Page 1

Richards brother and sister lead 16 area wrestlers to state

Oak Lawn routs Shepard in crucial SSC Red battle

REPORTER

COVERAGE IN SPORTS

THE Volume LVIII, No. 49

COVERAGE IN SPORTS

Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

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Thursday, February 15, 2018

‘Double duty’ fire chief retires

Oak Lawn acts quickly to replace Sheets, who also will leave Chicago Ridge position By Dermot Connolly “Double Duty” Fire Chief George Sheets, who has been leading the fire departments of both Chicago Ridge and Oak Lawn for the past four years, notified officials in both communities last week that he will be retiring. Sheets said in his resignation letter that he planned to retire in July, but following an executive session after the Oak Lawn Village Board meeting on Tuesday night, Village Manager Larry Deetjen accepted his retirement effective immediately. Deetjen said Sheets’ resignation and the decision by Chicago Ridge officials to end the intergovernmental agreement to share the fire chief necessitated the executive session. Sheets, who lives in Oak Lawn, was not at the village board meeting and his name wasn’t mentioned during it. In a statement issued Wednesday morning, Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury said, “The village manager accepted Fire Chief Sheets’ retirement effective as of midnight Tuesday, and immediately appointed Robert Tutko as acting fire chief for Oak Lawn. The village will

Sledders enjoy thrills and spills as they race down the snow-covered hill Saturday at 50 Acre Park in Evergreen Park. Many kids and adults took turns going down the hill near 93rd Place and California Avenue.

Getting stranded, Kendall’s goal mark early part of this adventure Southwest Regional Publishing correspondent Kevin Coyne, along with his family of seven, traveled from Chicago to South Korea to watch his sister, Kendall Coyne, compete in ice hockey and experience all the Olympics and South Korea has to offer for over two weeks. Here is the first of three columns:

P

Photo by Kevin Coyne

Palos Heights native Kendall Coyne, in white uniform, See COYNE, Page 10 scored a goal against Finland.

New York Times bestselling author of “Please Stop Laughing at Me” and bullying survivor turned activist Jodee Blanco presented a bullying survival and prevention seminar to children, teens and their parents on Monday night at the Chicago Ridge Public Library. Photo by Kelly White

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moved swiftly in naming a new acting fi e chief. Page 3

be conducting a search for a permanent fire chief over the coming months.” Tutko had been deputy fire chief. Sheets has been fire chief in Oak See SHEETS, Page 8

By Dermot Connolly

THE COYNES IN KOREA

YEONGCHANG, South Korea — The Olympics started with a bang, and the Coyne family is here to experience everything there is to offer in South Korea. We departed O’Hare Airport on Feb. 7 and arrived at Seoul Incheon Airport on Friday morning. After traveling through time, we completely missed a day, My brother, Jake, 23, and I ended up in a taxi where we did our best to get a feel for the Korean culture and how much they knew about American and British culture. Our taxi driver, said he loved rock music, specifically Eric Clapton, Kevin Jinn-Soo, Paul McCartney, and Mick Jagger. When asked about music, Coyne he mentioned the lead singers’ names as opposed to the bands they played in, but we knew that he had good taste in classic rock music. We enjoyed a wide range of Korean dining in one filling and satisfying meal after over 14 hours on a cramped airplane. The meal started with a creamy soup followed by noodles complemented with fresh vegetables and other Korean novelties. After we enjoyed the noodles, we started to enjoy real Korean culture: the meat.

MORE ON SHEETS: Oak Lawn

St. Gerald parishioners push for Father Malcolm to stay

Photos by Joe Boyle and Dermot Connolly

Snow much fun!

Photo by Jeff orva

George Sheets had served as the fire chief for both Chicago Ridge and Oak Lawn.

at a Mass later this month. Before coming to St. Gerald Parishioners at St. Gerald Church about 10 years ago, Malcolm, who in Oak Lawn have started a letter- was ordained in the 1960s, was writing campaign to the Chicago pastor at St. Daniel the Prophet in Archdiocese after their Chicago’s Garfield Ridge pastor, the Rev. Lawrence neighborhood, and at St. Malcolm, mentioned at Bede the Venerable in the Mass about two weeks ago Scottsdale neighborhood. that he had been asked He was popular in both to retire. parishes, and a new gymMalcolm did not want nasium built at St. Danto comment on the situaiel the Prophet School is tion himself, saying simnamed after him. ply that the decision has Similarly, at St. Gerald, Malcolm not been made yet. he oversaw the building Members of the Parish of the Jonathan Collins Council also did not want to com- Activity Center, which was dediment on the situation when asked cated in 2013. Since then, the debt about it recently, perhaps out of related to the construction has been concern that publicizing the matter paid off. might be detrimental to their goals. Although the Archdiocese genBut one parishioner did confirm erally asks pastors to retire at 70, that parishioners are writing let- St. Gerald parishioners are asking ters to Cardinal Blase Cupich and for an exception to be made for Bishop Andrew P. Wypych, auxil- Malcolm, who is 72. iary bishop in charge of Vicariate 5, “I don’t think of age. He is the asking them to reconsider. Vicariate most energetic, dedicated people5 is the part of the archdiocese person I have ever seen here,” said that includes Oak Lawn, and the Oak Lawn Trustee Alex Olejniczak woman, who did not want to be (2nd), a lifelong member of the named, said Wypych is planning to See MALCOLM, Page 9 meet with some of the parishioners

Author provides comfort and advice to young victims of bullying By Kelly White Jodee Blanco recalls her junior high and high school years as being traumatic. The bullying she received from classmates damaged not only her selfesteem, but her spirit. She is not alone. Bullying has become a nationwide epidemic. The phenomenon, ranging from verbal and emotional abuse to online bullying, has made countless

children and teens fearful to attend school and take part in extracurricular activities. Blanco, a New York Times bestselling author of “Please Stop Laughing at Me” and a bullying survivor turned activist, presented a bullying survival and prevention seminar to children, teens and their parents on Monday night at the Chicago Ridge Public Library, 10400 S. Oxford Ave.

“Kids see bullying as joking around when they are the tormentors, but it’s not just joking around, and it’s never just joking around for the child being bullied,” Blanco said. “Being laughed at can take a piece of your spirit that you can never truly get back.” Blanco has been helping the misunderstood, ostracized, and forgotten to reclaim their self-respect by traveling to present her program, “It’s Not

Just Joking Around” (INJA) at schools, libraries, and seminars. Blanco’s understanding of why kids abuse other kids and how that pattern can continue into adulthood — rearing its head at work, at home, in relationships, and wreaking havoc on virtually every aspect of one’s life — comes from a deep personal place. See BULLYING, Page 8

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2 The Reporter

Thursday, February 15, 2018

POLICE REPORTS Chicago Ridge Domestic battery

• Ameer Walker, 25, of the 6000 block of Marshall Avenue. Chicago Ridge, was charged with domestic battery after police were called to a disturbance at his home at 1:45 p.m. Feb. 5. Police said he punched his cousin in the face several times. He was also charged with possession of cannabis with intent to deliver, after police said an unspecified amount of the drug was found in three mason jars in the house. He was held for a bond hearing the following day. • Michael Martinez, 33, of the 10600 block of South Parkside Avenue, Chicago Ridge, was charged with domestic battery after police were called to a disturbance at his home at 9 a.m. Feb. 5. Police said he struck his girlfriend with his fist several times and pinned her against a wall after an argument. He was held for a bond hearing.

Photo by Kelly White

Self-portrait

Morgan Sukalo, 14, of Palos Hills, was happy to have the self-portrait she drew on display at the Stagg High School Art Reception at McCord Gallery & Cultural Center on Jan. 19.

Worth Township spons bus trip to Chicago Flower and Garden Show Worth Township is sponsoring a bus trip to see the Chicago Flower and Garden Show at Navy Pier on Thursday, March 15. Guests will leave the Worth Township center, 11601 S. Pulaski, Alsip, at 9:30 a.m. and are scheduled to return by 3:30 p.m.

The $45 fee includes transportation and admission. Lunch is not included. Payment is due by Thursday, Feb. 22. Interested residents can sign up and pay at the Worth Township Senior Room, or call (708) 371-2900, ext. 28.

Retail theft Chicago residents Kianna Sutton, 21, and Brianna Watson, 19, were both charged with retail theft at Kohl’s department store in Chicago Ridge Mall at 9 p.m. Feb 2. Police said they were seen on surveillance cameras filling bags with merchandise and were stopped as they left. Watson was also charged with unlawful possession of a theft detection device remover because police said she had a tool used to remove security tags from clothing. They are both due in court on Feb. 20.

St. Gerald HNS to host OLCHS Luck of the Spartans Casino Night Oak Lawn Community High School’s Spartan Educational Foundation and Athletic Booster Club will host a Luck of the Spartans Casino Night to benefit the Foundation’s educational programs as well as enhance the school’s athletic programs. The event is hosted by the St. Gerald Holy Name Society and will take place on Saturday, March 17 at the parish’s Jonathan Collins Activity Center, 9310 S. 55th Court, Oak Lawn. All businesses are invited to attend. Several sponsorship are

available. Doors open at 6 p.m. with a cash bar. A $35 Green Ticket includes appetizers and $1,000 in chips. A $55 Gold Ticket includes appetizers, $5,000 in chips and two drink tickets. All chips will be exchanged for raffle tickets and a chance to win great prize baskets. No cash prizes will be awarded. Tickets can be purchased online at olchs.org or in person. For more information, contact Maria Vanderwarren at mvanderwarren@olchs.org or (708) 741-5602.

Suspended license • Denise Trapp, 39, of the 7100 block of West 107th Street, Worth, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 10:55 a.m. Feb. 5 in the 6300 block of West 111th Street. Police said she was also cited for driving without insurance and failure to wear a seatbelt. She is due in court on March 29. • Vincent Prather, 21, of the 9700 block of South Natoma Avenue, Oak Lawn, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 8:51 a.m. Feb. 4 in the 10400 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he is due in court on Feb. 20. • Aniceto Pineda, 47, of the 2500 block of West 45th Street, Chicago, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 9:15 a.m. Feb. 2 at Southwest Highway and Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he was also cited for having tinted windows. He is due in court on March 20.

Evergreen Park Drug possession

Eugene Hughes, 39, of Mokena, was charged with felony possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop in the 4000 block of Southwest Highway. Po-

lice said he was carrying .2 grams of heroin. He was also cited for expired registration.

Battery off nse Alexis Warr, 21, of Evergreen Park, was charged with battery after an argument with another employee turned physical at Bubba’s Fried Chicken, 2511 W. 95th St., at 9:22 p.m. Feb. 4. Police said she allegedly punched a 25-year-old woman in the face numerous times.

Retail theft • Benny E. Lacey Jr., 55, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 4:38 p.m. Feb. 2. Police said he took electronic equipment and a diet shake worth a total of $69.43. • Sammy Moctezuma, 43, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 11:45 a.m. Feb. 5. Police said he took hair clippers and a flat iron worth $69.80 in total. • Dale Qualls, 31, of Manteno, was charged with retail theft at Aldi, 2541 W. 95th St., at 4:48 p.m. Feb. 7. Police said he took seven containers of deodorant worth $17.29 in total.

Obstructing justice Calen Johnson-Miller, 22, of Park Forest, was charged with obstructing justice following a traffic stop at 2:04 a.m. Feb. 5 in the 3900 block of West 95th Street. Police said he refused to provide identification despite multiple requests, and continued to obstruct officers when he was taken into custody. He was also cited for driving with a suspended license.

at 7:27 p.m. Monday in the 8400 block of West 87th Street. Police said she was also cited for driving without lights when required. She is due in court on March 1.

He was also cited for criminal trespassing. A woman who was in the car with him drove away when police arrived. He is due in court on Feb. 28.

Oak Lawn

Street racing

Unlicensed solicitation • Pete Johns, 40, of Oak Lawn, was charged with soliciting without a license at 3:24 p.m. Feb. 5, in the 10200 block of South Karlov Avenue. Police said he was knocking on doors, offering to shovel snow but was not carrying a shovel. He was described by an officer who saw him as a known burglar with a history of soliciting without a license in the past. Johns is due in court on Feb. 28. • Pavel Albrecht, 20, of Lockport, was charged with soliciting for contributions in the roadway at 5:32 p.m. Feb. 5 in the 4800 block of West 87th Street. Police said he was warned several times before, and motorists had to swerve to avoid him as he walked between lanes carrying a sign. He is due in court on Feb. 20.

Drug possession Jorge Hernandez-Castro, 20, was charged with possession of a controlled substance after police found him sleeping in his car in the 4700 block of West 91st Street. Police said three Xanax tablets were found in the car, along with three pipes used to smoke marijuana. He was also cited for possession of drug paraphernalia. He was held for a bond hearing.

Outstanding warrants

Suspended licenses

Wayne R. Potenberg, 54, of Chicago, was arrested on three outstanding warrants after police saw him soliciting for contributions at 111th Street and Pulaski Road at 5 p.m. Jan. 29. Police said he was carrying a sign claiming to be a single father who had been laid off, and had been warned the day before that he would be arrested if he continued. He was also cited for obstructing identification and soliciting contributions in the roadway because he originally gave a false name. The warrants included one from Cook County for possession of a controlled substance, driving under the influence of alcohol in Palos Heights, and one from Bedford Park for failure to appear in court. He was turned over to Palos Heights police.

• Robert N. Briscoe, 31, of Cornell Avenue, Calumet City, was charged with driving with a suspended license at 7:03 p.m. Feb. 1 in the 9500 block of South 76th Avenue. Police said he was also cited for failure to yield when turning left. He is due in court on March 1. • Precious J. Critterden, 25, of the 8800 block of South 84th Court, Hickory Hills, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop

Byron A. Kennix, 27, of Berwyn, was charged with battery following an incident in the 4000 block of West Dean Drive at 6:35 p.m. Jan. 29. Police said witnesses reported seeing a hooded man later identified as Kennix get out of a running car and walk down the street before disappearing into one of the yards. When a homeowner found him hiding in his yard, Kennix allegedly punched him several times in the stomach.

Hickory Hills DUI charge

Rene Avina, 33, of the 5100 block of South Ridgeway Avenue, Chicago, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 12:17 a.m. Feb. 5 in the 9000 block of South Milford Court. Police were called to the scene by residents who said Avina had driven through a yard in the 9000 block of South Milford Court, striking a porch and a tree. Police said he appeared intoxicated and refused to take field sobriety tests or submit a breath sample. He was also cited for reckless driving and is due in court on March 1.

Battery off nse

Mahmoud Abumaghli, 25, of Burbank, was charged with street racing following a traffic stop at 1:55 p.m. Feb. 3 at 87th Street and Ridgeland Avenue. A patrol officer said he pulled him over after seeing his car and another one speed past him. He was also cited for aggravated speeding of 65 mph in a 35-mph zone. He was also cited for failure to wear a seatbelt, expired license and registration, and driving without insurance. He is due in court on March 8.

Retail theft Dale S. Qualls, 31, of Manteno, was charged with retail theft at Target, 4120 W. 95th St., at 3:55 p.m. Feb. 3. Police said he took six deodorant containers worth $55.25 in total, and placed them in his coat sleeves. Police said he was stopped as he left the store. He was also cited for possession of drug paraphernalia because a pipe used to smoke cannabis was found in his possession. Qualls is due in court on March 21.

Palos Hills

Unlicensed driving Jonathan Orta-Nunez, 21, of Lyons, was charged with driving without a valid license following a traffic crash at 10 p.m. last Thursday in the 8800 block of West 95th Street. Police said he was also cited for driving too fast for conditions, leaving the scene of an accident, and improper lane usage. Police said he is due in court on Feb. 26.

Suspended licenses • Arteria Green, 22, of Palos Hills, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 2 a.m. Feb. 7. He is due in court on March 19. • Ilzeddin Rashid, 25, of Palos Hills, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at noon on Friday. He was also cited for driving without insurance, and was wanted on an outstanding warrant for a previous suspended license charge. He is due in court on Feb. 26. • Ashraf Ataya, 26, of Chicago Ridge, was charged with retail theft at the Shell gas station, 10300 S. Harlem Ave., at 12:30 a.m. Monday. Police said he took two cans of Red Bull energy drink and two boxes of condoms. He is due in court on Feb. 26. • Mohammad Husan, 19, of Lincolnwood, was charged with driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 8 p.m. Monday. Police said he was also cited for obstructing identification and improper lane usage. He is due in court on March 19.

Identity theft A resident of the 10400 block of South Aspen Drive reported being the victim of identity theft at 10 a.m. Feb. 7. Police said the person was waiting for a “cash back” check from a credit card company, and when the victim called to the company to inquire about the delay, they were told that the check had been delivered and cashed by someone else.

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Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Reporter

3

OAK LAWN VILLAGE BOARD MEETING

Village appoints Tutko as acting fire chief, will conduct job search By Dermot Connolly

Oak Lawn Fire Chief George Sheets had planned to retire in July, but after getting word of his plans, the village acted swiftly to install Robert Tutko as the acting fire chief. At Tuesday night’s Oak Lawn Village Board meeting, Village Manager Larry Deetjen accepted Sheets’ retirement effective immediately following an executive session. Sheets has been fire chief in Oak Lawn since July 2009. He has been the fire chief in Chicago Ridge for the past four years, and is also leaving that position. On Tuesday afternoon, Deetjen said Sheets’ resignation and the decision by Chicago Ridge officials to end the intergovernmental agreement to share the fire chief necessitated the executive session. Sheets, who lives in Oak Lawn, was not at the village board meeting. Tutko, the new acting fire chief, had been the village’s deputy fire chief. The village will conduct a search for a permanent fire chief over the coming months, according to Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury. “Chief Sheets worked over eight years for the Oak Lawn Fire Department during difficult times and worked to bring reforms to the overstaffing and excessive overtime in the department,” Bury said in a statement Wednesday. “The village of Oak Lawn has a plan in place so public safety is at the forefront going forward while the search for a permanent replacement is underway and we wish George Sheets and his family well.” Aside from the executive session, the rather brief village board meeting was taken up with routine

Skating at Family Flake Fest Above: Evergreen Park residents Emily Walden accompanies her brother, Aidan, 6, as they skate around the Daniel V. Capuano Ice Rink at Yukich Field as part of the annual Family Flake Fest on Saturday. Right: Aidan Cappozzo, 9, takes a break from ice skating and talks to his grandmother, Jean Cappozzo, an Evergreen Park resident for over 40 years. Photos by Joe Boyle

“Chief Sheets ... worked

to bring reforms to the overstaffing and excessive overtime in the department.” ­— Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury

business. The trustees praised the Public Works Department for the job done in clearing the heavy snowfall. And the board approved the lease of one snow plow truck valued at over $76,000. At the request of Trustee Tom Phelan (6th), Finance Director Brian Hanigan made clear that the vehicle would be leased rather than bought, in order to save the village money. The board also voted against a requested appeal of an adverse decision by the Planning and Development Commission for a special-use permit to allow the leasing and selling of used cars at 8940 S. Cicero Ave. The Planning Commission had voted 7-1 to deny permission, and trustees voted 5-0 to uphold that decision. Trustee Bud Stalker (5th) was absent. In the past, several trustees have expressed opposition to allowing used car lots to operate in the village, because they would compete with the many local car dealerships. The board did vote to approve a special-use permit for a business at 9637 Southwest Highway, which the Planning and Development Commission had voted 5-3 against doing. Details about that case were not immediately available.

