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Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

THE 73rd Year, No. 18

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

3 Sections

Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

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Thursday, May 1, 2014

Photo by Ellen Hodges

‘Spring at Last’ at McCord McCord Gallery & Cultural Center in Palos Park is happy to welcome spring. Ellen Hodges, Kathleen Newman, Jim Pavlatos, Lenox Wallace, and Marikay Peter Witlock were asked to render their interpretations of the season in oils, pastels, watercolor, photography and collage. The resulting exhibit, “Spring at Last,” will be on display from this Friday, May 2, through Saturday, June 7. The public is invited to meet the artists at a reception this Friday, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Pictured is a photograph by Ellen Hodges. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is at 9602 W. Creek Rd., (129th and La Grange Road). For more information, call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org. Photo by Tim Hadac

Palos Park

New village fence law now allows variances by Michael Gilbert staff reporter

the village allowed only post and rail front yard fences. Now front yard fences can be constructed usFront yard fences are frowned ing a variety of materials, but the upon in Palos Park, but village homeowner must first receive a officials are leaving the door variance from the council showing open for homeowners to install such a fence is needed for health one if special circumstances can or safety issues. An ad hoc committee formed be proven. The Palos Park Village Coun- last year to review the fence orcil voted unanimously Monday dinance and suggest updates to to approve a series of revisions the document had recommended to its fence ordinance, including the council prohibit all front yard the stipulations on front yard fences for aesthetic reasons, but fences and fences around swim- commissioners noted during Monday’s meeting there are certain ming pools. Under the old fence ordinance, circumstances in which a fence in the front yard could be warranted. “What kind of irks me is imagine the scenario in which someone were to move into the village with small children or a special-needs child, and in the absence of a front yard fence they would have to keep their kids in the back where they are out of sight,” Commissioner G. Darryl Reed said of prohibiting front yard fences entirely. “I can’t be a part of this. We’re about inclusion not exclusion. I could say you’d have any number of reasons for a front yard fence.” Commissioner Dan Polk agreed. “The beauty of the Park is that we are not all the same,” he said. “I’m glad there is a provision that Regional file photo

Commissioner G. Darryl Reed

(Fence law, Page 3)

First Midwest Bank Half Marathon co-directors Mel Diab (left) and Jeff Prestinario show off this year’s event poster, which just arrived from the printer last week.

Regional file photo

Last year’s women’s champion, Jacqui Giuliano of Oakwood Hills, ran the 13.1-mile course in 1 hour, 20.48 minutes.

Half Marathon ready to run Sunday First comes Chamber Expo Sat.

Chamber Expo

Adding to the buzz is a health and community expo set for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Momarathon and the newly added firstmidwesthalfmarathon.com raine Valley Church, 6300 W. by Tim Hadac 10K race, “not quite 1,300” run- for details. 127th St., Palos Heights. staff reporter Both Diab and co-director Jeff ners have signed up this year, Sponsored by the Palos Area While Mother Nature has been well below the 1,800-plus run- Prestinario thanked committee Chamber of Commerce, the ancruel to the 2014 First Midwest ners who competed in the half members in advance for their nual event typically attracts sevrace-day service. “As we come eral thousand people and offers Bank Half Marathon in recent marathon in 2013. One bright spot is registration down the home stretch, it’s going information and free services months, she is expected to smile on the popular annual event this for the Run, Walk or Roll race, to be hectic,” Prestinario said from 50 local health care proheaded by the South West Special to the group. “Before you know viders and other businesses, as Sunday, May 4. The big race takes place the Recreation Association (SWSRA), it, it’s going to be boom, boom, well as government agencies. “Everyone is invited to this day after Saturday’s Community which has hit an all-time high boom—so much so that you can and Health Expo organized by at 56, nearly doubling last year’s feel the electricity in the air. So fun and informative event,” said let’s all remember that there Chamber President Stephen the Palos Area Chamber of Com- final total of 32 participants. The ranks of volunteers have are always curveballs that come Georgiou, owner of Computer merce at Moraine Valley Church. “This past winter has been swelled, with more than 100 into play, so thank you for re- Greeks, 12222 S. Harlem Ave., wicked, and it has kept num- signed up and additional assis- maining cool, calm and collected Palos Heights. The expo will also feature a bers down at races everywhere, tance expected this week. Last- when that happens. Remember as runners haven’t had chances minute volunteers are welcome to smile and think safety, safety, to train,” said race co-founder and are encouraged to visit safety.” (See Big race, Page 3) and co-director Mel Diab, owner of the Running for Kicks specialty HALF-MARATHON CHAMPS running shop, 7158 W. 127th St., Palos Heights. “But the forecast MEN WOMEN for race day is 63 degrees and only a 10 percent chance of rain. 2008 Matthew Chesang, Kenya (1:05.31) Bridget Montgomery Chicago 1:20.48 So we’re looking good.” 2009 Japeth N O Joy, Kenya (1:05.14) Alona Banai Oak Park (1:22.51) Diab made his observation at an organizing committee meet2010 Matthew Chesang Kenya (1:06.14) Jennifer Digiacomo Orland Park (1:12.43) ing held last Friday at the Palos 2011 Benson Cheruiyot, Kenya (1:05.01) Erin Moffett, Chicago (1:19.27) Heights Recreation Center, 6601 W. 127th St. 2012 Robert Wambua, Kenya (1:06.49) Doreen Kitaka, Kenya (1:18.14) Race registration numbers 2013 Dan Kremske, Woodstock (1:06.15) Jacqui Giuliano, Oakwood Hills (1:20.48) reflect the record-setting chill. Diab noted that between the half

Photos by Jeff Ebert

Palos mom runs Boston Marathon; still has miles to go Palos Park resident Stephanie Ebert and her husband, Jeff, share a lighter moment in front of a motivational banner at this year’s Boston Marathon, held April 21 (photos from left). Profiled in a feature story in the April 3 edition of The Regional News, Stephanie Ebert competed in the Boston Marathon as a tribute to her son, Beckham “Sasha” Ebert, a 9-year-old with autism. Beckham and his younger brother, Zelalem “Zee” Ebert, got into the spirit of the race and thanked their mom for her efforts. Beckham savors his mother’s marathon medal. The Boston run was the first of 11 grueling marathons and triathlons that Ebert will compete in, ending with the Marine Corps Marathon on Oct. 26 in Arlington, Va.

All told, Ebert plans to swim, bike and run a total of 226 miles to raise awareness and funds for autism research, in conjunction with the Organization for Autism Research (OAR). Ebert’s initial goal was to raise $3,000 over several months, but after The Regional News article was published in print and online, the goal was met and surpassed in just 72 hours, a show of community support Ebert called “crazy successful” and “overwhelming.” Ebert then doubled the goal, and donations have continued to roll in. As of Tuesday afternoon, Ebert has raised $5,150, which is more than double what she has raised for autism research in any year since she started in 2009. Those who want to donate are encouraged to visit firstgiving.com and search for Team Beckham.


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The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Editorial Draft a local puppy mill law good pet shops can live with As The Regional reported last week, there is an ongoing debate in Orland Park over whether the village should use its home-rule powers to opt out of the Cook County Companion Animal & Consumer Protection Ordinance, set to take effect Oct. 1. The county ordinance is designed to strike a blow against so-called puppy mills, which as most of us know are commercial breeders who engage in sloppy and even inhumane treatment of dogs and cats. Its chief proponent, County Commissioner John Fritchey of Chicago’s North Side, says that the ordinance will limit “the retail sale of puppies and kittens in Cook County pet stores to animals sourced from shelters and other humane adoption centers.” The ordinance would almost certainly drive out of business one of village’s oldest and most respected retail establishments: Happiness Is Pets, 15647 S. 94th Ave., and throw its staff to the uncertainty of the unemployment line—despite the fact that owner Ron Berning insists that he does not purchase puppies from mills. At a recent village board meeting, Berning said that breeders he deals with meet and sometimes exceed USDA standards. He even offered to take trustees on a tour of a breeding facility. We suggest that they take him up on it. We’ll go, as well. Like all men and women of good will, we at The Regional News oppose puppy mills and other inhumane treatment of dogs. We have several additional observations to add to the debate. We question whether it is appropriate to attack a wholesale problem at the retail level, if it is fair to punish a licensed, respected pet shop owner for the sins of puppy mills with which he says he has no dealings. Think about that, and think about the ramifications. Imagine if legislators decided to expand the attack on animal cruelty, addressing horrific conditions at factory farms, where animals suffer every bit as much as dogs suffer at puppy mills. Imagine if the village banned the sale of all eggs, except those laid by free-range hens at small farms. Imagine if the village banned the sale of veal, the sale of beef from cattle kept in pens, the sale of pork and bacon from pigs kept in cages. Now imagine the reaction of Orland Park grocers and restaurant owners, as shoppers and diners abandoned local food establishments and went instead to Oak Forest, Orland Hills, Tinley Park, Mokena, Homer Glen and elsewhere. Rest assured that the Orland Park business community would rise up and use their muscle to stop the idea in its tracks, and then they’d talk about electing new faces next time around. But when the target is a solitary business owner, “just one pet shop,” as a village trustee said chillingly on April 21—well, you get the picture. So what is the right direction here? What should Orland Park officials do regarding the Cook County Companion Animal & Consumer Protection Ordinance? We see the answer in one of the options described by Trustee Dan Calandriello, chairman of the village board’s Public Safety Committee and an attorney who has successfully prosecuted those who abuse animals. Orland Park should use its power to opt out of the new county ordinance and at the same time craft its own law, made with input from the business community, animal rights advocates from Orland Park, and other interested parties in the village. Such an ordinance would be enforced by the village itself, by a code enforcement officer. If done right, such a law would demonstrate that there is a sensible middle ground, that Orland Park can be pro-dog and pro-business at the same time. If done right, such a law would serve as a model for other communities and show that Orland Park uses its head as well as its heart. The opportunity is there.

View from Trinity by Dr. Steven Timmermans

What’s good for the city is good for the College In my 11 years here, I’ve been abundantly pleased with the ever-increasing collaboration between the city of Palos Heights and Trinity Christian College. The Bootsma Bookstore Café on Trinity’s campus is one such example. After new owners of the former Dunlap’s restaurant sold the property to a developer, we heard from many that preserving the facility would be a better solution than to squeeze in dozens of condos. We were able to convince the developer to sell the property to us, and with neighbors, we designed a new future for the facility now known as the Bootsma Bookstore Café. Back in the spring of 2007, I watched one afternoon as neighbors, aldermen, college students, professors and others all huddled over tables, drawing their best ideas for the former Dunlap’s. It’s one of my favorite memories of my time here— matched, of course, by the picnic celebration where Dunlap’s chicken dumplings were served. And daily I’m reminded of its continued success, as I see neighbors mixing with students, enjoying this scenic space along

Navajo Creek. Having a bookstore café in a Palos Heights neighborhood is good for the city, and it’s good for the college as well. I suspect when the installation of the Cal-Sag Trail begins in a matter of weeks we will eventually look back upon its completion with satisfaction, too. Imagine, going right through Palos Heights— through the Lake Katherine Center and Botanic Gardens and Trinity’s George & June Schaaf Athletics Complex—will be a multi-use, 30-mile pathway built almost entirely along the banks of the Calumet-Sag Channel and Calumet River. This trail will connect the citizens of Palos Heights—as well as many others—to other trails and parks. It will be good for Palos Heights, and it will be good for Trinity Christian College, as students and employees stroll or ride in either direction from the campus. Looking forward, I can imagine other win-win opportunities for the city of Palos Heights and Trinity Christian College. I’m excited about the plans for the development at

the corner of Harlem and College Drive. Consider Trinity parents, coming in from out of state, wanting to enjoy a relaxed dinner with their son or daughter. Already we have a number of fine choices, and this development will extend those choices, providing a spot overlooking the water. A boutique hotel, intended to be part of the development, will be a logical place for such parents as well as Trinity guests to stay. Indeed, this proposed development will not only be good for Palos Heights; it will also be good for Trinity. While I won’t be party to the collaborative efforts that are sure to emerge between the city and the college in the coming years, I hope to enjoy the fruits of these efforts as a Trinity parent and supporter—as will all those who are living in or visiting Palos Heights. That which lies ahead is sure to be a win for all of us! Steven Timmermans, Ph.D., is the president of Trinity Christian College. He has announced his tenure in office will end June 1.

