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Sandburg finishes fourth in baseball state tourney

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THE REGIONAL NEWS Named best small weekly in Illinois five times by the Illinois Press Association

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Serving Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities

77th Year, NO. 24 • 2 Sections

PALOS TOWNSHIP

Brannigan shuts down meeting ‘50 minutes of the same old everything’ By Anthony Caciopo Regional News Editor

Photo by Anthony Caciopo

Crews from Lindahl Brothers earth excavation company strip the top layer of pavement from 69th Avenue at 120th Street Tuesday afternoon. Palos Heights, with two million dollars in its road and sewer fund for 2018, will spend more than $480,000 repaving stretches of more than a dozen city streets this year.

City of Palos Heights has budget surplus for 16th straight year By Anthony Caciopo Regional News Editor

Palos Heights is operating with a budget surplus of more than $3 million in 2018, at no extra cost to residents with new or increased taxes that the city controls. “We don’t spend it unless we have it, and we’ve operated at surplus for the last 16 years,” said Mayor Bob Straz. With total projected revenue of a little under $12 million, “the surplus will be probably $3 million,”

he said. “The surplus is usually 30 percent of the general fund. It’s the standard.” The city’s 2017 budget was similar, at $11.8 million. The city obtains revenue from a variety of sources, including real estate tax, sales tax, state income tax, utility fees, motor fuel tax, permits and vehicle stickers. The budget includes a number of funds apart from the general fund. Monies in each of those funds are used specifically for that purpose.

Among the more notable funds are the police pension fund, the library fund, recreation fund, the road fund, the municipal retirement fund, the bond fund to pay off the construction of the Recreation Center and a fund for water/sewer. “Wages have increased and health care costs have increased, although we’ve been very fortunate to be able to negotiate that (health care) down,” Straz said. “They started at 14 percent,” he said of the health care pro-

vider, “and we came in at five percent.” The total increase in cost to the city for 2018 is, in fact, five percent. “Who knows how long that’s going to stay,” Straz said, “but then you make adjustments with deductibles to make it work. It’s not unlike any other business.” Residents are already seeing the annual resurfacing program on portions of 15 city streets. Palos Heights has approximately 43 miles of streets. Work began See BUDGET, Page 2

Legalizing pot is topic of town hall meeting By Dermot Connolly Staff Writer

State Rep. Kelly Cassidy (D-14th) believes marijuana use should be legalized in Illinois for adults ages 21 and over. “Prohibition has not worked,” Cassidy said during a town hall meeting held Monday evening before about 150 people at the Oak Lawn Library. “The difference between what you can get legally, and what you get in a plastic bag on the street is night and day. The goal is to undercut the cost of what is available on the street, so you can’t tax it too much.” Cassidy, whose district includes part of Orland Park and Palos Heights, is co-sponsoring a bill with state Sen. Heather Steans (D-7th), said Senate B316/ HB2352 would tax and regulate marijuana similar to what is currently done for alcohol and

tobacco. The forum was sponsored by state Sen. Bill Cunningham (D-18th), state Rep. Kelly Burke (D-36th) and state Rep. Fran Hurley (D-36th). Cunningham’s district includes a portion of Palos Heights and Orland Park. Hurley’s district covers a portion of Orland Park, Palos Heights and Palos Park. Many residents who attended the session were open to the legalization of marijuana for adults. However, there were many other residents in attendance who were wary of the long-term impact of marijuana use. “We’re just here to learn. But we’re very skeptical about it,” said Oak Lawn resident Chris Kupscuk, who was there with her husband, Peter. “I don’t understand its popularity. I tried it once in high school and I didn’t like it,” she added. “We still have some questions.

Photo by Dermot Connolly

State Rep. Kelly Cassidy (D-14th), at right, responds to audience questions following a presentation she gave on Monday during a town hall meeting at Oak Lawn Library about her efforts to legalize marijuana for recreational use in Illinois. The event was hosted by state Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th) (standing, from left), state Rep. Kelly Burke (D-36th) and state Sen. Bill Cunningham (D-18th), who read the submitted questions.

But it just seems like it is going to happen,” said Peter Kupscuk. Hurley pointed out that in the non-binding Cook County referendum on legalizing marijuana

that was on the March 20 primary elections, Orland Township was 54 percent in favor, 55.6 in Palos Township, and 62 percent in See MEETING, Page 2

Monday’s Palos Township Board of Trustees monthly meeting came to a sudden end, like so many previous meetings, but this time it was because of the departure of embattled Trustee Sharon Branningan, who walked out of the room. “Where are you going?” said Husam Marajda, who was finishing his allotted three minutes of time to address the board during the public commentary portion of the meeting. Amid a chorus of boos, Brannigan unexpectedly stood up and headed for a side exit, smiling and waving her hand in her final steps before disappearing from sight. “I left because I refuse to be continuously called horrible and offensive, inappropriate names,” she told The Regional News later

Photo by Anthony Caciopo

Trustee Sharon Brannigan waves as she exits the Palos Township Board meeting Monday evening. Her sudden departure broke a quorum of the board and caused the adjournment of the meeting.

in the evening in an email. “The meeting came to an abrupt halt after approximately 50 minutes of the same old everything that the same group has been chanting,” she wrote. See PALOS TWP., Page 2

PALOS PARK

Village to repave more streets with expanded program By Michael Gilbert Correspondent

Palos Park officials Monday approved the funding for the largest motor fuel tax (MFT) pavement program in Mayor John Mahoney’s 10-plus years of leading the village. Village officials voted 4-0 on June 11 to budget $675,000 for the program. Commissioner G. Darryl Reed was absent. The not-always-annual program was last held in 2016 when the village allocated approximately $300,000 to repave a half-dozen roads. This time around, village officials opted to increase the scope of the project with the hope of attracting more bidders and better rates. “The idea here was to put as many dollars together so that we could get more bang for our buck,” Milovich-Walters said. “We’re trying to get more streets done because the more money we have to put forward, the price per block will come down.” “It’s economy of scale,” Ma-

honey added. “We anticipate getting better bidding and more vendors interested to bring the price down. That’s the thought process. (Budgeting this much money) is not what we are going to be doing every year. We are basically budgeting three years into one.” To fund the MFT pavement program the village will use $180,000 from its motor fuel tax budget, $320,000 from the half-percent sales tax budget and $100,000 and $75,000 from the water fund and sewer fund, respectively. The water fund will be repaid over four years using $25,000 annually from the half-percent sales tax while the sewer fund will be repaid over three years using $25,000 annually from the half-percent sales tax, Milovich-Walters said. She stopped short of saying this was the largest MFT program in the village’s history because a few decades ago a bond was taken out and nearly all the roads in Palos Park were improved in one year. Mahoney noted it was “by far” the largest See PALOS PARK, Page 2

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Visit us on the web at www.theregionalnews.com • email: TheRegional@comcast.net • To advertise, call 708-448-4000


2 Thursday, June 14, 2018

The Regional News

Palos Twp. Free admission as Porky’s Ribfest returns to Toyota Park

Continued from Page 1

The fifth annual Porky’s Ribfest returns to Toyota Park, 7000 S. Harlem Ave. in Bridgeview, on June 14-17 with free admission, succulent barbecue, carnival rides, a variety of musical options and a crowd estimated at more than 30,000. Porky’s Ribfest will host a variety of well-known Chicagoland barbecue restaurants featuring unique and original barbecue rib recipes. Entertainment for the entire family will be provide with performances on the main stage by top Chicago radio DJ acts and live

bands performing country, rock and other popular music genres. The fest will run from 5-10 p.m. on Thursday and Friday; from 2-11 p.m. on Saturday and from 1-9 p.m. on Sunday. Musically, Porky’s Ribfest will open its doors at 5 p.m. on Friday, June 15, with a performance from Eric Chesser. On Saturday, June 16, savor the flavors of your favorite barbecue while listening to live bands perform classic rock. On Sunday, June 17, Porky’s Ribfest celebrates Father’s Day with BBQ ribs and the best live country and rhythm and blues music.

On all four days, food vendors will be onsite sampling and sharing their original barbecue recipe representing different parts of the country. Adding to the excitement will be an extravagant carnival with more than 30 different rides, games and interactive activities for children. Porky’s Ribfest schedule is subject to change. To learn more about the festival and to keep up to date on all upcoming announcements, visit www.porkysribfest. com.

Photo by Anthony Caciopo

Sod is put in place on the north side of 127th Street west of Oak Park Avenue following extensive repairs made to the water main on the north side of the street. The blocks-long job will cost more than $250,000.

Budget

Continued from Page 1 this week. According to Straz, the city employs “under 80 full-time people, with about 300 seasonal employees. Camp counselors, lifeguards, concession stand workers, kids hired to cut grass,” he explained. The police department is the largest workforce, he said, followed by the public works department. The Palos Heights Police Department has 28 sworn officers, “and probably another 15-20 people, including administrative staff, community service officers and crossing guards,” the mayor said. Straz has been in office since 2000 and will be paid $12,500 in 2018 for his service, according to the budget. The city’s eight alderman are each paid $5,000 per year, he said. Capital expenditures this year have $1.5 million budgeted. “Capital improvements are anything other than operating expenses,” said Straz. Among the capital improvements for 2018 are the expanded Municipal Parking Lot at 12217 S. Harlem, which is being enlarged to 60 spaces and being beautified with a water fountain/waterfall.

Meeting

Continued from Page 1 Worth Township. Her district also includes Chicago’s 19th Ward, where she lives, as well as the 18th and 21st wards. Hurley said 67 percent of 19th Ward voters approved legalizing marijuana, as did 66 percent in the other two wards. “But everyone doesn’t vote. That just means that a majority of the voters were in favor of it,” Hurley said afterward, noting that voter turnout was about 29 percent. Cassidy cited statistics showing that 750,000 Illinoisans have admitting being regular users, and 22 million nationwide. She said that in all the states that have legalized marijuana, street sales of the drug have dropped. She added that the industry will also raise revenue through the creation of a variety of jobs related to the production of edible marijuana items, among other things. Cassidy mentioned that the tax revenue could go toward education, healthcare related to drug abuse, as a well as even paying down the pension debt. “How can we trust you that the revenue will go where you say it will?” asked one audience member, citing what happened to the lottery funds going into the general fund rather than education. The wording of the legislation is still being worked on, Cassidy said, and the feedback from town halls and public hearings is valuable. “Legalization is moving quickly across the country. It could be approved here as early as next spring, (after the gubernatori-

Others include improvements to the pool, improvements at Lake Katherine and improvements at the parks. Each year, Straz said, a park is modernized and this year the focus is on Palmer Park. At 7 p.m. today, residents can provide their input about redevelopment at an event held at the park, 123rd Street and 73rd Avenue. At Lake Katherine, parking will be expanded and an entrance will be provided on Harlem Avenue, between the Cal-Sag Channel and Route 83, heading west toward Lake Katherine. This will ease traffic on Lake Katherine Drive, the current main entrance, which has residences in close proximity. This year’s water and sewer fund has $2 million budgeted, and two major expenses have already claimed a good portion of that amount. Water main relocation at Ridgeland Avenue and Route 83, required by IDOT as part of lane expansion at that location, will cost the city approximately $675,000. “We didn’t know how much was going to be our portion (until recently),” said Straz of the total cost, which is being shared with the Village of Alsip. “It was bigger than we thought.”

Also tapping into the $2 million available is a water main project currently finishing up on 127th Street, just west of Oak Park Avenue, which will come in at a total of $250,000. “It happens,” he said. “That’s because the water mains and sewer lines are more than 50 years old.” Another project coming in capital improvements is construction of a plus-sized sidewalk along the west side of Ridgeland Avenue that will ultimately run from 135th Street to Route 83, with a median planter in the street toward the Route 83 end, said the mayor. “The idea is that we will tie all the sidewalks together on the main thoroughfares in town,” Straz said. He pointed out that some capital improvements in Palos Heights are eligible for matching funds from a variety of agencies, including the Southwest Conference of Mayors, the state and the RTA. “We search for those to maximize our dollars,” Straz said, noting that in some cases, the outside agencies will contribute up to 80 percent of the cost, with Palos Heights contributing as little as 20 percent. “If we don’t take it, somebody else will,” he said.

al election)” said Cassidy. “We probably have enough votes to pass it now, but the governor is against it and we don’t have enough votes to override a veto.” Cassidy said that legislative hearings will be held before any vote. She then answered questions submitted by audience members and read out by Cunningham, Kelly and Hurley. Cunningham pointed out that while Colorado and many of the other states that have legalized marijuana in recent years did so through referendums, but in Illinois, laws must be changed through the legislative process. Cassidy explained that under the bill, Illinois residents 21 and over would be allowed to purchase or possess 28 grams (1 ounce) of marijuana. “That amount is per purchase. So, if you kept buying it, and kept it with you, you could still have a problem if you were stopped by police,” she said, responding to an audience question. Public use of it would still be prohibited, she noted, under the legislation as it is written now. The marijuana sold legally would largely come from grow houses, just as medicinal marijuana is now. But households could also grow as many as five marijuana plants for their own use. “This is already an incredibly highly regulated industry,” said Cassidy, referring to the medicinal marijuana industry. It would be sold in dispensaries, like the ones for medical marijuana already in Worth, Justice, and on the Southwest Side of Chicago. She said municipalities, employers and landlords would still be able to restrict or prohibit use or possession of marijuana. “Municipalities can opt out of allowing marijuana possession en-

tirely. But then they also wouldn’t get any of the tax revenue it generates,” Cassidy said. “I would challenge a lot of things that were said today,” said Dr. Ken Yerkes, of Oak Lawn, who is running as a Republican write-in candidate in the 3rd Congressional District in November. Yerkes said that while he is in favor of decriminalizing marijuana, he questions a lot of the statistics cited during the presentation. “There is a DARE program for children, teaching them to avoid drugs. Some of the tax revenue should go toward a DARE program for adults, too,” he said. Cunningham said he is “leaning toward” supporting legalization, but is waiting for the final wording of the proposed legislation. “I think about Prohibition, and how that didn’t work. But a lot will depend on the final wording of the bill, whether or not I support the bill. We want to hear from you,” said Cunningham, urging audience members to contact the three offices and share their views on the subject. When asked for a show of hands from audience members if they supported legalization, most hands shot up. Burke said she was pleased with the turnout. “The event went well; the crowd was larger than I thought it would be and more of a mix of ages than I thought there would be. We don’t usually get many young people at our town halls so I am glad we could present information on a topic that is of interest to many young people. “I learned a lot from the presentation and I’d like to review the amended bill when it’s filed before making a commitment,” Burke added.  

Since July of 2017, Palos Township board meetings have been a hotspot as overflow crowds packed the meeting space each month at Township headquarters, 10802 S. Roberts Rd. in Palos Hills. The meetings have been crowded beyond capacity with activists, concerned residents from inside and outside Palos Township borders, the media and other individuals. Most have been present to call for the resignation of Brannigan, who posted comments last year on social media that many consider offensive to Muslims and Middle Eastern people in general. The comments have now long been removed. They included speculation about the legal status of many Middle Eastern students in local schools, and the numbers in which the students populate the schools. Another comment referenced First Lady Melania Trump looking dignified on a trip to the Middle East, compared to Muslim women who typically wear a traditional head covering. Last summer, Brannigan issued what she called a clarification of her position, and soon thereafter an apology that has found virtually no acceptance by those who want her off the board. “Once you say something, you can’t take it back,” said Sam Elmosa at Monday’s meeting. “Ms. Brannigan, it’s been a year (since the protests began) and it’s only going to get uglier,” he said. “You have to step back and say ‘I’m out.’” “I’m not resigning,” said Brannigan in her email Monday night and in-person to The Regional News two months ago following a meeting. “They have been told that countless times. Nothing has or will change. The ball is in their court if they want to come to the table to talk about issues.” The trustee was referring to a rumored third-party meeting between selected representatives of the Township board and members of the National Network of Arab American Communities. The meeting was reportedly to be brokered by a representative from the U.S. Department of Justice. “We cancelled the negotiations because you broke a confidentiality agreement by leaking it (word of a potential meeting) to the press,” said Husam Marajda to the board on Monday. Marajda is the Chicago Organizer for the Campaign to Take On Hate. For months now, protestors have pressured Brannigan’s fellow trustees to force her off the board, an action Township Supervisor Colleen Schuman said cannot be done. “She is an elected member that cannot be removed by us,” said Schumann. “The statement that the board will make, myself included, was made at the first meeting (last July)—and a meeting after that, and another meeting after that— was that we did not agree with Ms. Brannigan’s comments. “We are all individual board

Photos by Anthony Caciopo

Sam Elmosa gestures toward Larry Hickey (far right), taking issue with Hickey for some of the comments he made during the public comments portion of the meeting.

Gene Adams (right), the Palos Township highway commissioner, exchanges words with Husam Marajda, Chicago organizer for the Campaign to Take On Hate. The men were disputing the seating arrangements in the packed meeting room.

members, elected to serve this township, and we continue to do that.” Larry Hickey, who identified himself as a Palos Township homeowner, said “People here have the power to vote. I applaud them for taking part in the American process. “Our country is not run by intimidation and name-calling,” he said. “If the people here do not want Ms. Brannigan as their representative, vote her out. No reason to call her names.” Brannigan said the protestors are wrong in the action they are taking. “They refuse to recognize the law and abide by the same. This is the new face of the Democrat party in Illinois. All I’m doing is exposing it. Scream and holler until they get their way. Many of the people at the meeting were not even Township residents. In fact, some cars in the parking lot were from Indiana and Michigan,” she said. Monday’s public commentary portion of the meeting included almost a dozen people who addressed the board; some who have had a constant presence at the meetings and some who had not attended previously, including Zayna Ghouleh, who will be a high school senior in the fall. “Saying that our schools are filled with a lot of undocumented Arabs—why would you say that? Do you have facts to back that up?” “I go to Stagg High School,” Ghouleh said. “The majority of the people there are either Arab or Polish. We bring so much culture into these schools.” Throughout the public commen-

tary, Trustee Brannigan could be readily seen reading a magazine and flipping through her cell phone, rarely looking at any of the speakers. Her action was noticed, and commented upon, by several of the citizens. “You’re not looking at me, but it doesn’t bother me, because I know you can hear everything I say,” said Tammy Georgiou. “Words have weight. Hate words carry a heavy weight,” she said. “Do us all a favor. Step down and give us dignity in this township.” Palos Township covers all or parts of Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Palos Park, Orland Park, Willow Springs, Worth Bridgeview and Hickory Hills. Brannigan’s departure caused the meeting to be adjourned. “Just so you understand, Illinois law requires that we have a quorum,” said Erik Peck, the attorney for Palos Township. “This board no longer has a quorum here, so we can’t continue the public meeting,” he explained. A quorum is the minimum number of members necessary to be present in order to have a legal meeting. It was tipped by her departure because two other trustees, Richard C. Riley and Brent Woods, did not attend. Some members of the crowd questioned how Brannigan’s departure could be allowed. “The same way you are free to walk out this door, she is free to walk out this door,” Peck said. As the remaining board members began to exit following adjournment, chants of “We’ll be back, we’ll be back” filled the room from the meeting attendees.

