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$1 Newsstand A GUIDE TO THE BIG RACE | INSIDE

THE REGIONAL NEWS Named best small weekly in Illinois five times by the Illinois Press Association

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Serving Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities

75th Year, NO. 17 • 3 Sections

ORLAND PARK

Prostitution probe closes massage shop By Jack Murray An email tip to Orland Park police led to the arrest on prostitution charges of two female employees of a massage business in the village last week, police said. Suyun Jin, 47, of Orland Park, and Hongxiu Fu, also 47, of Chicago, were arrested shortly after 5 p.m. April 19 at ZY Massage, 11225 W. 159th St. The arrests were made by members of the Cook County Sheriff’s Photos by Patt Bailey Police vice unit and Orland Park police. Jin is charged with one count of prostitution related to an alleged incident on April 12, and two Local residents enjoy the outdoors as they explore the Palos woodlands and are introduced to native flora and fauna last Saturday courtesy the Palos counts of conducting a massage Restoration Project. The group's goal of habitat restoration is to increase bio-diversity in the forest preserves. A greater variety of native plants will without a license. Fu is charged support a more diverse insect, bird and mammal population. This event and more like these throughout the year are sponsored by the Friends of the with two counts of prostitution Forest Preserves and the Palos Restoration Project. related to alleged incidents on April 5 and 19, police said. Before the hikes A third woman, business owner began in Palos Liyun Zhu, 46, of Manhattan, was Woods South, cited with four municipal violaJoe Neumann, a tions, three counts of allowing

Caring for Palos’ natural heritage

26-year veteran steward of the Palos Restoration Project informed the crowd about the volunteer group’s work to preserve and restore the native ecosystems of the Palos and Sag Valley. The Palos Restoration Project organizes volunteers to help improve the ecosystem of the Palos Forest Preserves. To learn more about the Palos Restoration Project and how you can help, visit its website, www.restorepalos. com, or find them on Facebook.

employee-unlawful touching and one count of employing a massage therapist without a state license, police said. ZY Massage was ordered closed pending review of the violations by the village manager’s office, Orland Park police Cmdr. John Keating said in a release last Friday. Police began their investigation, following up a tip sent on March 30 to the Orland Park Police Department’s crime tip email, crimetips@orlandpark.org, police said. “The tipster related that ZY Massage was a front for prostitution and provided details on how the illegal activities were occurring,” Cmdr. Keating said. Orland Park police the next day sought assistance from the county sheriff’s police vice unit, which conducted undercover operations at ZY Massage on April 5, 12 and 19, when the arrests were made, according to police.

PALOS PARK

Village reserves will close budget gap

By Michael Gilbert

Regional correspondent Palos Park will likely dip into its reserves after village officials Monday approved the Fiscal Year 2017 budget with expected expenditures exceeding revenues by about $246,550. The Village Council officials voted 4-0 to approve the budget , which projects $8.51 million in total expenditures and $8.27 million in expected revenue. Commissioner James Pavlatos was absent. The expected deficit is due to upcoming expenses in the water

I T’ S B E T T E R AT

fund, as well as road improvement projects, Village Finance Director Barb Maziarek said. Despite the projected deficit in Fiscal Year2017, which starts May 1 and ends April 30, 2017, Maziarek said the village will still have a surplus of more than $7.3 million in its ending fund balance. “When I look at it, we still have a hefty balance [in our ending fund],” Maziarek said. “I’m not too worried about our reserve reduction. In the past couple years we have built up our reserves with cash balances.” During a five-minute PowerPoint presentation, Maziarek

told village officials she projects a balanced general fund with revenues and expenditures each at $4.7 million. The general fund is the largest of Palos Park’s 15 different funds and the one that includes village salaries and benefits. The general fund provides the resources to sustain the daily activities of the village. “The general fund is the biggest and most important fund because everything is recorded there,” Maziarek said, noting salaries and benefits account for more than 68 percent of the total general fund. There are no layoffs proposed for Fiscal Year 2017 and village

employees will also not be asked to take any furlough days, Maziarek said. There are no new village positions proposed in the budget. Village employees are due to receive a 2.5 percent salary increase, she said. “There will be no change in personnel – no layoffs and no furloughs,” Maziarek said. Moments before the council approved the proposed budget, Mayor John Mahoney praised Maziarek and her staff for the “hard work” they put forth in crafting the budget.

Palos Hospital gives volunteer recognition

Dr. Terrence Moisan, President and CEO of Palos Community Hospital, presents Orland Park resident Evelyn McGowan with the top volunteer award at the PCH Volunteer Recognition Dinner at Chicago Gaelic Park on April 19. During the event, Palos recognized volunteers for their more than 255,000 combined hours of volunteer work at the hospital. The hospital is a principal sponsor of this Sunday’s Southwest Half Marathon and 10K race. See our special section devoted to this weekend’s See PALOS PARK, Page 3 Big Race events inside.

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2 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News

Photo by Dermot Connolly Photo by Dermot Connolly The line outside Jimmy John’s, 11908 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights, stretches around the building during Customer Appreciation Day last Thursday. The

Co-owner Sam Bayaa chats with Kathy Poulsen over the counter at Booza, a shop sold sandwiches for only $1 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. About 1,600 sandwiches were sold during the promotion, twice as many as expected, according new ice cream parlor and juice bar at 11906 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights. to staff at the sandwich shop. Its neighbor in the Southwick Commons shopping center is Booza ice cream and juice smoothie shop.

They stop in for a cold treat at Booza Bubble tea a specialty among ice creams and cold drinks By Dermot Connolly Booza, an ice cream parlor and juice bar that opened in February at 11906 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights, is looking forward to a busy late spring and summer season. Co-owner Sam Bayaa, a former Palos Hills resident who has two partners,

pointed to the bobba tea on the menu, saying he saw a local need for a restaurant serving the drink, also called bubble tea, with its chewy tapioca balls. “It is from Taiwan, and very popular in Washington, D.C., where I make frequent trips in my other job as a software engineer,” said Bayaa, who lives in Oak Forest.

“I had a hard time finding it here, so I decided to open my own shop. We expanded the menu to include ice cream, smoothies, shakes and protein drinks,” he said. Booza is the Arabic name for the type of ice cream he sells, which is popular in Mediterranean countries and the Middle East. An additive called mastic makes it

more elastic and resistant to melting in hot climates. Bayaa describes it as “gourmet Mediterranean ice cream,” a cross between gelato and ice cream. In addition to kashta, a flavor similar to vanilla and served with pistachios, the many flavors available include banana fudge, coconut, chocolate, strawberry and other fruits. “We have all natural flavors. Everything we serve is gluten-free, kosher and halal,”

said Bayaa. “It tastes just like what I was used to growing up,” said Chicago Ridge resident Jihad Othman, a Palestinian-American who brought his five children one recent evening. Booza, is open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday-Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday, although Bayaa said the plan is to stay open until 10 p.m. on Sunday also.

Rid Litter Day volunteers help keep woodsy Palos Park looking its best

Supplied photo

Ken Cowan picking up litter. “We had a beautiful day for Rid Litter day and lots of volunteers,” organizer Denise Cowan said. Boy Scout Troop 729 had a great turn out and cleaned up 123rd from La Grange Road to 80th Avenue, filling about 20 bags of litter in that area alone.

Photo by Patt Bailey

Palos Park held its annual village-wide Rid Litter Day last Saturday. Denise Cowan of the Beautification Committee along with Theresa Tevsh, Palos Park’s Recreation and Parks Director, helped get the cleaup day started by distributing plastic gloves and bags to Scout groups, residents and other volunteers involved in the cleanup.

Papoose Lake before clean up on Rid Litter Day.

Photo by Patt Bailey

Two sets of Palos Park volunteers were both interested in cleaning up the same area on west 119 Street, so they joined forces. Here, Girl Scout cadets from Troop 60349 Sydney Walters, Cassie Thornburg and Lia Sanchez receive trash bags from Denise Cowan, of Palos Park’s beautification committee. Supporting their daughters and the Rid Litter Program for more than six years are Nicole Milovich-Walters, an elected village commissiner, and Tatum Sanchez. In the background are eco-friendly Palos Park residents Kris and Dan O’Reilly.

Supplied photo


The Regional News

Thursday, April 28, 2016

3

Mayor for a Day puts Heights students in City Council seats

Photo by Michael Gilbert

Palos Park Women make community contributions Photos and text by Patt Bailey

The Palos Heights Woman’s Club began its annual Mayor for a Day program at Lake Katherine Tuesday last week. City officials, woman’s club representatives, parents, students and guests were treated to pizza provided by the city and dessert provided by the woman’s club. Each student elected official read his or her winning essay to the audience. Shown are Christian Gambotz of Palos South Middle School receiving his award from Alderman Alan Fulkerson (3rd Ward) and student Nicole Walsh, of Independence Junior High receiving her award from Alderman Mike McGrogan.

An effective way to introduce students to the role and function of local government and the chamber environment is to conduct a mock council meeting. After the pizza party, the audience proceeded to City Hall for the evening’s meeting. Mayor Bob Straz hands the gavel over to Mayor for a Day Max Szykowny of Independence Junior High to commence the meeting.

Before the meeting began, Mayor for a Day City Clerk Shannon Stokes and City Treasurer Lindsey Bylut, both from Independence Junior High, receive a few pointers from City Clerk Thomas Kantas and City Treasurer Frank Oswald.

Junior legislators, Grace Mintle of Palos South Middle School, and Benjamin Fanelli and Niamh Byrne of St. Alexander, were teamed up with their real-world counterparts, Alderman Dolores Kramarski (3rd Ward), Alderman Jeffrey Key (1st Ward) and Alderman Donald Bylut (1st Ward).

Alderman Jack Clifford (2nd Ward), Alderman Jerry McGovern (4th Ward), and Alderman Bob Basso (2nd Ward) enjoyed mentoring Grace Enright of St. Alexander School, and Jillian King and Alyssa Heintzman of Palos South Middle School on their alderman duties.

Palos Park

Continued from Page 1 “The budget is the work of many long hours,” Mahoney said. “We would like to thank department directors and village staff for staying within the spending guidelines to produce this budget. There was a lot of sacrifice to get to this document.” Palos Park is required to file its projected budget with Cook County within 30 days, Maziarek said.

Half Marathon detours Police Commissioner Dan Polk

reminded the council and a handful of residents in attendance that Route 83 between Harlem Avenue and Archer Avenue will be closed to traffic from 6 a.m. to about 11 a.m. this Sunday for the annual Southwest Half Marathon. “We encourage you to avoid the area if possible and seek alternative routes during this time frame,” Police Chief Joe Miller said Tuesday. Possible alternatives to Route 83 would be 111th, 123rd and 131st streets; La Grange Road and Harlem and Ridgeland avenues, Miller added. The half marathon, which is

now in its 9th year, starts and finishes in front of the Palos Heights Police Department just west of 76th Avenue on Route 83. The race is to go west and continue on Route 83 until approximately 100 yards prior to Archer Avenue. Participants turn around in the parking lot for Camp Sagawau and head back to the finish line. Commissioner Polk and Chief Miller encouraged anyone with comments, concerns or in need of alternate routes during that fivehour stretch to contact the police station at (708) 671-3770 or email Polk at dpolk@palospark.org.

Palos Park Police Chief Joe Miller (from left) accepts a check for $2,500 from Palos Park Woman’s Club President Lucy Crocilla and member Adrienne Jackiw during Monday’s Village Council meeting.The money, which the Woman’s Club raised throughout the year, will be used to offset the cost of the Police Department’s recently remodeled roll call room. The department spent $6,000 on new work stations in the room as well as new carpeting and paint. “It’s probably our biggest room in terms of wear and tear in the station,” Chief Miller said. “We hold meetings in there and it’s where our guys get their radios and do their time sheets and reports. When our officers are in the station this is where they spend most of their time. The Woman’s Club also made donations Monday to the Palos Park Police Cadets, the Palos Park Public Library and the Palos Park Recreation Department.

Orland residents can call into telephone town hall meeting Orland Park’s second Telephone Town Hall meeting will be held today (Thursday), at 7 p.m. The hour long meeting is held over the telephone and will address public safety in Orland Park and give updates on other items of interest. The phone-in forum is among new programs the village has implemented to increase its civic engagement, inviting residents to offer input, ask questions, clarify rumors and more. The telephone town hall meeting debuted last year. “We had a very good response to last fall’s Telephone Town Hall,” said Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin. “It worked like a radio talk show where people called in to listen or to ask questions. We had nearly 3000 people participate.” The Telephone Town Hall enables residents to ask questions or simply listen to the conversations. Like last fall, nearly 20,000 residents will receive pre-recorded calls from the mayor to their land line telephones a few minutes before the start of the meeting. The recorded message from the mayor will invite them to remain on the line to participate. “We’re always looking for ways to get people involved, learn how they think we’re doing and what

Supplied photo

Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin (left) and village Trustee Jim Dodge listen to callers’ questions during the village’s 2015 Telephone Town Hall Meeting. Orland Park will hold its next Telephone Town Hall at 7 p.m. today Residents without land line telephones may participate in the meeting by calling 581-8777.

concerns they have,” said Trustee Jim Dodge, chair of the Technology Innovation and Performance Improvement Committee. “This worked well last September because people called in with great questions and shared their thoughts on what’s important to them.” Those with questions specific to the evening’s topics can press star to speak to a call screener before being entered into a question queue. Calls are answered live in the order they are received.

Callers unable to get through during the hour will receive personal replies within the week. Those with questions unrelated to the night’s topics may remain on the line after the meeting to leave messages along with their names and phone numbers. Residents without land line telephones may participate in the meeting by calling 581-8777 at 7 p.m. Questions may be directed to the village’s Office of Public Information at 403-6150.


4 Thursday, April 28, 2016

EDITORIAL

OPINION

The Regional News

Godspeed: All those miles they have run

It takes more than a village to run a half marathon. For Sunday’s Southwest Half Marathon and 10K race, it takes the cooperation of two localities, Palos Heights and Palos Park, their respective police departments and fire agencies, other municipal departments, Cook County and even state officials. Plus a host of volunteers, regular, normal residents with an ardor for community service like Ed Dombrowski, and plenty of others who chair or serve on the various committees that are needed to make what we like to call in headline shorthand The Big Race happen. The Big Race is arguably the Palos area’s biggest sporting event, drawing more people here than any other. If that’s wrong, please let us know what might top it for sheer volume and scope. In the pantheon of Palos Heights hometown local heroes, a special place has to be reserved for Jeff Prestinario, former alderman and half marathon co-director. Presto’s imaginative community service ideas gave birth not only to the Big Race, but the big classic car show on Harlem Avenue and the Palos Heights farmers market, as well. Prestinario’s Big Race co-director is Mel Diab, the owner of Running for Kicks athletics shoes and running gear store in Palos Heights, who is a marathon runner himself. They begin their own marathon efforts to produce the half marathon in December (likely even earlier) each year. Starting in cold early January, they hold monthly meetings with the volunteers and others on the planning committee to get the event on track and make sure all the things that need getting done get done. Somehow it all comes together just in time for the starting pistol on the first Sunday of May. Last December, they gathered with representatives of this year’s top tier sponsors, Palos Community Hospital and CNB Bank & Trust, Palos Hospital Vice President Tim Brosnan and Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz, to unveil the new logo for this Sunday’s event. The Regional was there to capture the moment. It is largely thanks to both institutions that the Big Race will be run its ninth time this year. Without big sponsors, the big race is a big expense that might otherwise be impossible to pull off. This week’s Regional News contains a special pull-out section that gives most all the details you need to know to attend and enjoy Sunday’s event, as well as the Palos Area Chamber of Commerce Expo to be held the day before, this Saturday. The Big Race weekend is indeed the biggest weekend in Palos Heights. From the half marathon’s inception nine years ago, The Regional has sent a reporter to those monthly Friday lunchtime planning meetings Presto and Diab hold to prepare the Big Race each year. The editor, still I, figured it was a great way to get some actual work out of one of our two reporters on a Friday afternoon. “Hey, get those feet off your desk and get to the half marathon meeting at the Rec. Center.” But far more important than a make-work assignment, sending our reporter to cover those meetings allowed us to promote runners’ participation in the race and gave us valuable insight into just what it takes to produce the half marathon and make it successful. Plenty of hard work, brain twisters, obstacles to overcome, ceaseless phone calls and emails. Diligence, that pays off in the end. Lo these many years later, we say thank you and congratulations to the volunteers, many of whom do it year after year. They give up hours of their free time and will get up extra early Sunday morning to do it all over again. And ditto to the mayors and other public officials and municipal workers whose cooperation is vital. And also of course to the sponsors without whose generosity no races would run Sunday. But the envelope goes to … the winner in the category of best deserving our praise and thanks really is those two guys, Mel Diab and Jeff Presinario, the heart and spirit of Palos’ own Big Race. They are the original, lasting co-directors with the Staying Power to be there again at the start for the ninth year this Sunday. Gentlemen, on behalf of a grateful community we in awe applaud you in a ringing ovation THE THE REGIONAL NEWS REGIONAL NEWS as you approach this ninth finish line. You are both, each an An THEindependent, locally-owned inspiration. REGIONAL NEWS An independent, locally-owned community newspaper

community publishednewspaper weekly An independent, locally-owned community newspaper Regional Publishing Corporation 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Regional Publishing Corporation Palos Heights, IL 60463 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Voice (708) 448-4000 Palos IL 60463 Fax Heights, (708) 448-4012 Voice (708) 448-4000 www.theregionalnews.com Fax (708) 448-4012 TheRegional@comcast.net www.theregionalnews.com Office Hours: Office Hours: Mon.- Fri. - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.Fri. -- 99 a.m. p.m. Office Hours: Saturday a.m. to to 5noon Saturday a.m. to to 5noon Mon.Fri. -- 99 a.m. p.m. SaturdayPublisher - 9 An a.m.independent, to noon

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This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s This newspaper is dedicated to freedom of the press, whenever and however it the memory of those who gave may be threatened. their lives to protect America’s free-

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READERS WRITE No to 66 percent county gas tax hike To the Editor, A 66 percent tax increase to Cook County’s special use gasoline and fuel tax has been proposed by Commissioner Richard Boykin. This proposed tax increase has been earmarked to fund several new, yet vaguely defined, county government programs. Not only is the 66 percent gas tax increase questionable, but there are also questions about the new programs that appear to be expanding the size of government by duplicating programs and overlapping services that already exist. In my view, attempting to impose a tax increase at this time would be circumventing the importance of the county’s budget process. A budget hearing is the proper forum to testify and debate the merits of a tax increase, especially one that specifically expands the size and costs of running county government. When consolidation of services is being examined at all levels of government, I believe it is best practices to first thoroughly analyze the efficiency of all existing programs and services already provided by Cook County government. Yes, there are very serious issues of crime and unemployment that plague certain areas of our community and yes, we must make every attempt to properly tackle those issues. But, it would be most effective to do

it in a comprehensive approach, not piecemeal. The county board has been asked to approve this tax increase along with the creation of new programs at a time when Cook County government is faced with serious fiscal challenges. We must be prudent in our allocation of tax dollars and that is why I look forward to working with my colleagues to closely analyze the effectiveness of our existing programs so that they are providing the very best services to address the needs of our constituents.