Readers Write Keep Palos clean of litter Dear Editor: This past Saturday, dozens of Palos Park residents, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and village officials spent most of

the morning picking up litter throughout Palos Park at the annual Rid Litter Day event. I applaud their efforts and the example the parents of these children are setting with instilling the importance of taking care of the environment.

The question that comes to my mind is, “How could someone disrespectfully throw litter out of their car window as if the earth is their garbage can?” Were these litterbugs never taught the importance of being good stewards of the environment? Litter is a national problem and is piling up around us.  According to the nonprofit group, Keep America Beautiful, About 85 percent of all littering is the result of individual choices, so by educating people and changing behaviors, you may be able to help reduce the amount of litter that accumulates on the ground. Please take the time to talk to your kids about the importance of not littering, be a good example and share with them the consequences of littering. Palos Park officers, for example, will be writing tickets (up to a $750.00 fine) for people caught littering.  Thank you for caring. Denise Cowan Palos Park Beautification Chairman

Letters Policy The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. Mail or bring Readers Write letters to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463, or e-mail us at theregional@comcast.net

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What is your favorite memory of St. John Paul II? (Asked before Mass last Sunday evening at St. Michael Church in Orland Park, hours after the late pope was canonized in Rome.)

Photos by Joan Hadac

Molly Scullion, Orland Park “It was amazing and very nice to see him travel to so many different countries and take the time to see the people.”

Kathleen Andrews, Orland Park “I was impressed that he started World Youth Day and that he consecrated the the world to Mary at the request of Our Lady of Fatima.”

Karen Nolan, Orland Park “I was touched by how he would embrace the babies. He had so much love, and he spread that around. He cared about everyone.”

Julie Grisolano, Chicago Ridge “Probably his love of the Blessed Mother and his love of young people. He tried to foster and bring in youth. His message to the young was “Be Not Afraid.” Christ tells us, “Be Not Afraid, Be Not Afraid, Be Not Afraid.” When you’re in your 20s, you’re afraid of what’s coming, the future. As pope, John Paul II merged devout holiness with love of humanity, a sincere love of other human beings.”

Tom Waliczek, Orland Park “His humility impressed me. The image of him kissing the ground in the many countries he visited will always stay with me. His leadership brought the Church out of difficult times and made it relevant in the modern world. Plus the contributions he made to freeing people from Communism can’t be overstated.”


The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Palos Heights Farmers Market returns

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Moshka Imports first guest of Community Tent on May 7 From Anne Girzadas Palos Heights Farmers Market coordinator The Palos Heights Farmers market will open the 2014 season this Wednesday, May 7, at the Municipal Parking lot, 12217 S Harlem Ave. The market opens every Wednesday at 7 a.m., and closes at 1 p.m. The season will run until Oct. 15. Ample parking is located behind the Harlem Avenue businesses off 71st Court. The market is sponsored by the city of Palos Heights and the Beautification Committee. Information about this year’s market can be found at the City of Palos Heights website, www.palosheights.org, or join us on Facebook. In addition, weekly email market updates are available for all patrons. Stop by the City Tent at the market to sign up for the emails, or call the city at 361-1800. The “Frequent Shopper Program” will start opening day and run for the entirety of the market. This year, double credit will be given to patrons who bring a friend to the market who also picks up a “shopper card”. Every ten visits to the market enter you into a year-end market raffle contest. Stop by the City Tent to pick up this year’s card. The spring has been very cool this year, but the vendors are ready for a new season. Many of the vendors will have beautiful flowers and baskets, and other gift items ready for Mothers’ Day.

Many of last year’s vendors are returning for the 2014 season, and 2 new vendors have also been added to expand the variety of the market. The food vendors returning to the market include Lyons Fruit Farm from South Haven, Mich. (Fruits, vegetables, eggs, cider, flowers and edible plants and herbs), Zeldenrust Farm from Chicago Heights (fruits, vegetables, flowering baskets, herbs, plants), and Richert-Phillips Farms from North Liberty, Ind.(organic fruits and vegetables, jams and jellies, honey, syrup, hanging baskets and herbs). Information about the Richert-Phillips CSA is available at their tent. Windy Hill Farms, from Grant Park, has expanded their selection this year to include not only hormone and antibiotic free, non-GMO fed beef, but also Amish chickens and other poultry products. Katic Breads from Aurora, IL will feature breads and pastries made from organic flour. Stamper Cheese from Chicago, IL will offer their large selection of artisan cheeses and cheese spreads from Wisconsin. Yoder’s Bakery from LaGrange, IN will offer eggs, butter and cheeses, along with delicious breads, pies, cookies, cakes, rolls, egg noodles and pasta, apple butter, honey, pickled beets and pickles, and kettle corn. The Olive Tap, from Downers Grove, IL will feature their large selection of olive oil, flavored olive oils, and vinegars. Aracely’s Bakery of Melrose Park, IL will again be

offering many varieties of homemade tamales. Parmesan’s Pizza from Frankfort, IL will be selling pizza and pizza products, breads and rolls, pastries, and pesto. Two new food vendors are joining this year’s market. Sozo Coffee from Topeka, IN will be selling pre-packaged coffees and lattes, Natural Energy Drinks and Nutritional beverage juice. Fresh coffee will also be available for sale. Theresa’s Selections from Country Club Hills, IL will be selling Artisan Pasta and sauces, salsa sauces, Jalapeno and fruit jams, bottled Italian peppers, and mustards. More food vendors are still being added to the market. Hiemenz Nursery from Monee, IL will return to the market this year with their large selection of perennial flowers, grasses and shrubs. The Pampered Chef will also be back, with many Mother’s Day gifts and everything needed for the kitchen and BBQ. Nature’s Resources, a Shaklee distributor based in Oak Forest, IL, will feature nutrition, weight loss, natural skin care and green home products. Super Sharp Sharpening Services, based in Crestwood, will be available to sharpen knives and more. The market is proud to announce partnerships with Dr. John Principe MD of WellbeingMD Center for Life, and with area restaurants. Dr. Principe will offer the “Recipe of the Week” again this year, along with sponsoring canning classes at the Mindful

Palos Heights’ annual Farmers Market opens for the 2014 season this Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the municipal parking lot/ plaza of the mural “Treasures of Palos Heights,” 122nd and Harlem Avenue. Kitchen facilities. This year Harvest Room Restaurant, Julianni’s Pizza and Country House Restaurant will be featuring menu items with fruits and vegetables from the Palos Heights Market. Additional information will be available as the season progresses. The market will again be offering the Community Tent for area businesses, organizations, and artists. Moshka Imports will be the May 7 guest at the Community Tent, featuring beautiful

stones, gems, crystals and jewelry items. The Palos Heights Library will again be offering story hour every first and third Wednesday of the month starting May 21st. Additional groups already booked include the Palos Heights Recreation Department (offering raffles with each visit), The Center of Palos Park and the Children’s Zoo, The Palos Heights and Palos Park Women’s Clubs, The Palos Heights Police and Fire Departments, The Palos Heights Garden

Club, Friends of the Palos Heights Library, Dr. John Principe MD of WellbeingMD Center for Life. Additional reservations are still available. Members of the Beautification Committee will be available with information and raffle tickets for the Car Classic Event. Please contact Anne Girzadas at palosheightsfarmersmarket@ gmail.com for more information. Make the Palos Heights Farmers Market your market. We look forward to seeing you May 7!

District 230 panel urges almost no change in graduation requirements by Tim Hadac staff reporter

the recommendations are quite minimal,” he said. “So I’m just wondering if there were other things considered—bigger-picture things that could bring us into alignment [with other districts], more progressive things that the committee members, all the bright minds in there, could have considered. These seem like very minor adjustments.” Dryier said there was a considerable amount of deliberation about a range of issues, including increasing the amount of required courses in certain areas, but that in the end, the prevailing opinion was to leave things as is to give students flexibility in pursuing academic interests. She added that the reason for giving more weight is to merely reflect that physical education in 2014 is much more than traditional “gym class” and that it typically incorporates nutrition, personal health monitoring and more. The added weight will not mean more physical education classes, Dryier added. “We are not recommending that the district add mandated classes or curriculum,”

she said. “These are not suggestions on curriculum or course offerings, these are just recommendations on graduation requirements,” seconded board Vice President Patrick O’Sullivan. The next steps, Dryier said, are to bring the recommendation before the board’s education committee and later before the full board. Also last Thursday, the board’s Student Services Committee was asked to begin a review of student ID policies, in the wake of an April 16 incident in which an 18-year-old man and a 17-yearold boy, neither of whom attends Sandburg, boarded a school bus, rode to the school, and walked around inside for 15 minutes before fleeing. The incident, which appears to be little more than a prank, caused concern among some parents about security at the school, 13300 S. La Grange Road, Orland Park. Also, board members praised John Connolly, the district’s technology director, for being named to the “20 to Watch” education technology leaders by the National

sue crazy,” Rogers said. Village Attorney Thomas Bayer told Rogers that even if the village were to eliminate the (Continued from page 1) double fence for pools it would allows for special circumstances.” still meet the requirements set A homeowner’s request for forth by the state of Illinois. “Our code will withstand legal a front yard fence would first go before the Zoning Board of scrutiny,” Reed added Another change is Palos Appeals and then the council. If the ZBA were to deny the Park’s rule that a rear fence request, it would need approval cannot be erected closer than from a super majority or four of three feet to the lot line. The revised ordinance states a back the five council members. The council is also making yard fence can be built on the lot changes to fencing around line if adjoining property ownswimming pools. The old code ers supply a recorded covenant required that a homeowner have agreeing to the construction of a fence around the pool even if the fence. The revised fence ordinance appropriate fencing was already around the yard. The revised document states that a perimeter yard fence can serve as the required pool fence instead of requiring another fence be constructed around the pool. “The fence inside of a pool is (Continued from page 1) just stupid,” Reed said. “If you have somebody stupid enough martial arts demonstration by to jump over your fence and go students of T-USA Martial Arts into your pool and they drown and a public safety demonstration whose fault is that. If they were of the Cook County Sheriff’s Police going to jump one fence they bomb squad. probably would jump over two.” Resident Maria Rogers ex- Start and finish pressed concern over this The half marathon itself starts change telling the council that and ends near Palos Heights City if a child were to go through Hall, 7607 W. College Drive, and the fence and drown in the pool runs west along Route 83. The half the homeowner would be sued. marathon starts at 7:30 a.m., the “We live in a world that is so event’s new 10K race begins at

may have taken more than a year to complete but Palos Park officials said it was worth the wait. “What we have here today is an excellent document and I’m all in favor of it,” Commissioner James Pavlatos said. “We’ve come up with an excellent document for the people of Palos Park.” “I think this is a remarkable example of the democratic process,” said Mayor John Mahoney, alluding to the number of meetings held to discuss the document as well as the amount public comment received. “Democracy is not always pretty, but I think it is effective.”

