL MADOUI, ABDELOUAHAB M. MADOUI, THOMAS CHARLES ESTATES TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION Defendants 09 CH 049335 8658 W. THOMAS CHARLES LANE HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 15, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 3, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8658 W. THOMAS CHARLES LANE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 18-35-307-028. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-09-39565. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1409-39565 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 049335 TJSC#: 33-4766 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I530816

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.MOHAMMAD SAYYAHIN, HALIMA GNAOUI A/K/ A HALIMA GRAOUI, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 41604 8834 WEST 98TH STREET Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 26, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 28, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8834 WEST 98TH STREET, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10203-048-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $271,070.11. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, or a unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). In accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(h-1) and (h-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g1), you are hereby notied that the purchaser of the property, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subsections (g)(1) and (g)(4) of section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Anthony Porto, FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC, 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333, NAPERVILLE, IL 60563, (866) 402-8661 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com.. Please refer to le number F12080191. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333 NAPERVILLE, IL 60563 (866) 402-8661 E-Mail: foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com Attorney File No. F12080191 Attorney ARDC No. 3126232 Attorney Code. 26122 Case Number: 12 CH 41604 TJSC#: 33-5800 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I528912

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.VOLHA NESTSIAROVICH A/K/A VOLHA NESTIAROVICH, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA, THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION, VITALI NESTSIAROVICH A/K/A VITALO NESTSIAROVICH A/K/A VITALI NESTIAROVICH Defendants 12 CH 025068 15 COUR CARAVELLE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 7, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15 COUR CARAVELLE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 2323-201-063. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-12-17552. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1412-17552 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 025068 TJSC#: 33-9126 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I527005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PNC MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF PNC BANK N.A. Plaintiff, -v.ADNAN A. JABER A/K/A ADNAN JABER, ESMAT A. JABER, FIRSTSECURE BANK AND TRUST CO. F/K/A FAMILY BANK AND TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE UTA DTD 10/17/06 AKA TRUST 11-920, MB FINANCIAL BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INBANK, FIRST SECURE BANK AND TRUST CO. F/K/A FAMILY BANK AND TRUST CO., THE MISSION HILLS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF FIRST SECURE BK & TRUST CO FKA FAMILY BK & TRST CO AS TRUSTEE UTA DTD 10/17/06 AKA TRUST 11-920, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 05357 10439 SANTA CRUZ LANE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 20, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 22, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10439 SANTA CRUZ LANE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 2732-206-003-0000. The real estate is improved with a white brick two story single family home; three car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to le number PA1003120. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1003120 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 05357 TJSC#: 33-4390 I524869

Do you have a house for sale? Call today to place your ad!

Experience Family Fun in the Great Outdoors…

Experience Galesburg!

*HTWPUNÄZOPUNJHUVLPUNZ^PTTPUNYLSH_PUNH[ [OLILHJOOPRPUNNVSÄUNVYM\UH[[OL^H[LYWHYR Where? All this and more at Galesburg area SHRLZWHYRZHUKJHTWNYV\UKZ

For even more great things to see and do visit: ^^^]PZP[NHSLZI\YNJVT 

It’s time for a

Spring

I36UG3Q 79<9K9Q3TAMK

Imagine A Pair of Glasses That Can Help You SeeRkk Better! Aygmr|k 3 Ngr… Ml <wgˆˆkˆ Tog‹ 6g| ?kw ^~Œ 5k‹‹k…°

9“k… w~~u ‹o…~Œmo g gr… ~l Ókwj mwgˆˆkˆ ~… hr|~iŒwg…ˆp Tor|mˆ w~~u hrmmk… g|j iw~ˆk…´ g|j kgˆrk… ‹~ ˆkk1 7…1 R“k‹wg|g NruŒˆ rˆ Œˆr|m yr|rg‹Œ…rškj hr|~iŒwg…ˆ ~… ‹kwkˆi~kˆ ‹~ okw k~wk ”o~ og“k jki…kgˆkj “rˆr~|´ ‹~ ˆkk hk‹‹k…1 A| yg|™ igˆkˆ´ ˆkirgw ‹kwkˆi~ri mwgˆˆkˆ ig| hk …kˆi…rhkj ‹~ k|og|ik “rˆŒgw k…l~…yg|ik1 Rok ~l‹k| ig| okw k~wk …kgj´ ”g‹io TX´ g|j ˆ~yk‹rykˆ j…r“k1 3w‹o~Œmo ‹kwkˆi~ri mwgˆˆkˆ i~ˆ‹ hk‹”kk| ©ÅÝ}}Ÿ©Šá}}´ r‹ rˆ g ˆygww …rik ‹~ g™ l~… ‹ok o~Œ…ˆ ~l k|s~™yk|‹ ”r‹o hk‹‹k… “rˆr~|

Garage Sale!

