Page 1

THE 2 SECTIONS 24 PAGES

Volume LIV No. 11

R EPORTER Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

USPS 118-690

75¢ $1.00

Thursday, May 23, 2013

A serious simulation OL students experience DUI By Laura Bollin

Softball

Shepard rocks rival Oak Lawn Baseball

Vikings cool off rising Phoenix Read Sports

An all new Wine Guy! Back Page Evergreen proposes unusual ordinance for home-buyers Story on Page 7

Reader Poll Last weeks result: Do you believe elected municipal offices (mayor, trustee, alderman, clerk) should be subject to term limits? Yes..............95% No.................5% Based on 20 votes.

What do you think of Evergreen Park’s proposed ‘home-flipping’ ordinance?

    Oak Lawn Community High School students wobbled as they tried to walk on white lines in the school parking lots, and swerved and crashed as they attempted to navigate golf carts through a course of orange construction cones last Friday.     The students weren’t drunk, but they were wearing special goggle simulated a state of intoxication. The driving course and sobriety tests were part of the Cook County Sheriff’s Police’s DUI and Distracted Driving Prevention Program, which is in its 10th year. The program has been coming to Oak Lawn High since 2006, and more than 150 students participated in the program last Friday.     The program starts with a classroom portion in which youth services officers teach the students about the laws regarding driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, and then a real-life portion, where students participate in sobriety tests, drive a few laps around a driving course in a golf cart, and use a driving simulator provided by AAA Motor Club to experience the dangers of texting and driving.     Oak Lawn High student Rachael France said wearing the goggles while trying walk a straight line for the sobriety test was a weird experience.     “It made you really dizzy, you couldn’t see anything, and it threw off my balance,” France said. “Parents and the school emphasize it, but through this program you learn not to do it, because it shows you what

will happen.”     The program helps students learn life lessons, said driver’s education teacher Brian Brandt.     “All distractions, whether it is texting, drinking and driving, or eating while driving, are a big problem in society,” Brandt said. “We need to teach students at a young age to make responsible decisions.”     Oak Lawn High student Breanna Markusic said the program was a good idea.     “I crashed into a stop sign with the simulator,” Markusic said. “It’s actually a good thing, because now you know when you drink and drive or text and drive, you can hurt people, crash into things, or even kill yourself.”     Omar Abdelrahman said he would never get behind the wheel after drinking, or text while driving after participating in the program.     “Overall, it was really interesting to try something like this,” Abdelraham said. “I wouldn’t recommend drinking and driving at all. You shouldn’t use the phone while driving. Lives can be lost.”     Driver’s education teacher John Robinson said the program was important to help students.     “It teaches them that they are not invincible,” Robinson said. “They can’t text and drive or drink and drive. When intoxicated, they can’t do simple Submitted photo tasks like put a key in a keyhole. When they’re driving the golf U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski speaks at Sunday’s Memorial Day observance at the Eternal Flame carts, they’re running over the monument in Worth. cones. It shows them that they can’t do it.”

Riviera turning to cameras in attempt to thwart vandalism By Kelly White Correspondent     The Riviera Townhomes, a quiet neighborhood near 111th Street and 84th Avenue in Palos Hills, has for nearly a year been the site of frequent theft and vandalism, according to the manager of the property.     Property theft has been occur-

ring since last summer, with damage and defacement of property occurring on a handful of occasions since last fall, according to Riviera property manager Karen Ferguson, who said she is looking to put a an immediate stop to the vandalism. Residents’ complaints range from scratches on cars to broken statues and flower vases (Continued on page 12)

Forget them not

Worth, Post 991 remember fallen vets By Kevin M. Coyne Correspondent     In honor of veterans who made the ultimate sacrifice in service of the United States, the village of Worth and the Marrs-Meyer American Legion Post 991 held their annual Memorial Day observance Sunday at the Eternal Flame monument at 111th Street and Harlem Avenue.     Attendees paid their respects to servicemen and women who never returned from war.

    “To me the most important message about Memorial Day is that we never forget the ultimate sacrifice that has been made by more than one million American service men and women since the Revolutionary War,” Worth Mayor Mary Werner told the gathering. “They have touched the lives of every man, woman and child who lives in America today.”     The remembrance’s keynote speaker, U.S. Rep Dan Lipinski (D-3, Western Springs), spoke to

the audience of veterans, veterans’ families and area residents, asking each person to remember the men and women who have died to preserve Americans’ freedoms.     “Memorial Day is one day of the year in which we collectively stop and pause to remember the men and women who gave their lives to preserve our freedoms,” Lipinski said. “Publicly acknowledging their sacrifice, as well as the sacrifice of all our veterans (Continued on on page 3)

Vote on Facebook at The Reporter or at thereporteronline.net, call us at 448-6161 or email thereporter@comcast.net

index Police News.....................2 Our Neighborhood..........4 Sudoku...........................4 School...........................5 Commentary...................6 Consumer.....................7 Crossword......................7 Death Notices.................8 Calendar........................11

columnists Dee Woods...................12 Wine Guy......................12

Submitted Photo

It all adds up     The Marist High School math team finished in fourth place at the state math finals held May 4 at the University of Illinois. Marist finished with 760 points, six points behind second-place finishers Vernon Hills and Glenbard South. Libertyville took the state title with 926 points. Marist’s fourth-place finish was the school’s best showing ever, and was tops among Catholic schools level 3A.     Top individuals for Marist were freshmen Rachel Ulascek and Jude Sanchez; sophomores Ryan Loizzo, Curtis Conlin, Mitchell Schroeder, Simon Rafacz, John Lamantia and Joe Kezon; juniors Kathy Ulascek and Liam Gibbs; and seniors Chris Shroba, Alexandra Feldner, Mike Byrd, Pete Conway, Mark Triezenberg and Shannon Cosgrove.     Marist advanced to the state competition after placing first at the Chicago State Regional. Other highlights for the season included a first-place finish at the Mathematics Teachers Association Math Contest, a sweep of all three Catholic Math League South competitions, and the team title at the Illinois Institute of Technology High School Math Competition.


2

The Reporter Thursday, May 23, 2013

police news

Chicago Ridge

13-year-old accused of stealing cell     A 13-year-old Chicago boy was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took a cell phone with a retail value of $149 from a store in the Chicago Ridge Mall.     He was arrested at 7:48 p.m. May 17. ***     A 50-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took copper fittings with a retail value of $919 from a store at the Chicago Ridge Commons.     Charles R. Payne, of Chicago, was arrested at 2:48 p.m. May 13. ***     A 25-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she allegedly took clothing with a retail value of $720 from a store at the Chicago Ridge Mall.     Maria Arroyo, of Chicago, was arrested at 2:55 p.m. May 18. ***     An 18-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took items with a retail value of $150 from a store at the Chicago Ridge Mall.     Mohommad T. Abousalem, of Burbank, was arrested at 8:15 p.m. May 13.

Evergreen Park     A 32-year-old man was reportedly charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug equipment, operation of an uninsured motor vehicle and improper turn after police stopped the vehicle he was driving at the intersection of Central Park Avenue and 95th Street.     James Donnelly, of Hometown, was arrested at 4:24 p.m. May 14. He possessed .8 grams of heroin, a cooking spoon and two syringes, police said. ***     A 39-year-old man was reportedly charged with possession of drug equipment, possession of a controlled substance, operation of an uninsured motor vehicle and failure to wear a seatbelt after police stopped the vehicle he was driving at the intersection of 91st Street and Pulaski Road.     Jason Stewart, of Chicago, was arrested at 4:41 p.m. May 14. He possessed 1.2 grams of heroin and a cooking spoon, police said. ***     A 41-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she allegedly took six packs of Nicorette gum and a loaf of bread with a retail value of $299 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     April Banks, of Chicago, was arrested at 6:20 p.m. May 12. ***     A 39-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took 12 video games with a retail value of $264 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     William Smith, of Chicago, was arrested at 5:20 p.m. May 16.

***     An 18-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took clothing with a retail value of $36 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Justin Lee, of Chicago, was arrested at 4:16 p.m. May 15. ***     Two Chicago Ridge women were charged with retail theft after they allegedly took men’s items and toys from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Marion Heywood, 23, and Stanzia Heywood, 29, were arrested at 8:35 p.m. May 11. Marion reportedly took men’s items with a retail value of $179, and Stanzia reportedly took toys with a retail value of $63. ***     A 35-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she allegedly took clothing with a retail value of $27 from a store in the 2500 block of 95th Street.     Elizabeth Crowley, of Chicago, was arrested at 1 p.m. May 10.

Hickory Hills

    A 22-year-old woman was charged with unlawful use of a weapon, possession of a firearm without a FOID card and resisting a peace officer after she allegedly walked in the westbound lane of 87th Street.     Patrice A. Bennett, of Justice, was arrested at 9:42 p.m. May 15. She possessed a loaded .22 caliber handgun containing seven rounds of ammunition, police said. She was also reportedly cited with improper walking on a highway. ***     A 27-year-old man was report*** edly charged with driving with a ***     A 29-year-old woman was     A 43-year-old man was charged suspended license, speeding, no charged with retail theft after with retail theft after he allegedly proof of insurance and improper she allegedly took perfume with took costume jewelry with a retail display of registration after police a retail value of $87 from a store value of $10 from a store in the stopped the vehicle he was drivat the Chicago Ridge Mall. ing in the 9200 block of Roberts 2500 block of 94th Street.     Angela Villies, of Oak Lawn,     Marcus Smothers, of Chicago, Road. was arrested at 4:12 p.m. May was arrested at 6:15 p.m. May     Andrzej S. Kucharski, of Hickory Hills, was arrested at 9:33 15. 18. p.m. May 17. ***     A 47-year-old woman was charged with criminal damage to property after she allegedly broke the rear window of a vehicle in the 8700 block of 84th Court. Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills     Cheryl A. Hudson, of Hickory Hills, was arrested at 9:03 p.m. Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth May 19. *** Publisher Amy Richards     Theft of electricity was reported Editor Jason Maholy at 1:41 p.m. May 15 an apartSports Editor Ken Karrson ment building in the 8800 block of Roberts Road. Graphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora     ComEd reportedly contacted the building manager and told Advertising Sales Val Draus her they were going to cut the To advertise call (708) 448-6161 electricity to one of the apartments. When ComEd came to To subscribe call (708) 448-6161 / Fax (708) 448-4012 shut off the electricity, the baseWebsite: TheReporterOnline.net ment door was forced open and e-Mail: thereporter@comcast.net the electric meter was broken, police said. Police reportedly found The Reporter is published weekly by the Regional Publishing Corp. an extension cord leading from a 12247 S. Harlem Ave. vacant apartment to the apartPalos Heights, IL 60463 ment where the electricity had Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon been shut off. Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Worth, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. *** Subscription rates: $37.00 per year by mail in Cook County. $47 per year by mail elsewhere. $1.00 per copy on newsstands and vending machines.     Criminal defacement of propPostmaster: Send address changes to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463. erty was reported at 7:21 a.m. May 19 at Prairie View Park, — Founded in 1960 and Locally Owned — 8200 W. 85th Street. Graffiti was (© Entire contents copyright 2013 Regional Publishing Corp.) sprayed on a trash can, a park

THE

REPORTER

Old Fashioned Butcher Shop 10717 South Ridgeland Avenue Meat: 636-3437 Deli: 636-6203

Jack & Pat’s

WE WILL Mild Italian or Fresh BE OPEN Polish Sausage MEMORIAL DAY

$

279 Lb.

Boneless Marinated

Chicken Breast

$

369 Lb.

9 am ~ 3 pm

Baby Back Ribs

$

3

59

Jack & Pat’s Baked Ham......................$4.49 lb. Minced Ham or Old Fashion Loaf.............$5.49 lb. Jack & Pat’s (Pork & Beef) Regular or Jumbo Hot Dogs...........$4.29 lb. Kidney Bean or Italian Pasta....................$2.59 lb.

Lb.

Oak Lawn     Two Chicago residents were each charged with retail theft after they allegedly took items from a store in the 4100 block of 95th Street.     Bertha Diaz, 35, and Rogelio Lopez, 25, were arrested at 3:48 p.m. May 11. Diaz reportedly took items with a retail value of $494, and Lopez took items with a retail value of $406. The two reportedly place the items in plastic bags they had brought into the store. Police reportedly found a plastic bin full of bags with store logos, and a purse containing $3,678 in Diaz’s car. ***     A 56-year-old man was charged with assault and retail theft after he allegedly took two candy bars and a can of sardines worth $5 and threatened a manager at a grocery store in the 5300 block of 95th Street.     Joseph M. Rotkis, of Oak Lawn, was arrested at 11:28 a.m. May 15. ***     A 22-year-old man was charged with disorderly conduct after he allegedly called the 911 emergency dispatch center for non-emergency reasons repeatedly from a cell phone in the 9500 block of 53rd Avenue.     Justin E. Hill, of Evergreen Park, was arrested at 7:59 p.m. May 15. ***     A 49-year-old man was reportedly charged with DUI and speeding after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 7100 block of 95th Street.     Richard M. Rigley, of Burr Ridge, was arrested at 12:52 a.m. May 17. ***     A 28-year-old man was reportedly charged with retail theft and possession of a hypodermic syringe after police stopped him at a store in the 4000 block of 95th Street.     Abraham Espanol Arteaga, of Chicago, was arrested at 1 p.m. May 15. He reportedly took a leaf blower and two drills with a retail value of $590. ***     A 22-year-old woman was charged with battery, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest after police stopped her while she was walking through people’s backyards in the 4200 block of 96th Street.     Breanna M. Delvalle, of Bridgeview, was arrested at 5:12 p.m. May 15. She allegedly refused to be handcuffed and kicked an

officer in the hand. ***     A 23-year-old man was reportedly charged with DUI and improper lane usage after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 6200 block of 95th Street.     Todd David Rose, of Palos Heights, was arrested at 12:59 a.m. May 9. ***     A 31-year-old woman was charged with possession of drug equipment after she was allegedly found asleep behind the wheel of a car in a McDonald’s parking lot, 10549 S. Cicero Ave.     Tiffany L. Thompson, of Hickory Hills, was arrested at 10:19 a.m. May 10. She reportedly possessed four syringes and a cotton ball. ***     A 47-year-old man was charged with retail theft after he allegedly took two packages of Tide detergent and a bottle of Grand Marnier with a collective retail value of $41 from a store in the 9400 block of Pulaski Road.     Bernard Dabney, of Chicago, was arrested at 1:51 a.m. May 12. ***     A 24-year-old woman was charged with retail theft after she allegedly took children’s clothing with a retail value of $31 from a store in the 4100 block of 95th Street.     Jasmyne L. Howell, of Chicago, was arrested at 1:10 p.m. May 11. ***     Theft from a motor vehicle was reported at 5:16 p.m. May 15 in the 8700 block of Cicero Avenue. A purse containing $150 and a credit card was reportedly taken. ***     Residential burglary was reported at 1:35 p.m. May 15 at a garage in the 5900 block of 99th Street. Tools worth $1,625 were reportedly taken.

Palos Hills     A 30-year-old man was charged with DUI, possession of a controlled substance, transportation of open alcohol and improper lane usage after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 10900 block of Roberts Road.     Andrezej Stoch, of Burbank, was arrested at 10 p.m. May 15. He possessed two open cans of beer and a plastic bag containing 2 grams of cocaine, police said. ***     A 47-year-old woman was reportedly charged with endangering the life and health of a child, driving with a suspended license and failure to wear a seatbelt after police stopped the vehicle she was driving in the 9700 block of 81st Avenue.     Donna Hanahan, of Hickory Hills, was arrested at 8 p.m. May 16. A small child was sitting on her lap as she drove, police said. ***     A 33-year-old man was charged

with telephone harassment and electronic harassment after he allegedly sent phone calls, text messages and emails to a female starting on May 13.     Dan Katula, of Chicago Ridge, was arrested at 11:30 a.m. May 17. ***     A 19-year-old woman was charged with criminal damage to property after she allegedly scratched a squad car parked at Stagg High School, 8015 W. 111th St.     Madeline Neufeld, of Palos Park, was arrested at 2 p.m. May 15. ***     Criminal damage to a vehicle was reported at 9 a.m. May 16 in the 10300 block of Roberts Road. The left front tire on a vehicle had been cut. ***     Criminal damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:30 a.m. May 18 in the 8200 block of Holly Court. The front and rear driver’s-side windows were reported broken. ***     Criminal damage to property was reported at 6:50 a.m. May 19 in the 9900 block of 81st Avenue. A mailbox was reportedly damaged.

Worth     A 19-year-old man was reportedly charged with DUI, improper turn, improper lane usage and leaving the scene of an accident after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 7200 block of 112th Place.     Mark A. Bromley II, of Worth, was arrested at 6:11 p.m. May 16. ***     A 44-year-old woman was reportedly charged with driving with a suspended license, speeding and no insurance after police stopped the vehicle she was driving in the 10700 block of Ridgeland Avenue.     Christina Garcia, of Bridgeview, was arrested at 10:39 a.m. May 15. ***     A 30-year-old man was reportedly charged with no valid driver’s license and obstructed windshield after police stopped the vehicle he was driving in the 6800 block of 107th Street.     Juan C. Lopez, of Worth, was arrested at 10:13 a.m. May 17. ***     A 16-year old Chicago Ridge boy was reportedly charged with criminal trespass to real property and resisting a peace officer after police found him asleep at the Metra train station, 11000 S. Depot Avenue. The boy allegedly fought with officers and refused to listen to them. Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

‘Orland Ghost Rider’ gets 18-month stint for wild ride

Jack & Pat’s SALE DATES: May 23rd - May 29th

sign and playground equipment, police said. ***     Theft from a motor vehicle was reported at 7:10 p.m. May 19 in the 9100 block of 83rd Court. Twenty-five CDs worth $50, a camera worth $30, a tool belt, sunglasses, $20 in change, and prescription medication including two sample bottles of Benicar, 60 methylphenidate pills, 45 methodone pills, and 15 effexor pills were reportedly taken from the vehicle.

By Jeff Vorva

Fancy Boneless

Sizzle Steaks

$

369 Lb.

Boneless Marinated

Pork Stix

$

4

59 Lb.

Fancy Boneless

Butterfly Pork Chops

$

389 Lb.

Sara Lee Turkey Breast..................$6.09 lb. Jack & Pat’s (Italian Style) Roast Beef.......................$6.49 lb. American Cheese (Yellow) or Pepper Jack Cheese........$4.39 lb. Cheddar Macaroni or Beets & Onions...............$2.59 lb.

    A man who gave himself the nickname “Orland Ghost Rider” was sentenced to 18 months in prison on May 14.     Justin C. Jachimiec, 23, of Orland Park, was sentenced after he pled guilty to two charges of aggravated fleeing and eluding police, which are both felonies.     Jachimiec was arrested March 19, 2012 after a four-month investigation. On Nov. 19, 2011, there were multiple complaints

of a person driving a motorcycle recklessly in the 7300 block of Wheeler Drive. Witnesses said he disobeyed stop signs and drove over lawns. Police said they observed him riding on one wheel and taunted officers as he drove by them. He refused to stop for the officers and fled the scene.     After an investigation, police learned Jachimiec was wearing a camera on his helmet and videotaped the incident and downloaded the video to YouTube under the names “Orland

LEGAL NOTICE

Ghost Rider” and “wheelerdrivebandit.”     Officers said they saw the same cyclist on 159th Street and La Grange Road on March 13, 2012 and said he was recklessly driving in and out of traffic and refused to stop for police. He was said to have done a wheelie for approximately four blocks. The police said they didn’t pursue him at the time for public safety reasons but obtained a search warrant for his home and arrested him on March 14, 2012. Police said the motorcycle he was driving was stolen from the home in Laona, Wis., on June 19, 2011.     Jachimiec was sentenced by Cook County Circuit Court Associate Judge Carmen Aguilar at the 5th District Courthouse in Bridgeview.

Oak Lawn cops earn command stripes at NU     Oak Lawn police Sgts. Martin McGrath and Patrick Barron have graduated from the School of Police Staff and Command at Northwestern University.     Both sergeants have successfully completed the 10-week Staff and Command program held in Plainfield from Jan. 7 to May 17. The program, implemented by the Center for Public Safety in 1983, has graduated more than 10,000 students both nationally and internationally.


Thursday, May 23, 2013 The Reporter

3

What do you say? Are you concerned about the Blackhawks being down 2-1 to the Detroit Red Wings in the Western Conference semifinals of the Stanley Cup playoffs?

Steve Crescent, Crete     “I’m a big Chicago fan, and I’ve been following the Hawks this whole season. I hope they win.�

(Asked Tuesday at Lake Katherine in Palos Heights)

Nell Donnelly, Palos Heights     “The Hawks might be down, but their loss will give them the energy and inspiration they need to come back and win the series against the Red Wings. They’re the best team!�

Michael Gonzalez, Alsip     “They have the chance to win. The Chicago people support their teams. Once the Blackhawks are back in their stadium, they will have their cheering fans.�

Matt Porter, Mokena     “With their game last night and all the people jumping off the bandwagon, they are misguided. Three of their shots hit the goal post — they were awfully close. They played better than their score would indicate. It’s not time to panic.�

Lill Stark, Chicago     “I’m not concerned about their game against the Red Wings. It’s a wakeup call for them. They need to play more physically.�

Palos man thanks public works for job on broken water main By Kelly White Correspondent     The Palos Hills Public Works Crew is being commended by a resident for its response during a water main break in mid-January on Loveland Lane.     Ronald Mika wrote a letter to Palos Hills Mayor Jerry Bennett and the Public Works Department that was read aloud by Alderman Mark Brachman (2nd Ward) at the Palos Hills City Council’s committee meeting held April 25.     At that time of the water break in front of Mika’s home in the 8500 block of Loveland, Public Works employees made a temporary repair to the water mane. An inspection of the water main indicated severe corrosion with deep pitting, and Public Works Commissioner Dave Weakley determined another water main

break was imminent.     “We decided to focus our repair efforts to the water main located under and adjacent to the driveway,� Weakley said. “We did not want to go through the cost of removing an expensive concrete driveway.�     In order to replace 40 feet of water main, two 41-year-old, 65-foot maple trees with 42-inch trunks in Mika’s front yard had to be removed. Public works employees then excavated and removed the main while simultaneously installing the new one. Work was reportedly completed in early April.     “The removal of the trees and the replacement of the water mane were accomplished by an extremely professional crew,� Mika stated in his letter. “This crew worked quickly and efficiently to remove the two said trees.�     “Not only did this crew work hard to complete the task at

hand, they were also courteous and sympathetic to my family’s needs and completed the repair with minimal difficulty.�     Mika stated the break was accomplished with little inconvenience to himself, his family or his neighbors.     “This crew should be commended for their work ethic and professional behavior,� he wrote. “It is wonderful to see that there are still people out there that still take pride in their work.�     The cost to complete the repair work was approximately $5,000 including labor. The public works department will be replacing the driveway and repairing the sod damage, which will cost approximately $1,500 for materials and labor. Had the work been completed by an outside contractor Photo by Kevin Coyne the cost would have been double, Worth and the Marrs-Meyer American Legion Post 991 held their annual Memorial Day remembrance Weakley said. Sunday at the Eternal Flame monument, 111th Street an Harlem Avenue.

District 127½ to amend budget By Kevin M. Coyne Correspondent     Chicago Ridge School District 127½ plans to amend its budget to reflect the costs associated with this year’s hiring of 18 paraprofessionals, most of which teach special education.     The proposed amendment amounts to an academic increase in the $16.58 million 2012-13 budget, with money to cover the approximately $275,000 cost being moved into the education fund. The spending increase is so slight the district is not legally obligated to amend the budget, according to District 127½ business manager Sue Liston     “I wanted to amend the budget because we are not sure what we’ll get for federal funding and we didn’t expect to hire so many

paraprofessionals, especially for special education,â€? said Distirict 127½ business manager Sue Liston. “This year, after we made the budget we ended up hiring quite a few paraprofessionals and I wanted the budget to reflect those changes.â€?     The school board will be scheduled to vote on the amended budget at its meeting June 11.     The district this year rehired 18 paraprofessionals and hired 18 new paraprofessionals, in part because the aides come at a cheaper cost than full-time teachers, Liston explained.     The district has also approved a one-year contract with Crestwoodbased transportation company Sunrise Southwest. Sunrise will increase its fees 1.5 percent next school year, which

will cost the district $7,000 to $8,000 more than it paid this year, not including field trips or special events. The cost increase is related to fuel costs and not knowing whether Sunrise will have to provide health care to its employees, said District 127½ board member Lori Bialczak.     Also on the rise is the cost of hot lunch, which will increase 10 cents next year to $2.45 per meal. The board has determined the 10-cent hike will help balance the budget.

Vets

ceed the event, and described how “we must remember the servicemen and women who fought and died for something larger than themselves.� Harn paid homage to those veterans who may at times be forgotten, and asked the audience to forever remember the gallantry of those who were killed, taken prisoner or missing in action.     Members of the Boy Scouts 668 and Cub Pack 3668 led the Pledge of Allegiance after MarrsMeyer Post 991 Chaplain Christie Jastczemski lead the group in a prayer and moment of silence. After the Worth Girl Scouts Troop 551 presented a heartfelt prayer

(Continued from page 1) and those still serving, is the very least we can do to honor these brave men and women and their families.     “As a congressman, I am committed to being their advocate, fighting to secure the funding our service personnel need and working with our veterans at home to address their individual needs and concerns, it’s a responsibility I feel privileged to have. That’s why events such as the Memorial Day tribute in Worth are so important to me.�     Post 991 Cmdr. John Harn em-

and poem, members of the Worth Village Board and veterans organizations from Palos Heights, Worth and Chicago lead a ceremonial placing of wreaths in remembrance of America’s war dead.     “Usually people that come here are here to pay respects to the dead,� said Martine Cpl. Alexander Pechar, who was deployed in the Far East from 1954 to 1959. “I know what I did in the service and I am proud of my service, this observance is not about what I did, it’s about those who are here to pay their respects and keeping young people aware of what’s going on in the world.�

Supplied Photo

Relay for mom     Anastasia Scourtes (left) and her mother, Chrisoula, who died from cancer in March. Scourtes, a student at Sandburg High School in Orland Park, walked in memory of her mother and in support of her cancer survivor father, and raised more than $4,000 at this year’s Consolidated High School District 230 Relay for Life, the largest student Relay for Life in the country.

SUPERHERO Be A Summer

Correction     The photo that ran with the story “Sandburg girl walks for parents at D230 Relay for Life� in last week’s Reporter did not include the images of Sandburg High School student Anastasia Scourtes and her late mother, Chrisoula. The women in the photo are Conrady Junior High teachers Jackie Hausman and Samantha Liddell.

+..+3!.Äš/ĆŤ.#%*ĆŤ +*ĆŤ.0!/ĆŤ/ĆŤ(+3ĆŤ/

* .9% 7

We Print Newspapers — 15% Discount to New Customers — • 67 years of experience • 149 satisfied publishers • One-day service • Quality Goss presswork • We can print from your Mac or other disks

• Typesetting & layout • 500 to 250,000 copies • We have newsprint & 50 lb. white paper • Pickup & delivery service available

REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. • Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

Hours: Monday thru Friday 9 am - 5 pm • Sat. 9 am - Noon

Call (708) 448-4000

Visit us online: www.regionalprinting.com

a p r

n

5ĆŤ+Ýƍ$%#$ÄĄ%*0!.!/0ĆŤ !0ÄŒĆŤ* ĆŤ/2!ĆŤ+*ĆŤ%*0!.!/0ĆŤ* ĆŤ,5)!*0/

n

),.+2!ĆŤ5+1.ĆŤ$+)!ÄŒĆŤ0'!ĆŤĆŤ20%+*ÄŒĆŤ,5ĆŤ01%0%+*ĆŤ* ĆŤ)+.!

n

+..+3ĆŤ1,ĆŤ0+ĆŤÄ¸Ä‚Ä†ÄŒÄ€Ä€Ä€ĆŤ"+.ĆŤ1,ĆŤ0+ƍĆƍ5!./ÄŒĆŤ%"ĆŤ5+1Äš.!ĆŤĆŤ-1(%Ăź! ĆŤ)!)!.

Call (708) 649-6420 to apply. Offer ends June 29, 2013.

Bank on the Difference. www.centralcu.org ÄˆÄ€Ä‰ÄĄÄ‡Ä…ÄŠÄĄÄ‡Ä…Ä‚Ä€ĆŤĆŤÄ‘ĆŤĆŤ4Ä?ĆŤÄˆÄ€Ä‰ÄĄÄ‡Ä…ÄŠÄĄÄ‡Ä…Ä…ÄŠĆŤ ĊĉĆĀƍÄ‹ĆŤÄ Ä†ÄŠ0$ĆŤ0.!!0ÄŒĆŤ.(* ĆŤ.'ÄŒĆŤ ĆŤÄ‡Ä€Ä…Ä‡Äˆ

!)!./$%,ĆŤ%/ĆŤ+,!*ĆŤ0+ĆŤ.!/% !*0/ĆŤ +"ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ#.!0!.ĆŤ$%#+(* ĆŤ.!Ä‹

*APR may vary based on creditworthiness. To take advantage of the listed rate, you must apply by June 29, 2013 and disburse your loan by July 15, 2013. Loans are repayable in equal monthly installments over the term of the loan. Example: Monthly payment on a $15,000 loan at 7.9% APR for 60 months is $303.49. Total finance charge: $3,209.15. Total loan cost: $18,209.15.


4

The Reporter Thursday, May 23, 2013

Our Neighborhood Palos Hills, D230 collaborate on how to combat heroin use By Kelly White Correspondent

Submitted Photo

Hero’s welcome     Shepard High School student Jeremy Sears welcomes home a U.S. military veteran at Midway Airport at an Honor Flight Chicago event. Honor Flight Chicago allows veterans to travel for free for a day in Washington, D.C., and high school students joined the veterans’ family and friends to welcome them back.     Although a storm extended an already long night nearly three hours, students enrolled in Shepard’s Air Force Junior ROTC program greeted returning veterans with handshakes, warm smiles, and gratitude. Maj. Dan Johnson and Chief Bill Foster, the aeronautical science instructors at Shepard, have made attending Honor Flight Chicago a priority for their students.     Honor Flight Chicago allows veterans to spend the day in the nation’s capital touring historic sites, memorials, and other pop-

ular venues. The organization flies veterans and an accompanying friend or family member to Washington — the experience

Races for all ages Sunday in Beverly     The Beverly Area Planning Association will hold the 36th annual Ridge Run on Monday, May 27.     Start times are 8 a.m. for the 10K, 8:10 a.m. for the Dick O’Neill Youth Mile, and 9:30 a.m. for the 5K run. Races start and finish at Ridge Park, 96th Street and Longwood Drive, where there will be refreshments and information from race sponsors. A free Tot Trot will be held for children up to 6 years old in the park at 10:15 a.m.     Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers of Evergreen Park returns as the Ridge Run presenting sponsor, providing medical personnel for race day emergency attention and blood pressure checks and other activities for race participants and spectators in the Little Company of Mary Hospital Family Services tent.     Participants in the 5K and 10K will all receive Dry Tech t-shirts, and youth mile-runners will receive cotton shirts. Prize money is awarded to the top three overall men and ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital® Memorial and Honor P.O. Box 1000 Dept. 174 Memphis, TN 38148-0174 800-276-8340 www.stjude.org/tribute

W e ’r eOPEN

MEMORIAL DAY

women in the 10K and 5K races.     The Ridge Run Challenge offers special recognition to runners who sign up for and complete both the 5K and 10K. New this year is an untimed 5K walk and the Middle of the Pack Winner — the latter being male and female runners in the 5K and 10K whose results are in the exact middle. Those two runners will receive a free pair of running shoes donated by Saucony and Running Excels. Running and walking teams are welcome to participate, and families who register in advance can receive a discount. Registration is available at bapa. orrg/ridgerun.     Advance packet pick-up and registration will be held at Ridge Park, 97th Street and Longwood Drive, from noon to 7 p.m. Friday, May 24;11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 25; and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 26. Race day registration will open 6:30 a.m., with 10K and youth mile registration closing at 7:30 a.m. and 5K registration closing at 9 a.m.     Entry fees through May 26 are $35 for timed 5K, $30 for untimed 5K, $40 for 10K, $60 for 5K/10K, and $15 for Youth Mile. Race day entry fees are $5 more for each race. The fee for active military with ID is $15.     Proceeds from the Ridge Run benefit the Beverly Area Planning Association, a not-for-profit civic organization serving the Beverly/ Morgan Park neighborhood of Chicago since 1947. For more information email ridgerun@bapa.org.