Palos Park

Continued from Page 1 MFT program during his tenure. The streets expected to be included in the project are: 121st from 86th to 88th; 121st from 93rd east to the new pavement; 93rd from 121st to 123rd; 91st from 123rd to Forest Glen; 90th from 125th to 126th; 125th from 89th to 90th; 125th from 80th to the dead end; 126th from 81st to 84th; 82nd from 126th to 127th; 83rd from 125th to the dead end; Post Road from 123rd to the cul-de-sac and Romiga from Old Timber into Wildwood. “Public works drives around and inspects all the roads and these are the ones they rated as being in the most need of improvements,” Milovich-Walters said. “There is a system they use and these ranked the highest. “This is a real nice sampling of roads that are desperately needed to be repaired. There is always more that we would like to do but we are trying to address the roads that are most degraded.” Bidding for the project is expected to occur in July with the project completed by around September, Public Works Director Mike Sibrava said after the meeting.

Lions Club makes donation In other news, the Palos Lions Club made a $500 donation to Special Olympics Illinois during a brief ceremony at the start of Monday’s meeting. Tom Crowhurst, the immediate past president of the Palos Lions, presented the check to Palos Park Police Officer John Sutko. The Palos Park Police Department is extremely active with Spe-

Photo by Michael Gilbert

Palos Lions Club immediate past president Tom Crowhurst (at podium) addresses the council as Lions Club member Mike Lebarre and Officer John Sutko hold the oversized check for $500 the Lions donated to Special Olympics Illinois Monday, in care of the Palos Park Police Department.

cial Olympics Illinois hosting the Cop on Top fundraiser annually and participating in the Special Olympics Torch Run. Crowhurst said by donating the money to the police department the PPPD will then get credit for the donation with Special Olympics Illinois. “We want to thank the Palos Park Police Department for their efforts to support Special Olympics Illinois,” Crowhurst said. “These dedicated men and women are the PPPD’s finest and give so much time of themselves for our community and those who are less fortunate.” On May 18, while taking part in Cop On a Rooftop at Dunkin Donuts, 13029 S. LaGrange Rd., the police were handed a $25,800 donation for Special Olympics Illinois from an anonymous donor. Details of that remarkable event were published in The Regional News on May 24, 2018. Money raised from the Lions’

sale of Christmas trees as well as roasted corn during village events helped to fund the donation on Monday, Crowhurst said. “We do (this donation) every year,” Crowhurst said. “Special Olympics Illinois is an important and great organization. We are happy to make the donation.”

Coffee shop opens in Metra station Also at the board meeting, Village Manager Rick Boehm said the village is now operating the coffee shop inside the Metra train depot, 123rd St. and 82nd Ave. Palos Perk is open from 5-9 a.m. on days when the Metra operates, Boehm said. The shop, which sells coffee and juices as well as sweet rolls and other breakfast items, opened on June 6. “We will see how it goes but so far the customers have taken well to it,” Boehm said.


The Regional News

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Appoint Palos Heights resident to Moraine Valley board of trustees Dan Casey of Palos Heights was sworn in recently as the newest member of Moraine Valley Community College’s board of trustees to replace trustee Michael Murphy, who resigned earlier this year. He will fill the vacated position until the 2019 election. Casey, who is the head of Credit for BP’s oil trading division in the Americas, will bring a strong finance and business background to help the college remain on sound financial footing as well as further the mission of the college and position it for success, according to a news release from Moraine Valley. As a former international banker, his global experience also will bring a unique perspective to the board. “On behalf of the other trustees, I would like to welcome Dan to our board,” said Dr. Sylvia Jenkins, college president. “With his

work experience and knowledge, I am confident our students, faculty and staff will benefit from the contributions he will make to the college during his term. I know we all look forward to working with him.” As a new member of the board, Casey said he hopes to build upon the foundation already established by the current board and administration. Regarding fiscal and economic opportunities, he wants to make sure there’s a viable continuing education option for anyone who wants to pursue it in the college’s district. “I want to lend my leadership experience and help shape the appropriate path for the college to ensure its financial sustainability,” he said, as part of the college’s news release. Casey joined the board during a busy time for the college. He

jumped right into collective bargaining agreement negotiations with the college’s unions, attended graduation and has been called into several closed sessions. He said he came onto the board with no expectations so he could gain appreciation for the current position of the college and board dynamics. “I’m very impressed in this short time with the representation of leadership, board members and faculty members of the college. It has surpassed all of my expectations of how well-run the college is. I’m very pleasantly surprised,” he said. When Casey saw the ad for the open board position in The Regional News, he knew right away it was something he wanted to pursue as he and his wife, Cherl, are passionate about continuing education.

They have another connection to Moraine Valley through their former neighbor Robert F. DeCaprio, who was close a close friend of theirs and an ardent supporter of the college before his passing. “This was a way to give back to something that was important to him. It’s kind of like a legacy of Bob,” Casey said. In his brief tenure at Moraine Valley, Casey already has noticed the passion, commitment and love the faculty and staff have for what they do and for the college. “I look forward to bringing a little of that along with me into my day job,” he said. Casey has a Master of Business Administration degree from St. Xavier University and a bachelor’s in finance from Eastern Illinois University. He is the father of three sons: Connor, 17; Chris, 15 and Tyler, 12.

Palos Heights Woman’s Club, library and Montessori join June 20 market ‘Gently used’ jewelry sale, story hours The Palos Heights Woman’s Club joins the Palos Heights Farmers Market June 20, with their annual “gently used” jewelry sale. The ladies will have many dazzling bangles and fun pieces, along with membership and upcoming programming information. The items go fast, so make sure to stop by early for best selection. Proceeds from the jewelry sale fund the Woman’s Club’s many philanthropic activities. The Southwest Suburban Montessori School will join the Community Tent that day from 7 to 10 a.m. The school, located at 8800 W. 119th St., Palos Park, will be offering many fun activities for preschool market guests, including a story hour and craft-making starting at 9 a.m. Information about the school, which serves children ages 2-6, will also be available. The Palos Heights Library will join the market from 10 a.m. and noon with “Play Ball” story hour and crafts starting at 10 a.m. In addition, information about upcoming library events will be

available, along with surprise giveaways. Sign up for a library card, and sign out books on site. More and more fruits and vegetables are coming into the market. Locally grown fresh strawberries and other berries, tomatoes, lettuces, kale, spinach, radishes, kohlrabi, beets, early summer squashes, carrots, microgreens and more can be purchased very week. Many food items are also at the market on a weekly basis. They include breads, multiple types of bakery items, pies, noodles, cheeses, eggs, butter, jams, jellies, local honey and maple syrup, olive oils, vinegars, beef, pork and chicken. Also available are salsas, pasta, barbecue sauces, Italian peppers, three different varieties of readyto-eat tamales, pizza and pizza products, ready-to-bake pizza, pesto, organic and vegan frozen vegetable patties, soups, desserts, iced tea and packaged teas. Our vendors also have beautiful perennial and annual plants, herbs and fresh-cut flowers. Get ready for summer barbecues and parties with the Pampered Chef. They have everything you will need. Finally, naturally scented olive oil soaps and other personal care products are available.

The market’s Facebook page will showcase all available produce at the start of the market day. Check it out at www.Facebook. com/PalosHeightsFarmersMarket. Stop in early for best selection. Make sure to stop by the City Tent to pick up and have endorsed your Frequent Shopper Cards. Patrons will earn double credit on their Frequent Shopper Cards for all canned and fresh food donations. Canned donations are given to Palos United Methodist Church, 12101 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights. Fresh food donations are given to Operation Blessing in Alsip. All completed Frequent Shopper Cards will be entered into a market gift certificate raffle every month, beginning this month. LINK cards are accepted at the Palos market. Stop by the City Tent to start the process. “Palos Bucks” Double Value Matching Dollars of up to $15 will be offered weekly. Pick up this week’s recipe, “Vegetable Chicken Stirfry,” at the City Tent. This year’s recipes are courtesy of Palos Health Dieticians. The recipe will also be part of our weekly email, Facebook page and city webpage (www. palosheights.org).

POLICE BLOTTER: ORLAND PARK Retail theft Timothy A. Wehmeyer Jr., 36, of Crete, and Lorraine B. Garrity, 37, of Chicago, were issued municipal violations for retail theft after allegedly stealing merchandise worth $102 from Kohl’s in Orland Square Mall at 1:45 p.m. May 21. Police said Wehmeyer was seen sticking a pair of shoes down his pants and both placed clothing items in a stroller Garrity was pushing through the store with two small children in it. The shoes, a sweatshirt, and sweatpants taken from the store were found in their car following a traffic stop outside the store. The couple were scheduled to appear at a hearing in the Orland Park Civic Center on Tuesday. Trovoy L. James, 51, of Chicago, was charged with felony retail theft at Brighton Collectibles in Orland Square Mall following a traffic stop near the mall at 3:32 p.m. May 22. Police said he took 11 watches from the store, worth $1,225 in total, which were found in his car in a “booster bag” lined

Orland chamber will meet, prep for golf outing A board meeting of the Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce will be held from 8 to 9 a.m. June 20 at the administrative office of Orland School District 135, 15100 S. 94th Ave. Final plans are being made for the Chamber’s annual golf outing, which begins with a best-ball shotgun start at 9 a.m. June 21 at Silver Lake Country Club, 14700 S. 82nd Ave., Orland Park. There will be an 8 a.m. check-in. Anyone interested in helping with the golf outing is encouraged to call the Chamber office at (708) 349-2972 or email Executive Director Felicitas Cortez, at fcortez@orlandparkchamber.org

with aluminum foil to avoid theft detection devices. James was also cited for failure to obey a stop sign and was held for a bond hearing. Nathalice K. Zamora, 22, of Montgomery, and Steven R. Deloach, 25, of Downers Grove, were charged with retail theft at Mariano’s, 9504 W. 142nd St., at 3 p.m. May 23. Police said the couple were seen acting suspiciously in the liquor aisle, and Deloach allegedly placed a $32 bottle of liquor in Zamora’s purse before the two left the store. Zamora was also cited for obstruction of identification because she initially gave a false name. Police said store officials suspect them of committing a similar theft in the store on May 16. They were due in court on June 7.

Deceptive practices Shannon K. Thomas, 38, of Park

Forest, was charged with felony unlawful possession of a fraudulent driver’s license following an incident at PNC Bank, 15411 S. LaGrange Road, at 11:39 a.m. May 25. Police said they were called by bank officials when Thomas allegedly presented a fraudulent driver’s license as identification when he tried to open a business checking account. He was held for a bond hearing.

DUI Titas Brigys, 29, of Romeoville, was charged with aggravated driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 7:31 p.m. May 20, in the Orland Square Mall parking lot near 151st Street. Police said he failed field sobriety tests. He was also cited for driving with a suspended license, no insurance, improper lane usage

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Photos by Anthony Caciopo

Phone outage at City Hall sign site

Personnel from AT&T work to repair a severed cable containing almost 1,000 individual wires following an excavation mishap outside City Hall, 7607 W. College Dr. on Tuesday. Construction crews were preparing the ground for installation of a new, electronic marquee sign that can rotate multiple messages, replacing the old sign which had a one-at-a-time message that had to be manually changed. A contractor severed the cable during the digging, which required a much larger hole to be dug so repairs could be made.

Raffle tickets for this year’s Car Classic Event will be available at every market. The Car Classic Event will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, July 19, centered at 123rd St. and Harlem Ave. This is the 15th anniversary for this very popular event and will feature hundreds of classic cars, a live band, delicious food and beverages, and more. The Classic Car Event brings thousands of visitors to town every year. More can be found at www.palosheights.org/ events/carclassic. Volunteers and sponsors are needed. Email carclassic@palosheights.org for more A portion of the damaged cable, revealing 400 pairs of wires that each information. needed to be reconnected at either end of the break. The work took approxThe market would like to ac- imately five hours. The outage affected an undetermined number of homes. knowledge and thank this year’s sponsors. They include Palos Health, CIBC Bank, City of Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz, CNB Bank and Trust, United Trust Bank, Running for Kicks, Golden DUI car was traveling in the opposite Shoes and Camille’s Confections. direction on Route 83 and made Michael John Williams, 60, of Additional information about a sudden U-turn, at the intersecthe market can be obtained Chicago, was charged with driving tion, striking his car. She reportedly at www.palosheights.org, by under the influence of alcohol fol- failed field sobriety tests and was lowing a traffic stop at 9:52 p.m. emailing farmersmarket@ June 2, in the 10400 block of West also cited for driving without inpalosheights.org, calling (708) 123rd Street. Police said he was surance and making an improper 361-1800 or visiting the Palos driving 25 mph in a 50-mph zone, U-turn. Court information was not Heights Farmers Market page causing traffic to back up behind available. on Facebook. him. He reportedly failed field so- Packages stolen briety tests and was also cited for Police are investigating the theft driving with a revoked license, no insurance, and driving too slow for of two packages from a parcel lockconditions while impeding traffic. er in the 11700 block of South 85th Avenue that were reported stolen He is due in court on July 12. and making an improper left turn. Angel Mae Taylor, 33, of Chica- at 10:30 a.m. June 6. The victim He was due in court on May 21. go, was charged with driving under told police that records show the Cesar D. Contreras, 22, of Chi- the influence of alcohol following packages ordered through Amazon cago, was charged with aggravat- a traffic crash at 10 a.m. June 1, had been delivered by the US Postal ed driving under the influence of at Route 83 and 85th Avenue. The Service between June 3 and June 5, alcohol following a traffic crash driver of another vehicle said her but were missing from the locker. at 4:50 a.m. May 22, in the 8100 block of West 143rd Street. Police said his SUV struck a curb, causing flat tires. They said a bag Puzzle on Page 7 Puzzle on Page 7 containing cannabis was found on top of a digital scale in the vehicle, and he was carrying another bag in his pocket. Together, the bags reportedly weighed 18 grams. He was also cited for driving without a valid license, no insurance, improper lane usage and failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident. Contreras was issued local ordinance citations for possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia and held for a bond hearing.

POLICE BLOTTER: PALOS PARK

Answers

Sudoku


4 Thursday, June 14, 2018

Budget passes with support of Democrat, Republican coalition Last year, the Illinois Senate Democrats and a handful of reasonable Republicans worked together to defy Gov. Bruce Rauner’s veto and pass a balanced budget to benefit all Illinoisans. This year, because of those efforts, we were able to build a much broader coalition with near-unanimous support to pass an even stronger budget that became law with the governor’s signature. This bipartisan effort, which achieved more than 150 ‘yes’ votes and just 20 ‘no’ votes between the two chambers, is a major step forward for Illinois, no matter which way you look at it. More importantly, at this juncture in our state’s history, this budget was our moral imperative. Simply put, this budget rejects the chaos of the last three years in favor of certainty and stability for our troubled state. It also rejects dangerous cuts that have been floated about in recent years. This budget contains a record investment in K-12 education and finally begins incentivizing Illinois’ students to obtain their college education right here at home. It imposes discipline on the governor, who spent $3 billion more than the state’s available revenues for the last three years on his way to building an unprecedented $16 billion pile of unpaid bills. We’ve whittled that number down to about $6 billion but more work remains in that category as well. We’ve increased our investment in local governments from a year ago, meaning our municipalities will have more revenue to improve roads, develop infrastructure and improve life for their citizens. This budget includes $8.8 billion in spending approval for capital projects like construction of water, transportation, housing facilities and most importantly roads and bridges. The budget includes another $2.2 billion in funding for infrastructure projects, some of which will go to protecting veterans at our state-run facilities that are in need of repair. These are vital expenditures for our state. I am happy, proud and relieved to have voted for this budget, especially with the support of so many Republican colleagues and the governor. But make no mistake, the governor and those Republicans voted to spend 100 percent of revenues. Many of them voted against raising taxes last year. So, as we collectively begin to see the smoke clear on an unprecedented budget impasse that depleted our university systems and nearly bankrupted our state, it’s imperative to remember the action it took to put us back on the path to stability. And it’s imperative to remember that impeding progress in favor of partisan talking points — on either side — benefits nobody. Today when I pick up the newspapers, the word impasse is almost non-existent, Gov. Rauner’s cuts are only mentioned in passing and bipartisanship is mentioned more than partisan bickering. That’s good news for Illinois. But as the news cycle trends back toward the mundane and ordinary and as political fatigue sets in, remind yourself of the actions that returned us to this point of normalcy, and never forget the destruction caused by an unprecedented three-year budget impasse. I don’t like seeing that word in the newspapers, but it’s important never to let it leave our vocabulary, because we can’t let it happen again.

OPINION

The Regional News

STEVEN LANDEK

State Sen. Steven M. Landek (D-12) is also chairman of Southwest Regional Publishing Company, owner and operator of this newspaper.

Letters Policy The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Local content is strongly suggested and will be given first consideration. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 350 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. E-mail letters to: theregional@comcast.net

Madigan’s biggest dilemma is sexist culture If you ask anyone at the Statehouse about House Speaker Michael J. Madigan’s former chief of staff, Tim Mapes, they’ll all say he “made the trains run on time.” Mapes made sure everything got done exactly the way he (and his boss) wanted. He mastered the complexities and dominated the workings of Illinois House operations, as well as Speaker Madigan’s massive political network. He worked practically non-stop, and he appeared completely loyal to Madigan. Mapes wasn’t always this powerful. After the 1998 election, several of Madigan’s top people left for the private sector. Mapes had been considered an equal to those folks, but when they left he made it clear that he was above their replacements. He eventually consolidated his power until it was absolutely unquestionable. The only person he reported to was Madigan, and it was tough to get to Madigan unless you went through Mapes. The problem has always been with how Mapes made those trains run on time. He did not generally tackle his endless daily tasks by being a friendly, kind and understanding fellow. By all accounts, Mapes is a good family man and can be an excellent friend. But business was entirely another matter. He was Madigan’s trusted enforcer, and he

RICH MILLER took the job seriously. As with every human organization, people take their management cues from the top, and that’s repeated all the way down the food chain. If the top person is an arrogantly snarky, sometimes personally cruel, hard-nosed workaholic and persnickety authoritarian, then that’s what everyone else in the organization will shoot for — or else. This approach worked spectacularly well for many years. The one thing Speaker Madigan prizes as much as loyalty is success, and Mapes was fabulously successful at his job. The trains always ran on time. But this outwardly successful culture became too toxic for our current era. As we’ve seen over the months, times changed; it didn’t. Worse yet, the toxicity spread to behavior that had nothing whatsoever to do with efficiency and order. Sherri Garrett is a $41,800 a year career employee of the House Clerk’s office. Mapes took over as House Clerk when the last one left, so he was her boss. During a press conference

on June 6, Garrett detailed numerous allegations of harassment and bullying over the years by Mapes. Like many people, I’ve always shrugged off Mapes’ awkward attempts at biting humor. Perhaps like many people, I didn’t imagine he was behaving that way with people like Garrett, who would be known in Statehouse parlance as a “civilian.” She’s just a regular person who does her job every day so she can go home to her family. One of the most eye-opening aspects of Garrett’s allegations against Mapes was that he said some sexist and demeaning things either directly to her or in her presence months after the first #MeToo revelations rocked the Illinois Statehouse last October. To me, that was a clear indication that despite all of Speaker Madigan’s vows to “change the culture,” the man at the very top of Madigan’s management pyramid had no intention of doing so. “Are you going to sex training today?” Garrett heard him joke to her colleague, referring to sexual harassment training required of all employees and legislators after revelations of Statehouse harassment emerged. That “joke” was allegedly made on the House floor. If there’s one thing many of us have learned in the past year (with varying levels of

success), it’s to leave tasteless jokes to professional comedians. Those jokes, combined with Mapes’ other alleged actions, appeared to have created an unacceptable working environment for Garrett; and as she claimed at her press conference, several others. Garrett is right out of central casting — a decent, middle-aged woman who was tired of being humiliated by a person with unlimited and unquestioned authority. Her Chicago press conference was the first time she’d been to the city in more than a decade. Madigan was likely furious that the same nice woman who regularly brought his gavel back to his office at the end of session days was subjected to this treatment by his righthand man. It was the height of disloyalty by Mapes to behave this way while Madigan had #MeToo problems exploding all around him. He had to go. Remaking the culture is not a done deal just because Mapes was ordered to resign. These attitudes and behaviors have been thoroughly ingrained into Madigan’s entire system for 20 years, after all. I’m not even sure if it can be done. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax, a daily political newsletter, and CapitolFax. com.