Crisis Center offers training to combat domestic abuse By Joe Boyle Reaching out to someone who has been scarred by years of emotional and physical abuse takes a person who possesses certain qualities. The staff at the Crisis Center for South Suburbia in Tinley Park is looking for those volunteers who can assist and provide solace to adults and children who have been marred by abuse. The year-round revolving 40-hour training course to comfort victims of domestic abuse will begin again this weekend. The first session starts Saturday, Feb. 17 at the Crisis Center. The sessions will be held over a six-week period. Classes will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturdays and 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays. “It is thorough 40-hour training and gets intense,” said Tonya Schassburger, director of residential and transitional services at the Crisis Center. “People will get to know about the myths surrounding domestic violence and how to help children with trauma. They will learn how you can help people learn to function. Domestic violence can be very traumatic.” Schassburger pointed out that the sessions are designed to take place over a six-week period. However, participants can attend the classes at their own pace. “The classes are always revolving so if you miss a class, you can keep going until you finish,” Schassburger said. However, participants must attend all sessions to earn the 40-hour training certificate.

The cost of the program is $250 (discounts are available with a six-month volunteer commitment). Some of the topics within the course may be sensitive to survivors of domestic violence. Individuals considering volunteering at the Crisis Center are encouraged to participate, as well as professionals who work with victims of domestic violence. After completion of the 40-hour DV training, participants will be allowed to direct services and “client-based” volunteering at the Crisis Center. Additionally, participants will be able to apply to complete 150 hours of direct client services in order to sit for the Illinois Certified Domestic Violence Professional examination. “We also help plan with people about medical treatment and advocate court advice,” said Deonne Senese, volunteer coordinator for the Crisis Center. “”But this is open to all people to take part in. We help people who have suffered emotional, physical and sexual abuse. It is a very comprehensive program, but it is quite fulfilling.” Schassburger said topics covered in the program include the various definitions of abuse, types of abuse and safety planning. They also discuss the abuser profile, teen dating, the cycle of violence, and legal issues related to domestic violence. “It really helps to train people and we cover it all,” Schassburger said. “We talk about the courts and help people fill out an order of protection. There are all kinds of remedies to help people. We also help people who miss work because of a DV issue.”

Schassburger said the Crisis Center’s highly skilled and licensed professionals will give participants an inside look into how to properly address a victim or abuser and how to face issues within the workplace. This is a course open to any individual interested in becoming educated on domestic violence. “I believe the program has been well received,” said Schassburger, who has been with the Crisis Center since 2005 and served as the shelter director for 12 years. “We remind people that domestic violence is out there. It could be one of our neighbors or you can just read the newspapers today.” To enroll in the program, contact Senese at (708) 429-7255, ext. 143, or email dsenese@ crisisctr.org To obtain additional information about the program, contact Schassburger at (708) 429-7255, ext. 115, or email tschassburger@ crisisctr.org Enrollment is limited and participants are accepted on a first come, first served basis. “This is a great organization,” added Senese. The Crisis Center for South Suburbia’s mission is to provide emergency shelter and other essential services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence and to address the societal issues that contribute to domestic violence. Visit www.crisisctr.org for more information on the Crisis Center for South Suburbia, ways to support its mission, and the services it provides.

HICKORY HILLS CITY COUNCIL MEETING

McAvoy: Hazardous waste pick-up program is a success

By Sharon L. Filkins

Hickory Hills Council members welcomed Tom McAvoy, a former 3rd Ward alderman, who presented a detailed report at last Thursday’s meeting on the success of the city’s first-year contact with a hazardous waste pick-up program. McAvoy was still in office in January, 2017 when the city approved a one-year trial contract with “At Your Door” Special Collection Service, operated by Waste Management, Inc., which is the city’s general refuse and recycling collection. He was invited to the Feb. 8 council meeting by Brian Fonte, the other 3rd Ward alderman who chairs the council’s Health and Environment Committee. He was instrumental in bringing the new collection service to the city. McAvoy, who supported the council’s

decision to sign the contract in 2017, said he wanted to encourage the council to increase its promotion of the new program. “In its first year, 422 residents utilized the services. That represents nearly one of every eight program-eligible households,” said McAvoy. “We need to get the word out about this program to our residents. If their refuse is picked up by Waste Management, they are eligible to sign up for “At Your Door Service.” He reported that a post card survey of residents during the past year indicated that there was a high rate of customer satisfaction. He added that “At Your Door” made 593 individual collection stops to pick up thousands of items for recycling or proper disposal in approved special landfills. According to his report, among the most frequently collected items were televisions

Skin care concerns?

(508), computers and computer accessories (397), and latex paint (1,251 gallons). In response to McAvoy’s report, Mayor Mike Howley encouraged all residents of homes who have their garbage collected by Waste Management to contact the company to arrange for a date when they can leave electronic and hazardous household wastes at their door for pick up. “This is easy and can be done by calling the firm at the toll-free number (800) 449-7587 or visiting the program’s website at www.wmatyourdoor.com.,” Howley said. He also noted that there is information on the city’s website (www.hickoryhillsil.org) describing the program and how to use it. In other business, the council approved a $250 donation to the Hills Baseball/Softball Association and a business license for Pillars Community Health at 8020 W. 87th St.

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4 The Reporter

Our Neighborhood

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Kids make Valentine’s Day cards at Evergreen Park Library Children had an opportunity to make their own handmade Valentine’s Day cards for their friends and loved ones during a session held on Feb. 7 at the Evergreen Park Library, 9400 S. Troy Ave. Kids interacted with staff members and parents at the

holiday session. Children had the opportunity to make their own Valentine’s Day cards for their mothers as well. Many moms were in attendance at the card making craft class. Some of the children also made handmade Valentine’s Day

cards for their grandmothers. Moms also helped their children make the handmade cards as well. Participants enjoyed some treats as well to mark the holiday. This is one of several programs that have been held this past month for children at the Evergreen Park Library.

Photos by Kelly White

Celia Bahena, 8, of Evergreen Park, takes her time creating Andrew Tapia, 5, of Chicago, works hard on a Miriam Alboutni, 7, of Evergreen Park, shows off a Annabel Kaner, 5, of Evergreen Park, is happy to display the perfect Valentine’s Day card for her mother, Valentine’s Day card for his grandmother. Valentine’s Day card she created. the Valentine’s Day card she created.

Charity runners can take part in SW Half Marathon to aid SWSRA

By Dermot Connolly

While many people registering for the 11th Annual Southwest Half Marathon and 10K Run/Walk on May 6 do it for the challenge, the Southwest Special Recreation Association would like some to do it for charity as well. Staff from Alsip-based SWSRA, which provides recreation programs for area residents with disabilities or special needs, has been on the volunteer organizing committee helping put together the races on Route 83 on the first Sunday in May since founders Mel Diab and Jeff Prestinario started the tradition more than a decade ago. While CNB Bank and Palos Health are chief sponsors of the half-marathon and 10K, SWSRA sponsors the Run, Walk or Roll that is held along with them. The half-mile event is open to people of all ages with physical or mental disabilities. In exchange for all their help, a portion of the profits from the races are donated to SWSRA. And the non-profit also receives funds

donated by charity runners. “This is one of our biggest fundraisers every year” said Paula Marr, of SWSRA, who is hoping to attract more charity runners this year. Last year, eight runners raised money for the organization. “All we ask is that people bring in a minimum of $100 in pledges,” said Marr recently. “That is because we give all the charity runners a goody bag with a T-shirt, snacks and other items.” This is in addition to another goody bag, which all participants receive along with their registration numbers the day before the event. She said that Kailey Green, a Chicago resident, has raised more than $5,000 for SWSRA since she began competing in the 10K as a charity runner in 2015. “Kailey actually won, as the fastest woman in the 10K in 2016,” Marr noted. “We’re so appreciative of all the donations we receive, from the event and the charity runners. Every dollar we get means we’re able to provide more scholarships and

Submitted photo

Kailey Green, of Chicago, seen here being applauded by SWSRA Run, Walk or Roll athletes, has raised more than $5,000 for Southwest Special Recreation Association since 2015 as a charity runner in the Southwest Half-Marathon and 10K. She also won the 10K in 2016.

services to the people we serve,” said Marr. In addition to the charity runners, volunteers also accompany participants in the Run, Walk or Roll. “As long as I am involved,

SWSRA will be a part of this. From the beginning, we wanted to make sure this event was welcoming to everyone in the community,” promised Diab at a recent meeting of the organizing committee

volunteers. “I really appreciate programs likes SWSRA,” agreed Prestinario, who has a nephew with Down syndrome. “SWSRA and programs like it do a lot of good for people with mental and physical difficulties. It gives them opportunities they otherwise wouldn’t have, and they enjoy the games like everyone else.” Prestinario pointed out that while SWSRA currently is the main charity receiving funds from the Southwest Half Marathon and 10K, that is only because of a downturn in participants over the last few years. Diab said registration for the races is down about 10 percent over what they would like to see at this time, but they are expecting the numbers to rise as the weather warms up. Since 2008, the Southwest Half Marathon has raised more than $200,000 for charities, which have included American Cancer Society for Prostate Cancer and Research, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, and Lake Katherine

Nature Center and Botanic Garden in Palos Heights A fourth race, the Kids’ Dash, which was added last year for the 10th anniversary to draw more families, proved very popular and will also be returning this year. In the free event, for children up to age 11, boys and girls run races of varying lengths, depending on age groups. Everyone gets a medal. “Even though it was chaotic, it was fun to see the enthusiasm,” said Diab. More information and registration for all of the races is available on the website, www.southwesthalfmarathon.com. Anyone interested in being a charity runner is asked to register on the event website and then contact SWSRA at (708) 389-9423. More information about being a charity runner is also available on the website, www.swsra.com. “I would suggest that anyone planning to collect donations should open a GoFundMe account,” said Marr. “It just makes everything a lot easier for them.”

Palos Winter Farmers Market continues at rec center The Palos Heights Indoor Farmers Market season continues from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 17 in the Orchard Room of the Palos Heights Recreation Department, 6601 W. 127th St. The market is offering a wide variety of fresh baked bakery items from Rustic Knead Bakery in Lemont, Sweet Pea Gluten Free Bakery, Eating Well, and Etalaya’s Exotic Mandel Broit. The farmer vendors offer a wide variety of apples and cider, syrup, local honey, garlic, winter root vegetables, including carrots, red, white and sweet potatoes, winter squashes, rutabaga, popcorn and a large variety of jams. Other vendors will be selling meats, salmon and other fish, cranberry sauces and healthy Mediterranean bars, organic teas, and healthy olive oils and vinegars. Hot tamales are available at Aracely’s, and hot or frozen veggie patties and health breakfast bars are available at Eating Well. Jewelry is available at Rita Schultz’s Day Dreamers Jewelry. The Palos Heights Library will also be at the market with information of upcoming winter programs and classes for children and adults. Sharon Speedwell was the winner of the Jan. 20 Farmers Market gift certificate raffle. A $5 Farmers Market gift certificate raffle will take place at the

end of each market. All attendees are welcome to enter. Canned food items will be accepted for area food panties at all indoor markets. Palos Heights Farmers Market gift certificates will also be for sale. They are sold for $5 each and can be used at both the winter and upcoming summer Farmers Markets. LINK cards are accepted at the Palos Heights Farmers Market. Residents can stop by the city table to start the process. Applications for the 2018 Summer Community Tent dates are currently being accepted. Applications will be available at the city table. In addition, applications can be found at www.palosheights.org under the events section or by calling (708) 361-1800. The market would like to thank this year’s Palos Heights Farmers Market sponsors. They include Dr. John Principe, MD, of Wellbeing MD Center for Life; Palos Health, The Private Bank, CNB Bank and Trust, United Trust Bank, Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz, Running for Kicks, Golden Shoes and Camille’s Confections. Additional information about the market can be found at www.palosheights.org, or by emailing farmersmarket@palosheights.org. Residents can also join them on Facebook or call (708) 361-1800.

Moraine Valley to host celebration of hip-hop culture Soulful sounds, hip-hop and poetry abound in “Street Science: A Celebration of Hip-Hop Culture” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 24 in the Dorothy Menker Theater inside the Fine and Performing Arts Center at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway, Palos Hills. The performance, free for all students, features Omar Offendum with The Reminders, Amirah Sackett, and DJ Man-O Wax (Asad Ali Jafri). Tickets are $30 for general admission and $25 for senior citizens. Offendum, a Syrian-American rapper/poet living in Los Angeles, is known for his blend of hip-hop and Arabic poetry. He has helped raise millions of dollars for various humanitarian and relief groups. The group’s members include Brussels-born emcee Big Samir and Queens-born emcee/vocalist

Aja Black. Jafri performs internationally, spinning spiritual, soulful and funky music from around the world. This performance is part of Moraine Valley’s ”Mosaics: Muslim Voices in America” project, which highlights the artistic and cultural diversity of Muslim artists living and working in the United States. Funding for this project is made possible in part by a grant from the Association of Performing Arts Professionals’ Building Bridges: Arts Culture and Identity, a component of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art. Tickets are available online at morainevalley.edu/ fpac or at the Box Office, located inside the Fine and Performing Arts Center. For more information, call the Box Office at (708) 974-5500.

Hot Sardines jazz ensemble to perform at Moraine The Hot Sardines, a jazz ensemble, will perform at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 11 in the Dorothy Menker Theater inside the Fine and Performing Arts Center at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway, Palos Hills. Tickets for this New York-based ensemble with its horn arrangements, piano melodies and vocals that transport listeners to a different era are $30 for adults, $25 for senior citizens, and $15 for students. The Hot Sardines’ self-titled debut album, named by iTunes as one of the best jazz albums of 2014, spent more than a year on the Billboard Jazz Chart, debuting in the top 10 alongside Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga.

Influenced also by such greats as Dinah Washington, Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday, they began playing open mic nights and small gigs and by 2011, headlined Midsummer Night Swing at New York’s Lincoln Center. The group appeals to jazz lovers of all ages. Bougerol noted on the band’s website she sees daughters, mothers and grandmothers coming to the show together and in New York, she had a 7-year-old girl bring up a can of sardines to sign. Tickets are available online at morainevalley.edu/ fpac or at the Box Office, located inside the Fine and Performing Arts Center. For more information, call the Box Office at (708) 974-5500.

Compiled by Joe Boyle

News and events from our archives • 50 years ago Local state rep introduces bill for part-time police officers From the Feb. 15, 1968 issue:

The story: A bill that will allow local municipalities to operate with special part-time police officers will be presented to the Illinois General Assembly on March 4 by state Rep. Harry “Bus” Yourell (D-6th). The law passed last fall ordered municipalities to convert to a complete full-time department by Jan. 1, allowing the appointment of part-time or special police officers only for emergencies and then only for a maximum of 120 days in any one year. Most local communities operating with almost all part-time men have appointed them for 120 days, hoping for an amendment before the appointments run out on April 30. Yourell said the bill would raise the minimum salary of a policeman to $600 per month and will create financial hardship for most communities. The quote: “Many of our towns budgeted for a one-cent increase in sales tax,” Yourell said. “Instead, they have only one-quarter of a cent to work with. If they have to have a number of full-time men at $600 a month, it’s going to cause a financial burden.”

• 25 years ago Our Lady of the Ridge students take initiative in recycling From the Feb. 11, 1992 issue:

The story: Five seventh-grade girls at Our Lady of the Ridge School in Chicago Ridge decided to collect newspapers and aluminum for recycling to help in the effort to make a clean environment. The five girls – Michelle Dakuras, Karyn Hovel, Jeanine Rozzo, Lauren Mikos and Melissa Hajer – go to the rooms of their school each day to collect aluminum containers that lunches come in. They also collect newspapers that are left in the school. For their work each girl recently was presented with a certificate of achievement by Chicago Ridge Mayor Eugene Siegel. The girls were featured in The Reporter newspaper. The quote: “We never thought about being in the newspaper,” Karyn Hovel said. “We just thought we would help the school.”

• 10 years ago Former slave talks to students at Moraine Valley CC From the Feb. 14, 2008 issue: The story: Simon Deng, a former child slave, shared his life in war-torn Sudan during a program held Feb. 5 at Moraine Valley Community College in Palos Hills. Deng was born in 1959 in a country that has been divided by civil war. The Sudan civil war is between the primarily Islamic north and Christian south. When Deng’s father took the family into a southern Sudan city, Deng was soon kidnapped by an Arab man and taken to another city. Deng was beaten by his owner and was a slave for nearly four years. Deng’s owners then moved to another city. It was in the new city where Deng recognized three members of his village. Through negotiations and help from these men, he was freed. Deng now lives in New York. The quote: “We assume slavery is history of the past, but unfortunately when it comes to case of Sudan in northern Africa, slavery still exists and exists after today. I am living proof.”


Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Reporter

WHATIZIT?

WORTH VILLAGE BOARD MEETING

Trustees work with Chicago Ridge, Oak Lawn to reduce speed limit along Ridgeland Avenue By Sharon L. Filkins

Photo by Joe Boyle

The clue for this week’s Whatizit photo (above) is: On track. Send your responses with your name and hometown by noon Monday to thereporter@comcast.net. Last week’s quiz was a lesson in history. Ron Wagenhofer, a resident of Palos Park, knew it was the John Humphrey House, located at 9830 W. 144th Place in Orland Park. The house was the home of Illinois state Sen. John H. Humphrey (1838-1914). A plaque in front of the house provides a lot of information about Humphrey, who became active in local politics and served as an Orland Township supervisor, village treasurer, and later as Orland Park’s first mayor. He was elected to the Illinois House of Representatives in 1880 and 1884. He advanced to the Illinois Senate in 1886, serving until 1910. The house, built in 1881, is the second oldest in Orland Park. It was donated to the Orland Historical Society in 1987 and was placed on the National Register in 2005.

SUDOKU

5

Village of Worth board members approved a resolution at the Feb. 6 meeting announcing the village is joining neighboring communities in a united effort to decrease the speed limit on Ridgeland Avenue. Mayor Mary Werner stated that Worth will be working with Chicago Ridge and Oak Lawn under the direction of the Cook County Transportation and Highway Department in an attempt to reduce the speed limit from 40 miles per hour to 30 miles per hour on the sections of the road that runs through all three communities. “In our village especially, speeding on Ridgeland is a real problem because there is a cemetery on the east side of the road and drivers just automatically speed up because of the open space,” Werner said. “However, there are homes along the west side of the road across from the cemetery and the speeding is a safety hazard to our residents,” she said. Trustee Rich Dziedzic asked Werner if the mayor of Palos Heights, Bob Straz, had been contacted concerning the united effort. “Ridgeland Avenue goes through his community also,” Dziedzic said. “Do we know if they have the speeding issues

Worth Trustee Brad Urban (from left) honors Ann Garvin, food and beverages manager at Water’s Edge Golf Course, and Dean Gabey, general manager of the golf course, in assisting to provide Christmas Day meals for Great Lakes Naval recruits that was held at the Marrs-Meyer American Legion Post 991. The presentation took place at the Feb. 6 Worth Village Board meeting. Photo by Sharon L. Filkins

too?” Werner replied that she would reach out to Straz about the united efforts. On another matter, a business license was approved for the Alkeif Restaurant, located at 69546956 W. 111th St. The restaurant owner is Tarek Obaid. If the name of the restaurant and the owner sound familiar, it is because Obaid also owns the Alkeif Hookah Bar, which is located just across the street from the newly approved restaurant. The Hookah Bar occupies the location of the former Saraya Restaurant, which closed in December. Trustee Brad Urban, who presented the license for approval, stated that the restaurant is strictly

for carry-out, and there is no seating in the facility. Dziedzic questioned if the restaurant would deliver food to the hookah bar across the street? He reminded the trustees that the issue of food servers in the bar had raised concerns in earlier discussions because of the risk of employees being exposed to smoke and fumes in the bar. Urban replied that the restaurant employees would only deliver the carry-out food to the front counter in the hookah bar and would not be exposed to any smoke. “I just want to be sure we don’t have any problems with this issue of food in the bar,” Dziedzic said.