The graduation requirements for Stagg, Sandburg and Andrew High Schools appear to be on track, at least in the opinion of a committee that studied the issue for months and had only one small revision to suggest. What was suggested by the group of 28 faculty and administrators was that Consolidated High School District 230 increase the amount of course credits granted for physical education courses to a half credit, up from the current one eighth. The announcement was made during a presentation by Kim Dryier, assistant superintendent for instructional services, at a board of education meeting held last Thursday at Stagg, 8015 W. 111th St., Palos Hills. After months of fact-finding and deliberation that included five meetings, the small, solitary suggestion seemed to perplex board President Rick Nogal. “It seems that a lot of time and energy went into this study; and quite frankly, in my view,

Fence law

Big race

7:40, and a “Run, Walk or Roll” half-mile race (for people with disabilities) is set to start at 7:45. The race officially ends at 10:30 a.m., and an awards ceremony is set for 11 a.m. As always, parking is at a premium at the event, and spectators driving to the site are advised to arrive early and use local parking lots along the north side of Route 83. Proceeds from the event benefit the American Cancer Society, the South West Special Recreation Association, and Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens.

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School Board Association. Connolly was the only person from Illinois named to the list this year. According to Nogal, Connolly has over the last two years “set a technology vision for the district that includes a one-to one ‘bring your own device’ program, along with leveraging social media, digital citizenship, Google migration and a website overhaul.” Finally, a number of District 230 student received awards for various achievements, including more than two dozen members of the percussion team at Andrew,

Photo by Tim Hadac

Kim Dryier, assistant superintendent for instruction (right), speaks with District 230 President Rick Nogal (from left), Vice President Patrick O’Sullivan, Kate Murphy-Peterson and Susan Dalton. who won a national championship this year after finishing second two years in a row. Others who received awards were district alumnae Kendall Coyne (Sandburg) and Katie

Eberling (Stagg), who returned from the Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Coyne was a member of the women’s silver medal ice hockey team, and Eberling served as an alternate on the bobsled team.


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The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Little Free Library joins Lake Katherine for Earth Day

Photos by Jason Maholy Haley Young, 5, (from left) and her sister, Makayla, 3, hold ducklings from The Children’s Farm at The Palos Heights Public Library Administrative Librarian Elaine Savage tells the story of The Little Free Center. The sisters traveled with their mom Jessie and brother Noemy, 8 months, from Blue Island to Library after she and Lake Katherine board of directors member Janet Czajkowski unveiled the bird- take part in the Earth Day activities at Lake Katherine. house-inspired gift to kick off Earth Day festivities on Saturday at Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Garden. The Friends of the Library have offered to stock the Little Free Library with naturerelated books for all ages.

Jessie Young of Blue Island holds her son Noemy as the 8-month-old curiously pokes his finger at a yellow duckling.

Palos Heights resident Karen Skocik snaps a photo of the Little Free Library. Skocik was among the contributors who helped develop the artistic concept of the one-for-one book depot given by the Palos Heights Library and Friends of the Library to Lake Katherine.

Grace Heafey, 5, of Palos Heights, points out the answer to a question posed by Mary Johnson as the Palos Heights Public Library’s head of public services reads a story to girls from Daisy Scout Troop 60168.

Lois Duran (right), from the Children’s Farm at The Center in Palos Park, introduces a duckling to Richard O. Gentry, 2, of Chicago’s Beverly community in the nature center.

Submitted photo

Earth Day efforts at Palos 118 schools Students rake diligently as part of Palos West School’s annual Earth Day efforts to spruce up the exterior of their school. Taking time out for spreading mulch, weeding, planting, and picking up trash are all part of annual Earth Day beautification efforts in Palos 118 elementary schools. This year was special at Palos West, as they marked their 25th anniversary of Earth Day observances on April 22 by planting a silver maple tree. After their outdoor ceremony in the afternoon, incoming Superintendent Anthony Scarsella distributed apple seeds harvested from West’s own “Johnny Appleseed Tree” to students. The treasured tree is significant because it is a direct descendent of frontier nurseryman Johnny “Appleseed” Chapman’s actual apple trees. Meanwhile at Palos East, student council members and various other classes took time out of their day to rake leaves, plant flowers, and pick up trash around the school grounds.

Lighting grant brightens interiors at Lake Katherine New indoor lighting improvements at Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens in Palos Heights are complete, paid for by a $4,000 grant awarded last October by the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation . The goal of the grant program was to reduce electricity consumption from indoor lighting. Lake Katherine used the majority of the grant funding to install five Solatube lights in April in the Nature Center offices and restrooms. Solatubes use a mirrored tube system to bring natural daylight into interior spaces. The remaining grant funding will be used to replace several old damaged fixtures in the Nature Center restrooms with energy efficient LED fixtures. Making energy-saving improvements to Lake Katherine’s buildings has been one focus of the organization over the past year. According to Development Coordinator Cecilia Govrik, “Reducing energy consumption through simple technologies like these solar daylighting systems is one way that the organization is promoting environmental stewardship. We appreciate having this opportunity to save energy and money for Lake Katherine because of the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation’s grant program.” The Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation was established in December 1999 as an independent foundation with a $225 million endowment provided by Commonwealth Edison. The mission of the

foundation is to improve energy efficiency, advance the development of renewable energy resources and protect natural areas in communities all across Illinois. To learn more about the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation, please visit www.illinoiscleanenergy.org. To learn more about Lake

Katherine’s programs and events, visit www.lakekatherine.org or call 361-1873. Lake Katherine Nature Center & Botanic Gardens, 501(c) (3) charitable organization, at 7402 W. Lake Katherine Drive in Palos Heights. —Lake Katherine

Submitted photo

Lake Katherine Operations Manager Gareth Blakesley and his staff now work in the light of a new enegy-saving lighting system paid for by a grant from a foundation started by ComEd.


The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Thefts from autos in Westgate Valley GPS units, electronics, tools and loose change were stolen from five vehicles parked near homes in Westgate Valley Estates, near 135th Street and Ridgeland Avenue, Palos Heights police said this week. The thefts occurred in the late night hours of April 20-21, all from vehicles that were unlocked. In other Palos Heights police news, Abdelghani Muza, 18, of Orland Park, was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and driving a vehicle with overly tinted windows. Police curbed his vehicle in the 13300 block of South Harlem Avenue at 8:13 p.m. April 23. A search of the vehicle yielded a smoking pipe, police said. Muza was released on his signature, and he is scheduled to appear in court on June 10. John P. Garman, 37, of Orland Park, was charged with driving on a suspended license, as well as operating a vehicle with overly tinted windows. His vehicle was pulled over by police in the 6300 block of West 127th Street at 1:47 a.m. last Tuesday. Bond was set at $1,500, and Garman is set to appear in court on May 27. Police charged two Oak Lawn men, John P. Collins, 22, and Michael J. Collins, 24, with possession of drug paraphernalia. Police stopped their vehicle in the

PALOS HEIGHTS POLICE 7100 block of West 127th Street at 11:33 a.m. last Saturday. Both were released on their signatures and are scheduled to appear in court on June 10. Paul G. Ward, 49, of Chicago Ridge, was charged with speeding and driving on a suspended license. His vehicle was pulled over by police in the 12300 block of South Harlem Avenue at 12:57 p.m. last Friday after police said they detected it traveling at 52 mph, 17 mph over the posted limit. Bond was set at $1,500, and Ward is set to appear in court on May 12. Police charged Graciela Pacheco-Montes, 36, of Alsip, with failure to dim headlights and driving on a suspended license. Police stopped her vehicle in the 6800 block of West 127th Street at 9:49 p.m. last Saturday. Bond was set at $1,500, and Pacheco-Montes was given a court date of May 12. Michael R. Dina, 54, of Downers Grove, was charged driving on a suspended license, no proof of insurance, and operating a vehicle with inoperative taillights. Police curbed his vehicle in the 12300 block of South Harlem Avenue at 8:36 p.m. April 22. Bond was set at $2,000, and Dina is set to appear in court on May 27.

Submitted photo

Palos Park intent to Rid Litter Dozens of Palos Park residents, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and village officials spent most of the morning picking up litter throughout Palos Park during the village’s annual Rid Litter Day last Saturday. About 40 volunteers gathered outside the Rec. Center to take part in the cleanup effort, organized by the village Beautification Committee each year around Earth Day. The panel chaired by Denise Cowan prepared a site map with locations for the volunteers to tackle garbage. Committee members hand out gloves and garbage bags to volunteers, with directions for the routes. The first Palos Park Rid Litter Day, organized by The Beautification Committee was in 1997, making Saturday’s event No. 17, Cowan said. An estimated 2 tons of litter has been picked up over that time period. Boy Scout Troop 729 adopted 123rd Street, collecting more than bags of litter from 86th Avenue west to La Grange Road. Brownies and Girl Scouts from Palos East collected litter along 119th and 86th Avenue. Palos Peddler representatives took part, as did Mayor John Mahoney and Commissioner Nicole Milovich-Walters, with family members. Participating Girl Scouting units are 4th-grade Troop 60349, 3rd grade Brownie Troop 50215and 4th grade Junior Girl Scout Troop 60349. Palos Park police is enforcing a zero-tolerance anti-litter enforcement campaign. Violators may be fined up to $750 for infractions.