Miss America, swimsuits and TV news women

I used to buy Playboy Magazine when I was young because I enjoyed the well-researched articles. Well, that’s not true. It’s also not true that I’ll continue to watch the Miss America contest this fall if it goes ahead with plans to eliminate the swimsuit competition. The Miss America organization announced it will no longer judge contestants, all women, on physical appearance, eliminating the swimsuit portion of the famous Owned and operated by Southwest Regional Publishing Co. contest. Instead, it wants to emphasize Mark Hornung, Chief Operating Officer scholastic achievement, creative accomplishments, healthy living and community The Business Side The News Side involvement in its contestants. Donna Brown, Sales Director Anthony Caciopo, Editor Suddenly, this for-profit business wants Monica Cotter, Finance Director Dermot Connolly, Reporter Mike Russell, Production Director Jason Maholy, Sports Editor to become Harvard University? Why just eliminate the swimsuit portion? Bonnie Hesik, Pre-press Manager Lauren Ziemann, Art Director Chuck Ingwersen, Designer Let’s eliminate gender discrimination and make it the “America Competition.” Put Southwest Regional Publishing housewives, men, old people and anyone 12243 S. Harlem Ave. on the Miss America stage. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Why not? Because it won’t work. EveryPhone: (708) 448-4000 day people with everyday lives like to look Fax: (708) 448-4012 at beautiful things. Website: www.theregionalnews.com The Miss America competition was email: TheRegional@comcast.net created precisely to use beauty as a way to Office hours: Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. boost business sales. The first Miss America pageant was held in September 1920 Deadlines and involved Atlantic City businessmen Editorial: Noon, Saturday • Advertising: 5 p.m., Monday pushing 350 wicker chairs carrying beautiSubscription rates: Local, delivered by mail, $49 a year in advance. Out-of-State, $58 ful women dressed in a variety of attractive a year. Single copies, $1. Postmaster: Send address changes to THE REGIONAL NEWS, clothing to boost their business sales. 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. Funny. People, especially men, like to The Regional News cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material. USPS look at beautiful women. In fact, I bet, it’s 419-260 Periodical postage paid at Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. not just men who like to look at beautiful Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Palos Heights, IL, 60643 and women. Women do, and it’s not about sex. additional post offices under the Act of March 3, 1879. Lots of women like to look at beautiful — © Entire contents copyright 2015 Southwest Regional Publishing handsome — men, too! Miss America wants people to think that This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s appreciating physical beauty is shameful freedom of the press, whenever and however it and degenerate? Why not just parade all may be threatened. the Miss America women in burqas? Why

RAY HANANIA even see their faces, then? Why doesn’t every TV news station in America hire what many viewers might consider ugly people to read the news? You think beauty isn’t a mandatory criterion for television? Or movies? Or advertising sales and marketing? TV and Hollywood aren’t selling news. They’re selling sex. Otherwise, we would see businesses using overweight mannequins with unattractive features model clothing and showcase food, computers, iPhones and profit. The simple truth is most overweight people — me included — don’t want to aspire to weight gain. Seeing “beauty” motivates us to be better. That creates a chain reaction that extends to personal achievement and higher education. “Looking good” motivates people. We wake-up in the morning, take a shower, put on nice clothing, sprinkle ourselves with perfume or aftershave, style our hair, add makeup, and then smile because we feel good. Imagine if we eliminated that from our society and everyone just got up and went to work never showering, never washing their clothes, never combing their hair, never brushing their teeth. That’s exactly the message Miss America is sending to the world by eliminating the swimsuit portion of the overall competition. It’s not about looks? People who stink aren’t good enough for you, Miss “too

good for the rest of us” America competition? I get that some people think beauty pageants are disgusting and appalling. They are offended that women are paraded around like cattle in a meat market, judged on their “beauty.” But if a woman wants to compete in bikinis, and millions of men AND women want to watch, why not? Suddenly there’s something wrong with it because a handful of activists are offended by perfection in the human image? They want to decide what’s acceptable and what’s not for the rest of us? If I wanted to watch a program where people are judged for their intelligence, I’ll rent a Yale University graduation video. I’m not going to waste my time watching this year’s Miss America pageant. Take “beauty” out of beauty pageants and watch advertising dollars disappear. Had those Atlantic City businessmen put old men in those wicker chairs hoping to bring attention to their businesses, maybe the city would just be a dirty swamp today. If I want to enjoy something that looks beautiful, I’m not going to allow some shallow activist shame me into turning away from beautiful women, or enjoying the beauty all around us. A bird. A Frank Lloyd Wright home. A magnificent painting. Or, Cheryl Scott doing the weather on WLS-TV each day — she’s from New Jersey. It’s the only time I pay attention to the weather report. And I’m glad I do. Ray Hanania is an award-winning columnist, author and former Chicago City Hall reporter. Reach him at his personal website at  www.Hanania.com  or email him at  rghanania@gmal.com.


BUSINESS

The Regional News

FINANCIAL FOCUS

Thursday, June 14, 2018

5

Lessons about money can be priceless gifts to children Father’s Day is almost upon us. If you’re a dad, you certainly may enjoy getting cards and gifts, of course. But, over time, you will gain even greater satisfaction by what you can give your children — such as some valuable financial lessons. These lessons can include the following: • Setting goals – If you are contributing to an IRA and a 401(k) or similar employer-sponsored plan, explain how you build these accounts now, while you are working, so you’ll have enough money to enjoy a comfortable retirement

Matthew Van Howe Edward Jones

someday. And you can bring your children into the picture, too, by telling them that another financial goal is saving enough to help send them to college or to further their education in other ways. • Value of understanding the financial markets – You may actually be quite surprised at how inter-

ested your kids are in investing, especially the concept of “owning” companies through stocks and stock-based vehicles. Depending on their ages, you might even want to show them the progress of your own investments and describe, in general terms, how different events can cause the markets to rise and fall, especially in the short term. You could even discuss the difference between the basic types of investments, such as stocks and bonds. • Putting time on your side – You might want to emphasize the importance of patience, and

COMINGS & GOINGS

Remodeled American Eagle store has landed at Orland Square Mall BOB BONG American Eagle has completed the remodel of its Orland Square Mall store, which reopened late last month at the Orland Park mall. The store is located in the upper level Macy’s wing of the mall.

Raffy’s opens sweet shop in Frankfort Raffy’s Candy Store, which opened in late 2015 in New Lenox, has opened a second location in the Trolley Barn shopping center in historic downtown Frankfort. Dave Rafalski, who co-owns the sweet shop with his wife, Pam, said the new location opened May 30 at 21 White St. “We had no intention to open a second location,” Rafalski said. “But we were encouraged by a lot of people to do so. Members of the chamber were eager for us to come into town.” The new Raffy’s is pretty much a carbon copy of the New Lenox location, Rafalski said. “The floor plan is a little different,” he said. “And there’s a nice patio at the new location. And except for the lack of softserve ice cream in Frankfort, the store features the same sweet treats as the New Lenox spot. There’s a wide selection of candy including premium chocolate, Albanese Gummy Bears from Indiana and what Rafalski calls nostalgic candy, popcorn and nuts. Frankfort also will have hard-packed ice cream by the original Plush Horse ice cream parlor in Palos Park. Hours at the Frankfort location will be from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday to Friday and from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday.

First Midwest acquires Northern States First Midwest Bancorp Inc., the parent of First Midwest Bank, announced last week that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Northern States Financial Corp., the holding company for NorStates Bank, based in Waukegan. NorStates Bank operates eight offices in Lake County and has approximately $500 million in total assets, $400 million in deposits, of which 90 percent are core deposits, and $320 million in loans. First Midwest has offices in Palos Heights, Palos Park, Palos Hills, Orland Park and many other southwest suburban locations. “We are very excited to welcome NorStates Bank to First Midwest and build on the strong relationships that NorStates has with its customers,” Michael L. Scudder, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of First Midwest, said in a release.  “This combination continues our expansion in the greater Chicagoland area and enhances our presence in Lake County where we have long-standing, deep roots.” “We are extremely pleased to partner with First Midwest,” Scott M. Yelvington, President and Chief Executive Officer of Northern States, said.  “Like First Midwest, we have a strong commitment to relationship banking, personalized customer service and involvement in the communities we serve.  We greatly look forward to offering our customers the broader array of financial products and services that First Midwest provides.” Based upon the closing price

Supplied photo

Raffy’s Candy Store has opened a second location in Frankfort.

of First Midwest’s common stock on June 5, on the Nasdaq Stock Market, the overall transaction is valued at approximately $91 million.  The acquisition is to close in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Ryerson to acquire Central Steel & Wire Ryerson Holding Corp. announced last week that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Central Steel & Wire for $140 million. Central Steel has its main plant and offices near 51st Street and Francisco in Chicago’s Gage Park community. The company was founded in 1909. It operates six plants, employs about 900 people and has annual sales of about $600 million. It produces bar, tube, plate and sheet products. Last year, it posted a $14 million loss. Central Steel will continue under that brand name after the closing of the deal, which is expected to come in the third quarter this year. Loop-based metal processor and distributor Ryerson is one of the 60 largest companies in the Chicago area, with $3.36 billion in revenue last year. Central Steel CEO Steve Fuhrman said in a statement that “the leverage this merger creates will benefit our diverse customer base, grow our respected supplier relationships and provide opportunity for further development of our loyal employees.” Eddie Lehner, Ryerson’s president and CEO, had nothing but praise for Central Steel. “Since 1909, Central Steel & Wire has cultivated a loyal customer following as an industry standard bearer of customer service. Ryerson’s acquisition of Central Steel & Wire into the Ryerson family of highly valued industrial metal distribution and processing companies takes Ryerson’s ability to provide great customer experiences to another level.   By supporting and further developing the Central Steel & Wire brand in the marketplace to existing and new customers, Ryerson continues along a smart growth trajectory that we expect to add meaningfully to shareholder value in the years to come.” Completion of the transaction has been approved by the board of directors of both companies and Central Steel & Wire shareholders signed a written consent approving the merger agreement and the transaction.  The decision to sell was an about-face for Central Steel, which waged a fierce court fight three years ago for the right to reject a more lucrative offer from  Canadian manufacturer and distributor Samuel Son & Co.

Marketing group holds grand opening WDB Marketing, a one-stop marketing and promotions shop

that offers graphic design, print services, web design, marketing and promotional strategies, held its grand opening June 8 at its new location at 1007 E. 162nd St. in South Holland. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday. For information, call 708-527-3090. The website in www.wdbmarketing.com.

Ooh Wee Burger coming to River Oaks

how investing is not a “get-richquick” scheme, but a process that requires decades of diligence and persistence. Let your children know that it’s of great value to start investing as early as possible, so you can put time on your side, giving investments a chance to grow. • Living within your means – We all know that you can’t always get what you want. Stress to your children that you can’t just splurge on big purchases whenever you feel like it, because such behavior can lead to bad outcomes. Use concrete examples: If you have

a car that’s several years old, tell your children that it would be nice to have a new one, but you simply must wait until you can afford it. • Paying debts on time – Tell your children that, no matter how good a saver you are, or how thrifty you try to be, you still have debts, such as your mortgage payment, and it’s important to pay these debts on time. You may not want to get too detailed about the consequences of missing debt payments — bad credit scores may not be that easy for children to understand — but you can certainly mention that if you’re always late on payments,

you might find it harder to borrow money when you really need it. By sharing these principles with your children, you will, at the least, give them something to think about, and you may well find that you’ve helped start them on the path to a lifetime of making solid financial moves. And who knows? If they truly master the ideas you’ve taught them, one day they might give you some really nice Father’s Day gifts. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

AREA PROPERTY Mortgage Rates Around the Area TRANSFERS Following are the property transfers in the area, according to the latest report, as received from the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office. The Regional News does not attempt to correct errors made by that office. Orland Park Truong Kiet to Yessin Amani, 15707 Centennial Dr, $222,500.00; Marek Connie F to Fogel Jonathan, 9949 145th St, $240,000.00; US Bk to Mousa Farid, 15210 Windsor Dr, $190,000.00; Seper Eleanor C to Topolia Karen M, 15121 Saint Andrew Ct, $235,000.00; Bank Amer to Wilde Wood Llc, 14509 Willow St, $166,000.00; Coleman Theresa Tr to Bock Bonnie, 18012 Kansas Ct, Unit #188, $196,000.00; Obriecht James H Tr to Zavala Christopher, 8940 Wheeler Dr, $265,000.00; Kuster Joseph S to Ficca Paul, 15401 West Ave, Unit #4402, $124,500.00; Mazur Elaine M Tr to Fudala Daniel G, 8138 Wheeler Dr, $265,000.00; Zurawicz Gregory to Su Hang, 13402 Westgate Ct, $299,000.00; Bayview Loan Servicing Llc to Castillo Rey Philip S, 8000 Revell Ct, $491,000.00; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Eck Thomas J, 15525 Canterbury Ln, $225,000.00; Hokkanen Gerald P Jr to Imm Rebecca E, 10050 Huntington Ct, $185,000.00; Perez Jose Cruz to Stark Brendon A, 15103 Quail Hollow Dr, Unit #603, $85,000.00.

Ooh Wee Sweet Tea and Ooh Wee Cereal and Candy Bar is expanding its presence at the River Oaks Center food court. Ooh Wee Burger Bar and Grill is coming this summer to the mall in Calumet City. Palos Park Kapturski Jeanne P to Bautista If you see a new business in Lucero Yazmit, 12750 W Tangletown or wonder what happened wood Cir, $361,000.00; to an old favorite, drop me a line Meyers Krista L to Hensley at bobbong@hotmail.com. You can Raymond, 8320 Kimber Ln, track business openings and clos- $275,000.00; Nanoz Harry S to Dorado Julio, ings at http://bobbongonbusiness. 13031 Holmes Dr, $382,000.00. com/

First Midwest Bank (as of June 11) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 30-year fixed Jumbo

RATES APR POINTS 4.625 4.670 0 4.125 4.180 0 4.375 4.430 0

United Trust Bank (as of June 11) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.750 4.772 0 4.375 4.412 0 4.375 4.429 0

Prospect Savings Bank (as of June 12) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.500 4.617 0 4.250 4.410 0 3.875 4.077 0

CNB Bank & Trust, N.A. (as of June 5) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.625 4.7330 0 4.375 4.5210 0 4.125 4.2080 0

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

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12330 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 (708) 728-9900 • Fax (708) 728-9270 • UTBHome.com


6 Thursday, June 14, 2018

The Regional News

DEATH NOTICES

PICK OF THE LITTER

Elizabeth Geneva Lincoln Paschall Services will be held beginning Monday for Elizabeth “Beth” Paschall, 95, who passed away on June 6, 2018, in Palos Park, Ill. She was born on January 25, 1923, to James William and Olive Geneva (Mason) Lincoln at home on their farm in Del Norte, Colo. She excelled at piano and academics, and in 1941 attended Western State College in Gunnison, Colo. There she met the love of her life, Gene Paschall. To fulfill her goal of becoming a teacher, Beth transferred to Colorado State Teachers College in Greeley, Colo. In 1945, Beth accepted a teaching position in San Bernardino, Calif. She and Gene were married on December 27, 1946, thus beginning a marriage of 71 years. The newlyweds moved to Ames, Ia., where Gene went to graduate school and Beth worked as secretary to the head of the Architecture Department at Iowa State University.  After moving to their first home in Orland Hills, Beth taught piano lessons and created Music Club while she raised three children. She was active in the League of Women Voters, eventually becoming President of the Palos-Orland League. Beth and Gene joined the Palos United Methodist Church in 1953 and were faithful members for 65 years. Over the years Beth filled numerous roles in the church including Sunday School Superintendent, Bible Study Leader, and Visitation Minister. In 1963 the Paschall family moved to Palos Heights, IL. Beth worked alongside Gene in the gardens at home, Lake Katherine and the church, and was a skilled

flower arranger. Beth served on the Board of Church and Society in the Northern Illinois Conference of the United Methodist Church and became chairman of the Committee on Gambling. She worked with the Rev. Tom Gray and the coalition Against Legalized Gambling for decades. Beth graduated from Northern Baptist Theological Seminary in 1988 with a MA in Theological Studies. At age 65 Beth began work as a chaplain at LaGrange Memorial Hospital, where she served for 22 years. She became a Consecrated Diaconal Minister in the United Methodist Church and served in that capacity for the rest of her life. Beth is preceded in death by her husband, Eugene Paschall, who passed away Easter Sunday, 2018; her son, Steven Paschall, and Steven’s daughter Kelly Ann Brown. She is survived by daughter Ann Cohrs (Tom); daughter Joyce Winterbottom (Steve); Steven Paschall’s wife Katy Jo Steward; grandchildren David Steward (Maria); Lauren Winterbottom; Jane Hamm (Tim); Kate Winterbottom (Jeff Bloomfield); Kelsey Winterbottom; and great-grand children David Miles Steward, Hazel Hamm and Linden Bloomfield. Visitation will be held at Schmaedeke Funeral Home, 10701 S. Harlem Ave. in Worth, on Monday, June 18 from 4 to 8 p.m. The funeral will take place at Palos United Methodist Church, 12101 S. Harlem Ave. on Tuesday, June 19 at 11:30 am, followed by interment at Fairmont-Willow Hills.  