Also approved was a request to order two 2018 Ford Utility police interceptors AWD, including equipment and exterior striping in the amount of $79,708. Urban, who coordinated the Christmas Day for Great Lakes Naval recruits holiday meals at the Marrs Meyer American Legion Post 991, presented certificates of appreciation to Worth Police Officer Mike Wirth, who donated his personal time for a second year to participate in the day’s events. He also gave certificates of appreciation to Dean Gabey, general manager of the Water’s Edge Golf Course; and Ann Garvin, food and beverage manager at the golf course, for providing and serving food to the recruits.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR EVERGREEN PARK

Evergreen Park Chamber hosts business property tax workshop

Answers on Page 8

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

The Evergreen Park Chamber of Commerce invites all local businesses to a workshop on the appraisal and appeal process for business property taxes, presented by the Cook County Assessor’s Office, at 8 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at Gilhooley’s Grande Saloon, 3901 W. 103rd St., Chicago. The fee is $15 for the breakfast buffet. To register, visit www.evergreenparkchamber.org.

EP Historical Commission seeks volunteers to mark village’s 125th year The Evergreen Park Historical Commission is looking for volunteers to assist with the 125th anniversary celebration of Evergreen Park that will include a variety of events that will begin this summer. The commission is looking for volunteers who like good, old-fashioned art and craft projects. Display boards are being created and volunteers are needed for cutting, pasting and helping with a variety of creative efforts. Individuals who are interested can send an email to epinf@hotmail.com for more information.

HICKORY HILLS

Indoor floor hockey league to be held at Krueger Park

ACROSS 1. Emperor of Russia 5. Abounding in rocks 11. Increase in speed 14. Music app 15. Not nice 18. Tables (Span.) 19. Decomposes 21. __ student: learns healing 23. Nursemaid 24. Joke-teller 28. Male parent 29. Group of countries (abbr.) 30. “Rambling Rose” actor Lukas 32. Midway between south and southwest 33. Cartoon Network (abbr.) 35. Peacock network 36. Principal ethnic group of China 39. Made of fermented honey and water 41. Exclamation of surprise 42. Evaluates skill or knowledge 44. Stage in ecological succession 46. Ethnic group of SE Asia 47. Not small 49. A cat is one 52. Broken piece 56. French president 58. Artist’s workroom 60. Ability to apply knowledge and skills 62. Visually stunning 63. Ancient region south of Dead Sea

DOWN 1. Used to pour beer 2. Con game 3. Skin disorder 4. Communists (slang) 5. Subjects to hostility 6. A major division of geological time 7. Hitting statistic (abbr.) 8. British thermal unit 9. Influe tial envoy to Woodrow Wilson 10. Fits on neck of animal 12. Fertile soil 13. Type of battery 16. Khoikhoin peoples 17. Consist of two parts 20. Small group of trees 22. Execute or perform 25. Millihenry 26. 007’s creator 27. Associated with esoteric doctrine 29. Electronic countermeasures 31. Schenectady County Airport 34. No (Scottish) 36. Position of leadership 37. Statement 38. Raccoons belong to this genus 40. One who diagnoses 43. True mosses 45. Blood type 48. Albanian 50. Emergency response notification system 51. College reservists 53. Away from wind 54. Tough outer layer 55. Art __, around 1920 57. Born of 58. The greatest of all time 59. Georgia rockers 61. Natural logarithm Answers on Page 8

The Hickory Hills Park District will hold its indoor floor hockey ball league from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Saturdays, Feb. 17 through March 31, at the Krueger Park Recreation Center, 9100 S. 88th Ave., Hickory Hills. Each week players will participate in shooting and passing drills and play a 45-minute game. Participants will be on different teams each week. The league is for competitors ages 8 to 12. The registration fee is $35 for residents and $40 for non-residents. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 598-1233 or visit www.hhparkdistrict.org.

Cowboys and cowgirls can attend Western Day Western Day will be held for cowboys and cowgirls ages 3 to 8 from 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Monday, Feb. 19 at the Krueger Park Recreation Center, 9100 S. 88th Ave., Hickory Hills. Participants will make cowboy hats and play cowboy games. The registration fee is $14 for residents and $15 for non-residents. More information about the this special event and other programming can be obtained by calling (708) 598-1233 or visit www.hhparkdistrict.org.

OAK LAWN

Oak Lawn film group to view, discuss ‘Allego non Troppo’

meet at 10 a.m. at the Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn. The return time is scheduled for 5 p.m. To register or for more information, call (708) 857-2200.

Pryme Tymers to listen to gospel songs The Pryme Tymers, a local senior organization, will hold their next meeting beginning at 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at Trinity Covenant Church, 9230 S. Pulaski Road, Oak Lawn. Gospel singer Ron Eckberg will sing songs of faith for the Lenten season. A catered turkey breast luncheon will be served at noon. The fee is $7 for the entertainment and the luncheon. Reservations are required. To register or for more information, call the church office, (708) 636-7548, or Tom Panush, (708) 636-7548. Non-perishable canned goods will be accepted for the Blue Island Salvation Army food pantry.

Trinity Seniors plan bus outing to see “Steel Magnolias” The Trinity Senior Fellowship Group is planning a bus outing to see “Steel Magnolias” on Thursday, March 15. A luncheon of baked north Atlantic cod or chicken breast a la king will be offered. The fee for transportation, tickets to the production, and the luncheon is $55 for members and $60 for non-members. The bus will leave the Trinity Church parking lot at 10:45 a.m. Reservations are required and are needed by Thursday, Feb. 22. For tickets and more information, call Mickey VonAsten, (708) 422-2355.

Serving spaghetti dinner at Pilgrim Faith Church A spaghetti dinner will be served from 3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 at Pilgrim Faith United Church of Christ, 9411 S. 51st Ave., Oak Lawn.Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for children and are available at the door. Proceeds will go to the summer camp fund to send youth to Tower Hill Camp for a week. The church is handicapped accessible.

Princess Luncheon to take place at Stony Creek Restaurant The Princess Luncheon will be held from noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 25 at the Oak Lawn Park District’s Stony Creek Restaurant and Banquets, 5850 W. 103rd St. A performance with the favorite Ice Queen and her Ice Princess sister will take place. Performers will sing popular songs, play games, and tell a story or two. A light buffet is included. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. The fee is $10.95 for adults and $6.95 for children ages 10 and under. Guests can come dressed as their favorite princess. Parents should bring a camera to take photos. Reservations are required. To register or for more information, call (708) 857-2433.

Johnson-Phelps Auxiliary hosts Paint-N-Party fundraiser

CineVerse, the Oak Lawn Park District’s weekly film discussion group open to anyone age 17 and older, will screen and discuss the 1976 animated musical “Allego non Troppo” from Italy from 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at the Oak View Community Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn. Members should check the building signage for the correct room number. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 529-9028 or visit cineversegroup.blogspot.com.

A Paint-N-Party fundraiser will be held beginning at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at the Johnson-Phelps VFW Auxiliary, 9514 S. 52nd Ave., Oak Lawn. The reservation fee is $35 per person. Appetizers will be served. A cash bar will be available. Proceeds benefit the auxiliary’s veteran and community programs. More information or to register, call Deb at (773) 614-3557 or visit www.paintnpartyillinois.com.

Oak Lawn Park District trip to Museum of Science and Industry

Oak Lawn Park Districts off rs pool memberships

The Oak Lawn Park District has scheduled a trip to the Museum of Science and Industry on Thursday, Feb. 22. The fee is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents. The cost includes transportation, museum entry, tickets to the U 505 Submarine, and a 30-minute movie in the giant dome theater. Lunch will not be provided. Guests will

Pool memberships for the Oak Lawn Park District will go on sale beginning Thursday, March 1. Memberships will grant pool permission for open swim sessions at Central Pool, 9400 S. Kenton Ave., and Centennial Aquatic Center, 9400 S. Nashville Ave. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 857-2225 or visit www.olparks.com.

Skating event will be held at Oak Lawn Park District Ice Arena The Green and White Skate event will be held from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday, March 4 at the Oak Lawn Park District Ice Arena, 9320 S. Kenton Ave. The afternoon will include skating, a dance performance, raffles, and music provided by a DJ. The fee is $7 for admission and $3 for skate rental. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 857-5173.

PALOS HILLS

Palos Township health services are offered The Palos Township Health Service will hold a variety of programs this month at the Community Center, 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills. Little Company of Mary Healthy Heart Screenings will be held from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20. Fees will be required for the screenings and appointments have to be arranged. Cholesterol and HA1C will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon Monday, Feb. 26. Fees also apply for the screenings and appoints have to be made. Hearing screenings will also be held from 9 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27. The screenings are free but appointments have be made. An arthritis seminar will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 28. The session is free but appointments have to be arranged. Appointments can be made by calling (708) 598-2441.

Toni Preckwinkle to speak to Palos Hills seniors The Palos Hills Police Department will be sponsoring a Senior Crime Prevention Breakfast for Palos Hills Seniors on Thursday, March 15 at the Belvedere Chateau, 8055 W. 103rd St. Palos Hills. Doors will be open at 8:30 a.m., with breakfast to follow at 9 a.m. Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle will be the guest speaker. The Palos Hills Police Department will present information on how to avoid phone, internet, and IRS scams. Handouts will be available. This event is limited to the first 250 Palos Hills senior citizens who respond by March 8. Reservations can be arranged by calling the City of Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Department at (708) 430-4500.

WORTH

Marrs-Meyers AL Post plans trip to play bingo with veterans Members of the Marrs-Meyer American Legion Post 991 will host their first trip to Hines Veterans Hospital to spend an hour or two to interact with hospitalized veterans on Saturday, Feb. 17. The post members said the trip is open to all residents. Guests will have a chance to meet the veterans and play bingo, have food and award prizes. Bus transportation will be provided from the post, 11001 S. Depot Ave., Worth, at 1 p.m. Bingo will be played from 2 to 3 p.m. The members said the event is a great time, especially for the veterans who love the fun and company. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 448-6699.

Marrs-Meyer AL Riders to hold 13th anniversary party The Marrs-Meyers American Legion Riders 991 will be holding their 13th anniversary party from 6 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 at the post, 11001 S. Depot Ave., Worth. The registration fee is $15. Tickets must be purchased in advance and will not be available at the door. The fee includes dinner, dancing, door prize entry, dessert, and a 50/50 raffle. The musical entertainment will be provided by Identity Crisis. More infomation can be obtained by calling (708) 448-6699.


6 The Reporter

THE

COMMENTARY

Thursday, February 15, 2018

REPORTER

An Independent Newspaper Published Weekly Founded March 16, 1960

Ray Hanania

Numbers are not good for Rauner

Snow isn’t the only thing making the week rough

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recent statewide poll taken for Sen. Daniel Biss’ gubernatorial campaign showed Gov. Bruce Rauner is much less liked by Illinois voters than his fellow Republican, President Donald Trump. The poll also found that the under-funded Democrat Biss actually does slightly better in a head-to-head match with Gov. Rauner than does the presumed frontrunner, billionaire JB Pritzker. The Public Policy Polling survey does have one problematic issue, so let’s get to that right up front. Some 76 percent of respondents were reached on landline phones (that’s too high for polls these days because so many people only use mobile phones) while 24 percent were “interviewed over the internet.” But this problem doesn’t totally disqualify it, so let’s go ahead and talk about it. Rich According to the poll, 37 percent of Illinois Miller voters have a favorable opinion of President Trump and 58 percent gave him an unfavorable rating while five percent were unsure. That seems about the expected number, considering national polls. The poll of 866 Illinois voters Feb. 5-6 and has a margin of error of 3.3 percent. What is somewhat unexpected is only 26 percent of Illinoisans have a favorable impression of Gov. Rauner, while a whopping 63 percent have an unfavorable view of the state leader. Whew. That’s just spectacularly lousy for a governor who isn’t under criminal investigation. Rauner is forging ahead with his reelection campaign by dumping a fortune into TV ads slamming JB Pritzker by tying him to convicted former Gov. Rod Blagojevich. Combine that with Biss’ own TV ads attacking Pritzker and it might be no surprise that Pritzker’s favorable rating is also “upside down.” According to the poll, just 33 percent of Illinoisans have a favorable view of Pritzker while a plurality of 42 percent has an unfavorable view of the man. A quarter of voters were still unsure, but yikes, man. The dude has spent more than $40 million on his campaign, so you’d think he’d be doing better. But fewer Illinoisans have a favorable opinion of Pritzker than… President Trump. OK, he’s not nearly as disliked as Trump, but still. The Biss campaign didn’t release its candidate’s own favorable ratings or any data on the other top tier contender, Chris Kennedy. But its poll found Biss leading Gov. Rauner 47-30 in a head-to-head matchup, with 23 percent saying they were unsure. Pritzker also led Rauner, but by slightly less than Biss’ 17-point margin. According to the poll, Pritzker is ahead of Rauner by 13 points, 48-35, with 17 percent unsure. Whether 13 points or 17 points, a win is a win. But there are growing concerns among Democrats that Rauner’s ads will continue to deflate Pritzker’s numbers through November. Then again, Biss doesn’t have Pritzker’s billionaire cash; and aside from Pritzker’s 15-second ads targeting him, nobody has yet “put him on blast,” as the kids say, so we don’t know how he’d survive an all-out assault like the one Pritzker is enduring. Pritzker’s favorable rating among his fellow Democrats was a somewhat tepid 52 percent, while his unfavorable rating was 22 percent and 26 percent are undecided, despite the fact that the guy has spent tens of millions over many months to woo those particular voters. Racial crosstabs were not released. “This confirms what we’ve known all along: voters prefer a middle-class governor in Daniel Biss rather than having to choose between billionaires Pritzker and Rauner,” said Biss campaign manager Abby Witt via press release. “Despite Pritzker outspending Daniel 20-to-1 on TV ads, Daniel continues to build momentum and is the strongest candidate to beat Bruce Rauner.” The poll found that Rauner’s favorability rating among Republicans is much narrower than a poll released last month, which might be good news for his primary opponent, State Rep. Jeanne Ives. A poll taken by We Ask America in mid-January had Rauner’s favorables at 65 percent and his unfavorables at 25 percent. But the new PPP poll found that just 49 percent of Republicans now have a favorable view of Rauner versus 43 percent with an unfavorable view. That’s far less than President Trump’s score of 73 percent favorable among Republican voters and a mere 19 percent unfavorable. Among voters who said they voted for President Trump, the new PPP found that 92 percent still view him favorably, while just four percent have an unfavorable view of the president. Among those same Trump voters, however, 54 percent view Gov. Rauner favorably, while 36 view Rauner unfavorably and nine percent say they’re unsure. That’s obviously not a great sign. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax, a daily political newsletter, and CapitolFax.com.

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Silence over Brannigan’s remarks might harm us all The following is Pastor Martin Niemoller’s famous quote about the silence that accompanied the persecution of the Jews by the Nazi regime prior to, and during, World War II. Neimoller’s statement reads, in full: “First, they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out — Because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out —Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—Because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me — and there was no one left to speak for me.” My letter is a personal response to the ongoing controversy surrounding Palos Township Trustee Sharon Brannigan’s openly Islamophobic Facebook posts regarding, in her words, the large number of illegal Muslim immigrants flooding into Palos Township schools. These comments were framed by Brannigan and some of her supporters as an exercise in free speech, but this type of speech is designed solely to promote division and fear. Brannigan posted it on Facebook to ensure that many would read it and understand her position. One media opinion piece even went so far as to claim, with no hint of irony, that Brannigan was the actual victim here of being bullied by the very people she had attacked. After her comments caused an uproar in the community, she refused to retract them or to even admit that her claims were totally untrue. Instead, she issued a vague statement claiming to regret that her words caused a controversy. A classic non-apologetic apology. And since the initial Facebook post, the Palos Township meetings have been the occasion of numerous protests and citizen complaints. In the face of these protests, Brannigan has refused to step down, and the Township Board, by their complete refusal to take action against her, has essentially shown both implicit support for Brannigan and an unspoken endorsement of her brand of hatred. One thing that has not so far been noted in all of the coverage of this matter is that Brannigan’s Islamophobia echoes numer-

ous earlier episodes of Muslim hatred that occurred in Palos Township in the not too distant past. In 2000, there was much controversy when it was proposed to put a mosque in a vacant building in Palos Heights. Many local residents opposed putting a mosque in that vacant building, claiming that a mosque would alter the essentially residential nature of the neighborhood and cause local traffic and noise issues. Ironic in that the vacant building in question was previously a Christian church. In 2004, there was a similar outcry when it was proposed to build a mosque in Frankfort. The same issues were raised, the same fears appealed to, but the mosque was built and the objections were subsequently revealed to have been groundless. In 2016 there was again a controversy, in Palos Park this time, when it was proposed to locate a mosque in a vacant building. The same objections were raised in Palos Park as were earlier raised in Palos Heights. Again, in a second, truly massive dose of irony, the vacant building in question was previously a Christian church. On a personal note, I am a 44-year union activist and a member of Southsiders for Peace, a social justice group. Some might ask why I even write about these issues. To those people, I refer back to the initial Niemoller quote, and the philosophy behind it. We are all linked as Americans. What hurts my Muslim brothers and sisters hurts me, and hurts all of us, because injustice and hatred must be acknowledged and opposed no matter what group is the current target of the hatred. If we do not protest this type of hateful conduct, it will become normalized by our own inaction. We do not have the option of keeping silent if we claim to believe in liberty and justice for all. We must choose a side in this and I am confident that the majority of American citizens will agree that this type of conduct is unacceptable, and is in stark contrast to the closing words of the Pledge of Allegiance, which talks of “liberty and justice for all.” — Bill Beaulieu, Oak Lawn

Brannigan’s apology is not backed up by her actions Instead of continuing to be a Sharon Brannigan apologist, perhaps columnist Ray Hanania (“Pritzker, Brannigan and the ‘politics’ of apologies,”Feb. 8 issue of The Reporter) should consider that activists do not accept her apology because she shows no signs of being truly sorry for her words and actions. From her facial expressions during meetings to her correspondence, Brannigan continues to disrespect her Arab-American constituents. For example, in a July 27, 2017, email, Brannigan wrote, “The hateful behavior exhibited almost feels like a stoning. I’m not sure if they realize however… that we have laws differing from where they are from.” Feels like a stoning? Where they are from? Do you think she would have used those phrases to a group of white protestors? Perhaps it’s the brown skin that makes her think the Arab-Americans pro-

testing were not born in the United States? And really, why would Brannigan truly change her words and behavior? This controversy has lifted her from an obscure member of an outdated taxing body to high-level recognition in the white nationalist movement. Pamela Geller, president of the anti-Muslim hate group The American Freedom Defense Initiative, tweeted her support of Brannigan. For someone like Brannigan, Geller’s support means Brannigan has hit the big time. If Hanania wants protestors to accept Brannigan’s apology, perhaps he should advise her to stop making inappropriate comments about a growing segment of her constituency. Only when she truly changes her words and actions will her apology be worth accepting. — Shari Schmidt, Palos Hills