Cleaning out your home or garage not only adds up to extra space... it adds up to extra cash, too!

Ever look through a pair of field glasses or binoculars? Things look bigger and closer, and easier to see. Dr. Svetlana Pikus is using miniaturized binoculars or telescopes to help people who have decreased vision, to see better. In many cases, special telescopic glasses can be prescribed to enhance visual performance. She often can help people read, watch TV, and sometimes drive. Although telescopic glasses cost between 6gww l~… g i~ywryk|‹g…™ $1700-$2500, it is a small price o~|k i~|ˆŒw‹g‹r~| ”r‹o 7…1 NruŒˆ to pay for the hours of enjoyment TMGG ;Q99 with better vision and more ş&ááŸ&Í͟Š}Š} independence.

7…1 R“k‹wg|g NruŒˆ´ M171Antioch, Crystal Lake, Glenview, Joliet, Mt. Prospect, Mundelein,

Advertise your sale in the Classifieds. Call today to place your ad!

Naperville, Coal City, also in Glendale, WI ş&ááŸ&Í͟Š}Š} & Sheboygan, WI

7…1 R“k‹wg|g NruŒˆ´ M171 ”””1w~”“rˆr~|~lAwwr|~rˆ1i~y


10

Section 2 Thursday, May 9, 2013

������������ ���������� �����������

��������

�������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

The Regional News - The Reporter

���������������

��������������� Garage Sale

Three plots at Evergreen Cemetery, Evergreen Park. $1,800 each, $5,000 for all three, plus transfer fees. Contact Charles Lange at (217) 793-9760.

2 FAMILIES friday, may 10th & saturday, may 11th 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.

Call (708) 691-1645

Garage Sale 2 FAMILIES friday, may 17th & saturday, may 18th 9 A.M. to 3 P.M.

Help Wanted

YRC Freight is hiring Road Drivers! Positions available immediately in Chicago Heights: Excellent wages, benefits, pension! Safe equipment! CDL-A w/doubles & Children’s clothing, housewares. Hazmat, ability/willingness to Lots of misc. items work in sleeper operation. EOE-/F/D/V. APPLY: 7936 W. 97th Pl. Hickory Hills www.yrcfreight.com/careers

Help Wanted

Piano Tuning

Experienced cleaning lady wanted for immediate start. Must be licensed driver with dependable vehicle. Good pay.

PIANO TUNING $50.00

REPAIRS EXTRA — 35 years experience — Call F. Stan Ignell

Call (708) 636-4030

8208 S. Lockwood Burbank

Drivers-$2000 sign on! Competitve Benefits. Avg income 2012 $65K. CDL-A, 1 yr OTR req. A&R Transport.

Call today to place your ad!

Call Jason (888) 202-0004

708/636-8212

Wanted

WE BUY

Cars • Trucks • Vans Runing OR Not Top Dollar Paid Call (708) 205-8241

Small engines, snowblowers, regular and riding lawnmowers, bicycles. Reasonably priced or free.

������������

Call (815) 468-7819 ����������

����

�������� �������� Wanted to Buy

������������� �����

Older Chevy Astro van in rea���������� sonbly good running condition. �������������� Must have 2 rear doors (not 3). Call Tim or Pat B. at (708) 448-4000

Call today to place your ad!