Dr. Fleming took this photo June 9 of men and women who were part of the first Stagg High School graduating class in 1968. Among those present for the 50th anniversary reunion was his wife, Connie (nee Kress), in the second row, fifth from left. She was the homecoming queen of that first graduating class. The reunion was held at Chet’s Melody Lounge, 7400 Archer Rd., Justice. The owner, Barb Prusinski, also a graduate of the Stagg Class of 1968, is at far right.

Raw pet foods are a raw deal Dear Dr. Fleming, Can you recommend anything that I can put into my dog’s food to prevent her urine from burning my grass? Mike, Palos Heights Dear Mike, There have been a lot of products advertised over the years and not one of my clients who has tried these products has ever had anything good to say about them. The solution to pollution is dilution (i.e. pouring water on the pee spot, each and every one. This I am sure you will do.

Dear readers, Just a quick note about the grain-free dog food-cardiomyopathy connection that we mentioned last week. I am looking for published information on this possible connection and will let you know what I find. I made the analogy last week about how we never knew that grapes and raisins were/are toxic to dogs. I was talking with our internist about this issue and he threw out another example. He said, “When did we learn that every part of the lily plant is toxic to cats”? I replied, “I think about 1981”. He said, “Bingo!” How many cats died in the preceding “This is a day of hope, where decades from chewing on a lily participants will engage in their plant leaf and no one ever underfavorite activities – biking, hik- stood why that cat died? ing, swimming, playing bridge, Dear Dr. Fleming, knitting and more – to honor a Do you recommend raw food caregiver, someone living with Alzheimer’s, or someone they’ve diets for pets? Cathy, Orland Park lost to this devastating disease. Together, participants will raise Dear Cathy, funds and awareness to advance No. I have clients who rave Alzheimer’s Association® care, about how every ailment every support and research programs,” dog ever had is cured by raw diaccording to the Illinois chapter’s ets. I am happy for them. But if media outreach. More information about The Longest Day may be obtained by visiting alz.org/thelongestday. To learn more and/or take part in the activities planned by the OFPD to discuss Arthur Murray Dance Studio, call ‘Ageless Grace’ the business at (708) 966-2180. The Orland Fire Protection District, Orland Senior Advisory Council and Aishling Companion Home Care will discuss Ageless Grace from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, June 28 during the Orland Fire Protection District’s Coffee and Conversation in the OFPD Administration Building Board Room, 9790 W. 151st St., Orland Park. The presentation is being held to help attendees better understand ways to improve brain functions during aging. Ageless Grace is a cutting-edge brain fitness program of appetite, nausea, generalized based on neuroplasticity that actiswelling and fatigue. vates all five functions of the brain Once kidney disease progresses, — analytical, strategic, kinesthetic patients need dialysis or a kidney learning, memory/recall, creativity transplant. However, only a third and imagination and simultaneof those on transplant lists receive ously addresses all 21 physical a lifesaving transplant due to the skills needed for lifelong optimal lack of suitable organs. function.  High blood pressure and diabetes are two of the main causes of kidney failure. While kidney disease cannot be cured, with early diagnosis and controlling blood sugar and blood pressure, maintaining healthy levels of cholesterol and avoid pain pills can slow the disease. For those living with kidney disease, ManorCare – Oak Lawn West has aligned with Affiliated Dialysis to offer an in-house dialysis center. The dialysis center will be open daily to provide inhouse hemodialysis services for its patients. The dialysis center will be overseen by the medical director at ManorCare – Oak Lawn West. Patients will also have experienced dialysis personnel along with social service and dietary support. The community is invited to stop by for a tour of the new dialysis center and to learn about other services at ManorCare that help short-term patients return home after an injury or illness.

Orland Park team will mark day for Alzheimer’s care

People around the world will participate June 21 in The Longest Day, an event demonstrating love for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and commitment to changing the course of this disease for millions. Locally, a team from Arthur Murray Dance Studio, 16131 S. LaGrange Rd., will take part in the event to help “ignite a global conversation about Alzheimer’s disease, the brain and other dementias as part of Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month in June,” said the Alzheimer’s Association Illinois Chapter in a news release. Held annually on the summer solstice, The Longest Day symbolizes the challenging journey of those living with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.

Manor Care – Oak Lawn West offers new dialysis center

ManorCare Health Services – Oak Lawn West, 6300 W. 95th St., is celebrating the grand opening of their dialysis center. In honor of the opening, ManorCare would like to raise awareness about kidney health and how to reduce the risk of kidney damage. Each year, 50,000 Americans die from kidney failure, 35,000 people wait on transplantation lists, and an additional 260,000 patients use artificial kidney machines (dialysis) to survive. The National Kidney Foundation urges regular checkups that include tests for blood pressure, blood sugar, urine protein and kidney function, as kidney disease is often silent for many years, until it reaches an advanced stage. Kidneys are bean -organs, about the size of a fist. Every day, the kidney processes 200 quarts of blood and cleans blood of toxins. When the kidney begins to fail, the toxins build up. According to Christopher Correll, administrator at ManorCare – Oak Lawn West, people in the early stages of kidney disease may not feel sick at all, or have general symptoms such as frequent headaches or feeling tired and itchy. As kidney disease progresses, a patient may see increases or decreased urine output, loss

JOHN FLEMING

DVM • Prairie StateVet.com

I won’t eat raw beef or chicken I won’t feed it to my dogs. There is no proven advantage to doing so that I have ever read, except in the lay literature. Commercial raw diets are available in many forms with frozen and freeze-dried being quite common. These are often marketed as “complete.” Others are intended to be fed with additional supplements. The internet is also full of recipes for bones and raw food (the BARF diet). Many of these advocate a formula of 60% raw meaty bones with the remainder of the diet consisting of green vegetables, eggs, milk, brewer’s yeast, muscle meat, organ meats, yogurt and some with grains and legumes. Meals are not expected to be balanced but rather in theory to be balanced overall by varying the ingredients from one meal to another. While some dedicated pet owners will follow these instructions over time many others get lazy and will not. Some owners will begin to make substitutions or fail to dedicate the time and effort to do things right. Studies on bacterial contamination of raw foods found that 20 percent to 35 percent of raw poultry and 80 percent of raw food diets for dogs tested positive for Salmonella, with 30 percent of stool samples from dogs fed these diets positive for Salmonella. Raw pet food diets have also tested positive for E. Coli and

Yersinia enterocolitica. Healthy pets may not show clinical signs of illness when ingesting these bacteria. However, the pets that are immune-compromised, the very young and the very old are at significant risk. The pathogens found in raw meat also pose a significant health risk to young children, the elderly and immune-compromised people. It is therefore extremely important that anyone preparing these diets practice proper hand washing and that all utensils, bowls, and surfaces used in preparation of raw diets are properly cleaned and disinfected. Raw meat may also contain parasites such as Echinococcus spp., (Google this disease in humans if you dare), Neospora canimum, Sarcosystis spp., Toxocara canis, Toxoplasmosis gondii and Taenia spp. It is also important to note the pet’s feces can contaminate the environment with these organisms, which may pose a health risk to people and other pets. I’ve euthanized many very old pets over the years and have yet to have someone tell me that they think their pet lived to such a long age because of a raw food diet. Dear Readers. Connie and I met at the University of Florida, got married, spent some time in the USAF then moved here for a good job at Palos Animal Hospital and to be near Connie’s parents. We’ve had a good life here. Yesterday it was my privilege to escort the Homecoming Queen of Stagg’s first graduating class to her 50th Stagg High School reunion. Saturday morning the group got a private tour of Stagg by the assistant principal and at 2 p.m. reconvened for the party. About one-half of the people

I met were still from the local area. The other half had flown or driven in from places around the country including Wisconsin, Michigan, Florida, California and Colorado. It was really fun to be an outsider watching these old folks stare at each other and then look at the name and graduation photo on each other’s name tags and scream and hug one another. It was fun watching people re-sign Connie’s yearbook—a heartwarming few hours. One of the ladies I talked with is now a retired pharmacist from Michigan. A gentlemen who worked in the nuclear power industry and I had a very interesting conversation with a guy who spent his career with Rockwell on the west coast designing and being very much involved with the space shuttle program. One time his was inside one of the wings on the Space Shuttle Challenger inspecting hydraulics and he was so far down into the wingtip that he got stuck and couldn’t back up. He had to force himself up onto the tips of his toes and inch his way back out. Later, Challenger would explode and I told him one of the engineers from the company that had manufactured the O-ring that failed lived across the street from my parents in Cocoa. Mom said he didn’t come out of his house for days. At 6 p.m. I slipped away into the bar to watch Justify win the Triple Crown. We finally said our goodbyes and I left feeling like the real winner. I’m grateful to have been allowed to be a part of this community. Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others. Roman philosopher Cicero

is at the Canopy Finish Line Patio. The buffet includes garden salad, hot dogs, barbeque pork nachos, chicken drummies, potato salad, cookie assortment and soft drinks.

For more information, or to reserve a seat, call (708) 371-2900, ext. 28. Worth Township covers a portion of Palos Heights.

SENIOR NOTES

The Coffee and Conversation series addresses the needs of the district’s residents and is co-hosted with the OFPD Senior Advisory Council, led by experts from Aishling Companion Home Care. The program is free and open to the public. Attendees should dress comfortably with walking or gym shoes.

Worth Township taking reservations for outing The Worth Township Seniors bus trip is now taking reservations for its September outing. Seniors will be traveling Thursday, Sept. 6 to Arlington Park Race Track. The bus leaves at 11:30 a.m. from the Worth Township Office, 11601 S. Pulaski, Alsip and departs from the track about 4:30 p.m. The cost is $85, which includes a two-hour buffet, transportation, at ticket and racing program. Seating

LEGAL NOTICE


The Regional News

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Stagg HS earns Sandy Hook awards Stagg High School and several of its students were recognized winners for their Sandy Hook Promise Say Something efforts during Sandy Hook Promise’s third annual Say Something Callto-Action Week. Say Something is a proven program that teaches youth and adults the signs of atrisk behaviors and how to properly intervene before that person harms themselves or others. The award winners included: • Stagg High School: 2017 Sandy Hook Promise Say Something Student Spirit, Creativity and Sustainability Award; • Nourhan Abdelbaky:  Sandy Hook Promise Youth Voices Written Category, High School Level: first Place; • Electra Buckley: Sandy Hook Promise Youth Voices Written Category, High School Level: third Place; • Nicole Saenz: Sandy Hook Promise Youth Voices Visual Category, High School Level: first Place; and • Cheyenne Griffin: Sandy Hook Promise Youth Voices Spoken Category, High School Level: third Place. Stagg High School not only trained their students but also trained students in neighboring school districts. Students formed a SAVE Promise Club, marched in the homecoming parade, decorated the campus and bathroom mirrors with uplifting messages, created a social media campaign, and produced a slideshow and video that be viewed on YouTube a the following link YouTube.com/ AmosAlonzoStaggHS/SWH.  Students also created a sustainability plan to make Say Something a part of the school culture and have plans to do at least six planned activities.  Abdelbaky’s essay was featured during a video performance during the conference. It can be viewed on YouTube at the following link: youtube/5z8qqecU2eA. The Call-to-Action Week was held between Oct.16 through Oct. 20, and hundreds of middle and high schools across the country participated. At the end of the week, SHP asks the participat-

ing schools to share what they did to implement and sustain the Say Something program in their schools and/or community and provides awards to the schools/ youth groups that demonstrate how they incorporated the core values of the Say Something program seamlessly into their school culture and/or overall community. According to SHP, in four out of five school shootings, the attacker told someone of his/her plans prior to the attack and 70 percent of people who complete suicide told someone of their intention or gave some type of warning. SHP’s Know the Signs programs, including Say Something, educate young people and adults about the warning signs and to how to intervene before it’s too late.  In the past three years, SHP has trained over 3.5 million youth and adults in at least one of its four proven Know the Signs programs, including Say Something. SHP has also released two PSA’s. In December of 2017, SHP released “Tomorrow’s News,” a PSA that shows a newscast covering a school shooting the day before it happens to highlight the signs that are often overlooked or not acted upon. In March of 2018, SHP released “The Other Side” a PSA that shows a teen prepping for a school shooting who highlights all the signs that were missed. This PSA was launched in con-

junction with the launch of SHP’s Say Something Anonymous Reporting System. The anonymous reporting system allows students to submit secure and anonymous safety concerns to help identify and intervene upon at-risk individuals before they hurt themselves or others. Concerned students can submit a tip using the SS-ARS app, website, or call the 24/7 crisis center. About Sandy Hook Promise: Sandy Hook Promise is a national, nonprofit organization based in Newtown, Connecticut. We are led by several family members whose loved ones were killed in the tragic mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14, 2012 that claimed the lives of 20 first-graders and six educators. SHP is focused on preventing gun violence (and other forms of violence and victimization) before it happens by educating and mobilizing youth and adults on mental health and wellness programs that identify, intervene and help at-risk individuals. SHP is a moderate, above-the-politics organization that supports sensible non-policy and policy solutions that protect children and prevent gun violence. The organization’s intent is to honor all victims of gun violence by turning the tragedy into a moment of transformation, according to a news release.

7

CROSSWORD PUZZLE ACROSS 1. Glowering 7. Sports equipment 13. Relief organization 14. Go against the flow 16. A public promotion of some product or service 17. Premier League’s Spurs 19. Of I 20. Tears down (Brit.) 22. One point north of due east 23. Sandwich shops 25. American spy 26. Medieval stringed instrument 28. Self-immolation by fire ritual 29. Pearl Jam’s debut 30. Panthers’ Newton 31. Press against lightly 33. __ Squad 34. Eminem hit 36. Violent seizure of property 38. Native or inhabitant of Asia 40. Loudness units 41. Knotted anew 43. Daddy 44. Folk singer DiFranco 45. Women from the Mayflower 47. Metric capacity unit 48. Couple 51. A way to coat 53. __ and Diu: Indian territory 55. French river 56. Asteroids 58. Investment measurement (abbr.) 59. India and Nepal border river 60. Santa says it three times 61. Hungers 64. Linear unit 65. Speech 67. Taking forcefully 69. Places to be 70. Amusing behavior DOWN 1. Adult female 2. An alternative 3. Rituals

4. Native American people 5. High school exam 6. Respect 7. Tanned 8. Kilometers per hour 9. Ancient Israeli city 10. Periods 11. Electron volt 12. Smallest interval in classical Western music 13. Metric weight unit 15. Occupies 18. __ and flow 21. Responsive to physical stimuli 24. One who presses into thin sheets 26. Jogged 27. Automobile 30. Punished 32. Belonging to a bottom layer

35. Japanese delicacy 37. Soda 38. Algonquian language 39. Legislators 42. Father 43. Needed at the ATM 46. Baltimore footballers 47. __ Tomei, actress 49. Expands 50. Person (Indonesian) 52. Related 54. Where wrestlers work 55. American communist leader 57. Creatively tell 59. Separatist group 62. Edgar Allan __, poet 63. A way to discolor 66. Actinium 68. Integrated circuit

(Answers on page 3)

SUDOKU

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle! (Answers on page 3)

STUDENT NEWS Orland Park woman earns degree at Olivet Orland Park resident Valerie Seehafer recently graduated with the eighth cohort of honors program graduates as part of the 105th Commencement Convocation at Olivet Nazarene University, Bourbonnais. She received a bachelor’s degree in international business. As their time at Olivet came to a close, Honors Program students Photo by Joe Boyle presented their required research projects during Scholar Week 2018, Supplied photo April 16-22. “Evaluation and RePictured are many of the Shepard High School students who qualified for induction into National Honor Society vision of BSRI Trait Selection” The clue for this week’s Whatizit (above) is: Nearby relic. for French language students. Not all students are shown. Send your responses with your name and hometown by noon Monday with Dr. Paul Koch (mentor) was to: thereporter@comcast.net. Seehafer’s project. We had several readers who answered correctly. The answer to last Palos Heights student week’s photo quiz is the Ralph E. Munch Public Works Building, 5532 makes dean’s list W. 98th St., Oak Lawn. Palos Park resident Ron Wagenhofer was the first to send an email Shepard High School recently Shepard students qualifying for biski, Madelyn Stepuszek, Kevin Palos Heights resident Chelsea honored its students who met the their first year in French NHS Szypulinski, Alayne Trinko, and Mazies was named to the spring with the correct answer. Oak Lawn resident Steve Rosenbaum also rigorous standards for induction included Lindsey Bylut, Jessica Nicole Walsh. dean’s List at Berry College, Rome, mentioned that the Ralph E. Munch facility is just north of the Ernie Kolb Baseball Fields for Oak Lawn Baseball. The facility is named after into the foreign language nation- Crowe, Joseph Feldner, Miriam Returning members of French Ga. al honor society for students of Itani, Eloni Jackson, Abbey Lorch, NHS included Alana Born, DayanThe dean’s list includes students an Oak Lawn trustee who was serving the village at the time of the French. Ellie McGovern, Kate McGovern, who posted an academic average of devastating tornado that hit in 1967. Steve also mentioned that Ralph’s Criteria included completing Sara McNicholas, Ally Mikos, An- na Culpepper, Kujtesa Gashi, 3.5 or better on a 4.0 scale while brother, Harry, was a captain in the Oak Lawn Police Department. Rich Rahn, of Evergreen Park, also knew it was the Ralph E. Munch three semesters of language study, drew Mutzbauer, Kateri Olivares, Rachel Guzman, Rachel Habbal, carrying a class load of at least 12 maintenance facility and was named after a former Oak Lawn village a grade point average of 3.6 in Marai Ornelas, Paul Perez, Mat- Carolina Lorano, Delaney Lyons, hours during the semester. trustee. French classes and an overall GPA thew Rivera, Adam Sapit, Cassan- Regan Monahan. Andreina RomeOrland Park woman earns of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. dra Schulist, Erin Scott, Emma So- ro, and Connor Sterling.

WHATIZIT?

Shepard students qualify for French NHS

engineering degree

Ashley Youngwirth of Orland Park was among more than 1,000 students from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, who received degrees during fall commencement exercises. Youngwirth graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor of science in engineering degree, majoring in electrical engineering.

Palos Heights woman earns bachelor’s degree Ashley Kay of Palos Heights graduated from Carson-Newman University, Jefferson City, Tenn., during the institution’s spring commencement. Kay earned a bachelor’s of science degree in foods, nutrition and dietetics.

Sixth-graders explore Chicago Christian

Supplied photo

Chicago Christian High School hosted a sixth-grade “Explore Day” March 21. More than 50 sixth-grade students attended the event. It began with the students enjoying a performance from the Chicago Christian IMPROV team. After participating in some mixer games to get to know each other, the students attended the chapel. Following the chapel time, the students spent time visiting classrooms, viewing various displays about the clubs and sports offered, and touring the building. The morning wrapped up with all of the students being treated to a pizza lunch. They were then transported back to their respective schools. Chicago Christian High School is located at 12001 S. Oak Park Ave. in Palos Heights.