We should rebuild our depleted military The Budget Control Act of 2011 necessitated budget cuts for the U.S. Defense Department, which had a huge negative effect on the readiness of our military. I quote from Alan Dowd’s article in the February 2018 issue of The American Legion Magazine. “In 2011, the Air Force had 333,370 active duty airmen. By 2017, it had fallen to 310,000. In 2013, 31 squadrons stood down. In 2014, 500 planes were to be eliminated. Just 12 percent of America’s aging bomber fleet will be able to penetrate and survive enemy air defenses. “In 2011, the Army’s active-duty end strength was 566,000; by 2016, it had fallen to 476,000. Only 25 percent of the Army’s combat aviation brigades are ready to deploy. Of the Army’s 58 brigade combat teams, only three could be called upon

to fight tonight. “Before sequestration, the Marine Corps fielded 202,100 active-duty personnel; by the end of 2016 there were only 184,000 Marines. By the end of 2016; only 41 percent of Marine aircraft were able to fly. “Today’s Navy has only 277 active deployable ships. According to former CNO Adm. Jonathan Greenert, we need a Navy of 450 ships. Fifty-three percent of Navy aircraft cannot fly. ” We need to fund the Defense Department with adequate budgets, probably on the order of $700 billion to $750 billion per year to rebuild our military and meet our national security requirements. President Trump is on board with the funding needs. — Donald Moskowitz, Londonderry, N.H.

e had a lot of snow this past week. So what? This is the Midwest, Chicagoland. We can handle snow. What’s worse than the snow lately is politics. Gov. Bruce Rauner has been slamming J.B. Pritzker with campaign ads featuring FBI wire-tapped conversations he had with now jailed Gov. Rod Blagojevich in which Pritzker said many unflattering things about African Americans. Pritzker’s words are undermining his campaign for governor in the March 20 Democratic primary. I figured Rauner believes Pritzker is the stronger of the two leading Democratic candidates he will face Nov. 8, over Christopher Kennedy. So, the thinking goes, Rauner is trying to hurt Pritzker now rather than saving the ads for the Nov. 8 general election. But that only adds to the mounting evidence that Rauner is not very bright when it comes to politics. The real threat is Kennedy, who I think is going to beat Pritzker. Some pundits assert the “Kennedy” name means nothing, but to seniors and baby boomers — the largest voting bloc in primary elections — the Kennedy name means everything. Rauner should have left Pritzker alone, slamming him only if he beats Kennedy on March 20. If Rauner faces off with Kennedy, Kennedy is going to win, despite some of the far left wing extremists who are dragging his candidacy down. There is nothing to think about in the race for Cook County Board president. Toni Preckwinkle’s sweetened soda tax was so repulsive to county residents that her strongest backers flipped on her faster than hamburger patties on a Smashburger grill. Preckwinkle had to break a tie to get the repulsive one-cent-tax per ounce on soft drinks and anything sweetened with only eight commissioners on her side. Seven of those commissioners got so much backlash from constituents their support of Preckwinkle’s tax didn’t last a month after it started. Constituents in the districts of her supporters began pounding their elected officials, not just on the Cook County Board but in almost every office. It made it easy for Preckwinkle’s arch-foe, Republican County Commissioner Sean Morrison (R-17th), to put together 16 votes to repeal it. Preckwinkle is being challenged by former Chicago Alderman Bob Fioretti, who ran against Mayor Rahm Emanuel four years ago. Had Fioretti won the backing of the anti-Emanuel groups then, rather than Jesus Garcia — who seems to be a candidate never satisfied with the elected office he holds — Fioretti would have beaten Emanuel. Fioretti has a strong chance of unseating Preckwinkle on March 20 because the pain of the oppressive one cent sales tax on sweetened drinks and soda pop is still so fresh and raw. Finally, back to the nauseating drum beat of the anti-Trump haters. Everything that President Donald Trump is attacked for, his predecessors did, too. But no one says anything about that. Who led the fight against illegal immigration before Trump? President Barack Obama and President Bill Clinton. Yet they look like they were saviors to the illegal immigration movement. It’s the same with sexual harassment accusations. Hollywood actress Barbra Streisand this week attacked Trump, claiming he doesn’t defend women who have been sexually harassed by men. Trump argued accusations should not decide anyone’s fate. Everyone should be considered innocent until proven guilty. Proven guilty in court, not by the biased mainstream news media, or the “fake news” as Trump accurately calls it. I didn’t hear Streisand or any of the Democratic women who lashed out at Trump this week mention the name of Juanita Broaddrick, who was allegedly raped by Bill Clinton — who faced no consequences for it. In fact, Broaddrick is chastised by the same women who are attacking Trump. Broaddrick has written a book with Nick Lulli and released this week called, “You’d Better Put Some Ice on That: How I Survived Being Raped by Bill Clinton.” She said those were the last words Clinton said to her after he allegedly raped her. Broaddrick said she was bleeding from her lip after the alleged attack. And you think snow is the problem? Ray Hanania is an award-winning columnist, author and former Chicago City Hall reporter. Email him through his website at www.TheDailyHookah. com.


Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Reporter

After spending years together, there’s still room for discovery

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t’s said that as couples grow older, they tend to start looking alike. Whoever came up with this has never seen me and my husband together. Polar opposites. Yin and Yang. Our personalities are nothing alike, either. He’s laid back and suave, I’m fidgety. This makes me wonder how we’ve lived under one roof for over 30 years, and raised four somewhat normal — and apparently, from the same gene pool — children. If you were to ask a few couples how they knew they were in love, I bet that would say something to the effect of, “We were just so alike! I met my soul mate!” Ten years down the road they may have completely forgotten that aura of romance, and perhaps that they were a little blind to their differences. As Valentine’s Day rolls around, I think back to those days of wine and roses. When I was in my 20’s, and dreamt of the man I’d like to marry someday, I knew he had to be someone with a very brilliant mind, who I could spend hours talking with, and also learn a little bit here and there. And he absolutely needed to be someone I could beat at chess. I wanted someone who worked hard and was well respected by his co-workers. Someone handsome, funny — well, you get the idea. Someone simply perfect, I guess. I mean, I’m dreaming! I’m not going to throw in any undesirable traits. Anyway, I think I got all of that with my husband. Having been married a very long time now, that virtuous list has mostly escaped me. I don’t think he’s quite so funny. Then again, he doesn’t think I’m all that cute wearing flannel pajamas to bed year round. Trying to choose or pick out something together, such as a new television, or simply a birthday gift, which used to be so easy, becomes a huge debate. We find ourselves going about our busy days, and many times, the only time we spend in physical proximity is when we sit down for dinner. This is marriage. Rather, this is our marriage. It’s nothing tragic, and while I hate to offer this cliche comparison, it sometimes feels like a comfortable pair of shoes. I can hear all the love gurus and psychotherapists out there advising that we need to “shake up” the marriage. Be adventurous. Go on dates. The date thing confuses me. What do young couple do these days on dates? My husband and I see the occasional movie, and usually have dinner out about once a week. If we had started to refer to these nights as dates, we could have nipped this whole comfortable shoe issue in the bud years before. You’d be surprised how mysterious life can be. And what about your partner? You may think you know someone through and through, and then you might find you haven’t scratched the surface. A few years ago my husband and I were

flying to Vancouver where he was going to speak to a large group of people for work. After the plane took off, I promptly fell asleep as I always do. My husband, who isn’t a good flyer at all, managed to keep his eyes squeezed shut for over four hours, with carefully Janet breathing. Boudreau regulated Once at the airport, we ran into — and always run into — that crazy little part of traveling that seems to get us: finding our way from the airport to the hotel. It may not surprise you, but he refuses to get a map. And he totally doesn’t understand how to use the map on his iPhone. So we end up going in circles inside and outside the airport. This would be the best time for me to be wearing that awful Fibit. I could clearly pass 10,000 steps. In the end, his methods work, and by the end of our trips, he can find his way around like a local. Me, I could get lost in a phone booth. The first morning there I awoke early and chipper. I had a whole day of shopping in mind. My husband was looking over his notes. “Okay, lets get moving on some breakfast and shopping,” I said excitedly. “Oh, sorry. I have to practice my speech. But you go on and have fun.” “But, I’ll get lost!” I pleaded, “I have no idea where the shopping is. I don’t even know how to use this crazy money, although it’s very colorful and could teach Americans a little about style.” “Well, you have to go. I need some quiet time here alone to prepare.” Now I was a little rattled. It isn’t like me to just hop in a cab, or call for an Uber to shop on Michigan Avenue. And now he was sending me off to find my way around a foreign city? As much as I whined, I couldn’t wear him down. Finally, he sat down on the edge of the bed and let out a big sigh. “I have to be alone. I have to use the mirror.” My voice was like a tiny squeak. “Okayyyyyyy...” “I need to practice my speech in front of the mirror — I just can’t do it with you here.” I couldn’t help but feel a little overwhelmed by his sensitivity and bit of embarrassment. This was the guy who never seemed to fear anything — except maybe flying — the one who reassured me, not the other way around. Most of all, a side of him I hadn’t seen. I got up feeling a little defeated, put on my coat and grabbed my purse, “I’ll be fine,” I said smiling weakly, and off I went. I stopped downstairs to speak to the concierge. I was given a cute little map and verbal instructions, which went in one ear and out the other. It was well worth the risk of getting lost, or worse, being kidnapped and held ransom

by a large Myanmar drug cartel. After four blocks, I found the equivalent of the Magnificent Mile. I went in and out of shops, picked up some lovely perfume for my daughters, sat on a bench in a small park, and ate a delicious croissant. I snapped dozens of pictures, and then shopped the other side of the street. When my bags became too heavy to carry, I headed back to the hotel. I can’t tell you how chuffed I was feeling after my adventure. I’d been gone over three hours, and I didn’t want to burst into our room when he was in the middle of asking the mirror for questions, or giving it a nod or thumbs up, so I made my way to the rooftop bar and ordered a cool glass of wine. It was then that I pulled my phone out of my purse and saw that he had called over and over for the past two hours. Oh, goodness? What went wrong? He asked, “where are you?” I’m upstairs on the roof,” I said. “Come and have a drink with me.” So up he came, stretching out his legs, and relaxing that brilliant mind. I, on the other hand, was all wound up, and gleefully showed off all my purchases, including a new tie for him to wear to the conference the next day. “You know,” he said. “Never in a million years would I have thought you could get around in a strange city, much less country, on your own.” “And I never would have imagined you talking to a mirror,” I replied. “In fact, I’m glad I was forewarned or I’d have thought you lost your mind!” So there you have it. Sometimes we think we know a person through and through, and then we find they harbor thoughts and fears and methods of coping that they’ve never shared. Maybe we simply didn’t want to. We are also guilty of pigeonholing people. That’s very sad. We are all capable of growing and learning — spreading our wings — and we must never doubt that in anyone we hold close. I don’t think I’ll ever feel that I’ve lost commonality with my husband just because we sometimes don’t enjoy doing the same things all the time. Maybe that’s the time we reintroduce ourselves to “ourselves.” Once we arrived home, we had a random conversation about our trip. My husband told me he actually missed me when I went off alone, and later felt a bit jealous that I had had such a good time without him. I like that. It was a learning experience for both of us. I’m actually getting excited about the next time he’ll be speaking in a place I’ve never been, what adventures I might find. I’m all about testing the waters, but knowing that buoy, which represents my marriage, is always in sight, I feel safe. Very, very safe. Janet Boudreau is a writer, blogger, and longtime resident of Evergreen Park. You can reach her at blndy9@yahoo.com

EP resident named to Moraine Valley Alumni Hall of Fame Debbie Izzo, a resident of Evergreen Park, is one of four alumni being inducted into the 2018 Alumni Hall of Fame at Moraine Valley Community College in Palos Hills. Izzo also has been selected as the Distinguished Alumnus of the Year. “I am honored,” said Izzo, a certified registered nurse (RN), childbirth educator and lactation counselor at Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn. “To be recognized for things I love to do — that’s just the best of everything.” Izzo earned an associate in applied science degree in nursing in 2008, associate in arts degree, and successfully completed the certified nursing assistant and phlebotomy certificate programs. While working as a nurse at Advocate Christ Medical Center, she earned a bachelor of science in nursing from Olivet Nazarene University. Her passion, she says, is working with new moms and infants. Izzo is certified in maternal newborn nursing, earned a Lamaze International teaching certificate, is a certified trainer with Childbirth Professionals International, and is a certified lactation counselor. In addition to her full-time job at the hospital and being a mom to nine children, Izzo volunteers as an instructor at the Southside Pregnancy Center in Oak Lawn and gives of her time to the Preeclampsia Foundation in several capacities, including being one of 24 people across the country who is a resource for women suffering from this condition. She served on the Illinois PTA state board serving as district director, regional director and as the organization’s health director, where she developed a health fair jumpstart kit to enable others to effectively run a health fair in their school or community.

Supplied photo

Debbie Izzo, a certified registered nurse at Advocate Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn, is one of four Moraine Valley graduates being inducted into the college’s 2018 Alumni Hall of Fame. Izzo also has been selected as the Distinguished Alumni of the Year.

Izzo’s honors include a March 2017 Nursing Excellence Award from the March of Dimes. She was one of only a few nationwide to be cited for their “tireless efforts and valuable contributions toward improving the health of mothers and babies.” She also was a finalist for the 2017 Joyce Woytek Clinical Nursing Excellence Award. She was cited by Advocate Christ Medical Center in recognition of her community service and by the Illinois Poison Center for her volunteer efforts to help create safer

home, play and work environments. “The fact that I was chosen to be in the Hall of Fame really blows me out of the water,” Izzo said. ”I got my wonderful nursing foundation at Moraine Valley, and I’m honored to be what I would consider an ambassador for the college.” Kristy McGreal, executive director of the Moraine Valley Foundation, said it is exciting to have Izzo among those being inducted into this year’s Alumni Hall of Fame. “Debbie’s service to the community coupled with her professionalism and compassion demonstrate the epitome of what we stand for at Moraine Valley, and we are proud to have her among this elite group of graduates,” McGreal said. Izzo is receiving special recognition as this year’s Distinguished Alumnus of the Year. This award is given to a Moraine Valley graduate who has achieved outstanding success in her chosen field, provided humanitarian service and continues to show interest in and support of education. She will be the college’s nomination to the statewide contest through the Illinois Community College Trustees Association. “Naming Debbie Izzo Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Award was a unanimous decision by the selection committee. We had an outstanding group of nominees from which to choose, but ultimately it was her dedication and involvement in the community. She gives back so much. She also is a lifelong learner and has continued to receive additional certifications to enhance her professional career,” McGreal said. Izzo will be inducted on Thursday, Feb. 22 at the college. For more information, contact McGreal at mcgrealc2@morainevalley.edu.

Moraine Valley art exhibition features work by Ellen Holtzblatt Paintings inspired by artist Ellen Holtzblatt’s trips to Japan and Iceland will be shown in the “Between Earth and Sky” exhibition through March 9in the Robert F. DeCaprio Art Gallery at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway, Palos Hills. The Chicago resident’s exhibition features paintings that explore physical being and spirituality with attention to light and ability to convey motion within her landscapes and scenes. She began painting landscapes through her memory of visiting the Orkney Islands in Scotland 30 years ago. “The islands are isolated, sparsely populated by humans, and a fierce and beautiful earth and sea. They represent a stark contrast with my busy and noisy

city life. Ultimately, the islands have become the place where I live in my imagination,” Holtzblatt said. Holtzblatt’s work has been featured in one-person exhibitions throughout the Chicago area, including a Woman’s History Month exhibition in Chicago, “From Birth to Memory” at the Josef Glimer Gallery in Chicago;

“Under the Sun: Landscape as Allegory” at the Chicago Public Library; and “A Passing Day: Land and Light” at the Fermilab Art Gallery in Batavia. Her group exhibitions have been seen across the United States, and in Jerusalem and Berlin. In addition, numerous art selections have been featured in various publications. She has a bachelor of fine arts

degree from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, a graduate certificate in art therapy from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and a master’s in education degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She also has studied at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The Robert F. DeCaprio Art Gallery provides an opportunity to view locally and nationally recognized arts. Exhibits in the gallery are free to the public and available for viewing from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, as well as during most performances in the Fine and Performing Arts Center. For more information, visit morainevalley.edu/fpac or call Rachel McDermott, Art Gallery coordinator, at (708) 608-4231.

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Wolves player visits Chicago Ridge Yassir Rouane, 5, of Chicago Ridge, smiles alongside Chicago Wolves defenseman Jake Bischoff, while wearing all of Bischoff’s hockey gear, at the Chicago Ridge Public Library on Feb. 6. Photos by Kelly White

Jake Bischoff signed autographs and talked with local kids and their families about his hockey career during his appearance at the Chicago Ridge Public Library.

DEATH NOTICES

Regina Leubscher Regina J. Leubscher (nee Webster), 69, a resident of Evergreen Park, died Feb. 3 at Little Company of Mary Hospital. Mrs. Leubscher was a college professor. Survivors include a daughter, Amelia Wozniak; sons, William M. and Kyle; brother, August Leubscher; two grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Services were Monday from Kosary Funeral Home to St. Bernadette Church. Interment followed at St. Mary Cemetery.

Vivian Noack Vivian D. Noack (nee Maurisak), 88, a Palos Hills resident, died Feb. 7 at Palos Hospital. Mrs. Noack was a teacher’s aide for many years at Nathan Hale Elementary School in Chicago’s Clearing neighborhood. Survivors include a daughter, Nancy Lunt; three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and many relatives and friends. Services were Monday from Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home to Sacred Heart Church. Interment followed at Resurrection Cemetery.

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8 The Reporter

Thursday, February 15, 2018

COMINGS & GOINGS

Some suggestions of what to do with your tax refund

May’s Lounge has opened in Hickory Hills

a year. At 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 3, the restaurant will host a beef-eating contest that will pit athletes from HomewoodFlossmoor High School against each other to win a catered party. Buona will also donate the food from 12 training sessions the week prior to the opening to South Suburban Family Services for local families in need. The fast casual chain serves old-school Chicago classics, including their signature Italian beef, Italian sausage, beef and sausage combo, meatball and pepper and egg sandwiches, alongside pizzas, salads and more. The menu also features Chicagostyle hot dogs and seasonal shakes and sandwiches. The new restaurant offers dine-in, carry out and delivery services. The restaurant also offers catering services that include ready-made sandwiches, heat and eat options and platters of Italian favorites such as mostaccioli and lemon chicken. The new restaurant will seat 130 yearround with additional outdoor seating in the warmer months. Hours will be daily from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, call (708) 9917300. You can visit them at Buona.com and at Buona-Flossmoor on Facebook.

ou may not get much of a thrill from filing your taxes, but the process becomes much more enjoyable if you’re expecting a refund. So, if one is headed your way, what should you do with the money? The answer depends somewhat on the size of the refund. For the 2017 tax year, the average refund was about $2,760 – not a fortune, but big enough to make an impact in your life. Suppose, for example, that you invested this amount in a tax-deferred vehicle, such as a traditional IRA, and then did not add another penny to it for 30 years. At the end of that time, assuming a hypothetical seven percent annual rate of return, you’d have slightly more than $21,000 – not enough, by itself, to allow you to move to a Caribbean island, but still a nice addition to your retireScott ment income. (You will need to pay taxes on Johnson your withdrawals eventually, unless the money was invested in a Roth IRA, in which case withdrawals are tax-free, provided you meet certain conditions.) Of course, you don’t have to wait 30 years before you see any benefits from your tax refund. If you did decide to put a $2,760 tax refund toward your IRA for 2018, you’d already have reached just over half the allowable contribution limit of $5,500. (If you’re 50 or older, the limit is $6,500.) By getting such a strong head start on funding your IRA for the year, you’ll give your money more time to grow. Also, if you’re going to “max out” on your IRA, your large initial payment will enable you to put in smaller monthly amounts than you might need to contribute otherwise. While using your refund to help fund your IRA is a good move, it’s not the only one you can make. Here are a few other possibilities: • Pay down some debt. At some time or another, most of us probably feel we’re carrying too much debt. If you can use your tax refund to help reduce your monthly debt payments, you’ll improve your cash flow and possibly have more money available to invest for the future. • Build an emergency fund. If you needed a new furnace or major car repair, or faced any other large, unexpected expense, how would you pay for it? If you did not have the cash readily available, you might be forced to dip into your long-term investments. To help avoid this problem, you could create an emergency fund containing three to six months’ worth of living expenses, with the money kept in a liquid, low-risk account. Your tax refund could help build your emergency fund. • Look for other investment opportunities. If you have some gaps in your portfolio, or some opportunities to improve your overall diversification, you might want to use your tax refund to add some new investments. The more diversified your portfolio, the stronger your defense against market volatility that might primarily affect one particular asset class. (However, diversification, by itself, can’t protect against all losses or guarantee profits.) Clearly, a tax refund gives you a chance to improve your overall financial picture. So take your time, evaluate your options and use the money wisely.