Business & Service Directory Automotive $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $$$ TOP CASH $$$ $ $ $ $ FOR YOUR JUNK $ $ $ CAR, TRUCK, VAN $ $ $ $ (708) $ $ $ 448-9155 $$ $ $ $10 off any tow service $ $ $ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Blacktop

Boswell Blacktop Paving Driveways • Parking Lots Resurfacing • Sealcoating FREE ESTIMATES

708-423-9594 Concrete

O’DONNELL CONCRETE

Cleaning Services

Plumbing

������� �����

ROYAL FLUSH

������������������ ���������������������������

�������������������� ����������������������� �������������������� �������������� �������������

��������������

Lawn Maintenance Hedge Trimming Retaining Walls Snow Removal Complete Landscaping

PLUMBING & SEWER

Cell:

Masonry

TUCKPOINTING • BRICK WORK ALL CHIMNEY REPAIRS CONCRETE WORK Free Estimates • Fully Insured 5% OFF before 6/15/13 with this ad

������������������������

������������

�������������������� ������������������������������������

GEORGE’S Flood Control Specialists All Types of Plumbing Repairs

EDWARD SIEARS

— Since 1988 —

Cleaning,�������� Moving & Organizing

708.424.6350 708.229.0123 Plumbing & Sewer

Senior & Military Discounts

���������� ������������������������

10% Off Repairs 24 Hour Service • Free Estimates Licensed/Bonded/Insured

Ed’s

Paul Lally’s Masonry Inc.

Cleaning Services

Most lines rodded-$49.95

LANDSCAPING

Patios, Sidewalks, Driveways

424-0200 Ph: (708) 259-5990

Power Rod Mainline & Sinks Tubs and Toilets Catch Basins Cleaned & Repaired Water Jetting Broken Pipes Detected with TV Camera

www.royalflushplumbingandsewer.com

Business:

Stamped Concrete Stone Pavers

Plumbing & Sewer

Landscaping

773.767.2095 312.446.9035

‘Expert Quality Work’

������������ ���� �����������

��������

�������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

����������������������������������������������������������

For Sale

Home Fitness Equipment Fantastic condition, barely used. Trimline Treadmill, Powertec Olympic Weight Bench, Cap Weights, Olympic Bar. Best offer.

�������������

(708) 448-8866

• • • • • •

Hot water tanks • Bathroom installations Toilets, Tubs, Sinks & Faucets Sewers rodded • Sump pumps Sewers inspected by camera Foundation leaks repaired Battery back-up systems

FREE Estimates (most cases) Quality Work - Reasonable Prices 40 years experience - Lic. #SL574

708.952.1833

Call today to place your ad!

Shop Smart... Shop the Classifieds!

ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK ADVERTISING SERVICES Need to place your ad in more than 300 newspapers throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-241-1700 or visit www.illinoispress.org

AUCTIONS RITCHIE BROS. UNRESERVED PUBLIC EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS Thurs, May 30 (Chicago) & Fri, May 31 (Joliet). Large equipment/ truck selection, no minimum bids. 815.941.6400 / rbauction.com

AUTOS FOR SALE

BOATS THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-793-7300 theboatdock.com

CAMPERS/RVS Colman’s RV We buy/consign used Campers & RV's! 217-787-8653 www.colmansrv.com

HELP WANTED SERVE TO LEARN. Earn money for college, train for a career, receive excellent pay and benefits. Serve in the National Guard. Call 1-800-GO-GUARD or visit nationalguard.com

HELP WANTED DRIVERS Driver - Two raises in first year. Qualify for any portion of $0.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com It’s True! Hirschbach Lease Program drivers pay on $.69/gal for first 6 months and then it’s only $.99/gal. Great miles, money and trucks! 888-5146005 drive4hml.com Owner Operator: Experienced CDL-A Owner Operators Wanted. $2,000 Solo Sign-On Incentive. $5,000 Team SignOn Incentive. Long Haul Freight. Competitive Pay Package. Paid loaded and empty miles. Also hiring Company Teams. Call 866-9387803 or apply online at www.drivenctrans.com.