Palos Park women named to dean’s list Nicole Pamphilis and Gianna Petrelli of Palos Park were named to the spring semester dean’s list at DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind. The dean’s list recognizes students who achieve a semester grade point average of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale.


8 Thursday, June 14, 2018

The Regional News

Orland Park offers multiple events for residents The Village of Orland Park will be offering its citizens several events focusing on health and wellbeing and entertainment. • Orland Park Police officers will be conducting a free child safety seat check from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, June 22 at the Orland Park Police Station, 15100 S. Ravinia Ave. • The Village of Orland Park Concert in the Park will be held Sunday, June 24 in Crescent Park, 9705 W. 143rd St., near the 143rd Street Metra Station. In case of

rain, the event will be held in the Orland Park Cultural Center Exhibit Hall, 14760 Park Lane. The Brass Tracks Jazz Orchestra will be playing from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. and the Southwest Community Concert Band will headline the entertainment from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The Orland Township Food Pantry will be hosting its food drive simultaneously with the Concert in the Park. Non-perishable food and monetary donations will be accepted. • The Orland Park Police De-

partment’s afternoon shift will hold its Roll Call in the Park from 2:50 to 3 p.m. Monday, June 25 in Veterans Park, 7721 Wheeler Drive. Residents are invited to attend the roll call, learning how Orland Park’s law enforcement officers begin their shifts. • The Orland Park Police Department will host Cook Out with the Cops from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, June 25 at Veterans Park. Everyone is invited to this free cookout. • The Village of Orland Park

History Museum presents Painting with Watercolors from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, June 30 at the history museum, 14415 S. Beacon Ave. Artist Mark LaCien will instruct participants in how to paint using watercolors in this beginners’ course. Registration will be accepted at the history museum or the Recreation Administration Center, 14600 S. Ravinia Ave. The cost is $15 for members or $20 for non-members.

OPPD takes first place honors for safety challenge Supplied photos

Two earn Lions Club scholarships The Palos Lions granted two of the club’s three scholarships recently. The first was given to Emily Paolini (top photo) of Shepard High School in Palos Height. She will be attending Northern Illinois University where she intends to major in music. Palos Lions Club member Jim Lewis presented the scholarship to Emily, in the company of her parents. The second scholarship was given to Logan Maske (bottom photo) of Stagg High School in Palos Hills. He will be attending the university of Illinois, where he plans to major in nursing. Lions Club members Jim Lewis (left) and Mike Gabel (right) presented the scholarship to Logan, joined by his parents.

CLUB ACTIVITIES Toastmasters mark milestones During their most recent meeting, Toastmasters of Palos Heights celebrated some milestones and elected new officers for the next club year, which will begin in July. The club was recently awarded Toastmasters President’s Distinguished Award in its first year as a fully chartered club. The award is given to clubs that meet certain educational, compliance, and membership targets within a given club year. Club President Chuck Bern remarked, “This is such a great feather in our cap. We’ve had amazing growth in the last year and people have really pushed themselves to pursue awards and really dive into what we’re all about. We’re one of the fastest growing clubs in the district and it’s not by accident.

The Orland Park Police Department received first place honors in the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police Traffic Safety Challenge for agencies with 66 to 100 personnel. Orland Park will accept its statewide honors in mid-August. The department also won the Distracted Driving Specialty Award for 2017. Members of the department’s Traffic Safety Unit prepared an extensive presentation detailing the department’s traffic safety efforts during the past year. Topics addressed included the department’s efforts to promote safety belt use, correctly installing child safety seats, speed enforcement, impaired driving enforcement and distracted driving prevention. “Our personnel used a number of strategies to meet the traffic safety challenge goals to reduce crashes and reduce roadway safety,” said Orland Park Police Chief Tim McCarthy. “They identified intersections with the highest crash volume and the beat with the most crashes, targeting them for increased traffic enforcement. The result was an overall decrease in crashes in the village and in the targeted areas.” The Traffic Safety Unit used crash data to identify areas with the highest number of crashes. Increased traffic enforcement and public safety education for officers and the public were two key parts of the initiative. “This was a yearlong, department-wide effort to increase traffic

People have really bought into the mission of Toastmasters.” Club officials congratulated members Gail Rice and Sheila Edens-Brown, who both completed their 10th speech in the club and now will both receive the Competent Communicator Award. Finally, the following members were elected to new club officer roles for the upcoming club year starting in July: Marty Idziak, Vice President of Education; Chuck Bern, Vice President of Public Relations, Paul Dombrowski, Treasurer; Janet Pearson, Vice President of Membership, Bill Webb, Sergeant at Arms; and Sheila Edens Brown, Secretary. Toastmasters of Palos Heights meets the first and third Mondays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Palos Heights Public Library. For more information, call (708) 480-2112. Sen. Jones hails grant

Supplied photo

Swallow Cliff Chapter Regent Gale Shafer and Cadet Jacob Kalabich pose for a photo.

DAR salutes JROTC cadets The Swallow Cliff Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, participated in recent JROTC awards ceremonies held at Shepard High School, Palos Heights, and Richards High School, Oak Lawn. The DAR JROTC award, consisting of a medal and certificate, was presented to Air Force cadet Jacob Kalabich at Shepard and Navy cadet Claire Kuypers

at Richards by Chapter Regent Gale Shafer. The awards are given to cadets of outstanding ability and achievement who have demonstrated qualities of loyalty, patriotism, dependability, leadership and good character. The students must also have a record of military and scholastic achievement during their participation in the JROTC program.

Market, 12217 S. Harlem Ave. • Family Game Night is open to all ages at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 20. Participants can play an old favorite or learn a new game. Patrons can drop in for board games, puzzles, trivia and more. • Kindergarten Ready will be held at 10 a.m. or 1 p.m. Thursdays through June 28. This story time is designed to help a preschooler prepare to make the transition into kindergarten. Children 3 to 5 years old will listen to stories, sing songs and engage in learning activities about letters, numbers and more. Register once. Also, there are several clubs that meet weekly at the library, such as the Needle Club (for knitting and crocheting), Scrabble Club, Chess Club and Mah Jongg Cub. Members and interested patrons are asked to call ahead for times and dates.

where will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, June 15. Children of all ages with an adult parent or caregiver can join library staff in the summer sunshine as they take story time outside. Participants will meet at a new location in Orland Park each week. This week the group will be at Breckenridge Park, 11700 Imperial Lane. In the event of rain, story time will be relocated to the library plaza.  • BINGO! Adults will play bingo at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 16 at 2 p.m. Registration is not required, but space is limited. • Mother Goose Baby Storytime is happening at 10 a.m. Monday, June 18. Children birth to 2 years old with a parent or caregiver can join library staff for songs, finger plays and plenty of nursery rhymes in this specialized Mother Goose story time.  • Adult Book Discussion will take place at 10 a.m. Tuesday, June 19. Adults can join library staff and other participants as they discuss, “Everybody Lies,” by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz. • Mystery Book Discussion will focus on “Flower Net” by Lisa See at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 20 at 7 p.m. All adults are invited.

LIBRARY NOTES to Heights Library

Supplied photos

Holding their Lenon Wisdom Memorial Spelling Bee trophies are junior division winners (first row, from left) Scott Westbrook, second place, Victoria Nielsen, first place and Sereen Alassaf, third place. Congratulating the winners are (back row, from left) State Sen. Bill Cunningham (D-18th), Worth Township Trustee Kelly Lynn Kelly, Worth Township Trustee Rich Lewandowski, Worth Township Trustee Eamon McMahon, Assessor Shaun Murphy and State Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th).

The Palos Heights Public Library will receive $15,643, as part of more than $15 million in funding to libraries statewide through Illinois Public Library Per Capita and Equalization Aid Grants, Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White has announced. Per Capita grants help fund library expenses such as materials, personnel, equipment, electronic access, telecommunications and technology. Equalization Aid grants help qualifying public libraries with a low library tax base ensure a minimum level of funding for library services. “Libraries are important cornerstones of a healthy community that provide valuable services for people of all walks of life,” said State Senator Emil Jones, III (D-14th), whose district includes a portion of Palos Heights. “These grants will help make sure libraries remain a lifeline to my district and provide my constituents access to all sorts of information about the world. A library is often the only readily available source of information needed by people and it is crucial that we provide them the necessary funds to better assist the public.” Libraries in Jones’ district will receive almost $150,000 in funding under the grants.

Palos Heights Library Holding their Lenon Wisdom Memorial Spelling Bee trophies are senior project promotes kindness division winners (first row, from left) Helen Joyce, second place, Patrick Driscoll, first place and Maura Hanley, third place. Congratulating them are (back row, from left) Assessor Shaun Murphy, State Sen. Bill Cunningham (D-18th), Worth Township Trustee Rich Lewandowski, Worth Township Trustee Eamon McMahon, State Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th) and Worth Township Trustee Kelly Lynn Kelly.

Worth Township announces winners of spelling bee The winners of the 41st annual Lenon Wisdom Memorial Spelling Bee were announced by Worth Township Supervisor John O’Sullivan. The competition was held April 27 at Worth Township offices in Alsip. Participants were divided into the junior division consisting of fifth  and sixth  graders and the senior division consisting of seventh and eighth graders. The spellers were from schools throughout the Township.

safety in the village,” said Lieutenant Tom Hottinger, supervisor of the department’s Traffic Safety Unit. “We have new programs for 2018, including our current Bicycle Safety Program, and new ideas to stop distracted drivers --- the number-one cause of crashes.” The two Orland Park intersections with the highest crash volume included 159th Street and 94th Avenue and 159th Street and 71st Court. These intersections, along with Beat Number Five, were targeted with increased enforcement. The award application also included officer training, policy and guidelines, incentives, public information and education, enforcement and the effectiveness of the department’s efforts. During 2017, the Orland Park Police Department saw a decrease in crashes related to speed, DUI, personal injury and property damage. The department responded to 1220 speed-related crashes in 2017 compared to 1378 in 2016. In 2017, the department saw an 11 percent decrease in the number of motor vehicle crashes caused by speeding. In his congratulatory letter to McCarthy, Illinois Traffic Safety Challenge Director Scott Kristiansen wrote, “We commend your commitment to highway safety in your community. Your efforts serve as an example to other agencies as we continue our work to make Illinois’ roads safer places to travel.”

The winners of the Senior Division were Patrick Driscoll, grade 8, Southwest Chicago Christian School in first place; Helen Joyce, grade 7, Central Middle School, second place; and Maura Hanley, grade 8, St. Catherine School in third place. The winners of the junior division were Victoria Nielson, grade 6, Incarnation School in first place; Scott Westbrook, grade 5, Southwest School; and Serren Alassaf, grade 5, Ridge Lawn School.

More than a dozen activities for the week ahead have been announced at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. For more information or to register for a program, call (708) 448-1473. • Tuesday Evening Book Discussion begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 19. Adults can join library staff and other participants for a discussion of the novel “A Gentleman in Moscow,” by Amor Towles. Copies of the book are available at the front desk. New members always welcome. The novelist describes his book as “Deemed unrepentant by a Bolshevik tribunal in 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is sentenced to house arrest in a hotel across the street from the Kremlin, where he lives in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history unfold.” • Skin Cancer Prevention and Awareness will be discussed at

6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 20. Dermatologist Dr. Jude Welsch from Advocate Christ Medical Center will share tips on skin cancer prevention awareness and prevention. • Sci-Fi Book Discussion takes place at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 20 at Joe Daniels Bar and Grill, 12218 S. Harlem. The Science Fiction Book readers will discuss the book “A Clockwork Orange,” by Anthony Burgess. Books are available at the library. • Kindness Rocks! This project promoting random acts of kindness will happen at 11 a.m. Thursday, June 21. The Kindness Rocks Project has one simple goal: to promote random acts of kindness to unsuspecting recipients. By painting and dropping inspirational rocks in public areas, participants can bring more kindness into the world. The library will provide the rocks and art supplies and participants provide the inspiration and kind words. They will paint the rocks at the library and then share them with the world. • Book and Film will be showing the film Victoria and Abdul, based on the book by Shrabani Basa at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 21. A brief discuss will be held before the movie, which has a run time of 1 hour, 52 minutes. All participants will be entered into a drawing to win a paperback copy of the book. • Biltmore Estate: America’s Downton Abbey will be profiled at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 21. Art historian Jeff Mishur will discuss the history, architecture and landscape plan of Biltmore Estate, America’s largest private home. He will make parallels between Biltmore and the fictitious Downton Abbey estate, as well as between Downton’s Crawley family and the real-life Vanderbilt family. • Superhero Video Game Tournament is for players in sixth through 12th grade. It will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, June 15. • Lego Builders are invited to the library at 11 a.m. Saturdays, June 16 and July 15. This program is for all ages. • Butterflies at the Library begins Monday, June 18. • Bee Our Friend takes place at 3 p.m. Tuesday, June 19 for students in kindergarten through third grade. Participants will learn about pollination and do a craft. • Farmer’s Market Story Times are held at 10 a.m. every first and third Wednesday of the month at the Palos Heights Farmers

Orland Park Public Library takes story time outside A new schedule of activities has been announced at the Orland Park Public Library, 14921 S. Ravinia. For more information, call (708) 428-5100. • Storytime Takes You Every-

Supplied photo

A check for a challenge

Treasurer Mary Ann Ahl (right) of the Friends of the Library presented a check for $4,000 to Vice-President Joanna Leafblad of the Library Board of Trustees  June 2 during the Summer Reading Challenge Kick-off at the Orland Park Public Library.  The check will be used to purchase green notebook prizes for adult finishers of the summer reading challenge and to purchase supplies for the end-of-summer party offered to youth who finish the summer reading challenge held Aug. 11. More information about the program can be obtained by calling the library at (708) 428-5100.


SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

Ken Karrson, SportsSports EditorEditor • sports@regionalpublishing.com Jason Maholy, • sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday,March June 14, 2018 Thursday, 5, 2015

Southwest Section Southwest • Section•2, Page 1 2, Page 1

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT

Eagles go fourth Drop two at state tourney but earn second trophy in program’s history By Jason Maholy Sports Editor

Sandburg entered the Class 4A state finals one of the hottest teams in the state. The Eagles had going into their semifinal contest against Plainfield North won eight straight games and 24 of their last 27, and during that stretch scored 6.6 runs per game. Sandburg also had proven to be resilient, never losing consecutive games over the course of the season. Neither trend continued last weekend at Route 66 Stadium in Joliet in the Eagles’ first trip to the state finals since 2003. The Eagles fell to the eventual state champion Tigers, 7-3, in the semifinals on June 8, and followed that up the next day with a 7-1 loss to Lake Park in the third-place game. The season, obviously, didn’t Photos by Jason Maholy end the way Sandburg’s coaches The Sandburg baseball team poses with the Class 4A fourth-place plaque on Saturday, June 9 at Route 66 Stadium in Joliet. The Eagles ended the season 28-8 and with the second- and players had hoped, but finbest finish in program history, behind only the Class AA state championship team of 2002. ishing fourth in Illinois isn’t anything of which to be ashamed. The Eagles twice had winning streaks of at least eight games, and their 28 wins were the most since the 2009 team won 29. “It’s a great group of guys here, man,” Sandburg outfielder Ian Sanders said after the Eagles received their fourth-place trophy. “It feels great — just a sad moment that everyone’s leaving. But, overall, we had a great season and it was nice to play for this team.” Sanders played a major role in the Eagles’ march through the playoffs. The fleet-footed junior scored the winning run in Sandburg’s walk-off victory over Providence in the Providence Regional title game, a contest in which the Eagles came from behind three times — the final time on a two-out, two run double by Brian Adams in the bottom of the seventh. Sanders believes that emotional win helped propel the Eagles through Above: Sandburg outfielder Tyler Fabis hugs fellow senior Scott Stemmons the postseason. as the latter walks off the field after a stint on the mound in the third-place “It was a high intensity game game against Lake Park. The game was the only one in which Stemmons throughout and got us going, got played this season. Right: Sandburg coach Jim Morsovillo presents a state our momentum going,” he said. “I Class 4A fourth-place medal to junior Alex Hemenik after Lake Park defeated think because of that game we took the Eagles 7-1 in the state third-place game at Route 66 Stadium. that with us through the playoffs.” Sandburg coach Jim Morsovillo Sandburg sent senior right-hander Evan Tesenior shortnuta to the mound in the thirdstop Branden place game, and he responded Comia holds by shutting out Lake Park on up the ball two hits through 2 1/3 innings. after atOnce Tenuta was out of the game, tempting to the Lancers promptly pounced on tag a Lake the Eagles bullpen. Senior southPark runner paw Seth Masters’ first pitch was at second clubbed to the left field wall, and base during Lake Park went on to score five the Class 4A runs in the inning to break the consolation game open. game. Another of Sandburg’s talented seniors, catcher Ryan Hampe, went 1-for-3, and his 55 hits were one shy of breaking the program’s record for hits in a season. Hampe had the chance to set a new mark but popped out for the final out of the Eagles’ season.

North-bound and down

Plainfield North coach John Darlington was coming into the See EAGLES, Page 3

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2

Section 2 Thursday, June 14, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

FOCUS ON LOCAL COLLEGES

Cougars hurler, runner honored as Academic All-Americans Supplied photo

Shooting stars

The Southside Shooters eighth-grade boys basketball team finished its spring season with at 18-4 record and won the GSBS spring travel league. The Shooters Green 8th beat the Shooters White 7th 42-39 in the semifnals, and beat the Beyond the Arc Bulldogs, 73-32, in the championship game. Seen here are Jake McGriff, from left, Edgar Orellana, Karim Elsokary, Coach Bill Lammel, Coach Eric Burke, Will Lammel, Matt Strama, Lukas Pukstys, Elias Garcia, Eric Burke and Aiden Gutierrez.

REGIONAL/REPORTER ATHLETES OF THE YEAR OVERALL ATHLETE OF THE YEAR 2016—Sean and Chris Torpy (Sandburg) Srs. 2017—Charley Niego (Mother McAuley) Jr.