— Sean M. Morrison, Cook County Commissioner, 17th District

Mayor goes above and beyond as civic guide Dear Editor, I am a special education teacher at Alan B. Shepard High School. As a community learning experience for my government students, we recently visited Palos Heights City Hall in hopes getting a closer look at the services provided at a local level. I expected a brief overview and perhaps an opportunity for students to collect some informational pamphlets. You can’t imagine my surprise when our tour guide turned out to be Mayor Bob Straz! The kindness, patience and pure fun he brought to the next 30 minutes was simply amazing.

The primary goal of the Community Access Program is to help students gain awareness of community resources and increase their comfort level to confidently access those resources. In government class we strive to help students learn that EVERY citizen’s participation counts in a democracy. Thanks to our talented and genuinely humble Mayor Straz, those goals were accomplished this week! — Kate Richardson, Alan B. Shepard High School

State of confusion To the editor, Last week was the first meeting among State leaders in months. Almost immediately after that meeting adjourned, Speaker Madigan paid a rare visit to the House Floor to give a 10 minute pre-prepared speech railing against the Governor before setting up what was yet another sham vote. It has become glaringly obvious that the battle of the wills between the State’s leaders won’t be resolved any time soon. Instead it is necessary for the rank and file legislators to step up and forge our own compromises. That was what we attempted to do this past week. Legislators from both chambers and both sides of the aisle worked on a deal to get much needed and fully funded money to

higher education institutions. It was modeled off of Republican State Rep. Fortner’s recent proposals and efforts led by Democrat Rep. Mayfield. The deal would provide stopgap funding for the state’s universities and MAP program and supply a legitimate funding source using the $600 million in the Education Assistance Fund. The bipartisan deal was reached and it had the complete support of the Governor. At the last minute, Speaker Madigan almost derailed the entire agreement by introducing to the floor completely different and unfunded amendments. Uproar was heard on both sides of the aisle and rank and file members were able to apply enough pressure to secure the eventual passage of the stopgap measure as originally negotiated. As a result we achieved one of the most successful and vital compromise efforts since the budget impasse began. There is no debate that a lot of difficult work remains to be done. This bipartisan, compromise effort is a good start and should be the template moving forward to find solutions for our deteriorating human services network and a full budget. Common ground can be found, we just need to look for it first and not let state leaders get in their own way. — Margo McDermed, State Representative, 37th District

Letters policy The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. E-mail letters to: theregional@comcast.net

Graduated Illinois income tax makes sense I’ve always liked State Rep. Lou Lang, even though he doesn’t represent the southwest region. Some people might think that’s strange because Lang is Jewish and I happen to be Palestinian. You don’t have to read the headlines coming from Israel and Palestine to know that most Jews and most Palestinians have a hard time getting along. But we do. Lang is a Democrat who represents the 16th Illinois House, including Skokie. He has represented that district for more almost 30 years. Some might say Lang has been in that office too long. But I say he is a public official who is good at his job because he hasn’t let his ego overcome his commonsense. Obviously, Lang hasn’t tried to be governor, congressman, senator or president of the United States. He’d probably be good in each one of those offices. But instead, he has stayed in the House representing his district and also representing the best interests of the people of Illinois. Which is why I am not surprised Lang proposed raising funds to off-set the state’s mounting debt by changing our state income tax formula. Currently, everyone in Illinois pays a flat rate 3.75 percent of their income to the state. It’s not a bad rate at all. Seven states don’t have a state income tax (Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming). Two (New

RAY HANANIA Hampshire and Tennessee) require taxes on dividends. A flat rate means you pay 3.75 percent of your income to the state whether you make $50,000 a year or $5 million a year. I think that’s stupid. So does Lou Lang. Of the 41 states that require state taxes, Illinois has the third lowest tax next only to Indiana (3.3 percent) and North Dakota (2.9 percent). Lang proposes we join the rest of the country and eliminate the flat tax. Under Lang’s proposal, taxpayers (married and filing jointly) would pay 3.5 percent for income of $200,000 or less; 3.75 percent on income between $200,000 and $750,000; 8.75 percent on income between $750,000 and $1.5 million; and 9.75 percent on income over $1.5 million. For all others, the rate would be 3.5 percent on income of up to $100,000; 3.75 percent on income $100,000 to $500,000; 8.75 percent on income $500,000 to $1 million; and 9.75 percent on income above $1 million. If we implemented Lang’s plan, the state would generate an additional $1.9

billion each year to help off-set the $10 billion deficit the state is accumulating. Yes, Illinois is in a financial crisis. Although partisan politicians place the blame on each other, you really can’t blame any specific political party or politician. It’s been a mess for at least seven decades. The real problem is our pension system, outrageous payments government promised to its workers we can’t afford. Some double dip and claim multiple pensions. We definitely need pension reform. But we also need Lang’s reasoned proposal. The majority of Illinois workers making under $200,000 a year would get a slight tax cut. And still, the state would make $1.9 billion more each year. What’s there to think about? Lang’s idea is certainly better than anything we have heard from Governor Bruce Rauner, who ignores everyday people like me and you. Rauner listens to the business lobbyists and the state’s wealthiest five percent, doing everything to protect their riches. Of course! I say, make Lou Lang the governor. He’s the only reasonable person who has offered a reasonable solution to the state’s financial problems. And I know he would take care of Illinois’ seniors, who desperately need financial help. Ray Hanania is a former Chicago City Hall reporter and political columnist. Email him at rghanania@gmail.com.


The Regional News

Thursday, April 28, 2016

5

Know the rules to bicycle safely on the trail and off

Pinwheel garden sends message

Supplied photo

Members of the Palos Heights Woman’s Club recently planted a pinwheel garden in front of the Palos Heights Recreation Center supporting the Prevention of Child Abuse. Shown are Pat Hogan (from left), Sherry TerMaat, Rose Zubik, outgoing president; Nancy Mitchell, incoming president; Arlene Sypniewski and Eileen Lunter. The Project Committee is busy making plans for the Club’s Garden Walk to be held on Saturday, June 25. A full hot breakfast catered by Royalberry Waffle House, raffles and tour of local gardens will be featured. Tickets will be available in May at the Mona Lisa boutique on Harlem Avenue.

POLICE BLOTTER: ORLAND PARK Charged with DUI, aggravated battery Orland Park police charged Anthony M. Stacey, 36, of Orland Park, with DUI, improper lane usage, unlawful damage to a highway, leaving the scene of an accident, failure to carry a driver’s license while driving and aggravated battery. Stacey was taken into custody by police near 143rd Street and John Humphrey Drive at 2:50 p.m. April 8 as he allegedly scuffled with an animal control officer who had earlier called police to say that Stacey appeared to be driving erratically, according to the police report. The officer told police he saw Stacey’s car strike a guard rail where 94th Avenue comes to a dead end near 147th Street, police said. The vehicle then drove down a hill to Orland Square Drive, with the animal control officer following, police said. The car was towed and impounded, and Stacey was due at a bond hearing on April 9.

Driver hits tree; charged with DUI, police say Police charged Orland Park resident Khodabhai A. Patel, 58, with DUI, improper lane usage, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident, leaving the scene of an accident and illegal transportation of alcohol after they stopped his SUV near Orlan Brook Drive and Wheeler Drive at 10:13 p.m. April 6. Police said that Patel’s vehicle struck a tree in the 15200 block of South Lawrence Avenue and that they found a half-empty bottle of Absolut vodka next to the driver’s seat. He is due in court in Bridgeview on May 20.

Charged with DUI Anastacio P. Roldan, 29, of Chicago, was charged with DUI and improper stopping on a roadway after police encountered his SUV

in the 9300 block of West 151st Street at 2:27 a.m. April 11. The vehicle was towed and impounded, and Roldan was due in court yesterday in Bridgeview. Chicago resident David Deckman, 56, was charged with DUI, improper lane usage and illegal transportation of alcohol after police stopped his SUV near 153rd Street and Harlem Avenue at 11:49 a.m. April 10. Police said they were alerted to the situation when a caller to 911 said the Deckman had just left Orland Bowl and was pulling a can of beer from his bowling bag. A search of the vehicle yielded an open can of Miller beer, according to the police report. The SUV was towed and impounded, and Deckman was given a court date of May 6 in Bridgeview.

Charged with speeding, fleeing police Police charged Orland Park resident Mohummed Ramahi, 24, with speeding, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident, leaving the scene of an accident, reckless driving and fleeing police after they took him into custody at his home in the 15500 block of South Peachtree Drive at 6:08 a.m. April 12. Police said that shortly after 3 a.m. April 9, Ramahi’s car was spotting traveling north at 66 mph, nearly double the posted limit, near 143rd Street and La Grange Road. They followed him east on 135th Street at speeds up to 80 mph, according to the police report, which added that Ramahi’s car crashed into a mailbox in the 13600 clock of South Sandalwood Drive. Moments later, he pulled over and bolted from his vehicle in the 13600 block of South Cherry Lane, according to the police report. Police turned off the engine and secured the car, which was later towed and impounded, police said. The driver of the vehicle

POLICE BLOTTER: PALOS PARK Man charged with theft Therman C. Anderson, 54, of Phoenix, was charged with theft following a traffic stop at 3:08 p.m. April 7, in the 11900 block of South 80th Avenue. Police said Anderson was stopped after a random registration check showed he was wanted on an outstanding McLean County warrant on a charge of failure to appear in court. Four copper rods were found under a floor mat in his car, and representatives of his employer said they were taken without authorization, police said. He was issued a summons to appear in court on May 20 on the theft charge, and transferred to McLean County custody because he refused to give a DNA sample as a bond requirement for the warrant.

Driver charged with DUI after collision Christopher S. Valent, 47, of the 9300 block of South 49th Court, Oak Lawn, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a two-car collision at 7:06 p.m. April 8, in the 12100 block of Southwest Highway. Police said witnesses reported seeing him directing a laser-light pointer at other drivers prior to the collision. Several open containers of alcohol were found in the car.

While in hospital being treated for injuries, Valent was charged with reckless driving, illegal use of lighting system, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident and transportation of open alcohol. He is due in court on May 20.

Charged with DUI Garland Pennington, 36, of Chicago, was charged with DUI following a traffic stop at 5:09 a.m. April 10, in the 9300 block of West 123rd Street. Police said he was also cited for improper lane usage and speeding. He is due in court on May 20.

Charged with driving while license suspended Ghadeer Ballout, 31, of Chicago Ridge, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic crash at 2:30 p.m. April 12, in the 12900 block of South LaGrange Road. Police said she was also cited for failure to yield in an intersection. Ballout is due in court on May 20. Alfonso Deluna, 52, of Blue Island, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 8:55 p.m. April 15, at Route 83 and 119th Street. Police said he was also cited for improper display of registration for having a plastic covering over his license plate. He is due in court on May 20. Issa Mohammed Amer, 69, of

escaped on foot. Ramahi was due in court in Bridgeview yesterday.

Charged with driving and using cell phone A 19-year-old Palos Hills woman was charged with using an electronic communications device while driving, speeding and driving on a suspended license. Layla H. Alkhatib was driving a car traveling at 68 mph, nearly double the posted limit, near 135th Street and La Grange Road at 12:53 pm. April 12, according to police. The vehicle was towed and impounded, and Alkhatib is scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview on May 20.

Stole from health club members, police say

We all know that cycling is a healthy, efficient and rewarding way to get around. Please learn how to share the road confidently, safely and legally with other road users. Riding Visibly: Being visible not only means wearing bright colors and using lights, but also positioning yourself where motorists are looking. Ride as far right as is safe: Sometimes hugging the curb or riding outside of the travel lane can put you out of sight of motorists. A good rule of thumb when not riding in a bike lane is to ride in the right third of the lane. When riding in high-volume slow-traffic situations, sometimes riding in the middle of the lane makes you more visible to oncoming traffic. Avoid riding on sidewalks: Motorists expect slow-moving pedestrians to be on sidewalks. Cyclists’ higher speed is not anticipated and can put cyclists on a collision course with turning motorists. Many motorists are focused on looking for a break in oncoming traffic and may pull out without noticing cyclists or pe- Bike Safety Tips destrians on the sidewalk or in a crossing. Never • Always wear a helmet ride against the flow of traffic: Turning motorists • Obey all traffic signals, signs and lane markings. do not expect you and have far less time to react. • Ride on the right side of the road with the flow Also, wrong-way cyclists cannot read street signs of traffic. Pass slower moving or stopped vehicles or ride predictably. on their left. • Ride far enough away from the curb to stay clear of opening car doors, potholes, debris and Trail rules sewer grates and to maintain a straight line. EVERYONE must follow the trail rules and use • Be alert, scan the route ahead for traffic, opencourtesy and common sense to avoid collisions -- ing car doors, pedestrians and obstacles on the road especially when the trails are most crowded. Here surface. are the trail rules and guidelines for safe shared • Ride predictably so that others can see you use of the trails. and predict your movements. Use hand signals to • All trail users should keep to the right side of indicate turns. the trail, except when passing. • Make eye contact with motorists and pedestrians • Pass other trail users on their left, leave at least before crossing paths. two feet of clearance between them and you. Give • Go slower and use caution when the road is an audible warning (such as “passing on your left”) wet or icy, or when visibility is limited. as you approach, at least two seconds before passing. • Be visible; use of lights, and reflectors are re• Pedestrians have the right-of-way on trails and quired when riding at night. Brightly colored or sidewalks. However, groups of pedestrians should reflective clothing can help increase visibility. form a single-file to allow bicyclists and others •When possible, avoid bicycling upon sidewalks, to pass. especially in areas where pedestrians and motorists • Travel only at speeds which are safe and ap- may not expect bicyclists or may have obstructed propriate for trail conditions. Safe and appropriate visibility. speeds will be lower in congested areas, when vis• Keep your bicycle in good working condition. ibility is limited and around curves. Also, only ride a bicycle that is sized and adjusted • Pay attention to all trail markings and safety signs. to fit you. • Move off the trail pavement whenever you Starting May 1, Palos Park police will give out need to stop. helmets to local children as part of the National • Bicyclists should ride single file. Children-N-Safety program. Head injuries and falls • Keep pets on a short leash and under control from bicycles are often times the main reason children at all times. The best place for pets is on the right visit emergency rooms during the summer months, shoulder of the trail, next to their owner. said Chief Joe Miller in a press release. Police hope • Private motorized vehicles (except wheelchairs) that by issuing the helmets they can prevent head are not permitted on the trails. injuries to children riding bicycles. • Trails are usually not cleared of snow and ice. Helmets can be picked up at the Palos Park Police If you choose to use the trails during the winter, Department 8999 W. 123rd St. For more information, always be alert for any snow or ice and exercise contact Chief Joe Miller at 671-3770. — Palos Park PD extreme care in your use of the trails.