Orland man charged with battery Orland Park police charged Nicholas J. Fountas, 22, of Orland Park, with battery and breach of the peace after he allegedly caused a disturbance at an immediate care medical facility on Orland Square Drive at 11:27 p.m. April 13. Staff at the site told police that Fountas became impatient while waiting to be seen, threw a cup in the waiting area, and put his hands on a physician’s shirt while cursing at him. Fountas had left the facility by the time police arrived, but he was positively identified in a photo lineup by staff, according to the police report. He turned himself in at Orland police headquarters several hours later. Fountas is set to appear in court in Bridgeview on May 21. In other Orland Park police news, Lisa M. Conry, 33, of Orland Park, was charged with DUI, speeding, and improper lane usage. Her car was pulled over by police in the 10700 block of West 143rd Street at 1:28 a.m. April 10. Police said they detected her car traveling at 56 mph, 21 mph over the posted limit. The police report gave no indication of a court date. Police charged Julio C. Olea, 35, of Orland Park, with DUI after they allegedly spotted him sleeping in a parked, running car with a large can of Icehouse beer in his hand in the 9800 block of El Cameno Lane at 8:55 p.m. April 3. His car was towed and impounded, police said, and Olea was scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview last Thursday. Frank J. Castro, 24, of Orland Park, was charged with possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia. Police said they found a bag of cannabis and a metal smoking pipe in Castro’s SUV while it was parked at Orland Square Mall at 6:52 p.m. April 7. He is set to

ORLAND PARK POLICE appear in court at the Orland Park Civic Center on May 13. Police charged Luke C. Thompson, 18, of Tinley Park, with possession of cannabis with intent to sell, as well as possession of drug paraphernalia. Thompson, a driver for an Orland Park pizzeria, was stopped by police in the 18000 block of Wolf Road at 8:58 p.m. April 6. Police said they searched his vehicle and found a plastic bag of cannabis, extra plastic bags, a digital scale, and a glass smoking pipe. They also confiscated $175 cash that they suspected to be involved in drug transactions, but left him with $67 he said belonged to his employer. He is set to appear in court in Bridgeview on May 21. Also charged in connection with the incident was James C. Coleman, 22, of Orland Park, a back-seat passenger in Thompson’s vehicle. Coleman was charged with possession of cannabis and was given a May 13 court date at the Orland Park Civic Center. Police charged Helen D. Baran, 29, of Oak Lawn, with speeding, DUI, improper lane usage, and no proof of insurance. Her SUV was curbed by police near 135th Street and La Grange Road at 2:07 a.m. April 12, after police said they detected it traveling at 58 mph, 23 mph over the posted limit. The police report gave no indication of a court date. Jason E. Coomer, 38, of Frankfort, was charged with assault after he allegedly threatened to kill a waitress at a restaurant in the 15300 block of South La Grange Road at 4:07 p.m. April 8. Coomer was described by police as “highly intoxicated” and was given a court date of May 13

Capri Restaurant is Celebrating it’s

at the Orland Park Civic Center. Police charged Allison R. Bartkowiak, 23, of Orland Hills, with possession of cannabis, possession of drug paraphernalia, and failure to obey a stop sign. Police curbed her car in the 8100 block of West Wheeler Drive at 8:39 p.m. March 31. Also charged in relation to the incident was Marianne E. Golk, 22, of Orland Hills, a passenger in the car. She was charged with possession of a controlled substance after police said they found five white pills, believed to be Xanax, in her possession. No court information was given by the police report. Alicia Michelle Shelton, 25, of Alsip, was charged with retail theft after she allegedly stole 18 items of children’s clothing from a clothier in the 100 block of Orland Park Place. Her minivan, matching the description provided by store security, was pulled over by police in the 16000 block of South Harlem Avenue at 11:40 a.m. March 31. The police report gave no information on a court date.

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Free bike safety helmets at Palos Park Police Dept. Palos Park Police offer free bicycle safety helmets to children in Palos Park. Head injuries and falls from bicycles are often times the main reason children visit emergency rooms during the summer months. Palos Park Police hope that by issuing the helmets they can prevent head injuries to children riding bicycles. All members of the Palos Park Police Bicycle Patrol Unit wear their bike helmets any time they ride. Helmets can be picked up at the Palos Park Police Department, 8999 W. 123rd St. For more information, contact Chief Joe Miller at 671-3770. Chief Miller and the Police Department offer the following bicycle safety tips:

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The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Shepard serves Arts Extravaganza by Jeff Vorva There was food that included fried green tomato sliders and chicken salad tartlets. There was music that included jazz and strings. There were group interpretations of works that included

“ZZ’s Sleepaway Camp for Disordered Dreamers.’’ There was comedy from a group called the Laughing Aardvarks. And there was plenty of art, art and more art. Shepard High School hosted the District 218 fifth annual

Arts Extravaganza on Saturday night and Shepard, Richards and Eisenhower high schools joined forces with Delta/Summit schools to provide a night of creativity in many different ways. Here are a few photos to catch the atmosphere of the night.

Shepard’s percussion ensemble Flam and Cheese performed Saturday night at that art show.

Self-portraits adorned the walls in the Shepard cafeteria on Saturday night.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Shepard senior Jessica O’Sullivan’s digital photo, “Forced PerspecStudent dish out desserts at the Arts Extravaganza at Shepard High School. Bugs and boots were a part of the artwork at the District 218 show. tive” was on display at the Arts Extravaganza on Saturday.

School Notes Mt. Assisi ‘Beat the Nun’ Golf on the Hill

the Nun” contest. Cost of $150 includes round of golf with cart, lunch, dinner, and refreshments. Visit www.mtassisi.org for more details.

today (Thursday), from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., at the school, 5705 W. 127th St. Meet the staff and students. Tour the state of the art buildAlvernia Manor Senior Living ing. View the interactive whiteand Mount Assisi Academy’s boards that are in every room. Golf on the Hill golf date is set Incarnation School Enjoy refreshments. for Monday, May 19. early childhood Attendees may join with the “Beat the Nun” golf outing: open house junior high students immediately 11:30 a.m. registration, lunch at noon, 1 p.m. shotgun start at Cog Incarnation Catholic School following for an open Mic poetry Hill in Lemont. in Palos Heights will hold an night and fine arts festival. For more information, call 385Includes auction, raffles, prizes, Early Childhood Open House, and contests, including the “Beat preschool through 4th grade, 6250.

Photo by Bob Rakow

Stagg’s Waleed Halim celebrates at the school’s homecoming parade in the fall. This spring will feature a Staggapalooza celebration of the school’s 50th birthday.

Stagg times 10 equals Staggapalooza Some Stagg Chargers — both present and former — list Staggfest as one of their favorite Stagg traditions. As a culminating 50th Anniversary event and as a tribute to current students, Stagg High School will present Staggapalooza, what some have described as Staggfest to the tenth power. On Saturday, May 17, a 5K Walk/Run kicks off the day-long Staggapalooza event. As runners line up near the school’s tennis courts on Roberts Road for the start of the 5K, the Stagg

kitchen will begin to serve up a pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. in the school’s Commons. Adults are charged $5 children ages 5 to 12 are charged $3, children 4 and under are free, and runners will receive a breakfast ticket as part of their registration fee. Race registration information is available on the school’s website at stagg.d230.org. The Staggapalooza morning rounds out with a Vendor Fair in the Charger Gym from 9 a.m. until noon. More than 55 vendors will showcase their organizations or businesses in an effort to better connect area resources with community members. A complete list of participant vendors will be listed on the school’s website. Vendor participants represent areas such as Health and Wellness, Academic Resources, Finance/Financial Planning, Retail/ Restaurant, and Home Improvement. The Community Resource Fair is free to the public. Each adult who attends will receive a raffle ticket upon entry. Vendors have donated certificates and

prizes that will be raffled off every 30 minutes. The event extends outdoors not only with the 5K finish line in the stadium, but also with a craft fair from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the south end of campus. The craft fair entry fee of $3 includes entertainment from a student performance stage featuring everything from jazz to cultural dance groups, from noon until 4 p.m. in the stadium. Local restaurants, including Chef Klaus, El Gallo, Peppo’s, Stacked, Sno Biz, Chase Events, Zacarella’s Pizza, and Tastee Freeze, will serve up a variety of tasty lunchtime choices from tented booths set up near the craft fair. Staggapalooza then finishes with rock bands that include Stagg alumni and a headliner group to be announced. Entry to the rock concert is $10 per person from 5 p.m. until 8:45 p.m. Student race participants will receive a concert wristband as part of their race registration. Children 13 and under must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, visit Stagg’s website at stagg.d230.org.

Maley lands at St. Laurence after controversial firing at Kenwood by Jeff Vorva

Maley said in a news release. “I’m committed to creating those same results for the Vikings.” In just a month after he was “We are thrilled to add a coach controversially fired at Kenwood of Jim Maley’s caliber to our athAcademy, Jim Maley found work letic department,” St. Laurence’s again. Athletic Director Tim Chandler St. Laurence High School ofsaid in a statement. ficials announced last week that “First and foremost, his comMaley was hired as the school’s mitment to academics and deboys basketball coach. veloping the whole person really To hear some talk about it, stood out in the interview process. Maley was fired for having strinAdd in his impressive basketball gent rules regarding academics credentials, including his experiand conduct and sat out some of ence in turning around a prohis players, which didn’t sit well gram, and it was a no-brainer with parents. Speculation is that it for the committee. It was very helped cause his ouster in March, apparent that coach Maley is a sparking a debate among observbasketball junkie and he is going ers about Kenwood’s priorities. to work tirelessly to restore the “We had a code of conduct in Jim Maley proud tradition of St. Laurence place,” Maley told the Chicago Side Sports website. “We tried to hold off-the-court stuff. We had a player basketball.” Maley played for Lyons Townkids accountable for their grades last year who was disrespectful to and their actions in school. We the security guard. We sat him. ship in high school, where he was were willing to lose games before He was our best player and we named three-time all-conference, two-time conference player of the we would violate the policy. We ended up losing because of it.” Maley began his coaching career year, and two-time Illinois Baskethad some parents hot about it.” “The reason I was given was at Glenbard West High School, ball Coaches Association all-state. He played a year at Norththat we weren’t winning enough where he was a volunteer varsity games. This was frustrating for assistant as well as head junior western University and finished at the College of the Holy Cross me especially all that we’ve done varsity coach. After Glenbard West, Maley was in Worcester, Mass. off the court and on the court.” It appears that St. Laurence’s He told the website he comes a sophomore coach and then the from a family of coaches and that head varsity coach at Kenwood, philosophy will be more in line he places emphasis on character where he compiled a 46-34 mark with his own. “During the interview process, with at least 15 wins each seaand academics. “We have a standard where you son. His team also improved their I was overwhelmed with confihave to have a 2.3 [grade point cumulative GPA and decreased dence in the direction, vision and average] and they have to main- their number of school absences. leadership of president Joe Marti“As a result of what our coaching nez, principal James Muting, and tain it at all times,” he told the website. “If it went down to a 2.2, staff built, Kenwood Academy will athletic director Tim Chandler,’’ we would sit people. We sat one be a serious contender for a public Malay said. “We seem to share of our players before a big game. league championship next year and the same set of values and beliefs, We lost but that taught the team will have at least three players in which was the deciding factor for that we’re serious about all of the line to earn Division I scholarships,” me in taking the job.”

Student News Josh Kurchinski of Palos Heights will perform as one of two featured soloists in Olivet Nazarene University’s 101st commencement concert this Saturday, May 3, at Kresge Auditorium in Larsen Fine Arts Center on Olivet’s campus. Nearly 40 Olivet students auditioned to perform as soloists. For this year’s concert, the Department of Music faculty selected

both Kurchinski based on his musical skills and accomplishments. A bassoonist, Kurchinski will perform Vivaldi’s Concerto in A minor, F. VIII, No. 2, Allegro, ma molto moderato. The concert includes a varied classical music program accompanied by the University Orchestra with Dr. Neal Woodruff conducting. ***

Class Reunions Fenger High School Class of 1964 will hold their 50th reunion on Saturday, Aug. 2, at the Tinley Park Convention Center, Tinley Park. Contact Susan Rheinheimer at susan_sings@att.net or email Fengerreunion1964@gmail.com.

There’s no place like USA.gov. It’s the official source of federal and state government information. It can make you as all-knowing as the Wizard of Oz.


The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

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Community Notes Bundle Weekend at St. Alexander

exercise equipment, books, jewelry, bedding and more.