EXPERIENCED OTR DRIVERS VAN DIVISION: Runs 48 States, heavy from WI to Philadelphia-BaltimoreMD area. Flex home time. 99% No-Touch, Top Pay! Vacation/401K/Vision/Dental/ Disability/Health. Require Class A CDL, 2yrs OTR exp. good MVR/References req. Call Ruth/Mike TTI, Inc. 1-800-558-2664 www.TTItrucking.com NOW HIRING! Truck Driving School Instructors and Management. JOIN CRST’s brand new training school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa! Relocation assistance provided. Call: 866-504-4035 email: ksackett@crst.com Drivers CDL-A $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS For exp’d solo OTR drivers & O/O’s Tuition reimbursement also available! New Student Pay & Lease Program USA TRUCK 877-521-5775 www.GoUSATruck.com AVERITT OFFERS CDL-A DRIVERS a Strong, Stable, Profitable Career. Experienced Drivers and Recent Grads Excellent Benefits, Weekly Hometime, Paid Training. 888362-8608 AverittCareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer

CAREER/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL AIM 800-481-8312

NEED CLASS-A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer "Best-In-Class" training. •New Academy Classes Weekly •No Money Down or Credit Check •Certified Mentors Ready and Available •Paid (While Training With Mentor) •Regional and Dedicated Opportunities •Great Career Path •Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (602) 648-5307 Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers / Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www.primeinc.com

LEGAL SERVICES

TRAINING/EDUCATION ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-336-5053 www.CenturaOnline.com

Chicagoland ICANS - Run Date Week of 5/5/2013

���������������

�������������

����������� ����������������� For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, SERVICING L.P. Plaintiff, -v.JOHN F. BRENNAN A/K/A JOHN F. BRENNANN, CARROLL A. BRENNAN Defendants 08 CH 027392 7455 W. UTE LANE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 20, 2009, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 17, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 7455 W. UTE LANE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-218-009. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-08-19142. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1408-19142 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 08 CH 027392 TJSC#: 33-9272 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I527003

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ARTURAS GRABAUSKAS, AUSRA GRABAUSKIENE, HARRIS N.A. D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 43379 8521 WEST SUN VALLEY DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 25, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 28, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8521 WEST SUN VALLEY DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-109-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a brick single family home; attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1019325. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1019325 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 43379 TJSC#: 33-5903 I527385

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC Plaintiff, v s . � SIE KHALIL; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON R E C O R D � CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 39434 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 25, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, May 29, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-13-113-006-0000. Commonly known as 10619 SOUTH TOD DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1200785. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I525948

Call today to place your ad!

Do you have a business or service? Get the word out in the Service Directory! Call today to place your ad!

Your Message Gets Across Better in the WANT ADS!

����� �

���

��� ������

� ��� ������


Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Broaden Your Horizons This week Luncheon: Farm and nature preschool     The Center’s preschool programs will be featured at a luncheon program on Tuesday, May 14, from noon to 2 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     The Farm and Nature Discovery Preschoolers will perform songs and show guests their classrooms, as Center director Dave Sanders and preschool director Kristin Hale tell about the farm and nature based program which began at the farm eight years ago.     The guests will then have a chance to see some of the farm’s rabbits and ducklings with farm education manager Kay Ardizzone and her weekly Junior Farmers class. Both the preschoolers and the Junior Farmers have the opportunity to become intimately involved year-round in the workings of this educational farm.     The program begins with a luncheon in the farm’s modern new Anderson Activity Center. The luncheon is served at noon, costs $16 and requires reservations. Call The Center at 3613650.

event is for teens in 7th through 12th grade with a completed student membership application on file.     • Saturday Night — 7:30-10:30 p.m. May 18, music by Parias Day & Max Dvorak with samples from Chili’s. This event is exclusively for students in 10th-12th grade and is free with a student membership application or $5 with a school ID.     To sign up for any programs, call 532-0500, or visit thebridge teencenter.org.

Upcoming Thursday morning basketry classes

    The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, will offer a summer basketry workshop for three Thursdays beginning May 16, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.     New basket students make an easy wood-bottomed basket, with their choice of colored trim. Instructor Ann Fowler will help returning or experienced students choose a basket style and pattern appropriate to their experience level, or students may finish up un-completed baskets from previous classes.     The basket class costs $42, plus The Bridge a $12.50 materials fee. RegistraTeen Center events tion is required. Call The Center     • Around the World, Morocco — at 361-3650, or visit thecenter 4:30-5:30 p.m. May 15, The Bridge palos.org. Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland Park, will offer Morocco’s Writing from the heart food, culture, dance and scenery. This free program is for teens in     A new three-week writing class 7th through 12th grade with a begins at The Log Cabin Center completed student membership for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, on Wednesapplication on file. day, May 22, from 2 to 4 p.m.     • Friday Night Live — 7:30-     Columnist Susan Alexander 10:30 p.m. May 17, music from teaches students how to transEnough For Now and samples late their passion for writing into from Old Town Pizza. This free focused efforts to publish their