    An increase in heroin use among suburban youths has prompted area public officials to discuss the possibility of implementing drug prevention programs.     Consolidated High School District 230 in January 2012 sent a letter to students’ homes after a Stagg High School student overdosed on the powerful opiate, asking parents for their help and awareness. The letter informed parents of “...disturbing stories about dangerous and sometimes deadly behavior in which teens in the south suburbs have been engaging, including underage drinking and law enforcement concerns over the increase in availability of drugs, particularly heroin.”     “That January, we began working closely with our police department and began forming student, parent and staff educational programs,” Stagg Principal Eric Olsen told the Palos Hills City Council on April 25. “We took a risk as a school by announcing that we have a problem, but it was something that needed to be done in order to come to a solution.”     District 230 officials believe drug and alcohol use among students has decreased since the incident, but they and city officials are not satisfied with the numbers. Stagg recorded 26 drug- or alcohol-related incidents in 2012, including nine in which students were reprimanded for being under the influence of drugs includes meals — for the day at or alcohol, and one involving a no cost. Veterans depart Mid- student caught in possession of way early in the morning and alcohol. The number of incidents return in the evening. decreased to 15 in 2013, with 10 students caught under the influence of drugs or alcohol, Olsen said. Duty,     Three persons between 19 Honor, and 36 years old have fatally overdosed on heroin in the past Country year, said Palos Hills Police Chief     Air Force Airman 1st Class Jacob Paul Madigan. The most common P. Kozlowski has graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntoTHE nio-Lackland in San Antonio.    Kozlowski completed an eight-week program that included training in military disci- 50 years ago pline and studies, Air Force core May 23, 1963 values, physical fitness, and basic     Vandals destroyed 35 glass warfare principles and skills. Air- blocks and stole baseball equipmen who complete basic training ment from the Oak Lawn Boys earn four credits toward an associate Baseball field house at 98th in applied science degree through Street and Central Avenue. Rethe Community College of the Air pairs could reportedly cost up to $1,000. Force. ***     Kozlowski is the son of Deborah Kozlowski of Hometown, and     Eleven truckloads of debris grandson of Anselmo Zuniga of were dumped onto the AmeriHickory Hills. He is a 2005 gradu- can Legion Memorial Park in ate of Brother Rice High School in the center of Oak Lawn. Legion officials believe construcChicago. tion crews from a nearby road project dumped the debris at the site. The flag at the site was flying at half-mast to protest the desecration. The park features a flagpole and a World     Share Your Soles, a nonprofit War II tank. group that collects gently-used and new shoes for persons in impover- 25 years ago ished nations, will hold its 14th an- May 26, 1988 niversary Gala on Saturday, June     Palos Hills Police Chief Daniel 29 at Alhambra Place, 1240 W. Hurley resigned after serving 13½ Randolph St. in Chicago. years with the department.     Tickets are $100 per person *** (tables of 10 are $90 per person),     Sixteen students from rubut will increase to $125 after Sat- ral Bayeux, France, spent two urday, May 25. Gala will feature weeks living and studying with complimentary beer and wine from students at Stagg High School. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., as well as food, The students went dancing and music and live entertainment. shopping, visited Chicago, and

This week in REPORTER history News and events from our archives

Share Your Soles 14th annual Gala

SHIRLEYS PLACE A n ti q u e s C o ll e c ti b le s G if ts

5 New Vendors!

See New Collections of TEA CUP PIN CUSHIONS

PARKING IN FRONT & REAR

users of heroin are high school students, but abuse of the narcotic is not limited to that age group, he added.     The drug began being distributed in powder form in the area about two or three years ago, according to Madigan.     “This is something we haven’t seen in a while; however, it’s cheaper and more easily accessible to our young people,” he said. “And, the problem with the powder form of heroin is that more of it is often needed in order to get high than the injected form, so these young people are taking a lot more than they should be and overdosing.”     The powder form of heroin is 80 percent pure on average, and sells for $20 to $25 dollars for a small bag, Madigan said.     “As recently as last week, we had another arrest with a person carrying enough heroin to distribute,” he told the council. “Now, we are questioning where they are buying the heroin from, and the most common response we are receiving is the west side of Chicago.”     The Police Department has taken a proactive approach by sending officers into Chicago to pose as potential drug-buyers. Once a transaction is made, an arrest is made on the street, Madigan explained. Still, even with the arrests of accused drug dealers, Madigan believes the project must be addressed on other fronts.     “The biggest problem is that the parents of teenagers who are using heroin are often in denial,” he said. “If your children are using heroin, you have to get them professional help. You cannot turn your head or think that this is something that can be solved within the walls of your own home.”     Palos Hills Alderman Joe Marrotta (4th Ward) has suggested the city establish a volunteer committee that would function as a support group for teenagers

GIF CERTIFICT AVAILABATES LE

Shirley’s Place on Harlem in Palos Heights

12343 S. Harlem Avenue • ShirleyNeumann@sbcglobal.net Open 7 Days A Week 10:30 - 5:30 • Evening Hours By Appointment

struggling with or trying to overcome drug addiction. State Rep. Kelly Burke (D-35, Evergreen Park) is working with District 230 on these educational programs informing students, parents and staff on drug prevention.     The Parent Education Programs at Stagg offered throughout the school year have had low turnouts even with multiple attempts to reach out to parents prior to the sessions, Olsen said. Programs have included information sessions on drug awareness and prevention and internet safety and cyber bullying, he added.     “Educating our parents is essential and by far the hardest thing to do,” he said.     In October 2012, through a partnership with the Robert Crown Center designed to enhance drug awareness and prevention efforts, all of the Stagg High School staff was trained by the Robert Crown Center staff on health lessons, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Olsen reported that every school in District 230, which also includes Sandburg High School in Orland Park, has a substance abuse coordinator that serves as a link and a liaison between the school and treatment centers such as Rosecrans Rehab.     Stagg also holds a monthly Law Enforcement Mega Meeting, at which members of the Police Department and representatives of Stagg discuss any drug use among students. Once a student is discovered using drugs, there is a meeting held with the dean, a member of the Police Department, the school’s substance abuse coordinator, one of the student’s teachers, the student and at least one parent. Possession of drugs on school property or being under the influence during school time results in a 10-day suspension that will be reduced to a five-day boot if the student’s (Continued on page 7)

Our Children

met Palos Hills Mayor Gerry Bennett.

10 years ago

May 22, 2003     A Hickory Hills man died of a self-inflicted stab wound May 20 after he fled from police in his missing wife’s car. Thomas Yohe, 46, died May 20. His wife, Martha McLees, 44, was reported missing May 18. She was last seen at 8 p.m. May 18 near LaGrange.

    Worthwoods School students Hiba Amara and Isabella Ramirez won medals for hula hooping the longest during a monthly dance and game day for students that filled their reading calendars.

Our Neighbors

***     Two women suffered minor injuries May 19 after the car in which they were riding crashed into Schmaedeke Funeral Home     Judy Hoffin Worth during a visitation serman of Palos vice. Hills has been     The driver veered off of Har- recognized for lem Avenue, through the park- her volunteer ing lot and crashed through the efforts at Brookfuneral home’s front entryway. field Zoo, where The driver and her passenger she has worked were transported to the hospital. as a volunteer for 10 years. No one inside the funeral home *** was injured. Some landscaping     Former Illinois state Sen. Edward was damaged and a flower pot Maloney will receive an honorary was thrown through the funeral doctorate from Saint Xavier Univerhome’s custom made mahoga- sity and deliver the commencement ny doors from the force of the addresses at the university’s spring crash. commencement on Saturday, May 11. The undergraduate ceremony is scheduled for 10 a.m. in the Shannon Center at the University’s Chicago campus, 3700 W. 103rd St.     Maloney, a lifelong resident of the Beverly area, represented the The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares state’s 18th District from 2003 to with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include 2013. He was elected to the Illiall digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must nois Senate where his top legislainclude all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of tive priorities focused on providing the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9. better educational opportunities for Illinois students, enhancing the lives of senior citizens, and protecting communities through support of police and fire personnel. Maloney chaired the Higher Education Committee and fought to maintain MAP grant funding for financially vulnerable college students. He was also a member of the Illinois Team of Complete College America, the Higher Education Finance Study Commission, and co-chair of the Legislative Education Caucus.     Maloney spent 28 years as a teacher, coach, counselor and volunteer at Oak Lawn High School, and seven years as assistant principal and dean of faculty at Brother Rice High School. He also was an area manager and deputy director of professional development for the Chicago Park District. He has been a member of the Saint Xavier School of Education Advisory Board since (Solution on page 11) 2003.

SUDOKU


Thursday, May 23, 2013 The Reporter

schools

5

Honors, perfect attendance at St. Bernadette academy     The following St. Bernadette Catholic Academy students made the honor roll for the second trimester of the 2012-13 school year. High Honors Eighth grade     Kaylin Dean, Victoria Krummick, Kaitlyn O’Connell and Falon Young. Seventh grade     Elvira Alexander. Sixth grade     Layla Brown. Fifth grade     Anna Fitpatrick, Kathleen Jacobson and Joseph Sullivan. Honors Eighth Grade     Emma Hughes and Emily Stepansky. Seventh Grade     Caroline Dwyer and Joelle Gillespie. Sixth Grade     Asha Clark, Erin Gessert, Ryan Jenkins, Jalon Jones, Steve

Santiago, Colleen Schmit, Imani Sykes, Amari Thomas and Alexander Wigsmoen. Fifth Grade     Jessica Krummick, Hannah O’Neill, Annabel Viravec and Ja’Niya Williams.     The following St. Bernadette students achieved perfect attendance for the second trimester of the 2012-13 school year. Preschool     Phoebe Mueller. Kindergarten     Caitlon Young. First and Second Grade     Andrew Viravec. Third and Fourth Grade     Reginald Sykes III and Noah Zukowski. Fifth and Sixth Grade     Lourdes Andrews, Jalon Jones and Imani Sykes. Seventh and Eighth Grade     Angelo Castro, Kaylin Dean and Victoria Krummick.

Bulletin Board Evergreen Park Dist. 124

and water polo.     Music camps for guitar and fiddle are taught by McAuley orchestra director Hannah Lawson. Kathy Gordon Davis, fine arts department chairperson will head the two-week Art Camp. Kids Kamp, a three-week camp with more than a 25-year history, will be run by McAuley auditorium manager Patricia Haynes. A staff of theatre, dance and music Mother McAuley professionals will work with the     Mother McAuley High School students throughout the weeks. will hold summer camps for     For detailed camp descriptions, grammar school and McAuley dates, times and appropriate age students. Camps include includ- groups visit mothermcauley.org ing 13 for sports, two for music, and look for the Summer Camp one art camp and the Theatre Information link. “Kids Kamp.” ***     Athletic camps are taught by     Mother McAuley Liberal Arts McAuley coaches. Sports include High School offers summer basketball, bowling, dance, diving, camps. golf, lacrosse, running, soccer, soft-     Grammar school and current ball, swimming, tennis, volleyball (Continued on page 7)     School District 124 provides free vision, hearing, speech, language, basic concepts knowledge, and fine and gross motor skills screenings for children 3 to 5 years old who are not yet in kindergarten. Children eligible can qualify for special programs. For more information call Jean Hector at 423-0951, Ext. 2140.

Submitted Photo

Astros inducted

    More than 25 students from Shepard High School met the rigorous qualifications for induction into Delta Epsilon Phi, the national honor society for students of German.     Shepard students qualifying for induction into Delta Epsilon Phi for the first time included Zach Abbott, Casey Bledsoe, Joseph Brewer, Jordyn Czarny, Logan Dolehide, Michael Evancich, Brandon Faro, Nathaniel Gibson, Traverse Jarman, David Jones, Francisco Juarez, Aleksander Kowalkowski, Konrad Ksiazek, Alexis Lyons, Kiersten Mahler, Enrique Montoya, Mariana Reyes and Sarah Wandachowicz.     Students qualifying for the second straight year included Tristan Busch, Julia Fischer, and Janek Wasag. Students qualifying for the third straight year included Alexandria Albrecht, Jordan Loman, Jamie Pieroth, Tyler Strejc, and Kendal Wigboldy.

Emmy-winning journalist to speak at Northwestern College commencement     Emmy Award winning reporter Anita Padilla of WFLD FOX 32 Chicago will be the 2013 commencement speaker for Northwestern College’s ceremony to be held June 28 at the Arie Crown Theater at McCormick Place.     Padilla, born and raised in Waukegan, is a 24-year media veteran who has worked in New York, Florida and the Quad Cities. She has covered news in Chicago for the past 16 years, and came to FOX 32 News in 2007 when she joined the network’s morning team at Good Day Chicago. This will be the first commencement address of her career.     Padilla graduated from Waukegan East High School and follow-

ing her parents’ divorce moved to Wisconsin with her mother. She attended the University of Wisconsin for two years, but after the death of her mother left college and returned to Illinois where she worked two jobs including a $6-an-hour gig as a cashier at a car dealership and another job with the Lake County Clerk’s Office. It was while working at the car dealership that Anita had her first exposure to media when she was invited to cut a radio commercial on behalf of the dealership. Shortly thereafter she enrolled in the broadcast journalism program at Columbia College in Chicago. She attended school while working two jobs

College Grads     Megan Mazurowski of Evergreen Park has graduated from Kansas University with a bachelor’s degree in occupational studies. ***     Amanda Vanoskey Greska has graduated Magna Cum Laude with a bachelor’s degree in forensic chemistry from Western Illinois University in Macomb. Greska was named the department scholar, an honor given to the top student in the chemistry department. ***     Michael Grigsby of Evergreen Park has graduated from McKendree University in Lebanon with a bachelor’s degree in health and wellness. McKendree, on May 11, held its 173rd commencement exercises during ceremonies for undergraduate and graduate students who atSubmitted Photo tend the Lebanon campus. ***     The following area students graduated from Hendrix College     Twenty-one fourth- and fifth-graders at Southeast School in Evergreen Park participated in on May 11 at the school’s 129th the school’s inaugural Geographic Bee. Fourth-graders Mani Onyango and Darien Parker cruised commencement ceremony. through to the Extreme Geography Round where Onyango was victorious.     Emily Depre of Oak Lawn re    Other students who competed were Grace Beyer, Colin Brennan, Kelly Cobia, Tessa Foley, ceived bachelor’s degree in studio Nick Garcia, Emmett Graylee, Courteney Hoover, Kyra Horton, Daniel Huerta, Nicholas Jacobs, art, and Paul Depre Jr. of Oak Thomas Jacobs, Dillon Leonard, Sarah Meyer, Mani Onyango, Daniel Oscik, Darien Parker, Grace Lawn received a bachelor’s degree Peart, Harrison Ramsey, Brooke Scanlon, Victoria Templin and Rachel Witte. in economics.

and thus it took her four years to complete the last two years of her degree.     The two most riveting assignments of Anita’s career have been her extensive coverage of the Drew Peterson murder trial out of Bolingbrook as well as the widespread coverage of the federal trial of Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, including coverage of the day he left for prison. Among her many achievements she counts her exclusive interviews with Cicero Mayor Betty Loren-Maltese on the day of her racketeering conviction and again when she was sentenced to eight years in federal prison. Another achievement was her coverage

of the explosion of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island, where she was the first reporter to interview Gov. George Pataki live from the scene as he got out of a helicopter.     Anita has won two Emmy Awards during her career. Her first came in 1995 while she was in Florida and was awarded for her Breaking News Coverage of an armed robbery and carjacking in Orlando by a murderer, with Anita being the first reporter to go on air with the story. Five years later she earned another Emmy in 2000 for her role in a New Year’s Eve Millennium celebration while at WMAQ Channel 5 in Chicago.

Campus L eaders     The following area residents made the dean’s list at Illinois Wesleyan University for the spring 2013 semester. Sarah Menke and Thomas Simmons, both of Evergreen Park; James Connolly and Paul Schall, both of Hickory Hills; Lizzie Egan and Kate Ford, both of Oak Lawn; and Spencer Rzeszutko and Erica Vrkljan, both of Palos Hills. ***     The following area residents made the dean’s list for the spring 2013 semester at the University

of St. Francis in Joliet.     David Dickey and Philip Rizzo, both of Evergreen Park; Michael Calandriello, Mateusz Gorecki, Kenneth Mason, Lee Phillips and Arthur Stringham, all of Oak Lawn; Kamil Buczek, Shaun McMillin and Mary Sanders, all of Palos Hills; and Jayne Joyce of Worth. ***     Victoria Dellorto of Worth and Mary Pattara of Oak Lawn made the dean’s list for the spring 2013 semester at the University of Evansville.

The bee team

Wildcats rewarded

Submitted Photo

    Worthwoods School May Gold Slip students Malina Atiq and Giselle Gallegos are the school’s Wildcat Reward Bucks this month. Gold Slips are awarded each month to students who go above and beyond the regular expectations of good grades and doing their homework on time with such actions as helping others without being asked, being polite, and holding a door open for someone. Gold Slip winners earn reward bucks that are placed into a raffle, and two winners are chosen and prizes are awarded. Seen here with the students is Worthwoods Principal, Mr. Tim Hathhorn.

D IDSI SCCOOUUNN TT RRAT ATEESS withoutdiscount discount service. without service.

It’s accident no accidentmore morepeople people trust It’s no trustState StateFarm. Farm.

Jazzin’ to the title

ErikR RNelson, Nelson, Agent Agent Erik 10200S SRoberts Roberts Road Road 10200 Palos PalosHills, Hills,ILIL60465-1539 60465-1539 Bus: Bus:708-430-7575 708-430-7575 erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com

Submitted Photo

    The Oak Lawn-Hometown Middle School jazz band won the Division 1 title at State Competition held May 4 at Joliet Junior College. The band qualified to compete at the state contest by earning a first place rating at district contest in March. Judges commented that the band was “very professional” and were impressed with the students’ solos.

P040036 P040036 02/04 02/04

StateFarm FarmMutual Mutual Automobile Insurance Company in NJ), Bloomington, IL State Automobile Insurance Company (Not in (Not NJ), Bloomington, IL


6

The Reporter

Thursday, May 23, 2013

commentary The

Reporter

An Independent Newspaper Amy Richards Publisher

Jason Maholy Editor

Published Weekly Founded March, 16, 1960

In Other Words

Don’t fence me in By William A. Collins No job now, Provides the pay, To let me find, A place to stay.     Many folks with big incomes are responding to the tensions of America’s growing economic inequality by moving into gated communities. This isn’t new, just growing more common. Ten percent of us are already gated in one way or another.     The recession has added further impetus to the nation’s housing challenges both inside and outside those gates. Foreclosures aren’t as common as they were a few years ago when the housing bubble burst, but they’re still converting more homeowners into renters. And the dwindling of the middle class keeps countless emerging young adults from ever gaining their own place.     Veterans, whom we once supported with yellow magnets, are frequently the worst off. The overall veteran homelessness rate declined last year, but the rate for Iraq and Afghanistan vets doubled between 2010 and 2012. Those former troops — many of whom returned with fearsome disabilities — are too often homeless and hopeless with no avenue into the commercial housing market     And commercial is exactly what our housing market has

become. It aims mostly at upper-income buyers these days, since that’s where the money is. The old mass housing market that blossomed during the middle class’s 20th-century heyday is but a distant memory.     Federal housing subsidies, meanwhile, also smile more warmly upon the rich. The federal government spends more on housing programs that benefit households earning $100,000 or more per year than on people who make less than that — and presumably are the ones who really need help. That includes $35 billion right off the top that goes to families with over $200,000 in income just for their mortgage interest tax deduction. Renters need not apply.     The result of these various trends is that the prosperous are further isolating themselves physically, as well as economically, from the rest of us. And as more and more people lose their homes or fail to transition from renting to owning, they’re building up less equity. That will haunt them in later life when the chasm between haves and have-nots will continue to widen unless we change course.

Inside the First Amendment

Graduation prayer, fighting over a lost cause By Charles C. Haynes     School officials in Lake City, Arkansas have come up with a novel solution to the fight over prayer at graduation:     No prayer, no graduation.     On May 6, the school board voted to cancel sixth-grade graduation at Lake City’s two elementary schools. The action came soon after the district received a complaint letter from the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) objecting to prayers at previous graduations.     Rather than drop the prayers, the district opted to drop the entire ceremony.     The decision appears to be popular in the community. For many Christians in the predominately Christian community, no graduation is better than graduation without prayers.     A group of Christian parents have come up with plan B: Privatize graduation by organizing a graduation ceremony at a local church where participants can pray as much as they like.

    No word yet on what parents and students of minority faiths or those with no religious affiliation will do on graduation day.     Meanwhile in Georgia, Houston County school officials also got a letter from FFRF demanding an end to prayers and religious music at the high school graduation.     The district is forging ahead with plans for a high school graduation ceremony — but minus the devotional content.     Needless to say, many conservative Christians in Houston County are angered by the change. Stripping the prayers and hymns from the ceremony is an “attack on Christianity,” one local pastor told Fox News.     What’s remarkable about these prayer conflicts (and we have them every May) is that some local school districts are still fighting about prayers at graduation twenty-one years after the U.S. Supreme Court declared the practice unconstitutional (Lee v. Weisman, 1992).     Every year, advocacy

groups uncover school districts, typically in rural, religiously homogenous communities, that continue to practice a form of civil disobedience by including prayers and devotional music in their graduation ceremonies. And every year, school districts breaking the law are made to uphold it.     Defending school-sponsored prayers at graduation is a lost cause, as Lake City and Houston County school officials can testify. But prayer doesn’t have to be banished from the graduation experience altogether.     First and foremost, communities are free to hold Baccalaureate services during graduation weekend with as many prayers as they choose. As long as such services are privately sponsored, the school can announce the event and even allow it to be held in the school (on the same basis as other community groups use school facilities in non-school hours). Students and teachers are free to attend or not.     It’s also possible that a student speaker at gradu-

ation will offer a prayer. But under current law, such prayers are only legal if the student speaker was chosen by neutral criteria and given primary control of his or her speech (i.e., not reviewed or edited by the school).     If school officials do decide to let students speak freely, they would be wise to put a disclaimer in the program explaining that the speech represents the views of the student, not the school.     But the best way to accommodate prayer at graduation is to let people choose for themselves what, if any, prayers they want to pray by putting a “moment of silence” on the program.     After all, the decision to pray or not to pray is a matter of conscience — and not the business of any school or state. Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Education Project at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. Web: firstamendmentcenter.org. Email: chaynes@ freedomforum.org<mailto: chaynes@freedomforum.org>.

   OtherWords columnist William A. Collins is a former state representative and a former mayor of Norwalk, Connecticut. OtherWords.org

Letters to the Editor Thanks for saying it

Dear Editor:     Thank you for printing the Bartosh column in the May 9 Reporter, “Your right to Say No More.”     It is frustrating to hear so much politically correct media propaganda and when anyone dares to remark otherwise, politely (as did Chris Broussard) or sarcastically, they are bashed and ridiculed as intolerant by the same not-so-tolerant media. Kathy Pouslen Mt. Greenwood

Remember the fallen

Dear Editor:     Memorial Day is a day we remember and honor our departed loved ones. It was a tradition in our family to gather at Resurrection Cemetery to visit family members and even picnic there every Sunday. My earliest memory is at age 3 when my grandmother passed away. I have a picture of myself sitting on her headstone. As told to me by my cousin, she and I danced around the graves. Our parents would give us pennies as we made the loved ones happy. Today we visit often but no dancing only flowers.     Memorial Day also brings

a memory of gathering at my parents’ home for a barbecue. Although they have been gone a long time I can still see Dad barbecuing chicken and ribs as Mom made the salads. Nothing was ever complete unless there was dessert and my sister provided the most delicious cheesecake. I envision the whole family in their heavenly home preparing a feast for Memorial Day weekend with special guests Jesus and His family. Undoubtedly, Jesus will provide the wine. Happy memories do light the corners of your mind and warm your heart. Marlene Jeziorski Oak Lawn    The Reporter Newspaper

encourages letters to the editor.    Letters must be 350 words or less.  Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Writers must also include their address and telephone number for verification, but that information will not be published and will remain otherwise confidential. Mail letters to the editor to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 or e-mail us at thereporter@comcast.net

Another Perspective

Arrogance is Obama’s worst enemy By Rick Manning     The Obama Administration felt the backlash from liberal media sources this past week and appears to be reeling from a sudden realization that they aren’t in Kansas anymore.     First it was Jon Stewart, whose Comedy Central “news” broadcast is must see tv for many of Obama’s under 30 voter base. While dismissing Benghazi, Stewart goes apoplectic on Obama over the IRS and then breaking Associated Press investigations scandals.     Next, “the don’t blame me” defense fell flat with an unlikely source — MSNBC host Chris Matthews.     Matthews, who served in the Carter Administration and for six years as a top staffer for former House Speaker Tip O’Neill, reminded viewers and perhaps Obama himself that, “He does run the IRS. He runs the Treasury Department. He runs the United States government, and he is accountable for it, and this is nonsensical.”     No solace for the Obama spin machine in that normally reliable, if little watched, outpost of the far left.     The week ended with venerable liberal old line CBS journalist Bob Schieffer stunning the White House by demanding to know, “why are you here?” of White House advisor Dan Pfeiffer who was making the Sunday show rounds, Susan Rice-

style, giving the designated talking points.     Schieffer, who has covered his share of White House scandals expressed frustration and a bit of pent up outrage that Pfeiffer was replaying the role Susan Rice played in the wake of Benghazi where he reminded viewers, “The bottom line is what she told the American people that day bore no resemblance to what had happened on the ground in an incident where four Americans were killed.”     In one week, Obama’s scandal defense got sideswiped by every component of the liberal media spin machine: the primary voice to the low information young voters, bad information far left voters, and a respected messenger to the too-lazyto-change-the-channel-forthe-past-twenty-years baby boomer and senior voters.     Quite a trifecta, and the problem Obama faces is that they have no idea how to deal with a now semi-hostile media.     Their experience has been to isolate talk radio and Fox News by demonizing them, and relying on the rest of the media to carry their water.     The past week of hard questions and outright disgust over Obama’s blatant overreaching tactics of dealing with his political enemies has left the liberal media at sea.     Obama was their guy. It was inconceivable that he

could actually be lying.     Over the course of the next couple of weeks, the newly awakened media will be tested as the Administration is attempting to make the CIA the scapegoat in the Benghazi scandal, and the Obama IRS claim that it was isolated to low-level employees at the Cincinnati office gets severely tested.     On Benghazi, it is almost impossible to believe that Obama really wants to take on the CIA, especially since their director at the time is a venerated war hero who had to resign his post for actions that Democrats excused from Bill Clinton.     What are the chances that General Petraeus sets the record straight on what happened during those fateful hours when the apparent inaction of our military led to at least two additional American deaths in Benghazi?     On the IRS front, the revelation that the person responsible for overseeing the targeting of conservative groups is now in charge of the newly minted IRS Obamacare division threatens to become elected Democrats worst nightmare.     An already unpopular Obamacare now has a face. The face of a bureaucrat who saw nothing wrong with implementing obvious politically motivated targeting.     The IRS issue goes to the heart of the basic trust that government depends upon. An abiding faith by the

American people that regardless of political differences government policies will be implemented equally and fairly.     Now, the Obama Administration has thrown away this trust, and every decision made by the IRS, every deployment of their massive new set of agents and every complaint about unfair treatment will be treated with new legitimacy.     Compounding these two issues is the AP wiretapping. Nothing gets the media upset like finding out they were being spied on. This turned cynicism into absolute outrage against Obama as well as fear that Obama was using his hardball tactics against them.     No one expects Jon Stewart, Chris Matthews and Bob Schieffer to have a Damascus Road-like conversion and suddenly run blistering pieces about Obama every night. But Obama has clearly lost the moral high ground forever. A high ground that allowed these three and others like them to avert their eyes from actions that did not fit the liberal narrative.     It is this breached relationship with his media allies that is the greatest threat to Obama’s presidency and legacy, and it is likely that in Obama’s arrogance, he doesn’t even know it. Rick Manning (@rmanning957) is the Vice President of Public Policy & Communications for Americans for Limited Government.


Thursday, May 23, 2013 The Reporter

consumer

7

Flip that house? It may cost $10K in EP By Jessie Molloy Correspondent     Evergreen Park trustees on Monday delayed voting on a proposed ordinance that would require certain home buyers to pay the village an up-front fee of $10,000.     The proposed ordinance would pertain to persons who plan to buy homes, refurbish them and sell them for a profit, a process known as “flipping.” Evergreen Park wants to require buyers who plan to flip homes and never live in them to pay a $10,000 cash bond. Mayor James Sexton said the proposed ordinance’s intent is to ensure any renovation work gets done properly, and to “protect the permanent residents from bad neighbors” who might rent such homes.     Two former Evergreen Park residents objected to the proposal, claiming the fee would create a financial hardship for potential home-flippers and discourage investors from trying to improve the housing stock in a neighborhood. Stephen and Catherine Maier of Palos Park raised the issue during the open public forum portion of the Village Board meeting.     “From my standpoint, I would probably be looking at a $10,000 cash bond as taking away from

Heroin

(Continued from page 4)

family agrees to risk assessment. Distribution of drugs on school property results in a 10-day suspension and a recommendation to the school board for expulsion.     “When we ask the majority of these teenagers caught using heroin, how or why they started using it, the answer is almost always that it began with prescription drug use, like Vicodin,” Olsen said, “The problem the kids have with buying pills is that they are expensive. Once the pills aren’t as easily available, if they are simply taking them from a parent’s medicine cabinet, for example, they then decide to switch to heroin. For them, it’s the next best thing. And, the scariest thing is that these kids all come from good families. There is just a lot of denial out there.”     Olsen reminded residents who may have unused prescription drugs in their home to carefully discard them.     “Sometimes we go in to get a tooth pulled and get prescribed Vicodin, but we may only take

my ability to work on the home I was buying,” Stephen Maier told the board.     Trustees tabled the proposal and directed the village attorney to amend the draft ordinance to guarantee a refund of the bond money within 30 days of the village issuing a “certificate of residence” once all work has been finished and approved. The refunding of the money was not specifically addressed in the proposed ordinance, and Stephen Maier pointed out the language implied the village could keep the money for up to two years.     In other Evergreen Park Village Board news, trustees voted to issue two business licenses. One of the licenses issued will require the village to update the ordinance pertaining to scavenger licenses, which would increase the number of available scavenger licenses from eight to 12. Scavenger licenses are granted to licensed companies businesses can contract for waste disposal or recycling. The license issued Monday went to Homewood Disposal, provided the company pays a $1,000 fee.     The board also issued a license to, Pure Indoor Cycling, which will open an indoor bike park and spin studio at 3354 W. 95th St. one or two of the pills, yet we just leave that bottle sitting in our medicine cabinets at home,” he said. “That’s like leaving the door wide open to potential users, even if they are our own family members, eventually leading to much larger addiction problems.”     Olsen referred to heroin as a “one-and-done” type of drug, opining that first-time users either die of an overdose or become addicted.     Bennett asked Olsen to make the drug prevention programs a permanent part of Stagg High School’s Educational Program.     “I have seen a lot of denial from parents, and I do think it’s very important we keep instilling these programs to our parents and students,” Bennett said.     Student Education Sessions regarding heroin use have been held at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 West College Parkway in Palos Hills.     “There are dire and deadly consequences to heroin use,” said Palos Hills Alderman Ricky Moore (4th Ward). “I’m not interested in doing nothing anymore. I think I speak for a lot of people when I say, I’m interested in doing something.”

Bank aids park district

    Standard Bank has donated $4,000 to the special events and programs of the Hickory Hills Park District. The funds will help pay for monthly senior luncheons and events such as the Egg, Carrot & Candy Hunt, Summer Concert Series, Street Fair, Bike Rodeo, Pumpkin Fest, Children’s Christmas Party, VIP Party, and Snowy Downhill Egg Hunt.

What to do with bonds if rates rise     Interest rates are at historic lows. But they will rise eventually. If you invest in fixed-income vehicles, such as bonds, what might higher rates mean for you?     As is almost always the case in the investment world, there’s no simple answer. First, it’s important to distinguish between short-term and long-term interest rates. The Federal Reserve is determined to keep short-term rates low until unemployment improves, but, in the meantime, longer-term rates may well rise.     Depending on your situation, a rise in long-term rates can present both opportunity and concern. The opportunity: Rising rates can mean greater income if you invest in newly issued bonds. The concern: If you already own longer-term bonds, and rates rise, the value of your bonds will fall. That’s because other investors won’t want to pay full price for your bonds when they can get new ones at higher rates.     Even if the value of your longterm bonds falls, isn’t it worthwhile to hold on to them? After all, as long as your bond doesn’t

default — and if the bond is considered “investment grade,” a default is unlikely — you will get a steady source of income and you’ll receive the full value of your bond back at maturity. Aren’t these valuable benefits?     They are indeed — but they may be more relevant for shortterm bonds. Longer-term bonds — those of 10-year duration or longer — are more subject to inflation risk than shorter-term bonds. Of course, we’ve experienced low inflation for a number of years, but, over time, even mild inflation can add up. When this happens, and you own a longterm bond whose rate doesn’t change, you could face a potential loss of purchasing power.