The 25th annual Bundle Weekend collection of new or gently used items for the needy sponsored by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul at St. Alexander Parish in Palos Heights will be held this Friday, Saturday and Sunday, May 2, 3 and 4, at the parish, 126th and 71st Avenue in Palos Heights. Items sought include baby clothes, blankets, pots, pans and other kitchen utensils. Silverware, jewelry, clothing. Not accepted: bicycles, computers or televisions. To schedule a pickup of large items, call 773-779-6700.

Laughter Circle with Kathy O’Brien

A monthly Laughter Circle with laughter yoga leader Kathy O’Brien RN this Sunday, May 4, at 6 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. Laughter leader O’Brien brings laughter and all its benefits to the Laughter Circle program. What’s a laughter circle? It’s a group of people who want to laugh. Not from jokes or comedy routines. but rather from laughter for the sake of laughter. Research shows that laughter strengthens the immune system, reduces stress and anxiety, alleviGarage sale ates pain, and helps people get at Good Shepherd along better. O’Brien is a regLuthern church istered nurse and an advanced The Evangelical Lutheran certified Laughter Leader. The Church of the Good Shepherd, cost of the laughter circle is $5, 7800 W. McCarthy Road, Palos which O’Brien donates to The Heights, will hold its 17th annual Center. She has led laughter garage sale this Friday, May 2, sessions locally at Lake Kathfrom 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Satur- erine, with Dr. John Principe’s day, May 3, from 8 a.m. to noon. WellBeingMD and for the Palos Everything will be half price Heights Woman’s Club. Registration is appreciated. on Saturday. There will be toys, antiques, housewares, furniture, Call The Center at 361-3650.

Submitted photo

Southwest Symphony’s ‘Irish Suite’ teams with dancers The award-winning Cross Keys Irish Dancers, The Voices of the Valley and the Leyden High School Choir will join the Southwest Symphony Orchestra in From Ireland to Distant Planets at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, May 10, in the Ozinga Auditorium of Trinity Christian College, 6601 W. College Drive (Route 83), in Palos Heights. Repertoire includes Anderson’s the Irish Suite and Holst’s The Planets, which will be performed with a multi-media presentation. Tickets are from $20 to $25 and can be purchased at the door, by calling 802-0686 or online at www.southwestsymphony.com. Seniors pay $15. Children 12 and under are free. Anyone wishing to audition for the Symphony should call the number above. 

Kevin Grace to emcee Orland Township’s Senior American Idol dinner show Tuesday

Kevin Grace from HGTV’s “Design Star” and Windy City Live’s “Kevin Grace Save my Space” is scheduled to emcee Senior American Idol on Tuesday, May 6, from 5 to 10 p.m., at Georgio’s Banquets, in Oak Lawn. 8800 W. 159th St. in Orland Park. Guest speaker Sheryl Monahan, Grace, a Chicago native and representing General Finishes, will interior design dynamo, decided talk about finishing wood products, to pursue his passion on his own such as furniture, turned vessels after starring in HGTV’s “Design and other creations. Guest are Star, Season 6.” Grace hosted Sewelcome to attend. nior American Idol last year, and

provided the audience with lots of laughs. Senior Idol’s panel of judges will consist of “American Idol” finalists Gina Glocksen and Kyle Dee, as well as WCCQ country music radio personality Rich Renik and the talented musical duo, Mr. and Mrs. O. Attendees will enjoy a meal while 16 contestants sing their way to the top, competing for the title of “Orland Township

Political memorabilia collectors show comes to Orland Sunday

Adopt-a-Pot: Help keep Palos Heights beautiful

Club Activities Hickory Hills Wood Workers The Hickory Hills Wood Workers will meet Thursday, May 8, at 7 p.m., at the Oak View Community Center, 4625 W. 111th. St.

Collectors of political history items from throughout the Midwest will converge on the Orland Park Civic Center for the spring meeting of the Chicagoland American Political Items Collectors’ Show this Sunday, May 4, from noon to 3 p.m. “We are very excited to bring this show to Orland Park,” said Mayor Dan McLaughlin, an avid political history collector. “This is a great opportunity for anyone who enjoys political history to see some amazing collections.” The Chicagoland American Political Items Collectors (CAPIC) is a subgroup of the national American Political Items Collectors, which first formed in the 1940s and re-organized in 1960. CAPIC formed in the 1960s and met in Chicago until the mid 1970s. Randy Kopp serves as the Chi-

cagoland group’s president. “We are very appreciative to Mayor McLaughlin for all of his help with bringing the show to Orland Park and for arranging for Chief McCarthy to be a part of the event,” Kopp said. Members and guests are encouraged to bring Ronald Reagan items to display, sell or trade. Orland Park Police Chief Tim McCarthy will be the group’s special guest on May 4. McCarthy was a secret service agent and was wounded during the March 30, 1981 assassination attempt on President Reagan. Past President Duane Ross joined the group in the early ‘70s. “Those were the days before eBay and collectors were still finding good items in antique shops, flea markets and garage and estate sales,” Ross said, noting there

were few books available to tell the value of political memorabilia. The group counts among its early members the best FDR collector in the world, an Admiral Dewey specialist and a Chicago mayors specialist. Sunday’s gathering at the Orland Park Civic Center will be collectors’ first gathering in the Southwest Suburbs. “This event promises to be a great afternoon for anyone who enjoys political memorabilia,” McLaughlin said. “We invite everyone to come to the Civic Center to learn more about CAPIC and to see some amazing pieces that helped shape our country’s political history,” he said. Collectors may rent tables for $10 each. Admission and parking are free. For more, call Randy Kopp at 630-897-0434.

Library Notes Free Comics Book Day Children of all ages are invited to celebrate Free Comic Book Day this Saturday, May 3, at the Palos Park Public Library, 12330 Forest Glen Blvd. Visit the special comic book display and pick up a free comic book provided by Diamond Comic Distributors. Come dressed in your favorite comic book character. Photos will be taken of children dressed as their favorite comic book character and a prize will be awarded for best costume. Winner will be announced by May 8.

Heights library upcoming events The following events will take place at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. Bring your projects to the Needle Club and enjoy the company of others while working on Tuesday, May 6, from 10 a.m. to noon. New members always welcome. Scrabble Club plays on Tuesday, May 6, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. New players always welcome. Lunch Bunch on Monday, May 12, at noon, will discuss “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief” by Lawrence Wright, available for pick up at the library. Bring your lunch; refreshments and dessert will be provided. On Tuesday, May 6, at 10 a.m., learn how the library provides access to thousands of audiobooks, eBooks and other downloadable items through Media on Demand. Devices including tablets, Kindles and other e-readers will be discussed and demo-ed. Learn about software, device capability, checkout and more, available to you with your Palos Heights library card. Dr. Linda Sasser, Ph.D., will present the program Healthy Brain, Healthy Memory on

Wednesday, May 7, at 7 p.m. She will discuss how memory works and what activities can help you maintain, and even improve, brain function. Like Netflix? Bring your Internet enabled device-computer, tablet, or smartphone-on Thursday, May 8, at 10 a.m. to start free movie streaming now! Find out about two new free streaming movie services the library offers to PHPL cardholders. When you look around your home, are you overwhelmed by the clutter? On Tuesday, May 13, at 1 p.m., Kristine Todd from Kat Organizing-Relocation Solutions will tell you how to de-clutter and start the cleanup. Program registration is always appreciated. Register online at palosheightslibrary.org, by phone at 448-1473, or in person. All programs are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

more, is available in the library. Visit or contact Adult Services at 448-1473 for more information.

Garden help The Prairie Godmothers will present “Rejuvenating Your Garden” at the Palos Park Public Library on Tuesday, May 6, at 7 p.m. Learn new ideas on downsizing the garden from house to townhouse, inviting desired birds to the backyard, low maintenance gardens, and new ideas for bored gardeners. Join in a lively discussion on how to rescue your garden whether you are a novice or a pro. Register by phone at 448-1530 or visit www.palosparklibrary.org. The library is at 12330 Forest Glen Blvd. in Palos Park.

Book & Film

The Book & Film Series returns to the Palos Park Public Library on Wednesday, May 14, Heights Library at 2 p.m. with the award winning featured database film “The Book Thief,” based on Ancestry Library, a genealogy the bestselling book by Markus research database, can help find Zusak. Oscar-winning actor Geofyour ancestors, and it’s easier frey Rush stars in the film about a young girl who transforms the than you think. Access to more than one and a lives of those around her in Gerhalf billion names in more than many during World War II. Run 4,000 databases, including the time 131 minutes. This program is free and open United States Census; military records; court, land and probate to the public. All who attend will records; vital and church records; be entered in a raffle to win a directories; passenger lists; and free copy of the book.

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Palos Heights businesses, community groups and families are invited to become a part of the Adopt-a-Pot program, the literally growing, economic development beautification effort that plants jumbo public flower pots in commercial and recreational areas of the city. Contribute to the overall ambiance of our city’s landscape and shopping experience and enjoy the community spirit this program offers. Businesses, groups and families may sponsor a pot for $80. Pick up an application at City Hall or visit www.palosheights. org and join the Adopt-A-Pot program to help. Adopt-A-Pot Planting Day will be held Saturday, May 17, at 8 a.m., at the Palos Pool parking lot. Sponsors and other volunteers are sought and welcome to help plant flowers in the pots there. Keep Palos Heights beautiful!

Senior American Idol.” All proceeds from this event benefit the Orland Township Scholarship Foundation, so you won’t want to miss this night of entertainment. Tickets for Orland Township’s Senior American Idol are still available. Tickets are $30 each Submitted photo and can be purchased at the township office, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Look for emcee Kevin Grace at Orland Park. For more informa- Orland Township’s Senior American Idol on Tuesday, May 6. tion, call 403-4222.

Submitted photo

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The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle

THE

REGIONAL Archives

"Sounds Familiar" Across 1 Capital of Idaho 6 Not many 10 Pollution problem 14 Between March and May 15 Hayworth or Moreno 16 Soap opera plot device, often 17 It keeps you cool in summer 19 Kitchen cooker 20 Approximately 21 Pool stick 22 Courageous 24 "I don't think so" 25 Hollywood legend ___ West 26 Keller or Mirren 27 Split ___ soup 28 Give a hoot 29 Car's navigation system, for short 32 Diet, casually 35 Puzzle with a "finish" you must get to 36 Round shape 37 Makes a mistake 38 Asked, as a question 39 One gender 40 Votes against 41 Cain's brother 42 Ate out 43 Muhammad in the ring 44 Eye part that's also a flower 45 Ancient Egypt's King ___ 46 Rafael of tennis fame 48 Papa 49 Take all of, as the blankets 52 Traffic ___

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35 Company that merged with Exxon 36 Leave out 38 Like lines that never meet 42 Firecracker that doesn't go off 44 Actress Lupino 45 Cab 47 Feeling nervous 48 Extinct birds 49 Marge Simpson's husband 50 ___ Mountains (Springfield, Missouri is there) 51 Fellas 52 "Beat it!" 53 Shakespeare villain 54 Grocery store "Paper or plastic?" items 55 Stare 58 Self-importance 59 Snooze

From May 2, 1974

40 Years Ago This Week More than 100 Moraine Valley college students and friends got out their walking shoes last Sunday to raise money for child care services. The marchers, led by Danny the Clown, made a 20-kilometer trek through Palos Hills and Worth in the warm, muggy weather, reaching their journey’s end just before the weather turned rainy. State Rep. Harry “Bus” Yourell was among the marchers. [Here, the group walks eastbound along 111th Street in Chicago Ridge just outside the fence of Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, if the Verns’ Mart grocery store sign gives us any clue].