work. Alexander offers direction in researching and outlining, constructing concise paragraphs, overcoming writer’s block and developing the patience for excellent writing. She welcomes students interesting in writing novels or articles, fiction or nonfiction.     Alexander has written novels, magazine and newspaper articles, short stories and essays. She currently writes two columns for an international magazine, in addition to her blog at letstalkcarving.com.     The class fee is $39. Registration is required. Students should bring a bound notebook, pen, and a sample of preferred writing format, such as a magazine or book. Call The Center to register. (361-3650)

Summer Farm Fest at Children’s Farm     More than 1,000 visitors are expected at the Children’s Farm on June 1 for its the 25th annual summer Farm Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.     The fest features horse rides, hayrides, and free tours of the barns to see the new lambs, piglets, bunnies, calves, goats, and the most recent addition — a new and huge black and white Holstein cow. The festival also includes a flea market, live music, games and crafts for kids, fresh lemonade and watermelon, grilled hotdogs and hamburgers, and a Green Fair of environmental organizations and businesses.     All garage sales vendors who sell used merchandise are invited to have a free flea market space. Others pay $25 for a space to sell their goods or services.     Festival admission is $4 per adult and $2 per child. For more information, call The Center at 361-3650.

Submitted photo

Summer camp at The Children’s Farm     Assistant Camp Director Paul Purdy (middle) returns for his sixth summer on the staff for summer camp at The Center.     Now is the time for children who love animals and nature to sign up for summer camp at the Children’s Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.     Children ages 9 through 12, entering 4th through 7th grades in the fall, will be attending the two week overnight camp which will begin its 77th season on June 16. Later summer sessions begin July 7 and July 28.     Each day is packed with fun for the 24 farm campers who learn to ride horses, care for animals, hike in the woods and creeks and make campfires. Campers enjoy campouts, hayrides, games, crafts and new friends.     While some sessions are already filled, there are still some spots available. A scholarship fund makes camp possible for children who need financial assistance. Call 361-3650 for registration information.

We’ve moved

just a few doors down

in Ravinia Plaza

15190 s. lagrange Rd, Orland Park (708) 364-7015

(Northwest corner of 153rd Street and LaGrange Rd, 3 doors down from Office Depot)

Open everyday of the week Submitted photo

‘Broadway in Orland’ auditions ahead     Just weeks since its four sold out performances of “Annie,” the Orland Park Theatre Troupe is preparing for its next production, “Broadway in Orland.”     Actors age 15 and older are invited to audition for the Orland Park Theatre Troupe’s musical dinner theater presentation, “Broadway in Orland.” Those auditioning must be able to sing and dance. Auditions require singing at least 16 measures, learning and performing a dance. Once cast, participants must pay a $35 registration fee.     Auditions will be held Monday and Tuesday, May 13 and 14, at 7 p.m. at Orland Park’s Old Village Hall, 14413 South Beacon Ave.     Rehearsals will be held Sunday afternoons and Monday and Thursday evenings, May 16 through July 18 with rehearsals being specific to performance numbers. Performances are Sunday, July 21 and 28.     For more information, call the Orland Park Recreation Department at 403-PARK.

Stop by and say hello! Great gifts for graduates too!

20% OFF

Any single item • st. Anne’s giFts No additional discounts or coupons In-store use only • Expires 6/30/2013


12

Section 2

Thursday, May 9, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Videoview by Jay Bobbin â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;starâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one star meaning â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;poor,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; four meaning â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;excellentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating.) â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; STARTING THIS WEEK: â&#x20AC;&#x153;JACK REACHER": The driving force behind one action franchise with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mission: Impossible," Tom Cruise aimed to launch another with this enjoyably tough melo­ drama centered around novelist Lee Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title character, an exmilitary man trying to determine whether a former Army sniper is at the heart of several Pittsburgh murders. Rosamund Pike (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Die Another Day"), Richard Jenkins, Robert Duvall and filmmaker Werner Herzog also star for