PLAYERS OF THE YEAR • FALL

2009 – Nick Valla (Marist) 2010 – Nick Valla (Marist) 2011 – Darius Draper (Stagg) 2012 – Michael Kamp (Chicago Christian) 2013 – Alex Majewski (Brother Rice) 2014 – Max Strus (Stagg) 2015 – Jaylan Catledge (Richards) 2016 – Jaylan Catledge (Richards) and Malik Parker (Chicago Christian) 2017—Josh Niego (Brother Rice)

GIRLS TENNIS 2015—Anna Loureiro (Sandburg) Fr. 2016—Anna Loureiro (Sandburg) So. 2017—Anna Loureiro (Sandburg) Jr.                                                                                                 GIRLS BASKETBALL 1994 – Anne McDonald (Mother McAuley) BOYS GOLF 1995 – Anne McDonald (Mother McAuley) 2015—Pete Vos (Chicago Christian) Jr. 1996 – Ann Mullins (Sandburg) 2016—Pete Vos (Chicago Christian) Sr. 1997 – Katie Schumacher (Mother McAuley) 2017—Max Farley (Sandburg) So. 1998 – Sarah Kustok (Sandburg) 1999 – Sarah Kustok (Sandburg) GIRLS GOLF 2000 – Sarah Kustok (Sandburg) 2015—Hannah Kilbane (Sandburg) Fr. 2001 – Emily Heikes (Stagg) 2016—Emilyee McGiles (Sandburg) Sr. 2002 – Tina Hill (Richards) 2017—Hannah Kilbane (Sandburg) Jr. 2003 – Heather King (Stagg) BOYS SOCCER 2004 – Heather King (Stagg) 2015—Ryan Kozlowski (Sandburg) Sr. 2005 – Erin Cattell (Sandburg) 2016—Mohammad Farraj and Giovanni Barragan (Oak Lawn) Srs. 2006 – Maureen Downs (Marist) 2017—Gilberto Arreola (St. Laurence) Sr. 2007 – Kelsey James (Marist) 2008 – Maureen Mulchrone (Mother McAuley) GIRLS SWIMMING 2009 – Haley Stercic (Marist) 2015—Clare Lawlor (Sandburg) Sr. 2010 – Jessica Contant (Stagg) 2016—Eva Kelly (Mother McAuley) So. 2011 – None named 2017—Taira Junonis (Stagg) So. 2012 – None named GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY 2013 – JaTuan Rouse (Marist) 2015—April Van Ryn (Chicago Christian) Jr. 2014 – LaTondra Brooks (Oak Lawn) 2016—April Van Ryan (Chicago Christian) Sr. 2015 – Brianna Markusic (Oak Lawn) 2017—Cecilia Light (Marist) Fr. 2016 – Kara Shimko (Queen of Peace) 2017 – Kara Shimko (Queen of Peace) BOYS CROSS COUNTRY 2015—Sean Torpy (Sandburg) Sr. • SPRING 2016—Dylan Jacobs (Sandburg) Jr. BOYS VOLLEYBALL 2017—Dylan Jacobs (Sandburg) Sr. 2016—Jake Hanes (Sandburg) Sr. 2017—Joe Kenzinger (Brother Rice) Sr. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL 2015—Kayla Caffey (Mother McAuley) Sr. GIRLS TRACK 2016—Charley Niego (Mother McAuley) Jr. 2016—Jada Jackson (Shepard) Sr. 2017—Molly Murrihy (Marist) Sr. 2017—April Van Ryn (Chicago Christian) Sr. BOYS TRACK FOOTBALL 2016—Chris Torpy (Sandburg) Sr. 1986—Jay White (Stagg) Sr. 2017—Brian Friesen (Chicago Christian) Sr. 1987—Ken Courtright (Sandburg) Sr. 1988—Efrem Haymore (Richards) Sr. and Dave Myers (Stagg) Sr. BOYS TENNIS 1989—Dave Jensen (Shepard) Sr. and David Demumbrum (Reavis) Sr. 2016—Michal Wolan (Stagg) So. 1990—Tyrone Washington (Shepard) Sr. 2017—Michal Wolan (Stagg) Jr. 1991—Joe Schissler (Brother Rice) Sr. GIRLS SOCCER 1992—Jim Wroblewski (Sandburg) Sr. 2016—Kylie Hase (Sandburg) Jr. 1993—Allen Ross (Shepard) Sr. 2017—Kylie Hase (Sandburg) Sr. 1994—Kenny Carrington (Richards) Sr. and Mike Tracy (Evergreen Park) Sr. BASEBALL 1995—Zak Kustok (Sandburg) Jr. 1986—Brian Wujcik (Richards), Sr.; Mike Budds  (Reavis), Sr.; 1987—Rob 1996—William Andrews (Richards) Sr. Sudd (Richards) Sr. 1997—Bruce Corcoran (Sandburg) Jr. 1987—Frank Jablonski (St. Laurence Sr.; Dave Ritter  (St. Laurence) Sr. 1998—Joe Martinez (St. Laurence) Sr. and Joe Toner (Shepard) Sr. 1988—Kevin Wojnarowski (Shepard) Sr.; Khris Kolk (Oak Lawn) Sr.;  Bob 1999—Tom Marsan (Evergreen Park) Sr. Mutnansky (Marist) Jr. 2000—Mark Hamstra (Chicago Christian) Sr. 1989—Brent Bowers  (St. Laurence) Sr.; Mark Friedsam (Stagg) Sr.; Ron 2001—Jon Cleveland (Shepard) Sr. Mahay  (Shepard) Sr. 2002—Sean Lewis (Richards) Jr. 1990—Rob Garcia (Stagg) Sr.; Mike Birsa (St. Laurence) Sr.: Bob Schaaf (Chi2003—Dan Nicholson (Brother Rice) Sr. cago Christian) Sr. 2004—Dion Foster (Richards) Sr. 1991—Todd Mensik (Sandburg) So. 2005—Mark Williams (Richards) Sr. 1992—Jerry Pezdek  (Stagg) Sr. 2006—Alex Haan (Chicago Christian) Jr. 2007—Alex Haan (Chicago Christian) and Tommie Thomas (Richards) Sr. 1993—Jim Dallio  (Shepard) Sr. 1994—Brian Harmon (Marist) Sr. 2008—Josh Hodur (St. Laurence) Sr. 1995—Craig Taczy  (Shepard) Sr. 2009—Jon Ryan (Richards) Sr. 1996—Brian Forystek (Sandburg) Sr. 2010-2012 – None named 1997—John Valenti  (Richards) Sr. 2013—Nic Weishar (Marist) Sr. 1998—Tom Syc  (Sandburg) Jr. 2014—Hasan Muhammad-Rogers (Richards) Sr. 1999—Chris Beyer  (Oak Lawn) Sr. 2015—Brendan Skalitzky (Marist) Sr. 2000—Jeremy Hyzny  (Richards) Sr. 2016 – Ricky Smalling (Brother Rice) Sr. 2001—Erik Lis  (Richards) Jr. 2017 – Tori Clinton (St. Laurence) Sr. 2002—Erik Lis  (Richards) Sr. • WINTER 2003—Ryan Campbell  (Sandburg) Sr. BOYS BOWLING 2004—Brian Smith  (Richards) Sr. 2016—Cameron Crowe (Sandburg), Fr. 2005—Mike Fazy  (Brother Rice) Sr. 2017—Cameron Crowe (Sandburg), So. 2006—Jim Calderone  (Brother Rice) Sr. 2018 – Zack McCormick (Evergreen Park), Jr. 2007—T.J. McFarland  (Stagg) Sr. 2008—Greg Billo  (Sandburg) Jr. GIRLS BOWLING 2009—Justin Ringo  (Stagg) Sr. 2016—Emily Schrader (Sandburg) so. 2017—Emily Schrader (Sandburg) Jr. and Alexandra Wozniak (Richards) 2010—Kyle Wood  (St. Laurence) Jr. 2011—Kyle Wood    (St. Laurence) Sr. 2018 – Emily Schrader (Sandburg), Sr 2012—Michael Kamp    (Chicago Christian) Sr. BOYS SWIMMING 2013—Mike Kornacker  (St. Laurence) Jr. 2016—Aidan Farley (Sandburg) Jr. 2014—Christian Bulthuis  (Chicago Christian) Jr. 2017—Lucas Smiarowski (Stagg) Sr. 2015—Mike Schalasky  (Brother Rice) Sr. WRESTLER 2016—Ryan Kutt  (Brother Rice) Jr. 2016—Rudy Yates (Sandburg) Sr.                                            2017—Matt McCormick (St. Laurence) So. 2017—Pat Brucki (Sandburg) Sr. SOFTBALL 2018 – Hassan Johnson (Brother Rice), Sr. 1994—Sarah Haak  (Stagg) Jr. BOYS BASKETBALL 1995—Jenny Raftery  (Mother McAuley) So. 1987 – Ray Thompson (Argo) and Delano Brazil (Brother Rice) 1996—Laurie Markatos (Stagg) Jr. 1988 – Raymond Thompson (Argo) 1997—Laurie Markatos (Stagg) Sr. 1989 – Dave Rettker (Sandburg) and Cleveland Anderson (Richards) 1998—Carole Gorecki  (Richards) Sr. 1990 – Steve Payne (Shepard) and Dave Rettker (Sandburg) 1999—Jenny Tyrell  (Stagg) Sr. 1991 – Steve Payne (Shepard) 2000—Brittany McIntyre  (Sandburg) So. 1992 – Gene Nolan (Marist) 2001—Nikki Netzel    (Sandburg) Jr. 1993 – Jim Sexton (Brother Rice) 2002—Brittany McIntyre  (Sandburg) Sr. 1994 – Jim Sexton (Brother Rice) 2003—None named 1995 – John Economus (Shepard) 2004—Theresa Boruta  (Queen of Peace) Jr. 1996 – Chad Harris (Chicago Christian) 2005—Theresa Boruta  (Queen of Peace) Sr. 1997 – Wayne Plowman (Marist) 2006—Sara Olson  (Sandburg) Jr. 1998 – Demetrius McDaniel (Richards) 2007—Sara Olson  (Sandburg) Sr. 1999 – Joe Scott (Stagg) 2008—Katie Freeman  (Marist) Sr. 2000 – Dwayne Wade (Richards) 2009—None named 2001 – Cory Cummens (Sandburg) 2010—None named 2002 – Rick Harrigan (Brother Rice) 2011—None named 2003 – Dan Hackstock (Oak Lawn) 2012—Brianna LeBeau  (Richards) Sr. 2004 -- Dave Telander (Brother Rice) 2013—Brooke Wyderski  (Marist) Jr. 2005 – Ross Stuursma (Chicago Christian) 2014—Brooke Wyderski    (Marist) Sr. 2006 – Cordelro Yelder (Richards) 2015—Skylar Hilger  (Shepard) Jr. 2007 – Jeff Miller (Stagg) 2016—Sara Kriziak    (Richards) Sr. 2008 – Joel Kamp (Chicago Christian) 2017—Angela Zedak  (Marist) So.

Saint Xavier senior right-handed pitcher Erik Eggert was one of just 11 players across the NAIA, and one of just two pitchers, to be included on the 2018 Google Cloud CoSIDA Academic All-American Team. Eggert, the Cougars’ closer, becomes the Eggert first CoSIDA Academic All-American for the Saint Xavier baseball program. He graduated from the university in May with a degree in biology. All eleven members of the first team posted an average GPA of 3.88. Eggert finished his SXU career as the program’s all-time leader in saves, with 26 over his four seasons as a Cougar. This season, he earned 11 saves while posting a 2.41 ERA over 37.1 innings pitched. Also honored was Saint Xavier cross country runner Ellie Willging. With a third consecutive CCAC individual title and a top-10 finish at last fall’s NAIA Cross Country Championships, the senior was one of 11 runners Willging in the region to be named to the 2017-18 Google Cloud CoSIDA Women’s Cross County/Track Academic All-District 2 Team. The Google Cloud Academic All-District Teams recognize combined success both in the classroom and on the field. All 11 members of the District 2 Team have cumulative GPAs of 3.80 or higher. Willging won her third straight conference title in November, besting the runner-up by 10 seconds. The senior then placed ninth at

the NAIA Cross Country Championships. The CoSIDA Academic All-District honor is the first for the political science major. Every member of the Academic All-District Teams will advance to the national ballot for the Google Cloud CoSIDA Academic-All American Team, which will be announced on June 18. Men’s volleyball: Saint Xavier University and Athletic Director Bob Hallberg have announced the hiring of Tom Ryan as the Cougars’ men’s volleyball head coach. Ryan, a 2014 graduate of Saint Xavier University, rejoins the program after a season on the coaching staff for Quincy University, an NCAA Division I program in Quincy. Ryan was a graduate assistant with the Hawks. He earned a master’s degree in busiRyan ness administration while at Quincy. Ryan played for one season as a student at Saint Xavier, playing a total of 21 matches during the 2012 season. “I was very impressed by Tom’s interview,” Hallberg said. “His enthusiasm for the job, and his passion to create a winning team made for an easy hiring decision.” “I’m incredibly grateful to take over as the next men’s volleyball coach at Saint Xavier University,” Ryan said. “Having played for this program, I’m immensely invested in its success and look forward to guiding it into a prominent future. “I’d like to thank Coach Halberg for the confidence he’s placed in me to lead this program. I’d also like to express my gratitude to some of the people who have helped me reach this point in my coaching career, Mark Johnston of Illinois Tech, and Terri Baranski of UNO Volleyball Club. Both have been tremendously helpful every step of the way.”

Chicago ranks high on list of best hockey cities

The 2018 Stanley Cup Finals website WalletHub has released are over, with the Washington a report title “2018’s Best Cities Capitals exorcising the demons for Hockey Fans,” which claims of numerous playoff failures in to have determined the best places for hockey specrecent years and winning their first tators in the United NHL championship. The Caps, led by Top 20 Cities States. WalletHub compared 73 U.S. Conn Smythe Trophy winner Alex for Hockey Fans cities based on two Boston, MA divisional categoOvechkin, defeated 1 Detroit, MI ries – professional the Vegas Golden 2 Pittsburgh, PA and college hockey Knights four game 3 New York, NY – across 21 key to one in the first 4 5 Chicago metrics. The data Finals since 2007 to 6 Newark, NJ set ranges from the feature two teams 7 St. Louis, MO performance level who had never 8 Buffalo, NY of the city’s teams won a Stanley Cup. 9 Anaheim, CA Washington, in its 10 Washington, DC to minimum season Philadelphia, PA ticket prices to sta44th season in the 11 San Jose, CA dium capacity. NHL, was making 12 St. Paul, MN Chicago — its second appear- 13 Denver, CO home of the 2010, ance in the Finals, 14 Sunrise, FL 2013 and 2015 while Vegas defied 15 16 Tampa, FL all odds and ex- 17 Los Angeles, CA Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks pectations and ad- 18 Las Vegas, NV — ranks consisvanced to the cham- 19 Dallas, TX tently high in the pionship series in its 20 Glendale, AZ metrics and placed inaugural season. fifth overall. Washington’s title is the first for a team from the nation’s capital since 1991, when Best vs. Worst • The Washington Capithe NFL’s Washington Redskins defeated the Denver Broncos in tals’ performance  level of 65.04 Super Bowl XXVI. It was only the percent is 1.7 times better than city’s second major professional the Buffalo Sabres’ 37.80 percent. sports title outside of football, join• San Jose (Sharks), Denver ing the 1978 Washington Bullets (Colorado Avalanche) and Anaof the NBA in that regard. heim (Ducks) have the lowest avFans in the D.C. region were erage ticket price for an NHL obviously ecstatic about the Caps’ game, $94,  which is 2.6 times title run, especially after enduring lower than in Boston, the city with numerous disappointing playoff the highest at $243. exits in recent years. Capitals • Chicago has the highest atfans gathered en masse, the shirts tendance  rate for NHL games, and sweaters in which they were 109.80 percent, which is 1.5 times adorned creating a sea of red, as higher than in Raleigh, N.C., they celebrated the night of the (Carolina Hurrricanes) the city series-clinching victory. Washing- with the lowest at 71.30 percent.  ton players had their obligatory • Chicago has the highest team fun as well, per NHL tradition franchise value, $1,000 million, parading the Cup around town which  is 3.3 times higher than and parting into the wee hoiurs in Glendale, Ariz., (Arizona Coyof the night with their adoring otes) the city with the lowest at fans. Ovechkin was caught on $300 million. video splashing with the cup in To view the full report and a public fountain. city rankings visit wallethub.com/ So, which NHL city has the best edu/best-worst-cities-for-hockeyhockey fans? Personal-finance fans/13283/.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, June 14, 2018 Section 2

Fire allows late goal as Revs earn draw Schweinsteiger nets Chicago’s lone goal The Chicago Fire earned another point via a 1-1 draw with New England last Saturday at Toyota Park, but by allowing a late, game-tying goal missed an opportunity to move into sole possession of sixth place – and the final playoff spot – in the MLS Eastern Conference. The 2018 season is still far from over, however, with 20 of the Fire’s 35 games still yet to be played before the regular season concludes in late October. Chicago entered this week 5-7-3 with 18 points, and trail Orlando City by one point for sixth place in the East. The Fire opened scoring in the 63rd minute when Bastian Schweinsteiger received the ball from Jorge Corrales, turned and raced towards goal. With a quick giveand-go with Aleksandar Katai, the German midfielder collected the ball just inside the 18-yard box and blasted a right-footed shot past Revolution goalkeeper Matt Turner to give the Men in Red a 1-0 lead. The goal was the fifth for Schweinsteiger as a member of the Fire, his second of the season, and his first in front of the home crowd since April 15 of last season. That goal, coincidentally, came against New England. In setting up Schweinsteiger’s strike, Katai now has registered either a goal or an assist in five consecutive MLS matches. The Fire appeared poised to earn a victory and three points, but Teal Bunbury equalized for the Revolution in the 82nd minute. Fire head coach Veljko Paunovic acknowledged the draw was a missed opportunity. “It’s painful because I think the majority of the time we controlled the game, not always with the ball, but we controlled in our defensive shape sometimes,” Paunovic said. “All the effort and the matchups we had on the different positions on the field were great. “I think huge, huge performance from the team and it hurts a lot when you, obviously, drop two points this way but it happens and that’s part of the game. We’ll keep learning from our mistakes and I hope it will get to the point where we’ll learn from others’ mistakes, our opponent’s mistakes. We still have to grow. We’re still young in terms of committing mistakes and we’ll get better. I think it’s a process.” Paunovic also spoke to the importance of midfielder Dax McCarty and forward Luis Solignac from injuries. “It’s very important for the team that Dax and Lucho are back and I think they did great,” he said. “It was very helpful to see Dax’s leadership on the field and also helping Basti in that role and the organization of the play and overall very important his presence on the field for us. Solignac, he added, is still rusty and still needs to find the sharp finishing in the final third. “We need him to get back to his level where he was at some point last season and

Supplied photo

Chicago Fire midfielder Alaksandar Katai assisted on Nemanja Nikolic’s goal in a 1-1 draw against the New England Revolution on Saturday, June 9 at Toyota Park. Katai entered play this week with either a goal or assist in five consecutive games.