(Answers on page 12)

Sudoku Puzzle #3124-M

1 5 2 4 7 8 3 6 2

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5 7 7 2 3 © 2009 Hometown Content

2 3 4 6 7 9 9 2 4 1 8 2 5 1 6 8

The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

From April 29, 2004

10 Years Ago This Week The former Willoughby’s restaurant, at 122nd Street and Harlem Avenue in Palos Heights, closed three weeks ago and will undergo extensive remodeling under new owners before it opens as a steak, seafood and pasta restaurant in December. The owners of Lumes Pancake House bought the 5,000 square-foot property from owner Bill Karas. Before Willoughby’s, a Chef’s Garden restaurant was at the location in the 1980s. [The site is now Bone a Pit Grill and Smokehouse, a favorite place for barbecue.]

(Answers on page 12)

Medium

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT? The last person to make a guess — and barely beat the deadline — on last week’s Guest WHATIZIT? photo was, appropriately enough, Worth’s Gene Sikora. Worth’s George and Theresa Rebersky brought home some photos of cherry blossom trees from their Washing D.C. trip. Our clue was that it sounds like Sikora should definitely make a guess on this one. See, another name for cherry blossom is sakura. Harrison Debre of Willow Springs was the first to guess the correct answer. Others who were right were Oak Lawn’s Steve Rosenbaum, Evergreen Park’s Jan Merchantz, Vince Vizza, Hickory Hills’ Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis, Palos Hills’ Lois Faragher, Worth’s Linda and Russ Martin, Robert Solner and Chicago Ridge’s Patty Vandenberg. Wrong guesses included a flowering shrub from a warmer climate i.e. a virbinum or azalea and a magnolia tree. In the spirit of George Washington’s “I cannot tell a lie” (or was it “I am not a crook”?) for chopping down a cherry tree, Worth’s Celeste Cameron admitted she was with the Reberskys when they took the photo so she was disqualified. “From sunrise to sunset blossoms were all over,” she said. “Even dancing in our dreams. It was a full five days of them.’’ How sweet. We will see is anyone can wax poetic over this week’s WHATIZIT? The clue is that it made us think of Donald Trump. Send those guesses by Monday night to thereporter@comcast.net with WHATIZIT? in the subject line. Don’t forget your name and home town.

‘Wicked winter’ puts a cold front on half marathon entries This past winter is still giving people headaches even though the snow is gone and the temperatures are bearable. Mel Diab calls it “the wicked winter” and it’s eating into the participation numbers of Sunday’s seventh annual First Midwest Bank Half Marathon. Race organizers in the past were comfortable with the numbers being in the 1,800-to-2,000 range. This year they added a 10K race to try to bolster the attendance. As of Friday, the numbers for the races, which take place in Palos Heights and slivers of Palos Park and Palos Hills, were at about 1,300. Diab doubts there will be a huge walkup in the final days. Diab, the co-organizer of the race along with Jeff Prestinario, said maybe 50 to 100 more runners will be signing up. So what about this wicked winter? What did the freezing temperatures and huge snowfall have to do with an event that takes place in May, usually under ideal running conditions? “Not as many runners were able to train in December, January and February,” Diab said. “There are some hard-core runners who were able to still train and prepare for events such as the Boston Marathon. But it was tough for most people to train.’’ The local race isn’t the only victim to the wicked winter. “The numbers are down for all the races,” Diab said. “The Shamrock Shuffle in Chicago usually gets 35,000 runners and this year they got 30,000. They had a 5K in town last week [the Chocolate Chase Rabbit Race 5K in Palos Heights] usually get about 500 or 600 runners and had 300 this year.’’ Diab is not thrilled with the numbers, but he is looking forward to the race.

“As a runner and a businessman, you always want to do better every year,” Diab said. “But I’m staying positive. The glass is half full.’’ There will be 80 runners from out of state this year including two runners from Brazil. Opening ceremonies are at 7:05 p.m. near Palos Heights’ Village Hall. The half-marathon starts at 7:30 a.m. and the 10K race starts at 10:40 a.m.

and some from out of Illinois who came to that school to help the Raiders win four Class 4A state titles. Locally, Stagg and Sandburg have taken a few Southwest Suburban Conference lumps at the hand of the Raiders and Vikings over the years while he was boss. But when he was hired at Homewood-Flossmoor and several players from the BolingbrookPlainfield area, it caused an unnamed teammate to file a lawsuit and that opened up a Pandora’s Go to college, coach The goofy, twisty story of girls Box that ultimately cost the powbasketball coach Anthony Smith erhouse a chance to compete in took another turn last week when the postseason. Smith was suspended by the the Illinois High School Association lifted its ban on him and he IHSA and also fired by his school is free to coach at any high school district by 4-3 vote two weeks ago. Now that the suspension is in the state if he wants. Smith was wildly successful at over, does H-F have a change of Bolingbrook and there were whis- heart? Does he move on? Will he pers back then about the question- get another job at a high school able transfers from within the state in Illinois?

Notes north of the Cal-Sag by Jeff Vorva

I say the guy will be poison for a high school program but he should be looking into coaching in college. Whether he recruited illegally or if everything was above board at Bolingbrook and H-F, talented kids wanted to play for the man. That’s a good thing in college. Not only could he coach talented players to win the ultimate prize – which is not as easy as it sounds – he was adamant about keeping their grades up and insisted that they project a good public image. He’s flirted with the college scene in the past so folks out there have him on their radar screen. Hopefully the next time Anthony Smith’s name surfaces it will be to announce he’s a college coach somewhere.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

The lousy cold and snowy weather from the winter (left photo) likely has kept the numbers down for Sunday’s First Midwest Bank Half Marathon and 10K races. In the right photo, Worth’s Liz Werner and Kevin Werner cross the finish line in last year’s race.


The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

9

Healthy Answers for Life by Carolyn Johnson

Natural solutions for easing constipation Q: I’ve been dealing with constipation off and on for some time now. I take laxatives sometimes, but I know it’s not good to take them all the time. Do you have any recommendations for things to help with constipation? A: Though it may not be a glamorous subject to talk about, almost everyone has bouts of constipation at one time or another. Constipation can have a variety of causes. Poor diet and lack of exercise are the most common reasons, though there are quite a few medical conditions and medications which cause constipation as well. Many people turn to over-thecounter laxative drugs when experiencing constipation, though laxatives should be used sparingly since long term laxative use can dependencies where the bowels become unable to function correctly without them. For short term use, laxative herbs like senna and cascara sagrada are a natural alternative to use than over the counter drugs. There are also several varieties of natural laxative teas available, which are a nice alternative to taking pills. Diet is the first thing to look to when experiencing constipation. The recommended daily intake of fiber is 25-35 grams per day; unfortunately Americans on average consume only 15 grams of fiber per day, many significantly less than that.

The easiest way to increase fiber intake is to eat less processed foods and more fruits and vegetables. Reducing dietary intake of meats and dairy products can also help since meats and dairy don’t contain fiber. Dairy products especially are well known to cause constipation, so reducing the amount of dairy in the diet may help. Eating a high fiber bowl of oatmeal is a good way to start the day and prevent constipation. If you aren’t crazy for regular oats, try steel cut oatmeal, which has a delicious slightly chewy consistency (I’m not a fan of regular oatmeal, but I love steel cut oats). There are many fibers available which can help with constipation, though the one I would recommend most are flaxseeds. Flaxseeds, in addition to being a great source of fiber, are good sources of omega 3 fatty acids, which are beneficial to cardiovascular health, joint function, and brain health. Flaxseeds must be ground to release the beneficial oils, however. One flaxseed product I’d especially recommend is Barlean’s Forti Flax, which has the date when it was ground on the label, to ensure freshness. I also like Forti Flax since it has a coarser grind than many brands which often grind the flaxseeds into an unappetizing powder. Ground flaxseed has a nutty taste and is delicious sprinkled

on cereal and salads or mixed in with yogurt or orange juice. One supplement which can also help with constipation is magnesium. Magnesium is crucial for many processes in the body, but is probably most well known for enhancing calcium absorption. As an aside, calcium supplements which contain calcium carbonate can cause constipation as well, so switching to a different form of calcium can be helpful. One of the side benefits of magnesium is that is can help to naturally soften stool, making it easier to pass. Certain forms of magnesium can also help to relax the muscles, so it can be nice to take before bedtime. Aloe vera juice can also be beneficial for constipation. Aloe vera juice has a healing and regulating effect on the intestines and colon and helps to make bowel movements easier. Some aloe vera juices have a bitter taste and can be a “rough drink” as my husband says. The brand George’s has a nice aloe vera juice that is great tasting since they remove the component that makes it bitter. It’s also important to drink plenty of water to ensure regularity. Coffee and soft drinks can dehydrate the body even further, so it’s important to drink extra water after having those beverages. Exercise can also help to keep the digestive system working properly. Stretches and walking

are easy to fit in to any lifestyle and can help all body systems to work better, including reducing constipation. Though constipation is a common problem, it’s not something to ignore, since chronic constipation can precipitate a number of health problems, as well as increasing the risks of colorectal cancer. Healthy Answers for Life is a column that seeks to answer health questions and concerns from a natural perspective. To submit a question to be answered in a future column send an email to healthyanswersforlife@gmail.com or mail to Healthy Answers for Life c/o Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive, Palos Heights, IL 6046. Carolyn Johnson is one of the knowledgeable associates at Pass Health Foods at 7228 W. College Drive. Feel free to stop by the store for more information or advice. www.passhealthfoods.com This column makes no claims to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure diseases with any advice or products. Any health related information in this article is for educational purposes only. The ultimate responsibility for your choices and their effect on your health are yours and before applying any therapy or use of herbs, supplements, etc., you should consult your health care provider.

Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM • PrairieStateVet.com Last week we talked about two cases for which inducing vomiting for poisoning was indicated. The Regional came out on Thursday, and on that same day we received another poisoning phone call from a wonderful client who had moved into a new home whose little Sheltie had found some old Decon brand rodenticide in the garage. We talked by phone about giving peroxide, which did indeed induce the vomiting of a large amount of the poisonous blue-green pellets, and when she brought the little guy into the clinic we induced vomiting one more time and administered charcoal, gave an phytonadione injection and sent him home with vitamin K-1 tablets. This particular type of mouse poison inhibits the liver production of vitamin K-1, which is necessary for blood coagulation to occur. Mice that eat this stuff bleed to death. About two hours after returning home our client called to inform us that her little dog had started seizuring. Initially we were concerned, that in addition to the vitamin K-1 antagonist that the dog had found and eaten in the garage, that there may have also been some of the new type of ro-

Submitted photo

Meet Christine and Olyvia from Tinley Park. Olyvia is a 7-year-old German shepherd who loves children. denticide that causes brain swelling. There is no antidote for this new and very dangerous product. Fortunately it was determined that this product was not in the garage. We got an edumacation Thursday. In talking to the ASCPA Animal Poison Control people, we discovered that it was us who caused

the seizures. This was upsetting since we caused the dog harm. It turns out, that in rare cases, charcoal itself can be toxic. I would imagine that 90 percent of vets in the U.S. do not know this. I have administered charcoal to an indeterminate number of dogs over the past 33 years and have never had a problem. I always thought

it might constipate the occasional dog but otherwise have always considered it non-toxic. No so in my mind anymore. Apparently, the charcoal caused an osmotic fluid shift (where water leaves the blood and shifts into the gut leaving sodium to increase in the bloodstream), resulting in hypernatremia which in turns “shrinks” the brain resulting in seizures. We were able to reverse the condition with sodium-free IV fluids and warm water enemas and the little guy responded nicely. In a followup call to Poison Control Monday morning, I learned that over the past few years they have really backed off the dose of charcoal that they are telling veterinarians (and owners who call) to administer. We have certainly relabeled all of our charcoal stock. This can happen with charcoal antidote products that contain, or not contain, sorbitol. Our product was sorbitol-free. I know a lot of you have the OTC charcoal tablets at home, and I would advise you to call us for a dose before you administer these at home.