If you see a new business in town or wonder what happened to an old favorite, drop me a line at bobbong@hotmail.com.

Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, (708) 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

Y

ay’s Lounge defied the storm last Friday to hold the grand opening of its fourth video gaming location at 7612 W. 95th St. in Hickory Hills. The lounge opened in January. May’s serves gourmet tapas-style dishes along with craft beer from local breweries, organic wine from family owned wineries and small batch coffees. Hours are from 8 a.m. to 2 a.m. Monday to SaturBob day and from 11 a.m. to Bong midnight on Sunday. Other locations are in Lake Zurich, Niles and Berwyn. Additional locations are planned for Burbank, Carpentersville, Streamwood, Wheeling, Elgin and Oswego. For more information on May’s in Hickory Hills, call (708) 529-0131.

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Supplied photo

May’s Lounge defied last week’s snow storm to hold its grand opening at its fourth location in Hickory Hills.

County gives tax incentives to three businesses Cook County Commissioners recently approved proposals from President Toni Preckwinkle’s Bureau of Economic Development that will provide tax incentives to three south suburban businesses. The incentives, which will either create new or save existing jobs, were approved for two businesses in Bridgeview and one in Dolton. The incentives should support the creation of an estimated five new private sector full-time jobs, retain an estimated 87 full-time jobs and support 30 construction jobs. “The companies receiving these incentives have demonstrated their commitment to our communities and residents,” Preckwinkle said in a release. “I’m pleased that we are able to use our tax incentive tools to either keep or expand businesses in Cook County.” PRH Trucking Inc., 8711 S. 77th Ave. in Bridgeview, a full-service trucking/cross docking/short-term warehouse operation received a Class 6b incentive. The company is expanding and relocating to the subject property it will own. The project will create three full-time jobs, retain 40 full-time jobs and support

Bullying

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From fifth grade through the end of high school, while attending schools in the south suburbs, she was rejected and tormented by her peers simply for being different, and she knows first-hand the long-term consequences. She recalled being laughed at, ridiculed and shoved around. “I didn’t really feel accepted until I was in college,” Blanco said. “I tell my story to others to generate awareness and understanding and motivate change.” Bullying can began as young as kindergarten age, according to Blanco. “Bullying starts at such a young age. However, it becomes dangerous around the fifth grade, because that’s often when cliques form,” Blanco said. “If a child doesn’t fit into any clique, that’s where things get dicey, because

10 construction jobs. Rex Carton, 7400 Richards in Bridgeview, also received a Class 6b incentive. The company plans to lease the property for its facility. Rex is one of the largest corrugated cardboard converter companies in the Chicagoland area. The project is expected to retain 36 fulltime jobs and support 10 construction jobs. Sibley Animal Hospital, 15022 Lincoln Ave. in Dolton, received a Class 8 incentive. The hospital will be relocating and expanding and opening the Dolton Stray Animal Program. The project will create two full-time jobs, retain 11 jobs and support 10 construction jobs.

Buona Beef to open this month in Flossmoor Berwyn-based Buona Beef will open its latest location later this month in an outlot next to the Meier supermarket in Flossmoor. Buona announced that it will open its 22nd location on Wednesday, Feb. 28, at 19801 S. Crawford Ave. A Buona Beef opened in Oak Lawn in December. To celebrate, family owned Buona will give a free Italian beef sandwich to anyone who is in line at the Crawford Avenue location before 10 a.m. on Feb. 28. In addition, more than 1,500 prizes will be given away from opening day through the weekend, including free Italian beef for

it makes the child feel that there is something personally wrong with them.” Blanco’s award-winning sequel, “Please Stop Laughing at Us”, was written in response to the demand for more information from her core audience — teens, teachers, parents and other adult survivors of peer abuse like herself — who have come to know Blanco as the champion of their cause. Her supporters said Blanco has successfully intervened in many bullying-related attempted suicides and acts of victim retaliation ranging from desperate, lonely teens and badly treated employees at the end of their rope, to grief-stricken parents unable to move on. “My objective is to help people feel stronger and more beautiful,” Blanco said. “Lots of people are concerned about bullying in an abstract, but Jodee’s personal story of her be-

ing bullied in school helps them personally connect,” said Lori Lysik, adult programming coordinator at the Chicago Ridge Public Library. “I’m hoping parents will talk to their kids about speaking up if they or someone they know is bullied after attending this program.” Lysik was responsible for organizing this first-time event at the library, which gathered not only children and parents, but also members of Our Lady of the Ridge and District 127.5, as well as students in the Richards High School SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) program. “I think it is important to educate parents and teachers on bullying because it is such a serious issue that prevents children from attending school,” Lysik said. “School is meant to be a safe and welcoming place. Those who are being bullied are suffering each day.”

Jodee Blanco, author of “Please Stop Laughing at Me” gathers with Richards’ High School SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions). Photo by Kelly White

Sheets

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Lawn since July 2009. He has been the fire chief in Chicago Ridge for the past four years. Although Sheets said two years ago that he was planning to retire “in the next few years,” his decision seems to have been made suddenly. There had been rumors that he was going to be fired last week in Chicago Ridge, but that could not be confirmed, and Sheets firmly denied them on Friday. “That is not true. I was not fired. This is nothing more than a simple retirement. This is the right time for my family and myself,” he said. Sheets had planned to stay on in Oak Lawn, where he lives, until July 14, when he would have marked nine full years as chief of that department. But that changed when Oak Lawn accepted his retirement Tuesday. He was hired there first, in 2009, and joined the Chicago Ridge department four years later when the two villages decided to share a chief, an experiment that saved both communities money. Sheets did not say exactly when he would be leaving as chief in Chicago Ridge. “I am just wrapping up a few things now,” he said last Friday, when he was reached at his office in Chicago Ridge. “I’ve been at this for 36 years,

SUDOKU

Answers

22 of them as a fire chief,” said Sheets, 54. “I’ve had enough. I’m tired. I’m exhausted. I just don’t have the energy to do it. Between the two villages, I work with 12 trustees and two mayors, and a village manager (in Oak Lawn), who all have varied opinions, wants and needs.” “Most fire chiefs do not get the fantastic opportunities I have had. This has been a joy to work at both departments,” said the chief. In resignation letters sent to both Chicago Ridge Mayor Chuck Tokar and Village Manager Larry Deetjen, Sheets said he had been “tremendously challenged” by the work, and thanked both the village officials and “the citizenry” for making his accomplishments possible. He added that he was at peace with his decision, and making it felt like “having a ton of bricks lifted off my shoulders.” His retirement apparently did come as a surprise to Oak Lawn officials. When asked for comment prior to Tuesday’s village board meeting, Oak Lawn Village Manager Larry Deetjen issued a statement saying: “Officials on Thursday, Feb. 8, received official notice from Chicago Ridge that they were terminating a Shared Use Intergovernmental Agreement’ entered into by both municipalities in 2014 and renewed in 2017. The agreement provides for Chicago Ridge to fund approximately $40,000 of the Chief’s wages and benefits

in exchange for professional executive fire-rescue administration services. This sudden termination of this agreement is a financial and policy issue as well as a personnel issue for Oak Lawn. The Chicago Ridge decision resulted in Oak Lawn’s Governing Body holding an Executive Session tonight (Feb. 13) to fully consider the matter.” Sheets said he felt he was leaving both departments in good hands. “We have done some tremendous things in Chicago Ridge, to have a union president create an annual award named for me, says a lot,” referring the award that was first presented last year. The Missouri native began his career in 1981 with the Missouri Fire Service, moving up from firefighter to lieutenant and captain before taking leadership positions in fire departments in Portage and Kalamazoo, Mich. He was chief of fire and EMS services in Beaver Dam, Wis., before coming to Oak Lawn with his wife and two children. “Chicago Ridge is running on all cylinders. We have three captains who are superb,” said Sheets. Engineer Joe Bandy, secretary treasurer of the Chicago Ridge firefighters union, a 16-year veteran of the department, had good things to say about Sheets on Friday as well. “I’ve had a good relationship with him. We have had a very good working relationship with him,” said Bandy. Sheets said he is considering going back to school to get a PhD. “What I intend to do first is travel and relax,” he said.

Mortgage Rates Mortgage Rates Around the Area Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of February 12) 30-year fi ed 15-year fi ed 30-year fi ed Jumbo

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

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Notice is Hereby Given that on 3-15-18, a sale will be held at T & T Auto Care at 21750 Main Street, Matteson, Il. 60443, 708-481-9161, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice.

LUIS C. AVALOS, IGNACIO LOPEZ & MOISES OROZCO

JENEAN P. JACKSON

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 3-15-18, a sale will be held at GS Tire & Auto Repair at 5321 W. Cermak Road, Cicero, Il. 60803, 708-243-5611, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice.

RATES 4.500 3.875 4.240

United Trust Bank (as of February 12)

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Prospect Savings Bank (as of February 13) 30-year fi ed 20-year fi ed 15-year fi ed

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CNB Bank & Trust, N.A. (as of February 12) 30-year fi ed 20-year fi ed 15-year fi ed

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APR 4.585 4.365 4.010

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

POINTS 0 0 0


The Reporter

Thursday, February 15, 2018

9

Supplied photo

Mount Carmel High School sophomores left the classroom to perform service projects in the Chicago area. In four days of work, the sophomore class spread out to help 17 organizations including Feed my Starving Children and Catholic Charities, for a total of 600 hours of service.

Mount Carmel sophomores perform service projects to aid the poor and hungry Sophomores at Mount Carmel High School last week spent some time out of the classroom to perform service projects in the Chicago area and Northwest Indiana. “Impact Week” allows students to provide aid and assistance for organizations in a hands-on way. Sophomore Impact week focuses on the theme of hunger and poverty. Students learn about the systemic forces that limit opportunities for many in our society, and engage service to food banks, community food pantries, and organizations that provide direct help to underresourced communities in our own area and worldwide. In four days of work, the sophomore class, faculty and staff spread out to help 17 organizations, including Feed my Starving Children, Northwest Indiana Food Pantry, and Catholic Charities for a total of 600 hours of service. “The task of doing it by hand forces you to put things in perspective so we actually can see what goes into this fight against hunger,” said sophomore Blake Lopez. “These aren’t just numbers that we’re trying to reach. These are people [who] we are helping out so it’s our duty as people [and also] as Catholics to do what we can to help.” Students packed food, cleaned shelters for the homeless, and also personally interacted with community members in the hopes of an unforgettable experience. That rang extremely true for sophomore Sebastian Manriquez. “This week really opened my eyes and honestly might have been one of the best things to happen to me,” said Manriquez when reflecting on his Impact Week. “You can make someone’s day in just a few minutes and it’s something we should step back and think about because not everyone has a shoulder to lean on [every day].” Manriquez went above and beyond during his time at

Little Brothers: Friends of the Elderly Chicago chapter. With bilingual skills, Manriquez was able to converse with the Spanish-speaking elders and also be a bingo caller in English and Spanish. His time interacting with the residents was “incredible” as he saw the joy on their faces because they were to meet someone new. “It feels good to make this type of impact and meet these great people,” said Manriquez. “I know I may not receive a tangible reward but I definitely earned [a reward] spiritually and physically.” With 600 hours of service, the students kept busy and kept the energy high especially through the competitive format at Feed My Starving Children in Libertyville. Groups of students competed with each other to see who could pack more boxes of food to be sent to third world countries thanks to the encouragement from the facility’s staff. “They really knew how to motivate us and they made it fun while we made a difference,” said sophomore Sean Goosherst. “It’s great to see how much food we packed in the span of just an hour.” During two days of service at Feed my Starving Children, students packed enough food to feed nearly 230 children for one year. The rewarding experience for the entire sophomore class offered a unique viewpoint of what some people go through on a day-to-day basis. The entire week was capped off with an all-class mass in the school’s chapel as a reminder of why the week of service was so important. “We want focus on the message the Gospel sends us to see, to act, and to help those in our community to make God’s Kingdom come,” said John Stimler. “Thank you to all of those organizations that brought our students in to work side-by-side with you in your daily work as we helped impact throughout the week.”

The Kolmar School Student Council members count the donations from Giving Tree event that took place during the holiday season. Supplied photo

The Unarmed Drill Team and Armed Drill Team from the U.S. Navy JROTC program at Richards High School appear with their trophies won at the Zion Benton Stinger Drill Meet. The progream won three team trophies at the meet. The Bulldog Company placed first in the Unarmed Drill, second place in Armed Drill, and second place in Personnel Inspection. CDR (ret.) Doug Groters and CPO (ret.) Dennis Reynolds serve as the JROTC instructors at Richards.

St. Patricia students win Knights of Columbus essay, poster contests

Supplied photos

St. Patricia students Blessie Cuta and Fareed Alkhader (above) are joined by a representative from the Knights of Columbus after winning the organization’s poster contest about on “Remember it’s CHRISTmas.” Right: St. Patricia student Anna Sako was the Catholic Citizenship essay winner sponsored by the Knights of Columbus.

Students at Kolmar School in Oak Lawn started a “Giving Tree” in an effort to help the less fortunate this past holiday season. The Giving Trees are decorated with donations. Kolmar students decorated the Giving Tree with donations of hats, scarves and other winter wear to keep recipients warm in the cold. School officials said the Kolmar Student Council was delighted with the generosity

Malcolm

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parish and member of the Holy Name Society. “If Father Malcolm hadn’t come here, I don’t think we would be the parish we are today. We’re a faith-based, active parish with growing enrollment at school. With the way things are going in the Archdiocese, with the consolidation of parishes, and the way he shares his beliefs and faith, I think Fr. Malcolm is the right man for the job here. He is very inspirational,” Olejniczak added.

from the school community. “The student council was excited to be able to sort and box up all of the items,” said Colleen Koch, a first-grade teacher at Kolmar. Donations were collected throughout the month of December. The student council collected 24 hats, two scarves, and 46 gloves for a total of 72 items. The pastor is known as a baker at St. Gerald, where his homemade bread is a hot commodity at all the parish events. But he is also known as a walker, getting in at least 10,000 steps a day, and leading class trips to downtown Chicago. “That’s one of the greatest things about him. Many of these kids in Oak Lawn would never get to downtown Chicago otherwise,” said fellow Trustee Tim Desmond (1st), whose sons went on the trips. “But he’ll take them on buses and trains, and show them all around. It is a great experience for them.”

Students at St. Patricia Elementary School in Hickory Hills were recognized by the local Knights of Columbus representatives for winning the “Keep Christ in Christmas” parish-wide contest. St. Patricia students channeled their artistic sides and participated in the event. The poster and essay contest is sponsored annually by the Knights of Columbus for students ages 5 through 14. This year’s theme was “Remember it’s CHRISTmas.” The winners of the poster contest were Fareed Alkhader and Blessie Cuta. The Catholic Citizenship essay winner was Anna Sako. More information about St. Patricia can be obtained by visiting the website at www.stpatriciaparish. com/school.

LIBRARY HAPPENINGS

CHICAGO RIDGE

Basic computer skills class “Computers 101” will be offered from 10 to 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 16 at the Chicago Ridge Library, 10400 S. Oxford Ave. The class is for people who would like to build their technology skills but don’t know where to start. This hands-on computer class will go over the basics. No previous computer experience is required. More information about the free program can be obtained by calling the library, (708) 423-7753, or visit the website at www.chicagoridgelibrary.org to sign up.

Explore sounds of ‘New Orleans and Dixieland Jazz’ A session on “New Orleans and Dixieland Jazz” will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 19 at the Chicago Ridge Library. Bandleader, jazz trumpeter and music historian Steve Cooper will present the program of rare videos and films of the best of New Orleans and Dixieland Jazz. Guests will get an opportunity to listen and see footage of great New Orleans performers including Harry Connick, Louis Armstrong, Al Hirt and some current Mardi Gras musicians and singers. Footage of Glen Campbell singing some of the best New Orleans tunes will also be included. Residents can sign up for this free program by calling the library, (708) 423-7753, or visiting the website at www. chicagoridgelibrary.org.

Calling out bingo at library

Kolmar Student Council’s ‘Giving Tree’ provides warm clothes for the needy

Supplied photo

Richards JROTC Drill Team places first in meet

Bingo will be played from 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 at the Chicago Ridge Library. Prizes will be awarded to the game winners. Participants must be at least 18 years of age to play. Patrons can sign up for the free program by calling (708) 423-7753 or visit the website at www.chicagoridgelibrary.org.

EVERGREEN PARK

Organic Gardener Jeanne Nolan Organic gardener Jeanne Nolan will be on hand at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 1 at the Evergreen Park Library, 9400 S.Troy Ave. Nolan is an educator, author and consultant who has been growing food organically for more than 20 years. Her company, The Organic Gardener Ltd, works with families to develop gardens that are beautiful, productive, and uniquely suited to their homes and lifestyles. She also works extensively with schools, restaurants, not-for-profit organizations, and other institutions and has created more than 700 food gardens in and around Chicago. In partnership with Green City Market, she designed, installed, and maintains The Edible Gardens, a 5,000-square-foot vegetable garden in Lincoln Park Zoo. She teaches monthly workshops at The Edible Gardens. She is also a regular on WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight.” Nolan will be speaking about her book, “From the Ground Up,” and will share her personal experiences that led her into the good food movement, the benefits of having an organic garden, and her five keys to successful growing. Registration is requested from the library website at www. evergreenparklibrary.org or call (708) 422-8522.

OAK LAWN

Reading ‘1,000 Books Before Kindergarten’ Parents can sign up for an early literacy initiative for newborns, toddlers, 2-year-olds and preschool children for a program entitled “1,000 Books Before Kindergarten” at the Oak Lawn Library, 9427 S. Raymond Ave. According to studies, not only does reading aloud to children help foster an early interest in books, but research shows it can improve reading readiness when they start school. Parents can stop by the Youth Services Desk to pick up a log to get their children started. For more information about this and other youth programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

‘Learn in the Lobby’ at library The Oak Lawn Public Library card can be used for more than just to check out books. The OLPL staff will have patrons “Learn in the Lobby” with a variety of programs that will be offered. Residents can stop by from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. or 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesdays during February at the Oak Lawn Library. Patrons will receive a quick demonstration on some resources. “Music movies and magazines with Zinio and Hoopla” will be held on Feb. 21. “Language software (Mango) and local job postings with ReferenceUSA” will be provided on Feb. 28. For more information about this and other programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Story of ‘Stone Soup’ Families can viewthe comedic telling of the Improv Playhouse “Stone Soup,” a classic folk tale in which a hungry traveler schemes to get a hot meal, from 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17 at the Oak Lawn Public Library. For more information about Stone Soup and other youth programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Free movie screening of ‘Going in Style’ will be held

A free movie screening of the 2017 film “Going in Style” will be held at 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 26 at the Oak Lawn Library. The film is about three lifelong pals who risk it all in an effort to pay the bills and come through for their loved ones. They embark on a daring bid to knock off the very bank that absconded with their money. The movie stars Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman and Alan Arkin. The 96-minute movie is rated PG-13. For more information about this and other adult programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

PALOS HILLS

ages will be offered at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at the Green Hills Library. Children under age 6 must be assisted by a caregiver. Miss Emily will lead the group in science experiments. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

STEAM Explorers learn about technology The next STEAM Explorers session for children in the third through eighth grade will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at the Green Hills Library. Participants will explore and tinker with Dash and Dot, Spheros, Osmos a 3D pen and other robotics. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Book club to discuss ‘The Velveteen Daughter’ The Fact and Fiction Book Club of the Green Hills Library will hold their next discussion at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant, 8128 W. 95th St., Hickory Hills. The book club will discuss “The Velveteen Daughter” by Karen Abbott. Copies of the book will be available at the circulation desk for GHPLD cardholders. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

‘The Glass Castle’ will be screened in morning The next Morning Movie will be the presentation of “The Glass Castle” at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 23 at the Green Hills Library. Popcorn and drinks will be served. This event is for adults only. Register online at www. greenhillslibrary.org.