I think it’s going to come soon,” he said. Schweinsteiger welcomed McCarty back to the starting lineup. “If you have Dax McCarty back in the team, it’s always an advantage when our captain is on the field,” Schweinsteiger said. “But the guys, when he was injured, stepped in, like Brandt Bronico or Mo Adams, they did really, really well. But I’m personally, of course, very happy to see Dax in the midfield. You know, Dax McCarty, he understands the game. He is very experienced, he is a very good player in my eyes and you can see in every second of the game how important he is to us.” Star forward Nimanja Nikolic left the contest in the 13th minute after sustaining a head injury. “He needed to be intervened by our medical staff and we were waiting for that situation to be solved,” Paunovic said. “But, unfortunately, it took too long and the team was suffering too much and we had to make the decision to make a substitution. We asked if he had some symptoms of concussions, which could happen. It doesn’t look like it.” Paunovic defended goalkeeper Richard Sanchez. “I think what is singled out is that, once again, we lost a great opportunity and today we can say it was his case but in other games others have failed,” he said. “Errors are a part of this game and unfortunately, when they occur and are decisive, they hurt more. This is the life of a goalie as well. He’s the last man that can fail and we understand that perfectly. But no one blames Richard. No one is going to point the finger at him.” Schweinsteiger said New England is a physical team that presents a challenge. “Let’s say it this way, it was not an

easy match to play,” Schweinsteiger said. “They’re very, very physical – you could see that after 10 seconds. It’s not easy to play against them. I think we did a good job of fighting against them, the effort was there. Obviously, we wanted to win, but we could not win the game so we are not 100 percent happy.” Defender Kevin Ellis echoed those sentiments. “At the end of the day, we would have loved to have two more points than we have right now, but we showed that we can fight, we can battle with a physical team and that’s a positive,” Ellis said. • The 1-1 draw snapped Chicago’s four-game winning streak against New England but extended the Fire’s home unbeaten run against the Revs to eight games (5-0-3). The Fire remained five points behind the fifth-place Revs but did gain ground in the Eastern Conference playoff chase. With 18 points, Chicago is now level with Philadelphia in seventh place and one point behind Orlando City for the final playoff position in the East.

Fire advance in U.S. Cup Open

Goalkeeper Richard Sanzhez found himself an unlikely hero by scoring the winning goal on a penalty kick as the C Fire advanced to the fifth round of the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup with a shootout win over Columbus on June 6. After the two sides ended regulation 1-1 and deadlocked 2-2 after the 30-minute extra time period, the Fire converted 10 of 11 PKs to emerged victorious. Sanchez stopped two of the Crew’s 11 PK attempts, and after his second save stepped up to provide the game-winner. “I don’t recall taking a PK in these circumstances, but you do train for them,”

Sanchez said. “You train for them during practice and I myself train them, so it feels good. It gives me confidence. I think it gives the players confidence as well for the ones that made it and we just continue to build from this.” Columbus got on the board first in the 10th minute after Cristian Martinez broke into the 18-yard box and snuck a shot under Sánchez. The Fire equalized just before halftime when Daniel Johnson fed the ball to Rafael Ramos on the right flank. Ramos took a touch and sent a low ball into the box, which Nemanja Nikolic redirected into goal to pull the Fire level in the 45th minute. With neither team able to find a winner in regulation, the two sides headed into the requisite 30-minute extra time. The Fire pulled ahead in the 109th minute when defender Jorge Corrales intercepted a Crew pass and raced down the right flank, finding Aleksandar Katai. Katai found Nikolic at the top of the sixyard box for a right-footed volley to give the Fire the lead. Adam Jahn equalized in the 114th minute for Crew SC to force penalty kicks. Nikolic, who has been dealing with ankle issues, commented on the win and his two goals. “It is always important thing, for us, this competition,” he said. “I am happy because of the goals. I am happy that I don’t feel any more problem with the ankles. It’s been bothering me a couple of weeks but the medical staff did a very good job last week so, now I feel okay and I am happy that we are going to the next round because in this competition we want to create something, good opportunities to build, something good from this victory.”

Eagles

Continued from Page 1 semifinal well aware of the Eagles’ offensive proficiency, and sent ace Brady Miller to the mound with a berth in the state title game on the line. Miller delivered, allowing two runs on seven hits over 6 2/3 innings and ending Sandburg’s dream of playing for its second state championship. The Eagles won the Class AA title in 2002. “They’re such a good hitting team, and for [Miller] to go out and pitch the way he did... he had them offbalance,” Darlington said. “They made some good swings on him and we made plays when we needed to.” The Tigers coach was complimentary of Eagles senior shortstop Branden Comia, who will play next season at the University of Illinois. “Man, I’d take 10 of him,” Darlington said. “He is a good hitter.” Miller’s performance aside, the momentum turned in the fourth inning when the Tigers pulled off a double steal, with junior Garret Cook swiping home on the play. Cook broke for the plate when Hampe attempted to gun down Gavin Doyle at second on a delayed steal attempt. The run extended North’s lead to 3-0, and they would score once more in the inning then three more times in the fifth to essentially put the game out of reach. “That was just a good athletic play by both of them,” Darlington said. “Gavin sees the ball hit the dirt – that’s our rule, take off for second. Garret sees the throw – that’s our other rule, once it clears the pitcher’s head we go – and it worked to perfection. I wish we could say we drew it up but we did not, it was just two good athletes making a play.” Sandburg committed four errors, contributing to their woes. “Tough one today,” Morsovillo said. “We’ve been playing great, got a great group of kids and they’ve been playing hard all season. Things didn’t work out for us today. We competed, they left everything out there, that’s all we can ask for. “What are you going to do? It was one of those days. We didn’t play great defense. We’ve been playing very good defense, but you give a good team at this point extra opportunities, more than likely they’ll make you pay for it and they made us pay for it.” Sandburg looked to mount a rally in the fifth and had Tenuta, one of their best hitters, at the plate with the bases loaded and two outs, but Miller struck out the Eagles senior to end the threat. “We strung together a couple hits and got a run, it was definitely a confidence booster, especially for myself,” said senior Andrew Tenison. “I know Tenuta’s been hitting, and just trying to pass the bat throughout the order, and I thought we could do it at that point, but unfortunately we couldn’t.” The Eagles did not play from behind much this sea-

Photo by Jason Maholy

Sandburg catcher Ryan Hampe greets fellow senior Seth Masters as the latter takes the ball for the final pitching performance of his high school career in the Class 4A third place game against Lake Park.

son, but Hampe recalled the win over Providence in the regional championship game, and believed he and his teammates could mount a similar rally against the Tigers. “I was just thinking about the Providence game the whole time, knowing we could come back and knowing that we’ve been here before,” Hampe said. “I wasn’t nervous at all going into it. I figured we’d string some hits together like we always do, just this time it didn’t happen.” Hampe expressed how proud he is of what the team accomplished this season. “Looking back at it, since the beginning of the year

we’ve all talked about how far we wanted to go, and then as the journey went we all talked about how proud we are of each other, how proud that we’ve stayed together as a team. There’s been disagreements here and there but we’ve all stayed together as a family.” Comia was especially broken up after the loss to North. “I’ve been here for four years, and every year we just seemed to get better and better,” he said. “This team by far... no offense to the other teams, but it was just a special team. I loved every single guy like he was my brother and we just fought. It’s going to be really hard to go.”

3

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Red Stars’ Nagasoto Player of the Week Chicago Red Stars forward Yuki Nagasato was voted the National Women’s Soccer League Player of the Week by the NWSL Media Association for Week 10 of the season. Nagasato, 30, scored her first goal of the season to lead the Red Stars to a 2-0 victory over the Washington Spirit on June 2, helping Chicago snap a sevengame winless streak. The Atsugi, Japan, native created the opening Nagasato goal of the match in the 25th minute as she sent a bending free kick over the wall toward the near post, forcing Washington goalkeeper Kelsey Wys to make a diving save. Wys was unable to hold onto the ball in a driving rainstorm, and Samantha Kerr buried the rebound in the back of the net. The Japan international gave her team a 2-0 advantage in the 48th minute after collecting a long ball into the box and dropping it to Alyssa Mautz, who played the ball back to her just inside the top of the box. Nagasato took a single touch and fired a left-footed shot that skipped into the lower corner. Nagasato played all 90 minutes of the game and finished with two shots (two on target) and one chances created on 43 touches. It is the first time Nagasato has been honored as the NWSL Player of the Week and the 12th time a member of Red Stars has won the award. She is the first Japan international to win the award since Seattle Reign midfielder Nahomi Kawasumi claimed the honor in Week 5 of the 2017 season. • The Red Stars will return to action at Toyota Park on Saturday, June 16 at 2:30 p.m. against the Portland Thorns in the NWSL Game of the Week, to be broadcast on Lifetime.

Chicago to host soccer hackathon during World Cup U.S. Soccer will host an inaugural U.S. Soccer Hackathon July 14-15 in Chicago at 1871 — Chicago’s Center for Technology and Entrepreneurship. The event will be the first soccerspecific hackathon to take place in North America. The event will attract engineers, developers, data scientists, and students from across the country to gather in a world-class work space. 1871 was recently rated as the top incubator in the world, per UBI Global. Attendees will access exclusive data used by federations and professional clubs, develop solutions for soccer industry problems, and share ideas to push the sport forward from commercial and soccer standpoints. Hackers for the event will be divided into teams and challenged to use the provided data to develop an innovative solution or new insight that would present commercial or sporting value for a soccer federation, league or club. A panel of judges will evaluate the team submissions and select two winners. The grand prize-winning team will receive an Ultimate Fan Ticket to a U.S. Soccer-sponsored match of their choice in 2019, including airfare and hotel. In addition, the winning team will receive regular tickets to all other U.S. Soccer-sponsored matches in 2019. The runners-up will also receive tickets to all U.S. Soccer-sponsored matches in 2019. Opta is the Official Live Match Data Provider of U.S. Soccer and will be providing match data from international competitions and domestic leagues. Additional data also will be provided, and hackers will be allowed to supplement with publicly available data. On the second day of the event, U.S. Soccer will host a viewing party for hackers to enjoy the men’s 2018 World Cup championship match. No purchase is necessary to participate in the event, and applications will be reviewed to ensure a minimum level of ability among all hackers. Details, including how to apply, can be found at ussoccer. com/hackathon.


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NEW PENN FINANCIAL, LLC D/B/A SHELLPOINT MORTGAGE SERVICING Plaintiff, -v.DAVID HOENIG Defendants 15 CH 08859 15531 112TH COURT ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 23, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 24, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15531 112TH COURT, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-18-421-004-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 346-9088. Please refer to file number 262303. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 346-9088 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 262303 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 15 CH 08859 TJSC#: 38-3779 I3089485

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (‘’FANNIE MAE’’), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, -v.KAREN D. GREENE, CITIBANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N.A., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Defendants 16 CH 15483 11741 SPRINGBROOK CT. Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 15, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 6, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11741 SPRINGBROOK CT., Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-30-309-013-0000 Vol. 147. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $403,931.77. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 541-9710 Please refer to file number 16-3950. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 541-9710 E-Mail: ilpleadings@johnsonblumberg.com Attorney File No. 16-3950 Attorney Code. 40342 Case Number: 16 CH 15483 TJSC#: 38-4654 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3089273

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF: KRUEGER THE MONEY SOURCE, INC. Plaintiff, -v.DIRK KRUEGER, TERESA KRUEGER Defendants 15 D5 30870 AS CONSOLIDATE WITH 17 CH 03467 9003 CYPRESS COURT TINLEY PARK, IL 60487 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 25, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 26, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9003 CYPRESS COURT, TINLEY PARK, IL 60487 Property Index No. 27-34-207-018-0000. The real estate is improved with a white brick, two story single family home with an attached two car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale.The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 346-9088. Please refer to file number 261492. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 346-9088 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 261492 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 15 D 5 30870 AS CONSOLIDATE WITH 17 CH 03467 TJSC#: 38-3856 I3089689

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Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC; Plaintiff, vs. TADEUSZ SOKOL; JOANNA SOKOL; THE RIVERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; MONIKA SOKOL; SLAWOMIR SOKOL; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF TADEUSZ SOKOL, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MONIKA SOKOL, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF SLAWOMIR SOKOL, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 11860 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-23-101-059-0000. Commonly known as 21 Cour Madelein, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 WA16-0606. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3088673

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Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION UNITED COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, -v.JULIE RUSSELL, THE EARL CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, DENISE RICHMOND, KATHY CLAPPER, GEORGE LEON, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF BETTY LEON, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, THOMAS P. QUINN, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR BETTY LEON (DECEASED) Defendants 18 CH 00961 9728 MILL CT EAST PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 29, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 10, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9728 MILL CT EAST, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-33-209-031-1049. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-17-16987. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-17-16987 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 18 CH 00961 TJSC#: 38-4716 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3089614

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC. Plaintiff, vs. HEA SOOK SHIN, CHICAGO TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED DECEMBER 22, 2004 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NO. 1114017, ARIES INVESTMENTS, INC., UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants, vs. HAFIDA MRABET Intervenor, 15 CH 2946 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on January 25, 2017 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, July 20, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 27-13-202-037-0000. Commonly known as 15240 Heather Court, Orland Park, IL 60462. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Kluever & Platt, L.L.C., 150 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 981-7385. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3089657

For Sale

5 ACRES RT. 45 IN PEOTONE 600 ft. frontage x 400 ft. deep 40 ft. x 60 ft. pole barn CALL 815-450-0004

Houses For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.RICHARD D. HANDLEY A/K/A RICHARD DALE HANDLEY, TINA M. HANDLEY A/K/A TINA MARIE HANDLEY Defendants 16 CH 965 7911 WEST 100TH STREET Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 9, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 10, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7911 WEST 100TH STREET, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-12-304-029-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $276,726.53. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact The sales clerk, SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301, Bannockburn, IL 60015, (847) 291-1717 For information call between the hours of 1pm - 3pm. Please refer to file number 15-078172. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301 Bannockburn, IL 60015 (847) 291-1717 E-Mail: ILNotices@logs.com Attorney File No. 15-078172 Attorney Code. 42168 Case Number: 16 CH 965 TJSC#: 38-3236 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3084519

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.

Houses For Sale

Houses For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.VALERIE BENNECKE SLACK, EDWARD F. SLACK, FIFTH THIRD BANK (CHICAGO), UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS Defendants 17 CH 655 9220 SOUTH 85TH COURT Hickory Hills, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 11, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 5, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9220 SOUTH 85TH COURT, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-314-013-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $250,344.94. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact The sales clerk, SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301, Bannockburn, IL 60015, (847) 291-1717 For information call between the hours of 1pm - 3pm. Please refer to file number 16-080846. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301 Bannockburn, IL 60015 (847) 291-1717 E-Mail: ILNotices@logs.com Attorney File No. 16-080846 Attorney Code. 42168 Case Number: 17 CH 655 TJSC#: 38-4585 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3089174

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION LENDINGHOME FUNDING CORP. Plaintiff, -v.RELIANT ASSET CORP., AWAD M. ODEH Defendants 17 CH 13434 9937 S 88TH AVE. Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 24, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 6, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9937 S 88TH AVE., Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-11-300-010-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $569,191.60. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 541-9710 Please refer to file number 17-0784. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 541-9710 E-Mail: ilpleadings@johnsonblumberg.com Attorney File No. 17-0784 Attorney Code. 40342 Case Number: 17 CH 13434 TJSC#: 38-4652 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3089271

HAVE A HOUSE FOR SALE? Advertise today! Call 708-448-4000 or 708-448-6161


6

Section 2 Thursday, June 14, 2018

The Regional News - The Reporter

The Reporter • 448-6161 • Deadline 5 p.m. Monday • Hours M-F 9 to 5

Get Fast Action

Very Low Cost

The Classifieds Little Want Ads do big jobs? TRY one and see for yourself. The Regional News • Call 448-4000 • Deadline 5 p.m. Monday • Hours M-F 9 to 5

Garage Sale

Help Wanted

Police OfficerCity of Palos Heights Applications may be obtained at www.palosheights.org or picked up at City Hall, 7607 W College Dr, Palos Heights, from June 18 – July 5, 2018. Hours are 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday - Friday. There is a $25.00 non-refundable fee that must be submitted with the completed application by July 6, 2018. Applicants must be 20 Garage Sale (21 at time of appointment) to 35 years of age (except as permitted by statute), be a citizen Friday & Saturday of the U.S., have a valid driver’s 6/15 & 6/16 license and possess one of the 9-5 pm following: 95th & 87th Ave • An Associate Degree in crimHickory Hills inal justice or a related field Across from Fairplay from an accredited college. Multi family - Multi homes • A Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university. The written examination will Garage Sale take place on Saturday July 14, 2018. Garage Sale Candidates who pass the writ4620 W. 99th Street, Oak Lawn ten examination will be placed 6/14, 6/15 and 6/16, 9am-5pm on an Initial Eligibility List and Lots of tools, furniture, tiling, further screened for appointdrum set and office furniture. ment as determined by the Too much to mention! Board of Fire & Police Commissioners, which may include oral interview, polygraph screening, Help Wanted background check, psychological assessment and medical examination. The City of Palos Heights is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Line Cook Wanted

Brother Rice High School is seeking a Full Time Marketing Director for the 2018-2019 School Year. Please send resume and cover letter to Dr. Kevin Burns at kburns@ brrice.org. by June 15. For list of job responsibilities and questions, please visit our website (brotherrice.org)

Call or stop by for an application

708-430-2800 9644 Roberts Rd.

Hickory Hills or email resume to: accounting@vitoandnicks2.com

M-F 9 to 5

For Sale 1994 Cadillac Deville Excellent condition Like new - 44,000 miles $6900 or best offer Call 708-745-8671

M-F 9 to 5

Landscaping

Plumbing & Sewer

C&C

Asphalt Paving Inc. Family Owned & Operated Business Since 1982

Complete Residential & Commercial Service Your Complete Paving Contractor (708)

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Lawn Mowers & Riding Mowers Repair/Tune-Up

Foundation Cracks Repaired Sub-pumps Installed Drain Tile Lifetime Transferable Guarantee 708-479-8300

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Flood Control Specialists All Types of Plumbing Repairs

LUSKEY CONSTRUCTION Garages • Decks Additions • Oak Floors

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Hot water tanks • Bathroom installations Toilets, Tubs, Sinks & Faucets Sewers rodded • Sump pumps Sewers inspected by camera Foundation leaks repaired Battery back-up systems

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• Tear Offs • Re-Roofs • Shingles • Flat Roofs • EPDM Rubber • Siding

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• Blown-In Insulation • Fascia & Soffit • Gutters • Gutter Cleaning

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Mike Stekala Construction

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Cash in on treasures sitting around the house — with a classified ad! CALL 448-4000 OR 448-6161

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PRUSAK ROOFING STORM DAMAGE EXPERTS

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Help Wanted

The Regional News Call 448-4000 Deadline 5 p.m. Monday Hours

Business & Service Directory

Asphalt Paving

Saturday, June 16 Sunday, June 17 8-4 6823 W Crowdall Dr. Worth, IL Quality items Lots of children toys & crib, Legos, arts supplies for scrapbooking & stamping etc., household items, & Brio train accessories

Flexible Shifts Pay based on experience

The Reporter Newspapers Call 448-6161 Deadline 5 p.m. Monday Hours

Licensed • Bonded • Insured

Carpenter will do Home Repairs & Remodeling

Over 25 Years Experience Kitchens • Bathrooms • Additions Basements • Windows • Doors Siding • Garages • Roofs • Decks Licensed Bonded & Insured FREE ESTIMATES

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SPRING SPECIAL 1/3 OFF • Bathrooms • Kitchens • Rec Rooms • Attics • Basements • General Repairs • Painting

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Advertise in the Business and Service Directory! Call 708-448-4000 or 708-448-6161

• Windows • Doors • Flooring • Electrical • Plumbing • HVAC • Carpeting

Senior Discount Veteran Discount Licensed & Bonded


Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

OUT & ABOUT

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 7

Hold summer art classes for kids at The Center The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, has announced a number of activities for all ages. For more information and to register, call (708) 361-3650. • Copper and Rivet Bangle Bracelet Class is being held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 15. Instructor Liz Credio will help students learn how to paddle out metal and how to use rivets to secure a bangle together. Participants can make it their own by adding different elements and textures. The class fee is $22 plus a $13 materials fee. • Photography Basics Workshop For Kids is set from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 16 and is for students in fourth through 10th grade. Instructor Lauren Becker will show students the basics of working with their cameras as well as how to improve or attain a photographer’s eye. Students will

be taken on a field trip around The Center snapping shots along the way at the cabins, the forest and the farm. Students may bring in any type of camera and should be dressed for rain or shine. The fee is $17. • Summertime Essential Oils will be explored from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 16. Instructor Liz Credio will help participants learn about the benefits of essential oils and create their own cooling spray, lotion bar, bug spray and foot-soak tea sachet to take home. The workshop fee is $17 plus a $20 materials fee. • Preschool and Kindergarten Summer Art Class will be held from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, June 18, 20 and 22. Instructor Karen Signore will help students explore the world of art and nature. Signore will have nature inspired

projects planned experimenting in painting, drawing, collage and more. Class will be held both in and outdoors. The last day will feature an art show. The class fee is $45. • Plein Aire Sketch And Watercolor is slated from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, June 21. Instructor Lois Hrejsa and art students will visit the Peabody Estate in Oak Brook for this meeting. Painting and drawing is scheduled until 12:30 p.m. when the group breaks for lunch followed by a group critique. Students are asked to bring art supplies and a folding stool or chair. Registration is required by calling The Center and is necessary to receive a detailed schedule with exact locations and lunch details. Classes are for students with some art experience. The class fee is $22 per session. Students will meet at The Center.