One of the reasons that longterm bonds pay higher interest rates than short-term bonds is because the issuers of longer-term instruments are rewarding you for taking on this additional inflation risk.     Consequently, simply holding on to long-term bonds — especially very long-term ones, such as those that mature in 30 years — may not be the best strategy. If you review your fixed-income holdings and find that they skew strongly toward longerterm bonds, you may want to consider reducing your exposure in this area. If you did sell some of these bonds, you could use the proceeds to help build a “bond ladder” — which may be one of the best ways to invest in bonds.     To create this ladder, you need to invest in bonds of varying maturities. When market rates are low, you’ll still have your longer-term bonds earning higher interest rates, thereby paying you more income. And when market rates rise, you can reinvest your maturing short-term bonds at the higher rates. You must evaluate whether the bonds held within

the bond ladder are consistent with your investment objectives, risk tolerance and financial circumstances.     If you own bonds, you do need to be aware of where interest rates are — and where they may be headed. Nonetheless, as we have seen, you don’t have to be at the mercy of rate movements. By keeping yourself informed and choosing the right strategies, you can benefit from owning bonds and other fixed-income vehicles in all interest-rate environments.     Before investing in bonds, you should understand the risks involved, including credit risk and market risk. Bond investments are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease, and the investor can lose principal value if the investment is sold prior to maturity. Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

State Senate approves medical marijuana bill

    The Illinois Senate on May 17 voted to approve a bill that if signed by Gov. Pat Quinn will allow Illinois residents with certain illnesses to use medical marijuana under a doctor’s prescription.     The Senate passed the measure 35-21. The House voted 61-57 April 17 to approve the ley offers its students during bill. Quinn has said he is “open(Continued from page 5) McAuley students have a wide the year: basketball, bowling, minded” to signing the bill into range of camps to choose from, dance, diving, golf, lacrosse, law, and Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon including 13 sport camps, two running, soccer, softball, swim- recently expressed support for music camps, an art camp, and ming, tennis, volleyball, and the proposal.     “We applaud the Illinois Legwater polo. the Theatre Kids Kamp.     McAuley summer camps offer     All fine arts camps, which con- islature for taking action and athletes, artists, actresses and sist of guitar, fiddle, art, and the adopting this widely supported musicians from kindergarten theatre Kids Kamp, are open to and much-needed legislation,” said Dan Riffle, deputy director through high school age the op- both girls and boys. portunity to develop skills by     For detailed camp descrip- of government relations for the learning from and interacting tions, dates, times and appro- Marijuana Policy Project. “The priate age groups, visit moth- final product is a comprehensive with staff.     Athletics camps are taught by ermcauley.org and look for the and tightly controlled system that Summer Camp Information McAuley coaches,     The music camps, Guitar and link. Fiddle, are taught by Orchestra No. Palos Dist. 117 Director Hannah Lawson.     North Palos School District     Kathy Gordon Davis will 117 is offering online programs head the two-week Art Camp, to parents for registering stuwhile Kids Kamp, a three-week dents for the 2013-14 school camp with over a 25 year his- year. The district will move to tory, will be run by 99th Street an online registration process Theatre Company Director Pa- and fee payment system that     I’m used to having a hypertricia Haynes. A staff of theatre, will replace the mail-in regis- aggressive image at the table. dance and music professionals tration option that was used in One of the things it lets me do will work with the students the past. Mail-in registration will is get a lot of value when I make throughout the weeks. no longer be accepted. For more a medium-strength hand.     Sports camps reflect the in- information call Dianne Hasler     The opponent in this hand, terscholastic sports that McAu- at 233-5758. “The Villain,” and I have played lots of hands together, often putting in three- and four-bets preflop against each other. We have also played lots of pots in which I’ve bet on all streets postflop (known as “threebarreling”).     One of the reasons this happens so frequently is that I know he likes to enter pots United Trust Bank lightly. That lets me bet weaker (as of May 21) hands for value, because it’s less likely I’m beaten, and also lets RATES APR POINTS me bluff more often, because it’s 30-year fixed 3.750 3.731 0 more likely he has a marginal 15-year fixed 2.875 2.933 0 hand. 10-year fixed 2.750 2.828 0     With blinds at 75-150, action folded to The Villain in the hijack Prospect Federal seat, and he opened to 300 with (as of May 20) a stack of about 10,000. I called on the button with Kh 10c and a stack of about 26,500. Both RATES APR POINTS blinds folded. 30-year fixed 3.625 3.662 0     The flop came 10h 7h 9c. The 20-year fixed 3.375 3.426 0 Villain checked. I checked. 15-year fixed 2.875 2.939 .25     I decided to check back this flop for a few reasons. It’s a flop All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders. that allows for a lot of flush draw/ straight draw and pair/straight draw combinations, and if he

Bulletin Board

Submitted Photo

will allow individuals with serious illnesses to safely and legally access medical marijuana with their doctors’ supervision.     “We are hopeful that Gov. Quinn will join legislators and the vast majority of Illinois voters in supporting this proposal. Marijuana has proven medical benefits, regulating it works, and there is broad public and legislative support for doing it. This is a no-brainer.”     House Bill 1, sponsored in the House by Rep. Lou Lang (D-Skokie) and in the Senate by former state’s attorney Sen. William Haine (D-Alton), would allow people suffering from medical conditions including cancer, multiple sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, and rheumatoid arthritis to use medical marijuana if their doctors

recommend it. Qualified patients would be able to obtain marijuana from one of up to 60 dispensaries, which would acquire marijuana from up to 22 cultivation centers. The Illinois Department of Agriculture, Department of Health, and Department of Financial & Professional Regulation would regulate the cultivation, acquisition, and distribution of marijuana.     The measure has been endorsed by the Illinois Nurses Association and the Illinois State Bar Association. Since last month, more than 265 doctors from across the state have signed on to a statement in support of safe access to medical marijuana for patients with serious illnesses.     A 2008 Mason-Dixon poll found that 68 percent of Illinois voters

would support a bill to allow seriously and terminally ill patients to use marijuana for medical purposes with their doctors’ approval, according to the Marijuana Policy project. Eighteen states and Washington, D.C., allow patients with qualifying conditions to use medical marijuana with recommendations from their physicians. Similar legislation has been introduced in 16 additional states this year, and it is anticipated in one more.     Washington and Colorado have moved beyond medical marijuana when voters in both states last November passed referendums clearing the way for full legalization of the herb. Both state’s legislatures have been busy crafting laws pertaining to the cultivation and retail sale of cannabis.

Talkin Poker

Mortgage Rates Around the Area

By Ben Wilinofsky

check-raised, there would be very few good turn cards for my hand. I also wanted to disguise my hand to get more value from weaker one-pair hands. It would be much tougher for him to call with a lower pair if the pot gets big and a scary card comes.     Having the Kh gave me the flexibility to check back, knowing that I’d have more equity and playability on the turn if a heart fell.     The turn was the 9s. The Villain checked. I bet 600.     I was pretty confident my hand was best once The Villain had checked twice. He might try to check-raise the turn with a strong hand, but I thought it more likely he had a hand that had some showdown value but was too weak to bet.     The Villain called. The river was the 5h. The Villain checked. I bet 3,150.     Once my opponent called on the turn, I was confident he didn’t have three 9s. If he had taken a tricky line up to that point, he would probably raise the turn to make the pot bigger and try to get me to bluff-catch (i.e., call with a hand that beats my opponent’s bluffs, but not his hands played for value). It seemed very unlikely I was

beaten unless he had a rare boat with pocket fives.     On the other hand, my bet of about one and a half times the pot looked like a “polarizing” bet, one that is made with the very best hands or as a bluff.     The Villain called, showing 6d 7d.     One of the reasons why I was able to get such a big value bet out of my hand is that when I checked the flop, The Villain couldn’t put me on a lot of the very strong hands that I could confidently bet big. He would expect me to bet most of my flush draws, sets and two pair on the flop. By choosing a bet size associated only with very strong hands when in fact it appeared unlikely that I had a very strong hand, I was able to get my opponent to make a light call.     Because I had shown a willingness to put lots of chips in lightly against my opponent previously, I was able to take a tricky line and get an unusual amount of value out of a mediumstrength hand.    (Ben Wilinofsky is a Canadian poker player with more than $3 million in online tournament winnings and more than $1 million in live winnings. He won the 2011 European Poker Tour championship in Berlin.)

HEALTHY EYES

WEAR SUNGLASSES

Every day that you’re outside, you’re exposed to dangerous, but invisible, ultraviolet (UV) sunlight. Left unprotected, prolonged exposure to UV radiation can seriously damage the eye, leading to cataracts, skin cancer around the eyelid and other eye disorders. Protecting your eyes is important to maintaining eye health now and in the future. Shield your eyes (and your family’s eyes) from harmful UV rays. Wear sunglasses with maximum UV protection. For more information, visit www.thevisioncouncil.org/ consumers/sunglasses. A public service message from The Vision Council.


8

The Reporter

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Death Notices Marion L. Ehmen     Marion L. Ehmen, 75, née Wagner, of Worth, died May 16 at Palos Community Hospital in Palos Heights. A memorial service will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 25 at Schmaedeke Funeral Home, 10701 S. Harlem Ave. in Worth. Interment will be private.     Mrs. Ehmen is survived by her husband, Norm; her sons, Butch, Michael and Keith; her daughter, Pam Casarda; and 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.     Mrs. Ehmen was born in Chicago. She worked as a secretary.

Eugenia Hartmann     Eugenia Hartmann, 80, née Lincz, of Worth, died May 15 at Resurrection Hospital in Chicago. Visitation was held May 16 at Schmaedeke Funeral Home in Worth. A funeral service was held May 17 at the funeral home. Interment was private.     Mrs. Hartmann is survived by her husband, Julius; her daughter, Sylvia Tynan; her sons, Jeffrey and Thomas; and five grandchildren and three-great grandchildren.     Mrs. Hartmann was born in Hungary. She was a homemaker.

Health Scan

Submitted Photo

All about Earth

    St. Bernadette Catholic Academy students Jacob Frank (from left) and Kayla Curtis informed their fellow students about reducing waste and reusing recyclables, left, during the school’s Earth Day activities.     Festivities at St. Bernadette Catholic Academy included an informative assembly presented by first- and second-graders, and an item-swap sponsored by the Student Council. Students and teachers also beautified the school grounds by cleaning up and planting flowers.     Harrison Bayorgeon (left) and Britney Darling shared tips on how to save energy, right.

Palos hospital cancer rehab info

Knee pain PCH presentation

    Learn more about Palos Community Hospital’s Cancer Rehab program.     Join Alicia Ferguson as she explains how Cancer Rehab may benefit you during a free one-hour presentation, Living a Better Life with Cancer, at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 6, at Palos Health & Fitness Center, 15430 West Ave., Orland Park.     Registration is required; call 226-2300, or register online at http://bit.ly/cancerrehab

    Palos Community Hospital will give a free presentation by board-certified Orthopaedic Surgeon Michael Liston, M.D., of Southside Orthopedics, as he discusses options for managing knee pain, common causes of knee pain and when to consider a total knee replacement.     The program will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, at Palos Health & Fitness Center, 15430 West Ave., Orland Park. Light refreshments will be served. Registration is required; call 226-2300.

Church Corner Church Corner

    Oak Lawn Community Church, at 9000 S. Ridgeland Ave., is seeking sellers for its annual Outdoor

Flea Market to be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 22. Up to 39 sellers will be accepted on a first come, first served basis.

You may already know that we offer cremation, but you may not know this:

VBS

We’re Reasonably Priced. We offer traditional funeral services as well astraditional cremation.funeral We also want We offer services as as cremation. We also want youwell to know that we offer them you offer them bothtoforknow muchthat lesswe than it might both for much less than it might cost you elsewhere. cost you elsewhere.

So So if if you you appreciate appreciate quality quality service, service, but don’t appreciate but don’t appreciate overspending, overspending, think of of us—you’ll us—you’ll be be glad glad you you did. did. think

‹DGÀQLW\

(708) 448-3530 VanHenkelum.com

Funeral Directory 9236 ROBERTS ROAD HICKORY HILLS, IL

708-430-5700

Call About Our ‘VALUE PLAN’

For Information About an Affordable Full Funeral Service with Burial or Cremation Since 1916

Cremation Service

www.lackfuneralhome.com

“Your Neighborhood Funeral Home”

Palos-Gaidas

FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME David Gaidas, Jr. Director

11028 Southwest Highway Palos Hills, IL 60465

HILLS FUNERAL HOME, LTD.

“Family Owned & Operated” 10201 S. Roberts Rd. Palos Hills, Illinois 60465

(708) 598-5880

    The Kelly High School Class of 1963 is planning a 50th reunion for this fall. The planning committee is seeking classmates. For more information or to have your name placed on the distribution list for the formal invitation contact Bernadette (Bernie) Petrauskas at (630) 469-9418 or bernptrsks@yahoo.com.

Personalized Funeral Choices

3colCHRCH Submitted Photo

Buggin’ out     Harlem Reed enjoys a pony ride at last summer’s June Bug Camp at St. Bernadette Catholic Academy in Evergreen Park. June Bug Camp is accepting registration for this year’s camp to run from 9 a.m. to noon June 10 to 14 for children 3 to 5 years old and potty trained. Cost is $75 per child. St. Bernadette is at 9311 Francisco Ave. Registration forms can be obtained at sbschool.us, or contact the school office at 422-6429.

Crossword Puzzle

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-23-13, a sale will be held at Economy Transmission & Auto Repair, 3400 W. 159th Street, Markham, IL. 60428, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Yousef Ghusein & Mervat Ghusein 2008 Infiniti VIN# 5N3AA08CX8N906190 Lien Amount: $10,863.00

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-23-13, a sale will be held at Ray’s Towing & Auto Repair, 17356 Burnham Avenue, Lansing, IL. 60438, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Lucy Dillard 2005 Buick VIN# 2G4WC532451214024 Lien Amount: $7,239.73

LEGAL NOTICE

708-974-4410

Serving All Faiths

    Oak Lawn Bible Church will hold its annual free Vacation Bible School July 22 to 26 at the church, 9435 S. 54th Ave. The program will run from 9:30 to noon daily and is open to children in kindergarten through those entering fifth grade. This year’s program is “Colossal Coaster World.” Children need not be members of the church to attend. The program is free. For more information and to register call 857-9800 or visit oaklawnbible.org.

Class Reunions

13401 South Ridgeland Ave. Palos Heights, Illinois 60463

Affordable Funeral & Cremation Services

The price is $15 a space, a second space is $10. For more information call the church office at 599-4025 or stop in the church office on Tuesday through Thursday between 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-23-13, a sale will be held at Cool Flow Automotive, Inc., 1340 W. Ogden Avenue, Naperville, IL. 60563, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Raymone B. Kuykendall & Ray Kuykendall 2006 Dodge VIN# 2B3KA53H96H174868 Lien Amount: $4,225.00

Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter

Across 1 Its “fleece was white as snow” 5 __ Sutra 9 Go with the flow 14 Pastoral verse 15 Pink-slipped 16 Ladies’ man 17 Nicolas of “Adaptation” 18 Got one’s uniform dirty, maybe 19 Mississippi, e.g. 20 Understand how things are done 23 Many frozen dinners are high in it 24 Taker of vows 25 Def Jam genre 28 Native American group 31 As plain as day, e.g. 33 Tax pro 36 Places to see links 38 Friend 40 Cancœn uncle 41 36-Across opening 42 Simple floral garlands 47 Fair-hiring initials 48 Forensic facility 49 Spy wear 51 S’ or oui 52 Do-favor link

54 58 61 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71

Broadsided Stage name of Ehrich Weiss, for whom the ends of 20-, 36- and 42-Across were props Wife of Abraham Long, long time “__ Three Lives”: TV oldie Michelangelo figure Pear variety Charity Suisse peaks Like an animated Pea? Cold-cock

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21

Down The home team gets the last ones Hersey’s “A Bell For __” “Nearer, __, to Thee” Messed up Former Asian state known for goat wool Wheel holder Golda of Israel Supplement Poison in some whodunits Kids’ book connectables GP’s gp. Gently stroke Place for a ring Racetrack surface

(Answers on page 11)

22 25 26 27 29 30 32 33 34 35 37 39 43 44 45 46 50 53 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

Door sign Go through energetically, as drawers 1966 Michael Caine title role Pasta topper “Little Women” woman Pioneering computer Letters before nus Tea leaves holder Wood shaver Fake name Slinky’s shape Fashion monogram Steinway alternatives Trucker with a handle Never “Elephant Boy” actor Alaskan brown bear Iraqis, usually Nabisco brand named for its flavor The Penguin, to Batman Playground retort Can’t stand “Ouch!” Fire truck item Mineral spring Feel sick Workout unit


Thursday, May 23, 2013 The Reporter

Features History of the World By Mark Andrews     May 20: ON THIS DATE in 325, the first Christian ecumenical council opened at Nicaea, in what is now Turkey. In 1927, aviator Charles Lindbergh took off from Long Island, N.Y., on the first solo flight across the Atlantic.     May 21: ON THIS DATE in 1804, Lewis and Clark’s expedition to explore the American West began. In 1891, boxers Peter Jackson and Jim Corbett fought 61 rounds to a draw.     May 22: ON THIS DATE in 1868, the Great Train Robbery took place near Marshfield, Ind., as the Reno gang made off with $96,000. In 1992, after a reign of nearly 30 years, Johnny Carson hosted NBC’s “Tonight Show” for the last time.     May 23: ON THIS DATE in 1903, the first automobile trip across the United States, from San Francisco to New York, was completed. In 1934, bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were shot to death in a police ambush as they drove a stolen car in Louisiana.     May 24: ON THIS DATE in 1844, Samuel F.B. Morse transmitted the message, “What hath God wrought” from Washington to Baltimore as he opened America’s first telegraph line. In 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge, linking Brooklyn and Manhattan, was opened to traffic.     May 25: ON THIS DATE in 1787, the U.S. Constitutional Convention convened in Philadelphia after enough delegates showed up to make a quorum. In 2012, the first commercial spacecraft, SpaceX Dragon, docked with the International Space Station.     May 26: ON THIS DATE in 1868, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson ended with his acquittal on all charges as the Senate fell one vote short of the two-thirds majority required for conviction. In 1977, the movie “Star Wars” debuted.    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@ embarqmail.com.)

The Kid’s Doctor By Sue Hubbard, M.D. Monitor moles in children     Anyone can develop a mole, even those who use sunscreen routinely, since not all moles are related to sun exposure. Moles can occur on any area of the body from the scalp to the face, chest, arms, legs, groin and even between fingers and toes and on the bottom of the feet.     Many people inherit a tendency to have moles and may have a family history of melanoma (cancer), so it’s important to know your family history. People with certain skin types, especially fair skin, as well as people who spend a great deal of time outside, whether for work or pleasure, are more likely to develop dangerous moles.     A child may be born with a (congenital) mole or develop a mole in early childhood. It’s common for children to continue to get moles throughout childhood and adolescence, and even into adulthood.     The most aspect of monitoring moles is to be on lookout for changes in the shape, color, or size of a mole. Look carefully at moles with irregular shapes, jagged borders, uneven color within the mole, or redness.     I begin checking children’s moles at their early checkups and point out any I want parents to watch. I note all moles on the child’s chart so I know each year which ones I want to pay attention to, especially moles on the scalp, fingers and toes and in areas that are not routinely examined. Parents should check their child’s moles every few months.     Be aware that a malignant mole may often be flat, rather than raised.     Freckles, also common in children, are usually found on the face and nose, the chest, upper back and arms. Freckles tend to be lighter than moles, and cluster. If you are not sure what you’re looking at, ask your doctor.     Sun exposure plays a role in the development of melanoma and skin cancer, so it is imperative that your child be sun smart. This includes wearing a hat and sunscreen, as well as the newer protective clothing available in many stores. Have your child avoid the midday sun and wear a hat. Early awareness of sun protection will hopefully establish good habits that will stick throughout your child’s life.    (Dr. Sue Hubbard is a nationally known pediatrician and co-host of “The Kid’s Doctor” radio show. Submit questions at www.kidsdr. com.)

Travel Troubleshooter

Retire Smart

By Christopher Elliott

By Jill Schlesinger

    Q: I recently booked two tickets through an online travel agency for my husband and me to fly to the Philippines. When I got his ticket, I noticed that “Jr” was missing from his name. I went back to the site and discovered that there was no “space” provided where I can put a “Jr”.     I called the agency and a representative told me it was “not a big deal” and that I should not worry about it. They suggested I call Delta Air Lines, the airline I was flying on, to give them a “heads-up.”     This weekend, I called Delta and asked them about the name issue. Delta told me that the name on the ticket should match the one on the passport. Delta said that my husband may not have a problem checking in with the airline but that he may have some problems with security, immigration, and even entry and exit to the country we are visiting.     This set me into a panic mode. Delta also told me that to ensure that my husband would not have any trouble at all, that I call my

travel agent and request a name change. My agency says Delta doesn’t allow name changes and that they need to issue a new ticket. I persisted, and they finally agreed to change the name for $300 — that’s $200 for Delta and a $100 fee the agency charges. I find this ridiculous and expensive. Please help us. — Agnes Lednum, Henderson, Md.     A: Your travel agency was both wrong — and right.     Wrong, in the sense that it should have offered a section for “Jr” or “Sr.” given how particular TSA, customs and immigration officials can be, they ought to allow you to input your full, legal name.     But your agency was correct about this not being a big deal. I’ve never heard of someone being denied boarding because they were listed as “II” instead of “III” or “Jr” rather than “Sr”.     It’s difficult to tell if this is an airline hang-up or a TSA issue. But in a situation like this, I just follow the money. No terrorist has ever slipped on a plane by hiding behind a suffix. Airlines

like Delta, however, collect billions of dollars a year in ticket change fees and other ancillary surcharges.     Airlines need to adopt a more flexible, customer-friendly ticket change policy. That way, a little problem like this wouldn’t get turned into a federal case. I contacted Delta on your behalf. It reviewed your record and agreed to fix your husband’s ticket as a goodwill gesture.    (Christopher Elliott is the author of “Scammed: How to Save Your Money and Find Better Service in a World of Schemes, Swindles, and Shady Deals” (Wiley). He’s also the ombudsman for National Geographic Traveler magazine and the co-founder of the Consumer Travel Alliance, a nonprofit organization that advocates for travelers. Read more tips on his blog, elliott.org or e-mail him at chris@elliott. org. Christopher Elliott receives a great deal of reader mail, and though he answers them as quickly as possible, your story may not be published for several months because of a backlog of cases.)

Mayo Clinic

Stay active to slow muscle loss that comes with aging     DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’ve heard that we lose bone mass as we age, but what about muscle mass? Is that also a normal part of aging? Does exercise slow the progression, or is muscle loss inevitable?     ANSWER: It is very common to lose muscle mass as we age. Although all of us will have some degree of muscle loss over time, how much muscle is lost and how fast it happens depends a lot on how well we take care of our bodies. Staying active and exercising regularly can significantly slow muscle loss due to aging.     The process of losing muscle mass as we grow older is called aging sarcopenia. It begins around the age of 25, but it becomes much more noticeable after age 65. As we lose muscle mass, our bodies get weaker. As muscle loss progresses, particularly after 65, it can limit our ability to take care of ourselves. Simple tasks like getting dressed, using the bathroom and walking can become difficult when muscles are weak.     Also, as muscle decreases, it can become more difficult to maintain balance. Our walking speed slows, and the risk of falls and broken bones increases. That’s significant because research has shown that if an individual older than 65 falls and breaks a bone, it has the potential to substantially

lower overall life expectancy. In addition, muscle weakness has been associated with a variety of other diseases. For example, there appears to be a strong association between sarcopenia due to aging and heart disease.     Fortunately, it is within our power to combat this natural process of muscle loss. With exercise and an active lifestyle, we can begin to bring some muscle back. And the really good news is that exercise can help at any age. Several studies have compared people between 70 and 80 years old with people 20 to 30 years old engaging in the same regimen: a strengthening exercise program with weight lifting for 12 weeks. Researchers evaluated the participants’ strength before and after the program and found that the amount of strength gain in both groups was similar, despite their age difference. So it’s never too late, or too early, to work on protecting your muscle mass.     Specifically, to decrease the effects of sarcopenia and slow the loss of muscle mass, a good guideline is to engage in strengthening exercises twice a week. The exercises should include eight to 10 repetitions of each major muscle group. Wait at least 48 hours between exercise sessions to allow your muscles to recover. If you can move up to doing the exercises three times

a week, that’s an excellent goal to set and achieve.     Combining strengthening exercises with aerobic exercise, as well as stretching and balance exercises, can increase the benefit to your muscles even more. An added advantage is that this type of regular physical activity can promote heart, bone, metabolic and mental health, too. Before you get moving, though, talk to your doctor to decide on an individual exercise program that best fits your needs.     Loss of muscle mass is a process that comes with aging, but you have the power to control it. Regularly making time to fit exercise into your schedule is well worth it. You’ll see long-term benefits not only in strength, but also in your flexibility and balance, and improvement in your overall fitness, health and — particularly important — your quality of life. — Carmen Terzic, M.D., Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.    (Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic is an educational resource and doesn’t replace regular medical care. E-mail a question to medicaledge(AT SIGN)mayo. edu , or write: Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic, c/o TMS, 2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 75038. For more information, visit www.mayoclinic.org.)

9

Protecting yourself from the costs of long-term care     There’s no denying it: Most of us are going to need some form of long-term health care during our golden years. And costs of such care are rising.     Genworth Financial recently released its long-term care Cost of Care Survey for 2013, and the results are sobering. The costs of home care providers, adult day health care facilities, assisted living facilities and nursing homes have been steadily rising over the past 5 years.     That being said, the cost increase varies depending on what type of service is necessary. For instance, in 2008 the median annual rate for a private nursing home room was $67,525; in 2013, it’s $83,950 (though prices vary widely across the country). This increase reflects a 4.45 percent compound annual growth rate, more than twice the annual rate of inflation during the same time period.     However, the news is a little better if you don’t need a facility. The national hourly median rate for a licensed home health aide rose by just 1 percent annually over the past 5 years to $19. This slower rate of inflation is attributed to increased competition among agencies and the wider availability of unskilled workers during the recession.     Those are the numbers, but how likely is it that you will need care? According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, about 70 percent of people over age 65 will require some type of longterm care (LTC) services during their lifetime, and more than 40 percent will need care in a nursing home. Of course, your personal health history may increase or decrease your chances of needing long-term care. (One surprising fact: If you live alone, you’re more likely to need paid care than if you’re married or single and living with a partner. Maybe Match.com should incorporate this detail into their sales and marketing materials!)     One of the big misconceptions about LTC is that services are covered by Medicare. But in reality, Medicare only addresses short-term skilled services or rehabilitative care; it does not cover “custodial care,” or assistance with activities of daily living. The only governmentprovided insurance that does provide LTC coverage for this is Medicaid, but qualifying for it is a doozy.     If your total net worth is below a certain level (probably around $300,000), it makes sense to rely on Medicaid for future LTC costs. However, Medicaid is a state-specific benefit, so you should visit http://longtermcare. gov/medicare-medicaid-more/ medicaid/ for more information.

On the other end of the spectrum, if you have more than $1.5 million, you can choose to “selfinsure,” where you tap into your assets to pay for care.     The folks that fall in between Medicaid coverage and selfinsurance are the ones that should be considering how to protect against a long-term illness that eats away at their financial health as well. These “LTC tweeners” should consider purchasing long-term care insurance.     The biggest problem with longterm care insurance is that it is expensive. It’s hard to justify spending thousands of dollars a year on insurance that you may never need. But then again, do you kick yourself for buying auto insurance and not totaling your car?     Another hurdle is that it’s been hard to find a highly rated insurance company in the LTC business these days. Prudential Financial, MetLife and Unum have all decided to exit the individual long-term care insurance business. While these companies have said that they will honor all existing contracts, which will be guaranteed renewable, they will no longer write new LTC policies.     Why are these companies leaving what would seem to be a highly profitable business? The answer is clear: Insurance companies are very good at pooling and insuring certain types of risks, like homeowners and drivers, but they are less confident about projecting how many people will need long-term care and how much that care will cost.     Unfortunately, the more insurance companies that exit the LTC business, the fewer options there are for consumers. As you shop for LTC providers, stick with the highly rated companies that have a proven track record of being in the business and not hiking premiums. Check out the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance (http://bit.ly/I0YSV1) for more information.     Getting old is hard enough as it is, but protecting yourself and your family from rising LTC costs can make all the difference in the world.    (Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Emmy-nominated, Senior Business Analyst for CBS News. A former options trader and CIO of an investment advisory firm, Jill covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated radio show), the web and her blog, “Jill on Money.” She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney. com.)


10

The Reporter

Thursday, May 23, 2013

S HOPPES S

AT

M ILL C REEK

H O P P I N G

C

E N T E R

We are conveniently located on the North West corner at the intersection of 131st St. & LaGrange Rd. in Palos Park with 21 stores offering various services and products, from everyday groceries and supplies to relaxation and fashion, you’re sure to find what you’re looking for at Mill Creek! Visit us today!

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL Basic Cleaning, Exam & X-Rays

only

We’ll provide you with that Winning Smile!

$99.95*

Are you our customer?

Joy’s Best Friends Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road. We carry a large selection of all natural pet food and treats that have no China ingredients. Our dog & cat foods include dry, raw and frozen. Some brands are: Acana, Annamaet, Born Free, Evanger’s, Fromm, Orijen, Northwest Naturals, Party Animal, Stella & Chewy’s, Weruva, Zignature & More!

expires 8/31/13 *Normally $290.

Does not include periodontal treatment. New patients only. Must present coupon. Shoppes at Mill Creek Location Only

See Store for more details.

$3 Off $20 purchase

Dr. Vincent Greci & Dr. Sheri Zentic-Greci

Excludes Acana and Orijen brands. Expires 6/30/13.

Hurry in to register your dog as a Dog Of The Month contestant. Have your relatives, friends and neighbors stop by and VOTE for your dog. Contest winner will win a $100 gift certificate. Voting begins on June 1, IN STORE ONLY. Get 1 vote for every item purchased thru June 25! The dog with the most votes wins.

708.361.9656

www.millcreeksmiles.com

FREE order of

Dog of the Week - Layla!

(708) 448-1515

Buy any loaf of Bread Get a loaf of White or Wheat for

standard checks with new checking accounts*

FREE!

www.standardbanks.com Member FDIC *Checks not available with the Second Chance Banking Account Shoppes at Mill Creek location only.

If so, your “Best Friend” can be featured as our “Dog of the Week” in the Regional Newspaper.

708-499-2062 | www.standardbanks.com

9646 W. 131st St. (Next to Jewel) 708-361-6016 www.handkneaded.com

Must present coupon. One free loaf per customer please. Shoppes at Mill Creek location only. Expires 6/30/13

In Today’s Real Estate Market, Are You Looking for True Professionals?

CALL RE/MAX “10”

708-923-0900 in The Park 708-857-1500 of Oak Lawn 773-735-6000 in Chicago

Outstanding Agents - Outstanding Results

ONLINE CHECK-IN! Download our free app today or visit greatclips.com

7

$ 99 HAIRCUT

13002 LaGrange Rd., Palos Park • 708-923-0772 Not valid with any other offer. No appointment necessary. Shoppes at Mill Creek Location Only Expires 7/15/13

Great Clips in Palos Park offers quick and efficient haircuts at a value of $13 for adults and $11 for kids and seniors. Our team of stylists will provide you with a top-notch haircut and a friendly customer service experience. For a limited offer, get a free haircut (the day of your haircut) when you purchase four $9.99 “Great Cards.” So hurry in and purchase your “Great Card.” This offer will expire June 30, 2013. You never need an appointment at Great Clips; just walk right in and get that “Great” haircut.

IT’S GONNA BE GREAT!!!!

STORE COUPON

Valid 5/23/13 - 6/30/13

SAVE 5 $

Valid only at Jewel-Osco, 9652 W. 131st St., Palos Park, IL (The Shoppes at Mill Creek) Valid 5/23/13 - 6/30/13


Thursday, May 23, 2013 The Reporter

community calendar

11

Library Notes Green Hills

    The Green Hills Public Library is at 8611 W. 103rd St. in Palos Hills. The phone number is 598-8446. ***     Family Movie Time featuring “Madagascar 3,” popcorn and lemonade for all ages will be at 4 p.m. Friday, May 24. Registration required. ***     The library will be closed Monday, May 27. ***     Tasty Tapas with chef Kate Bradley will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 28. Bradley will introduce spicy almonds, vegetable paella, patatasbravas, Spanish meatballs and lemon bar dessert. Samples will be provided. Registration required. ***     Tie Dye for Teens will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29. A white t-shirt will be provided; participants may bring their own clothing. Event may be held outdoors, weather permitting. Registration required. ***     The library is collecting Legos to be used in a Lego club that will begin this summer. Bring donations to the library. ***     The library offers the eBook platform 3M Cloud Library, and has a touch-screen Discovery Station where patrons can browse and checkout eBooks. Cloud eBooks can be read on most eReaders, computers, tablets and smart phones. Check out a 3M eReader at the circulation desk. Visit greenhillslibrary. org to get started. ***     The library has an eBook service, Axis 360, through which users can download bestselling eBooks for as many as 21 days directly onto a device using the Blio software application. Titles automatically expire at the end of the lending period and there are no late fees. Place holds on items that are checked out. Service is only available to Green Hills cardholders. To start browsing visit http://ghpl.axis360.baker-taylor. com. For more information call 598-8446. ***     The library is collecting firstperson accounts of stories of military service to be donated to the Veteran History Project of the Library of Congress. The library is seeking photos, memoirs, and wartime diaries from World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, and the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Call 598-8446 for more information. ***     The library offers Freegal Music, a downloadable music service that provides access to the Sony Music Entertainment catalog. The catalog offers hundreds of thousands of songs in more than 100 genres of music. ***     The library’s Media on Demand program enables patrons to download best-selling and classic audiobooks, eBooks, music and video. No late fees. Works include best-selling novels, wellknown classics and self-improvement guides. For more information visit mediaondemand.org. ***     The library has a scanner available to the public. Pictures, documents, etc., can be scanned and sent to an email, printer or USB device. ***     The library offers TumbleBooks!, a collection of animated talking picture books with fiction, non-fiction and foreign language titles, and read-alongs (chapter books with sentence highlighting and narration but no animation). Visit greenhills. lib.il.us or call 598-8446, Ext. 117, for more information.