Discovering methods of tracing family tree Patrons can discover methods of evaluating websites for reliable sources of information about their family tree at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 at the Green Hills Library. Guests willlearn how to use subscription databases in tandem with free genealogy websites to trace their family trees. Participants will also learn how to find out what is new in the online genealogy community. This event is for adults only. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Discussing and making crafts session A book discussion for kids ages 10 to 17 followed by making a craft will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 28 at the Green Hills Library, 10331 S. Interlochen Drive, Palos Hills. Miss Natalie will lead the discussion. Snacks will be provided. Copies of the book will be available at the youth services desk. Registration is limited to 15. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Pizza and Movie Night

Offering tips on skin treatments

Pizza and Movie Night will be held offered at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 at the Green Hills Library, 10331 S. Interlochen Drive, Palos Hills. Kids ages 10 to 17 can snack on pizza and pop while watching the PG-13 rated movie “The Fate of the Furious.” No registration is necessary. Space is limited to the first 30 who sign up.

A program on treatments for the skin will be offered at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Green Hills Library. Guests can learn why ingredients they use on their skin matter, along with the role of facial treatments in skin care, why makeup in the right formulation is important, how renewal treatments rejuvenate, and about ingestible beauty. Jill Moss Stetson will lead the discussion and share her philosophy that everyone can achieve beautiful skin at any age. This event is for adults only. Register online at www.greenhillslibrary.org.

Science lab lessons are offered for youths Science lab sessions for children of all


10 The Reporter

Thursday, February 15, 2018

SXU to hold open house for graduate program Coyne An open house for the St. Xavier University’s graduate program will be held from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 2 in the Warde Academic Center’s Butler Reception Room, 3700 W. 103rd St., Chicago. Attendees will learn about the institution’s graduate degree programs ready to prepare them for in-demand careers in business, computer science, education and nursing.

An open forum will feature a panel of current students and alumni in the workplace from 6 to 6:45 p.m. This event the opportunity to talk to admission counselors and faculty, learn about financial aid and scholarship options, and attend our open forums where faculty, current students and alumni in the workplace will share their experiences and advice in various fields.

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Continued from Page 1

After the third dish of beef, chicken and pork, we got to the final dish — Korean steak. We used scissors to cut the plump and juicy steak and add some of the veggies from one of the several plates on our table.

Opening Ceremonies Getting ready for the opening ceremonies included a lot of warm clothing. We got ready to endure the bitter cold and hellish wind supplied by the mountains at the Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium. The temperature reached a low of 17 degrees. The stadium was at its maximum capacity of 39,000, along with the largest athlete pool of 2,900 representing 92 different countries. After the parade of athletes and the lighting of the Olympic torch, most fans left the stadium, which was a terrible mistake. The grand finale, or encore, included a massive fireworks display. We spent nearly three hours in the stadium, but the final 15 minutes of the show made braving the cold worthwhile. Immediately following the ceremonies, we were herded to the buses that were supposed to take spectators to the main KTX station in Jinbu. Unbeknownst to us, the bus driver had other plans, which included leaving us in a desolate, empty parking lot in the freezing cold. Luckily, one of the volunteers spoke to an incoming bus driver who went out of his way to take a group of tired, cold and unruly Americans to the main train station after waiting 30 minutes for some sort of assistance. Once we arrived at the KTX or KROL station, we learned that the only way to get a taxi in South Korea is by waiting in a long line outside of a train station or

Photo by Kevin Coyne

The opening ceremonies were cold, but well worth it.

by asking a business owner to call on your behalf. We took the next best option: taking a long two-mile walk home.

Stranded again!

On day two, we spent hours watching snowboarders fly hundreds of feet above our heads. The twisting, spinning, and flipping was a mouth-dropping sight. We even witnessed a Swedish athlete take a blow that rendered him unconscious. We stopped by a small coffee shop about 100 feet from our home to get lunch. We asked the business owner to call a taxi to take us over to the venue. We struggled to communicate with the gentleman, but it appeared that he knew exactly what we were asking him. We spent 15 minutes going back and forth before the Korean gentleman gestured for us to follow him. He removed his apron and began to get in his car. He then said in broken English “no taxi” and “I take you,” which was enough for us to understand. The ride was only 10 minutes, and we attempted to pay the man 20,000 won ($20 USD) but he refused. We will make it a point to eat every meal at his establishment in an attempt to pay him back for the ride. We attended the short-track speedskating event, watching

nearly 15 races. However, we spent hours in the freezing cold attempting to catch a taxi. This is now the second night we went through this song and dance. After the first hour elapsed, we needed to get out of the freezing cold. We also did not dress warm enough to be sitting outside for hours on end. We ended up taking a bus 30 minutes away from our destination to get a taxi from one of the KTX stations. We again had no luck getting a taxi once we got to the station and again made the two- to three-mile walk back home in the bitter cold.

A goal for Kendall On day three, we spent a few hours singing, having fun and talking about the U.S. women’s hockey team upcoming game against Finland. At the end of the tailgate, a Chicago news station dropped by to join the fun. It was great to talk with other Olympic families and the individuals who spent the past few days capturing all the great stories from around South Korea. With five seconds left in the first period, Finland scored the only goal of the period. But the United States won that opener, 3-1, and Kendall scored one of the goals. After the game we were able to see Kendall along with her teammates and the other Olympic family members.

Moraine Valley VP selected for national Forward50 committee Dr. Normah Salleh-Barone, eration, underrepresented, and vice president for Student De- immigrant students, and the velopment at Moraine Valley importance of reviewing proCommunity College, is one of grams, services and policies 50 higher education to support college completion,” she leaders from across said. “At Moraine the country chosen Valley, my team to participate in Forward50. and I have created The committee programs to support students who was assembled by receive financial the National Association of Student aid in maintaining Financial Aid Adtheir funding so ministrators (NASthey can graduSalleh-Barone ate. I’m excited to FAA), of which the share our effective college is a member. Forward50 committee mem- practices.” bers will meet over the next 18 In preparation for the group’s months to share best practices first meeting in March in Washand ideas on improving financial ington, D.C., Salleh-Barone will aid at the federal level. Collec- hold focus groups on campus to tively, they will write four white get students’ perspectives on fipapers on their recommendations nancial aid. She also will collect in policy areas related to access, data from the college’s financial affordability, accountability, and aid representatives on what they transparency. These recommen- perceive are the common chaldations will be shared with Con- lenges and what they would like to see changed in federal policies. gress. Salleh-Barone was selected According to NASFAA, Forfrom 200 applicants to work ward50 is a result of a grant from with leaders from community the Bill and Melinda Gates Founcolleges, and four-year colleges dation to convene the Higher Edand universities. Other commit- ucation Committee of 50, tasked tee members are college presi- with developing policy solutions dents, admissions staff, financial to help surmount obstacles preaid leaders, enrollment managers, venting students from enrolling, and students. Moraine Valley is paying for and graduating from the only community college from college. The grant will pay for travel and lodging for the comIllinois represented. With less than 10 commu- mittee’s members. “I’m most looking forward to nity colleges on the committee, Salleh-Barone will have a big learning what other institutions voice on financial aid policies are doing. There are a lot of big at two-year institutions. universities in this group, and “In all my roles in higher I think our shared ideas will education, I have been a cham- help strengthen our existing pion for low-income, first-gen- programs,” Salleh-Barone said.

You are invited Join us Thursday, February 22nd from 4-8 p.m.

Palos Heights Ribbon Cutting Ceremony & Wine Reception

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SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

91-POINT SWING FOR TRINITY CHRISTIAN After losing by 70 points in December, TCC’s women win by 21 over Olivet Nazarene. Page 2

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor • sports@regionalpublishing.com Jeff Vorva, Sports Editor • sports@regionalpublishing.com

SNOW DOESN’T POSTPONE WINNING Oak Lawn takes care of business a day after its boys hoops game was postponed. Page 3

Southwest Section Southwest • Section•2, Page 1 2, Page 1

Thursday, February 15,2015 2018 Thursday, March 5,

Still grappling with history Richards’ Palumbo siblings lead 16 area wrestlers to state meet By Jeff Vorva

The Palumbos lead a group of 16 area wrestlers to the state meet, which begins today, Thursday, Mia and Rocco Palumbo didn’t and runs through Saturday at the let the pressure of sectional action State Farm Center in Champaign. get in the way of making history. Brother Rice is bringing the bigThe two Richards High gest contingent with four School wrestlers became wrestlers, including secthe second brother/sister tional champions Hassan combo to qualify for Johnson (120 pounds), the Illinois High School STATEMENT Dominic Murphy (160) GAMES Association Individual and Myles Ruffin (285). Wrestling State Finals Richards coach Nick in the same year when Grabarek said before Mia, a freshman, won the the postseason began 106-pound championship that Mia Palumbo could and Rocco, a sophomore, win a regional, sectional finished second at 145 at the Class and state title, and now she is 2A Hinsdale South Sectional on four matches away from that. She Saturday in Darien. beat three sectional opponents by a Mia also became the first female combined score of 24-0 to improve to win a conference, regional and her record to 28-3. sectional title in the same year. And she is picking up a bigger She is the second freshman female following with every victory. to qualify for state and is one of “It was crazy with everyone four females to advance this far. cheering for me at the end,” she Caitlyn Chase of Glenbard North said. “People have been supportqualified in 2005 and lost in her ing me throughout.’’ only match at state. Carbondale’s She makes her state debut Ally Ragan qualified in 2007 as a against Springfield’s Kaeden Kifreshman and lost her only state nison (35-9). The other wrestlers match. Dunbar senior Quiovany in the field have records ranging Santos also qualified on Saturday from 42-1 (Crystal Lake South’s by winning the Class 1A Hope Christian Olsen) to 27-16 (St. Academy Sectional at 106 mak- Rita’s Noel Rosales, whom she ing Palumbo and Santos the first beat twice in the postseason). females to ever win a sectional. Mia said she watched the final Palumbo could become the first See WRESTLING, Page 3 female to win a match at state. Sports Editor

Above: Richards’ Mia Palumbo, shown tying up Lindblom’s Steven Ross in sectional action on Saturday, is the second female freshman in history to qualify for the IHSA state finals. Right: Richards’ sophomore Rocco Palumbo, battling Rich East’s Jalen Terry at the Class 2A Hinsdale South Sectional, is a part of the second brother/sister duo to qualify for the IHSA state wrestling finals.

AREA WRESTLING STARS HEAD TO CHAMPAIGN A list of state wrestling qualifiers from the area: CLASS 3A Stagg: Domenic Zaccone (120 pounds), Peter Radev (160) and Ahmed Suleiman (170) Sandburg: Pat Nolan (132) and Mike Amedeo (220) Marist: Michael Leveille (106) and Jacob Dado (138)

Photos by Jeff Vorva

CLASS 2A Brother Rice: Hassan Johnson (120)*, Dominic Murphy (160)*, Paul Gliva (170) and Myles Ruffin (285)* Richards: Mia Polumbo (106)*, Rocco Polumbo (145) and Marquis Hall (285) St. Laurence: Mike Archer (113), Mike Rodriguez (126) * — Sectional champion

Thome says Orland Park youth will be ‘one heck of a hitter’

A picture of determination Sandburg gymnast qualifies for state using same layout that caused injury

O

rland Park 10-year-old hand, analyzing the local leftAidan McGovern never handed kid’s swing on national met baseball legend Jim television as a part of the “MLB Thome. Tonight’’ program. McGovern’s parents, Tim “My mouth opened in amazeand Jeanine, clothed Aidan in a ment and I was like, ‘Wow,’ ’’ Thome White Sox jersey Aidan said. when he was younger. The mouth-opening Aidan knew who segment lasted a little Thome was — espemore than a minute. cially on Jan. 24, when “I actually really like the former slugger who this,” Thome said after spent 2006-09 with the watching McGovern’s White Sox, was voted into first cut. “There is rebaseball’s Hall of Fame. ally not much here to But there was never a JEFF VORVA critique.’’ connection between the Making the But Thome did critwo…until Jan. 30. tique. Because, well, McGovern, a fifth grad- Extra Point that’s his job. er at St. Michael School, “I think the one thing was at his grandparents’ house I would be careful is…let’s watch after school. his leg kick,’’ Thome said. “To At about 5:25 p.m. on George me, interestingly, the leg kick is and Barbara Winistorfer‘s big- getting him loaded. But I would screen television set tuned to just smoothen that out just a the MLB Network, there was touch. You don’t have to raise a video of Aidan taking some the leg kick so high.’’ swings at the Bo Jackson Elite Thome, also a lefty, took his Sports dome in Lockport from bat and went into a hitting stance a few days prior. in front of the video screen of And there was Thome in the McGovern swinging away. studio with a black bat in his “The leg kick will actually get

By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

Supplied photo

Orland Park’s Aidan McGovern, 10, had his swing critiqued by Jim Thome on national television.

you started but the leg kick should actually flow with how you are striding and keep the front part of your foot kind of smooth to the ground,’’ the Hall of Famer said. Then, Thome’s bat served as See VORVA, Page 2

A Tsukahara layout laid up sophomore gymnast Taylor Talley for a little while. She tried the more daring move on Jan. 20 during the vault event at York High School and it didn’t work out Photos by Jeff Vorva too well and she spent some time on crutches. Sandburg/Stagg’s Taylor TalThe Sandburg/Stagg ley takes pictures of some coop athlete came of her teammates after the Sectional on Feb. back for Illinois High Sandburg 5. She is heading to state in School Association the vault event this weekend. regional action nine days later at Oswego and hit the vault with a safer pike maneuver and finished second with a 9.350 score. When it came to the Sandburg STATEMENT GAMES Sectional on Feb. 5, Talley was determined to try that Tsukahara layout on the vault again. This time she didn’t need crutches after she landed. She nailed it with

Sophomore Sandburg/Stagg gymnast Maddie Giglio performs on the balance beam during sectional action and qualified for state in four events.

a 9.500 to win her first sectional championship and is heading to the state finals, which will be held Friday and Saturday at Palatine High School. She will be joined by teammate Maddie Giglio, See GYMNASTICS, Page 3


2

Section 2 Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

FOCUS ON AREA COLLEGES

Big snowfall isn’t all bad for outdoor folks

TCC hangs 91-point swing on Olivet By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

For those who thought they saw it all in sports… Trinity Christian’s women’s basketball team knocked off NAIA Division II’s 13th-ranked Olivet Nazarene 94-73 in Bourbonnais on Saturday in a Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference game. This was the second time the two schools played this season and Olivet whipped the Trolls 118-48 on Dec. 1 in Palos Heights, so this represented a 91-point swing between games. The Trolls (14-14, 10-8) trailed 43-42 at halftime on Saturday and went on a tear in the second half. Olivet (19-8, 16-2) averaged 101.8 points per game heading into Saturday’s game and the Trolls held the Tigers to just 30 points in the second half. Ally Giampapa had 18 points and eight assists to lead TCC while Breanna Toppen and Lauren Stokes each had 17 points.

Moraine Valley Men’s basketball: Sophomore guard Deshawn Wilson put on a show, scoring 42 points, but the former Zion-Benton star’s effort couldn’t put Moraine Valley Community College over the hump

A

in a 75-71 loss to Morton, to snap a seven-game winning streak of Feb. 6. Wilson added five assists and four steals while Cortez King added 16 points and six rebounds. The team also signed 6-foot-5 St. Laurence forward Zion Fortune. “Zion can take smaller guys inside and bring bigger guys outside. He will be a match-up nightmare for other teams,” said Moraine Valley assistant men’s basketball coach Roosevelt Green.

St. Xavier University

Women’s basketball: SXU qualified for the NAIA Division II Women’s Basketball National Championship tournament for the 16th year in a row after berating Indiana- South Bend, 96-53, to clinch at least a share of first in the CCAC on Saturday. Brittany Collins had 22 points for the Cougars (24-2 overall, 18-0 in the league) while Kara Krolicki added 21 points, nine steals and eight assists. The Cougars are 14-15 in national tournament play but last year finished 4-1 and finished second in the nation. They are currently ranked fourth in the nation. On Feb. 7, sophomore Chanel Fanter became the fourth player in program history to record a triple-

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sophomore Breanna Toppen had a big hand in Trinity Christian College’s 91-point turnaround against Oliver Nazarene on Saturday.

double with 17 points, 10 assists and 10 blocked shots in a 97-68 win over Roosevelt. Men’s basketball: The Cougars knocked off the 24th-ranked team in the nation, Roosevelt, 73-58, on Feb. 7 as Quinn Niego scored 25 points Jack Brody had 11 points and nine rebounds.

Sports Editor

The second football signing period opened Feb. 7 and players from the area joined players from other sports in signing letters of intent to continue their athletic and academic careers in college. A look at some of the area schools signings and signees:

St. Laurence

Football players Jerry Carey (Concordia, Wisconsin), James Buchanan (Upper Iowa), A.J. Andrews (Wayne State), Ed Pierson (Northern Michigan), Brendan Cavanaugh (University of WisconsinWhitewater), Christian Booker (Indianapolis), Tori Clinton (Indianapolis), Donte Bronson (Northern State) signed letters of intent. Soccer player Gilberto Arreola (Dominican University) and girls volleyball player Veronica Vida (Benedictine) also made their choices official, Clinton and Arreola were Regional/Reporter Players of the Year in their respective sports in the fall.

Stagg Ally Mussallem signed a soccer letter to play at Purdue University. She will join her sister, Hannah, who will be a senior at the school in the fall. Stagg soccer player Grace Javaras (Wisconsin Parkside), Maja Persa (Fort Hayes State) and Angelina Kosmas (Illinois Wesleyan) also signed.

Football players John Murphy (Carthage), Eddie Schullo (St. Ambrose), Ricky Kwak (Marian University) made their choices official.

Marist

Safari Club protects changes HQ

Football players Denny Meehan (Dayton), Tommy Greene (Indiana), Tom Gillen (St. Ambrose) and Joe Green (St. Ambrose) signed up to their respective schools.

On Feb. 1, the board of directors of Safari Club International changed its headquarters designation from Tucson, Arizona to Washington D.C. The purpose of the move is to focus and intensify SCI’s efforts on all forms of advocacy to protect the freedom to hunt, in coordination with other organizations. The decision was made during SCI’s 46th Annual Hunter’s Convention. The convention is an extraordinary global gathering of the SCI family and hunting world. In all, 1,100 exhibitors from all over the world showed their hunting opportunities and gear to more than 20,000 attendees. There were seminars on hunting techniques, ethics, legal issues and a host of other topics. There were side meetings with government delegations from Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, South Africa, China and Kazakhstan, to name some. There were evening events featuring fundraising auctions to support the work of SCI and its sister organization, the SCI Foundation that puts more than $3.5 Million on the ground annually for wildlife conservation, anti-poaching, education and humanitarian efforts related to hunting.