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS Visit Disney’s Toy Story Land this weekend at Orland Square Mall’s lower level

Fans of Toy Story will receive an advanced opportunity to explore Andy’s toy-filled backyard when the Toy Story Land nationwide tour comes to Orland Square Mall, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 15 and 16. Orland Square’s lower level by JCPenney will get a makeover and offer fans the chance to take in sneak peeks of Toy Story Land concept art, hop in an interactive photo booth and even receive giveaways. BoxLunch in Orland Square will offer exclusive Toy Story merchandise throughout the two-day event. The Toy Story Land Mall Tour coincides with the upcoming opening of Toy Story Land in Disney’s Hollywood Studios at Walt Disney World Resort.

Bridge Teen Center offers summer fun and many learning activities

The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Ct., Orland Park, offers several free events for teens in seventh through 12th grade.  For more information, call (708) 532-0500.  • A Parking Lot Jam and Kanjam Frisbee Tourney will be held from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday,

June 15. Students can enjoy a festival night filled featuring carnival games with prizes, a live DJ, coffee and donuts from Dunkin’ Donuts, and a Kanjam Frisbee tournament. • Kickball with CarMax is set from 3:45 to 5:45 p.m. Tuesday, June 19. Students can enjoy a classic outdoor kickball game with friends from CarMax, a company that supports and donates funds to The Bridge. • Project Serve: Thrift Store takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 20. Students will sort clothes and pick out the ones that could use a good wash. They will also learn how to read the laundry symbols on the inside tag. • Culinary: Gnocchi Carbonara with Cooper’s Hawk Winery and Restaurant is scheduled from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 20. Students will learn how to create an Italian dish of gnocchi dumplings, chicken, and carbonara pasta. They will measure and combine ingredients for the dumplings, boil the pasta in water and discover tips on how to know when it’s fully cooked. • Gearheads: Summer Auto Recharge with Bettenhausen Auto will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. Thursday, June 21. Students will learn how to change the oil and recharge the air conditioner from the car experts at Bettenhausen Auto.

CLUB ACTIVITIES PHGC to learn about oriental-style gardening

The Palos Heights Garden Club welcomes members and non-members to a monthly meeting and program beginning with hospitality at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 25 at the Brigid O’Malley Auditorium at Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens, 7402 Lake Katherine Dr., Palos Heights. The program, The Building and Growing of a Garden, begins at 7 p.m. It will be presented by club member Ron Karlic. He will show guests through photographs the germination of his award-winning oriental-style garden 20 years ago and its growth over time at 10- and five-year markers. Ron’s garden included a

large pond, hundreds of varieties of hostas and unique flowering plants. PHGC meets every fourth Monday, February through October. Hospitality is from 6:30-7 p.m. with the program starting at 7 p.m. Membership is $20 for individuals and $35 for couples. Guest fee is $5. New members are welcome. More information can be obtained by contacting Julie Pietrzak, club president, at jmpietrzak@sbcglobal.net.

Worth Township offers new chess club

The Illinois Chess Vets weekly chess club with instruction will meet from 4 to 8 p.m. every

Serve steak alongside a backyard barbecue staple A night of al fresco dining next to a grill in the backyard can be a great way to spend an evening. Nearly any type of food can be grilled, and steaks tend to be especially good when cooked over an open flame. The following recipe for “Grilled Rib-Eye Steaks with Mushroom-Shallot Butter” from Laurie McNamara’s “Simple Scratch” (Avery) is sure to please, especially when coupled with McNamara’s recipe for “Baked Beans,” a must-have staple for any backyard barbecue.

GRILLED RIBEYE STEAKS WITH MUSHROOM-SHALLOT BUTTER non-holiday Wednesday at the Serves 4 to 6 Worth Township office, 11601 S. Pulaski, Alsip. • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) Those who want to learn the plus 3 tablespoons game of chess, but didn’t think unsalted butter, at room they could, or want their family temperature and friends to learn the game • 1/2 cup sliced shallot are invited to this newly formed • 1 heaping cup sliced weekly club for all ages. cremini mushrooms Worth Township has brought • 2 large cloves garlic, in U.S. Chess Federation-certified minced chess coaches and VA Hospital • 1 teaspoon coarsely Chess Program facilitators to get chopped fresh thyme things started. All individuals, releaves gardless of where they live, are • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, invited. Those who already play plus more as needed are invited to help to teach others • 1/4 teaspoon coarsely or just find someone to play with.   ground black pepper, Reservations are requested. For plus more as needed more information and reserva- • 4 to 6 steaks (such as tions, call Worth Township at rib-eye, New York strip (708) 371-2900, ext. 28.   or porterhouse)

Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a medium skillet over mediumlow heat. Add the shallot and cook until golden and slightly crispy, 7 to 8 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the shallot to a clean plate. In the same skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of butter, then add the mushrooms, garlic, thyme, salt, and pepper. Stir and cook until the mushrooms are softened, about 5 minutes. Transfer to the plate with the shallot and let cool. In a small bowl, use a rubber spatula to blend the remaining 8 tablespoons of butter with the cooled mushroom mixture until combined. Place the butter in the center of a piece of parchment paper. Bring the edges together and press with your fingers to form the butter into a log. Roll and twist the ends before popping the butter into the refrigerator for at least 20 to 30 minutes. Set the steaks on the counter for 30 minutes to bring them up to room temperature. Meanwhile, preheat a grill or grill pan to medium-high or about 400 F. Season both sides of the steaks with 2 pinches of salt and a pinch of pepper. Grill each steak for 6 to 8 minutes per side, depending on the thickness and the desired doneness. Tent with aluminum foil and let rest for 5 minutes. Slice the mushroom butter into coins and top each of the steaks with two coins before serving.

BAKED BEANS Serves 10 • 2 15-ounce cans navy beans, drained and rinsed • 4 slices applewood- or pecan wood-smoked bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces • 1 cup diced yellow onion • 11/2 cups ketchup • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons unsulphured molasses • 1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar • 11/4 teaspoons ground mustard • 1 teaspoon ground cloves • 1 teaspoon kosher salt Preheat the oven to 350 F. Combine the bacon and onion in a medium Dutch oven. Slowly cook over medium heat until the onion is tender and the bacon is cooked, 8 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, whisk together the ketchup, molasses, sugar, ground mustard, ground cloves, and 1 cup water to combine. Add the cooked beans and pour the mixture into the pot with the bacon and onion. Stir, cover and bake for 1 hour, stirring every 20 minutes. Add the salt and stir. Uncover and let sit for 15 to 20 minutes before serving.

HOROSCOPES ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, this week seems like a race, but you may be losing steam. With a lot of distance still left to cover, it’s time to conserve your energy and find some assistance. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, your imagination is very active lately, so much so that it may make it difficult to concentrate on anything else. Make an effort to get work done in spite of the distractions. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, others may misinterpret your enthusiasm for a carefree nature. However, you are actually busy getting the job done — even if you’re having some fun doing it. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

It’s possible you may misread someone’s intentions, and it could get you in a bit of hot water, Cancer. Don’t make any assumptions and apologize if you make mistakes. LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, if your energy levels are waning, find a way to put some hop in your step. Take a break from work if necessary. This is a great way to recharge.

where you are heading, Libra. Don’t let others’ misconceptions sway you.

to let loose a little bit this week and your friends will flock to you in no time at all.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, if left to your own devices, you can get your work done quickly. But overcoming distractions may be difficult in the days ahead. Do your best to stay the course.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, you’re normally a people person, but every once in a while you enjoy solitary time to think and avoid crowds. This could be the week for that.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, you haven’t yet found your groove at work, but don’t get discouraged because it will happen. Pay attention to others around you and how they act.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/ Dec 21 Sagittarius, if you are feeling high strung or nervous, you may just need to take a little time away from a situation to reorient yourself. Come back with a fresh perspective.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Even if others think you are ambivalent, you possess a clear picture of what you want and

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, don’t put others off by being too serious. Learn how

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Everything seems to be unfolding on schedule, Pisces. This is advantageous because you don’t have to put in extra effort or sweat the details.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

JUNE 14 Donald Trump, President (72) JUNE 15 Ice Cube, Actor/Rapper (49) JUNE 16

Rick Nash, Athlete (34) JUNE 17 Venus Williams, Athlete (38) JUNE 18 Blake Shelton, Singer (42)

JUNE 19 Zoe Saldana, Actress (38) JUNE 20 Nicole Kidman, Actress (51)

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

July 30 – August 3 • 9:00–11:30 a.m. VBS is a fun place for children who are 3 years old through 6th grade. At Son Rock Kids Camp, children of all ages will learn to build their lives on the SOLID ROCK of JESUS. Children will learn that they are Accepted, Protected, Saved and Forgiven by Jesus and that they are Living for Jesus. Bible study, games, crafts, music, snacks, friends and more await the campers as they learn and live the theme verse 1 John 3:1 “See what great love the Father has lavished on us, that we should be called the children of God!” This is a free program for the community. PROGRAM AND DINNER Thursday, August 2, 6-8 P.M. REGISTRATION ON-LINE www.trinitycovoaklawn.org Or drop off/mail to Trinity Or call the church office 708-422-5111 HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!!!! BRING A FRIEND FOR THE WEEK AND GET A PRIZE!

Trinity Evangelical Covenant Church 9230 S. Pulaski Road | Oak Lawn | 708-422-5111


Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

OUT & ABOUT

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Southwest • Section 2, Page 8

Welcome summer with programs at Lake Katherine Dozens of children will be inspired by nature this summer as they take part in outdoor activities and camps at Lake Katherine. Naturalists based at the nature center and botanical gardens in Palos Heights are offering every child—from preschoolers to teens up to 15—a summer of outdoor adventures as they open their eyes to the wonders of wildlife and the natural world. The 85-acre park is located at 7402 Lake Katherine Drive. From walking in the waterfall to Tom Sawyer-style fishing to campfire safety skills and close encounters with insects and bugs, the Palos Heights facility will host a range of daily and weekly educational programs to introduce children to the inspiring and eyeopening world of nature. “Our goal is to help parents steer their children away from tablets, phones, or video games in favor of enjoying and exploring nature,” said Lake Katherine naturalist Marian Sinkus, who organizes the nature center’s summer programs and camps. “Some children who come to camp have never caught a fish, smelled herbs straight from the plant, cooked their own hotdog on a stick or freely explored the outdoors,” she said. “I have the privilege of witnessing them discover these milestones. Seeing kids grin from ear-to-ear as they hold a frog or a turtle for the first time or after they have accomplished climbing a tree with ropes and harness is very special.” Parents can find more information at lakekatherine.org or by visiting Lake Katherine’s Facebook page. The office can be reached at (708) 361-1873. The summer programs include: Walking in the Waterfall Wednesday, June 20, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Make a splash investigating the movement of water while

walking in our waterfall. Please wear clothes that can get wet. We supply boots for children. Sign up in advance at the Nature Center quoting program numbers 703 (K-2) or 704 (3-5). Leafy T’s Wednesday, June 27, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Bring your own white t-shirt and design your own imagination. We will be using natural materials to create a masterpiece. Sign up in advance at the Nature Center quoting program numbers 705 (K-2) or 706 (3-5). Tom Sawyer-Style Fishing Wednesday, July 11, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Try your hand at fishing, catchand-release style. Poles and bait will be provided. Pre-registration required quoting program numbers 707 (K-2) or 708 (3-5). Incredible Insects Wednesday, July 18, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Six-legged creatures are fabulous! Using magnifiers, we will look closely at grasshoppers to identify their incredible parts. We’ll hike outdoors with nets to capture insects and let them go. Pre-registration required quoting program numbers 709 (K-2) or 710 (3-5). Walking in the Waterfall Wednesday, July 25, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Make a splash investigating the movement of water while walking in our waterfall. Please wear clothes that can get wet. We supply for children. Pre-registration required, quoting program numbers 711 (K-2) or 712 (3-5). Tom Sawyer-Style Fishing Wednesday, Aug 1, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Try your hand at fishing, catchand-release style. Poles and bait

will be provided. Pre-registration required quoting program numbers 713 (K-2) or 714 (3-5). Wetland Wonders Wednesday, Aug 8, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Take a hike on the shores of Lake Katherine using water nets to collect specimens. We will examine the specimens using magnifying glasses and a dissecting scope. Pre-registration required quoting program numbers 715 (K-2) or 716 (3-5). Walking in the Waterfall Wednesday, Aug 15, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3-4 p.m. (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Make a splash investigating the movement of water while walking in our waterfall. Please wear clothes that can get wet. We supply the boots for the children. Pre-registration required quoting program numbers 717 (K-2) or 718 (3-5). Flower Pounding Wednesday, Aug 22, 1-2 p.m. (grades K-2), and 3pm4pm (grades 3-5). Cost: $6. Transfer the colors of plants and flowers onto fabric. Our art project will start with a hike to find a variety of colors of plant leaves, stems and flowers, and then we’ll use a mallet to press the plant material onto fabric. Pre-registration required quoting program numbers 719 (K-2) or 720 (3-5). Little Explorers A one-hour experience for 3-6-year-olds, together with their favorite adult. Choose from three date options for each program. Pre-registration and payment are required. Space is limited to between three and 10 children. Little Clouds June 7, 8, or 9, $6 per child. Join us as we lie in the grass, watch the clouds, and spot shapes. We’ll sing a rain cloud song and make a project and other activities. Program number, Day/Date/Time

16 MONTH CD SPECIAL 1

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PREFERRED MONEY MARKET SPECIAL 2 Guaranteed for 12 months. $2,500 minimum to open. New money only.

Supplied photo

Children meet turtles at Lake Katherine.

724 Thursday June 7 9:30 a.m. 725 Friday June 8 9:30 a.m. 726 Saturday June 9 10:30 a.m. A Walk in the Waterfall July 12, 13, or 14. $6 per child. We’ll put on our boots and make a splash investigating the movement of the water. We have a supply of boots for children and parents. Parents are also welcome to bring their own boots or old tennis shoes. Program number, Day/Date/Time 727 Thursday July 12 9:30 a.m. 728 Friday July 13 9:30 a.m. 729 Saturday July 14 10:30 a.m. It’s a Small World August 9, 10, or 11, $6 per child. Become a scientist and use a magnifying glass to look for nature’s tiny creations. We will go for a walk and find small creatures and plants. Our hour together will include a project to take home. Program number, Day/Date/Time 730 Thursday August 9 9:30 a.m. 731 Friday August 10 9:30 a.m. 732 Saturday August 11 10:30 a.m.

Summer camps

Forest Explorers: Two-day minicamps Children 5 and 6 years of age will have opportunities to discover the wonders of nature through games, activities, and projects during two-day minicamps. Activities will include exploring a variety of animals and the forest area. As a highlight, during the last hour of the last day of each session, Forest Explorers will walk in the waterfall. Register by Thursday before the session begins. Cost: $25 per program. Program numbers, Session/ Dates/Time 733 1: Gardening & mammals. 6/11 and 6/13 9.30-11:30 a.m. 734 2: Turtles and birds. 6/12 and 6/14 9.30-11:30 a.m. Rangers Five-day summer camp for children age 7-9. Rangers will explore in the Lake Katherine ‘wild’ through hands-on activi-

ties, nature games and crafts, fishing and walking in the waterfall. Discover mud, bugs, reptiles, amphibians, and plants. Register by Thursday before a session begins. Cost: $95 per program. Program numbers, Session/Date/ Time 737 June 18-22 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Jr. Naturalists Five-day summer camp for children age 9-11. Begin an adventure at Lake Katherine through handson activities. Learn the skill of paddling a canoe, fish Tom Sawyerstyle, walk in the waterfall and hike to and explore our hidden ravine. Handle a turtle or a snake, and hunt for frogs and insects. One day will be spent taking part in wild science experiments. Register by Thursday before the session begins. Cost: $95 per program. Program number, Session/Date/ Time 740 June 25-29 10am-2pm

25 MONTH CD SPECIAL 1

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3960 W. 95th St. | Evergreen Park, IL 60805 708-952-0148 | www.bankevergreenpark.com

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First National Bank of Evergreen Park and Oak Lawn Bank & Trust are branches of Beverly Bank & Trust Company, N.A. Funds used to open the accounts must be new money. New money is defined as money not currently held at any Wintrust Community Bank. Annual Percentage Yields (APYs) are accurate as of 5/17/18. 1. APY assumes funds remain on deposit. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Promotional period is 6/1/18 to 7/31/18. 2. A monthly maintenance fee of $15 will be imposed every month if the daily balance in the account falls below $2,500 any day of the month or an average daily balance of $5,000 was not maintained for the monthly statement cycle. The APY of 1.25% will be guaranteed for 12 months from the date the account is opened on all balances. Offer expires 6/30/18. After 12 months, the rates may be tiered and variable and subject to change at the bank’s discretion. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 5/17/18. Transaction limitations may apply. Fees may reduce earnings.

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