Oak Lawn

    The Oak Lawn Library is at 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The phone number is 422-4990. ***     The library will be closed May

26 and 27 for the observance of Memorial Day. The Library’s regular hours are: Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. ***     Donate your “gently used” books, magazines, CDs and videos to the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library ongoing book sale. The Friends will not accept Readers Digest Condensed Books, encyclopedias and older text books. The donation dropoff area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the Reception Booth to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their donation.     The Friends Ongoing Book Sale provides an ever-changing variety of books, magazines and other forms of media at bargain prices. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents and magazines cost five cents each. Audio visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programming and purchases that are beyond their regular budget. ***     Oak Lawn Artists Group Show.     The Oak Lawn Public Library will host its sixth annual Oak Lawn Artist Group Show from June to August 2013. Oak Lawn artists who wish to participate in this special exhibit can print an application from www.oaklawnlibrary.org or pick one up at the reception booth or art gallery. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, May 15. ***     Maura Maloney, licensed clinical professional counselor with Genesis Therapy Center in Oak Lawn, will present “Parenting Children with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD) on Wednesday, May 15 at 7 p.m. at the library. She will discuss the challenges that accompany parenting a child diagnosed with ADHD or other autism spectrum disorders including obtaining a diagnosis, how to advocate for your child at school, when and what form of therapy is appropriate, long-term expectations for your child, and reflecting on your own feelings as a parent. ***     A free movie screening of “The Impossible” will be at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 24. An account of a family caught, with tens of thousands of strangers, in the mayhem of one of the worst natural catastrophies of our time. Starring Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor. ***     The library now offers movie check-out for free. Check-out periods are seven days with no renewals. Oak Lawn residents may check out up to 10 films at a time. ***     The library offers “Temporary Online Patron Registration.” Fill out a registration form at oak lawnlibrary.org/ librarycards2.shtml, and visit the Circulation Desk within 14 days to receive a permanent card. Proof of residency in Oak Lawn is required. ***     The library has the newest and most popular titles and resources in its collection of eBooks, Blu-Ray and DVDs (movies and TV series), CDs for a range of music interests, and hard copy books. The library also has a language learning program and databases. During September, new library card-holders will add a leaf to the tree in the Cook Avenue foyer and be eligible to enter a drawing for a book of their choice (one child prize and one adult/young adult prize up to $35 value each). Cards are available to Oak Lawn residents at the Circulation Desk. Bring an ID and proof of address. ***     Books, tapes and CDs not found at the library can be requested online from another library. For more information

call the Interlibrary Loan department or stop by the Help Desk on the first floor. ***     “Images of America: Oak Lawn” by Oak Lawn Library local history coordinator Kevin Korst contains more than 200 photographs with captions and chapter introductions, and highlights the many aspects of Oak Lawn’s history including Round-Up Days and the 1967 Tornado. The book is available for purchase at the library’s Reception Booth for $21.99 (cash or check). Book sales benefit the Oak Lawn Community Library Foundation. A corresponding photo exhibit is on display and features more than 100 historic Oak Lawn images and dozens of artifacts. The display is in the Local History Room on the library’s second floor. For more information contact Korst at 422-4990. ***     The library offers “Accessible Archives,” an electronic resource available at oaklawnlibrary.org. Click on the “Research” tab and select the icon for “Accessible Archives.” The collection features historic periodicals and books and provides eyewitness accounts and editorial observations of events, genealogical records, county histories and Godey’s “Lady’s Book” — a magazine published to entertain, inform and educate women of America. The Civil War collection is noteworthy and presents coverage based on various historical perspectives. ***     The Freegal music service is available on the library’s website, oaklawnlibrary.org. Patrons may download up to three songs a week from the Sony catalog with their library card. Freegal includes millions of songs and requires no software to install. Files that can be played on any device including iPods. For more information visit oaklawnlibrary.org. ***     Recycle “gently used” books, magazines, CDs and videos by donating them to the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library Ongoing Book Sale. The Friends will not accept Readers Digest Condensed Books, encyclopedias or older text books. The donation drop-off area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the Reception Booth to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their donation. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents and magazines cost five cents each. Audio visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programming and purchases beyond the regular budget. For more information call 422-4990 or visit oaklawnlibrary.org.

Submitted Photo

Walk of life     Kiwi green with pink accent t-shirts and pink ribbon headbands could be seen in abundance at the 14th annual Beverly Breast Cancer Walk held on Mother’s Day, May 12. More than 14,000 people poured into Ridge Park to embark on a 3-mile walk through Chicago’s Beverly and Morgan Park neighborhoods. The record-breaking turnout was in support of Little Company of Mary’s Comprehensive Breast Health Center, which has been recognized as one of the top breast health centers in the country.     The inaugural walk was held in 2000, when a group of friends from Beverly decided to walk for breast cancer on Mother’s Day. The walk’s evolution honors the lively spirit of its participants and shows the commitment to continue battling a disease that has touched many people’s lives.

Park Clips Evergreen Park

    The Evergreen Youth Department has teens and young adults available to help with yard work, cleaning garages and basements, and hauling items to the dumpster. For more information call 229-3377. ***     The Evergreen Park Youth Commission will hold an “American Academy of Pediatrics” Babysitting class from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 25 at the Community Center, 97th Street and Homan Avenue. Fee is $45 per child. For more information call 229-3377.

Hickory Hills

    The Hickory Hills Park District has openings in its preschool classes. Five-day class is $1,540, three-day class (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) is $860, and two-day class (Tuesday and Thursday) is $695.Classes start in September and run through May 2014. Class times are 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 3:15 p.m. The office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for registration. Parents must provide child’s birth certificate and immunization records. For more information call 598-1233 or visit hhparkdistrct. org.

Oak Lawn

    The park district offers duplicate bridge every Monday at 11:30 a.m. at Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St. Cost is $7 per person and includes a light lunch. All ages are welcome. For more information call 857-2200. ***     Registration is underway for before- and after-school FLASH (Fun Worth     The library subscribes to & Learning After School Hours). Zinio, an online magazine stand The park district has partnered that enables patrons to read with Ridgeland School District magazines on computers, tab- 122 and Oak Lawn-Hometown lets or phones using web brows- School District 123 and is in all of ers and apps. Must have Worth those districts’ elementary schools Library card. Zinio is accessible — Columbus Manor, Harnew, Kolb and Lieb in District 122, and Covat worthlibrary.com. ington, Hannum, Hometown, Kol***     The library offers Try-It Illi- mar and Sward in District 123. For nois, which allows access to 300 more information call the FLASH free databases from more than 40 director or the FLASH assistant vendors. Access Try-It at worth- director at 857-2420. library.com (login and password Worth is available at the library).     Mini Campsall day child care

for children 3 to 13 years is available the week before Summer Camp begins. Children will participate in arts and crafts, games and more. Snack provided. Registration deadline is May 27. Cost is $20 per child per day for Worth residents. For more information call 448-7080. ***     The park district is holding a smile search contest with two ways to participate. All summer long the park district will hide its “Worth Your Smile” logo throughout its website, worthparkdistrict.org. To participate follow “Worth Park District” on Facebook for contest details. Through Facebook participants will get instructions and clues on how to find the logo and report back to the park district. Several online Smile Searches will be held through the summer.     Participants can also accept the challenge by attending free family special events held during the summer including the Family Fun Movie and Play in the Park Series. Smiles Search Collector Cards along with additional contest details will be handed out at the Summer Kick-off Party to be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 8 at Terrace Centre Park. ***     Little Club offers benefits such as free indoor playground usage. Fee is $10 resident, $15 non-resident. For more information call the park district. ***     Jazzercise for persons age 16 years and older will be from 9:20 to 10:20 a.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, and 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Saturday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave. Fee is $37 monthly for an Easy Fit Ticket and a registration fee of $25. For more information call 448-7080 or visit worthparkdistrict.org. ***     The Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., has an indoor playground featuring slides, a climbing wall, tree house and more for children who can walk through 4 years old. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 (Continued on page 11)

Focus on Seniors Fairs by Lipinski

    U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski (D3, Western Springs) will hold Senior Fairs in June to give seniors the opportunity to get assistance with a variety of issues from his staff as well as local organizations, agencies and business. Fairs will be from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, June 3 at the VFW Rhine Post 2729, 5858 S. Archer Ave. in Chicago; and 10 a.m. to noon Monday, June 10 at Oak Lawn High School, 9400 Southwest Highway in Oak Lawn.

Double Nickel

    The Double Nickel Plus Chorus meets at the Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen Park, every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers are always welcome. For more information call 4228776.

Rules of the Road

    The Worth Township Seniors will hold a free Rules of the Road class from 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. June 5, Aug. 7 and Oct. 2. Appointment must be made to attend; call the Worth Township Senior Room at 371-2900, Ext. 28. Worth Township Center is at 11601 Pulaski Road in Alsip.

Meals on Wheels

    The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services offers a Meals on Wheels program for village residents 60 years and older who are unable to prepare their own meals. Meals are delivered Monday through Friday. For more information call 422-8776.

55 and Up

    Palos Hills residents 55 years and older meet from noon to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. Tickets for events must be purchased one week in advance. Entertainment includes musicians, singers, luncheons, movies, plays and bingo.

Pinochle

    The Worth Senior Pinochle club is seeking new members. Membership is free. Visit the group at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., every Monday and Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games begin at noon. Call 448-1181 for information.

SUDOKU Solution

Ham radio club to meet June 7     The Hamfesters Radio Club will meet at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 7 at the Crestwood Civic center, 14025 Kostner Ave.     Hamfesters Field Day Chairman Jim Riley, author of “On 15 Years as Field Day Chairman,” a feature article in the June 2010 issue of the American Radio Relay League’s magazine QST, will look at past Field Days past this year’s event to be held in late June.     Field Day is an annual field demonstration of emergency communications preparedness by voice, Morse code, and digital modes. During the weekend-long contest at 115th Street and Oketo Avenue in Worth, the Hamfesters

contacts as many other ham radio club stations across the country and throughout the Western Hemisphere as it can. All levels of government — local, state, and federal — recognize amateur radio’s historic contributions to emergency communications and homeland security.     The Hamfesters conducts volunteer examiner testing for persons seeking ham tickets and for radio amateurs wishing to upgrade to higher classes of licenses. Tests begin at 9 a.m. and are held the second Saturday of each month at Oak Forest Village Hall, 15440 S. Central Ave.

Crossword Answers

Big money for Big 10

Submitted Photo

    Marist High School seniors Nick Cristiano (from left), Dan Hopkins and Matt Quinlan have each received the Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship.     To be eligible to apply for a Chick Evans scholarship, all applicants must have a strong caddie record, excellent academics, and demonstrate financial need and outstanding character. Hopkins and Quinlan will attend Indiana University in the fall, and Cristiano will attend Purdue University.


12

The Reporter

The

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Back Page

Nutrient deficiencies cause brain disorders     One of the earliest clues to my body’s warnings of nutritional deficiencies occurred after the birth of my first child. I was exhausted, miserable, cranky and unhappy.     I didn’t know it at the time, but the birth control pills I had been taking were taking a toll on me.     My then-new doctor, an osteopath, noticed the changes in me and wrote a prescription. Back then, prescriptions only contained numbers, no names of the contents. I took the pills for a few days and felt wonderful.     “What pill is this? I feel great!” I asked the doctor. He laughed and replied, “It’s just a B-complex vitamin.”     Many years later, I learned birth control pills rob the body of B vitamins. I could not believe the transformation I felt from taking those vitamins. My world was wonderful. My gynecologist attempted to place me on mind-altering drugs to deal with the situation. Glad I didn’t listen. I’m not saying that everyone who feels out of sorts can resolve the problem that easily, because some people have legitimate mental disorders and may

need prescription drugs. I’m saying to check for lack of nutrition or even infection before taking drugs. Heavy metals can affect the brain, too, so you may even

Mixing it up for good health By Dee Woods

want to check for various heavy metals.     Just as a deficiency of magnesium, calcium or potassium can result in leg cramps, the same is true for the brain. I’ve seen doctors prescribe all sorts of medications for cramps without checking for mineral deficiencies. The brain responds to lack of nutrition or the presence of excitotoxins the same way, according to neurosurgeon Russell Blaylock. He noted the changes in many people who use aspartame, which he refers to as a neurotoxin.     However, something as simple as an iodine deficiency can affect many parts of the body especially

the brain via the thyroid. The brain needs the thyroid to be healthy. Fluoride in water and bromines added to bread and other foods can interfere with our iodine absorption. Blaylock also believes iodine deficiency should also be considered.     Another recent finding is that the body and brain need healthy saturated fats in order to allow us to absorb our nutrition and to feed the brain. A little butter, coconut oil, and avocado all contains these healthy saturated fats.     About a year ago, I wrote of how one physician saw her husband’s Alzheimer’s disease respond to something as simple as coconut oil, a saturated fat. I’m not talking about those nasty fast food burgers and French fries. I’m speaking of healthy saturated fats like butter, olive oil and coconut oil. However, for years physicians abided by the incorrect assumption that we should eat margarine and avoid all forms of saturated fats. Many physicians have realized the error and now advise avoiding trans fats, a genuine culprit that are really dangerous to health.     I would wager that we all know

people who have become mindnumbed as a result of pharmaceutical drugs. We knew these people once as vibrant beings, but somehow, they languish, unable to make decisions, while barely functioning as human beings. I would love to see these people or their families seek out the ways their loved ones might be better served. Yes, it’s not as easy as popping a pill or two, but it’s worth the quality of life that may be restored.     It begins with a bit of depression and the doctor gives pills. Then anxiety comes along, and more pills. When the pills cause reactions or don’t seem to work well, more pills are prescribed to counter the reactions. Memory fails as a result of the drugs, so expensive drugs for Alzheimer’s are sometimes prescribed. It’s a sad nightmare and becomes a vicious cycle.     Next week, I’d like to explain what various alternative doctors recommend for both overall health and brain health. Dee Woods is available to give presentations about alternative health treatments and healthy living. She can be reached at deewoods@comcast.net.

Scratch away health problems with Cat’s Claw

Submitted Photo

Pets of the Week     Pepper, a 3-year-old male gray tabby, and Bonnie and Clyde, a pair of 5-year-old beagles, are among the animals available for adoption at the Animal Welfare League, 10305 Southwest Highway in Chicago Ridge.     Adoption Hours are noon to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Dogs are $135 ($100 for dogs more than 5 years old) and cats are $73 (half off for any cat 3 years or older. Fee includes spay/neuter surgery, shots, one-year rabies vaccination, AVID microchip, cat carrier or dog leash and collar, 10-day health guarantee for kennel related illness, and 30-day money-back guarantee. For animals too young to be spayed/neutered, a deposit of $50 is be required to ensure the animal is altered. Deposit will be refunded, via mail, once the animal has been spayed/neutered.     For more information call 636-8586 or visit animalwelfareleague.com. Like the AWL on Facebook at facebook.com/AnimalWelfareLeague.

Riviera

(Continued from page 1)

and other personal property.     Ferguson believes youths who live in the neighborhood are responsible for the vandalism, and that closer monitoring and reporting by the homeowners association and residents may be a key aspect in catching the perpetrators. Video surveillance may be the solution in stopping the vandals, according to Riviera recreation Chairwoman Donna O’Connell.     “We have decided to make a priority to put in place video surveillance cameras that will hopefully be worth its weight in gold to help prevent vandalism and theft and gets the community together for a common goal, to ensure the safety and our hard earned money towards associations fees to keep our community safe and free of vandalism.”     O’Connell has solicited bids for video surveillance cameras that will be placed throughout the townhome complex to work as an all-encompassing security system for residents. The surveillance cameras will not raise homeowners’ association fees, which are $162 a month. She believes the cameras will provide a final solution to the seemingly never-ending problem.

    “We will be working on proposals to place the proper surveillance system throughout the Riviera and ensure the vandals are caught and prosecuted,” she said. “This will give us the peace of mind that we are entitled to.     “In addition, we will save literally thousands of dollars that would be spent to repair or replace stolen or vandalized items.”     The committee plans to prosecute the vandals once they are caught, if they are of age to be prosecuted.     Roger Schweikert, 29, of the Cour Michele subdivision in Riviera, aid he can not even place items outside for fear they will be damaged.     “Not only that, but I come home after work sometimes to find garbage and debris scattered throughout my carport that isn’t even mine, that I am now forced to clean up, from used coffee cups and food wrappers to children’s toys,” Schweikert said. “This needs to be stopped.”     Schweikert has contacted the homeowners association on issues regarding vandalism to his property and was told his was not the first call regarding a vandalism issue in the Riviera.     Riviera includes an in-ground pool, clubhouse, tennis courts and a large open park area. The neighborhood is made up of primarily young adults with families.

    The plant with the scientific name uncariatomentosa ,known more commonly as Cat’s Claw, is an herb from the Peruvian Amazon that grows wildly in the country’s highlands. For over thousands of years, the herb has been used by native Ashanica Indians to treat a wide range of health issues that can affect the digestive and immune systems.     Ongoing research and evidence suggests Cat’s Claw may help more effectively treat cancer, ulcers, arthritis, allergies, HIV, rheumatism, diabetes, prostate conditions, genital herpes and pre-menstrual syndrome. Other research indicates the herb has remarkable effects on the

digestive system that help patients suffering from intestinal ailments such as Crohn’s disease, leaky bowel syndrome, colitis, gastritis, diverticulitis and parasites. More studies on uncariatomentosa may be able to support the belief of some advocates that it lowers blood pressure, and prevent heart attack and stroke. Cat’s Claw may increases circulation and keep plaque from forming on arterial walls, as well as inhibiting blood clots from forming in the vessels of the brain and heart.     Scientist Klaus Keplinger in July 1989 isolated six alkaloids from the root of uncariatomentosa, and his efforts revealed

The Wine Guy with Anthony Scarano

remarkable data. As his report indicates, these alkaloids have a great impact on both white cells and macrophages and their ability to invade and digest harmful foreign matter and microorganism.     Although other herbs includ-

ing uncariaguianesis have similar qualities of Cat’s Claw, to mentosa has the most important alkaloid, isopteropodine, which is known to increase the body’s immune response and acts as an antioxidant. Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an 88-year-old Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the opinions of Mr. Scarano based on years of independent study and personal experience, and may not be beneficial to health. Wine should be consumed in moderation, as overindulgence may be harmful to health.

Park Clips (Continued from page 11) p.m. Monday through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for nonresidents. For more information call 448-7080 or visit worthparkdistrict.org.

***     The Worth Park District Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. every fourth Wednesday of the month at the Worth Historical Museum, in the Terrace Centre at 11500

Beloit Ave. Meetings are open to the public. Membership is free but is not required to attend.     Volunteers are welcome to come to the museum from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesdays to assist with

projects. The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Curator hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday. For group visits call 448-7080, Ext. 107.

your local landscaper since 1951 Call us today for a free estimate!

before

Complete landsCape renovations LICENSED, BONDED, INSURED Landscape Contractors family owned & operated

baCkyard retreats

(708) 389-8119 WilliamQuinnAndSons.com

RUN 5-23-13 Both papers front section 4x51/2

New Kids Clothing Store in Worth Boys & Girls CloTHEs NEwBorN to sizE 16

Featuring

NOW OPEN!

American, Japanese & Chinese Cuisine GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

Stop by & say “Hello!”

101 Commons Drive Formerly Old Country Buffet

NEw mErCHaNdisE arriviNG daily

Playwear • Swimwear • Shower Gifts • Gifts Sets • Accessories

11425 S. Harlem Ave. • Worth

708.671.8959

3x5 color

— HourS — Mon-Fri 10am - 8pm Sat 10am - 7pm Sun 10am - 5pm

Chicago Ridge Phone: 708.529.7553

Open 7 Days: Sun-Thur: 11am-10pm Fri-Sat: 11am-10:30pm

ADULT LUNCH BUFFET • $6.99 Plus tax ADULT DINNER BUFFET • $9.99 & drink • Ask About our frequent buyer’s cArd •

3x5 COLOR

$1.50

$2.00

Maximum 4 people per coupon. each must buy a beverage.

Maximum 4 people per coupon. each must buy a beverage.

Off Lunch Off Dinner MON-FRI LUNCH BUFFET. DINE IN ONLY. MON-FRI DINNER BUFFET. DINE IN ONLY. Present original coupon before payment. Present original coupon before payment. No other offers apply; no kids or senior No other offers apply; no kids or senior discounts. Not valid on holidays. discounts. Not valid on holidays. Expires 7/31/13 Expires 7/31/13

Flaming Grill & Buffet 101 Commons Dr. Chicago Ridge • 708.529.7553

Flaming Grill & Buffet 101 Commons Dr. Chicago Ridge • 708.529.7553


Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Thursday, May 23, 2013 Section 2

Page 1

Ruling over the Red Perfect week lifts Spartans to SSC crown By Ken Karrson

other teams’ pitching would be tough for us to handle.     “One thing we did that nobody else did was sweep Richards, and we were the only team on either side [of the SSC] to beat Lemont. Those were the most pivotal things, and I couldn’t be happier for our guys.”     The Spartans (15-12, 13-6) got ahead of TF North right away, using RBI hits from Matt Dunne, Bob Kametas and Mitch Swatek to fuel a four-run first inning. Brandon Quillin also drove in a run with his fielder’s choice.     That was part of a 12-hit day for Oak Lawn, which came on the heels of a 14-hit outburst versus Tinley.     “They played like conference champs,” Gerny said of his athletes. “Guys are having much better at-bats and making solid contact, and they played really loose on Thursday.”     The Spartans added single tallies in the third, fourth and fifth stanzas, with RBI being generated by Matt Witkowski (sacrifice fly), Kametas (groundout) and Billy Thome (single). Also contributing to the cause were Chris Rafacz (fourth-inning triple, run scored) and Marcin Krzyciak (fifth-inning double, run scored).     That was more than enough support for Dunne on the hill. The junior pitcher, who has been overshadowed by Kametas this spring, was in complete control against the Meteors as he fired a four-hitter, struck out six and did not walk anyone. Only one of the two runs he gave up in the fifth inning was earned.     “I wouldn’t trade our pitchers for anyone else’s in the conference,” Gerny said. “They kept us in every conference game. TF North doesn’t have the strongest

team we’ve seen this year, but they didn’t just roll nine bodies out there. Dunne stepped up and shut them down.” Oak Lawn 6 Tinley Park 1     Even more dominant was Kametas last Tuesday. He threw third strikes past 11 Titans batters and tossed a four-hitter as the Spartans guaranteed themselves no worse than a share of the divisional crown with a win.     “They weren’t a bad team by any stretch,” Gerny said. “Tinley had a similar conference record to ours, but with Kametas on the mound, we look like a different ball team. Guys don’t get too nervous because there’s room for error and it takes a lot of pressure off the offense, and we just play with more confidence.     “I don’t think anybody in the conference had a pitcher up to Bob’s level. He’s a power pitcher who can shut guys down.”     Oak Lawn was up just 2-1 after four innings, but gradually pulled away from the Titans by tallying four times over the fifth and sixth frames. Six extra-base hits were featured among the Spartans’ 14 safeties, two of the biggest being Kametas’ two-RBI triple and Quillin’s homer.     Also lending a hand were Thome (two doubles, one RBI), Krzyciak (double), Mitch Swatek (double) and Rafacz (two RBI on sacrifice flies).     “With the number of hits we had, we should have had 10 or 12 runs,” Gerny said. “We ran ourselves out of a couple innings. Part of that is probably that we haven’t had a lot of scoring opportunities [this season].”     Gerny reminded his players afterward what their conquest of (Continued on page 3)

    Oak Lawn is first at last, and it’s there by itself.     A season-long jockeying for position within the South Suburban Conference Red finally ended last week, and the group standing tallest was the Spartans. Oak Lawn broke a first-place tie with Shepard by beating Tinley Park last Tuesday while the Astros were losing a rematch with Evergreen Park, and the Spartans then sealed the deal on an outright divisional championship by knocking off TF North 7-2 on Thursday.     Thus, Bill Gerny became the second consecutive Oak Lawn baseball coach to capture a title in his inaugural season, following the course traveled by Brian Clifton in 2009. Clifton, who stepped Photo by Jason Maholy Shepard pitcher Nick Medlicott prepares to fire a throw to first after fielding a dribbler hit by down as head coach before the Evergreen Park’s Mike Rizzo during a game last week between the South Suburban Conference 2013 campaign, was in attendance on Thursday to honor assistant Red rivals. coach Brian Brandt, who is leaving the program after a long association with it and had his jersey retired.     Also on hand was former Spartans coach Skip Sullivan, for whom both Brandt and Clifton played, as well as a number of win it that it was hard for them run [of success],” DiFoggio said other athletes from past seasons. By Ken Karrson to get back into it the next day of Medlicott, who’s in his fourth Gerny enjoyed the pregame cel    Frank DiFoggio doesn’t care if [versus Brother Rice]. Our bubble varsity campaign. “Anytime we ebration, but was just as enampractice fails to make Shepard burst, and after that it just snow- needed a guy [to come through], ored of the postgame one that he was our guy. He got healthy followed Oak Lawn’s clinching of perfect. balled.     He just hopes it put Astros play-     “When you’re playing day after and he set the tone for us every the championship. ers back in the proper frame of day after day and kids don’t get Monday.”     “I would not have believed it home until 7:30 [at night], that     Evergreen did pose a couple at all,” Gerny said, when asked if mind.     Shepard had been on a roll just wears on you. No doubt that other threats in the contest, but he thought of his club as a title prior to the start of last week, affected us. The best thing about it could not capitalize on a bas- contender prior to the start of the and after notching a Monday vic- the week was Saturday because we es-loaded situation in the fourth season. “It’s a tough conference tory over Evergreen Park nothing were able to practice for the first frame and left men stranded because you’ve got teams known seemed out of the ordinary. But time since May 1, and it was the at second and third in the sev- for baseball, like Reavis and Richthat wound up being the Astros’ first time since [last] Monday I enth. ards, and I knew we were going heard a little bit of laughter.” lone triumph of the week.     The Astros tallied once in the to struggle with our hitting, so     The Mustangs gained their re-     The Astros (15-17, 11-8), who third, fifth and sixth innings, and I assumed — incorrectly — that venge on Shepard the next day, wound up third in the SSC Red, twice in the seventh. Collecting effectively removing the Astros met Thornton this past Monday RBI were Adam Samad (single), from first place in the South Sub- in a first-round contest within Brendan Hermann (single), Mark urban Conference Red standings, the Class 4A Lincoln-Way Cen- Albrecht (single) and Matt Scott and then the bottom dropped out. tral Regional. If successful against (fielder’s choice). Tinley Park tacked on another the Wildcats, Shepard would have     Mustangs coach Mark Smyth conference defeat, Brother Rice earned a semifinal date with felt Shepard’s final bit of scorand Andrew got the better of powerful Lincoln-Way North on ing wouldn’t have happened if his Shepard in nonleague encounters, Wednesday. team had been able to execute a and all three outcomes favored the     The Astros certainly did what double play. Astros’ foes by a wide margin. was needed to vanquish Evergreen     “That was absolutely an enor    So when Saturday finally pre- the first time around, an accom- mous play we didn’t make,” sented Shepard with an open date, plishment largely made possible Smyth said. “It really should have By Ken Karrson who also tied a program record games and can compete in them. DiFoggio used it to conduct a two- by pitcher Nick Medlicott, who been 3-2 going into the bottom for single-season wins, clash with We know what we’re capable of hour practice, the Astros’ first of won for the fifth straight time of the seventh, and that would     Two down, five to go. El Paso-Gridley today in a Seneca when we play well and we’ve got any kind since the start of the after tossing a four-hitter and have changed how we played the     Twenty-eight regular-season Sectional semifinal. a very good chance [to move on month and their first outdoor striking out nine. The senior did seventh. wins were obviously quite sat-     While Brauer had an opportu- again].” session since April 19. Not only issue an uncharacteristically high     “[The outcome] could have gone isfying, but seven postseason nity to scout the Titans a couple     Having outscored three foes by did Shepard players put in some seven walks, two of which led to either way. Those were two real triumphs would mean a great times, this will be the initial meet- a combined 53-2 last week — an necessary on-field work, but the the Mustangs’ only scoring. good, competitive games against deal more to Chicago Christian. ing between the schools. Gridley 18-1 victory over Wheeler (Ind.) practice also gave everyone an op-     Keyshawn Carpenter drew both Shepard.” Reaching that total in the playoffs advanced out of the regional round on Monday concluded the regular portunity to get back on track of those free passes, in the second *** would net the Knights a first-ever by defeating Reed-Custer, which schedule — Christian might apand sixth innings. Tim Walsh’s     Shepard couldn’t complete a state championship. psychologically. had scored a pair of upsets prior pear inadequately prepared for     “That loss kind of crushed us single brought him home the first sweep, though, as the Mustangs     Christian coach Eric Brauer to Saturday’s finale. the tighter battles that are likely [emotionally],” DiFoggio said, re- time, while a Shepard error pro- made off with a 3-2 triumph last isn’t yet looking that far down     “I have no problem playing to come up the remainder of the ferring to the second game against duced the second marker. Tuesday. the road, but the Knights are somebody we’ve never heard of tourney. However, the Knights Evergreen. “The kids wanted to     “He hasn’t had his best stuff     Hard-luck pitcher Jeremy two steps closer to reaching the [before this past week],” Brau- didn’t run away and hide from win a conference championship, the last couple times out, but Dryier absorbed the loss for the Promised Land than they were er said. “That’s the fun of the Ag Science until the latter portion and they fought so hard to try to he’s the reason for our [recent] (Continued on page 6) at the beginning of last week. playoffs: playing teams you don’t of Saturday’s contest. That’s because they took care normally play.”     The Cyclones, in fact, posed the of business in their own Class     And, although his team’s goals first threat by either club as they 2A regional. are lofty, Brauer doesn’t believe placed men on second and third     After blasting CICS-Longwood the weight of those expectations with just one out in the top of the 23-0 in five innings last Wednes- will lie heavily on his athletes. third inning. With its cleanup and day, Christian came back on Satur-     “I don’t think there’s any pres- No. 5 hitters due up, Ag Science day to down Chicago Agricultural sure because we’re not expected had a very real chance to gain a Science 12-1 in six stanzas and lay to win [a sectional title],” he said. lead, but Christian hurler Josh claim to its fourth regional crown “We’ve never won a sectional in Novak managed to escape un    “The intensity was there, for On the mound, Kornacker raised during Brauer’s five-year tenure school history, but I think we’ve scathed from the predicament. By Ken Karrson (Continued on page 6) sure, from the start of the game his record to 6-1 by firing a four- at the school. The Knights (30-6), gotten comfortable being in those     For much of the 2013 high to the end. One through nine [in hitter and whiffing six. 6 school season, Lincoln-Way North the batting order] hit the ball and St. Laurence 4 has been the talk of south-sub- we played tremendous defense.” Brother Rice     Lotus acknowledged that his     The Vikings had all of about a urban baseball.     Last Thursday, St. Laurence athletes were stoked by Smith’s half-hour to savor their momenplayed the role of silencer. And presence, and beating him created tous win over Lincoln-Way North making the Vikings’ unexpected a very tangible sense of achieve- before they had to tangle with the 14-0 romp past the Phoenix at ment for them. However, he in- Crusaders for the third time in Benedictine University even more sisted he didn’t invest anything just over a week in another Steve satisfying for everyone involved extra in the contest. Bajenski Tournament contest. was that the lion’s share of dam-     “I stopped thinking about Kevin     St. Laurence had ruled in both age was inflicted while Kevin the day he left,” Lotus said. “I of the two previous matchups, Smith toed the rubber for Lin- can’t put my focus on someone the second of which wrapped who isn’t there. That wouldn’t be up a Catholic League Blue title coln-Way North. for it. With those outcomes still     Smith spent the first three fair to the kids we have. seasons of his prep career at St.     “I know it was more [of a big fresh and serving as motivation, Laurence, where he attained all- deal] for a lot of people and, win Brother Rice wasn’t about to give area status and became one of or lose against Lincoln-Way North, in quietly to the Vikings. the Chicago Catholic League’s top it was going to be an emotional     And indeed, the Crusaders hung performers. His offseason decision game. But in reality, it’s only one tough, although they never did to transfer to the public school game, and this was no different to hold a lead. St. Laurence got up closest to his residence brought me than the one against Downers 2-0 in the top of the first on Lewis’ Smith to the Phoenix, for whom Grove South [last Tuesday]. We two-RBI double and survived a try to preach to our guys about couple Rice threats later on. he has also excelled.     But the other team that knows consistency because, at this part     “We didn’t play our best game, him best was unfazed by his cur- of the season, we can’t afford any but I thought our guys handled it pretty well,” Lotus said of his rent-year exploits. Smith lasted letdowns.” into the sixth inning, but departed     There certainly weren’t any in club’s two assignments on the after being unable to register an store for the Vikings (24-8) on same day. “To have them conout in that frame. Already ahead Thursday. Included among their centrate for 14 innings after a 6-0 at that juncture, the Vikes 13 hits were four by Brad Wood, full day at school, that says a lot amassed eight runs during their who also drove in two runs. Win- about them.” Photo by Jason Maholy last at-bat to apply the finish- ning pitcher Mike Kornacker and     Miller’s fielder’s choice handed ing touches to a slaughter-rule Zach Lewis both slammed two- the Vikes a 3-0 advantage in the RBI doubles, while T.J. Marik third stanza, but the Crusaders success. fought back with a deuce in their     “We played unbelievably well,” stroked a two-run single. St. Laurence coach Pete Lotus     Knocking in one run apiece portion of the fourth as Wendall     Oak Lawn catcher Sam Akouris braces for a collision as Shepard’s Skylor Hilger slides into home said. “I thought it was one of our with singles were Mike Miller, Ferguson (double) and Andrew plate during last week’s game in Palos Heights. Lamb hung onto the ball, but the Lady Astros walked best all-around games of the en- Pat Haugh, Nate Tholl, Ryan Dyke delivered RBI hits. The away with a mercy-rule shortened 12-2 victory over the visiting Lady Spartans. For more softball (Continued on page 4) news, see Page 2. Rybakowski and Roger Wilson. tire season.