Quarterback Kyle Neputy participated in a signing ceremony for Cornell University. Ivy League schools do not give out athletic scholarships but athletes are allowed to participate in ceremonies.

Sandburg

Chicago Christian

Knights quarterback Henry Light, who played both offense and defense, signed to play at Lake Forest College.

St. Xavier University Football coach Mike Feminis welcomed 13 recruits, including four from Indiana. “The Chicago area has and will always be our main focus, and we certainly landed some outstanding players right from our own backyard,” added Feminis. “But we also got an All-State receiver and a huge O-lineman from one of the top Catholic programs in Indianapolis, as well as a couple more kids from Indiana schools that we had not tapped

Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Laurence running star Tori Clinton is heading to play for the University of Indianapolis next season.

into until this year.” The Cougars signed linebacker Brayden Bauer (Riley High School) and defensive lineman Jaden Chandler (McCutcheon), along with a pair of high school teammates in offensive lineman Dominic Clouse and wideout Jacob Luedeman (Roncali) from Indiana. Note: If we missed any recent signings, please let us know at sports@regionalpublishing.com

FOCUS ON AREA SPORTS

Eagles aim for best girls bowling finish in team history individual for state with a 1,264.

By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

For the fifth time in school history and the first time since 2013, Sandburg’s girls bowling team qualified for the Illinois High School Association State Bowling Tournament. And the Eagles are looking for the best finish in school history when the meet opens Friday at the Cherry Bowl in Rockford. The Eagles made it to the second round of state action only once in their four attempts when they finished 10th in the state in their debut in 2007. They finished 15th in 2008, 16th in 2012 and 21st in 2013. One of the top bowlers in Sandburg history, Emily Schrader, will close her high school career at state this weekend and rolled a 1,363 six-game series at the Bolingbrook Sectional Saturday at the Brunswick Zone in Woodridge, good for second place overall. That helped the Eagles finish third with a 5,581 to qualify for state. SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue opponent Lockport won with 5,991. Fellow District 230 squad Andrew finished fourth with 5,530 and will join the Eagles in Rockford. Sandburg sophomore Vanesa Perez added an 1,103, junior Jill Richmond rolled a 1,069, junior Alyssa Novak had a 1,057 and junior Katie Colbert tossed a 989. This is Schrader’s fourth appearance at state and first with her full team. She finished 69th in the state as a freshman, 10th as sophomore and 25th last season. Richards sophomore Mia Jones qualified as an

All-SCC cheerleading team

The South Suburban Conference announced its all-conference cheerleading team. Shepard was represented by Skylar McGrath, Jenny Hernandez, Marissa Sokdowski, Katie Justin while Evergreen Park’s Andre Sykes, Sean Wilkerson, Catherine Schaffratz, Richards’ Magen Levy, Taudrea Kerby and Oak Lawn’s Alexia McGlynn and Corrine Oldham also made the team.

Oak Lawn dedicates baseball game to classmate

Oak Lawn’s baseball team will dedicate its May 3 game against Tinley Park to senior classmate Lena Rayas, who is battling Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia. The baseball team will sell jerseys for the occasion with all proceeds benefitting the Rayas family. Jerseys are $20 each and are on sale through the baseball program or by emailing head baseball coach William Gerny at wgerny@olchs.org. In recent years, the baseball program has dedicated games to Tommy Clifton (son of baseball coach Brian Clifton), Connor Lowry (nephew of Oak Lawn English teacher Jenn Jepsen), Tim Sidlow (Former English teacher at the school), and Kenadie and Declan Haubenreiser (niece and nephew of teacher Janet Meyers).

Shooters girls tryouts The Southside Shooters will host tryouts for its girls spring season on Tuesday and Feb. 22 at

Stagg High School in Palos Hills. Players in third through seventh grade will try out at 6:30 p.m. and eighth graders through juniors in high school try out at 7:30 p.m. For more information contact Gary Ferguson at 630-935-1150 or ssshootersbball@ aol.com or visit www.southsideshootersbball.com.

Hampton to guest at Brother Rice Sports Night Brother Rice is hosting a Sports night at 6 p.m. March 3 at the school’s Carmody Center. Dan Hampton will be the guest speaker. Tickets, which include dinner drinks and raffle starter tickets, are $60. For more information, contact Mike McShane at 773-429-4343 or visit brotherrice.org.

Oak Lawn Baseball/Softball registration

Oak Lawn’s Baseball and Softball League is accepting registration for the coming season for players age 4 to 18. For more information, visit oaklawnbaseball.com.

Shooters boys tryouts The Southside Shooters boys basketball organization will be holding tryouts for the spring season March 5 at the Moraine Valley Community College G Building, 9000 College Parkway, Palos Hills. Fifth and sixth graders will try out from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. while seventh and eighth graders will try out from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. The season will feature approximately 22 games with shootouts and league play. For more information, contact Bill Finn at 708508-0170 or at finn@morainevalley.edu.

CHICAGO FIRE NOTES

Fire hoping for the best with signing of Serbian midfielder By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

Which Aleksandar Katai did the Chicago Fire sign last week? Will it be the player who managed just three goals and four assists Deportivo Alaves in 23 matches last season? Or will it be the guy who scored 21 goals in the Serbian SuperLiga in 2015-16? Fire officials are banking on the latter after signing the midfielder on loan with an option to purchase

Vorva

Continued from Page 1 a makeshift pointer when he pointed it right at the image of McGovern as the young man prepared to take another hack. “The other thing I liked…and this is important. Watch on contact — watch his head. He lands his front foot and (after Thome had the tape stopped) look at his head. Look at his eyes. Really, really good swing. This kid is going to be one heck of a hitter, for sure.’’

Bass completes deal The years of speculation and rumors have come to an end. Bass Pro Shops completed their purchase of Cabela’s. The $4-billion acquisition has been years in the making, so we expect the process to go very smoothly. As of now, no stores will be closing and things should remain mostly the same for shoppers with some noticeable improvements. What’s less certain is the fate of 2,000 or so of employees at Cabela’s Sydney, Nebraska headquarters. Bass Pro officials stated they expected to move operations to Missouri, but they may keep some employees in Nebraska, according to the Great Lakes Basin Report.

Area athletes make signature moves By Jeff Vorva

s I sit here writing this column, I can’t help but take note of the many inches of snow that have fallen with more on the way, making this area a winter wonderland for some. I was thinking about what the big snowfall means to different folks. To some it means shoveling, snow blowing or plowing. To others it offers the opportunity to enjoy the moOUTDOORS ment — ice fishing, buildWITH ing a snowman or woman, JIM KIRBY an old fashioned snowball fight, cross-country or downhill skiing, sledding and tobogganing. Wouldn’t it be nice if the Cook County Forest Preserve District re-configured the Swallow Cliff toboggan slides to include the gate house and longer runs?

his contract outright to extend his Major League Soccer contract. “Aleksandar should make our attack more diversified,” said Fire president and general manager Nelson Rodríguez. “He has the ability to turn a game on a single play whether it be off the dribble, with a pass or cross or even on set pieces. His desire to triumph should also fit well in our locker room.” “I am excited to join my new teammates and for the opportunity to work with Veljko Paunovic and the rest of the coaching staff,” said the 27-year-old Katai. “We will do everything to win a champion-

Jim McGovern originally shot the video to show Aidan’s hitting coach, Tyler Thompson, so that Thompson could give it a critique. Days later, Jim saw a Tweet on Twitter from MLB asking for videos of kids swinging or pitching with the chance that a Hall of Famer might critique it. Jim already had the video so… “I never really thought they would use it,” Jim said. “But I figured, what the heck? I sent it in and that was a day before it aired. They sent us a message on Twitter to watch ‘MLB Tonight.’ ”

ship for the city and our supporters, and I can’t wait to score in front of our fans.”

No score The Fire and Philadelphia played to a scoreless draw in a preseason battle Thursday at the Joe DiMaggio Sports Complex in Clearwater, Fla. Fire goalies Richard Sanchez and Stefan Cleveland record the team’s seconds straight shutout of the preseason. Former Fire star David Accam played 62 minutes for the Union.

Jim wasn’t able to watch it live as he was coming home from work in Chicago. But he saw a DVR replay of it and the show was repeated at 10 p.m. The family got to watch that version. “Ten is past my bedtime,” Aidan said. “But my parents let me stay up that night.’’ Between 6 and 10 p.m., Jim went to work on his phone. “I think I texted everybody I know,” Jim said. Included in a large group of the McGovern inner circle who watched Aidan swing on TV was his other grandfa-

Huge gun rights victory Apparently fearing a devastating loss that could crush arbitrary concealed carry laws in a handful of states, the District of Columbia has declined to appeal its loss of a conceal carry case that struck down its “needs-based” permit requirement, the Second Amendment Foundation learned. The SAF case is Wrenn v. District of Columbia. A three-judge panel struck down the city’s “good cause” requirement as unconstitutional. The court declined a request for a panel review, according to Great Lakes Basin Report. SAF founder Alan M. Gottlieb said, “Let’s face it, anti-gunners are determined to cling their dogma of public disarmament rather than admit that their resistance to common sense conceal carry reform amounts to nothing more than stubborn denial. These people simply do not want to enter the 21st Century. They refuse to accept the Supreme Court ruling that the Second Amendment protects and affirms an individual right to not only keep arms, but to bear them as the founders understood.’’

Green Bay packs musky in waters Efforts to establish a self-sustaining population of spotted musky in Wisconsin’s Lake Michigan waters got a boost this fall when 7,000 musky fingerlings averaging 17 inches were stocked into the Fox River, Lake Winnebago and three inland lakes. The stocked fish were hatched from eggs collected from Michigan waters were spotted musky are still found. These stockings have helped create a popular fishery in Green Bay with anglers reeling in many 50-plus inch fish. The ultimate goal of the project creating a self-sustaining population has been elusive. Department of Natural Resources staff have worked in recent years to diversify the genetic pool in hopes of seeing better natural reproduction. This is good news for Chicago-area anglers who fish the Green Bay area and its tributaries.

Think about it “If you get to thinkin’ you’re a person of some influence, try orderin’ somebody else’s dog around.” — Will Rogers, circa 1930. Jim Kirby’s column appears every first and third Thursday of the month. E-mail him at Kirbyoutdoors@sbcglobal.net.

ther, Jerry McGovern, a Palos Heights alderman. Aidan, however, was sick and didn’t get to go to school for a few days after it aired so he didn’t get the celebrity big-shot treatment there, but Jim said plenty of St. Michael parents saw it and commented on the family Facebook page. Aidan said he started his career with the Orland Youth Association when he was four and when he was eight, he joined the Lincoln-Way Prospects. He has a couple of Florida trips under his

belt for baseball and lists the White Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers as his favorite teams and Clayton Kershaw and Josh Donaldson as his favorite players. McGovern’s baseball future remains to be seen. But two things are for sure. First, not many 10-year-olds are shown on the MLB Network. Second, during a week in which there are piles of snow on the ground and cold temperatures, it’s great to have a nice warm baseball story to break things up.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, February 15, 2018 Section 2

3

AREA HOOPS AT A GLANCE BOYS

W-L STREAK NEXT

16-9 Brother Rice Chicago Christian 13-10 Evergreen Park 10-13 Marist 22-4 Oak Lawn 17-6 Richards 10-13 Sandburg 15-8 Shepard 15-7 St. Laurence 17-8 Stagg 9-14

W1 W1 W1 L1 W7 W3 L2 L1 W1 W1

at St. Francis, Fri. hosts Ridgewood, Fri.; vs. Minonk Fieldcrest in Class 2A El Paso-Gridley Regional, Tues. at Reavis, Fri. at St. Patrick, Fri.; hosts Marian Central Catholic, Wed. at Eisenhower, Fri. at Shepard, Fri. hosts Lockport, Fri.; hosts Homewood-Flossmoor, Tues. hosts Richards, Fri.; hosts Manteno, Tues. at Providence, Fri.; hosts Urban Prep, Tues. hosts Lincoln-Way East, Fri., at Lockport, Tues.

* Records through Sunday, Feb. 11; compiled by Randy Whalen

GIRLS

W-L STREAK Chicago Christian 11-16 L1 Evergreen Park 24-3 W5 Marist 21-6 L1 Mother McAuley 22-7 W2 Oak Lawn 17-9 L1 Richards 19-7 W2 Sandburg 10-17 W1 Shepard 6-21 L6 St. Laurence 14-13 L1 Stagg 15-11 W1

NEXT Season over. at Class 3A Brooks Regional at Class 4A Bloom Township, Regional at Class 4A Sandburg Regional at Class 4A T.F. North Regional at Class 4A Bloom Township Regional hosts Class 4A Sandburg Regional at Class 4A Lincoln-Way East Regional hosts Class 3A St. Laurence Regional at Class 4A Lincoln-Way East Regional

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist’s girls basketball team is gunning for its 12th regional title in the 16-year history of the program.

* Records through Sunday, Feb. 11; compiled by Randy Whalen

FOCUS ON BOYS AND GIRLS BASKETBALL

Saturday special: Oak Lawn topples Shepard in key SSC game By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

Moving Friday night’s game to late Saturday afternoon didn’t throw off Oak Lawn in its quest to try to win its first boys basketball conference title since 1983. The game, like many in the Chicago area, was moved because of a snowstorm. But the Spartans still were able to put up an impressive 60-45 victory over Shepard in a huge South Suburban Conference Red battle in Oak Lawn. Sophomore Sami Osmani led the Spartans with 19 points while his senior brother, Adem, had 14 points and 12 rebounds and Trey Ward added 14 points. Heading into this week’s action Oak Lawn and Richards each had 7-3 marks in the conference and Shepard was 7-4. Oak Lawn was scheduled to host Reavis (4-5 in the league) Tuesday night and visit Eisenhower (1-8) Friday night and visit Argo (0-10) on Feb. 23. Shepard, which was led by Chris Harrison’s 13 points on Saturday, hosts Richards on Friday night in a game that can help

Wrestling

Continued from Page 1 night of the state tournament from the stands last year. “It was fun to watch, but it’s better to be out there on the mat,” she said. Her goal, like her coach’s goal, is a state title. “No matter who steps on the line, I’ll give it 110 percent — even if they are ranked higher than me,” she said. “Anything can happen in any match so you have to go out there and compete.’’ Rocco was on a roll in sectional action when he blanked Rich East’s Jalen Terry, 10-0

Eisenhower. They had a road game scheduled last Friday night against Lincoln-Way East but that game was postponed due to the snowy conditions and moved to Feb. 22.

the Spartans out.

Marist’s repeat is in jeopardy Marist’s chance to win the East Suburban Catholic Conference for the second straight year took a hit on Saturday with a 54-49 loss to St. Viator in Arlington Heights. St. Viator junior Trey Calvin scored 13 of his 26 points in the third quarter to keep his team on top of the ESCC mountain with a 7-0 mark while Marist fell to 5-2 with two more league games on the schedule, including Friday night’s game at St. Patrick. Morgan Taylor had 13 points for Marist against Viator. While many conference games throughout the Chicago area were postponed until Saturday because of the weather, this game was actually scheduled for Saturday afternoon.

CC heads to El Paso The Illinois High School Association announced its seeds for Class 1A and 2A boys basketball last week and Chicago Christian drew the third seed in the 10-team Class 2A Clifton Central Sectional sub-sectional. Lisle and Westmont picked up the top two seeds. The Knights open play at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the El Paso-Gridley Regional against fifth-seeded Minonk Fieldcrest. Class 3A and 4A seeds are scheduled to be announced today, Thursday. Photo by Jeff Vorva

Welcome back

Sandburg hosts Lockport in a SouthWest Suburban Blue contest in Orland Park. The Eagles were on the road for six games since a home contest in the quarterfinals and topped Nazareth’s Alex Carrillo in the semifinals, 6-2. But he was pinned by Thornton Fractional North’s Bilal Bailey in the finals. Rocco brings in a 29-4 record into his second state appeance. Two of his losses were to Bailey, a sophomore who has not lost to an Illinois opponent this season. “I’ll pull around and get him one time hopefully,” Rocco said. “Making it back to state is exciting. When we wrestled in the (Illinois Kids Wrestling Federation) I never made it to state the same time Mia did so it’s nice to be together.’’ Brother Rice coaches are hoping for big things from the Crusaders’ First-year Sandburg wrestling coach Clinton Polz will take two wrestlers to state this weekend and the Eagles will compete in the team dual sectional on Tuesday. Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sophomore Sami Osmani, shown in a game earlier in the season, scored 19 points Saturday against Shepard to keep Oak Lawn’s chances of a rare conference championship alive.

Some great records By the time this week ends, there might not be a lot of girls teams left in the postseason. But the area had some pretty gaudy records during the regular season.

Evergreen Park led the pack with a 24-3 record. Marist was 21-6 and Mother McAuley was 22-7 and both teams played strong schedules. Richards finished 19-7 during the regular season and Oak Lawn finished 17-9. Stagg cooled off toward the end of the season but put up an impressive 15-11 mark heading into regional play.

Three Marist girls named all-conference

Marist senior Ally Corcoran, junior Abby Callahan and freshman Sydney Affolter were named to the all-East Suburban Catholic Conference team. The RedHawks this week are gunning for their 12th regional title in the 16-year history of the program.

CC 3-point shooters advance

Chicago Christian was eliminated in the first round of the Class 2A girls regionals but Cheyenne Slager and Beth Regnerus advanced to the sectional round of the IHSA’s 3-point shooting contest.

against Tinley Park on Jan. 16. In that span, they went 3-3

including wins over LincolnWay West, Plainfield South and

contingent. Johnson, who was second in the state at 120, pinned his first two opponents at Hinsdale South and earned a 7-2 decision over Lemont’s Kyle Schickel to win the sectional title. He improved to 31-6. Murphy beat Rich East’s Michael Terry, in just 28 seconds in the sectional title match and takes a 35-9 mark into the state finals. Ruffin, who finished third in the state last year at 285, pinned his first two sectional opponents and beat Richards’ Marquis Hall, 10-4,

in the finals to improve to 35-3. Other area grapplers who didn’t win sectional championships who could still make a lot of noise in Champaign are Stagg’s Domenic Zaccone (120 pounds, who finished second in the state at 113 last year), Marist’s Jacob Dado (138, who took fourth at 120), and Sandburg’s Pat Nolan (132, fifth at 120). Sectional dual team wrestling takes place on Tuesday and Sandburg faces Marmion at 6 p.m. at Supplied photo Downers Grove South. The winBrother Rice is bringing four wrestlers to state: left to right, Paul Gliva, ner goes to the state finals. Dominic Murphy, Hassan Johnson and Myles Ruffin.

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Continued from Page 1 who tied for first in the all-around (37.000), tied for first on the balance beam (9.325), finished second on the vault (9.350) and took second in the floor exercise (9.325). “Our team put everything we had into this meet and I just wanted to go for it,” Talley said after the sectional. This will be Talley’s first trip to state as a competitor. Last year she went as a spectator. There was a long layoff between the sectional and the state finals and she didn’t plan on dwelling on state too much. “Usually nerves don’t hit me until there are about two minutes before my turn,” she said. “And it doesn’t really feel real until it happens. I should be OK.’’ Gilgio will be busy with her

four events. Last year, she made her state debut and finished ninth in the floor exercise (9.375) and 28th in the all-around (35.150). “I’m hoping to be a lot more confident than I was last year,” she said. “I’m not going to go in as nervous. I’ll try my hardest again and hope I can place higher and do a lot better than I did last year.’’ Sandburg/Stagg finished fourth in sectional action with 136.425 points. Lincoln-Way’s coop team won the meet with 143.275. The team was without Stagg senior Maddy Roe, who suffered a season-ending right fibula injury after a pre-meet double-full layout attempt in December. Roe finished seventh in the state last year in the all-around and seventh on the balance beam and ninth on the bars. She plans on attending the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater for academics and gymnastics.