director-screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie, who won an Oscar for his script for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Usual Suspects" and also co-wrote â&#x20AC;&#x153;Valkyrie" for Cruise. *** (PG13: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand) â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;SAFE HAVEN": Sincere performances, lovely scenery and other familiar elements of other Nicholas Sparks-based films â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and a few new twists â&#x20AC;&#x201D; factor into this drama, another trademark Sparks tale of a complicated romance. A woman (Julianne Hough) on the run has to face her past and consider her future when she is drawn to a North Carolina widower (Josh Duhamel). Her new neighbor (Cobie Smulders, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How I Met Your Mother") tries to help her work through her maze of

emotions. Lasse Hallstrom, who also guided the Sparks-inspired â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear John," directed the film. *** (PG-13: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand) â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;STEEL MAGNOLIAS": The Robert Harling play fueled a movie version that has remained much-loved, thanks in large part to its all-star gathering of actresses, and it also fuels this Lifetime remake that unites many African-American performers. A Louisiana beauty shop remains the prime meeting place for the characters played by Queen Latifah (also an executive producer of the film), Phylicia Rashad (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cosby Show"), Alfre Woodard and actress-musician Jill Scott. *** (Not rated: AS, P)

Photo by Jason Maholy

The grilled calamari at Capri, 12307 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights.

Capri: for people who love food by Jason Maholy â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; At the southeast corner of 123rd Street and Harlem Avenue in the heart of Palos Heights stands one of the crown jewels of the southwest suburbsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dining scene. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been written about, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been featured on television and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been at least mentioned in conversation by probably the vast majority of people who have eaten there â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if for no other reason than the generous portions of wine which are served in equally huge glasses. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost a dirty trick, giving customers so much wine they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but think â&#x20AC;&#x153;this place is awesome;â&#x20AC;? but can it really be dirty when it brings such big smiles and a feeling of being welcomed in? Of course not. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; And besides, while the wine certainly helps build good vibes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the only thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done right and isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the reason people keep coming back to â&#x20AC;&#x153;this placeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Capri, 12307 S. Harlem Ave. The Italian restaurant tucked into Old Palos has stood strong while the landscape of the heightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; downtown goes through a transitional period

that has seen the shuttering of cornerstone businesses and a spattering of redevelopment. One visit to Capri explains why it has remained vibrant despite changes all around. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; To ease into that visit start with a glass of wine, and anyone who enjoys good calamari would be well-served to try it grilled Capri-style. Squid can be tender and delicious, but is a fickle food easily ruined by overcooking. Fortunately the people over at Capri know exactly what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing, and the calamari is a fantastic result. The light, pleasant flavor of finely-cooked squid is accompanied by the smoky taste of the grill for a welcome and unexpected melding of flavors. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Food-lovers who appreciate eggplant and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an aversion to fried foods shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hesitate to try the eggplant parmesan. The purple-skinned, bulbous relative of the tomato (and tobacco â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it actually contains nicotine) isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top choice on the menu, but when seasoned well and cooked right can be a culinary delight that is hearty enough to pass as a main course. With its thick texture

Photos by Jason Maholy

For eggplant-lovers, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to beat Capriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eggplant parmesan.

and versatility â&#x20AC;&#x201D; grill it, bread it, bake it, fry it, sautĂŠ it, use it in chili or a stir fry â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is a capable substitute for meat. No less can be said about Capriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breaded variety, which features a complementary golden crust and is layered with marinara sauce and a smothering of mozzarella. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Capri offers four chicken dishes including baked half bird with pepper, onions and olives, and a breast sautĂŠed with mushrooms and marsala wine. The lemonsauced variety come either naked or pan fried in egg and flour. The baked chicken is served with roast potatoes, the breasts with pasta. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; With a menu featuring no fewer than 10 meatless dishes, Lent may be the perfect time to try dinner at Capri. One canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go wrong with the baked cod in marinara or the lobster diavolo. The lobster at $39 the most expensive item, by far, on the menu; but with calamari, shrimp, scallops, mussels and crab legs is a seafood-lovers dream. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Those with a predilection to shrimp â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and that should include everyone without a shellfish allergy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also have their options. The scampi di cosenza boasts numerous delectable crustaceans sautĂŠed along with artichoke hearts and mushrooms in oil, garlic and white wine. The mix of ingredients infuse the dish with a simple but sweet and tangy flavor that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try too hard to be different, but attains excellence just the same. For diners who like to live on the spicy side, try the linguini scampi diavolo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; shrimp with olive oil and crushed hot peppers in marinara. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Whether chicken, seafood, pasta, veal or steak, Capri does it Italian, does it well, and appeals to people who love food. The fullness of the flavors without overdoing it is an admirable quality in a restaurant because it indicates a respect for cuisine and confidence in oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s craft. These qualities and more put Capri among the elite for good dining in the southwest suburbs.