Stumbling to the finish line Four straight losses erase Astros’ momentum

Class 2A Chicago Christian Regional

Two steps forward Regional title concludes Knights’ first playoff week

Northern exposure

Vikings highlight so-so week by routing Phoenix

Plate coverage


2

Section 2 Thursday, May 23, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Good sportsmanship will never replace good play Bartosh (Reprinted from Aug. 20, column, here’s something else 2009) the ARA presented: In the same study, 85 percent of Americans     Winning is everything. aged 20 and up believe sports    Although Vince Lombardi’s manship is worse now than in famous declaration isn’t typi- previous years, and that opincally quoted with complete ac- ion has been largely unchanged curacy, those three words have over the past four years. The nevertheless resonated with statistic is a little more favorsports participants and fans able among the 30-and-under for decades. Anything less than crowd, but even then only onesuccess is considered unaccept- third of the respondents deem today’s level of sportsmanship able.     That opinion is OK if it’s be- to be superior than that found ing used as a motivational tool in the 1980s. to encourage athletes to give it     So if 85 percent of the public their best shot, but far too many looks negatively upon the role of people adopt an all-or-nothing sportsmanship these days, how attitude. Other than Cubs fans, on earth can 94 percent claim to who doesn’t yearn to leap off a be on such high moral ground? It doesn’t take a mathematician sinking ship?     But if an e-mail I recently to see that those figures simply received from an organization don’t jibe. called the Awards and Recogni-     What’s especially interesttion Association isn’t a complete ing is that a vast majority of fabrication, I’m incorrect in my people agrees that exhibiting assumption and Mr. Lombardi sportsmanship is vital at the was way off-base as well. youth-league level, yet that’s     According to a survey cited by often where the worst behavthe ARA, 94 percent of Ameri- ior takes place. Actually, the cans would rather see their kids are all right, but parents child lose a big game than fail frequently embarrass their offto display good sportsmanship. spring, and that doesn’t change At first read, such a statistic when the children reach highengenders a warm, fuzzy feeling school age. within me.     And even if you choose to ex    Then I caught myself and cuse the hysteria on the grounds realized something else: About that adults get a little crazy with 90 percent of those people were anything that involves their probably shoveling cow pies. progeny, how do you write off     Come on, should we even for the boorish behavior exhibited a nanosecond believe that all by fans with no direct connecbut six percent of our country tion to a team? is guided by a sense of fair play?     Remember, for example, the Heck, the politicians alone ex- Oklahoma football zealot who ceed that number, and we all threatened the well being of an know what an honorable profes- official whose wrong call cost the Sooners a win against Oregon a sion they represent.     And if you think I’m just being few years back? How about the argumentative for the sake of a Penn State backers who dogged

Joe Paterno on an Internet site hours after the 9/11 terrorist attacks had taken place? Let’s not forget, either, the angry mob that wanted a piece of Steve Bartman after he got to a foul ball faster than Moises Alou could during the 2003 National League Championship Series.     And if you think spectators are the only parties sadly lacking in sportsmanship, you haven’t been doing much sports viewing. Or don’t the ridiculous home runadmiring displays of many major leaguers, end zone celebrations of touchdown-scoring NFL players and finger-wagging antics of NBA dunkers count?     Sportsmanship also wouldn’t allow for cheating, but it goes on all the time. It may not be flagrant in nature, but when was the last time an athlete admitted that his foot really was out of bounds when he made the catch, the ball actually bounced into his glove or he took extra steps before he released his shot?     You know why mum’s the word on those occasions? Because the object of any game is to win, just as Lombardi stated.     Coaches don’t save their jobs merely by populating their rosters with nice guys. They may not always finish last, as Leo Durocher implied, but those nice guys better finish high enough in the standings to avoid shame.     It’d be great if the ARA’s findings represented real life. But they don’t.     And I’ll bet at least 94 percent of sports fans, under penalty of having to watch “Dancing With The Stars” nonstop for one week straight, will agree I’m a good sport for telling the truth about that.

Late bloomers Bulldogs end regular slate on high note By Ken Karrson     Development doesn’t occur in a one-size-fits-all form.     Some individuals mature quickly, others do so later, and a few may never advance much beyond adolescence. Sports teams, being made up of people, follow a similar pattern.     For a time, Richards coach Brian Wujcik might have wondered if his Bulldogs, in a baseball sense, were going to remain in the latter category. After all, they had yet to demonstrate the ability to embark on an extended run of accomplishment, either with a series of crisp performances or string of successes.     But just as the state tournament loomed on the horizon, Richards finally hit its growth spurt. Four wins in five games proved it, and even the one setback — a 6-2 verdict versus Sandburg — presented far more positives than negatives in Wujcik’s mind.     Thus, as play in the Class 4A Richards Regional got underway this week, the Bulldogs’ longtime leader suddenly was flush with optimism.     “I like where we’re at right now, even though it took us a little longer to get there than I hoped it would,” Wujcik said. “Everybody’s back at 0-0 [starting the current week], and the team that’s hot now goes the farthest in the tournament. We’re as hot as anybody else right now, and all you’ve got to do is be better than an opponent for that one day.     “Last year, I know we limped into the playoffs, [so] I like the fact that heading into [these] playoffs, we’re not on a downslide. We’re swinging the bats well, playing good defense and throwing strikes.”     Among Richards’ most recent victories were two over Argo and one against Hillcrest, and those enabled the Bulldogs to wind up second behind cross-town neighbor Oak Lawn in the final South Suburban Conference Red standings. Richards (16-18, 12-7) also rolled over Bolingbrook 12-2 on Saturday.     As for that Wednesday defeat against the Eagles, the Bulldogs’ only wart was a first inning where an error helped Sandburg stage a four-run rally.     “We pitched well [all week] — even Sandburg didn’t really explode on us,” Wujcik said. “And we had some hard outs in that game.     “This was very much like the Lincoln-Way West game [the Saturday before], where you don’t have a lot to say to your play-

ers. They played well, but didn’t win, and sometimes that grates on you.     “Moral victories don’t cut it now; you want to win those games. But when you play a team that, on paper, is better than you because they might have more [NCAA] Division I talent and you hang with them, it tells you something about your team.”     The victory Richards realized against Bolingbrook was of the standard variety, and it resulted from a pair of Bulldogs explosions. Richards tallied five runs in the top of the second to send the Raiders reeling and then added a seven-spot three innings later to complete the mercy-rule win.     The first of those uprisings began after two men had been retired and was highlighted by two-run singles from Jim Wujcik and Charlie Zeschke. Anthony Smith drove in one teammate with his hit.     Back-to-back solo homers by Smith and Zeschke kicked off the Bulldogs’ ensuing round of scoring, and Zeschke struck again later in the frame by smacking an RBI single. Alex Weinert (double) and Shane Mills delivered other RBI hits, while Wujcik chased in a fellow Bulldog with his fielder’s choice.     “We haven’t had many of them,” Coach Wujcik said, referring to the big innings. “One of our downfalls early in the season was that we’d get the first two guys on and then wouldn’t score them. We couldn’t get that key hit.”     The beneficiary of Richards’ 11hit barrage was A.J. Sanchez, who pocketed his second pitching win of the year by scattering five hits over the first four frames. Sandburg 6 Richards 2     As he has chosen to do against several of the Bulldogs’ SouthWest Suburban Conference foes this spring, Wujcik summoned knuckleballer Alex Villafuerte to the hill in an attempt to stymie the Eagles.     “Let those teams try to get themselves out,” Wujcik said.     Sandburg didn’t do that too often last Wednesday, but it also didn’t tee off on Villafuerte, who gave up eight hits and held the Eagles to a total of two runs from the second inning on. The problem for Richards was a first-inning miscue that assisted Sandburg in its creation of a four-run surge.     Only David Cronin (single) and Alec Nelson (groundout) notched RBI for the Eagles. Sandburg’s other markers came courtesy of that Bulldogs error, a passed ball

and double play.     Dan Estrella and Shawn Chiaramonte accounted for Richards’ runs with RBI singles in the fifth and sixth innings, respectively. Richards 12-11 Argo 1-3     Although the Argonauts were one of the two teams not involved in the chase for the SSC Red championship, Wujcik did not want his guys looking past them last week.     “Argo is always dangerous,” he said. “Argo’s a team that if you let them hang around, they’re going to beat you.”     So the Bulldogs didn’t let that happen on either Monday or Tuesday, and the Argonauts were subdued with minimal resistance. Six runs in the third inning allowed Richards to gain a foothold in the first encounter, but it was unable to end the contest early because of the slaughter rule.     “We kind of controlled the whole game,” Wujcik said. “We just couldn’t put it away until the seventh.”     The ’Dogs did so then by using a combination of Jim Wujcik’s double, Eric Hall’s single and an Argo miscue to plate four runs. Triggering Richards’ other multiple-run outburst were Jake Kendryna’s grand slam and Hall’s two-RBI single.     Chiaramonte (sixth-inning double) and Estrella (basesloaded walk in the second) gave the Bulldogs their other markers. Richards finished with a baker’s dozen worth of hits.     Tyler Fortier pitched the first five stanzas on a yield of three hits to collect his fifth victory in six decisions. He fanned five and reliever Justin Naval racked up three more strikeouts over the final two innings while not giving up any hits. ***     Consecutive three-run rallies established some distance between Richards and the Argonauts on Tuesday and enabled the former to complete a sweep of the teams’ two-game series.     Hall socked his 10th homer of the year to begin the Bulldogs’ scoring in the first inning, and the hosts tallied in each of their next four at-bats as well. Hall later added an RBI double and RBI single, Zeschke doubled twice, and Chiaramonte and Harley Miller each belted a run-producing single.     Prospering from the 15-hit onslaught was Kendryna, who upped his ledger to 5-1 by tossing a four-hitter over the first four frames. The win kept Richards (Continued on page 4)

Softball roundup

Lady RedHawks enter playoffs at full throttle By Anthony Nasella     More than her team’s winning of five straight games last week, Marist coach Denise Bromberek cited the Lady RedHawks’ ability to compete at a high level on the eve of the state tournament as their most enduring quality, along with the player camaraderie that continues to be demonstrated each day.     Marist began the week with a convincing 9-0 East Suburban Catholic Conference win over Marian Catholic on Monday and then followed up with a 135 triumph over Oak Forest on Tuesday.     But it was the next two games where the Lady RedHawks once again demonstrated their resilience. First, they defeated a rejuvenated Marian squad 8-7 on Wednesday and then edged Conant 9-8 on Thursday before finishing the week off with a 5-2 win over Cary-Grove on Saturday.     “The girls are working hard every game,” Bromberek said. “When we’re behind in games, they have fought every inning — they did that numerous times during the games we played this past week. They keep fighting back and we’re proud of them for that.”     In the nine-run win over the Lady Spartans, Marist pitcher Andrea Hecker threw a four-hit shutout and continually stranded runners. Most noteworthy was the fifth inning, when Marian left two runners aboard.     Brooke Wyderski, Brooke Wilson and Angela Sorrentino led the way offensively with three hits each, while Kaitlin Kenny contributed a pair of two-run doubles for the Lady RedHawks. In all, they pounded out 15 hits.     Kenny drove in Marist’s first two and last two runs, chasing home both Wilson and Sorrentino in each instance. Sorrentino garnered two RBI with her single and sacrifice fly, and Hecker supported herself with a run-producing hit of her own.     “It was Senior Day and a great win for the girls,” Bromberek said. “There were a lot of positive things that I saw out there. I try to communicate to them every game, since a conference championship was no longer an option, that we have to keep working toward the state playoffs.     “We have to keep improving on the fundamentals and on things that our team needs to improve on. We can’t focus on the uncontrollable things and what the other team is doing, or the weather. We need to do what we can do in order to be successful.” ***     Haley Richy included a threerun homer among her two hits and Katie Caulfield went 4-for-4 with two RBI and three runs to propel the Lady RedHawks past Oak Forest. Erica Nagel contributed three hits, two RBI and two runs to Marist’s cause.     The decision over the Lady Bengals gave the Lady RedHawks their 20th victory of the spring.     “Winning 20 games is always a great accomplishment,” Bromberek said.

Photo by Jason Maholy

Shepard’s Melissa Kelly readies to fire a pitch during last week’s South Suburban Conference Red contest versus Oak Lawn.     In the rematch against Marian Catholic, Julie Trellicoso (4-for-5) scored on an error in the top of the eighth to cap a two-run spree for Marist. Wyderski and Nagel both had two hits and totaled five RBI between them on the Lady RedHawks’ behalf.     Just as Marist had added motivation in Monday’s game because of its Senior Day, the Lady Spartans played equally inspired softball for their Senior Day on Wednesday.     “The team wanted to win for their seniors, and I sure respect that,” Bromberek said. “Marian came out ready to play on their home field. I don’t think our girls were expecting that. [We] came out and battled back, even though we had some defensive errors and mental errors.     “We capitalized on it with our bats and with some great defensive plays. We took some lessons from that game into the next game, and that’s always good to see.” ***     Caulfield’s single in the top of the eighth brought in Lauren Holt with the winning run to help the Lady RedHawks climb past Conant. The hit was one of four on the day for Caulfield.     Wilson (two hits, two RBI, two runs) and Wyderski (two hits, two RBI) were other key figures for Marist.     “Conant scored two runs in first inning,” Bromberek said. “I pulled my freshman pitcher out after six batters and put in our senior starter, and Conant didn’t score again until the sixth.”     In between, the Lady Red-

Hawks (23-9) rebounded with three runs in the third inning and two in the fourth to take a 5-2 lead. The Lady Cougars answered with six tallies in the sixth stanza, but Marist was able to force extra innings by scoring three runs in the seventh.     “Conant has a great-hitting team,” she said. “Their catcher is committed to Oklahoma and their shortstop is committed to Indiana. It was fun to go out there and play because they weren’t originally on the schedule.     “It was a nice pick-up game for us. It’s always good to play against competitive teams, especially right near the end of the season and before the state playoffs.” ***     Wyderski (two hits, three RBI) and Kenny (two hits, two RBI) spearheaded the Lady RedHawks’ charge past Cary-Grove at the Chicago Bandits Jamboree at the Ballpark in Rosemont on Saturday.     What impressed Bromberek about this specific win was that it came one day after Marist held its senior prom. The 6 p.m. start she requested definitely proved beneficial for her sleep-deprived players.     “Some of our seniors were out to prom the night before until about 4 in the morning,” Bromberek said. “I asked for a later game, and we were fortunate that they gave us a late game. Some [players] were lacking sleep, but the defense was stellar.     “Cary-Grove has nice pitchers, good speed and some good hitters. Offensively, we out hit them, and (Continued on page 3)

Mission accomplished Chargers earn share of second in SWSC Red By Ken Karrson     Sixteen games into the schedule, 2013 hinted at being a lost season for Stagg.     Four wins obviously weren’t very many, foul weather was forcing practices indoors with regularity and slowing any improvement, and some stern tests within the SouthWest Suburban Conference Red were still to come. Clearly, the Chargers were staring at an uphill battle.     But after completing a sweep of Thornwood with a 12-0 whitewash last Thursday in its 33rd outing of the spring, Stagg had a chance at posting a plus-.500 record for the regular campaign. A Friday defeat against Reavis ruined that goal, but the Chargers nevertheless accomplished one very important mission: They earned a share of second place in the final SWSC Red standings.     Back-to-back victories over the Thunderbirds nailed down that runner-up position for Stagg, which triumphed in 10 of 14 divisional contests. Only champion Lincoln-Way North was able to take two from the Chargers, while the latter did the same to Bradley-Bourbonnais, Thornton and Thornridge in addition to Thornwood.     Stagg (16-19, 10-4) split twogame sets with Andrew and Lincoln-Way West. The Thunderbolts wound up tied with the Chargers in the No. 2 position.     “We’ll take that, for sure,” Stagg coach Matt O’Neill said. “We definitely played better [as the season went on].

    “What was going to make or break our season was timely hitting and our ability to pick up the ball [cleanly]. It was just a matter of developing some consistency, which is probably true of most high school teams, and I think we’re at the point where we know we can play with most teams if we do things right.”     The Chargers had shown that by playing competitive games against teams like Lincoln-Way North and Sandburg, although those only fell into the moral-victory category. Stagg didn’t have to settle for that against RiversideBrookfield last Monday, however, as it claimed a 7-4 road triumph over a foe that had already soared past the 20-win plateau and pocketed a conference title.     The Chargers demonstrated no fear of the Bulldogs as they tallied three times in their initial at-bat. Brandon Campbell (single) and Drew Bolero (sacrifice fly) notched RBI, Max Strus and Mike Farnan also singled, and the hosts aided Stagg further with two errors and a walk. One of the miscues brought in a run.     R-B responded with a four-spot in its half of the second, but Farnan went deep with a tying homer in the top of the third. The Chargers then loaded the bags with no one out, but failed to do any more scoring.     “Getting off early was nice,” O’Neill said, “but I really thought that [third inning] was going to come back to bite us, especially because they were swinging the bats well.”     However, Strus pretty much

stilled those bats after the second stanza. He scattered seven hits, struck out one and induced 14 ground-ball outs.     And Strus was given an opportunity to gain a victory in the sixth when Farnan broke the 4-all deadlock with his second round-tripper of the afternoon, a three-run shot. Stagg totaled 10 hits. Stagg 12-12 Thornwood 2-0     The Chargers again raced out to a quick lead last Tuesday, doing so with another three-run rally that featured RBI from Strus (triple), Brett Stratinsky (sacrifice fly) and Campbell (groundout).     And unlike R-B, the T’birds didn’t have an adequate response for that early blast. Thornwood scored twice in the third inning, but that left it two runs in arrears, and Stagg stormed back with four runs in the fourth that kept it firmly in command.     Stratinsky belted a two-run double and Peter Angelos stroked a two-RBI single to highlight that surge, and the latter picked up one more RBI in the seventh with his fielder’s choice. Farnan added a two-run double in that later frame as the Chargers eventually constructed a 10-run cushion.     Jeff Goral was the victorious pitcher after going six innings on a yield of just two hits. He whiffed eight and was backed by a robust 12-hit attack.     “We didn’t make any errors and we kind of took care of a game we were supposed to,” O’Neill said. *** (Continued on page 4)


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 23, 2013 Section 2 crown as Davina Gutierrez starred as both a pitcher and hitter. At the plate, she went 3-for-5 with four RBI and two runs scored. Also helping Gutierrez pocket her 18th win of the spring were Abbie Bulthuis (4-for-4, four runs, two stolen bases) and Megan Glynn (two hits, four RBI).     Only six innings were required for Chicago Christian to bounce Illiana, and just five were needed to dispatch the host school in Wednesday’s semifinal. Bulthuis was also 4-for-4 in that contest with three runs and two RBI, while Gutierrez included a double among her pair of hits and knocked in three runs.     Before entering the playoffs, the Lady Knights concluded their regular season by downing Timothy Christian 11-5 on Monday.     Ashley Quinlan (three hits, four RBI), Kami Sidener (two RBI) and Theresa Kraiss all homered for Chicago Christian, while Glynn and Kaycee Pittman each went 3-for-5 with two runs.

MOTHER MCAULEY     After dropping a 3-2 decision to Lincoln-Way North last Monday, the Mighty Macs rebounded to take down Marian Catholic (5-0) and Morton (4-1) on Tuesday and Thursday, respectively.     Taylor Moore and Jessica Alberts had hits for Mother McAuley on Monday, and the latter tossed a six-hitter while silencing the Lady Spartans the next day. Backing Alberts’ pitching effort was Kelly Photo by Jason Maholy O’Donnell, who swatted a twoThe ball falls in front of an Oak lawn outfielder during last week’s run homer. game against Shepard.     Amy Balich had two hits and an RBI double to lift the Macs (17-5) past Morton. tallying twice.     In Saturday’s 4-3 defeat against RICHARDS Bartlett at the Dave Glasscock     The Lady Bulldogs began last Jamboree, Krzus had two RBI and week by defeating Evergreen Park Herold struck out five in throw- 5-1 on Tuesday and improving to ing a complete game for Sand- 17-2 in the SSC Red. (Continued from page 2) burg. Koch doubled and scored     Emily Wetzel (2-for-4) hit a it was nice to see.” for the Eagles, and both Herold two-run double and Sarah Tobin     Next for Marist is the begin- and Cierra Adams also crossed scored three times to boost the ning of the state tournament this the plate. visitors. Stephanie Waller gave week. Based on her team’s reup four hits and struck out eight cent performances and chemistry, SHEPARD in pitching a complete game for Bromberek is excited about the     The Lady Astros picked up a Richards (19-9). Lady RedHawks’ prospects. pair of South Suburban Confer-     On Wednesday, the Lady Bull    “A big reality that is helping us ence Red victories over Oak Lawn dogs dropped a 5-3 decision to is there is good camaraderie be- last week, as well as a nonconfer- Providence Catholic. Dana Cumtween the players,” she said. “We ence triumph over Romeoville. mings had a two-run single for have seven girls back from last     A wild 14-8 conquest of Oak Richards, while Molly Pohrebny year’s state championship team Lawn began Shepard’s workweek added an RBI double. [and] we have a nice group of on Monday, and Francesca Graf-     In a 6-4 loss to York on Saturday, girls. There’s nothing negative or feo played a starring role for the Abby Gentile (two-run double) selfish, or any drama. winners by hitting for the cycle and Tobin (two hits, one run) were     “It’s a great group of girls who while going 5-for-5. Graffeo had the Lady Bulldogs’ headliners. love the game and want to play. a hand in 11 of the Lady Astros’ They’re a lot of fun to coach.” runs, as she knocked in a halfSTAGG dozen and scored five herself.     The Lady Chargers captured SANDBURG     Stephanie Brand and Melissa three victories last week, including     The Lady Eagles went 4-1 last Kelly shared the pitching duties routs of Thornridge (16-0) and week as they defeated Plainfield for Shepard (22-7, 15-4). Reily Thornwood (16-3) in SWSC Red East, Lincoln-Way East, Minooka McTeague (two hits, three RBI) encounters. Stagg also slipped and Homewood-Flossmoor while and Morgan Jozsa (two-run dou- past De La Salle 6-5. only losing to Bartlett. ble) were the Lady Spartans’ top     Tuesday’s vanquishing of the     Sandburg started off with a 4- performers. Lady Falcons was made possible 2 victory over Plainfield East on     Dominique Tanchez’s two hom- by Sam Owens (two hits, four Monday. Meg Flaherty had a two- ers and four RBI carried the Lady runs, one RBI) and Mia Moustarun single and Karli McLaughlin Astros to a 13-2 victory over Oak kas (double, three RBI), while clubbed a solo homer to fuel the Lawn on Thursday. Kelly scat- Kyla Frain (3-for-3, double, three Lady Eagles’ attack, while pitcher tered six hits to earn the pitching RBI, two runs), Lizzy Rapacz Sarah Herold threw a four-hitter win in the five-inning contest. (2-for-3, double, four RBI, three and struck out 12.     Jozsa came through with two runs) and Briana Minet (two hits,     In Tuesday’s 9-7 SouthWest hits, including an RBI double, and three runs, two RBI, two steals) Suburban Conference Blue tri- Rachel Burba socked a homer for were the Lady Chargers’ stalwarts umph over the Lady Griffins, the Lady Spartans. versus the Lady Thunderbirds on Kathleen Steffensen’s two-RBI     Sandwiched between those suc- Thursday. single in the top of the eighth cesses was a 9-0 whitewash of Ro-     Ashley Bartkowiak allowed just capped a three-run burst for meoville on Wednesday. Tanchez two hits to Thornwood and struck Sandburg that put it in front to also went deep in that game and out four while earning her fourth stay. Candice Koch (3-for-5, three finished with three RBI, while pitching win of the season. runs) slugged two homers and Samantha Newhall homered and     Lexi Minet logged the victory chalked up four RBI to pace the drove in two runs. for Stagg (8-14, 7-7) last Friday Lady Eagles at the plate.     In the circle, Brand fired a against De La Salle and also *** three-hitter in improving her chipped in offensively with two     For the second game in a row, record to 13-3. hits and two RBI. Sandburg delivered a big hit that     Briana Minet was 4-for-4 with led to a victory, this one a 5-4 verOAK LAWN a homer and double to speardict over Minooka on Wednesday.     The Lady Spartans (10-14, 9- head the offense, and she comKatie Krzus’ two-out single in the 10) did enjoy a bit of success last plemented those stats with two bottom of the seventh scored Koch week, as they slipped past Reavis RBI and two runs. Rapacz was with the deciding run. 3-2 in an SSC Red matchup on 2-for-3 with a double, two RBI     Koch had an RBI single ear- Tuesday. and one run. lier in the frame for the Lady     Alexa Rothman pitched a Eagles, who scored three times complete game and Sam Dillon EVERGREEN PARK to overcome a 4-2 deficit. Herold sparked Oak Lawn’s offense with     Bethany Salazar drilled a threepitched three scoreless innings in two RBI. run homer and Maddie Bojacek relief for the win. (4-1) tossed a complete game to lift     In Thursday’s 10-4 SWSC Blue CHICAGO CHRISTIAN the visiting Lady Mustangs (12-12, win over the Lady Vikings, Ellie     The Lady Knights won three 9-10) to a 4-0 SSC Red victory over Forkin (3-for-4) belted a pair of times last week, with the last of Eisenhower last Thursday. two-run homers to lead host Sand- those securing a Class 2A Chicago burg (20-13, 9-5). Herold (eight Agricultural Science Regional title QUEEN OF PEACE strikeouts) pitched a complete for them on Saturday.     The Pride suffered a 7-1 road game for the Lady Eagles in ad-     Chicago Christian beat longtime defeat against Fenwick last Tuesdition to providing two hits and rival Illiana Christian 17-4 for the day.

Softball roundup

Spartans (Continued from page 1) Tinley meant to them in regard to their pursuit of the conference championship.     “We told them, ‘If you guys win out the rest of the week, you’re champs and nobody can take that away from you,’” he said. Oak Lawn 4 Leyden 3     Beating the Eagles Saturday afternoon in Franklin Park meant nothing to the Spartans as far as the conference crown was concerned, but Gerny felt it was a good tune-up for the playoffs, which begin today against Reavis in the Class 4A Mt. Carmel Regional.     If so, then future Oak Lawn opponents better be wary of Kametas, who remained unbeaten on the year by pitching four innings of one-hit ball and fanning seven. Only one Leyden batter was able to coax a free pass from him.

    “He was lights out — the kids on Leyden couldn’t touch him,” Gerny said of Kametas. “He’s so confident out there that once he gets on a roll, he deflates the other team. He overmatched their batters.”     Swatek encountered some difficulties in the final frame of his three-inning relief appearance. Gerny blamed it on a shifting strike zone, but whatever the reason, the Eagles reduced the Spartans’ 4-0 edge to 4-3 and filled the sacks before Swatek retired them for the last time on a pair of flyouts.     Oak Lawn plated three runs in the second inning and added what became a crucial marker in the top of the seventh. Credited with RBI were Witkowski (two-run single), Thome (single) and Kametas (double). Kametas chased in Rafacz after the latter singled and then stole two bases.     Before squaring off with Reavis for the third time this season, the Spartans clashed with Andrew and Morton this past Monday and

Tuesday, respectively, to wrap up the regular season.     “We could practice those two days, but facing live pitching is so much better to prepare you for the playoffs,” Gerny said.

Statistics Oak Lawn Tinley Park

010 113 0 - 6 000 100 0 - 1

Oak Lawn 2B: Thome 2, Krzyciak, Swatek. 3B: Kametas. HR: Quillin. RBI: Kametas 2, Rafacz 2, Quillin, Thome. WP: Kametas (7-0). TF North Oak Lawn

000 020 0 - 2 401 110 x - 7

Oak Lawn 2B: Krzyciak, Swatek. 3B: Rafacz. RBI: Kametas 2, Dunne, Quillin, Swatek, Thome, Witkowski. WP: Dunne (4-5). Oak Lawn Leyden

030 000 1 - 4 000 000 3 - 3

Oak Lawn 2B: Kametas. RBI: Witkowski 2, Kametas, Thome. WP: Kametas (8-0).

3

RedHawks in the pink Marist closes schedule with a rush By Ken Karrson     In a spring filled with blue moods, the RedHawks suddenly find themselves in the pink.     After slogging its way through most of the 2013 schedule and exhibiting few signs of becoming a force on the diamond, Marist unexpectedly did much to change minds last week. In the span of five days, the RedHawks defeated Mt. Carmel, Downers Grove South and Andrew, and immediately wiped away the negative impact of earlier struggles in the process.     And while Marist entered the Class 4A TF North Regional this past Monday with a sub-.500 record, RedHawks coach Tom Fabrizio was convinced things are unquestionably looking up for his group.     “I’ve got a feeling we’re not going to creep up on anybody,” he said. “We’re 13-16, and I don’t think there’s a team in the state that would be anxious to face us.     “It’s playoff time and it’s fun. We’re doing the things we need to do and we hope we can roll this into the playoffs.”     The Caravan were the first hurdle Marist cleared, and that 6-2 win last Tuesday offered the latest example of why sophomore Rich Kairis has become a Fabrizio favorite. Kairis handcuffed Mt. Carmel batters most of the day and wound up going the distance on the hill.

    “He has quickly become the ace of our staff with minimal starts,” Fabrizio said. “It’s certainly a turnaround [in fortunes for us], and the biggest thing about this [past] week was that we played good defense and threw strikes. We did some [solid] fundamental things execution-wise.     “I don’t know how consistently we can do it, but if we can make enough plays on defense to keep us in games, I like our chances.”     Cody Bohanek, the RedHawks’ lone representative on the AllEast Suburban Catholic Conference baseball squad, and Bryan Polak were the offensive ringleaders behind Kairis. ***     Downers Grove South was up next, and a quartet of Marist hurlers joined forces to shut out the Mustangs 3-0 on Thursday. Kairis was part of that foursome, and Fabrizio also gave freshman callup Jack Butler an inning of work that delivered positive results.     Kairis made an impact at the plate as well, as his suicide squeeze supplied the RedHawks with one of their runs. Polak’s single drove in another.     “We made some big plays,” Fabrizio said, “and when our better players play well, we tend to be successful.”     Of course, that plan has backfired a few times this season. So what made the final week of the regular slate different?     “It seems like this time of year,

our kids’ confidence grows, even when things haven’t always gone well,” Fabrizio said.     This year’s veterans have an easy point of reference — they were part of Marist’s superb 2012 playoff run, which took the RedHawks to the cusp of a Final Four berth. Like the 2013 club, Marist’s previous team did not wear the look of a potential juggernaut for most of the regular season.     “We’ve just got to convince them they’re better than their record,” Fabrizio said, in explanation of his coaching strategy both then and now. “There were times we could have gone crazy, but we didn’t. We maintained being positive and [the players] finally started to believe.” ***     Andrew threatened to ruin the RedHawks’ growing momentum when it grabbed a 3-0 lead on Saturday, but there was no sense of foreboding in the Marist dugout. Instead, the RedHawks roared back with a five-spot in the fourth inning, a rally sparked by Polak’s bases-clearing double.     With Kairis chipping in a couple RBI of his own, Marist went on to log a 9-6 triumph over the Thunderbolts. Kairis, the last of three pitchers, wrapped up the win by holding Andrew down in the late going and securing a win for Robert Hovey.     If successful versus host TF North this Monday, the RedHawks will tangle with Lockport today.

Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella     When Stagg’s girls’ soccer team battled rival Sandburg to a 1-1 tie in the middle of the regular season, Lady Chargers coach Chris Campos called it an inspiring moment for his players and a performance that kept them dreaming of bigger things.     After defeating HomewoodFlossmoor for a Class 3A regional championship last week, Stagg will have another opportunity to be inspired when it faces the Lady Eagles this week in the semifinals of the Class 3A Andrew Sectional.     “We came prepared in that first game [against Sandburg], and we’re going to continue to make adjustments when we play them in the sectional,” Campos said. “Sandburg, though, is a hard team to prepare for because they have more than just one or two players who can hurt you. They have a bunch of players who can beat from different spots on the field.     “They’re so talented and loaded across the board. We’re going to put together a very prepared game plan. We gave them too many chances in that second half, and they’re the kind of team that makes you pay for that.”     Campos said an aid in preparing is the quality of coaches — past and present — who have helped him along his own journey as a first-year coach.     “Fortunately, I have a terrific coaching staff,” he said. “Mike [Kealy] coached this program for a many years and [assistant coach] Randy Zolk has been doing this for many years, having also played at the collegiate level.     “We’re going to be prepared and ready. I know the girls are going to give another tremendous effort. They’re playing at a high level right now.     “We’re going to throw the history and records away, and play Sandburg with all we have. The tie was very inspiring, but we’re hungry for more.”     In the regional victory over H-F, Julia Gawlak’s hat trick catapulted Stagg (10-4-3) to the championship. The Lady Chargers beat Kelly 7-0 in the semifinals on Tuesday, as Jazmin Castanon scored two goals.     Ann Marie Gal scored Stagg’s initial goal versus the Lady Vikings four minutes into the match on a penalty kick. Gawlak’s first tally then gave the Lady Chargers (18-4) a 2-0 edge they nearly maintained until intermission.     “We were pretty happy to be up 2-0 in first half against H-F in a regional final,” Campos said. “We came off the gas pedal a little bit after that because they cut it to 2-1 late in first half.”     But it was after the break that Campos thought his team played perhaps its best half of the season. Gawlak added two more goals, while Stagg’s defense smothered H-F’s attack.     “We came out, moved the ball well and took H-F out of their rhythm,” Campos said. “We had many scoring opportunities, which two resulted in goals.     “Julia is definitely playing at a very high level. She’s going to be key piece of whatever success we can attain against Sandburg. We have to get her some looks.”