Orland Park resident Matthew J. Byrdak, 20, was charged with burglary and theft after he allegedly stole several items belonging to fellow members of a health club on Orland Square Drive over several days in late March. He was taken into custody at his home at 11 a.m. April 1, after a police officer found several items in his car, according to the police report. Byrdak allegedly stole some from unlocked lockers at the club, oth- Car burglaries ers from members’ vehicles he Police are investigating severallegedly broke into. He was due al reports of unknown offenders at a bond hearing on April 2. stealing items from unlocked cars in the Ishnala subdivision near Wallet stolen at Gymboree 129th and Harlem Avenue in the overnight hours between April 21 A 34-year-old Manteno womand 22. an told police that someone stole her wallet from her purse, while Charged with DUI she, her mother and son shopped Richard J. Bark, 31, of Chicago at Orland Square Mall at 3:30 Ridge, was charged with driving p.m. April 10. The victim said under the influence of alcohol that when she was shopping at following a traffic stop at 2L14 Gymboree, another woman knelt a.m. Saturday, in the 12900 block down near her purse, but that she of South Harlem Avenue. Police thought nothing of it at the time. said he was cited for aggravated She later discovered her Coach speeding and failed field sobriety wallet missing. It reportedly con- tests. He is due in court on June 8. tained about $300 cash, a debit Kayla E. Blume, 23, of Oak card and other items. Forest, was charged with DUI

POLICE BLOTTER: PALOS HEIGHTS

following a traffic stop at 12:40 a.m. Monday in the 12900 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said she was also cited for driving without insurance. She is due in Brookfield, was charged with drivcourt on June 8. ing on a suspended license at 8:19 p.m. April 13, in the 8600 block Theft reported of West 123rd Street. Police said An employee of a business in he was also cited for improper the 7800 block of West College lane usage and failure to yield Drive reported that her jacket was at an intersection. He is due in stolen from the employee break court on May 20. room at 11:01 p.m. Saturday. Sean C. Thompson, 22, of Hazelcrest, was charged with Charged with battery Jonathan N. O’Shea, 25, of driving on a suspended license following a traffic crash at 8:06 Hickory Hills, was charged with a.m. April 14, in the 12700 block two counts of battery following of Southwest Highway. Police an incident in Palos Community said he was also cited for driv- Hospital, 12251 S 80th Ave., at ing without insurance, improper 12:44 a.m. Monday. Police said lane usage and improper passing, he battered a nurse and public as well as a registration violation safety officer at the hospital. He is due in court on May 16. because there was no VIN tag on the dashboard. He is due in court Charged with driving while license suspended on May 20.

Antonia Oates, 22, of Richton Park, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 9:35 a.m. April 19, in the 11600 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said she is due in court on June 8. Mario A. Sanchez, 28, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 3:42 a.m. Saturday, in the 12200 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was also cited for expired registration and having one headlight. He is due in court on May 24. Carl J. Pratscher III, 27, of Burbank, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 8:43 p.m. Sunday, in the 12300 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was also cited for driving without insurance and having no rear registration

light. He is due in court on June 8.

Man charged with aggravated speeding Daniel Jeffery, 19, of Chicago, was charged with aggravated speeding following a traffic stop at 11:09 a.m. April 19, in the 12200 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was driving 26 mph over the speed limit. He is due in court on June 8.

Charged with trespassing Christopher S. Walent, 51, of Oak Lawn, was charged with criminal trespassing following an incident in the 11800 block of Southwest Highway at 12:21 p.m. April 22. Police said he entered a nursing home although he had been given a prior warning not to come on the premises. He is due in court on June 8.


BUSINESS

6 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News

FINANCIAL FOCUS

Can you make your investments less ‘taxing’? Supplied photo

Small business event at Heights Post Office

The Palos Heights Post Office invites business owners to an open house on Monday, May 2, between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., as part of National Small Business Week. Come meet and greet your local postmaster, have passport questions answered and learn how to advertise your business in a direct mail program offered by the U.S. Postal Service in conjunction with the Small Business Administration. Coffee and cookies will be served. Small businesses are an integral part of the national economy and the Postal Service wants to ensure you get the best mailing, shipping and advertising solutions. Shown are Palos Heights Postmaster Tom Culver (center) with staffers Lashae Kennedy and Susan Mason.

FASHION CHAT

Prince’s artistry reigned supreme CAROLINE FOREMAN Last week, the world lost one of its most renowned and dynamic artists. Prince was prolific, enigmatic, and supremely talented. His musical work and trail-blazing approach to business management will be forever influential, but his radical sense of fashion style will endure as the lifeblood of Prince’s reign. Prince Rogers Nelson was encapsulated by an aura of mystery and exercised a unique fearlessness, particularly in his dressing. He is known for donning everything from opulent fabrics, heavily embellished four-inch heels, and cravats to navel-plunging, chest-hair-exposing shirts and derrière peekaboo pants. He would send his costumer Mary Kay Stolz from Minneapolis to Los Angeles simply to buy the best fabrics for his tours. Stolz said, “He liked what he liked. I would leave the clothes at night and he would try them and if he liked them they wouldn’t be there anymore. He was in his musical world and that was it.” While his 1979 album displayed him shirtless and haloed by swirling Farrah waves, by 1984, he had established his iconic look of high heels, lace gloves, frilled shirts, and hair wound into a boisterous curly bouffant. He developed a fusion of the European romantic dandy, Jimi Hendrix’s military style, and the psychedelia of the Sgt. Pepper look. The fashion world embraced Prince wholeheartedly. Donatella

Orland Park Ritter Sandra V Tr to Colletti Robert, 14588 Creekview Dr, $305,000; Sweeney James J Trust to Majka Jennifer A, 10648 Lynn Dr, Unit #21, $165,000; Kimmey Michael F to Scalise Matthew J, 11649 Valley Brook Dr, $360,000; Jarosky Joseph F to Pula Daniel, 9321 Fairway Dr, $225,000; Allen Athena N to Zbronska Izabela, 15717 Ravinia Ave, Unit #157172W, $180,000; Thelen Theodore J Jr Tr to Ozerdinc Aziz, 9965 El Cameno Dr, Unit #99651W, $125,000; Schneider Linda to Carioti Frank P, 15628 Orlan Brook Dr, Unit #141, $120,000; Beemsterboer Simon to Kotsiovos Peter, 9215 Whitehall Ln, Unit #28D, $163,000; Petrosky John to Capuano James, 9138 140th St, Unit #204, $85,000; Readycap Lendg LLC to Kobylarczyk Krzysztof, 8742 Sunshine Ln, $230,000; First Midwest Bk Tr to Fast Start Const Inc, 9775 143rd St, $125,000; Nachel Germaine to Hoker Theresa, 15721 Orlan Brook Dr, Unit

JIM VAN HOWE

Edward Jones Investments than the rate on your ordinary earned income. As an added benefit, many dividend-paying stocks also offer growth potential. With some research, you can find stocks that have paid, and even increased, their dividends over a period of many years. (Be aware, though, that companies are not obligated to pay dividends and can reduce or discontinue them at their discretion.) • Use those tax-advantaged accounts. Virtually all retirement accounts available to you, whether you’ve set them up yourself or they’re made available by your employer, offer some type of tax advantage. With a traditional IRA, or a 401(k) or similar employer-sponsored retirement plan, your contributions are typically tax-deductible and your earnings can grow tax deferred. Contributions to a Roth IRA, or a Roth 401(k), are never deductible, but earnings can grow tax free, provided you meet certain conditions. The bottom line? Contribute as much as you can afford to the tax-advantaged plans to which you have access. Tax Freedom Day is here and then it’s gone. But by making some tax-smart investment decisions, you might reap some benefits for years to come. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

CAREER & BUSINESS Prince.org

Versace is one of several designers to have Prince perform during a runway show. He was a strong influence on Donatella, as well as Tommy Hilfiger and Matthew Williamson. It has even been said that Prince also directly and indirectly contributed to the look of Blood Orange’s Dev Hynes, D’Angelo and Justin Bieber. In 2011, Prince preformed during Versace and H&M’s collaboration runway show, and designer Joseph Altuzarra was amidst the mesmerized audience. Altuzarra was so taken, in fact, by what he called “a living legend” that the designer channeled the sartorial maverick in the creation of his fall 2015 collection. The garments included ruffled lace blouses in Prince’s signature 1980s neo-Victorian aesthetic. The artist’s proclivity for musical dynamism was boldly accentuated by his morphology of dressing. The music and the fashion was interwoven with electric novelty. Beginning in the late ‘70s and igniting the entire decade of the ‘80s, the visual image of Prince was just as powerfully defining as the music itself.

In a Bowie-esque stance, Prince flirted with the concept of the alien, androgynous persona. With hypersexuality, he pushed the boundaries of the concepts of sexuality, gender, race, and perceptible identity. He became the iconic dandy, the wistful flâneur. We especially recognize his pioneering methodology today as we see more and more fashions expand upon the notion of gender-neutrality and ambiguity. For instance, in today’s sartorial scene, we have the gender-neutral Vetements exploding as one of the most sought after and talked-about label in fashion, and many designers are showing combined men’s and women’s runway shows. As we bid farewell to one of the biggest pop stars in the world, we come to realize the extent of his impact. There are countless facets of Prince’s influential artistic contributions. From the music, to the persona, to the fashion, the force of his innovation and spunk will endure throughout the world for musicians, fashionistas and fans. Caroline Foreman is a fashion model, writer and critic. She lives in Palos Park.

AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS Following are the property transfers in the area, according to the latest report, as received from the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office. The Regional News does not attempt to correct errors made by that office.

Tax Freedom Day, which typically occurs in late April, according to the Tax Foundation, is the day when the nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay off its total tax bill for the year. So you may want to use this opportunity to determine if you can liberate yourself from some investment-related taxes in the future. Actually, Tax Freedom Day is something of a fiction, in practical terms, because most people pay their taxes throughout the year via payroll deductions. Also, you may not mind paying your share of taxes, because your tax dollars are used in many ways — such as law enforcement, food safety, road maintenance, public education, and so on — that, taken together, have a big impact on the quality of life in this country. Still, you may want to look for ways to reduce those taxes associated with your investments, leaving you more money available to meet your important goals, such as a comfortable retirement. So, what moves can you make to become more of a “tax-smart” investor? Consider the following: • Know when to hold ’em. If you sell an investment that you’ve held for less than one year, any profit you earn is considered a short-term capital gain, and it will be taxed at the same rate as your ordinary income. (For 2016, ordinary income tax rates range from 10 percent to 39.6 percent ) But if you hold the investment for longer than one year, your profit will be taxed at the long-term capital gains rate, which, for most taxpayers, will be just 15 pecent. If at all possible, then, hold your investments at least long enough to qualify for the lower capital gains rate. • Look for the dividends. Similar to long-term capital gains, most stock dividends are taxed at 15 percent for most taxpayers. Thus, dividend-paying stocks can provide you with an additional source of income at a tax rate that’s likely going to be lower

#86, $85,000; Steiger Karen Tr Trust 1001 to Tomecki Ryszard, 13338 88th Ave, $260,000; Cox David F to Nelson Karen, 17912 Lennan Brook Ln, $200,000; Standard B&T Co Tr to Superior Holdings LLC, 13451 Southwest Hwy, $2,000,000; Conway Colleen M to Regan Joanne, 7300 155th St, MANY, $143,000. Palos Heights Lake Katherine Building to

7530 College Drive LLC, 7530 W College Dr, $1,040,000; Jensen Keith M to Quick Lisa M, 12539 S 76th Ave, $317,500. Palos Park Lazzeroni Stephanie Wilx Tr to Henderson Angela, 46 Old Creek Rd, $100,000; Allen Patricia J Tr to Griggs Laura, 9841 Terrace Ct, Unit #E1L6, $172,000; Woolridge Gilbert Duane Tr to Lowell Phillip, 12508 S Pawnee Rd, $245,000.

Mortgage Rates Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of April 25) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 30-year fixed Jumbo

RATES APR POINTS 3.875 3.910 0 3.125 3.180 0 3.875 3.920 0

United Trust Bank (as of April 25) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 3.750 3.770 0 2.990 3.026 0 2.875 2.927 0

Prospect Federal (as of April 25)

30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 3.625 3.673 .25 3.375 3.442 .25 3.000 3.067 .25

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

McCord board president honored for her service Sears Holdings Corp. recently honored McCord Gallery & Cultural Center Board President Carol Trzcinski, of Orland Park, for her volunteer work at McCord. Trzcinski is an employee of the

Sears firm and was presented its volunteer award recently. The McCord Gallery and Cultural Center is an organization built by volun-

Carol Trzcinski

teers. This summer a new addition will be added allowing McCord to expand its programs. McCord is a non-profit organization that is expanding and in need of more volunteers. To volunteer, contact Trzcinski at carolt35@hotmail. com or call McCord at 671-0648.

COMINGS & GOINGS

Enrico’s announces start-up dates While it took a few months longer than expected, Enrico’s Italian Restaurant of Frankfort announced last week that it would resume limited carryout service starting this week in advance of its fulltime reopening in May. The restaurant has been remodeling the former Wild Rover location at 20535 S. LaGrange Road since announcing in September that it would be reopening in the village. The original location near U.S. 30 and LaGrange Road closed in August 2012 to make way for the Mariano’s supermarket. Owners Bob and Harry D’Ercole announced that Chef Frank and Delilah would be returning to oversee the kitchen and that the menu would include all of the old favorites including baked mostaciolli, baked lasagna and banana cream pie. On Monday, Enrico’s announced limited carryout service would resume April 21-23 to let the kitchen staff work out any problems. The restaurant will offer one section of its carryout menu each night from 4:30-9:30 p.m. The section will be posted at Enrico’s Italian Dining on Facebook. The full menu is available for carryout nightly from 4:30-9:30 p.m. Enrico’s will be closed Sunday and Monday for carryout. The dining room will open Wednesday, May 11, and will be by reservation only for the first few weeks. Reservations will be taken starting Tuesday, May 3, at (815) 469-4187, ext. 17. Enrico’s will also be taking reservations for private parties of up to 50 guests, which will start in mid-May. The restaurant will be offering pizza on Mondays starting in June.

Chick-fil-A opens kiosk at Chicago Ridge Mall The Chicago Ridge Chick-fil-A, which is in an outlot at Chicago Ridge Mall at 95th Street and Ridgeland Avenue, has opened a satellite location inside the mall food court so customers can eat without having to leave and return.

BoxLunch coming to Orland Square Mall BoxLunch, a store that special-

BOB BONG izes in pop culture merchandise and collectibles, will be opening this spring at Orland Square Mall in Orland Park. The mall also announced renovations are underway at The Buckle and Swarovski. “We’re excited to welcome BoxLunch to Orland Square this spring,” Nadia Seniuta, general manager at Orland Square, said in a release. “This addition and others signify our commitment to provide the best possible shopping experience for visitors.” BoxLunch will make its debut on the lower level Center Court near Gymboree and Aeropostale. The store will help provide a meal to a person in need through its partnership with Feeding America for every $10 spent at the store after it opens. The Buckle and Swarovski, two existing retailers, are undergoing complete renovations to update their spaces and expand their merchandise selections. The Buckle is open in a temporary space next to

its existing location on the upper level in the Macy’s Wing. Construction is expected to be completed by late May. Swarovski is expected to reopen in its current space on the lower level Center Court near Teavana and abercrombie kids later in April.

Med spa opens in Tinley Park Allure Laser & Med Spa held its grand opening April 1 at 7062 W. 183rd St. in Tinley Park in a former candy and gourmet popcorn store. The new spa offers Botox injections, laser services, skin chemical peels, microdermabrasion as well as Coolsculpting, a form of nonsurgical fat reduction. For more information, call (708) 864-4988. A website is under construction. If you see a new business in town or wonder what happened to an old favorite, drop me a line at bobbong@hotmail.com. You can also catch up on Comings & Goings in other parts of the Southland at www.southlandbusinessnews.com and www. southlandsavvy.blogspot.com


SCHOOLS

The Regional News

Thursday, April 28, 2016

7

SCHOOL NOTES

‘Seussical’ musical at Stagg

Supplied photo

Palos 118, North Palos 117 forge transport pact

The Palos School District 118 Board of Education has approved an intergovernmental agreement between the district and North Palos School District 117 for emergency use of transportation services. In the event of a natural disaster or other significant event that would require a mass evacuation of multiple schools within one of the two neighboring school districts, the other school district would aid by providing additional transportation services. “The safety and well being of our students has always been our top priority,” said Palos 118 Superintendent Dr. Anthony Scarsella. “Securing this partnership in the event of a crisis will further ensure our students’ safety, and give parents in both school districts even more peace of mind.”

Stagg High School’s Drama Department presents “Seussical the Musical” at 7 p.m. April 28, 29 and 30 and 3 p.m. May 1 in its performing arts center, 8015 W. 111th St. Tickets cost $8 for adults and $6 for students, children and senior citizens. The box office opens 30 minutes before the show for ticket sales. Seating is general admission. For information, email tickets@staggpac.org or call 974-7545. More than 100 students are expected to put on the show, from cast members to pit orchestra musicians, stage managers, lighting experts, stagehands and those who create the sets. The show, one of the most performed in the Unites States, is a fantastical journey through the world of author and illustrator Dr. Seuss.

Comedian Pat McGann to host Comedy Night at St. Alexander School St. Alexander School in Palos Heights will present Chicago comedian Pat McGann to host Comedy Night on Saturday, May 21, at St. Alexander Parish Center, 126th and 70th Avenue. The Comedy Night is open to all. A Beverly Pat McGann resident, McGann is a regular host at Zanies Comedy Club and has been seen on The David Letterman Show. Doors will open at 7 p.m. AtSupplied photo tendees are encouraged to bring their own snacks and beverages. The comedy will begin at 8 p.m. For the 27th year, Palos West students ventured outdoors for a few minutes to help beautify their school grounds last Friday in commemoration of Earth Day. The weather was dry and mild for students as they broke out into with opening act Kevin Bozeman, who has appeared on Last Comgroups throughout the day to weed, pick up trash, rake leaves, and spread mulch. ic Standing and Comedy Central, before McGann takes the stage. Music entertainment will follow from Joey, Digs & The Dentist Band. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Drop off a check at the parish or school office. Special pricing is offered: “Fallon Package” - $35 per person with open seating; “Kimmel Package” - $320 for a table of 8 people or “Letterman Package” - $400 for a table

Earth Day efforts at Palos West

of 8 people with front row seating. Pat McGann created and hosted the Emmy nominated television show “The Chicago Stand Up Project” and appears regularly on Sports Talk Live (Comcast), Windy City Live (ABC), Mancow & Good Day Chicago (Fox), WGN Morning News, WGN Radio & ESPN Radio. For more, visit stalexanderschool.com or all the school office at 448-0408.