Photos by Tim Hadac

Heart of Mercy

Volunteers recruited by St. Alexander Catholic Church worked the corners in Palos Heights last Friday, collecting cash for Misericordia as part of the not-for-profit community of care’s annual jelly beans tag days. Top, the church’s pastor, the Rev. Martin Michniewicz, known to many as Father Marty, pauses for a picture as he is photo-bombed from the opposite corner by Debbie Myron, retired longtime parish administrative staff member. Above, Deacon Jim Horton accepts a donation from a passing motorist and rewards her with a smile and a small packet of Jelly Belly-brand jelly beans. Headquartered on Chicago’s Northwest Side, Misericordia offers “a community of care that maximizes potential for persons with mild to profound developmental disabilities, many of whom are also It’s a bad plan that can’t be physically challenged,” according to a description on its website. changed. The name Misericordia is Latin for Heart of Mercy. To aid the Heart —Publilius Syrus of Mercy campaign, visit misericordia.org or call 773-973-6300.

Independence students urge good prom decisions by Bob McParland High School Dist. 218

CDC cites many potential factors, the messages, laws, and preventive efforts aimed at the problem Between 1991 and 2011, the seem to work. In the last three years, Shepard percentage of American teenagers who reported driving after con- High School has asked students suming alcohol fell by half ac- from Independence Junior High cording to the Centers for Disease School to add their voices to the campaign to make teenagers think Control and Prevention. Whatever the reasons, and the wisely.

Independence students again wrote and designed cards that will appear on the tables of the Shepard prom the night of May 2. The cards ask Shepard students to make healthy decisions, avoid risk, and act like role models. Parents, of course, remain the primary messengers. Juan Cruz, a Shepard teacher and faculty sponsor of Class Officers, emphasized that moms and dads should talk with their children about making healthy decisions. “Parents should talk with their son or daughter and have a frank conversation about making smart decisions the weekend of prom. They should stress that a decision affect the rest of their lives,” Cruz said.

Independence Junior High School students Christian Czarny (from left), James Hunt, Joe Feldner write and design prom cards asking Shepard High School students to make healthy decisions at this year’s dance. Independence Junior High School student Maxine Hoge designs prom cards that will greet Shepard High School students at their prom.

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Independence Junior High School 6th-grader Ellie McGovern designs a prom card asking Shepard High School students to make healthy decisions at this year’s dance.

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The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Christian musician encores at Palos Park Presbyterian by Dolores Barnes Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church Would you quit your job and hit the road with just a Bible and a guitar if God asked you to? Come and meet the couple who did. Joshua Price and his wife, Deanna, have traveled across America since 2009, bringing their powerful witness and music to people in dozens of denominations. From retreats to Sunday morning services and everything in between, they have touched thousands of people with God’s love. Now they want to share their faith with you too. This Saturday, May 3, at 7 p.m., you will have a rare chance to be moved by Joshua’s music when he comes to Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church for one show only. You can even go “back stage” and meet Joshua and Deanna at a reception afterward. The church is at 12312 S. 88th Ave. There is no charge for tickets to this concert. Instead, an opportunity for a free-will offering will be given. Come again this Sunday to hear their amazing witness about God’s call when Joshua leads worship and music during the 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. services. Some of our own members have experienced the Price’s music and had this to say: “When Joshua Price leads music, I am taken to a differ-

Death Notices Grace M. Gary

Grace M. Gary, nee Kaufmann, 92, of Orland Park, died on April 18 at Palos Community Hospital in Palos Heights. A memorial Mass was offered on April 24 at St. Stephen, Deacon and Martyr Church in Tinley Park. Inurnment was private at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Worth. Mrs. Gary is survived by her daughter, Laura Frain; son, Paul Gary Jr.; sister, Lois Orr; two grandchildren, and niece, Carol

Seratore. Mrs. Gary was born in Chicago. She was a homemaker.

Martyr Church in Tinley Park. Interment was at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. Mr. Mulhall is survived by his wife, Geraldine, daughters: Janet Edward E. Mulhall (Roger) Douglas, Diane (Jim) Edward E. MulDelach, Mary (Ken) Cowdery, hall, 87, late of Orand Cynthia (Mike) Hayes. Fifland Park, died on teen grandchildren and six greatApril 24. grandchildren. Edward was born Visitation was in Chicago, a retired bank loan held at Thornridge Funeral Home on April 27. A officer, a U.S. Army WWII veteran, funeral Mass was held on April and member of the Tinley Park/ 28 at St. Stephen, Deacon and Bremen VFW Post 279

Respect Life ministries offer hope after suicide The Rev. Charles Ruby, founder and director of the LOSS Program (Loving Outreach to Survivors of Suicide), will speak at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, 15050 S. Wolf Road in Orland Park, at ent place. I am completely engulfed where God has been calling me, 7 p.m. on Monday, May 12. in the arms of Jesus. I can’t wait trusting that His compassion and Founded in 1979, LOSS is a supto go there again on May 3,” Betsy faithfulness will land me upright,” port group for those who are grievJill Long said. Kastak said. ing a death by suicide of a family Shirley Swanson said: “Joshua member or close friend. The LOSS “Joshua’s transparency and honesty, sharing in both word and song, Price was so enthusiastic in his program is a non-denominational of the call the Lord placed on his presentation, knowledgeable and program offered by the Catholic and Deanna’s life is at once re- his experience. I was impressed Charities of the Archdiocese of freshing and inspiring. His story with his comment, “Worship is Chicago in collaboration with the is messy, real and redemptive. An Our Response to What We Value Diocese of Joliet. evening with Joshua Price made me Most, both Personal and Corporate Through such efforts as ongoing want to squeeze my eyes shut and to God, for who He is and what monthly meetings, weekly groups, take that leap of faith to the place He has done!” individual and family counseling, Submitted photo

Christian musician Joshua Price and his wife Deanna will minister in music and words this Saturday, at 7:p.m., and Sunday during both the 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. worship services at Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church, 12312 S. 88th Ave.

Honor Flight bound

monthly newsletter and parent consultation, LOSS has created a valuable and necessary support service to survivors - helping them to find hope and strength. Father Rubey will tell how LOSS has helped thousands again find joy and purpose in life. Father will also touch on suicide prevention and the growing problem of youth suicides. The program is the latest in the 2014 Knowledge and Prayer Series sponsored by the Multi Parish Respect Life Ministries of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Michael, Our Lady of the Woods in Orland Park and St. Bernard’s and Annunciation Byzantine Catholic Church in Homer Glen.

House of Worship Garage sale at Good Shepherd Luthern Church The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd, 7800 W. McCarthy Road, Palos Heights, will hold its 17th annual garage sale this Friday, May 2, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Saturday, May 3, from 8 a.m. to noon. Everything will be half price on Saturday. There will be toys, antiques, housewares, furniture, exercise equipment, books, jewelry, bedding and more.

Billy Graham’s “My Answer”

Photo/story courtesy Jeannine Kacmar

Let Christ be your example in everything, including your work Q: I don’t hate my job, but sometimes I hear people talking about how much they love their work, and it makes me wonder if I should’ve done something else. Did I fail to listen to God when I was choosing my career? — A.J.

Palos Park resident and World War II veteran Irving M. Ward Sr. has been invited to join 80 other World War II heroes on the Honor Flight to Washington D.C. on May 7. The Honor Flight, sponsored by the non-profit organization Honor Flight Chicago, was founded to recognize Chicagoland’s World War II veterans and to pay tribute to their service. The veterans will depart from Midway Airport to Washington D.C. and will spend the day in the nation’s capital visiting national monuments ending up at the World War II Memorial with a commemorative celebration. The veterans will return to Chicago that evening and will be met with a special “welcome back” celebration of family, friends, and volunteers. Ward’s service in the U.S Army began in 1943. He served for 18 months in the North African, Rome-Arno and North Apennine campaigns with the 3825th Quarter Master Trucking Battalion attached to the 5th Army and was awarded three battle stars and several medals. Upon returning back to civilian life, Ward played professional basketball, married his high school sweetheart, became the father of three children, and earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree. He worked in recreational programs associated with the Chicago Public Schools until he retired in 1982. As a widower, he married BettyAnn Bukovsky and has lived in Palos Park for the past 16 years.

help you be the best worker you can be. The Bible says, “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters” (Colossians 3:23). Remember, Jesus worked as a carpenter most of His life, and if the Son of God didn’t find it demeaning to work with His hands, neither should we. And how good A: Today is Labor Day in the do you suppose His work was? United States — a special day When He built a cabinet, did the when we honor all those who’ve doors not quite fit or the handles made our nation great through not quite match? When He laid their work. We sometimes see the foundation of a new house, work as a burden (and it can did He use shoddy materials or be), but our work is important cheat those who hired Him? No, to God; even in the Garden of of course not. Commit your life to Eden God gave Adam work to Him, and then let Him be your do (see Genesis 2:15). Work gives example in everything, including dignity and meaning to our lives, your work. and helps us make the world a (Send your queries to “My better place. Did you choose the wrong ca- Answer,” c/o Billy Graham, reer? (In other words, are you in Billy Graham Evangelistic the wrong place?) I don’t know, Association, 1 Billy Graham but I doubt it. God might lead Parkway, Charlotte, N.C., 28201; you to another career as the years call 1-(877) 2-GRAHAM, or visit go by, but the important thing is the Web site for the Billy Graham for you to thank Him for the job Evangelistic Association: www. you have now, and ask Him to billygraham.org.)

History of the World by Mark Andrews May 1: ON THIS DATE in 1844, Samuel Morse sent the first telegraph message. In 1960, the Soviet Union shot down an American U-2 reconnaissance plane and captured its pilot, Francis Gary Powers. May 2: ON THIS DATE in 1863, Confederate Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was accidentally shot by his own men; he died eight days later. In 1932, Jack Benny’s first radio show made its debut on the NBC Blue Network. May 3: ON THIS DATE in 1568, French forces in Florida slaughtered hundreds of Spanish. In 1979, Conservative Party leader Margaret Thatcher was chosen as Britain’s first female prime minister. May 4: ON THIS DATE in 1776, Rhode Island declared its freedom from England, two months before the Declaration of Independence was adopted. In 1970, Ohio National Guardsmen opened fire on anti-war protesters at Kent State University, killing four students. May 5: ON THIS DATE in

1925, schoolteacher John Scopes was arrested for promoting the theory of evolution in Tennessee. In 1961, Alan Shepard became the first American to fly in space, making a 15-minute suborbital trip from Cape Canaveral, Fla., into the Atlantic aboard the Mercury capsule Freedom 7. May 6: ON THIS DATE in 1851, Dr. John Gorrie of Apalachicola, Fla., patented a refrigeration machine to treat malaria patients; this led to the development of air conditioning decades later. In 1937, the German dirigible Hindenburg exploded in flames during an attempted landing at Lakehurst, N.J. killing 36 people. May 7: ON THIS DATE in 1925, Pittsburgh Pirates shortstop Glenn Wright made an unassisted triple play. In 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in Rheims, France, ending the European conflict of World War II the next day. (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarqmail.com.)