    Netminder Jen Duffner had five saves in the first half and only one in the second, as the Lady Chargers prevented the Lady Vikings from making inroads. Allison Stefan was a ringleader for Stagg on the defensive side.     “Allison played her best game of the season,” Campos said. “We were taking care of the ball.     “Our marking backs have played a ton of minutes this year, and they were very effective against H-F. They’re the main reason why we’ve only lost four games all season. The defense is playing at a high level.”     The victory over H-F — a team that has been a tough opponent for the Lady Chargers over the past two years — was, understandably, a thrilling one for Campos.     “We were very excited to have beaten H-F,” Campos said. “The girls had put in a lot of work. We had a really good week for practice. We came out as a fourth seed this year in regionals, so we were putting together a nice season.     “Everybody is pitching in right now. It really is a team effort that has carried us this far. We played together real well on Saturday against H-F and came out top.     “The girls are very excited to move on and, more importantly, to be able to play Sandburg, our rival, again. They are definitely looking forward to it.” ***     Sandburg advanced to the sectional round following an impressive 7-0 win over Reavis Friday night. Sam Messina, Morgan Manzke, Jen Olsen, Sammi Milwit, Emily Osoba, Rachel Mokersky and Meghan Carmody all found the back of the net for the Lady Eagles (15-5-3).     Sandburg advanced to the championship match of its own Class 3A regional by notching a 7-0 semifinal win over Curie last Tuesday. Once again, seven different players tallied for the Lady Eagles.     Doing so on this occasion were Messina, Osoba, Manzke, Sarah Dewolf, Mokersky, Milwit and Amanda Kester. ***     Shepard was eliminated from the state tournament last Tuesday when it dropped a 3-1 decision to host Marist in a Class 3A regional semifinal. BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL     Sandburg collected three wins last week as it downed Joliet West, Brother Rice and Bolingbrook. The Crusaders pushed the Eagles to three sets on Tuesday, while both of Sandburg’s SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue foes were vanquished in straight sets.     Ian Zalewski’s 25 assists and Paul Chmura’s nine kills keyed the Eagles’ 25-14, 25-18 triumph over the Tigers last Monday, and Chmura was a central figure against Rice as well as he registered a match-high 18 kills in Sandburg’s 25-22, 23-25, 25-16 win. The Eagles used a late 18-9 run to finally put the Crusaders away.     Big efforts from Zalewski (42 assists), Mike Scannell (13 kills) and 6-foot-10 middle blocker John Hodul (nine kills, one block) boosted Sandburg (25-7, 8-2) to a 25-15, 25-16 verdict over the Raiders on Wednesday. ***

    Stagg (18-7, 6-5) split a pair of SWSC matches last week as they beat Andrew in straight sets before falling short of Lincoln-Way East in a three-set encounter.     Wednesday’s 25-23, 25-19 victory over the Thunderbolts resulted largely from strong performances by Nick Stanek (16 assists) and Kamil Barnas (11 kills). The Griffins downed the Chargers 25-18, 19-25, 25-18 the next day. ***     Oak Forest pinned a 25-19, 25-27, 25-19 defeat on Shepard (11-16, 6-10) in a South Suburban Conference crossover match last Thursday despite 17 kills from the Astros’ Kyle Joy. BOYS’ TENNIS     Sandburg captured Saturday’s Stagg Sectional handily by totaling 34 points and finishing 19 ahead of both the host Chargers and Oak Forest.     The singles finale was an allEagles affair as Eric Pontow beat teammate Jonluke Passett 6-0, 6-1 for the title. It was also Sandburg-versus-Sandburg in the doubles championship match, as the duo of Jimmy GradowskiTrent Sichelski got past fellow Eagles Ryan Schusler-Jake Schramm 6-4, 6-4.     Keying Stagg’s showing was sophomore Brendan Wolan, who defeated Oak Lawn’s Rami Araibe 7-6 (7-5), 6-4 to take third in the singles category.     Chicago Christian tied Oak Lawn for fourth in the team standings at Stagg, with the doubles tandem of Seth Hamstra-Austin Vander Veld providing the Knights’ top exhibition by placing fourth.     Shepard wound up tied for sixth with Richards at the Stagg Sectional. BOYS’ TRACK     Sandburg qualified three relay teams and three individual qualifiers for state out of last week’s sectional.     Representing the Eagles in Charleston will be long jumper LeMonte Booker, who went 22 feet, 4 ½ inches in the sectional meet; 1,600 runner Pat McMahon (4 minutes, 19.47 seconds); 800 runner Nicholas Prajka (1:57.24); and the 400-, 1,600- and 3,200meter relay units, which clocked respective times of 41.99, 3:22.71 and 7:53.84) last week. ***     Making the trip down Interstate 57 for Shepard will be Londell Lee, Armon Lansdown and the 800-relay team. Lee qualified for state in both the high jump (61) and long jump (22-3), while Lansdown advanced in the triple jump (43-10 ¾).     The Astros’ relay foursome completed their race in 1:31.19 at the sectional. ***     Competing for Stagg at state will be high jumper Anthony Gardner, who went 6-1 at the sectional meet.

10 9

11 12 1

2 3

Let us know you want afterschool programs in your area.

Call 1-800-USA-LEARN.


4 Section 2 Thursday, May 23, 2013 Moraine athletics wrap

The Regional News - The Reporter

Cyclones leaves bumpy 2013 season behind By Maura Vizza     Things aren’t always as they seem.     A bumpy first year for Moraine Valley College baseball skipper Cole Farmer masked some notable achievements by the 2013 Cyclones and overshadowed the prospects for a better 2014 campaign.     In addition to the unfavorable weather that canceled 10 games, Moraine had to endure a string of losses that contributed to an overall 13-26 record and a 4-10 mark within the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference. The Cyclones’ season ended in the National Junior College Athletic Association Region IV Tournament.     “What it came down to was a lack of determination and

Chargers (Continued from page )     Thursday was more of the same for Stagg, which immediately shoved the T’birds into a 6-0 hole and never wavered. Nick Novak (two-run double), Sean Dwyer (two-run double) and Campbell (two-run single) were the principal figures behind the Chargers’ eruption.     Stagg hurler Vito Cali didn’t let Thornwood ever get its bearings, and the margin grew wider with each ensuing plate appearance. The Chargers tacked on two more runs in the second inning, three in the third and one in the fourth. Delivering RBI were Farnan (tworun single), Bolero (single, hit by pitch), Dwyer (groundout) and C.J. Casey (single).     While Stagg’s 15-hit display was made possible by a number of different people, O’Neill pegged Farnan as the main man behind the Chargers’ burgeoning offense. The senior concluded the regular schedule with a .453 average, more than 30 runs scored and two-dozen stolen bases.     “We put him in the three hole and that’s given him more opportunities to drive in runs,” O’Neill said. “We originally had him batting leadoff because he’s fast and we wanted to get him as many at-bats as we could, but this has worked out well.     “I knew our pitching was going to keep us in all the games, but we’ve also been getting the hitting and defense [lately].” Reavis 7 Stagg 3     Both of those areas sagged on Friday, however, as the Chargers were limited to four hits and committed four errors, a combination

commitment from some players,” Farmer said. “They were unenthusiastic and didn’t want to play. That makes it hard to win. You want players to really love the game.”     Farmer said he plans to remedy that bout of malaise with some strong recruits.     As for the season just ended, Moraine did pick up big wins over 2012 NJCAA Division III national champion Joliet Junior College, Triton and Elgin. Several players also had standout individual performances, including first-team all-conference catcher Mario Hernandez, who finished with a hefty .415 average.     “I’m proud Mario gutted it out,” Farmer said. “He loves baseball and showed it every time he was on the diamond. He put up good numbers and

had a good year. We’ll be sad to see him go.”     Freshman southpaw Mike Levigne (Sandburg) was Moraine’s mound ace as he put together several solid outings. Another ex-Eagle, freshman Brandon Martinez, received a nod to the all-conference first team, while freshman pitcher Kyle Belluomini (Stagg) and sophomore Scott Petrovich were second-team selections on the All-ISCC squad.     When Farmer was hired late last year, he didn’t have time to recruit most of his roster. He already has some talented players signed to play next season and will recruit more athletes who will fit comfortably into his system of fast-paced ball.     “It was a frustrating year this first time around, but things are on the uptick,” Farmer said.

that made it easier for the Rams to prevail.     The most vivid illustration of Stagg’s woes occurred in the third inning, when Reavis tallied three runs without benefit of a base hit. Included in the Rams’ outburst were two Chargers miscues, a pair of free passes, a wild pitch and successful double steal.     With second place in the SWSC Red already locked up, did Stagg players suffer from an emotional letdown?     “I don’t think so,” O’Neill said. “I think, for whatever reason, we just didn’t play well. We can’t afford to make errors and walk guys because we’re not going to score seven or eight runs against a good team.”     Another Chargers error was responsible for Reavis’ second-inning run, while the Rams slugged a homer in the first. Stagg’s only response during the first half of the game was Novak’s RBI single in the second frame.     The Chargers scored again in the fifth and sixth stanzas, but they also stranded a total of five baserunners in those instances. A strikeout and popout shortcircuited the first of those rallies, while a double play ended the sixth.     Campbell (fielder’s choice) and Farnan (bases-loaded walk) had Stagg’s last two RBI. Angelos was tagged with the pitching defeat. St. Joseph 3 Stagg 0     Eight more runners were unable to find their way home after reaching base on Saturday, and as a result the Chargers were shut out.     The inning that haunted O’Neill was the first, when his club put men on first and second

with no one out, but came away empty. Stagg was down 1-0 at that point.     “Not getting those runs in the first was a momentum killer,” O’Neill said.     A two-RBI double gave St. Joseph a three-run edge in the fifth and pretty much salted away the victory for them. The Chargers were held in check from the fourth through the sixth innings, but finally put two men aboard in the seventh, although that circumstance also failed to come to fruition.

Statistics Stagg R-B

301 003 0 - 7 040 000 0 - 4

Stagg HR: Farnan 2. RBI: Farnan 4, Bolero, Campbell. WP: Strus (5-2). Stagg Thornwood

310 400 4 - 12 002 000 0 -   2

Stagg 2B: Dwyer, Farnan, Stratinsky. 3B: Strus. RBI: Angelos 3, Stratinsky 3, Farnan 2, Campbell, Rankin, Strus. WP: Goral (4-4). Thornwood Stagg

000 00 -   0 623 1x - 12

Stagg 2B: Dwyer, Novak. RBI: Dwyer 3, Bolero 2, Campbell 2, Farnan 2, Novak 2, Casey. WP: Cali (2-2). Stagg Reavis

010 011 0 - 3 113 110 x - 7

Stagg RBI: Campbell, Farnan, Novak. LP: Angelos (1-1). St. Joseph Stagg

100 020 0 - 3 000 000 0 - 0

Stagg 2B: Novak. LP: Strus (5-3).

Bulldogs (Continued from page 2) mathematically alive for a share of the SSC Red title.     “I really thought that was amazing,” Coach Wujcik said. “I didn’t think we had much of a shot [earlier in the schedule], but we were in it to the final day.” Richards 18 Hillcrest 2     The Bulldogs did their part to keep the championship dream alive by drubbing the Hawks on Thursday, but when Oak Lawn took care of business that same day against TF North, the Spartans wore the crown and Richards had to settle for being runner-up in the standings.     Nevertheless, the Bulldogs were impressive in routing Hillcrest, which got buried beneath two straight six-run blasts. Richards struck for that many runs in both the third and fourth innings, with

Hall (two-run homer, RBI double), Jim Wujcik (two-run double), Estrella (two-run double) and Mills (two-run single) all playing pivotal roles.     Estrella also knocked in two runs with his second-inning triple, while Mills singled in a third. Ryan Thompson logged the pitching win.     The Bulldogs met Eisenhower this past Monday in their own Class 4A regional. If successful against the Cardinals, Richards was to clash with Andrew on Wednesday.

A FISH

“ I FEEL LIKE

and in eight years I’ll be an alcoholic. I’ll start drinking in middle school, just at parties. But my parents won’t start talking to me about it until high school. And by then, I’ll already be in some trouble. The thing is, my parents won’t even see it coming.

START TALKING BEFORE THEY START DRINKING Kids who drink before age 15 are 5 times more likely to have alcohol problems when they’re adults. To learn more, go to www.stopalcoholabuse.gov or call 1.800.729.6686

A FISH ”

Richards 2B: Wujcik. RBI: Chiaramonte, Estrella. LP: Villafuerte (1-3). Sandburg 2B: Martinez. RBI: Cronin, Nelson. WP: Meeuwes (1-0). Richards Hillcrest

036 63 - 18 020 00 -   2

Richards 2B: Estrella, Hall, Miller, Mills, Wujcik, Zeschke. 3B: Estrella. HR: Hall. 016 001 4 - 12 RBI: Estrella 4, Hall 3, Mills 3, Wujcik 000 000 1 -   1 2, Kendryna, Marchione. WP: Thompson (2-3). Richards 2B: Chiaramonte, Wujcik. HR: Kendryna. RBI: Kendryna 4, Hall Richards 050 07 - 12 3, Chiaramonte, Estrella, Wujcik. WP: Bolingbrook 010 01 -   2 Fortier (5-1). Richards 2B: Weinert. HR: Smith, ZeArgo 011 010 0 -   3 schke. RBI: Zeschke 4, Wujcik 3, Smith Richards 212 330 x - 11 2, Mills, Weinert. WP: Sanchez (2-4).

either Washington or Juarez this past Wednesday in a Class 4A Fenwick Regional semifinal. (Continued from page 1)     “We’ve pitched and played detwo squads then swapped solo fense and, for the most part, hit tallies in the sixth, St. Laurence the ball well, but we can’t have using Kevin White’s sacrifice fly lackadaisical days,” Lotus said. to plate Wilson (double) and Rice “We need to find that middle countering with a Dyke sacrifice ground, where we stay consisfly that brought in Kevin Biondic tent after playing in emotional games.” (double). 8     Miller (single) and Marik (sac- Downers Grove South 3 rifice fly) concluded the Vikings’ St. Laurence scoring in the seventh, and those     Lotus thought the Vikings eninsurance runs offset the Cru- dured a letdown last Tuesday saders’ last bit of noisemaking, when they fell short against the which occurred by mixing a walk, Mustangs. Coming off its conferErich Lieser’s double and Luke ence title-clinching performance of the week before, St. Laurence Liebforth’s sacrifice fly.     Wood earned the pitching tri- spotted Downers Grove South a umph by striking out six and scat- 4-0 lead early and was unable to tering nine hits. Ian McGinnis ever catch up.     “It’s tough to get up for evtook the loss for Rice. Mt. Carmel 11 ery game — we found that out,” St. Laurence 1 Lotus said. “We didn’t play well     The Vikings suffered through on Tuesday. The energy wasn’t a rare sub-par effort on Friday, there.” as four errors sabotaged them     And, in Lotus’ opinion, oppoagainst the Caravan in another nents are particularly targeting Bajenski Tournament outing. Mt. the Vikings because of the latter’s Carmel scored three runs in its league affiliation. initial turn at bat and, accord-     “There’s so much publicity ing to Lotus, St. Laurence “never about the Catholic League Blue,” really recovered and didn’t have he said. “I think it’s the best conference in the state, but others much in the way of offense.”     “It was disappointing to come probably don’t think so, and teams out and play like that,” he said, in other conferences want to show “and it was that bad. We played that. We’re dealing with that every like we just got off a plane. We day, and if we don’t match that didn’t have energy from the will to win, we’re going to have tough days.” start.”     Lewis’ RBI single chased in the     Tuesday counted as one of Vikings’ lone marker in the sixth those, despite clutch hits from inning, but that wasn’t enough to Miller (RBI double), Wood (RBI prolong the game as the Caravan single) and Kornacker (RBI sinhad already piled up enough runs gle). St. Laurence managed only three other safeties and was guilty to possess a double-digit lead. St. Rita 5 of three errors on the defensive St. Laurence 2 side, a negative combo for starting     Another loss was doled out to pitcher Kyle Estand, who surrenthe Vikings on Saturday, this time dered three earned runs over four by the Mustangs, who made the frames and got pinned with his most of their five hits off Lewis. first loss of the season. 12 Three of the bloop variety were Brother Rice 1 part of St. Rita’s three-run fourth Peoria Notre Dame inning that put it in front to     The setback against St. Laurence was the Crusaders’ only stay.     St. Laurence remained shaky in stumble in the Bajenski Tournathe field, as evidenced by three ment, and they began their revival more errors, and it managed just with a romp past the Irish on four hits for the second straight Friday. A seven-run fourth inning enabled Rice (21-14) to close out day.     “I thought we could have done a Peoria Notre Dame prematurely better job and I was pretty upset via the slaughter rule. with our guys,” Lotus said. “But     Biondic (two hits, two runs) the more I thought about it, it had and Redic Richardson (two hits, to be tough on our guys to play including a double, one run) both that many games in three days. garnered three RBI to lead a group I was exhausted and I didn’t play of six players who had entries in that statistical category. Fergua single inning.”     Lewis’ first-inning single and son (double) and Dyke (two hits) third-inning double supplied the supplied two RBI apiece, while Vikings’ RBI, but those weren’t Lieser and Brian Musielak both enough to salvage a triumph for knocked in one him on the mound. Lewis fanned     Musielak also earned his sevsix and now has 73 strikeouts in enth pitching victory by throwing only 46 innings while carrying a a three-hitter. 11 minuscule 0.30 earned-run aver- Brother Rice New Trier 9 age for the season.     While Lotus forgave his team’s     The Crusaders secured fifth drop-off later in the week, he place in the tourney for themdidn’t want St. Laurence players selves by outlasting the Trevto accept that without reaction as ians in a high-scoring affair on they prepared for the postseason. Saturday. The Vikings were slated to meet     Rice put itself in prime position for success by exploding for eight runs in the third inning, which gave it a 9-4 lead. The margin grew to 11-4 in the top of the sixth before New Trier fought back with a five-spot in the botWITH NO WATER. tom of that same stanza. WITH NO WATER.     Reliever Mike Gianakos finally ended –JACOB, AGEthe 5 Trevians’ rally and then –JACOB, AGE 5 pitched an uneventful seventh DESCRIBINGDESCRIBING ASTHMA ASTHMA to notch his fourth save. Mike Enriquez bagged the win after WITH NO WATER. striking out five, surrendering two earned runs and scattering eight –JACOB, AGE 5 hits over the first five frames. DESCRIBING ASTHMA     Biondic and Lieser went a combined 6-for-7 at the plate to lead the Crusaders’ charge. Each player included a double among his three hits, and between them they drove in five runs and scored three others. You know how to react     Also lending a hand were Ferto their asthma attacks. Here’s how to prevent them. guson (two hits, triple, three RBI, two runs), Kevin Sullivan (two 1- 866 - NO -ATTACKS hits, three runs), Dyke (double, EVEN ONE ATTACK IS ONE TOO MANY. RBI, run) and Liebforth (one hit, For more information log onto You know how to react www.noattacks.org one RBI, one run). to or their asthma attacks. You know how to react call your doctor. Here’s how to prevent them. Brother Rice 11 to their asthma attacks. 1- 866 - NO -ATTACKS Shepard 1 Here’s how to prevent them. EVEN ONE ATTACK IS ONE TOO MANY.     One day before traveling to For information log -ATTACKS onto 1-more 866 - NO Benedictine for the start of the www.noattacks.org Bajenski call your doctor. IS ONE TOO EVENorONE ATTACK MANY.Tournament, the Crusaders bashed the Astros. Five-run For more information log onto uprisings in both the third and www.noattacks.org fourth innings set the table for or call your doctor. Rice’s mercy-rule triumph.

“ I FEEL LIKE ”

000 011 0 - 2 401 100 x - 6

Richards Argo

“ I FEEL LIKE

My name is Peter,

Richards Sandburg

Statistics

Vikings

A FISH

Richards 2B: Zeschke 2, Hall. HR: Hall. RBI: Hall 4, Chiaramonte, Miller. WP: Kendryna (5-1).

    Dyke’s homer actually got the Crusaders’ scoring underway in the second, and he ended the day with two hits, three RBI and three runs. Lieser (two RBI), Kyle Hilliard (two RBI), Biondic and Musielak all joined Dyke at the two-hit level. Other RBI men included Richardson (single), Gianakos (sacrifice fly) and Danny Roche (single).     Biondic recorded the pitching win by stopping Shepard on five hits and whiffing one. The Astros ruined his shutout bid by plating an earned run in the top of the fourth. A bad throw following Nick Schwartzkopf’s single accounted for the marker.     Schwartzkopf’s double was Shepard’s lone extra-base hit. Brendan Hermann absorbed the defeat for the Astros. Brother Rice 4 Montini 0     Also coming up short against the Crusaders were the Broncos, who were blanked by Enriquez last Monday. Montini scratched out just three hits against Enriquez, who struck out nine and walked only one.     Rice tallied twice in the fourth to provide its hurler with the only runs he’d really need. Biondic’s leadoff double eventually led to the first marker, as he crossed the plate on Dyke’s fielder’s choice. Hilliard then laid down a squeeze to score Richardson, who had drawn a walk.     Liebforth’s double and Musielak’s single were responsible for the Crusaders’ third run, and following that fifth-inning tally was one in the seventh, which materialized on Dyke’s sacrifice fly.     Rice meets Providence Catholic in a Class 4A Sandburg Regional semifinal contest on Friday.

Statistics DGS St. Laurence

220 201 1 - 8 001 200 0 - 3

St. Laurence 2B: Miller. RBI: Kornacker, Miller, Wood. LP: Estand (3-1). St. Laurence Lincoln-Way North

302 108 - 14 000 000 -   0

St. Laurence 2B: Kornacker, Lewis, White. RBI: Kornacker 2, Lewis 2, Marik 2, Wood 2, Haugh, Miller, Rybakowski, Tholl, Wilson. WP: Kornacker (6-1). St. Laurence Brother Rice

201 001 2 - 6 000 201 1 - 4

St. Laurence 2B: Lewis, Wilson. RBI: Lewis 2, Miller 2, Marik, White. WP: Wood (6-1). Brother Rice 2B: Biondic, Ferguson, Lieser. RBI: Dyke 2, Ferguson, Liebforth. LP: McGinnis (3-6). Mt. Carmel St. Laurence

310 304 - 11 000 001 -   1

St. Laurence RBI: Lewis. LP: Gutierrez (2-3). St. Rita St. Laurence

000 300 2 - 5 101 000 0 - 2

St. Laurence 2B: Lewis. RBI: Lewis 2. LP: Lewis (6-3). Peoria Notre Dame Brother Rice

010 00 -   1 203 7x - 12

Brother Rice 2B: Ferguson, Richardson. RBI: Biondic 3, Richardson 3, Dyke 2, Ferguson 2, Lieser, Musielak. WP: Musielak (7-2). Brother Rice New Trier

108 002 0 - 11 220 005 0 -   9

Brother Rice 2B: Biondic, Dyke, Lieser. 3B: Ferguson. RBI: Biondic 3, Ferguson 3, Lieser 2, Dyke, Liebforth. WP: Enriquez (5-2). Shepard Brother Rice

000 10 -   1 015 5x - 11

Shepard LP: Hermann (1-3). Brother Rice HR: Dyke. RBI: Dyke 3, Hilliard 2, Lieser 2, Gianakos, Richardson, Roche. WP: Biondic (2-2). Brother Rice Montini

000 210 1 - 4 000 000 0 - 0

Brother Rice 2B: Biondic 2, Liebforth. RBI: Dyke 2, Hilliard, Musielak. WP: Enriquez (4-2).


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 23, 2013 Section 2

5

Community sports news

Submitted photo

Evergreen Park High School athletic director Jim Soldan welcomed 20 student-athletes as the newest names on the school’s Varsity Leaders Wall, which honors Mustangs who have earned at least five varsity letters in their prep careers.

Twenty Evergreen athletes put on ‘Leaders Wall’

    Twenty student-athletes have been chosen for inclusion on Evergreen Park High School’s Varsity Athletic Leaders Wall.     The wall was established to showcase athletes who have received a minimum of five varsity letters during their prep careers. Among the 2012-13 selections was Megan Beckow, who has amassed 10 letters.     Also honored were Jeremy Esparza (eight letters), Anthony Betts (seven), Rachel Koronkiewicz (seven), John Measner (seven), Maggie O’Toole (seven), Rachel Torrez (seven), Taeylor Jackson (six), Mike Reuter (six), Paul Romano (six), Kyle Venhuizen (six), Anthony Briante, Colleen Burns, Chelsea Christopher, Katelyn Easterhouse, Monica Falconer, Claritza Garcia, Matthew Lovett, Keith Ritter and Samantha Schickel.

Rice topples Marist in volleyball

    A recent string of East Suburban Catholic Conference volleyball successes didn’t adequately prepare Marist for what awaited it against neighborhood rival Brother Rice last Thursday.     The RedHawks were competitive, but they couldn’t prevent the Crusaders from sweeping their way to a 25-19, 25-20 triumph. Morty Berglind put down eight kills to pace Marist, while Tom Inzinga blocked five Rice shots. Craig Rosner (six kills) and Matt Munro (four blocks) were other RedHawks notables around the net.     Also making their presences felt were Mike Schreiber (16 assists), Brendan Hopkins (14 digs) and Tim Hauser (five digs). Mariat’s biggest problem, according to coach Jodi Frigo, was its inability to maintain consistency.     “Our unforced errors hurt us,’” she said. “We would give them a run of points, then have to fight back to close the gap.”     Things went a little better for the RedHawks (19-15, 6-1) on their Senior Night last Tuesday, as big outings from Berglind (14 kills, eight digs, two service aces), Munro (11 kills, eight blocks) and Schreiber (33 assists, two aces) paved the way to a 25-18, 18-25, 25-16 victory over Notre Dame.     “It was a good win,” Frigo said. “Our game was played from the heart. I couldn’t ask for anything more.”     Other contributors to the win were Hopkins (19 digs), Justin Lapinskas (13 digs), Sam Jercich (eight kills) and Bill Kennedy (five blocks). ***     Marist also required three sets to defeat St. Patrick in another ESCC match. Behind 20 kills from John Yerkes and nine blocks by Munro, the RedHawks posted a 23-25, 25-23, 25-15 triumph.     Yerkes also had 10 digs and served two aces, one fewer than team leader Hopkins, while Munro recorded four kills to go along with his blocks. Hopkins had a team-best 23 digs to further boost Marist, Berglind supplied 12 digs and four kills, Kennedy made eight blocks, and Schreiber distributed 26 assists and had one ace.     The RedHawks vanquished Nazareth Academy 25-21, 25-15 as Yerkes (10 kills, eight digs), Berglind (seven kills, 11 digs), Kennedy (six kills, five blocks),

Schreiber (33 assists), Hopkins (12 digs) and Inzinga (five blocks) all played pivotal roles.

Maria no match for Peace in soccer

    Queen of Peace made short work of Maria in the two teams’ Class 1A regional meeting, as the Pride routed the Mystics 11-0.     Spearheading the offensive explosion for Peace were Violeta Valencia, Erica Gens and Kelsey Healy, each of whom booted in a pair of goals.

Marist boasts eight All-ESCC selections

    A total of eight student-athletes from Marist were among those individuals who were selected to All-East Suburban Catholic Conference teams for the spring sports season.     Leading the way were four members of the RedHawks boys’ volleyball team. Honored from that program were senior outside hitter Morty Berglind, senior libero Brendan Hopkins, senior right-side/outside hitter Craig Rosner and senior setter Mike Schreiber.     Marist was one of only two schools to place as many as four people on the 19-member all-conference volleyball contingent.     Chosen from the Lady RedHawks softball team were senior outfielder Erica Nagel, junior infielder Brooke Wyderski and sophomore outfielder Brooke Wilson, while senior infielder Cody Bohanek represented Marist on the All-ESCC baseball squad.

Orland man sinks hole-in-one

    Orland Park resident Lawrence Lode registered a hole-in-one while playing a round of golf at Silver Lake Country Club earlier this spring.     Lode’s ace came on the 143yard 18th hole of Silver Lake’s South course. He used a 6-iron to hit the shot, which was witnessed by playing partners Roy Abner and John Carney, another Orland resident.     “I hit the shot to the right of the hole and the slope [of the green] took the ball in the hole,” Lode said. “However, none of us saw it because of the sun in our eyes.”

Marist’s Weishar nominated for U.S. Army All-American Bowl

    Marist wide receiver Nic Weishar, a two-time all-area selection who is being heavily recruited by a number of NCAA Division I universities, was one of nine Chicagoland-area football players to be nominated for the 2014 U.S. Army All-American Bowl.     The game will be played Jan. 4 in San Antonio, Texas, and televised on NBC.     The athletes were nominated by the U.S. Army All-American Bowl Selection Committee, which consists of All American Games, 247Sports — the bowl’s official online recruiting network — and All American Games’ network of regional coaches throughout the country. Of the 400 nominees, 90 will be selected and invited to the U.S. Army All-American Bowl.     The next step for the nominees occurs in September, when the U.S. Army All-American Bowl Selection Tour begins. Player finalists, along with U.S. Army All-American marching band musicians, will be announced

nationwide throughout the fall, with the selection tour ending in early December.     “The U.S. Army All-American Bowl is a unique celebration of high school athletes, musicians and the American soldier,” said Mark S. Davis, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for marketing. “These nominations recognize the mental, emotional and physical strengths, as well as the leadership qualities the nominees possess, both on and off the field, qualities reflective of Army-strong soldiers.”     Weishar caught 89 passes for 1,034 yards and five touchdowns for the RedHawks last fall and has two-year varsity totals of 167 receptions, 2,194 yards and 18 TDs. He will be a senior during the 2013-14 school year.

Spencer named to all-region team

    Aurora University senior softball player Brooke Spencer, a Sandburg graduate, was one of four Spartans named to the Louisville Slugger/National Fastpitch Coaches Association All-Great Lakes Region team for 2013.     Spencer, who received the same honor in 2011, was picked for the first team after batting .421, with 41 RBI, 32 runs, 14 doubles, four homers, a .607 slugging percentage and .465 on-base percentage. With the shortstop playing a key role for it, Aurora posted a 39-8 record and won the Northern Athletics Conference championship. Submitted photo Hyc sets records, St. Laurence St. Laurence bass fishing coach Barry Shaw, senior Zac Marcolini, sophomore Santo Munizzi and bass fishermen win tourney

    On the same weekend St. Laurence’s baseball squad gained a Chicago Catholic League championship, Mike Hyc and the Vikings bass-fishing team produced successes of their own.     By throwing the discus 180 feet, 10 inches at the Loyola Academyhosted Catholic League meet, Hyc set school, meet, league and stadium standards in the event. For good measure he also placed first in the shot put with a heave of 61-3 ½, which set school, meet and stadium records.     On the water, St. Laurence won the District 230 Tournament championship as Santo Munizzi and Zac Marcolini comprised the top duo. Marcoloni’s 3.43-pound fish was recognized as the “Bass of the Day.”

Richards, Shepard to conduct summer sports camps

    Richards and Shepard high schools will both host a variety of sports camps for youngsters this summer.     Richards will offer two different baseball camps, one for players in grades 1-6 and the other for grades 7-9, plus two for boys’ basketball. Separate soccer camps will be conducted for boys and girls, while the cross country and volleyball camps will be coed. Camps will also be available for girls’ basketball, softball and football.     Offerings at Shepard include coed camps for cross country, soccer, golf, bowling and volleyball, two baseball camps, plus one apiece for football, wrestling, badminton, boys’ and girls’ basketball, swimming and cheerleading.     For exact dates, times, prices and age requirements, call 4992550 (Richards) or 371-1111 (Shepard).

driver John Marcolini pose with the trophy after the younger Marcolini and Munizzi earned the top prize at the District 230 Tournament.

SXU sports summary

Cougars going national     The ranking has proved accurate.     A season’s worth of good work propelled St. Xavier University’s softball team to a top-10 ranking in the national poll, and the Cougars validated that lofty status by capturing one of the NAIA’s 10 Opening Round Tournament titles and advancing to the National Championship. The 10-team final tourney begins Friday in Columbus, Ga.     And by virtue of its 10-2 win over No. 11-ranked Corban (Ore.) University last Wednesday at Delta Park in Portland, SXU established a school record for single-season victories by logging its 49th. The Cougars dropped an earlier contest to Corban that same day, but the 10-7 loss was their first in the double-elimination event so they were still able to play for the championship.     SXU’s triumph was achieved in only five innings, thanks in large part to a rapid getaway. The Cougars tallied four times in the top of the first, a rally highlighted by sophomore center fielder Shannon Lauret’s two-RBI double.     After Corban sliced its deficit in half in the bottom of the first, SXU seized control by plating six runs over the next four stanzas to bring the game to a premature halt. Senior third baseman Kate Mollohan delivered one of the key hits, as her two-run double boosted the Cougars’ lead to 9-2.