Palos Heights Dist. 128 preschool screenings Palos Heights School District 128 will be conducting a screening for all children residing within district boundaries who are 3 to 5 years of age. The screening will be held on May 16 from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Indian Hill School, 12800 S. Austin Ave. The Student Services office is taking appointments from 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Areas of development assessed include speech and language, gross motor skills, and visual/ auditory strengths. A vision and hearing screening will also be conducted. Children will be screened by a diagnostic team of district personnel under the direction of District 128 Administration. Contact the Student Services office at 597-1285 to make an appointment or to request additional information.

Registration for summer classes at Moraine Valley Moraine Valley Community College summer 2016 semester starts with a three-week pre-session beginning the week of May 23, while the eight- and first four-week as well as continuing education sessions begin the week of June 13, and the second fourweek session begins the week of July 11. Moraine Valley offers classes for those interested in transferring to four-year colleges or universities by earning associate’s degrees in Arts, Fine Arts or Science. Students also can choose from several career programs offered at the college including Allied Health and Nursing, Business and Computer Sciences, Industrial Technology, and Public Service. The college

also offers several noncredit programs and courses. To accommodate various student needs, the college offers flexible learning options, including evening, off main campus, oneday-a-week, online, weekend, and short-term classes. A complete list of credit and noncredit classes can be found in the summer 2016 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $116 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, located on campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY 711); or online at morainevalley.edu.

Online/Internet hybrid classes at Moraine Valley Online or Internet hybrid classes this summer through Moraine Valley Community College are taught primarily over the Internet, while Internet hybrid courses are taught through a combination of classroom and Web-based instruction. Both types allow for students to attend all or part of their class via the Internet with the ability to access the instructor, classmates and course materials. Some of the online and Web-assisted classes this summer include Arabic I, II, III and IV, Fundamentals of Chemistry, Introduction to Business, Composition I and II, Introduction to Computer Science, Western Civilization I and II, Cultural Geography, Probability and Statistics, Music Appreciation, Introduction to Philosophy, American National Government, Introduction to Psychology, and Medical Terminology, among others. A complete listing of credit and noncredit classes can be found in the summer 2016 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $116 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, located on campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY 711); or online at morainevalley.edu.

STUDENT NEWS Belmont University’s highest achieving students were honored for their commitment to the University’s mission and dedication to scholarship, service and leadership at the annual Scholarship and Awards Day. Gregory Wittenberg, a Palos Park native, received The Williams-Murray First Year Writing Award, an award given in recognition of student writing. Belmont is in Nashville, Tenn. *** Supplied photo

Supplied photo

Coolest ride to school ever for Montessori tot

Who wouldn’t want to ride on a fire truck? Asher Memon arrived at Southwest Suburban Montessori School in Palos Park on the Palos Fire Protection District’s Engine 6303, assisted by firefighters Gozdal and Duggan. His classmates happily were there to greet him. The ride was generously donated by PPFD to Montessori’s annual fundraiser, where Asher’s parents were the highest bidders.

Prom night safety tips offered to ease worries, keep kids safe Prom night is probably the most anticipated night of the year for teens. Most teens heading off to their prom will tell their parents that they know everything about drinking and driving, and their parents’ other concerns. No matter how strong the family relationship, many parents are still unaware of the choices teens face every day. Involved Parenting is the Best Prevention. Research consistently shows that parents remain a powerful influence in fostering healthy teen development and preventing negative outcomes. The following tips may ease prom anxieties and keep our kids safe.

When your Teen Attends a Party: Contact the adults to verify the occasion and the time of the party. Make sure that an adult will be home and that there will be no alcohol or other drugs permitted. Have the address and phone number of the party. Arrange transportation beforehand. Assure your teen that you or a specified neighbor or friend can be called if a ride home is needed. Agree on times before the party starts. Be awake when your teen gets home. It is not only a sure way of checking the time, it also gives your teen a chance to talk about the party. Know the location of post prom parties and who is sponsoring them. Talk to your teenager about

the serious dangers and consequences of underage drinking and driving. Remind your child that you are there for them, if they need a ride home or to an after prom affair.

Hosting Teenage Parties: An adult should be present at home throughout the party. When possible, do not have the party in a separate part of the house. Parents need to stay visible during the party. Bring in snacks or non-alcoholic beverages, wander through to say hello.

Prom Night Driving Tips: There are more drunk drivers on the roads during the weekend. Keep a close eye on oncoming drivers, as impaired drivers tend to drive toward lights. Know where you are going before prom night and have directions to those places.

Prom Tips for Teens: • Do not accept any drinks from some-one you do not know. If you leave your drink, discard it and get a new one. Do not leave your possessions unattended. • Have a responsible person available for transportation for a safe ride home or in case an emergency arises. • Remember to charge your cell phone and have it with you. Know where you are and where you are going, keep your parents and friends informed.

• Trust your instincts - if you feel endangered or uncomfortable, leave immediately. • Intoxication by alcohol or drugs can lead to poor judgment and dangerous situations. • Remember to contact your parents if your plans change. — Palos Park PD

Marist High School Chick Evans Caddie Scholars Brendan Mullen (Palos Heights), seated from left, Brian Kettering, Matt Kettering, standing: Griffin Farrelly and Patrick Keffer (Evergreen Park) are pictured with Marist President Br. Hank Hammer and Principal Larry Tucker. The students have already started participating in activities through the Chick Evans houses at their respective campuses. Mullen has caddied for five years at Beverly Country Club. He will attend Indiana University next fall, where he will major in finance. Mullen has participated in track and volleyball while at Marist. The Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship provides full tuition and housing college for golf caddies, and is renewable for up to four years. To be eligible to apply for the scholarship, all applicants must have a strong caddie record, excellent academics, demonstrated financial need, and outstanding character. Applicants are evaluated and compete on the above criteria for the limited number of awards given annually.


COMMUNITY NEWS

8 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News

COMMUNITY NOTES

Palos 118 kids garage sale Palos 118’s Parent Faculty Association (PFA) is sponsoring a Kids Garage Sale this Saturday, April 30, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Palos East School.

Rx drugs take back The Palos Heights Police Department will be participating in the annual National Drug Take Back Day this Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Police will also be accepting out-of date, expired medications and over the counter meds at the Palos Area Chamber’s Health Expo the same date being held at Shepard High School. The Orland Park Police Department invites residents to drop off no-longer-needed prescription medications at the Orland Park Police Station on Saturday, April 30 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. The

station is at 15100 S. Ravinia Ave.

members.

Coffee with a Cop

Lake Katherine Scenic Trail Race

Orland Park police officers and community members will come together in an informal setting to discuss community issues, build relationships and enjoy coffee. Everyone is invited to attend from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Monday, May 2, at Chick-fil-A, 15605 S. La Grange Road in Orland Park. Coffee with a Cop offers an opportunity for community members to ask questions and learn more about the department’s work in Orland Park neighborhoods. Coffee with a Cop breaks down barriers and allows for a relaxed, one-on-one interaction. The program aims to advance the practice of community policing through improving relationships between police officers and community

Runners and walkers of all ages can sign up now for Lake Katherine’s annual trail race on Sunday, May 15. The fourth annual Break for the Lake race will kick off at 8 a.m. with participants following a scenic 5K route around the Palos Heights park. The race entrance fee prior to the day is $25 for adults (15 years and older) and $15 for children under 14. Details to register can be found at lakekatherine.org. Proceeds from the race will go toward children’s programs, ecological restoration and animal care at Lake Katherine. The trail race course is not suitable for dogs or strollers.

LIBRARY NOTES

Palos Heights Farmers Market opens May 4

Supplied photo and text

MWRD rain barrel raffle, Camille’s Confections help start season

The Palos Heights Farmers Market opens the 2016 season on Wednesday, May 4, and will run through Oct. 12. The market will take place at the Municipal Parking Lot, 12217 S Harlem Avenue, and will be open rain or shine from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Parking is available behind the businesses along Harlem Avenue. Mother’s Day is Sunday May 8, and our vendors are ready with beautiful plants, flowering baskets and flowers, herbs, very early vegetables, other food and gift items for the day. Many of the 2015 vendors are returning, and we are welcoming four new vendors in 2016. Returning farmers include Lyons Fruit Farm (South Haven, Mich.), Zeldenrust Farms (Chicago Heights), Windy Hill Farms (Grant Hill). Zeldenrust Farms is a pesticide free farm, selling a huge variety of vegetables and fruits, and local honey. Lyons Fruit Farm specializes in a very large variety of fruits, tomatoes, vegetables, herbs, and eggs. Windy Hill Farms specializes in gourmet beef, Amish chickens and sausages. Also returning to the market this year are Yoder’s Bakery (La Grange, Ind.), Pampered Chef (Hometown), Aracely’s Tamales (Melrose Park) Hiemenz Nursery (Monee) Parmesan’s Wood Stone Pizza (Frankfort) Stamper Cheese (Chicago) The Eating Well (Hillside), and Theresa’s Selections (Country Club Hills). Yoder Bakery sells delicious butter, cheeses, and eggs, in addition to pies, breads, cookies, cakes, egg noodles and pasta, jams, jellies and apple butter. Aracely’s Bakery sells delicious homemade chicken, pork and pepper tamales. Parmesan’s Pizza sells hot pizza by the slice, sausage sandwiches, fresh baked breads and pastries, take and bake pizzas and flat breads. Stamper Cheese sells a huge variety of artisan cheeses and cheese spreads from Wisconsin, and cheese curds. The Eating Well carries a variety of organic vegetable patties, energy bars and soups. Theresa’s Selections offer individually crafted artisan pasta sauces, salsa sauces, mustards and jalapeno and fruit jams, Muffultta, Giardiniera, Bruschetta, fruit butters, BBQ sauces and condiments. Pampered Chef is guaranteed to offer everything needed for both indoor kitchen and outdoor grill-

ing all year long. They also offer beautiful gifts and gift baskets for Mother’s Day, showers, and more. Finally Hiemenz Nursery sells incredibly beautiful perennial flowering plants and shrubs for all seasons of the year. Our four new vendors are Armstrong Farms (Monee), Bettina’s Tea and Coffee (Lisle), Doughs Guys (Palos Heights) and Simply the Best Olive Oils (Orland Park. Look for a few more additions to the market as the summer progresses. Armstrong Farms in located in Monee, and is a non-certified organic vegetable and flower farm. Bettina’s Teas and Coffee will be selling a large variety of loose teas, including green, white, black, hibiscus, fruit, herbal, chai, rooibos, oolong, and more. In addition, they will have tea accessories available and organic coffee. Palos Heights’ own Doughs Guys Bakery will be joining the market this year, offering their large selection of breads, cupcakes, cookies and brownies and fruit slices. Simply the Best Olive Oils and Vinegars will be joining the market later in May with a variety of oils, vinegars and dry mixes. Camille’s Confections will be a guest of the Community Tent on May 4th. Every mother needs some delicious toffee on Mother’s Day! Four different varieties will be offered, including Original, Sassy Sea Salt, The Nutty Buddy and Dark Chocolate Blueberry Pecan, in both half and full pound sizes. Representatives from the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) will also be a guest of the Community Tent on May 4th. MWRD has been preparing a master plan for the Roberts Road Study Area, which includes Hickory Hills, Palos Hill, Bridgeview and Justice. After receiving some fantastic feedback in the fall of 2015, they are ready to share that information with the public! Come visit MWRD’s table at the Farmers Market to learn what engineers discovered about your neighborhood and - most important - learn first-hand what you can do to reduce flooding on your property. MWRD will have hands-on demonstrations on actions all homeowners can take to reduce flooding on their properties, including information about rain gardens, rain barrels, garden-

ing with native plants, permeable pavers and more! There will even be a raffle to win a rain barrel for your home! Make sure to stop by the City Tent. Pick up this week’s recipe of the week “Asparagus Rice” courtesy of Dr. John Principe MD of WellbeingMD Center for Life. This and some previous year’s early springtime recipes will be available. Previous year’s recipes can be found at www.wellbeingmd.com, or palosheights.org. Also, make sure to pick up a 2016 Frequent Shopper Card. Bring a canned food donation (fruit, vegetable or protein only), or donate fresh fruit or vegetables from the market, and double credit will be given to your Frequent Shopper Card. This year, the market is partnering with The Palos United Methodist Church Food Pantry at 12101 S Harlem Ave. All canned donations will be brought to that location. All fresh produce donations will be donated to Operation Blessing in Alsip. LINK cards are now accepted at the Palos Heights Farmers Market. New to the market this year, the “Palos Bucks” Double Value Matching Program has started. Stop by the City Tent to start the process and for more information. The market is proud to announce that it is the recipient of a LINK UP Illinois USDA Grant, for the support of the promotion of the Palos Heights Farmers Market LINK program. Representatives of the Palos Heights Beautification Committee will be available selling this year’s Classic Car Event Split the Pot Raffle Tickets. The Grand Prize is a guaranteed $10,000, with other prizes available. They make great Mother’s Day Card stuffers! The Drawing will be on Thursday July 21, and winner need not be present. The market would like to thank this year’s Palos Heights Farmers Market Sponsors. They include Dr. John Principe, MD of Wellbeing MD Center for Life, The Private Bank, BMO Harris Bank, CNB Bank and Trust, United Trust Bank, City of Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz, Running for Kicks, Bon A Pit, Golden Shoes and Type Concepts Inc. Additional information about the market can be found at www. palosheights.org, by emailing farmersmarket@palosheights.org. ,join us on Facebook, or call 708361-1800. — Palos Heights Farmers Market

CLUB ACTIVITIES Foresters Camera Club Foresters Camera Club invites photographers and others to the club’s annual Picture of the Year competition on Tuesday, May 3, at 7 p.m., at Palos United Methodist Church, 12101 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights. Club members will submit competition pictures from this last season vying for Picture of the Year. Foresters is a local club for camera enthusiasts from the Palos area and nearby suburbs. Meetings are held 7 to 9 p.m. September through May on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at the church.

Palos Heights Woman’s Club

on Saturday, June 25.

Nancy Mitchell will be installed as the next president of the Palos Heights Woman’s Club at its installation dinner on Tuesday, May 3, at Zachary’s Grill, 134th and Ridgeland Avenue in Palos Heights. Guests are welcome to attend the installation dinner, where Mitchell and the rest of the 201618 board will assume office. For more information or a reservation, call Marilyn at361-4682. The club’s annual Flower Sale will be held on Saturday, May 21. A Palos Garden Walk will be held

SW Suburban widow/ widowers social club SW Suburban WOW will meet 7 to 9 p.m. on Fridays, May 6 and June 3, at Zion Church, 17100 S. 69th Ave. Tinley Park. The group meet monthly; beverages and snacks are served, and entertainment often provided. Activities include restaurant outings, dances, trips, theater, monthly games, discussion, interaction meetings, newcomers get- acquainted meetings. For more, call Danell Chmura at 630-728-9368

Palos Heights library upcoming programs • Creative Coloring for GrownUps – this Sunday, 2 p.m. - Explore your creativity and let your inner artist reign in this stress-free and relaxing hour of coloring designs from the popular coloring books for grown-ups. All materials will be supplied. • Getting Started With Mango Languages - Monday, May 2, 6:30 p.m. - Discover how to access, create an account, and get started using Mango Languages. With over 70 languages offered, Mango builds both language and cultural understanding around real-world communication skills. • Singin’ and Swingin’ with Chris Colletti - Wednesday, May 4, 6:30 p.m. - Join singer and entertainer Chris Colletti as he serenades all moms in honor of Mother’s Day with some of the greatest music of all time, featuring the popular standards, ballads, and Broadway’s best. • Prepping & Maintaining Your

Garden Throughout the Seasons - Thursday, May 5, 6:30 p.m. - Karen Biernacki from Ted’s Greenhouse will share her secrets of keeping your garden healthy and vibrant all season long. • The following clubs meet weekly at the Palos Heights Public Library: Needle Club – Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to noon. Scrabble Club – Tuesdays from 1-3 p.m. Mah Jongg – Tuesdays from 1-4 p.m. Contact the Library to register for these programs at 448-1473 or visit its website at www. palosheightslibrary.org. The library is at 12501 S. 71st Ave.

Palos Heights library youth programs Registration for all May programs begins on May 1 at the Palos Heights Public Library. • Drop In Story Times - Children ages 2-6 can join us for Drop In Story Times at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 5. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie Friday, May

20 Bookmark Contest Winners announced Wednesday, May 25, Ready, Set, READ! • Teen Gaming, Board Games, Media Lab–grades 6 and up Bring friends to the library to relax with Wii or Xbox gaming every Friday from 2:30-4:30 p.m. No registration is necessary. • Meet Cookie Mouse - Stop by to meet the life-size Mouse from the popular book, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, and have your photo taken with him on Tuesday, May 3 at 6:00 p.m. No registration is necessary. • Pajamarama– all ages - Wear your pajamas, bring your blankie and celebrate “May the Forth Be With You” day on Wednesday, May 4 at 6:30 p.m. No registration is needed. All programs are free and open to everyone at the Palos Heights Public Library, located at 12501 S. 71st Ave. For more information or to register for a program, visit www.palosheightslibrary.org, call 448-1473, or stop by the Youth Services desk.