New Kids Clothing Store in Worth Boys & Girls CloTHEs NEwBorN to sizE 16

Stop by & say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hello!â&#x20AC;?

NEw mErCHaNdisE arriviNG daily

Playwear â&#x20AC;˘ Swimwear â&#x20AC;˘ Shower Gifts â&#x20AC;˘ Gifts Sets â&#x20AC;˘ Accessories

11452 S. Harlem Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Worth

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; HourS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mon-Fri 10am - 8pm Sat 10am - 7pm Sun 10am - 5pm

708.671.8959

3x5 color O&A 5 9 13

Featuring

NOW OPEN!

American, Japanese & Chinese Cuisine GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

101 Commons Drive Formerly Old Country Buffet

Chicago Ridge Phone: 708.529.7553

Open 7 Days: Sun-Thur: 11am-10pm Fri-Sat: 11am-10:30pm

ADULT LUNCH BUFFET â&#x20AC;˘ $6.99 Plus tax ADULT DINNER BUFFET â&#x20AC;˘ $9.99 & drink â&#x20AC;˘ Ask About our frequent buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cArd â&#x20AC;˘

$1.50

$2.00

Maximum 4 people per coupon. each must buy a beverage.

Maximum 4 people per coupon. each must buy a beverage.

Off Lunch Off Dinner MON-FRI LUNCH BUFFET. DINE IN ONLY. MON-FRI DINNER BUFFET. DINE IN ONLY. Present original coupon before payment. Present original coupon before payment. No other offers apply; no kids or senior No other offers apply; no kids or senior discounts. Not valid on holidays. discounts. Not valid on holidays. Expires 7/31/13 Expires 7/31/13

Flaming Grill & Buffet 101 Commons Dr. Chicago Ridge â&#x20AC;˘ 708.529.7553

Flaming Grill & Buffet 101 Commons Dr. Chicago Ridge â&#x20AC;˘ 708.529.7553

3x5 COLOR RUN 5-9-13

1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:

NEW SHOW AND MARKET

A New Monthly Market of Quality Antiques, Collectibles, Repurposed and Garden Items

May 12

At the historic Sandwich Fairgrounds

)UHH3DUNLQJÂ&#x2021; $70VRQVLWHÂ&#x2021; Food Vendors

Show Hours: 8 am - 4 pm

your local landscaper since 1951

$GPLVVLRQÂ&#x2021;&KLOGUHQDQGXQGHU)5(( 6DQGZLFK)DLU*URXQGV²6X\GDP5RDG 6DQGZLFK,/

Call us today for a free estimate!

A special Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Breakfast will be served. Festive Ă&#x20AC;RZHUV DQG SODQWV ZLOO EH DYDLODEOH IURP 5HGEXG )DUPV Dealers from four states will be offering their fantastic wares Like us on for your purchase. So, bring the family and enjoy the day. )DFHERRN

&RQWDFWXVDWRUÂ&#x2021;ZZZVXQGD\DWVDQGZLFKDQWLTXHVFRP 1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:Â&#x2021;1(:

before

Carpetp

CarpetsPlus C O LpO R T I L E

CARPET ON SALE Now $ 49

1

sq. ft.

ed

vot

7329 W. 79th St. â&#x20AC;˘ Bridgeview (79th & Harlem, next to K-Mart)

708-496-8822 advantagecarpetsplus.com

Hours: Mon-Thur 9am-8pm Fri-Sat 9am-5pm Sun 11am-4pm

2x3 run

Complete landsCape renovations LICENSED, BONDED, INSURED Landscape Contractors family owned & operated

baCkyard retreats

(708) 389-8119

RUN O&A 3-28-13 and 4-25-13

WilliamQuinnAndSons.com


Reporter_5-9-13