    Freshman Nicole Nonnemacher, who went 6-for-8 with four runs and two RBI on the day as a batter, earned the win by tossing a threehitter and fanning three. Anchoring the defense behind her was freshman second baseman Kasey Kanaga, who turned in one of the contest’s best plays with a diving stop that resulted in the second out of the fifth inning.     Game 1 also featured plenty of offense, but not only for SXU (497). A leadoff homer in the eighth allowed Corban to snap a 7-all tie, and the Warriors picked up two insurance markers before finally being retired.     Two other round-trippers — junior Lounette Jackson’s two-run shot in the third and senior Stephanie Nippert’s three-run blast in the fourth — had helped Corban erase a 3-1 Cougars advantage and create a 7-3 edge for itself, but SXU started a comeback in the sixth frame. Nonnemacher’s bases-loaded, ground-rule double — the Cougars’ fourth consecutive hit — reduced the margin to two runs and sophomore first baseman Amanda Hainlen drew a bases-filled walk to bring SXU closer.     The Cougars then got even in their ensuing at-bat, as sophomore catcher Megan James’ infield single drove in senior shortstop Ashley Sullivan with the tying run. Sullivan’s hit had also gotten SXU’s sixth-inning uprising

underway.     Sophomore left fielder Holly Hilden was credited with the Cougars’ other RBI. Her single capped a three-run outburst in the bottom of the first.     Junior pitcher Megan Nonnemacher suffered just her third setback in 29 decisions this spring by surrendering 11 hits and nine earned runs. ***     Nonnemacher fared better the day before versus Corban, which struck out 12 times and managed only two hits in a 2-0 loss to SXU last Tuesday. The Cougars’ 48th triumph of the year enabled them to match SXU’s 2000 squad, which set the school mark for singleseason victories.     Nonnemacher’s 10th shutout allowed the Cougars to prosper despite a less-than-dynamic offensive showing. SXU scored its only runs in the bottom of the second inning, with RBI singles by Lauret and James providing the payoffs. ***     Nonnemacher had far more support in last Monday’s Opening Round Tournament debut, where a 10-hit Cougars attack laid the groundwork for a 12-1 win over MidAmerica Nazarene (Kan.) University.     Nonnemacher threw a four-hitter and fanned 12 batters, including three in the bottom of the first. (Continued on page 6)


6

Section 2 Thursday, May 23, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Photo by Jason Maholy

Evergreen Park’s Keyshawn Carpenter watches the ball into the catcher’s glove during an at-bat last week against Shepard.

Astros (Continued from page 1) Astros. Dryier tossed a three-hitter and walked only one, and has now come up short three times in games where he allowed no more than three hits. His earned-run average for the season is 1.41.     An Evergreen throwing error in the first stanza and Bobby Peterka’s RBI single in the second staked Shepard to a 2-0 lead, but the Mustangs pulled even in the third on Mark Martin’s long RBI triple and an ensuing overthrow.     The Astros had four batters reach base in the fourth inning, but came up dry because of a double play and strikeout.     “We probably would have broken the game open [by scoring there],” DiFoggio said. “It was just missed opportunities, [but] that changed the ballgame. After that, we played tentative.     “Sometimes it’s hard to figure out what kids think, but you have to seize the moment; don’t run from it. For so long, we took the initiative and went after it, but [here], it was like, ‘We don’t want to lose this,’ instead of, ‘We’re going to win this’ — that [attitude] makes a huge difference.”     The Mustangs got the final say by pushing across the deciding run in the top of the sixth. Martin doubled and eventually crossed the plate on Kyle Venhuizen’s two-strike sacrifice fly.     Venhuizen also pitched the first five innings before giving way to Aaron Green Van Zee, who pocketed the victory. Smyth praised the work of both hurlers and thought all of his players had done a good job answering the bell after seeing their own hopes for a divisional title dashed the day before.     “We were a little fired up because we didn’t get the win on Monday, so you want to get those guys back,” Smyth said. “We just wanted to play well and get a quality win, and it was a big win for us.     “Kyle battled and had confidence in his fastball, which was good, and I can’t say enough about Aaron Green Van Zee. We’re playing meaningful baseball games [at

Knights (Continued from page 1)     “They got our attention,” Brauer said of the Cyclones. “We were a base hit, error or wild pitch away from falling behind in that game.”     Not only did the Knights dodge trouble, they multiplied Ag Science’s frustration by erupting for four runs in the bottom of that same inning. Wally Findysz’s single and Dylan Marinec’s bunt hit opened the frame, then Sean O’Meara (two-run double), Corey Bulthuis and Ryan Bielecki all followed with RBI hits.     “I think it was huge,” Brauer said of Christian’s rally. “It took us one time through the lineup to get used to their pitcher, but things got going in the right direction pretty quickly. It was definitely a momentum turner for us to set the pace.”     The Cyclones tallied once in their half of the fourth, but the Knights immediately countered with Marinec’s suicide squeeze. Christian then exploded for seven runs over the fifth and sixth stanzas, with Findysz’s three-run homer and Brodie Meyer’s tworun blast serving as the critical blows.     “Given the choice, every coach would prefer to be up early and not be in a scoreless tie in the third inning,” Brauer said. “But it was good for it to be tight for a while, where we had to deal with some challenges.”     Still, the Knights’ boss wouldn’t declare routs to automatically be off-limits for the rest of the postseason.

the end of the regular season], so hopefully that serves us well and makes us a better team for the playoffs.”     Evergreen (14-15, 10-9) opened postseason play this past Wednesday against Morgan Park in the Class 3A Brooks Prep Regional. Tinley Park 11 Shepard 2     After getting tagged with a resounding 11-1 defeat by Brother Rice last Wednesday, the Astros jumped in front of the Titans on Thursday by tallying twice in the top of the first. Samad and Scott keyed the uprising with RBI singles.     “We had a little bit of energy,” DiFoggio said, “and I thought we had a 24-hour hiccup. I thought maybe we turned it around and had a little bit of our swagger back, but things fell apart in the fourth inning.”     Tinley Park’s five-run outburst snapped a 2-all deadlock and put the hosts ahead to stay. Four more runs in the fifth turned the SSC crossover affair into a romp for the Titans.     Shepard finished with only four hits and fanned nine times on the day. The Astros did put three men aboard in the seventh, but could not generate any scoring. Andrew 10 Shepard 0     The offensive drought continued for the Astros on Friday, as they were limited to four hits by the Thunderbolts. Andrew took control of the proceedings by plating six runs in the first inning, a rally featuring a home run and greatly aided by three Shepard miscues, including two that began the frame.     “We played very poorly defensively,” DiFoggio said. “One ball was hit hard off [Medlicott].”     The Astros totaled six errors in all and were never able to recover from the mistakes. A bright spot was the debut of Brett Smith on the hill. Smith, the pitching ace of Shepard’s sophomore squad, held the T’bolts to one hit over a three-inning mound stint. TF South 7 Evergreen Park 2     David Kutschke, who had stopped Chicago Christian cold the Saturday before and been     “We assume the 10-run wins are over, but we’ve 10-runned some good teams this year when we play our brand of baseball,” Brauer said. “We broke the school record for sacrifice bunts, walks and hit-by-pitches, and that’s how we play. We’ve done a good job of playing one game at a time and nobody trying to shoulder too much of the load.” ***     While Novak improved his ledger to 8-1 with Saturday’s win, sophomore Christian Bolhuis triumphed for the 10th time on Wednesday as he pitched Chicago Christian past CICS-Longwood. Martin Johnston ran his record to 5-1 in the Knights’ shellacking of Wheeler.     The Bearcats, who are normally among the better small-school baseball programs in northwest Indiana, surrendered five firstinning runs to Chicago Christian and never recovered. The Knights tallied in four of five at-bats, with an eight-run third stanza representing the apex of their attack.     Interestingly, Chicago Christian totaled only nine hits, but had 11 other players reach base on either free passes or after being hit by pitches. O’Meara (3-for-4), Bulthuis (two hits, three RBI) and Meyer (two hits, two RBI) were the Knights’ top offensive guns behind Johnston, who stopped Wheeler on four hits through four innings, whiffed three and walked one. ***     Bolhuis fanned seven in only three innings of work on Wednesday while allowing just one hit and one walk to CICS-Longwood. He

instrumental in the Mustangs’ capturing of a 2-1 triumph, wasn’t as formidable last Thursday as the Rebels chased him early by erupting for seven runs over their first two at-bats.     No additional harm was done to Evergreen after that, but the Mustangs could not stage a comeback. They did tally once each in the second and third frames on a wild pitch and Mike Reuter’s single, but Evergreen’s failure to take advantage of a bases-loaded, no-out situation in the fifth sealed its fate.     “We had guys on base and chances to cut into [our deficit], but we couldn’t get it done,” Smyth said. “Our bats are falling asleep and we’ve got to wake them up again.” Illiana Christian 4 Evergreen Park 1     A year ago, the Mustangs registered a slaughter-rule win over the Vikings at Standard Bank Stadium. Last Friday’s rematch featured no such enjoyment for Evergreen.     The Mustangs’ sticks stayed so quiet that Corey Miller’s seventhinning RBI single was their first — and only — hit.     “It was an uninspired effort,” Smyth said. “It was a long week with conference games and I think there was a little bit of a letdown, but we’re struggling offensively. Mark Martin’s been on fire, but he can’t do it by himself. We need our seniors to step up, especially with Dan Duh out [with an injury].”

Shepard RBI: Peterka. LP: Dryier (24). Shepard Tinley Park

200 000 0 -   2 101 540 x - 11

Shepard RBI: Samad, Scott. LP: Garetto (3-3). Andrew Shepard

620 20 - 10 000 00 -   0

Shepard LP: Medlicott (5-4). TF South Evergreen Park

340 000 0 - 7 011 000 0 - 2

Evergreen Park 2B: Martin. RBI: Reuter. LP: Kutschke (2-4). Evergreen Park Illiana Christian

000 000 1 - 1 202 000 x - 4

Photo by Jason Maholy

Evergreen Park shortstop Mark Martin throws to first base Evergreen Park RBI: Miller. LP: Meisl after fielding a ground ball during last week’s game against Shepard. (5-3).

Statistics Shepard Evergreen Park

001 011 2 - 5 010 001 0 - 2

Shepard2B: Schmeski. RBI: Albrecht, Hermann, Samad, Scott. WP: Medlicott (5-3). Evergreen Park RBI: T. Walsh. LP: Meisl (5-2). Evergreen Park Shepard

002 001 0 - 3 110 000 0 - 2

Evergreen Park 2B: Martin. 3B: Martin. RBI: Martin, Venhuizen. WP: Green Van Zee (3-0).

was given an 8-0 lead to protect when Chicago Christian erupted for that many runs in its initial plate appearance, and the Knights followed up with six-run surges in two of the next three stanzas.     Bulthuis (3-for-4) and Mike Santarelli (two hits, including a homer) both garnered four RBI to pace the Knights, while Jack De Vries chipped in three hits and two RBI. Meyer added a double and two RBI for Chicago Christian, which stroked 14 hits and drew that same number of bases-on-balls.

Photo by Jason Maholy

Shepard’s Jeremy Dryier has Evergreen Park’s Kyle Venhuizen trapped in a rundown during a game last week.

SXU (Continued from page 5)

Sandwiching that display was a pair of three-run eruptions by SXU that put it in command.     RBI doubles by Mollohan and Sullivan sparked the Cougars’ initial rally, while Hilden’s tworun single fueled the second one. Hilden and Nicole Nonnemacher both finished with three RBI.     SXU picked up four more runs in the third as it capitalized on two MidAmerican errors and a passed ball, and Nonnemacher completed Statistics the Cougars’ scoring with her twoChicago Christian 518 04 - 18 run single in the fourth. *** Wheeler 000 10 -   1     Mollohan and Megan NonChicago Christian RBI: Bulthuis 3, Meyer nemacher both claimed spots on the 2013 Capital One Academic 2. WP: Johnston (5-1). All-America® College Division CICS-Longwood 000 00 -   0 softball team, as selected by the Chicago Christian 863 6x - 23 College Sports Information Direc-

tors of America.     Mollohan was the only one of this year’s honorees to have also earned first-team recognition on the 2012 Capital One squad. Nonnemacher was a third-team choice last spring. SXU was the only institution to have two players named to the 11-member first team.     Mollohan, a mathematics major, has a 3.78 cumulative grade-point average. Named SXU’s Female Student-Athlete of the Year for 2012-13, she also claimed a spot on the All-Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference team for the third time in her career.     Mollohan is the Cougars’ second-leading hitter with a .360 average and is their No. 1 run producer with 39 RBI. Through 56 games, she also has 58 hits, 20 runs, six doubles and a homer.     Nonnemacher, an elementary education major with a 3.87 cumulative GPA, was named the CCAC

Pitcher of the Year for the second straight season and established an SXU record for single-season wins with 26 to date. She also leads the Cougars in earned-run average (1.58), shutouts (10), complete games (28) and innings pitched (195).     Nonnemacher, who pitched her first perfect game this season, is ranked sixth in the NAIA in wins, 12th in strikeouts (221) and 27th in ERA.     The Capital One Academic AllAmerica® College Division softball team is comprised of student-athletes from NAIA, Canadian and two-year institutions. To be eligible for consideration, a student-athlete must be a varsity starter or key reserve, maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 on a scale of 4.0, have reached sophomore athletic and academic standings at his or her current institution, and be nominated by the school’s sports information director.

Chicago Christian 2B: Meyer. HR: Santarelli. RBI: Bulthuis 4, Santarelli 4, De Vries 2, Meyer 2. WP: Bolhuis (10-3). Agricultural Science Chicago Christian

000 100 -   1 004 152 - 12

Chicago Christian 2B: O’Meara. HR: Findysz, Meyer. RBI: 3, Meyer 2, O’Meara 2, Bulthuis, Bielecki, Marinec. WP: Novak (8-1).

The LATCH system makes it easier to be sure your child’s car seat is installed correctly every time. Just clip it to the lower anchors, attach the top tether, and pull the straps tight. To find out more, visit safercar.gov.


The Regional News - The Reporter

������������ ���������� ����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

Thursday, May 23, 2013 Section 2

���������������

����������� For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC Plaintiff, -v.REMIZ MEHOVIC A/K/A RAMIZ MEHOVIC, MARIANNA MEHOVIC, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA, PINEWOOD EAST UNIT FIVE ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 036041 14368 CREEK CROSSING DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 26, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 30, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 14368 CREEK CROSSING DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-07-205-002. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgageeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-28655. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1410-28655 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 036041 TJSC#: 33-5609 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I529193

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION METLIFE HOME LOAN, A DIVISION OF METLIFE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v s . ďż˝ AGNIESZKA ZAJDA; MARCIN PSZCZOLA; THE R I V I E R A ďż˝ IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; U N K N O W N ďż˝ OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , ďż˝ 12 CH 5588 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on December 12, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, June 24, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-23-112-036-0000. Commonly known as 7 COUR MASSON, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a townhouse residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1128909. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I532442

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION METLIFE HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF METLIFE BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO EVERBANK REVERSE MORTGAGE LLC FKA BNY MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC Plaintiff, -v.UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS AND LIENHOLDERS AGAINST THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS AND LIENHOLDERS AGAINST THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, VILLAS OF PALOS HEIGHTS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, WILLIAM BUTCHER, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF DOROTHY A. FELDNER, DECEASED, PATRICK FELDNER, ERIN BRACE, JOSEPH T. FELDNER Defendants 10 CH 03935 202 FELDNER CT. Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 19, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 20, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 202 FELDNER CT., Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-31-201-063-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $246,152.32. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certiď&#x192;&#x17E;ed funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to conď&#x192;&#x17E;rmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certiď&#x192;&#x17E;cate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conď&#x192;&#x17E;rmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court ď&#x192;&#x17E;le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 10 CH 03935 TJSC#: 337647 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I522097

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION ALBANY BANK AND TRUST COMPANY NA; P l a i n t i f f , ďż˝ v s . ďż˝ 11824 S.W. HIGHWAY (PALOS HEIGHTS) LLC; DAN DEVELOPMENT, LIMITED; UNKNOWN OWNERS A N D ďż˝ NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 29323 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on March 12, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, June 13, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-24-300-131-0000. Commonly known as 11824 Southwest Highway, Palos Heights, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is a mulit-tenant medical office building. The property maybe made available for inspection by contacting Jeffrey W. Finke at (312) 606-3333. Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. For information call Mr. Jeffrey W. Finke at Law Offices of Jeffrey W. Finke, 55 West Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 606-3333. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I529917

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L . P . , ďż˝ P l a i n t i f f ďż˝ V . ďż˝ HENRY M. PERILLO A/K/A HENRY MORTON A/K/A HENRY PERILLO, D e f e n d a n t s ďż˝ 10 CH 28143 Property Address: 9740 SOUTH 90TH AVENUE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 09-022266 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) ďż˝ PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 14, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on June 17, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 9740 South 90th Avenue, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-10-202-034 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 449,164.94. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . ďż˝ For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I522237

Do you have a VACATION home for RENT? Call to place your ad today!

����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

����������������� For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

������������ ����

�������������

For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N , ďż˝ P l a i n t i f f ďż˝ V . ďż˝ PATRICIA S. HENRICKSON; CONDOMINIUMS OF EDELWEISS, INC.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, D e f e n d a n t s ďż˝ 11 CH 19739 Property Address: 11541 AUTOBAHN DRIVE E UNIT 202 PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M ďż˝ Fisher and Shapiro file # 11-051808 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) ďż˝ PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 28, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on July 1, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 11541 Autobahn Drive E, Unit 202, Palos Park, IL 60464 Permanent Index No.: 23-23-416-027-1052 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $166,483.18. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . ďż˝ For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I525180

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-5, P l a i n t i f f ďż˝ V . ďż˝ KHALED JAMIL SHALTAF; AKRAM QANDEEL; NISREEN AD QANDEEL A/K/A NISREEN AD Q A N D E E K , ďż˝ D e f e n d a n t s ďż˝ 09 CH 3352 Property Address: 10112 South 81st Court Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 08-015653 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) ďż˝ PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on September 14, 2011, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on June 24, 2013, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 10112 South 81st Court, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-11-405-040 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $714,784.50. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all i n f o r m a t i o n . ďż˝ For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 498-9990, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I522612

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT5, A S S E T ďż˝ BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT5 P l a i n t i f f , ďż˝ v s . ďż˝ UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF M A R G A R E T ďż˝ DENNIGER, SUZANNE DENNIGER, THOMAS DENNIGER, CHRISTINE DENNIGER, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S . ďż˝ D e f e n d a n t s , ďż˝ 12 CH 17082 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on March 11, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, June 14, 2013 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : ďż˝ P.I.N. 23-11-204-007-0000. Commonly known as 9741 South 81st Court, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. David C. Kluever at Plaintiff's Attorney, Kluever & Platt, L.L.C., 65 East Wacker Place, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 236-0077. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I529949

Tom Maloney, Selling or Buying? RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

Expect the Best

1 in Sales in Palos Park & Palos Heights

#

Call Tom Maloney at

(708) 903-9865 RUN 10 13 11 RARELY FOUND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A MAGNIFICENT, nearly 3 acre wooded hilltop building site in the very heart of Palos Park. Picturesque views on every side! Call 708-448-6100 for further information. $1,050,000.

Blount, REALTORS L.T.L.T. Blount, REALTORSÂŽ

8100 W. 119th Street Palos Park, IL 60464 (708) 448-6100 www.prublount.com

Run 5 23 13 For Sale Notice

Salefor Rent VacationFor Notice Home

PALOS HEIGHTS by OWNER

â&#x20AC;˘ DOOR COUNTY â&#x20AC;˘ Woodland Vacation Home

Duplex Ranch Townhome for sale in Keystone Crossing. For details follow the links below: www.forsalebyowner.com Then enter zip code: 60463 Click on: Duplex Ranch Townhome, Palos Heights, Keystone Crossing

Do you Have a CONDO for sale? Call and place your ad today!

in Fish Creek Book now for Fall & Winter! This four bedroom, two full bath home offers privacy on a lovely wooded 1+ acre lot. Large kitchen and open living room area. The backyard features a large patio, stone fireplace, propane grill & firepit. The serenity of the front porch will beckon after a busy day on the Peninsula. Fish Creek & Egg Harbor are just minutes away â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an ideal location for all Door County adventures. Many amenities. $175-$225+ per nite. Photos online, Trip Advisor: Shared Serenity Vacation Home or call: (708) 704-8972

Do you have a home or property for sale?

BOOKLETS PRINTED IN ONE DAY FROM YOUR COPY

FROM YOUR DISK

â&#x20AC;˘ Sales Manuals â&#x20AC;˘ Training Manuals â&#x20AC;˘ Parts Books â&#x20AC;˘ Condominium Documents â&#x20AC;˘ Handbooks

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORP. III; P l a i n t i f f , ďż˝ v s . ďż˝ MICHAEL W. RISTIC AND JOSEPHINA RISTIC; D e f e n d a n t s , ďż˝ 12 CH 41067 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on March 14, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, June 17, 2013, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 8942 Sandra Lane, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. P.I.N. 23-03-408-023. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The judgment amount was $272,051.55. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Ira T. Nevel at Plaintiff's Attorney, Law Offices of Ira T. Nevel, 175 North Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 357-1125. Ref. No. 12-04105 I531318

â&#x20AC;˘ Employee Handbooks â&#x20AC;˘ Manuscripts â&#x20AC;˘ Rulebooks

Call now to place your ad!

â&#x20AC;˘ Club Bylaws On-site binding, plus mailing and pick-up services

REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

Call (708) 448-4000 HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sat. 9 A.M. to Noon

5HDO(VWDWH

7HAT CAN

    2GQRNG NQQMKPI VQ ETGCVG C NKVVNG OQTG TQQO CV JQOG CTG GZVGPFKPI VJGKT NKXKPI URCEG DG[QPF YCNNU CPF KPVQ VJG ITGCV QWVFQQTU D[ CFFKPI C FGEM +VĹ&#x17D;U OQTG CHHQTFCDNG VJCP DWKNFKPI C PGY TQQO RNWU OQFGTP OCVGTKCNU CTG OCMKPI FGEMU OQTG NKXCDNG VJCPGXGT   %QORQUKVG FGEMU JCXG JKV VJG JQOG UEGPG KP C DKI YC[ %QORCTGF VQ YQQF EQORQUKVGU RTQXKFG FGUKTGF FGUKIP HNGZKDKNKV[ YKVJ C JQUV QH CFFKVKQPCN DGPGHKVU +PHCEVEQORQUKVGUCTG TCRKFN[ TGRNCEKPI YQQF CU JQOGQYPGTUĹ&#x17D; RTGHGTTGF FGEM OCVGTKCN   %QORQUKVG RTQFWEVU QHHGT TGNKGH VQ JQOGQYPGTUD[IGVVKPI

TKF QH UPCIU CPF URNKPVGTU V[RKECN QH FGEM NWODGT /CFG HTQOCOKZQHTGE[ENGF RNCUVKEU CPF UCYFWUV EQORQUKVG FGEMU RTQXKFG URNKPVGTHTGG UNKRTGUKUVCPV UWTHCEGU VJCV CTG EQOHQTVCDNG VQ JCPFNG CPF YCNM QP (QT KPUVCPEG VJG D C T G H Q Q V  H T K G P F N [ $QCTFYCNM%QORQUKVG &GEMKPI D[ %GTVCKP6GGF KU C UCHG OCVGTKCN HQT HCOKN[ OGODGTUQHCNNCIGU   7PNKMG VTCFKVKQPCN YQQFFGEMUVJCVQHVGP TGSWKTG EQPUVCPV WRMGGR EQORQUKVGU NCUV NQPIGT CPF YQPĹ&#x17D;V URNKV QT TQV 6JGTG KU CNUQ PQ PGGF VQ RCKPV QT UVCKP EQORQUKVG FGEMKPIOCMKPIVJGO GCU[VQOCKPVCKP   #U FGOCPF HQT EQORQUKVG FGEMU KPETGCUGU UQ FQ VJG

FGUKIP QRVKQPU %QORNGVG EQORQUKVG FGEMKPI CPF TCKNKPI U[UVGOU CTG PQY CXCKNCDNG VQ ETGCVG C EQPUKUVGPV HKPKUJGF NQQM HQT JQOGQYPGTUĹ&#x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Ĺ&#x17D;U EQORNGVG NKPG QH DWKNFKPI RTQFWEVU XKUKV YYYEGTVCKP

DOFORYOU 7HETHERYOURE LOOKINGTOBUY

Do you Have a home for sale? Call to place your ad today!

Serving Your Community for 30 Years

Serving the Palos area for over 50 years

For Notice Sale

ORLOOKINGTOSELL 2EAL%STATECANHELP YOUGETWHATYOU Shop smart..in the Classifieds!

7

WANT


8

Section 2 Thursday, May 23, 2013

������������ ����������

The Regional News - The Reporter

���������������

����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

�������������

�����������

������������ ���� ����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

�����������������

For Sale Notice

For Notice Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, -v.ROBERT W. WELLS JR A/K/A ROBERT W. WELLS, KIMBERLY A. WELLS A/K/A KIMBERLY ANN WELLS, HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III Defendants 11 CH 037847 7648 W. 105TH STREET PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 24, 2012, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 7, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7648 W. 105TH STREET, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-13-107035. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-11-35527. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-35527 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 037847 TJSC#: 33-11337 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I531594

It’s time for a

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION ILLINOIS HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY Plaintiff, -v.DONALD J. SMALL, MELISSA FOGARTY, VILLAGE SQUARE OF ORLAND CONDOMINIUM 1 ASSOCIATION Defendants 12 CH 027919 9204 ERIN LANE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 21, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 10, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9204 ERIN LANE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-15-301-026-1042. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-12-21785. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-21785 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 027919 TJSC#: 33-11384 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I532276

For Sale Notice

For Notice Sale

For Notice Sale

For Sale Notice

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.AMEL MADOUI, ABDELOUAHAB M. MADOUI, THOMAS CHARLES ESTATES TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION Defendants 09 CH 049335 8658 W. THOMAS CHARLES LANE HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 15, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 3, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8658 W. THOMAS CHARLES LANE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 18-35-307-028. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certied funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certied funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to conrmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certicate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after conrmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court le to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court le or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to le number 14-09-39565. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1409-39565 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 049335 TJSC#: 33-4766 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I530816

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR NEW CENTURY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2004-4 Plaintiff, -v.RICHARD JESSE, CAROL M. JESSE, FOUNDERS BANK, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF A TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MARCH 31, 2005 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 6658, NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION Defendants 12 CH 34237 16431 SOUTH 89TH AVENUE Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 20, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 24, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 16431 SOUTH 89TH AVENUE, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27224060060000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $216,396.03. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES, 120 N. LASALLE STREET, SUITE 1140, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 239-3432. Please refer to file number 12IL00337-1. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES 120 N. LASALLE STREET, SUITE 1140 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 239-3432 Attorney File No. 12IL00337-1 Attorney Code. 46689 Case Number: 12 CH 34237 TJSC#: 33-7305 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533067

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION UNITED CENTRAL BANK, A TEXAS BANKING CORPORATION Plaintiff, -v.JOY CHEMMACHEL, SHILA J. CHEMMACHEL, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., REPUBLIC BANK OF CHICAGO, THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNITED STATES SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 18855 8801 W. 87TH STREET Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 2, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 14, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8801 W. 87TH STREET, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-03-201-014-0000. The real estate is improved with a gasoline station. The judgment amount was $2,119,574.83. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: NADA DJORDJEVIC, BOODELL & DOMANSKIS, LLC, 353 North Clark Street, Suite 1800, Chicago, IL 60654, (312) 938-4070. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. BOODELL & DOMANSKIS, LLC 353 North Clark Street, Suite 1800 Chicago, IL 60654 (312) 938-4070 Attorney Code. 46656 Case Number: 11 CH 18855 TJSC#: 33-11810 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533791

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. Plaintiff, -v.ABDEL ABUISNEINEH, COLONADES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION #1 Defendants 12 CH 012200 7305 TIFFANY DRIVE UNIT #3B ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 11, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 13, 2013, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7305 TIFFANY DRIVE UNIT #3B, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-13-409-018-1010. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-09354. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1412-09354 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 012200 TJSC#: 33-6868 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533831

Spring

Garage Sale! Cleaning out your home or garage not only adds up to extra space...it adds up to extra cash, too!

Do you have

Publisher’s Notice    All

Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1 (800) 927-9275.

SUMMER Property for RENT?

Call today to place your ad!

I36UG3Q 79<9K9Q3TAMK

Imagine A Pair of Glasses That Can Help You SeeRkk Better! Aygmr|k 3 Ngr… Ml <wgˆˆkˆ Tog‹ 6g| ?kw ^~Œ 5k‹‹k…° 9“k… w~~u ‹o…~Œmo g gr… ~l Ókwj mwgˆˆkˆ ~… hr|~iŒwg…ˆp Tor|mˆ w~~u hrmmk… g|j iw~ˆk…´ g|j kgˆrk… ‹~ ˆkk1 7…1 R“k‹wg|g NruŒˆ rˆ Œˆr|m yr|rg‹Œ…rškj hr|~iŒwg…ˆ ~… ‹kwkˆi~kˆ ‹~ okw k~wk ”o~ og“k jki…kgˆkj “rˆr~|´ ‹~ ˆkk hk‹‹k…1 A| yg|™ igˆkˆ´ ˆkirgw ‹kwkˆi~ri mwgˆˆkˆ ig| hk …kˆi…rhkj ‹~ k|og|ik “rˆŒgw k…l~…yg|ik1 Rok ~l‹k| ig| okw k~wk …kgj´ ”g‹io TX´ g|j ˆ~yk‹rykˆ j…r“k1 3w‹o~Œmo ‹kwkˆi~ri mwgˆˆkˆ i~ˆ‹ hk‹”kk| ©ÅÝ}}Ÿ©Šá}}´ r‹ rˆ g ˆygww …rik ‹~ g™ l~… ‹ok o~Œ…ˆ ~l k|s~™yk|‹ ”r‹o hk‹‹k… “rˆr~|

Ever look through a pair of field glasses or binoculars? Things look bigger and closer, and easier to see. Dr. Svetlana Pikus is using miniaturized binoculars or telescopes to help people who have decreased vision, to see better. In many cases, special telescopic glasses can be prescribed to enhance visual performance. She often can help people read, watch TV, and sometimes drive. Although telescopic glasses cost between 6gww l~… g i~ywryk|‹g…™ $1700-$2500, it is a small price o~|k i~|ˆŒw‹g‹r~| ”r‹o 7…1 NruŒˆ to pay for the hours of enjoyment TMGG ;Q99 with better vision and more ş&ááŸ&Í͟Š}Š} independence.

7…1 R“k‹wg|g NruŒˆ´ M171Antioch, Crystal Lake, Glenview, Joliet, Mt. Prospect, Mundelein, Naperville, Coal City, also in Glendale, WI ş&ááŸ&Í͟Š}Š} & Sheboygan, WI

7…1 R“k‹wg|g NruŒˆ´ M171 ”””1w~”“rˆr~|~lAwwr|~rˆ1i~y


The Regional News - The Reporter

������������ ���������� �����������

��������

�������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

Thursday, May 23, 2013 Section 2

���������������

The original Nordic Track Sequoia ski machine/cross country skier. Sturdy solid pine framing with redwood finish, adjustable arm and leg resistance and monitor. Folds down for storage. Barely used, excellent condition. $100. Call (708) 458-9233 leave message Kitchen Helpers The Pancake Factory Pancake Maker, $15. Magnawave Perfection Microwave Roaster, $25. Magnawave Perfection Junior Roaster, $15. Xpress Ready-Set-Go, $20. GE Digital 6.5 quart slow cooker, $25. All are brand new. Call (708) 458-9233

Help Wanted The Palos Area Chamber of Commerce is looking for a candidate to work with the chamber board and maintain the day to day operations of the chamber. Requirements for the position include an outgoing personality, people skills, and computer skills including knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel, and comfort with new programs. Hours are somewhat flexible and can vary based on events. Approximately 15 to 20 hours per week are required. Please send resumes to: info@palosareachamber.org or mail to: P. O. Box 138, Palos Heights, IL 60463

Help Wanted

Automotive $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $$$ TOP CASH $$$ $ $ $ $ FOR YOUR JUNK $ $ $ CAR, TRUCK, VAN $ $ $ $ (708) $ $ $ 448-9155 $$ $ $ $10 off any tow service $ $ $ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Piano Tuning

Blacktop

Garage Sale

Home & Decor IDEAS, Clipper Magazine, a Gannett Company

Paving Driveways • Parking Lots Resurfacing • Sealcoating

friday, may 24th & saturday, may 25th 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.