Answers

Puzzle on Page 11

Sudoku

Puzzle on Page 11

Photo by Patt Bailey

New chief garden clubber

Palos Heights Garden Club’s new president, Julie Pietrzak, welcomed guest speaker Mel Tracy of Wild Birds Unlimited in Palos Park to the club’s April meeting. They are shown with immediate past president Jim Agnos. The club’s next meeting will be Monday, May 23, with Master Gardener Sue McCarthy’s presentation on “BodySmart Gardening,” learning how to protect yourself from injury while gardening. Look for details in The Regional’s club news briefs closer to the meeting date.


The Regional News

Thursday, April 28, 2016

9


10 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News

SIMPLE GIFTS Volunteers sought at Neat Repeats Donation transporters are needed at Neat Repeats Resale. Volunteering at Neat Repeats is a good way to get involved, meet new people, and make a difference

in the lives of others. For more details call the store manager: Orland Park at 9028 W. 159th St. 364-7605. Worth 7026 W 111th St. 361-6860. All sales at Neat Repeats Resale benefit the clients served by the

Crisis Center for South Suburbia. The Crisis Center for South Suburbia is a non-profit community organization that provides emergency shelter and other services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence.

SENIOR NOTES Luau for Worth Township seniors

Race fundraisers for Elim ahead

Supplied photo

The 6th annual Elim Eagles’ Wings 5K Run, Walk & Roll will be held Saturday, May 7, at 9 a.m., on the grounds of Elim Christian Services, 13020 S. Central Ave. in Palos Heights. The event will benefit Elim’s essential resources for children and adults with disabilities. All registered participants will receive a free T-shirt and will also enjoy music, refreshments, and raffle drawings. Kids will even have the opportunity to partake in a free pre-race obstacle course. In addition, this year’s 5K event has a “Star Wars” theme, and costumes are welcome. For details, visit elimcs.org, call 293-6509 or contact elimeagleswings5K@elimcs.org with questions. Visit www.crowdrise.com/ Elim5K to register online or to help fundraise for the event.

HEALTH BEAT Smith homes offer free support for caregivers Residents of Chicago’s Beverly/Morgan Park neighborhood and in and around Orland Park who are caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia are invited to attend special programs offered by two of the area’s leading life plan communities. The first meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 3, when Sarah Jewett—Smith Village’s resident service director of assisted living—will hold an open forum discussion and answer any and all questions about the effects of dementia on the sufferer and their family and friends. Smith Village is at 2320 W. 113th Place, in the Beverly/Morgan Park area of Chicago. To reserve your place, call 773-474-7300 or send an email to familyandfriends@ smithvillage.org. Beginning at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 5, at Smith Crossing, 10501 Emilie Lane (enter at 104th Avenue and 183rd Street), director of resident services Amie Swim and life enrichment director Dana Mahler will lead an hour-long open forum discussion about dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. To reserve your place, call 326-2300 or email to familyandfriends@smithcrossing.org. Light refreshments will be served before both meetings end at 7:30 p.m.

Marijuana effects on the brain and behavior Learn the effect of marijuana on the brain and behavior of teens and young adults at a seminar hosted by Moraine Valley Community College on Tuesday, May 3, on the main campus Moraine Business and Conference Center (Building M) in Palos Hills. There will be two sessions: 9:30-10:45 a.m. and 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Janice Gabe, LCSW, therapist for New Perspectives in Indianapolis, Ind, will cover the biological, emotional and behavioral changes stemming from

LEGAL NOTICE

marijuana use; the drug’s impact on memory, attention and academic abilities; and touch on treatment approaches. Following the presentation, there will be a question and answer session. This seminar will provide one hour of approved continuing education credit for social workers, professional counselors, clinical psychologists, marriage and family therapists, alcohol and drug abuse counselors, nurses, and nationally certified counselors. This event is free and open to the public. For more, contact Nickolas Shizas at 608-4121 or shizasn2@morainevalley.edu.

Joy of Grandparenting class at Palos Hospital All soon-to-be grandparents are invited to attend a free class at Palos Community Hospital designed to help prepare for a new baby. This interactive program explores the many facets of the grandparent role as well as ways to support the new parents. An update on current childbirth practices and a tour of the Birthing Center are included. The class takes place Thursday, May 12, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. This is a free class. Registration is required. To register, visit PalosCommunityHospital. org or call 226-2300.

Breastfeeding basics class at Palos Community Hospital Breastfeeding Basics is a personalized class led by a Palos Community Hospital lactation consultant. It is designed to provide new parents the basics for successful breastfeeding. The program covers breastfeeding advantages, practical techniques, pumping, storing, returning to work, dad’s role and family support. Breastfeeding Basics will be offered from 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 19 at Palos Community Hospital. Cost is $20 per couple. Advance registration is required. To register, visit PalosCommunityHospital.org or call 226-2300.

Seniors living in Worth Township are invited to a luau on Wednesday, May 11, at Worth Township, 11601 S. Pulaski Road in Alsip. Doors open at 11 a.m., lunch at 11:30, show at 12:15 p.m. Entertainment provided by Royale Polynesian Revue. Cost is $30, includes show plus a catered lunch from Jack & Pat’s (ham, chicken, double-baked potato, broccoli au gratin, macaroni salad, garden salad, and more). Hawaiian attire encouraged and leis provided. Reservations required. Call 3712900, ext. 15.

Mystery Mansion outing Orland Township offers a trip to a luncheon-mystery at the Jacob Henry Mansion in Joliet on June 2. Attendees will arrive for a town meeting in the mansion where guests unknowingly become entangled in an intriguing web of drama and anticipation, as they become victims, the suspects or even the “person of interest.” This real-time, lighthearted personalized package of excitement propels everyone into an actual life game of “Clue.” The show theme revolves around the 1920s era and dress

from that period is encouraged. Costumes add to the festivities but are not necessary. Solving “Who did it?” is necessary in this theatrical matinee of fun and mayhem. Transportation is provided to the event by deluxe motor coach departing at 10 a.m. on June 2 from the parking lot at 151st and 94th Avenue between Bank Financial and Robert Morris College by the Mall in Orland Park with return at 4 p.m. to the same location. Tickets ($95 residents, $100 non-residents) are on sale and can be purchased through the Orland Township office. For more information, contact Marie Collins Ryan at 403-4222.

PICK OF THE LITTER

Causes of skin lesions in cats JOHN FLEMING DVM • Prairie StateVet.com

Dear Dr. Fleming, My 8-year-old Siamese cat has a sore on his lip. My neighbor said he had a cat with a similar sore and said his vet called it “Rat Lip” and it never fully went away. What do you think? Ralph, Palos Heights Dear Ralph, The first thing I think is that you should have the thing looked at by a vet who will stick a needle in it and make a slide and try to discern whether or not it is cancer. If there are no obvious cancer cells, and a preponderance of eosinophils, then a presumptive diagnosis of eosinophilic granuloma can be made. A formal biopsy is usually unnecessary. Eosinphilic granuloma complex (EGC) derives its name from the classic finding of the white blood cells called eosinophils in these skin lesions. A granuloma is a firm nodule of inflammation. The word “complex” was added to the name when it was discovered that flat and or ulcerated lesions can also occur. The flat lesions

LEGAL NOTICE

Meet Debbie and her 7-year-old Sterling from Bourbonnais.

are called eosinophilic plaques, and the ulcerated lesions have been called indolent or rodent (not RAT) ulcers. Although eosinophilic plaques occur in other species, this particular complex of lesions occurs only in the cat. The cause of EGC in cats is believed to be a form of an allergic reaction, that is, the immune system overreacts to something to which the cat is exposed. Possible inciting agents include foods, environmental allergens, external parasites, bacterial or fungal skin infections, or virus infections. The general appearance of these lesions is frequently suggestive of the diagnosis, but testing is often needed to confirm the diagnosis.

Eosinophils can usually be found on needle cytology or even a touch prep of the lesion. If needed, a skin biopsy can confirm the diagnosis Treatment involves several different steps. It is important to decrease exposure to and control any underlying allergies. Antibiotics may be administered in some cases and most resolve with some steroid treatment. If the lesions do not resolve after steroid treatment or if steroids become less effective over time, other drugs may be tried that modify the immune response. Small unresponsive lesions may be treated by surgical removal, laser, or cryotherapy. It may take two to six weeks to show a response to treatment. It is very important that the underlying allergy be managed and therapy may be discontinued if the allergies are well controlled. Dear Readers, The new ACVIM guidelines are out on when to start anticonvulsant medication in dogs that seizure: If the dog has two or more seizures within a six- month period, if the dog has three or more seizures within a 24-hour period, or if the dog has a status epilepticus episode lasting more than five minutes. Thou shalt have no other Gods before me. — The first of the Ten Commandments

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE VILLAGE OF PALOS PARK PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Historic Preservation Committee of the Village of Palos Park, Cook County, IL has scheduled a public hearing on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers of the Kaptur Administrative Center, 8999 West 123rd Street, Palos Park, IL to consider the following: HPC 2016–03: 9602 West Creek Road. McCord House NFP, the tenant, is requesting a Certificate of Appropriateness for Demolition of a portion of the existing structure and Construction of approximately 4,500 square foot addition. The site is legally described as follows: LOT 1 IN MCCORD PLACE OF PALOS PARK, A SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN (EXCEPT THE WEST 60 ACRES THEREOF AND EXCEPT THAT PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 33 LYING EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, SAID POINT BEING 51.41 FEET WEST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE SOUTHERLY A DISTANCE OF 1328.8 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A POINT IN THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 33, SAID POINT BEING 50.19 FEET WEST OF THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33), IN COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PROPERTY SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL TAKING BY THE ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, PER DOCUMENT NO. 85161070. PIN Number: 23-33-200-029-0000 All are welcome to attend, testify, and submit evidence. For further information, please contact the Village Community Development Director, Lori Sommers at 708-671-3731 or lsommers@palospark.org. Respectfully submitted by: Marie Arrigoni, Village Clerk


The Regional News

Thursday, April 28, 2016

PHOTO MEMORIES FROM THE REGIONAL ARCHIVE

40 Years Ago This Week

File photo from April 29, 1976

Smoothing the rough spots in Heights business district: Several Palos Heights businesses are having their front parking lots renovated and will have a new parking lot completed by late spring. Those businesses are Shapiro’s Shoes, Fabrics by Maxine, Rini’s Drugs, Barnett Interiors, Pat Harvey’s Fashions, Palos Camera, Park Terrace Beauty Salon, Jett’s Restaurant, Lord-Hunt Jewelers, Palos Plumbing, Hillig’s House of Color, House of Charles Beauty salon and Heights Heritage Flowers.

40 Years Ago This Week

11

CROSSWORD PUZZLE Across 1 Norms: Abbr. 5 Channel with a “Congressional Chronicle” online archive 10 In an unexpected direction 14 Hawkeye State 15 Curly-tailed Japanese dog 16 Old conductance units 17 Give the okay 19 Trusted assistant 20 Move it, old-style 21 Thames islands 22 Northern Ireland province 24 Leaves for a cigar 26 Came up 27 Bring lunch from home, say 29 __-Mart Stores, Inc. 32 Walks leisurely 35 Christmastide 36 Boxing legend 37 Manicurist’s tool 38 Tit for __ 39 Baking amts. 40 Pie __ mode 41 “Never Wave at __”: 1952 film 43 Tread water to check out the surroundings, as a whale 45 DVR button 46 Dismiss from the job 48 “Hogan’s Heroes” colonel 50 Oft-rented suits 54 Insert new film 56 Spice Girl Halliwell 57 One: Pref. 58 Settled on the ground 59 Alter a manuscript, e.g. 62 Savior in a Bach cantata 63 Path for a drink cart 64 Kitchenware brand 65 Play segments 66 Like some private communities 67 Coloring agents

Down 1 Vision 2 “Road __”: 1947 Hope/Crosby film 3 Nerdy sort 4 Enc. with some bills 5 Colorful cats 6 Chair lift alternative 7 Sty residents 8 Sports fig. 9 Kin of organic, at the grocery store 10 Stockpile 11 Gloss over 12 Went by scooter 13 River of Flanders 18 Mother-of-pearl 23 Theater box 25 Equal to the task 26 Border on 28 New York City suburb on the Hudson 30 Dog food brand 31 Speech problem

32 At a distance 33 Runner’s distance 34 Ostracize 38 Propane container 39 Use a keypad 41 Samoan capital 42 Blowhard 43 Ate noisily, as soup 44 Playful sprite 47 “Remington __”: ‘80s TV detective show 49 Cross-legged meditation position 51 Dr. Mallard’s apt nickname on “NCIS” 52 Chilling in the locker room, as champagne 53 Storage towers 54 Indian royal 55 Util. bill 56 Sudden wind 60 __ Fail: Irish coronation stone 61 Actor Beatty

Answers on Page 8

The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

File photo from April 29, 1976

Robbins Lodge is one of the five cabins at Camp Palos, a camp that the South Cook County Girl Scout Council acquired this year and which will be dedicated at on open house this Sunday. Robbins Lodge is a two-story cabin containing three dormitories that sleep a total of 48 people. Camp Palos is at 117th Street and Will-Cook Road, near Palos Park. The camp was purchased from the YMCA for $700,000.

Answers on Page 8

Photo by Joe Boyle

WHATIZIT? Readers were on task this week for the Whatizit photo quiz. We accepted Advocate Christ Medical Center at 4440 W. 95th St. in Oak Lawn as the right answer. However, many of the readers were more specific. The photo in the April 21 edition is the pedestrian sky bridge from parking structure (Parking A) to the main hospital at Advocate Christ Medical Center. Evergreen Park resident Jan Merchantz provided us with that specific answer. Evergreen Park resident Vince Vizza also said it was the walkway from the parking lot to Advocate Christ Medical Center, which is actually closer to 93rd and Kostner Avenue. Oak Lawn resident Jane Foley said it was the upper walkway at the hospital. Also answering correctly were Palos Heights resident Chrystine Busch and Dan and Kathy Higgins, of Chicago Ridge. This week’s Whatizit may be a little more challenging. The clue for the photo above is: Marquee setback. Send your responses with your name and hometown by noon Monday to thereporter@comcast.net.

20 Years Ago This Week

File photos from April 25, 1996

Left photo: Sandburg quarterback Zak Kustok, the Regional’s Player of the Year for 1995, has verbally committed to attend college at Notre Dame. Kustok still has one year of high school remaining. Kustok enjoyed a superb junior season for the Eagles after transferring from Lincoln-Way. He led Sandburg to its first perfect season since 1987 and its first 11-win campaign ever. Coach Mike Navarro noted that he ranks No. 6 in his class. Right photo: The Palos Baseball Association held its opening day parade and field ceremonies last Saturday. Danny Truffa, 7, a player for the Braves upheld tradition as he doffed his cap for the playing of the National Anthem.


LIFESTYLE

12 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News

‘So I Bought an Air Force’ memoir by Will Martin available at McCord McCord Gallery and Cultural Center has a new shipment of So I Bought an Air Force, the aviation adventure by author and longtime Palos Park resident Will Martin, available for purchase. Recently profiled with his family in a magazine feature, Martin continues to receive accolades for his book. The U.S. Air Force quarterly Air Power History praised it in its Spring 2016 issue: “[Martin’s] lively, fresh narrative leads the reader through crash landings in remote areas, encounters with machete-toting civilians, treacherous mercenaries, and obfuscating embassy personnel.” The reviewer concludes, “Destined to be a classic, this is a book you’ll want to read and re-read.” Martin’s book was front page news in The Regional when it was published in 2013. Popular with both pilots and

Supplied photo

Will and Pat Martin on El Gato.

non-pilots alike, So I Bought an Air Force makes a great read for anyone who enjoys a good adventure. McCord Gallery and Cultural Center is located at 9602

Supplied photo

West Creek Road, Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org. — McCord Gallery & Cultural Center

Volunteers improve Lake Katherine’s ecosystem

Volunteers from Mother McAuley High School do their bit for Earth Day as they work on a wildlife enhancing project at Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens in Palos Heights. The project clears the land of woody invasive species, such as buckthorn, replacing them with nearly 50 species of plants, native to Illinois. It was made possible by a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Lake Katherine is creating a diverse ecosystem to attract pollinating insects species of birds that feed on them. These include host plants to attract native butterflies to feed and lay their eggs and oak trees to attract bugs and birds alike.


SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

Toyota Park gets assist? The Chicago Red Stars won their first game — thanks in part to their new digs. Page 2

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor • sports@regionalpublishing.com Jeff Vorva, Sports Editor • sports@regionalpublishing.com

Astros are in the nation’s top 50

Shepard’s distance runners had a huge night in Palatine. Page 3 Southwest • Section 2, Page 1 Southwest • Section 2, Page 1

Thursday,March April 28, 2016 Thursday, 5, 2015

They’re heading into the home stretch Ninth half marathon event will get rolling on Sunday morning By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

Runners had a chance to get in a good stretch before last year’s half-marathon/10K race.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

It will be a packed day of celebration for Mel Diab. The co-founder of the Southwest Marathon and 10K running event in Palos Heights will spend the early hours of Sunday morning getting the course ready for the ninth running of the event. Then when it’s over, he will be celebrating his father’s — Sam’s — 93rd birthday. “It’s a big day,” Diab said. “And for me, it’s a good day.’’ Diab and co-founder Jeff Prestinario were happy to report Friday that more than 1,000 runners signed up for the two races including close to 800 for the half marathon. Those numbers are down from past races, which would flirt with or eclipse the 2,000-runner mark and feature some international runners. But given that a lot of winter preparation time getting the word out was wiped out because the race changed sponsors from First Midwest Bank to Palos Hospital and CNB Bank, numbers were anemic in January and February. Officials are hoping for a lastminute burst of entries but at least they have

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Palos Heights will welcome more than 1,000 athletes to the 2016 race.

a number in four digits. “It’s great considering the start we had,” Prestinario said. “Because of the sponsor changes, we just need to get over the hump this year and we hope the bigger numbers will come next year, when it’s our 10th year.’’ Activities start at 6:30 a.m. with a nondenominational service provided by Pastor Ryan Hall of Harvest Bible Chapel of Palos Heights. At 6:45 a.m., Palos Hospital Fitness representatives will lead runners in a stretching program. From 6:55 to 7:20 a.m., there will be speeches and presentations from various dignitaries, including U.S. Congressman Dan Lipinski, who is the race’s Grand Marshal. Gunshot starts for the wheelchair half marathon (7:20 a.m.), the half marathon (7:30), the 10K race (7:40) and the walk, run or roll race (7:45) follow.