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Section 2 Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

Scenes from sectional gymnastics and wrestling

Sandburg/Stagg co-op sophomore Maddie Giglio tends to her foot after a painful landing on the balance beam in sectional action.

Sandburg’s Jimmy Ferguson and Wheaton-Warrenville South’s Hunter Edwards are a tangle of arms and legs during the 120-pound preliminaries at the Class 3A Hinsdale Central Sectional on Saturday. Sandburg/ Stagg co-op freshman Helen Wheeler dismounts off the balance beam during Sandburg’s girls gymnastics sectional on Feb. 5.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Brother Rice’s Dominic Murphy (bottom) gets ready to flip over Back of the Yards’ Carl McNickles during the Class 2A Hinsdale South Sectional. Murphy was one of three sectional champions for the Crusaders.

Somewhere in the middle of this mob is Sandburg-Stagg’s Taylor Talley after her performance on the uneven parallel bars event at the Sandburg Sectional.

Sandurg’s Dominic Iannantone smiles as he has the upper hand in a preliminary match against Reavis’s Jack McDonald at the Hinsdale Central Sectional.

Oak Lawn’s Mike Kass (on knees) has his hands full against Thornwood’s Brandon Wynn at the Class 3A Hinsdale Central Sectional.

St. Laurence’s Sean Burns (right) battles Richards’ Marty Cosgrove in sectional action in Darien on Saturday.


The Regional News - The Reporter

The Reporter Newspapers Call 448-6161 Deadline 5 p.m. Monday Hours M-F 9 to 5 Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWMBS, INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2005-22, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2005-22, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-22 Plaintiff, vs. JANE BLANKSHAIN; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, OFFICE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; CEDAR CROSSING III Defendants, 16 CH 2969 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, March 6, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 27-02-201-079-0000. Commonly known as 13701 Trafalgar Court, Orland Park, IL 60462. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (614) 2205611. 17-030504 F2 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3074643

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Fifth Third Mortgage Company Plaintiff, vs. Alan M. Dudnick; First Secure Bank and Trust Company f/k/a Family Bank and Trust Company, as Trustee under the provisions of a Trust Agreement dated April 16, 2007 and known as trust number 12-933; Palos View Condominium Association; First Secure Bank and Trust Company f/k/a Family Bank and Trust Company; Unknown Tenants; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants, Case # 17CH746 Sheriff’s # 170287 F17050187FT FITH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on March 27th, 2018, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 10511 South Roberts Road, Unit 2A, Palos Hills, Illinois 60465 P.I.N: 23-13-103-033-1005; 23-13-103-033-1044 Improvements: This property consists of a Residential Condominium. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier’s check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier’s check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments. Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff’s Attorney ANSELMO, LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. Diehl Road, Suite 120 Naperville, IL 60563-4947 Phone: 630-453-6960 Fax: 630-428-4620 Attorney #: Cook 58852, DuPage 293191, Kane 031-26104, Winnebago 3802, IL 03126232 sales@alolawgroup.com For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

Thursday,February 15, 2018 Section 2

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Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.DANNY KATEEB, STATE OF ILLINOIS - DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE Defendants 16 CH 016474 16787 91ST AVENUE ORLAND HILLS, IL 60487 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 22, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 7, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 16787 91ST AVENUE, ORLAND HILLS, IL 60487 Property Index No. 27-27-206-015-0000. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-16-16007. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-16-16007 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 16 CH 016474 TJSC#: 38-933 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3076057

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.NANCY M. LEMPERA A/KA NANCY MAE LEMPERA, THOMAS J. LEMPERA, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 16 CH 7404 8037 LINDER AVENUE BURBANK, IL 60459 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 4, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 20, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8037 LINDER AVENUE, BURBANK, IL 60459 Property Index No. 19-33-116-013-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family home with no garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service. atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5pm. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 416-5500. Please refer to file number 256176. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 416-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 256176 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 16 CH 7404 TJSC#: 37-11162

HAVE A HOUSE FOR SALE? PLACE YOUR AD TODAY! CALL 448-4000 OR 448-6161

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON; Plaintiff, vs. MARK J. HOLDA, ET AL; Defendants, REPUBLIC BANK OF CHICAGO; Counter-Plaintiff, vs. MARK J. HOLDA AKA MARK HOLDA AKA MARK J. HOLDA; LYDIA MICHELLE HOLDA FKA LYDIA ROJAS AKA LYDIA MICHELLE HOLDA; HOLDA ENTERPRISES, INC.; FIRST MIDWEST BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO PALOS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED DECEMBER 13, 2000 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 1-5000; LOMA VISTA NURSERY; CHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES AMERICAS LLC DBA CHRYSLER FINANCIAL FKA DAIMLERCHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES AMERICA, LLC; STATE OF ILLINOIS; CAPITAL ONE BANK, (USA), N.A., CITY OF PALOS HEIGHTS; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF TRUST AGREEMENT DATED DECEMBER 13, 2000 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 1-5000; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Counter-Defendants 12 CH 8082 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, March 9, 2018, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 24-31-107-010-0000. Commonly known as 6833 West 127st Street, Palos Heights, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. THE SALE SHALL BE SUBJECT TO GENERAL TAXES, SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS AND TO A PRIOR RECORDED FIRST MORTGAGE. Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier’s or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Brandon R. Freud at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Ruff, Freud, Breems and Nelson, Ltd., 200 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 263-3890. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3075066

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.

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Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION MOREQUITY, INC Plaintiff, -v.ANDRZEJ KULIKOWSKI, RENETA KULIKOWSKI, PNC BANK, N.A. S/I/I TO MIDAMERICA BANK, FSB Defendants 13 CH 5764 8115 WEST 90TH STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 26, 2015, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 23, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8115 WEST 90TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-209-027-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story, single family home with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service. atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5pm. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 416-5500. Please refer to file number 11143. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 416-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 11143 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 13 CH 5764 TJSC#: 38-706 I3075111

For Sale

5 ACRES RT. 45 IN PEOTONE 600 ft. frontage x 400 ft. deep 40 ft. x 60 ft. pole barn CALL 815-450-0004

For Rent 2 Bedroom Heated Apt Vicinity of Midway Orange Line - Appliances Laundry Facilities - Parking 1 Year Lease - No Pets One Month Security Deposit 708-599-6037 Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC DBA MR. COOPER; Plaintiff, vs. KERRY VINKLER; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; MATTHEW VINKLER; Defendants, 17 CH 12477 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, March 5, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-02-313-012-0000. Commonly known as 9260 South 86th Avenue, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (614) 2205611. 17-030301 F2 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3074640


6

Section 2 Thursday, February 15, 2018

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OUT & ABOUT Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 7

Warm up with stew on cold winter nights Hearty meals are best on cold nights, when food can provide a warming effect after coming in from the cold outdoors. This recipe for “Boeuf Bourguignon” from Jill Lightner’s “Edible Seattle: The Cookbook” (Sterling Epicure) is sure to provide such an effect. BOEUF BOURGUIGNON Serves 6 generously • 2 pounds beef shoulder, cut into 2-inch pieces (see note) • 1 onion, cut into large dice • 2 carrots, cut into large dice • 2 stalks celery, cut into large dice

• 2 dried bay leaves • 4 sprigs fresh thyme • 7 sprigs fresh flat-leaf parsley • 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns • 1 bottle red wine • Salt • Freshly ground black pepper

• 1 tablespoon canola oil • 1/4 pound slab bacon, cut into large dice • 1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour • 4 cups beef stock • 2 large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into large dice • 1 pound pearl onions, blanched and peeled • 1 pound button mushrooms, diced 1. Put the beef chunks in a large bowl and add the onion, carrots and celery. In a piece of cheesecloth, tie together a bouquet of garni of the bay leaves, thyme, parsley, and peppercorns and add to the bowl. Pour in the bottle of wine. Cover and let marinate in

the refrigerator overnight, stirring the mixture once or twice over the course of the evening. 2. The next day, remove the meat from the marinade and dry the pieces in a shallow pan lined with several layers of paper towels. Remove the vegetables and reserve them separately, along with the bouquet garni. Reserve the wine. Season the beef with salt and pepper. 3. In a large Dutch oven over medium heat, warm the canola oil. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat is rendered, about 5 minutes. Remove the bacon from the pot and set aside. In single-layer batches, brown the beef chunks on all sides, then set aside. Brown the reserved onions, carrots and celery, about 10 minutes. Add additional canola oil

to the pot if there is not enough bacon fat to brown all of the beef and vegetables. 4. Return the beef to the pot with the vegetables and add 3 tablespoons of the butter. Sprinkle with the flour and cook, stirring, for about 3 minutes. Add the reserved wine and deglaze the pot, scraping up all the browned bits from the bottom. Add the bacon and stock and bring to a boil. Skim off the scum that rises to the top; once the scum is removed, add the bouquet garni. Simmer, covered, over medium-low heat until the beef is very tender, about 11/2 hours. Remove the bouquet garni. 5. Toward the end of the beef’s cooking time, bring the potatoes to a boil in a separate saucepan covered generously with salted water. Cook until tender, about

15 minutes. 6. In a medium sauté pan, melt 3 tablespoons of the butter over medium-high heat. Add the pearl onions and sauté for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the mushrooms to the onions and cook until both onions and mushrooms are golden brown, about 5 minutes longer. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 7. Serve the stew in bowls, garnished with the pearl onions, mushrooms and potatoes. Note: When shopping for beef, you won’t find a cut labeled “beef shoulder” — what you want is either a chuck roast of some sort or, from a bit lower on the shoulder, a cut labeled either “arm roast” or “round bone roast.”


OUT & ABOUT Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

The Regional News • The Reporter

Left: Terry Lynch as Benjamin Franklin. Right: The Pottery for Kids class.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Japan, Iceland are the focus of MVCC art exhibition

Supplied photo

The Center to host ‘Benjamin Franklin’ The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, has announced a slate of activities for the days ahead. For more information or to register for a program, call (708) 361-3650. • Beginning Collage will be held from 9:30 a.m. to noon on six Monday mornings beginning Feb. 19. Instructor April Schabes will have beginning and intermediate students experiment with color and composition to create mixed-media collages. The class fee is $120. • A luncheon will feature Terry Lynch as Benjamin Franklin from noon to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20. Center favorite and local actor Lynch will share some of Benjamin Franklin’s lore and wisdom. A man for all ages, inventor, statesman and founding father, Franklin seemed to do it all. Franklin reminisces about his political life, writing and scientific inventions. This program will address the question about how this founding father has changed the

way people live their lives today. Luncheons cost $22 and advance reservations are necessary. • Painting Mandala Rocks is the theme of this class being held from noon to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20. Instructor Robin Neumann will help participants learn a fun and easy method for painting on rocks using dotting tools. Neumann will show how to make a variety of simple strokes that can be combined to make beautiful mandalas on beach pebbles. All supplies will be provided. The workshop fee is $22 plus a $3 materials fee. • Advanced Collage will be held from 9:30 a.m. to noon six Wednesdays beginning Feb. 21. Instructor April Schabes will have students continue on their journey into the world of collage. Schabes will have projects planned, experimenting with papers, paints, images and text. This class is only for students who have studied with Schabes before. The class fee is $120. • Quilting is scheduled from 1 to 3 p.m. for six Wednesdays be-

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS Invite senior crooners to American Idol-style contest Singers age 55 and older are invited to compete in Orland Township’s annual Senior American Idol contest. Auditions are set for Tuesday, Feb. 20 at the Township Office, 14807 S. Ravinia, Orland Park. Check-in begins at 5:45 p.m., with auditions starting at 6 p.m. Each contestant will sing a 2-3 minute segment of a song of their choice, a cappella, for a panel of judges. At the end of the evening, the top 16 contestants will be selected to compete at the finals in May. “Our seniors have such talent and a zest for life that this event is always an entertaining, energy packed evening,” said Supervisor Paul O’Grady. “I always look forward to the showcase of talent.” To register or learn more information, contact Orland Township at (708) 403-4222.

McCord hosts family painting night Winter Wonderland Family Night is set for 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 at McCord Gallery & Cultural Center, 9602 W. Creek Road, Palos Park. Parents and children are invited to visit art stations and learn art techniques and then dine on pizza. Participants will paint a wintry scene, led by instructor Marlo Steinke. The fee is $75 for every McCord member and guest; $85 for nonmembers. Each additional person will be charged $25. For details, call (708) 671-0648.

Crisis Center sets annual gala The public is invited to the Crisis Center for South Suburbia’s annual gala, set for 6 to 11 p.m Saturday, March 3 at the Hilton DoubleTree Chicago-Alsip. Reservations can be made online at crisisctr.org/events/gala. The gala, sponsored by Exelon, will be a “Night on the Red Carpet” to showcase the positive impact of the Crisis Center and to raise critical funds to continue providing emergency shelter and other essential services to victims of domestic violence.   The evening, priced at $100 per ticket, includes cocktails, a fourcourse dinner, mobile bidding on auction items, dancing to live entertainment by The Jimmy O and

Rhonda Lee Duo, raffles and more. Live-auction items include four tickets and a limousine ride to a Justin Timberlake concert, a Disney trip, a Chicago stay-cation, and other vacation packages. Silent auction items will be up for bid through online bidding. Guests at the event, and supporters at home alike, are invited to use their cell phones and devices to bid in real time on silent auction items and increase their chances of winning an array of items from toys to weekend getaways and sporting events. The link to register for the silent auction is 2018CCSS.gesture.com.  For reservations, sponsorship opportunities and additional information, contact Kerri Twietmeyer at (708) 429-7255, ext. 136.  The Crisis Center for South Suburbia’s mission is to provide emergency shelter and other essential services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence, and to address the societal issues that contribute to domestic violence.

Bridge Teen Center to celebrate Winter Olympics The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Ct., Orland Park, offers several free events for teens in seventh through 12th grade.  For more information, call (708) 532-0500. • Bridge Winter Olympics and Rep Team USA with Danger Scene will be hosted from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16. Students will celebrate the Winter Olympics and participate in the Bridge’s very own Winter Olympic games. Danger Scene, an electronic band, will provide live music. There will be free donuts and coffee from Dunkin’ Donuts. • Harmonica with MG Bailey will be held from 5 to 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 19. Students will learn to play a tune on the harmonica with the One-Man-Band, Matt Bailey.  • Study Hacks will be presented from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20. Students will discover secret strategies to study more effectively, improve memory and prepare for tests and quizzes. Mini Clay Pots will be made from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21. Students will mold, score and build small pots using oven-bake polymer clay and incorporating unique textures, colors and designs. Understanding Hidden Medical Conditions will be discussed from

Southwest • Section 2, Page 8

ginning Feb. 21. Instructor Denise Dulzo asks participants to bring their own sewing machine and choice of fabrics. Students will learn to design a project, cut fabrics, piece them together, add batting and backing and stitch it all together to create a baby quilt, wall hanging or other pieced fabric project. The class fee is $100. Students must purchase fabrics and batting before the first class. A list of required fabrics and supplies is available in the office. Pottery for Kids is set from 4 to 5:30 p.m. for four Thursdays beginning Feb. 22. Instructor Liz Credio will moderate this class in which students will learn the process of creating ceramic art. Students will learn the how to make such things as pottery and sculptures. Credio will have several projects planned, as well as allowing time for experimentation. This class is open to children in kindergarten through eighth grade. The class fee is $51 plus a $14 materials fee.

Paintings inspired by artist Ellen Holtzblatt’s trips to Japan and Iceland are shown in the “Between Earth and Sky” exhibition running through March 9 in the Robert F. DeCaprio Art Gallery at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway, Palos Hills. The Chicago resident’s exhibition features paintings that explore physical being and spirituality with attention to light and ability to convey motion within her landscapes and scenes. She began painting landscapes through her memory of visiting the Orkney Islands in Scotland 30 years ago. “The islands are isolated, sparsely populated by humans, and a fierce and beautiful earth and sea. They represent a stark contrast with my busy and noisy city life. Ultimately, the islands have become the place where I live in my imagination,” Holtzblatt said. Holtzblatt’s work has been featured in one-person exhibitions throughout the Chicago area,

Supplied photo

Artist Ellen Holtzblatt’s “Under the Sun” is among her work that calls attention to light to convey motion within her landscapes.

including a Woman’s History Month exhibition in Chicago, “From Birth to Memory” at the Josef Glimer Gallery in Chicago; “Under the Sun: Landscape as Allegory” at the Chicago Public Library; and “A Passing Day: Land and Light” at the Fermilab Art Gallery in Batavia. Her group exhibitions have been seen across the United States, and in Jerusalem and Berlin. In addition, numerous art selections have been featured in various

publications. ​ The Robert F. DeCaprio Art Gallery provides an opportunity to view locally and nationally recognized artists. Exhibits in the gallery are free to the public and available for viewing from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, as well as during most performances in the Fine and Performing Arts Center. For more information, call Rachel McDermott, Art Gallery coordinator, at (708) 608-4231.

estrings for the next few weeks. Financial discipline now will pay dividends later.

seem to be falling out of sync with a close friend. There will be ample opportunities to rekindle the relationship. Right now you may need a breather.

HOROSCOPES ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Keep your eyes on the prize, Aries. Hard work is the key to success, and your hard work will be rewarded in time. This may be a week of transition, so be ready to jump if necessary. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 There is strength in numbers if you align yourself with the right team, Taurus. Collaboration is the name of the game this week. Jockey for your position, but share the work.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, if you are approaching an emotional overload, you will need to schedule time to decompress. Find an activity that relaxes 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. you and delve into that to clear 21. Students will gain knowledge your head. and compassion for those living CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 with diabetes, learning how to Cancer, you are the eternal provide support for others living optimist this week. As a result, with medical conditions. you may not be able to accurately Advanced Writing: Creating He- assess all situations. Ask a friend roic Characters will be held from for advice before making any big 5 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22. decisions. Students will discuss what makes characters the heroes in stories and LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 practice developing a protagonist Leo, even if you have been relathat is strong and connects with tively good at managing money, you may need to tighten the pursreaders.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Contradictions should not surprise you this week, Virgo. Focus on fixing as much as you can while you have an opportunity to do so. It’s a big job. LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, you make friends easily, and this week your social circle figures to expand even further. Embrace this opportunity and enjoy beginning a new relationship. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, some of your most innovative ideas may be met with lukewarm responses. Do not let this derail your plans. You just need to be a little more persuasive. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/ Dec 21 You are very good at giving others credit, Sagittarius. But this week people may be singing your praises. It’s fine to be modest about it, but don’t downplay your contributions. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, do not fear if you

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, a romantic relationship can be taken to a new level when buried desires come to the surface. Give yourself plenty of time to pursue these feelings. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, this is a week when you want to double-check everything that you do. Be sure to dot every “I” and cross every “T.” Details matter.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS FEBRUARY 18 Matt Dillon, Actor (54) FEBRUARY 19 Millie Bobby Brown, Actress (14) FEBRUARY 20 Cindy Crawford, Model (52) FEBRUARY 21 Ashley Greene, Actress (31) FEBRUARY 22 Lea Salonga, Actress (47) FEBRUARY 23 Francesca Simon, Author (63) FEBRUARY 24 Floyd Mayweather, Boxer (41)

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