We are seeking an advertising business development professional to strengthen our team in the Cook Co. teritory. We offer a wide portfolio of advertising products that range from our flagship, fullcolor local advertising magazine to cutting edge digital solutions. Our compensation package recognizes prior experience, benefit package and expense reimbursement included. Please contact:

REPAIRS EXTRA — 35 years experience — Call F. Stan Ignell

708/636-8212

708-423-9594

Wanted

Concrete

WE BUY

O’DONNELL CONCRETE

Thursday, MAY 30th, friday, may 31st & saturday, June 1st 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Tools, fishing gear, old collectibles. Too much to list! 9745 Marion Ave. Oak Lawn

Help Wanted

$50.00

Cars • Trucks • Vans Runing OR Not Top Dollar Paid Call (708) 205-8241

Christine Gimber, SPHR Director of Recruiting 717 509 9358

Boswell Blacktop FREE ESTIMATES

����� ���������� ��������������

Plumbing

������� �����

ROYAL FLUSH

������������������ ���������������������������

�������������������� ����������������������� �������������������� �������������� �������������

��������������

Small engines, snowblowers, regular and riding lawnmowers, bicycles. Reasonably priced or free. Call (815) 468-7819

‘Expert Quality Work’ Stamped Concrete Stone Pavers

professional couple ready to offer your newborn a safe, stable, happy home, a lifetime of opportunities and all of our love and devotion. Call us! Michelle & Jeoff (888) 807-5044 (toll-free) michelleandjeoff@mjadopt.com www.mjadopt.com

ADVERTISING SERVICES Need to place your ad in more than 300 newspapers throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-241-1700 or visit www.illinoispress.org

AUCTIONS RITCHIE BROS. UNRESERVED PUBLIC EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS Thurs, May 30 (Chicago) & Fri, May 31 (Joliet). Large equipment/ truck selection, no minimum bids. 815.941.6400 / rbauction.com

BOATS THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-793-7300 theboatdock.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES The Greatest Business Adventure of Your Life! Prerequisites are: Intelligence, Courage & Discipline. Exceptional career opportunity, no foolishness. See for yourself at: www.gbaoyl.com

www.colmansrv.com

Lawn Maintenance Hedge Trimming Retaining Walls Snow Removal Complete Landscaping

PLUMBING & SEWER

CAREER/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL AIM 800-481-8312

HELP WANTED SERVE TO LEARN. Earn money for college, train for a career, receive excellent pay and benefits. Serve in the National Guard. Call 1-800-GO-GUARD or visit nationalguard.com Contractor hiring the following: Carpenters, Electricians, Concrete Labor, Steel Erectors, local and traveling Welders, Fitters, Millwrights. To Apply call: 630-444-2175

HELP WANTED DRIVERS $6000 Sign On Bonus for new lease purchase drivers at Hirschbach Motor Lines. Midwest Regional and OTR positions available. New Trucks. Great miles, 888-5146005 drive4hml.com EXPERIENCED DRIVERS $1500 Sign-On BONUS ! Regional LTL Opportunities in Bridgeview, IL! Earn up to $1100 or more per week. Excellent Home Time! www.driveffe.com 855-356-7119

Drivers: Run FB with WTI. Be home weekends. Start up to 28% plus fuel bonus. New equipment. BCBS. Experience needed. LP available. Call 877693-1305.

Driver - Two raises in first year. Qualify for any portion of $0.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

LEGAL SERVICES

Class A CDL Flatbed Drivers Needed. Excellent Pay & Benefits. 6 month exp., Min 23yrs of age. 877-261-2101. Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers / Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www.primeinc.com $2500 Sign-On Bonus for Company Drivers! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. CDL-A required. Great hometime options. Call 888471-7081 or apply online at www.superservicellc.com AVERITT OFFERS CDL-A DRIVERS a Strong, Stable, Profitable Career. Experienced Drivers and Recent Grads Excellent Benefits, Weekly Hometime, Paid Training. 888362-8608 AverittCareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer

SWIMMING POOLS / MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE HOMEOWNERS WANTED!!! Kayak Pools is looking for demo homesites to display our maintenance-free Kayak pools. Save thousands of $$$ with our pre-season SALE! CALL NOW! 800-315-2925 kayakpoolsmidwest.com Discount Code: 981L01

TRAINING/EDUCATION ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-336-5053 www.CenturaOnline.com

Chicagoland ICANS - Run Date Week of 5/19/2013

GEORGE’S

EDWARD SIEARS

Flood Control Specialists All Types of Plumbing Repairs

Cell:

Masonry

— Since 1988 —

1 year OTR & Hazmat. 888705-3217 or apply online at www.drivenctrans.com.

708.424.6350 708.229.0123

Plumbing & Sewer

Senior & Military Discounts

99% No-Touch, Top Pay! Vacation/401K/Vision/Dental/ Disability/Health. Require Class A CDL, 2yrs OTR exp. good MVR/References req. Call Ruth/Mike TTI, Inc. 1-800-558-2664 www.TTItrucking.com

10% Off Repairs 24 Hour Service • Free Estimates Licensed/Bonded/Insured

Ed’s

Paul Lally’s Masonry Inc.

www.hollandregional.com/careers

Most lines rodded-$49.95

LANDSCAPING

Patios, Sidewalks, Driveways

424-0200 Ph: (708) 259-5990

Power Rod Mainline & Sinks Tubs and Toilets Catch Basins Cleaned & Repaired Water Jetting Broken Pipes Detected with TV Camera

www.royalflushplumbingandsewer.com

Christine.gimber@clippermagazine.com

Drivers: Local and regional. Great pay/benefits! 1 yr or 50,000 van exp. in last 5 yrs. Haz/Tanker End. Chicago & Wheeling Terminals. Apply:

Plumbing & Sewer

Landscaping

773.767.2095 312.446.9035

����������

Amtrak.com 1-800-USA-RAIL

�������� �������������

Cleaning Services

Business:

Class A CDL Experienced Cleaning Services BLACK HORSE CARRIERS cleaning lady Wanted to Buy wanted has New Business and is looking for full time drivers in the Chi- for immediate start. Must be cago Ridge area: New Tractors licensed driver with dependable ������������������������ Older Chevy Astro van in reawith paid Satellite radio, Dedi- vehicle. Good pay. Cleaning,�������� Moving & Organizing sonbly good running condition. ������������������������ cated routes, no touch freight, Call (708) 636-4030 Must have 2 rear doors (not 3). ������������ M-F work, 12:30 pm dispatch, �������������������� Call Tim or Pat B. home daily and average 6.25 ������������������������������������ at (708) 448-4000 hours per day. No weekends, Call today to place your ad! Pay based on $18 an hour with a 40 hour a week guarantee. These full time positions come with medical, dental and vision ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK benefits. If you have 3 yrs. Exp. and a Class A CDL with a clean MVR. Call 219-841-9113 or EXPERIENCED OTR Company Driver: Solo and ADOPTION CAMPERS/RVS DRIVERS VAN DIVISION: Team OTR Lanes. Sign-On email todd@blackhorsecarRuns 48 States, heavy from bonus: Solos - $2000 & Teams A BABY TO CHERISH Colman’s RV We buy/consign riers.com. EOE. Drug Testing WI to Philadelphia-Baltimore- $5000. Competitive Pay. used Campers & RV's! We respect you and your is a condition of employment. MD area. Flex home time. Great Hometime. CDL-A with 217-787-8653 courage. Down to earth,

ARE YOUR Closets cluttered? Give your unused items a new home... Sell them in the Classifieds! Call today to place your ad.

��������

Business & Service Directory

PIANO TUNING

10206 S. 82nd Ave. Palos Hills

�����������

����������������������������������������������������������

Outside Advertising Sales & Marketing Sales

Collectibles, books, clothes. Much More!

������������ ����

�������������

���������������

For Sale

9

TUCKPOINTING • BRICK WORK ALL CHIMNEY REPAIRS CONCRETE WORK Free Estimates • Fully Insured 5% OFF before 6/15/13 with this ad

• • • • • •

Hot water tanks • Bathroom installations Toilets, Tubs, Sinks & Faucets Sewers rodded • Sump pumps Sewers inspected by camera Foundation leaks repaired Battery back-up systems

FREE Estimates (most cases) Quality Work - Reasonable Prices 40 years experience - Lic. #SL574

708.952.1833 Remodeling

(708) 448-8866

From the Ground Up

Call today place your ad!

Decks • Home Remodeling Custom Woodworking

Remodeling

Call Josh 708.639.8483

You can still protect much, and maybe all, of their assets for the family.

CallOettel, Joe Oettel , MCEP, ChFC, AEP Call Joe MCEP, CFP®CFP®, 217-726-0176 217-726-0176 Estate & Retirement Estate & Retirement PlanningPlanning


Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Videoview by Jay Bobbin     (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating - one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)

Submitted photo

McCord offers silk painting workshop     A silk painting workshop at McCord will be held Saturday, May 25, from 1 to 3 p.m.     Instructor Karen Snow will help you paint designs on a luxurious Habotai silk scarf at the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center.     If you like beautiful colors, that’s all the artistic ability you need — the technique itself is simple to do. Using dyes instead of paint keeps the softness in the silk: the non-toxic dyes are formulated to react with the protein fibers of the silk, creating abstract patterns as the dye is carried along the silk fibers. No two designs are ever the same. This is instant gratification: your lovely new fashion accessory is washable and will be ready to wear home.     Participants should wear old clothes. The price of the workshop is $35. A silk scarf, dyes and finishing supplies will be provided.     Here, Lisa Wood and Beth Leahy admire a hand-dyed scarf by instructor Karen Snow.     McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th Street and La Grange Road), Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648 or visit mccordgallery.org.

Broaden Your Horizons This week

Upcoming

Womantalk discussion

Working ‘9 to 5’

    The Center, 12700 Southwest     The Oak Lawn Park District Highway, Palos Park, will host its Theatre production of “9 to 5” will monthly Womantalk coffee hour run at Oak View Center, 4625 W. and discussion on Tuesday, May 110th St., at 8 p.m. Friday, May 28, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. 31 and June 7, and Saturday, June     Led by MaryAnn Grzych, ladies 1 and 8; and 3 p.m. Sunday, June are invited to join the discussion 2 and 9. Tickets are available at of “Simple Abundance” by Sarah Oak View Center. Prices are $22 Ban Breathnach or other inspira- for adults, $21 for seniors and tional readings that participants children 12 and under. To order wish to bring. There is no cost, tickets or for more information but reservations are required. Call call 857-2200. The Center at 361-3650.

Meditation     Meditation opportunities are offered every Tuesday evening, 5:30 p.m. and both Monday and Thursday mornings, 9 a.m. at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.     Pastoral Director Chris Hopkins organizes these 20 minute periods of silent meditation, offers guidance to those new to the practice of meditation and welcomes anyone to join. The Monday morning group meditates specifically for the intention of peace in the world. Call 361-3650 for information.

Discussion of ‘Bingo Long …’     CineVerse, the Oak Lawn Park District’s free weekly film discussion group, will examine “The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings” (1976) on Wednesday, May 29, from 7 to 10 p.m. at Oak View Community Center, 4625 W. 110th St. in Oak Lawn (check building signage for room number). For more information call 529-9028 or visit cineverse group.blogspot.com.

joys of peace and love. However, a tragedy will force her to confront her ghosts.

Jazz in the pines

    The 21st annual outdoor jazz concert will be held in the Pine Forest at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, on Sunday, June 2, at 5:30 p.m.     The Darlene Baresch Quartet will return to The Center’s outdoor stage with an evening of jazz standards. Musicians include Dean Minuth on drums, Spencer Keyes on keyboard, Scott Gamina on saxophone, and Tyke ‘West Side Story’ Hendershot on bass, with Darlene Baresch on vocals. The stage is auditions located in a grove of pine trees     The Oak Lawn Park District on the northeast corner of The Theatre will hold auditions for Center’s farm property. “West Side Story” at 7:30 p.m. Monday, June 3 and Tuesday, June     Guests are invited to park in the 4 at 7:30 p.m. at Oak View Center, Children’s Farm parking lot and ride 4625 W. 110th Street. Callbacks the farm hayrack to the concert site. if needed will be at 7:30 p.m. Guests should bring lawn chairs or Wednesday, June 5. Participants blankets for seating, and may choose (Continued on page 11) must be 16 or older and should come prepared to dance and sing a song from the show. For more information call 857-2200.

‘War Witch’ at BAC     The Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St. in Chicago, will present “War Witch” (Unrated for war-related violence and brief nudity) at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 5. Tickets are $7.50 ($5.50/ BAC members). For more information call (773) 445-3838 or visit beverlyartcenter.org.     Montreal-based filmmaker Kim Nguyen tells the story of a 14year-old girl kidnapped from an African village by rebels who want to make her a child soldier. She escapes with an older soldier and experiences for the first time the

    STARTING THIS WEEK: “BEAUTIFUL CREATURES”: Aiming to be the next “Twilight,” director Richard LaGravenese’s (“P.S. I Love You”) take on the best-seller by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl doesn’t quite get there, but it still has striking visuals and a very strong supporting cast. Alice Englert plays a literally magical newcomer to a South Carolina town, where a classmate’s (Aiden Ehrenreich) unusual sense of connection to her eventually becomes clear. Emma Thompson, Jeremy Irons, Viola Davis, Emmy Rossum and Eileen Atkins also star. DVD extras: deleted scenes. *** (PG13: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “PARKER”: There’s no honor among thieves — except for Jason Statham’s title character, that is — in this wellexecuted melodrama based on novels by veteran crime writer Donald Westlake, who used the alias Richard Stark for them. Parker is a member of a robbery team double-crossed by his cohorts, who are then pursued and targeted by him as they plan their next heist in Florida. Jennifer Lopez and Michael Chiklis (“Vegas”) also are in director Taylor Hackford’s (“Ray”) cast. DVD extras: two “making-of ” documentaries; audio commentary by Hackford. *** (R: AS, N, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “THE LAST STAND”: For his re-entry into headlining movies after his run in politics, Arnold Schwarzenegger wasn’t unwise to choose an action vehicle, though this one goes heavy on genre cliches ... especially the amped-up firepower. The star plays a sheriff caught up in the pursuit of a drug kingpin who’s heading for the Mexican border in a wildly tricked-out Corvette, prompting the lawman to align with a federal agent (Forest Whitaker) to stop the bad guy. Peter Stormare, Johnny Knoxville, Rodrigo Santoro and Harry Dean Stanton also are featured. DVD extras: four “making-of ” documentaries; deleted, extended and alternate scenes. ** (R: P, GV) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “SIDE EFFECTS”: Again altering a genre with his unique

just a few doors down

in Ravinia Plaza

15190 s. lagrange Rd, Orland Park (708) 364-7015

(Northwest corner of 153rd Street and LaGrange Rd, 3 doors down from Office Depot)

Open everyday of the week Stop by and say hello! Great gifts for graduates too!

20% OFF

Any single item • st. Anne’s giFts No additional discounts or coupons In-store use only • Expires 6/30/2013

Alfre Woodard, Robert Patrick and William Sanderson (“Newhart”) are among the guest stars. DVD extras: audio commentary by cast and crew; interviews with the writers; previews and recaps. *** (Not rated: AS, N, P, GV) (Also on Blu-ray)     COMING SOON: “DARK SKIES” (May 28): A couple (Keri Russell, Josh Hamilton) fear their family is being targeted by otherworldly forces. J.K. Simmons also stars. (PG-13: AS, P, V)     “ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH” (June 4): An astronaut (voice of Brendan Fraser) quickly finds trouble on a perilous planet. Sarah Jessica Parker, Ricky Gervais and William Shatner also are in the voice cast. (PG: AS, P)     “A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD” (June 4): John McClane (Bruce Willis) sees action again when he goes to Russia to help his estranged son (Jai Courtney). (R: P, V)     “IDENTITY THIEF” (June 4): When a Denver businessman (Jason Bateman) learns his identity has been stolen, he heads for Florida to catch the culprit (Melissa McCarthy). (R: AS, P)     “WARM BODIES” (June 4): In a world ruled by the undead, a zombie (Nicholas Hoult) tries to protect a human (Teresa Palmer) he’s fallen for. (PG-13: AS, P, V)     “HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS” (June 11): Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton play adult, vengeful versions of the fairy-tale characters. (R: AS, N, P, GV)     FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

Carpetp

CarpetsPlus C O LpO R T I L E

CARPET ON SALE Now $ 49

1

sq. ft.

ed

vot

7329 W. 79th St. • Bridgeview (79th & Harlem, next to K-Mart)

708-496-8822 advantagecarpetsplus.com

Hours: Mon-Thur 9am-8pm Fri-Sat 9am-5pm Sun 11am-4pm

2x3 run 5 9 13 O&A

OPENING NIGHT! Monday, May 27th vs. the Frontier Greys at 6:05pm

Magnetic Schedules courtesy of Standard Bank and Trust (first 2,000 fans) Post-Game Fireworks courtesy of City Beverage Markham Active and retired military personnel will receive FREE admission!

For FULL SCHEDULE and more information:

www.wcthunderbolts.com

We’ve moved

cinematic sensibility, director Steven Soderbergh (“Traffic,” “Ocean’s Eleven”) puts his spin on a medical thriller with the story of an emotionally fragile woman (Rooney Mara, “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”) prescribed an experimental drug by a psychiatrist (Jude Law). Her subsequent, shocking action has a far-reaching impact on all concerned, including her prison parolee husband (Channing Tatum). Catherine Zeta-Jones, Mamie Gummer and Vinessa Shaw also appear. DVD extras: “making-of” documentary; fake commercials. *** (R: AS, N, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “STAND UP GUYS”: The pleasure of watching several acting staples — Oscar winners all — do what they do best is the big treat of this tale of reunited crime veterans. One, played by Al Pacino, has just ended a stretch in prison and is happy to be back with his friend and former felony partner (Christopher Walken) ... who secretly has been hired to kill him. Alan Arkin also stars as a member of the duo’s old gang, with Julianna Margulies (“The Good Wife”) as Arkin’s daughter. DVD extras: three “making-of ” documentaries; audio commentary by director Fisher Stevens; deleted scenes. *** (R: AS, P, V) (Also on Bluray and On Demand)     “TRUE BLOOD: THE COMPLETE FIFTH SEASON”: Ahead of its June 16 return to HBO, the vampire saga resumes here with Sookie (Anna Paquin) making a deal to ensure the future existence of Tara (Rutina Wesley). Bill (Stephen Moyer) is in big trouble with the Vampire Authority, and Steve Newlin (Michael McMillian) makes a surprising revelation.

708-489-BALL (2255)

Standard Bank Stadium 14011 S. Kenton Ave. Crestwood, IL 60445

PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL AT AFFORDABLE PRICES! Kids eat FREE on Mondays!

Offer valid only when kid's ticket is purchased on the day of the game.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 23, 2013 Section 2

Out & About

11

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Wolfgang Puck’s Kitchen by Wolfgang Puck

Soup to make anyone a garlic lover     Forty years ago, I moved from Europe to the United States. I was so excited to be here. I loved everything I’d heard and seen about America, and really did think of it as the land of opportunity. Today, I’m happy to be a citizen.     But, I must admit, it was an adjustment at first. In so many ways, I was surprised by American tastes and food habits. I remember the first time I cooked scrambled eggs the soft, creamy

way they’re served in France — only to have a guest send them back, with the message that they were undercooked! Customers sometimes wanted mint sauce with their (overcooked) lamb, and ketchup with their steaks.     It was a learning process — both in the kitchen and in the dining room.     Another surprise when I first came here was that garlic still seemed a little bit like a novelty.

Submitted photo

Book tells The Center’s story under Rev. Sanders     A new book chronicles the Rev. Frank Sanders’ leadership of The Center in Palos Park.     The Center in Palos Park announced the publication of a new book, written by Lois Lauer, about the history of The Center between the years 1982 and 2007 (from the 50th to the 75th anniversary).     It’s the story of the leadership of the Rev. Frank Sanders, who continued and expanded his father’s dream of “A House by the Side of the Road.”     The road was often not an easy one for Sanders, as he dealt with changing times, staffing problems, financial shortfalls, and a busier schedule of Center activities than his father ever had.     “The House by The Side of the Road: A New Generation 19822007” tells the story of how Frank Sanders met those challenges head on with enthusiasm, commitment and determination. His warmth and humor won the hearts of The Center’s fellowship, “as he led The Center with love and warmth into the 21st century,” Lauer said.     The Center has planned two book release parties, on Sunday, May 26, 2:30 p.m. (no reservations necessary), and Tuesday, May 28, from noon to 2 p.m. ($16 luncheon, reservations required). At both parties, Lois Lauer will read from the new book and show slides both from the book and from The Center archives to illustrate the story of Sanders’ remarkable leadership and faith.     The books are for sale in The Center gift shop for $10 each, and also online at Amazon.com for $15 each. Each book comes with a hug-from-Frank certificate.     The Center is at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Call 361-3650 for May 28 luncheon reservations.

Sure, you expected it in Italian restaurants, and in maybe some other ethnic places. But American home cooks still seemed to rely more on tired jars of garlic salt and garlic powder from the supermarket spice aisle than they did on garlic cloves from the produce department. Unlike in European kitchens, they hadn’t become aware of garlic’s essential role in adding aromatic complexity to slowly simmered and quickly sauteed dishes alike. And they hadn’t yet learned how to tame garlic’s unruly, sometimes harsh personality.     An essential way to make garlic more palatable is first to blanch the peeled cloves. Blanching basically refers to precooking an ingredient, usually cut-up vegetables, briefly in a pan of boiling water, and then draining it. For popular side-dish ingredients such as carrots or broccoli, this not only softens the vegetables slightly before further cooking but also — if they’re immediately plunged into ice water after draining — keeps their colors bright and beautiful.     Blanching garlic cloves, however, provides another benefit: It tames their harshness, adding an aspect of mild sweetness to the stillfamiliar garlic flavor. The result is garlic that’s easier to digest, and that diminishes (if not eliminating completely) the sometimes dreaded “garlic breath.”     You can blanch garlic cloves before you include them in stews, braises, or sautes, whether whole or sliced. Some recipes might even call for “double blanching” them — simply going through the process twice to make them even milder. For an outstanding example of the remarkable results that come from such a simple kitchen trick, look no further than my recipe for GarlicPotato Soup. It actually contains as much garlic as it does potato — an impressive 1/3 to 1/2 cup of peeled cloves per serving. But, thanks to blanching, your guests will be only intrigued and delighted by the bulb’s subtle flavor. GARLIC-POTATO SOUP WITH BASIL OIL AND PROSCIUTTO Serves 4 to 6 GARLIC-POTATO SOUP: 2 cups peeled garlic cloves, about 3/4 pound 1 large baking potato, about 3/4 pound, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes 2 cups organic chicken broth, heated Salt Freshly ground white pepper 3/4 cup heavy cream BASIL OIL: 1/4 cup packed fresh basil leaves 1/4 cup packed Italian parsley leaves 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 thin slices prosciutto, cut into thin strips, for garnish     First, blanch the garlic: Put the peeled garlic cloves in a medium saucepan and add cold water to cover. Bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat; then, reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes.     Drain the garlic and return it to the pan. Add the potato and the chicken broth. Season lightly with

salt and white pepper. Return the pan to medium-high heat. Bring the broth to a boil, reduce the heat to maintain a gentle simmer, and cook until the potato is tender enough to be pierced easily with the tip of a small, sharp knife, about 20 minutes.     Pour and stir the cream into the simmering soup. Over low heat, bring the liquid back to a simmer.     Meanwhile, prepare the Basil Oil: In a blender, combine the basil, parsley, and olive oil. Blend until smoothly pureed, stopping once or twice if necessary to scrape down the sides of the container with a rubber spatula. Pour the puree through a fine-meshed strainer set over a bowl. Set the strained oil aside. Wash out the blender container thoroughly.     Working in two or more batches Submitted photo to avoid overfilling the blender, transfer the soup into the blender and blend until smoothly pureed, following the manufacturer’s     McCord Gallery & Cultural Center asked artists: What gives you instructions to avoid spattering a sense of being sheltered? Home? Grandma’s lap? A friend’s the hot liquid. Transfer the pureed smile?     In the current juried exhibit called Gimme Shelter artists have soup to a clean saucepan.     Gently reheat the pureed soup explored the possibilities and ideas of places, people, and things over low heat. Taste and adjust the that give them comfort. Pictured is Home Is Where the Heart Is by seasonings, if necessary, with a little Palos Park artist Pat Doyle Mikrut.     The exhibit is open until Saturday, June 8, and the public is invited more salt and white pepper.     To serve, ladle the soup into to meet the artists at a reception this Friday, May 24, from 6:30 to heated bowls. Arrange strips of 8:30 p.m. prosciutto on top of the soup and,     McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th with a teaspoon, drizzle on some of Street and La Grange Road), Palos Park. For more information, call the Basil Oil. Serve immediately. 671-0648 or visit mccordgallery.org.

Gimme Shelter exhibit at McCord

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders     ARIES (March 21-April 19): There is no reason to be mean if someone thinks the ends justify the means. Group interactions and politics can be challenging in the week ahead, but a trusted partner will be there to add moral support.     TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Be steadfast and true to your goals in the week ahead. Don’t be sidetracked by small temptations. Even the most awkward situation can’t dampen your enthusiasm for those things close to the heart.     GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t let excuses put limits on your success. You may be able to talk your way out of any box, but you must be sincere about your promises and resolutions to make it to the big leagues in the week to come.     CANCER (June 21-July 22): Grab hold of a situation by the scruff of the neck. Like a mother cat with a kitten, it may be a case of mother knows best. Earn respect from others by being gentle, but firm, in the upcoming week.     LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Practice what you preach. If you follow your heart and remember to take your own advice, everything will work out for the best this week. Upsets at the workplace could suddenly alter your prospects.     VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If you really love ‘em, you can’t leave ‘em. Close intimate

relationships can grow closer in the week ahead. This may be an excellent day to talk over long-term plans and define joint objectives.     LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Learn to grin and bear it. World opinion may go against the grain in the week ahead. Focus on personal romance instead. An ill-informed consensus is still wrong - no matter how many people share it.     SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Know your boundaries and stay within them. The week to come may show you that true love means you must do your duty. You may learn that security in relationships is more valuable than excitement.     SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You deserve a break today. Plans will move along like clockwork during the upcoming week if you pay extra attention to a special someone. Frankly discuss problems to nip troubles before they bud.     CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You might not be a very good cook, but even you can manage to bake some humble pie. Situations outside your control might force you to take a back seat or to accept your limits in the week ahead.     AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Opportunity only knocks once, so listen closely. In the week ahead be on the lookout for a chance to make some extra cash, buy something of beauty,

improve your health, or make everyday tasks easier.     PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Romance might be on your mind in the week to come. Hold off on vows of commitment and everlasting love until at least the middle of the week. Right now, your impulsive actions might backfire.

Broaden Your Horizons

Upcoming

(Continued from page 10) to bring a picnic supper (no alcohol please). The Center will serve punch and cookies.     There is no admission fee to the concert, as the event is The Center’s gift to the community. (361-3650)

Top Pop Singles     1. Can’t Hold Us, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, featuring Ray Dalton, Macklemore     2. Just Give Me a Reason, Pink, featuring Nate Ruess, RCA Record     3. Mirrors, Justin Timberlake, RCA Records     4. Stay, Rihanna, featuring Mikky Ekko, Def Jam     5. When I Was Your Man, Bruno Mars, Atlantic Records


12

Section 2

Thursday, May 23, 2013

The Regional News - The Reporter

Banking, Together. Same great people, same great service Soon with more access and more convenience

We are excited to announce that Citizens Financial Bank is planning to join First Merchants Bank. Citizens Financial and First Merchants have agreed to combine our companies in order to provide better value for our communities, clients, shareholders and employees. Through this combination, we intend to provide expanded products and services including insurance and wealth management, along with more banking centers and ATMs. Our new partnership would provide you with nearly 100 banking locations throughout 26 Indiana counties, as well as two counties in both Illinois and Ohio. Our companies are similar; both have deep roots in community banking and both are committed to local delivery of exceptional service. Both banks believe in building deep, lifelong relationships with our clients and in being part of the fabric of the communities we serve. We both strive to be trusted advisors and true partners with our clients. Headquartered in Muncie, Indiana, First Merchants is one of the largest financial services holding companies in the state. For more than 120 years, they have been providing trusted advice and counsel to clients and communities like ours. In fact, we are already neighbors, as their DeMotte location is just 20 miles from both our Crown Point and Valparaiso banking centers. We plan for the partnership to be official in the fourth quarter of this year, assuming we receive the required shareholder and bank regulatory approvals. We are excited and proud of our intention to take the First Merchants name, but the people who serve you will not change. Although we would be a much larger company, you would see the same employees at your neighborhood banking centers, providing you with the high performing service and advice you have become accustomed to. By combining Citizens Financial with First Merchants, we can bring you even more products and services while maintaining the legacy of real community banking that you expect and deserve. It is our pledge to continue to provide the same personal, personal banking experience, from the same great people you know and trust. If you have any questions about this exciting news, please let us know. On behalf of the entire Citizens Financial Bank team, we look forward to supporting your personal and business financial needs now and in the future.

Personally yours,

Daryl D. Pomranke President and CEO, Citizens Financial Bank P.S. For additional information about First Merchants, I encourage you to visit their website at www.firstmerchants.com.

1.888.226.5237 | www.mybankcitizens.com

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS This communication contains forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe-harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements can often, but not always, be identified by the use of words like “believe”, “continue”, “pattern”, “estimate”, “project”, “intend”, “anticipate”, “expect” and similar expressions or future or conditional verbs such as “will”, would”, “should”, “could”, “might”, “can”, “may”, or similar expressions. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements relating to the benefits of the proposed merger (the “Merger”) between First Merchants Corporation (“First Merchants”) and CFS Bancorp, Inc. (“Citizens”), including future financial and operating results, cost savings, enhanced revenues, and accretion/dilution to reported earnings that may be realized from the Merger, as well as other statements of expectations regarding the Merger, and other statements of First Merchants’ goals, intentions and expectations; statements regarding the First Merchants’ business plan and growth strategies; statements regarding the asset quality of First Merchants’ loan and investment portfolios; and estimates of First Merchants’ risks and future costs and benefits, whether with respect to the Merger or otherwise. These forward-looking statements are subject to significant risks, assumptions and uncertainties that may cause results to differ materially from those set forth in forward-looking statements, including, among other things: the risk that the businesses of the First Merchants and Citizens will not be integrated successfully or such integration may be more difficult, time-consuming or costly than expected; expected revenue synergies and cost savings from the Merger may not be fully realized or realized within the expected time frame; revenues following the Merger may be lower than expected; customer and employee relationships and business operations may be disrupted by the Merger; the ability to obtain required governmental and stockholder approvals, and the ability to complete the Merger on the expected timeframe; possible changes in economic and business conditions; the existence or exacerbation of general geopolitical instability and uncertainty; the ability of First Merchants and Citizens to integrate recent acquisitions and attract new customers; possible changes in monetary and fiscal policies, and laws and regulations; the effects of easing restrictions on participants in the financial services industry; the cost and other effects of legal and administrative cases; possible changes in the credit worthiness of customers and the possible impairment of collectability of loans; fluctuations in market rates of interest; competitive factors in the banking industry; changes in the banking legislation or regulatory requirements of federal and state agencies applicable to bank holding companies and banks like First Merchants’ affiliate banks; continued availability of earnings and excess capital sufficient for the lawful and prudent declaration of dividends; changes in market, economic, operational, liquidity, credit and interest rate risks associated with the First Merchants’ business; and other risks and factors identified in each of First Merchants’ filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. First Merchants does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, relating to the matters discussed in this presentation or news release. In addition, First Merchants’ and Citizens’ past results of operations do not necessarily indicate either of their anticipated future results, whether the Merger is effectuated or not. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION The proposed Merger will be submitted to First Merchants’ and Citizens’ stockholders for their consideration. In connection with the proposed Merger, First Merchants will file with the SEC a Registration Statement on Form S-4 that will include a Joint Proxy Statement for First Merchants and Citizens and a Prospectus of First Merchants, as well as other relevant documents concerning the proposed transaction. STOCKHOLDERS ARE URGED TO READ THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT AND THE CORRESPONDING PROXY STATEMENT AND PROSPECTUS REGARDING THE MERGER WHEN THEY BECOME AVAILABLE, AS WELL AS ANY OTHER RELEVANT DOCUMENTS FILED WITH THE SEC, TOGETHER WITH ALL AMENDMENTS OR SUPPLEMENTS TO THOSE DOCUMENTS, AS THEY ALL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION. Once filed, you may obtain a free copy of the Proxy Statement and Prospectus, when they become available, as well as other filings containing information about First Merchants and Citizens, at the SEC’s Web Site (http://www.sec.gov). You may also obtain these documents, free of charge, by accessing First Merchants’ Web site (http://www.firstmerchants.com) under the tab “Investors,” then under the heading “Financial Information,” and finally under the link “SEC Filings,” or by accessing Citizens’ Web Site (http://www.mybankcitizens.com) under the “Investor Relations” tab, then under the “Financial Documents” tab, and finally under the link “SEC Filings.” First Merchants and Citizens and their respective directors and executive officers may be deemed to be participants in the solicitation of proxies from the stockholders of First Merchants and Citizens in connection with the proposed Merger. INFORMATION ABOUT THE DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF FIRST MERCHANTS IS SET FORTH IN THE DEFINITIVE PROXY STATEMENT FOR FIRST MERCHANTS’ 2013 ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS FILED WITH THE SEC ON MARCH 29, 2013 AND FIRST MERCHANTS’ ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K FILED ON MARCH 15, 2013. INFORMATION ABOUT THE DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF CITIZENS IS SET FORTH IN THE DEFINITIVE PROXY STATEMENT FOR CITIZENS’ 2013 ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS FILED WITH THE SEC ON APRIL 2, 2013. Additional information regarding the interests of those participants and other persons who may be deemed participants in the transaction may be obtained by reading the Proxy Statement and Prospectus regarding the proposed Merger when they become available. Free copies of these documents may be obtained as described in the preceding paragraph.

Reporter_5-23-13  

Reporter_5-23-13

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you