Half Marathon Champions

The start of the ninth Southwest Half Marathon and 10K Race takes place at 7:30 a.m. Sunday on Route 83 in Palos Heights.

Chicago 1:20.48 Oak Park 1:22.51 Orland Park 1:12.43 Chicago 1:19.27 Kenya 1:18.14 Oakwood Hills 1:20.48 Naperville 1:20.24 Bolingbrook 1:18.36

10K Run Champions 2014 Adrian Campbell 2015 Mark Luttrell

Chicago Chicago

Chicago Tinley Park

40:53 38:12

Pamela McLeod Kailey Green

44:10 39:05

Strus ready to fight the Irish

‘A million things can happen’

Former Stagg star transfers to DePaul and his 2017 debut could be vs. ND By Anthony Nasella Correspondent

Chicago Christian grad Vander Laan is preparing for anything and everything during the NFL draft By Anthony Nasella Correspondent

Having put together a storybook college football career at Ferris State University, where he set enough team and national college quarterback records to fill an almanac, Jason Vander Laan has remained serious about a career in the National Football League. Starting today, Thursday, and through Saturday, the Chicago Christian alum and two-time Harlon Hill Award winner — given to the best player in Division II football — will be watching the NFL draft with great anticipation locally, in the presence of family and friends, to see if his name will be called. “A million things can happen during the draft, but I’m looking forward to it,” he said. Vander Laan spent previous months doing all he could to get noticed by NFL scouts and coaches. “I have some NFL teams definitely interested in me right now,” Vander Laan said. “I’m looking forward to a quiet environment and being around family during the draft. I know I’ll be busy throughout the day talking on the phone with NFL teams – whether I’m drafted or not.’’ Vander Laan participated in a pro day at Northwestern University on March 8 and a second pro day at Central Michigan on March 17. He came away from both days very encouraged by his performance and the pulse of interest that he was

MEN WOMEN 2008 Matthew Chesang Kenya 1:05.3 Bridget Montgomery 2009 Japeth N O Joy Kenya 1:05.14 Alona Banai 2010 Matthew Chesang Kenya 1:06.14 Jennifer Digiacomo 2011 Benson Cheruiyot Kenya 1:05.01 Erin Moffett 2012 Robert Wambua Kenya 1:06.49 Doreen Kitaka 2013 Dan Kremske Woodstock 1:06.15 Jacqui Giuliano Oakwood Hills 1:10.15 Amanda Mirochna 2014 Ryan Giuliano 2015 Kyle Brady Warrenville 1:11.31 Kristen Heckert

Photo courtesy of Ferris State University

Former Chicago Christian standout Jason Vander Laan is hoping to be drafted by an NFL team in the coming days.

drawing among potential NFL teams. One scout told the Chicago Tribune that Vander Laan is “Tim Tebow 2.0’’ and meant it as a compliment to his ability as a versatile athlete. “Both pro days went well,” Vander Laan said. “I did tight-end stuff at both. I threw individually for the New England Patriots and couple other teams who also wanted to see me as a quarterback. I then improved on a couple of times up at Central See VANDER LAAN, Page 3

When former Stagg basketball standout Max Strus made the decision last month to leave Lewis University to seek out a Division I college to transfer to, he had hopes of finding a college that competes in a major conference. The Hickory Hills native accomplished that last week when he chose to transfer to DePaul University, which competes in the high-profile Big East Conference. And while Strus will have to sit out the 201617 season, he will be gunning for the 2017-18 season when the Blue Demons plan to leave Allstate Arena in Rosemont and debut at their new 10,000-seat, $164 million arena at McCormick Place and, if there are no construction complications, will open up the new place against Notre Dame. “To be able play my first game against Notre Dame is going to be pretty exciting,” Strus said. “We certainly want to bring a winning culture into that new gym. Hopefully we can elevate the program.” DePaul had expressed immediate interest in Strus’ services when he was granted his release by Division II Lewis. He also took visits to Butler and Xavier. “I really got to know the coaching staff and the players,” he said of DePaul. “I really felt that I fit in the best there and with the players and really got chance to develop some relationships immediately. I just liked everything about the campus and the program. Coach (Dave) Leitao has the program moving forward.’’ In the 2015-16 season at Lewis, Strus led the Flyers in scoring (20.2 points per game), rebounding (8.4 per game), assists (3.5 per game), and steals (39) while helping Lewis to a 24-9 record, a conference tournament championship and a berth in the NCAA Division II Tournament.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Max Strus, shown his senior year at Stagg playing at the United Center, will play a lot more in Chicago as he transferred from Division II Lewis to Division I DePaul. The Blue Demons are moving their home court from Rosemont to Chicago.

Now Strus will have the challenge of helping the Blue Demons in securing their first NCAA Division I Tournament berth since Leitao led the team to the second round in the 2003-04 campaign in his first go-around as the team’s coach. See STRUS, Page 2


2

Section 2 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News - The Reporter

ANALYSIS: CHICAGO RED STARS VS. WESTERN NY FLASH

Give Toyota Park an assist in Red Stars’ first win

By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

The Chicago Red Stars won their first game of 2016 thanks to a goal from Naperville’s Casey Short and an assist from Bridgeview’s Toyota Park. Wait a minute. Toyota Park? It can’t execute a push pass or head the ball to a teammate. It’s a stadium. Well, the way Western New York Flash coach Paul Riley explained it after the Red Stars’ 1-0 victory over his team Saturday night, the Red Stars’ new digs may have had a hand in the victory. The Flash came in with a 1-0-0 record and knocked off defending National Women’s Soccer League champion FC Kansas City, 1-0, the previous weekend. “We might have been a little awed by this stadium the way we played the first half,” Riley said. So, at least for one match, the stadium paid off dividends after switching from

Benedictine University to Toyota Park in the offseason. In the seats? The Red Stars did not release an attendance figure and it would take guesswork to figure if they drew more than 1,000 so there will be work to be done, there. But those in attendance were able to see the Red Stars (1-1-0) improve on defense drastically after giving up three goals in a 3-1 loss to Houston on April 17. “Let’s not talk about (the Houston game),” said Red Stars coach Rory Dames. “Let’s just say they were much more organized and worked hard to fix some of the things we got wrong. I thought they were great this week.’’ Short found the bottom right corner of the net after her shot deflected off a Flash defender at the 28-minute mark for the lone goal of the game. It was her first NWSL goal in just her second game in the league. She was drafted by Boston in 2013 and acquired by the

Photo by Jeff Vorva

The Red Stars mob Casey Short (No. 6) after her goal in their 1-0 victory over the Western New York Flash Saturday night at Toyota Park.

Red Stars in 2014 but never played because of two knee injuries.

The defender played in Norway in 2015 before coming back to the Red

Stars. “It felt great to finally put one in,” she said.

RED STARS NOTEBOOK

Press not thinking about wage problems or potential Olympic boycott By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

Red Stars star Christen Press is tactfully keeping her distance when commenting on five U.S. women’s team players filing a wage discrimination against U.S. Soccer in March. Press, who played on the U.S. team that won the World Cup in 2015 and is a finalist for this year’s Olympic squad, says the suit has nothing to do with the Red Stars’ organization or the National Women’s Soccer League. “I think it’s completely separate as far as I know,” Press said. “The coolest thing about our national team is our ability to keep all of that stuff off the field and be able to play at a high level. It’s not something we’re thinking about or talking about. We’re just doing our jobs.’’ There has been speculation that members of the U.S. team could boycott the Olympics. “At this point, my job isn’t really to speculate what we will be doing off the field,” Press said. “My job is to perform. There is a lot of

Orlando Pride at Chicago Red Stars

Red Stars players Alyssa Mautz (left) and Sofia Huerta (right) hound Samantha Mewis of the Western New York Flash in Saturday’s shutout victory.

WHEN: 6 p.m. Sunday WHERE: Toyota Park, Bridgeview RED STARS RECORD: 1-1-0 ORLANDO RECORD: 1-1-0 LAST TIME: This is the first meeting between the two teams as it is Orlando’s fi st year in the league.

things that have to happen before I worry about boycotting the Olympics. I mean, I’m trying to make the Olympic squad and I’m trying to have a great season. I’m not thinking about that.’’

Photo by Jeff Vorva

With an offense that has seen just seven on-target shots in the past five matches, Chicago Fire officials were hoping that last week’s bye week would enable offensive threat David Accam to be ready for Saturday’s game against D.C. United. But Accam, who has been out with a left knee injury suffered March 11 against Orlando City, did not progress much last week and even though he is progressing more this week, he still hasn’t practiced and it’s doubtful he will be ready for Saturday. “We want him back but it’s not a minor injury and we have to be smart about this in our approach,”

Trinity Christian College’s baseball team scored 28 runs in a doubleheader win over Indiana University-South Bend. Trinity took the first game with 17-1 final after scoring nine runs in the sixth inning. They scored six runs in the late innings of the second game to run away with the lead and post the 11-4 victory to improve to 33-16-1 overall and 17-8-1 in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference. Dan Budde had three hits in the opener to help winning pitcher Tanner Reklaitis. In the nightcap, the Trolls had a 5-4 lead in the seventh and triples by Tyler Sroczynski and Blake Kerzich helped break the game open. Mike Levigne picked up the victory. Track: In their final meet of the regular season the Trolls women’s team took ninth out of 18 teams and the men were 11th out of 23 squads at the Concordia University Cougar Invitational in River Forest. Erin Wessels was fifth in the triple jump and Molly Toepper was sixth in the javelin for the women. Cody Velthuizen was second in the 1,000-meter run with a school record of 2 minutes 35.56. Softball: The Trolls have had a rough season but Friday split in a doubleheader against LindenwoodBelleville, a team ranked 23rd in the nation. They won the nightcap, 8-4, to improve to 8-26. Adrianna Puente had four hits in the win and Jenna Steinkamp pitched the victory.

Moraine Valley Baseball: The Cyclones dropped four games Friday and Saturday, losing a doubleheader to Elgin Community College, 7-3 and 9-7, and a 10-1, 12-2 doubleheader to the College of DuPage. Tyler O’Connell (Sandburg) had three hits in the nightcap loss to Elgin. Softball: Pitcher Hannah Thielmann (Andrew) had a three-game stretch in which she struck out 28 batters last week. Molly Pohrebny had five hits in an 8-7 win over McHenry County College. Men’s tennis: MVCC beat both Sauk Valley Community College and College of Lake County 9-0 and McHenry County College, 8-1. At No. 1 singles, Gregorio Illner (Brazil) battled back after losing the first set 6-3 and going down in the second 3-4 against McHenry before winning 6-4. He then took the super tiebreaker 10-6.

St. Xavier

The Red Stars host Orlando Saturday — a team that beat Houston, 3-1 on Saturday, one week after Houston beat the Red Stars, 3-1. The Pride is a first-year team that is making noise early as its debut win drew a National Woman’s Soccer League record 23,403. And the play on the field isn’t bad either. “(Coach Tim Sermanni) did a

Softball: Senior Nicole Nonnemacher (Bloomington/Normal Community) logged her fourth nohitter of the season and the 11th of her career behind 13 strikeouts in an 8-0 over Trinity International on Saturday. She becomes the first pitcher in SXU softball history to record 20 wins (20-1 this season) in all four seasons of her playing career. Baseball: A sacrifice fly by junior first baseman Tom Hayes (Crestwood/Mount Carmel) in the bottom of the second inning scored sophomore Erik Eggert (Tinley Park/Lincoln-Way North) and proved to be the game-winning run in a 1-0 victory over Mount Mercy University (Iowa) in game one of Sunday’s non-conference doubleheader. The Cougars (23-21 overall), lost the second game 5-0.

great job putting that team together — there is quality all over the field,” Red Stars coach Rory Dames said. “They have a player who is up front who is dangerous. I can’t remember

her name but she is dangerous.’’ He was joking about not knowing star Alex Morgan, who is an Olympic Gold Medalist and World Cup Champion.

Accam likely not ready for D.C. United game Sports Editor

TCC bends South Bend pitching in doubleheader

What’s her name?

CHICAGO FIRE NOTEBOOK

By Jeff Vorva

FOCUS ON AREA COLLEGES

D.C. United at Chicago Fire WHEN: 4 p.m. Saturday WHERE: Toyota Park, Bridgeview FIRE RECORD: 1-2-3 D.C. RECORD: 2-3-3 LAST TIME: D.C. beat the Fire 4-0 in Washington on Oct. 18.

Fire coach Veljko Paunovic said on Monday. “He’s working hard with our medical team to try to get back as soon as possible. “We don’t any to make this injury worse. If he can come back (Saturday) and he’s ready and the doctors are OK and give him a full-go, that’s perfect. But we don’t expect that.’’

Accam led the team with 10 goals last year and had two in his first two matches this year before bowing out with the injury.

more competition.’’

Johnson back

Gilberto’s no-goal, one-assist total from six matches is not pleasing Paunovic. “The team needs him and his capacity to score goals,’’ the coach said. “He needs to step up in the coming game. He has worked very hard and we’re being patient with him. But at some point – better sooner than later – we hope he steps up and scores goals and helps the team.’’

Goalie Sean Johnson, who has missed the past three games with a wrist injury, will be available Saturday but the longest-tenured Fire player (seven seasons) did not play the first three games because Paunovic chose Matt Lampson to start. Johnson got some playing time in during a scrimmage Friday. “Everybody is fighting for their spot,” Paunovic said. “We’re very happy to have Sean back because he can compete for his spot and that makes our team better. It for sure makes our practices better. We have

Compiled by Jeff Vorva from submitted reports

Looking for that rock of Gilberto

Familiar face Zach Thornton, who played with the Fire from 1998-2006, is an assistant coach for D.C. United.

FOCUS ON COMMUNITY SPORTS

Lacrosse event to benefit breast cancer awareness

To support breast cancer research, state Rep. Fran Hurley, D-Chicago, is sponsoring a breast cancer awareness lacrosse game at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday between St. Rita and host St. Laurence at 5556 W. 77th Street in Burbank. “This event will gather people together to do something they love, while supporting an important cause, and that’s great for our community,” Hurley said. “Thousands of families in Illinois have been directly or indirectly affected by breast cancer, and it’s important that we provide funding for research. Please join me in supporting local lacrosse teams in our community and the continued effort in search of a cure to this horrible disease.” Hurley and advocates will be taking donations, offering a split-the-pot raffle and selling Tshirts, paid for by NPL Construction Company. All the proceeds raised will be donated to Breast Cancer Research at University of Chicago.

Shooters open season with two wins The South Side Shooters sixth grade boys team opened its spring league schedule at the Frontier Fieldhouse in Chicago Ridge with a 4522 victory over BTA White and a 46-15 triumph over BTA Blue.

Leading the way for the Shooters were Michael Perkins, AJ Egan, Matt Strama, Devin Giles, Walter Davis and Kyle Knickrehm.

TCC summer camps The Trinity Christian College Athletics Department is offering a variety of summer sports camps for athletes of various ages. The camps will be conducted by the college’s head coaches and student-athletes and will offer individual skill development and team play in baseball, basketball, soccer, softball, track and field, and volleyball. Sports offered are baseball (July 11-15, grades K-4), boys basketball (June 20-24 and July 1822, grades 3-9), girls basketball (June 20-23, grades 4-9), boys and girls soccer (June 27-July 1, grades K-8), girls softball (June 20-24, grades 1-8), boys and girls track and field (July 5-8, grades 3-9) and boys and girls volleyball (July 18-24, grades K-9). For specific camp descriptions and registration information, visit www.trnty.edu/summercamps or call 708-239-4779.

Sisters of St. Francis hosting golf and running events The Sisters of St. Francis organization in Lem-

ont is hosting two events in the coming months. The Golf on the Hill event takes place a 9 a.m. May 16 at Cog Hill, which features a scramble format, a silent auction, raffles, prizes and a Beat the Nun contest. The cost is $150 for a round of golf, lunch, dinner and refreshments and there is a $50 dinneronly option. The organization is also hosting the Run with the Nuns 5K and Youth Dash at 8 a.m. June 5 on the Mt. Assisi campus, 13860 Main St. in Lemont. It is a chip-timed race through natural hills and picturesque scenery of Mount Assisi Academy and Mount Assisi Convent on a challenging all-terrain course featuring a variety of surfaces from asphalt to grass. All participants will win a medal and those who are registered before May 15 will receive a short-sleeve dry-fit shirt. Participants may walk or run the course. There will also be a one-mile youth dash after the 5K. For more information on either event, contact Carrie Peters 630-257-7844 ext. 223 or carriepeters2@sbcglobal.net. We welcome community news at sports@regionalpublishing.com

Supplied photo

Moraine Valley’s Greg Illner is the No. 1 player on a team that outscored three opponents by a combined 26-1 score.

Strus

Continued from Page 1 “I know I’m going to right place and I can sleep at night because I’m living my dream,” he said. “I finally made my decision, and I’m looking forward to the next three years.’’ Some speculate the 6-foot-6 Strus could be a pro player after his DePaul days, but right now he said he wants to turn a program around that has had nine consecutive losing seasons and four head coaches in that stretch. “I’m certainly hoping that I can make a difference and help bring this program back to where it used to be,” he said. “I’m very excited about the future.”


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, April 28, 2016 Section 2

3

Press-ing issue: Generating interest in women’s soccer in Chicago

S

trike 1: Chicago doesn’t really embrace pro sports outside of baseball, football basketball and hockey. Strike 2: Chicago doesn’t really embrace soccer. Strike 3: Chicago doesn’t really embrace women’s sports. So as the Chicago Red Stars women’s soccer team tries to heighten its profile by moving back to Toyota Park in Bridgeview this year, it has a tall task ahead of it. But the team has three weapons who could try to make an impact and strike back at those three strikes. Three players from last year’s World Cup team who will likely make the final cut of the United State Olympic squad – goalie Alyssa Naeher, defender Julie Johnston and forward Christen Press – will be spending most of the season with the Red Stars. The team also has some Chicago area talent who could draw some interest. The player that could probably charge Chicago up is Press, who scored 10 goals in 12 matches for the Red Stars last year and opened the season scoring the team’s only goal in

JEFF VORVA Making the Extra Point a 3-1 loss to Houston on April 16 to open the season. In February, she had a scoring play for the U.S. team during a qualifier that was immortalized in a Deadspin. com headline as “Holy S—t, Christen Press’s First Touch Will Make Your Knees Buckle.’’ A few weeks ago, Shape.com reporter Alyssa Sparacino gushed that Press “perfectly embodies this dynamo combination of sweetness off the field and badass grit on it.” It seems like folks can’t talk about Press without using a cuss word. In the world of women’s soccer, the 27-year-old is already a legend to younger players, so having her play a bunch of games here in the south suburbs is pretty cool. Press knows that selling the Red

Stars will not be easy. But this is why she thinks fans should come out: “This is the best game in the world — it’s obviously the beautiful game,” Press said. “If people here in Chicago would come and watch us play, they would really love what we represent. Our team embodies the culture of Chicago. We’re a blue collar, hardworking team. We grind out results. We fight until the end of the game. “I think that we have a very exciting product. If fans see our passion and work rate, they will love it.’’ Time will tell. Women’s soccer made a nice splash nationally last year during World Cup play and the Olympics this year could keep some of the momentum going. The problem was that the national players on various National Women’s Soccer League teams last year missed a lot of action because of the World Cup. This year, Press, Johnston and Naeher will be heading off to train for Olympics in early July and Red Stars officials figure they will only miss four games. The league will go on ice for most

Chicago Red Stars forward Christen Press said that if Chicagoans come and watch her team play this season, they will be impressed with the team’s work ethic and play. Photo by Jeff Vorva

of August, when the Olympics heat up in Rio, and resume Aug. 27. Maybe if these women made a big

splash in the Olympics they could enjoy a real hero’s welcome at Toyota Park in the fall.

FOCUS ON HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

No dime-a-dozen start for Sandburg Shepard distance Eagles perfect through first 12 games on the diamond By Anthony Nasella Correspondent

A month into the season, the Sandburg baseball team has been literally playing perfect baseball – with evidence of a 12-0 record – which is the best start that head coach Jim Morsovillo has experienced in his five years coaching the varsity squad. And the source of that success, to hear Morsovillo tell it, has not only been a result of solid pitching, hitting and defense but also with the senior leadership that has served as the team’s catalyst for early success and team cohesiveness. The core of that senior leadership has come from the likes of senior pitchers Jack Wolfe and Marco Babic as well as the team’s seven through nine hitters — Sean McShane, Kevin Cronin and Matt Richards. And Morsovillo expressed surprise by the emergence of junior pitcher Kevin Lane, who is off and running with a 4-0 start and being thrilled with sophomore Branden Comia and junior offensive juggernaut Eric Papierski. The result has been wins against programs such as Lyons, Lemont and LincolnWay Central. “The great thing this year more than years in the past is the leadership that we’ve had from the seniors,” Morsovillo said. “They’re a real solid group of young men that we had meetings with prior to the season. We talked about what they had to put out there, so everyone kind of understood what we’re all about. “And it’s translated to the weight room, to working out, to practices on a daily basis to the classroom and working hard for grades. The seniors have helped us get off on the right foot by taking the initiative

with everyone else joining in.’’ Morsovillo said Wolfe will pitch the first game of every conference doubleheader and can also depend on the versatility that Babic and junior Tim Dobrik (2-0, 1.40 ERA) bring while eventually bringing other pitchers such as senior Matt Owens and Kyle Knight, juniors Papierski and Eric Jones and sophomore Evan Tenuta into the mix. “Jack has like an ERA somewhere around 1.10, so he’s been just as advertised,” he said. “Marco can come out of the bullpen or start and can get lefties out. We have a lot of key guys that we can fit in where needed and more kids who will get plenty of innings as the season progresses.” Wolfe said one of the big goals, ultimately, is to advance past the regional. The Eagles have won one regional title in the last four seasons after winning 10 straight from 2002-2011. “We knew in the summer what we would have,’’ Wolfe said. “And I really believe that we have ability to go much further in the playoffs this year.” Lane, the No. 1 starter on last year’s sophomore team, said he immediately

Sandburg’s Kyle Knight deals in a recent game against Thornridge. The Eagles opened the season 12-0.

runners earn top-50 time in the nation

Photo by Anthony Nasella

By Jeff Vorva

picked up the big difference between the two levels. “You’re definitely facing better hitters,” he said. “I have to learn how to locate my fastball much differently. But it’s exciting to see how well we’ve been playing. We’re doing everything we can do win.” Comia, who started at third base as a freshman and led the team last season in home runs, has now returned to his natural shortstop position. Papierski is hitting .430 and has driven in more almost a run per game. “We knew Branden was a special kid to start as a freshman,” Morsovillo said. “He can just flat out hit the baseball, plays tremendous defense and works hard. And we knew Eric could handle the bat from the summer, but what we realized is that he can get on and flat-out get it done.’’ Papierski echoes the sentiments of his underclassmen teammates about team camaraderie. “The seniors have welcomed all the juniors, and we’re having fun and great time,” he said. “Everyone has been working hard work and playing their part.”

IHSA gets on the stick: Lacrosse will be sanctioned in 2018 By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

After several years of coming close, there are now enough schools with lacrosse programs that want to join the Illinois High School Association and it will become a sanctioned sport in spring, 2018. The IHSA Board of Directors made the announcement April 19. Both boys and girls lacrosse will have their own state series. “The addition of lacrosse builds on the IHSA mission of offering a wide range of participation opportunities for high school students in Illinois,” said IHSA Executive Director Craig Anderson. “The IHSA Board has been extremely diligent in evaluating lacrosse’s status as an IHSA sport over the past seven years, and based on the continued growth, felt the time was right to begin in the spring of 2018.” Locally, area schools with lacrosse programs include Marist, Brother Rice, Mother McAuley, Sandburg and St.

grown to 83 boys’ entries and 59 girls’ entries. “The number of participating schools and students has continued to grow,” said IHSA Board President and Wauconda High School Principal Dan Klett. “The Board is confident that there will be healthy participation numbers in 2018, which made us comfortable moving beyond the threshold numbers (65 and 40) from 2009 and simply establishing a start date for 2018. This is an important day for the IHSA and a decision we believe will spur growth in high school lacrosse throughout the state.” The state finals are tentatively set for May 25 and 26, 2018. Photo by Jeff Vorva The tentative schedule would Lacrosse teams, such as Mother McAuley, will be sanctioned by the include boys’ and girls’ semifiIllinois High School Association starting with the 2018 season. nals on Friday and third-place/ state championships on SaturLaurence. viewed each January, but both day. The last sport added by the The IHSA Board initially thresholds were never reached. approved the start of a state In 2015, 42 schools entered the IHSA was competitive dance, series in 2009 contingent upon girls’ tournament, but the boys’ which debuted in 2013. The 65 schools simultaneously en- entries came up short of 65. The board will announce informatering for the boys and 40 for benchmarks were not met this tion on state final hosting bids the girls. The entries were re- past January, but have since in the coming months.

Vander Laan Continued from Page 1

Michigan.” According to the Tribune, Vander Laan measured 6-foot-3 3-8 and 243 pounds and ran the 40-yard dash in 4.75 and 4.83 seconds and a three-cone drill in 6.73 seconds. Vander Laan, a Frankfort native, said that he size should work in his favor as he prepares to transition from quarterback to tight-end. “I’m definitely going to be stronger than just about every single tight end,” he said. “Now it will just come down

to footwork and fundamentals – which will be taught by whatever coach I play under.” Vander Laan said the Dallas Cowboys and Baltimore Ravens both sent their tight end coaches to Chicago to have a private workout with him, and then the Kansas City Chiefs sent their director of player personnel to Chicago to oversee a workout with him. Then, on April 16 and 17, Vander Laan was invited to a pre-draft day by the Washington Redskins. “They flew me out there and I had meetings with coaches,” he said. “I had a physical and check-up by doctors, who did drug and blood tests. The

whole experience was very exciting.” Vander Laan said signing with Robert Walker’s Unlimited Success Sports Management firm, which claims two dozen NFL clients on its web site, none of whom was drafted higher than the fifth round, was a good choice. “They did a lot for me in terms of visibility,” he said. “Out of college, you really don’t know anything. He has like 12 or 13 guys in the league, so he’s been around and knows people. He’s helped me set up my visits and workouts.” In Atlanta, Vander Laan trained with Chip Smith, whose clients have ranged from Brian Urlacher and 49ers quarter-

Sports Editor

Shepard’s distance runners won the Main Event. As a result, the Astros distance team is among the top 50 in the nation. The Astros competed at the Distance Night in Palatine event Saturday and its Distance Medley Relay team (consisting of 1200, 400, 800 and 1600 meters) won the Main Event division with a time of 10 minutes, 32.11 seconds after qualifying earlier in the night in the Undercard. Caleb Washington, Garret White, Kevin Courtney and Paul Milkus were the four Astros who burned the track that night and racked up the best DMR time in Illinois by nine seconds, according to the Dyestat rankings. The time is also 50th in the nation and second in the Midwest. The top team in the nation is Great Oak California, which ran a 10:01.71 on April 15. On the same day Shepard had its big run, Cedar Rapids Prairie Iowa ran a 10:25.52 in the Kansas Relays for the best in the Midwest and 22nd overall. Shepard is coached by Joe Lerner, who is a Richards and Trinity Christian College grad. Individually, Sandburg’s Sean Torpy won the 1600 event with a 4:08.64,

Not lost causes Mother McAuley’s softball team dropped an 8-3 decision to

rival Marist on Thursday and 24 hours later, Oak Lawn’s baseball team took a 5-0 lead into the fifth inning but lost to Jones Prep, 8-6. While the losses hurt the two home teams, there were important factors off the diamonds that made these two games worthwhile. Marist and McAuley raised money from the game to benefit the National Alopecia Areata Foundation. McAuley pitcher Holly Marousek has the rare disease, which causes a loss of hair. Both teams wore special t-shirts in her honor and she pitched her first game without a hat or helmet. The Oak Lawn game honored Tim Sidlow, a 15-year English teacher who is on a leave of absence due to chronic kidney and liver disease. Players and coaches wore special jerseys with the name “Sidlow” on the back. Proceeds from the sale of the jerseys went to Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago where Sidlow received a kidney transplant in 1984.

Loya earns Spartan Athlete of the Month Oak Lawn softball pitcher Marisa Loya earned the school’s Athlete of the Month honor for March after opened the season 1-1 on the mound allowing just two earned runs and striking out 12 in 14 innings pitched. She also hit .500 in the first week of action going 5-for-10 with two runs, two RBIs and two stolen bases in three games.

Supplied photo

Shepard distance runners (from left) Caleb Washington, Garret White, Kevin Courtney and Paul Milkus pose with their coach, Joe Lerner, after the team turned in one of the top 50 times in the nation at Palatine.

back Colin Kaepernick to the members of the U.S. women’s gymnastics and volleyball teams. Vander Laan set the NCAA Division II Record for most career rushing touchdowns by a quarterback and was the nation’s top rushing quarterback this past year (1,542 yards) at all levels of college football and top ten overall as well as completion percentage and rushing touchdowns (24). He accounted for 51 touchdowns his senior season and ranked first in nation in points responsible for (306), is the only active QB in college football at any level with 70-plus rushing and passing touchdowns and has

more career rushing yards than any other QB in college football history at any level. But now, Vander Laan has the biggest challenge ahead for him — simply waiting for the draft to unfold. “I’m getting excited because a couple of teams had told me I’m on their draft board,” he said. “And a couple teams have told me if they don’t draft me, they will definitely come at me for free agency. “I’m not going to sweat it — whether I’m drafted or have to prepare for free agency. I’m just excited about the chance to play football again and get the pads back on.”


4

Section 2 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News - The Reporter

Images from SXU spring scrimmage and the Smack Attack By Jeff Vorva • Sports Editor On Saturday morning and afternoon, St. Xavier University was the place to be for spring football and some of the best high school volleyball talent in the state. National power SXU held an open football scrimmage to the public and the Cougars are hoping for another big season in the fall. The Cougars were ranked 11th in the nation

among NAIA teams in the spring coaches poll and have been ranked in the top 25 in 100 straight polls. Last year, the Cougars were 7-4 and ended their season with a wild 75-69 four-overtime playoff loss to Morningside, which set an NAIA record for most points in a playoff game. Meanwhile, inside the SXU Shannon Center, the Brother Rice Smack Attack was wind-

ing down and defending state champion Glenbard West beat Glenbrook North 25-15, 25-13 for the title. Locally, Marist finished third and had its shot at West in the semis, but fell to 25-16, 25-18 minutes after a draining 21-25, 25-29, 27-25 quarterfinal thriller over Lincoln-Way East. The Redhawks recovered from the loss to beat Lincoln-Way Central, 25-22, 25-17 for third.

Brother Rice was hoping for a top-four finish but the Crusaders finished seventh thanks in part to an ankle injury during pool play on Friday to star hitter Jimmy Baker. He was on crutches during Saturday’s action. Glenbard West’s Paul Bischoff was the tournament MVP while Marist’s Aaron Kumer and Brother Rice’s Steve Lona made the all-tournament team. Here are a few photos from the two events:

Left photo: Junior Abdul Mahdi, the Cougars kicker, shows off some soccer skills before the SXU scrimmage. Above: Linebacker Omar Salazar signals “no catch” after one of the SXU offensive players dropped the ball in Saturday’s scrimmage. SXU quarterback John Rhode, who was last seen throwing a school-record seven TD passes in a wild 75-69 playoff loss to Morningside in November, will be back for his senior season in the fall.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

SXU coach Mike Feminis, whose teams have been in the top 25 in the last 100 polls, tries to organize his troops during the scrimmage. Marist’s Colin Meyer has a big swing against Glenbard West on Saturday in the semifi als of the Brother Rice Smack Attack at SXU.

Jack Berglind gets ready for a dig attempt against defending state champion Glenbard West.

Marist’s boys volleyball team had plenty to get fired up about after its thirdplace finish in the Brother Rice Smack Attack.

Glenbard West’s Paul Bischoff, a Stanford recruit, was the Smack Attack’s MVP.


5

Section 2 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News - The Reporter

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES E. TALERICO; VICTORIA M. TALERICO; MARQUETTE BANK; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants, 14 CH 14266 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, May 23, 2016 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-34-100-068-0000. Commonly known as 12920 South 94th Avenue, Palos Park, Illinois 60464. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call The Sales Department at Plaintiff’s Attorney, Anselmo Lindberg Oliver LLC, 1771 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (630) 453-6960. For Bidding instructions visit www. fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F14080156 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I691167

BUYING OR SELLING?

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF8 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST Plaintiff, -v.ANTOUN SOUSAN, HAYAT SOUSAN AKA HAYAT SAMMAN, VILLAGE OF OAK LAWN, UNKNOWN HEIRS LEGATEES OF ELIAS SOUSAN, ABDOULLA SOUSAN AKA ABDOULLA E. SOUSAN, MARYAM SOUSAN AKA MANJAM SOUSAN AKA MANJAM A. SOUSAN, ABRAHAM SOUSAN AKA IBRAHIM SOUSAN, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO CAPITAL ONE BANK, CITY OF CHICAGO, MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, KARL MEYER SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE ESTATE OF ELIAS SOUSAN, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 14 CH 6446 8708 South 50th Avenue Oak Lawn, IL 60453 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 25, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 26, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8708 South 50th Avenue, Oak Lawn, IL 60453 Property Index No. 24-04-219-014-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $259,486.04. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, or a unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). In accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(h-1) and (h-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the property, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subsections (g)(1) and (g)(4) of section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact the sales department, ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC, 1771 W. Diehl Road, Suite 150, NAPERVILLE, IL 60563, (630) 453-6960 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com. Please refer to file number F14030292. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. Diehl Road, Suite 150 NAPERVILLE, IL 60563 (630) 453-6960 E-Mail: foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com Attorney File No. F14030292 Attorney ARDC No. 3126232 Attorney Code. 26122 Case Number: 14 CH 6446 TJSC#: 36-3053 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR HSI ASSET CORPORATION TRUST 2006-HE1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE1 Plaintiff, -v.UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF EWA TURAKIEWICZ, ANSON STREET, LLC, HICKORY WOODS CONDOMINIUMS, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, WILLIAM P. BUTCHER, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR EWA TURAKIEWICZ (DECEASED), ANGELIKA TURAKIEWICZ Defendants 15 CH 005250 7932 W. 93RD STREET UNIT #1B HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 28, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 18, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7932 W. 93RD STREET UNIT #1B, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-01-309-029-1002. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-15-04999. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-15-04999 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 15 CH 005250 TJSC#: 36-4131 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I689817

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.ILIRJAN RREDHI, HURMA RETHI, MIMOZA RREDHI, SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION Defendants 15 CH 7132 7 COUR MICHELE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 4, 2015, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 1, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7 COUR MICHELE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-111008-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family home; detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1502185. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. PA1502185 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 15 CH 7132 TJSC#: 36-3845 I689783

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5 ACRES RT. 45 IN PEOTONE 600 ft. frontage x 400 ft. deep 40 ft. x 60 ft. pole barn CALL 815-450-0004 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.TADEUSZ PUSTUL, DANUTA PUSTUL Defendants 12 CH 23545 8921 MOODY AVENUE Oak Lawn, IL 60453 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 15, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 19, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8921 MOODY AVENUE, Oak Lawn, IL 60453 Property Index No. 24-05-105-108-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $375,903.87. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact The sales clerk, SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301, Bannockburn, IL 60015, (847) 291-1717 For information call between the hours of 1pm - 3pm fax number 312-372-4398 Please refer to file number 12-059735. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. SHAPIRO KREISMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC 2121 WAUKEGAN RD., SUITE 301 Bannockburn, IL 60015 (847) 291-1717 Fax #: (312) 372-4398 E-Mail: ILNotices@logs.com Attorney File No. 12-059735 Attorney Code. 42168 Case Number: 12 CH 23545 TJSC#: 36-4754 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (‘’FANNIE MAE’’), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, -v.STEVEN P MILLER, ELIZABETH M MILLER A/K/A ELIZABETH M HEPBURN A/K/A BETH MILLER, CITY OF PALOS HEIGHTS, TARGET NATIONAL BANK F/K/A RETAILERS NATIONAL BANK, DISCOVER BANK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. Defendants 15 CH 15703 12023 SOUTH 70TH COURT PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 12, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 20, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12023 SOUTH 70TH COURT, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-30-112-003-0000. The real estate is improved with a white, brick, single family home; two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1506404. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. PA1506404 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 15 CH 15703 TJSC#: 36-4676 I691345

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff, -v.FATIMA SHUMAN, SAM SHUMAN, TONIA IBRAHIM, WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 27474 32 SOUTH COUNTRY SQUIRE ROAD PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 2, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 3, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 32 SOUTH COUNTRY SQUIRE ROAD, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-25-114-008-0000. The real estate is improved with a one story, single family home; two car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service. atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1212935. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. PA1212935 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 27474 TJSC#: 36-2811 I690006


6

Section 2 Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News - The Reporter

For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, -v.ROBERT C. CARLSON A/K/A ROBERT CARLSON, SANDRA J. CARLSON, OAK HILLS CONDOMINIUM II ASSOCIATION, OAK HILLS COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Defendants 12 CH 018389 13206 S. WESTVIEW DRIVE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 3, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 6, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 13206 S. WESTVIEW DRIVE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-303-124-1008. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-14-12674. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-14-12674 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 018389 TJSC#: 36-3256 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I690989

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WILMINGTON TRUST, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO CITIBANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR LEHMAN XS TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-13 Plaintiff, -v.ELORDE P. GAGNI A/K/A ELORDE GAGNI, RENILDA GAGNI, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. Defendants 12 CH 039689 16801 ROBIN HOOD DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 25, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 27, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 16801 ROBIN HOOD DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-26-109-001-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-15-18065. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-15-18065 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 039689 TJSC#: 36-3044 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I689822

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR HOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-7 Plaintiff, -v.JAMAL RASIM JABER A/K/A JAMAL R. JABER, RANA MOHMED JABER, SILO RIDGE ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, SILO RIDGE MASTER HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, ALLEGIANCE COMMUNITY BANK Defendants 09 CH 007527 25 PRAIRIE LANE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 25, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 27, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 25 PRAIRIE LANE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-07-304-036. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-09-03147. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-09-03147 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 007527 TJSC#: 36-2860 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I689895

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FANNIE MAE), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, -v.STOYCHO IVANOV AKA STOYCHO DOBROMIROV-IVANOV, DESISLAVA IVANOV, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION Defendants 14 CH 08828 3 COUR MASSON UNIT 3 PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 7, 2015, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 20, 2016, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 3 COUR MASSON UNIT 3, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-112-032-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story, single family home; no garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1404014. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. PA1404014 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 14 CH 08828 TJSC#: 36-4805 I691347

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OUT & ABOUT Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Southwest • Section 2, Page 7

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS The Center programs

Emily Blunt (left) and Charlize Theron star in “The Huntsman: Winter’s War.”

PINTO’S POPCORN PICKS

Costumes, fairy tales carry ‘Th Huntsman: Winter’s War’ “The Huntsman: Winter’s War” is a fun prequel/ sequel to “Snow White and the Huntsman.” It’s a fairytale spinoff of the Snow White story you’ve heard and the “untold” story surrounding Snow White that you probably haven’t heard. Be warned, just because this is loosely based upon Snow White this is not a kids’ movie whatsoever. The prequel worked as a dark take on the familiar “Snow White” story that was thrilling but ultimately empty inside. The reason that film worked was because it had a singular focus and kept you engaged. With this film’s many scattered storylines, it can make this one hard-to-follow film. All these different storylines can make it more challenging to stay engaged; however, even with all the subplots, you can easily see where this film is headed. What is this film about? Is this about Snow White because she was the title character in the first one? This writer can for sure tell you it’s not about her. She doesn’t even make an appearance, which seems quite odd. Is this about two feuding sisters, the dastardly Ravenna (Charlize Theron) and the devastated Freya (Emily Blunt)? Is this about a forbidden love between Freya’s two top soldiers, huntsman Eric (Chris Hemsworth) and Sara (Jessica Chastain)? Is this about two squabbling dwarfs (Nick Frost and Rob Brydon) who serve as comic relief? It’s probably not about the dwarfs, but you can’t be sure what this film is about. It begins with an infant dying. Action moves very quickly on to the kidnapping and training of child soldiers to serve in Freya’s army as she seeks revenge for the death of her child from her castle high atop the snow-covered hills. Since Freya can’t have the love she lost, she has made it clear that love is not allowed, so when

STARTING THIS WEEK: “RIDE ALONG 2”: Kevin Hart and Ice Cube reunite in this action-comedy sequel as their characters - an Atlanta police detective and his future brother-in-law - team with a Miami cop (Olivia Munn, “The Newsroom”) against a drug kingpin (Benjamin Bratt). Not surprisingly, the movie hews very closely to the style of its surprise-hit forerunner, particularly since director Tim Story also returns. Tika Sumpter is back as Hart’s bride-tobe, and the cast also includes Ken Jeong, Sherri Shepherd and (reprising his police-boss role) Bruce McGill. DVD extras: four “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by Story; deleted scenes; outtakes. *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand) “KRAMPUS”: A definite twist on the traditional sort of holiday-season story, this dark-humored thriller makes a good case for not letting a youngster down at that time of year. The child in question (played by Emjay Anthony) conjures up a Christmas demon who’s basically the anti-Santa, doing out punishments to the naughty. Adults should be careful about letting the kids near this, since it’s precisely what yuletide nightmares are made of. Toni Collette, Adam Scott, David Koechner, Allison Tolman (“Fargo”) and Conchata Ferrell also star. DVD extras: “making-of” documentary; audio commentary by director and co-writer Michael Dougherty and co-writers Todd Casey and Zach Shields; deleted and extended scenes; alternate ending; outtakes; galleries. *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand) “SON OF SAUL”: A major success on the film-

12:30 and 4:30 Vesper Sunday services at The Center. The mini-concert of choral exaltation will feature several soloists from the choir and favorites such as “As the Deer,” “Majesty,” and “More Precious Than Silver.” The Center Singers take a recess after this performance, and fall practice will begin Monday, Sept. 12.

The Bridge Teen Center programs

• Bean Bag Tournament - 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. this Friday, The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland Park. Participate in a Bean Bag Tournament and blindfolded competitions. Rock band “Lloyd Gross” will perform live and free food will be provided by Chick-fil-A. • Sand Volleyball - 4 to 6 p.m. May 3, Enjoy the nice weather and play sand volleyball with other students. Gather your own team or join one. Students should wear appropriate athletic shoes and clothing. • Movie Day: Star Wars - 3:30 to 6 p.m. May 4, If you love Star Wars, and love to geek-out on this unofficial holiday every year, you will be in good company. Watch Star Wars: Episode 4: A New Hope while enjoying some free popcorn. • Culinary: Fancy Hors d’oeuvres - 4 to 5:30 p.m. May 4, Hors d’oeuvres is a French term that means “outside the meal” or appetizers. Bridge volunteer, Chef Jesus, will teach you how to create hors d’oeuvres of your own. • Chess Tournament - 4 to 5 p.m. May 5, Chess is a thoughtful game of strategy and maneuvering. Challenge your fellow students to an intense game and see who comes out the victor. • A Gift for Mom - 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. May 5, Make the mother figure in your life a gift that is unique and beautiful. • Pool Tournament - 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. May 6, Enter a Pool Tournament to win a prize, then stick around to listen to live music from indie/ alternative band AsWeAre. A free popcorn bar will be open to students. These events are for teens in 7th through 12th grade. For more information call 532-0500.

OMARR’S WEEKLY ASTROLOGICAL FORECAST her two fiercest weapons, Eric and Sara, have dared to fall for each other, she destroys their chances of happiness as well. The motivations of everybody are fairly easy to figure out, and the narration from Liam Neeson spells it all out very clearly if you can’t figure it out. Seven years after the introductory scenes are shown, the story picks back up, timeline-wise, after the events of “Snow White and the Huntsman.” Ravenna may or may not be dead, but the mirror that she embodied has gone missing. The search is on for it because it’s powerful or because it’s gold, you don’t really know or care. The big problems here are with the acting. Hemsworth and Chastain’s characters are hard to understand for large parts of the movie because they do a “Scottish” accent that is terrible. The on-screen chemistry for the two stars is non-existent and the scenes depicting intimacy can be hard to watch. Theron and Blunt, the other major stars here, have acting problems as well. There problems come from the emptiness of the script and not so much their own flaws as performers. Ultimately, this is a film with nice costumes, scenery, and not much else. If you really like fairy tale stories, then maybe check out “The Huntsman: Winter’s War.” Tony Pinto’s grade: B-

VIDEOVIEW BY JAY BOBBIN (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating - one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ - followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a familyviewing guide, the key for which appears below.)

• Saturday Morning Bird Watching Beginning April 30, 8-10 a.m. Avid birder Dan Morley will lead four Saturday mornings of bird watching at the height of the spring bird migration season. The Center woods serve as a great stopover site for migrating warblers and songbirds on their way north to their summer breeding grounds. In past springs, scarlet tanagers, orioles, grosbeaks, and a multitude of warblers have been spotted near The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, in Palos Park. Wear sturdy hiking shoes for spring mud. Program fee: $20 ($5 each Saturday). Call 708-361-3650 to pre-register. • Pastel Painting Class Begins Monday May 2, 9-11:30 a.m. Instructor Susan Flanagan starts a new four week session of Pastel Painting on Monday mornings in May. She invites beginners and experienced painters to explore the many creative possibilities of painting with soft pastels. Develop your individual style as you paint using your own photograph, or paint a still life provided by the instructor. Learn the principals of composition, shape, color, and value as well as techniques for under painting and pastel application. The class fee is $80, there is a list of required supplies available in the office. Advance registration is required, call 361-3650. • eBay from A to Z Luncheon Tuesday May 3, 12-2 p.m. The Center has a volunteer-run eBay store that has for years contributed significantly to its mission. “eBay from A to Z” is a video produced in-house that takes a donated object and shows the process from donation to selection to listing to selling to packing and then to shipping that special item. The eBay team will then be happy to answer questions and give pointers about the eBay selling process. Cost is $20. Please make reservations by the Sunday before the Tuesday luncheon. Call 708-361-3650 to make your reservation. • The Center Singers Spring Concert Sunday May 15, 12:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. The Center Singers will be singing at both the

honors circuit, winning an Oscar, a Golden Globe and an Independent Spirit Award, and also feted at last year’s Cannes Film Festival - this drama traces the World War II experiences of a Jewish prisoner of the Nazis (portrayed by Geza Rohrig), who make him a worker for them. He discovers the body of a youngster who may be his son, then tries — against the complicated, ever-shifting circumstances of the war — to ensure the boy a proper funeral. DVD extras: audio commentary by Rohrig, director Laszlo Nemes and cinematographer Matyas Erdely; deleted scene; interview session at the Museum of Tolerance. **** (R: AS, N, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand) “JANE GOT A GUN”: Natalie Portman rarely has been one to resist tackling something different, and she certainly does in this revisionist Western, playing the title character who gets a reason to become proficient with firearms. When her family is victimized by a vicious gang leader (Ewan McGregor, Portman’s former “Star Wars”-franchise cohort) and his followers, Jane hesitantly seeks assistance from a man with a very personal connection to her past (Joel Edgerton). Noah Emmerich (“The Americans”) and Rodrigo Santoro also star in the film, which had its share of behind-the-scenes drama, since its original director departed just before filming was to begin. *** (R: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)

COMING SOON: “JOY” (May 3): Jennifer Lawrence plays Miracle Mop inventor and marketer Joy Mangano in director David O. Russell’s comedy-drama, also reuniting the actress with Robert De Niro and Bradley Cooper. (PG-13: AS, P) FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

By Jeraldine Saunders ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you break enough rules eventually that rule is replaced. Until then you must yield to the pressure to conform and stick to what you know best. Seek the sound advice of friends or partners in the week ahead. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Good manners make the man. Your interest in a variety of unusual subjects can earn you the friendship or admiration of less adventurous souls. Be content to stick to the conventional route in the upcoming week.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): People can be nourished by your energy without draining it. Once stirred by your example someone could go to great lengths to imitate your unconventional methods this week. Prevent a friend from burning bridges. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your partners may throw caution to the winds in the week to come. Be a good friend and act as a restraining influence. Getting wrapped up in complicated schemes to protect your future security could drain resources.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A tendency to wallow in self-indulgence could put you in the doghouse as this week unfolds and cause others to criticize. Bypass social exchanges and keep your nose to the grindstone until the atmosphere shifts.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll be late if you procrastinate. In the week to come you could lose out on opportunities because you take too much time to prepare for public appearances or meetings. Be proud of your plethora of experience.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): False starts may occur when too many people wave a checkered flag. This isn’t a good week to give in to romantic notions or to let mixed signals deter you from your goals. Creative activities provide suitable outlets.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Getting ahead requires persistence and relentless ambition. In the week to come you may feel less under pressure and can relax to enjoy the fruits of your labors. You social life may revolve around the home.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Ambition may not be your aim this week. True friendship and mutual appreciation is gender neutral. You may meet someone who has your best interests at heart but physical attraction isn’t part of the equation.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Traditional values will keep you afloat when new ideas flood in. Your friends and partners may stray from the herd and tempt you to discard conventions. A surprising message might brighten the week ahead.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When the oilcan is within reach it is easier to tend to squeaky wheels. Focus on fixing problems within the home and family in the week to come. Use wisdom and generosity to handle intense interpersonal situations.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If you don’t stand for something you might fall for anything. It is easy to echo the opinions of your friends just so you appear to fit in. Make a statement this week by concentrating on achieving realistic goals.


Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Regional News • The Reporter

OUT & ABOUT

Southwest • Section 2, Page 8

St. Laurence High School

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond Thursday, October 1, 2015

Where leadership begins

Nature photography class starts at Log Cabin Center for the Arts

The Center offers Nature Photography starting this Saturday, from 9-11 a.m. Photographer Rick Steffen teaches the basic tools and techniques of photography. Bring in your camera and he will show you how to use it more easily and effectively. Steffens demonstrate and share his strategies for composing great outdoor pictures, getting the right exposure on each shot, and perhaps more importantly, how to look for great subject matter in nature. Capture the beauty of spring at The Center. Birds are chirping, plants are sprouting and wild flowers are in bloom. This class runs Supplied photo Rick Steffen will share strategies for for four Saturday mornings and costs $64. Advance registration is required, call 361-3650. The Log Cabin getting great shots at his nature Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. photography class.

SIGN UP FOR

SUMMER CAMPS Registration is now open for 5th-8th graders!

Supplied photo

Lois Lauer gets ready for the Spring Tea Party at The Center.

Spring tea ahead at the Center

The Center will hold its 11th annual Ladies Spring Tea Party on Sunday May 1, from 2-4 p.m. Imagine the elegant excitement of a room full of ladies wearing hats and gloves. Come and enjoy a beautiful afternoon in the Great Hall of The Center’s Lodge. Floral arrangements, a delicious assortment of tea party foods to choose from, a craft to partake in, an inspiring speech by Scared Space author Jill Angelo, and of course a special offering of hot and iced teas. Tickets cost $30 each, advance reservations only. Call 361-3650. The Center is at 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.

Supplied photo

World Labyrinth Day Walk

The Center’s in-ground labyrinth will be the scene of a World Labyrinth Day walk at 1 p.m., Saturday May 7. This is a global movement to gather and walk the labyrinth for peace. Participants will “Walk as One at One” and add their energies and prayers to this global peace effort. The Center is at 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.

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