Submitted photo

New arrival “My first granddaughter,” Palos Heights Alderman Jack Clifford (2nd Ward) wrote to The Regional this week. Daenerys “Dany” Koranda was born on April 28, at 5:21 p.m., at Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn.

LEGAL NOTICE VILLAGE OF PALOS PARK PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Historic Preservation Committee of the Village of Palos Park, Cook County, IL has scheduled a public hearing on Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers of the Kaptur Administrative Center, 8999 West 123rd Street, Palos Park, IL to consider the following: HPC 2014 – 01: 9602 West Creek Road. McCord House NFP, the tenant, is requesting a Certificate of Appropriateness for Demolition of a portion of the existing structure and Construction of approximately 8,500 square foot addition. The site is legally described as follows: LOT 1 IN MCCORD PLACE OF PALOS PARK, A SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN (EXCEPT THE WEST 60 ACRES THEREOF AND EXCEPT THAT PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 33 LYING EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, SAID POINT BEING 51.41 FEET WEST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE SOUTHERLY A DISTANCE OF 1328.8 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A POINT IN THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 33, SAID POINT BEING 50.19 FEET WEST OF THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33), IN COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PROPERTY SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL TAKING BY THE ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, PER DOCUMENT NO. 85161070. PIN Number: 23-33-200-029-0000 All are welcome to attend, testify, and submit evidence. For further information, please contact the Village Community Development Director, Lori Sommers at 708-671-3731 or lsommers@palospark.org. Respectfully submitted by: Marie Arrigoni, Village Clerk

Engaged? Getting Married? Submitted photo

Golden Oak Seniors invite new members Palos area seniors are welcome to attend the Golden Oaks Seniors meeting on Wednesday, May 7, at noon, at the Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church, 12312 S. 88th Ave. Lunch is at noon ( but do come early,) followed by returning entertainer, Larry Bergnach who will take attendees on a trip down memory lane with his 1930s nostalgia program. The cost for lunch is $5, the cost for membership to join Golden Oaks is $8 for the year. Shown are Golden Oaks members Shirley and Harold Neubauer, with Larry Bergnach. To attend the upcoming luncheon meeting, call the church at 4480819 to make a reservation.

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The Regional News invites couples or their parents to submit for publication engagement or wedding announcements. There is no charge for this service offered to community residents.

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E-mail announcements to: TheRegional@Comcast.net Mail announcements to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463


The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Photos by Tim Hadac

11

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Bella’s Bakery opens suddenly in Baumann’s site After months of promises and delays, the long-anticipated Bella’s Bakery & Breakfast in downtown Co-owner Elvis Hall was on hand to showcase freshly-baked coffee cakes, doughnuts, bagels, bread Palos Heights held a surprise, soft-launch opening on Tuesday. and more. He gave away one item free to customers as an additional surprise to his unexpected opening. Drivers and pedestrians along Harlem were surprised to see Now Open signs whitewashed on the Former bakery owners Ray and Cathy Baumann wanted to be there for the long-awaited grand openwindows of the new business located in the old Baumann’s Bakery space and adjacent storefront at ing of a successor bakery to their beloved store. “We wouldn’t have missed it,” Cathy Baumann said. 12246-48 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights (photos from left). The Baumanns gather here with Hall and his partner Michael Spizzirri (right).

Observe Tax Freedom Day by making tax-smart investments You didn’t see it on your calendar, but Tax Freedom Day fell on April 21 this year. So, why not mark the occasion by beginning to look for ways to become a “tax-smart” investor? Tax Freedom Day, calculated annually by the Tax Foundation, is the day on which Americans have earned enough money to pay this year’s federal, state and local taxes. Of course, Tax Freedom Day is something of a fiction, because most people pay their taxes throughout the year, via their paychecks. Furthermore, as famed Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., said: “Taxes are what we pay for civilized society.” When you pay taxes, you help fund public education, the police, the fire department, food inspection, college scholarships and many other elements of society. Nonetheless, you may want to use the concept of Tax Freedom Day to find ways to reduce the taxes associated with your investments. Here are some suggestions: • Boost your 401(k) contributions. Your 401(k) contributions are typically made with pre-tax dollars, so the more you put in, the lower your taxable income. (Some employers allow a “Roth” option, under which you can make post-tax contributions.) In 2014, you can put in up to $17,500 to a 401(k) or similar plan, such as a 403(b) or 457(b), and if you are 50 or older, you can contribute an

Jim Van Howe

additional $5,500. • Fully fund your IRA. No matter which type of IRA you have — traditional or Roth — you will gain some valuable tax benefits. With a Roth IRA, your contributions are not deductible, but your earnings can grow tax free, provided you don’t start taking withdrawals until you are 59-1/2 and you’ve had your IRA for at least five years. If you own a traditional IRA, your earnings can grow taxdeferred, and your contributions may be deductible, depending on your income level. So, similar to a 401(k), the more you put in to your traditional IRA, the lower your taxable income may be. In 2014, you can contribute up to $5,500 to an IRA, or $6,500 if you are 50 or older. • Contribute to a college savings plan. Many college savings plans offer some type of tax advantage. For example, if you contribute to a 529 plan, your earnings can grow tax free, provided all withdrawals are only used to help pay quali-

fied higher education expenses. (529 plan distributions not used for qualified expenses may be subject to federal and state income tax and a 10 percent IRS penalty.) Furthermore, your 529 plan contributions may be deductible from your state taxes. • Avoid excessive buying and selling. If you are constantly buying and selling investments, you may find it “taxing,” because short-term gains (gains on assets owned for less than one year) will be taxed at your ordinary income tax rate, which could be as high as 39.6 percent (and you may also be subject to a 3.8 percent Medicare surtax). However, if you hold your investments longer than a year before selling them, you’ll pay the more favorable long-term capital gains rate, which will likely be 15 percent or 20 percent, depending on your income, though you might still be assessed the Medicare surtax. Tax Freedom Day is here, and then it’s gone. But by taking the steps described above, you may be able to brighten your tax picture for years to come.

Gently used clothing will be accepted and donated to local organizations. Contractor, agricultural, business, governmental, commercial, industrial, school or public works wastes cannot be accepted. A complete list of waste that will and will not be accepted can be found at http://www.epa. state.il.us/land/hazardous-waste/ household-haz-waste/hhwcacceptable.html. Two additional household hazardous waste collections will be held in Cook County; on May 17, items may be brought to Countryside City Hall, 5550 East Ave., Countryside, and on June 28, items may be brought Submitted photo Kathleen Therese Meany, MWRD to Eisenhower High School, 12700 Sacramento Ave., Blue Island. Oppresident. erating hours for both are 8 a.m. ticides, pesticides, and similar to 3 p.m. hazardous household products. Batteries and electronic waste will also be collected. Smoke detectors, agricultural chemicals, controlled substances and sharps will not be accepted. Latex paint is not considered hazardous; it can be Employers sought dried and taken out with the regular trash. for Orland Twp.

Business Note Safeco Insurance recognizes Hunt Insurance Group for performance Safeco Insurance has recognized Hunt Insurance Group, Palos Heights, with membership in the Safeco Key Agent Program. “Fewer than 20 percent of independent insurance agencies that sell Safeco products are selected for Key Agent status,” said Matthew Nickerson, president of Safeco Insurance. “Safeco Insurance is pleased to provide our Safeco Key Agent partners with special resources that help them serve our customs even better.” “Hunt Insurance is honored to be included in the Safeco Key Agent Program,” said Matt Hunt, vice president of Hunt Insurance. “We make it a priority to be a trusted advisor for our

job fair in May

customers and deliver quality Hunt Insurance, go to www. service.” thehuntgroup.com or call them For more information about at 361-5300.

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Orland Township offers deed alert program signup To help protect individuals and families from property and recording fraud, Orland Township is now registering residents for the Cook County Recorder of Deeds’ Property Alert Program. This program monitors your mortgage deed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and notifies you anytime a document is recorded against your home. Property and recording fraud happens when criminals target homes- usually ones that are fully paid for and owned by older individuals, and forge ownership documents they then file with the county recorder. Victims of this crime often lose their most valuable investment, costing them heartache and a large financial problem. “Homeownership is not only an investment for families and

McCord Housewalk ahead

McCord Gallery & Cultural Center in Palos Park plans its annual “Walk in the Park” Housewalk to be held on Saturday, May 17. Marking Palos Park’s Centennial celebration this year, each of the homes is of historical significance. The tour of these timeless treasures will begin at 10 a.m. at the McCord Gallery where guests will pick up maps, enjoy a continental breakfast, and view “Spring at Last,” a unique exhibit of work by Ellen Hodges, Kathleen Newman, Jim Pavlatos, Lenox Wallace, and Marikay Peter Witlock. One of the homes was built in 1890 on a foundation of granite. Originally designed to be a vacation Jim Van Howe is a financial home, this house is constructed with many formal details usually found in main residences. At least advisor with Edward Jones Invest- one antique piece of furniture in every room reflects the historical past of the house while the mix of ments, in Palos Heights. His office contemporary pieces reflect how the family has adapted an historical home to a contemporary life is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be style. Original art work throughout the house lends interest and color to an extraordinary setting. Elereached at 361-3400. This article ments of the past combined with modern conveniences set in the middle of Nature can easily make was written by Edward Jones for one visualize a permanent vacation here. use by your local Edward Jones Tickets for the housewalk are $30 and may be purchased by calling 671-0648. The McCord Gallery Financial Advisor. & Cultural Center is located at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and LaGrange Road).

Household hazardous waste dropoff at Moraine Valley Sat. Area residents will be able to dispose of their household hazardous waste in an environmentallyfriendly manner on Saturday, May 3, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway, Palos Hills. While they are routinely used to clean, maintain vehicles, and garden, household hazardous waste poses an environmental threat. Consumer product labels that include “danger,” “warning,” or “caution” in the text are an indication that the product should be disposed of in a special manner. “These products are harmful to the water environment, so it is important that residents use, store and dispose of them properly. The MWRD is happy to work with our state and municipal partners to bring this collection opportunity to the south suburbs,” said Kathleen Therese Meany, president of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago. Items that residents may bring include unwanted medicines, chemical cleaners, aerosol and oil-based paints, paint thinners, antifreeze, weed killers, insec-

Submitted photo

noon), afternoon session (noon to 2 p.m.) or both and will be given a table and three chairs for set-up. There are no registration fees. Lunch will be provided. Many employers have filled available positions with applicants they met at past Orland Township job fairs, making the event a successful opportunity for both employers and job seekers. For more information or to register, call Lea Sullivan at 403-4222.

Orland Township is seeking employers to participate in its next annual spring job fair taking place on Thursday, May 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the township individuals, but it is a way of activity center, 14807 S. Ravinia building strong communities and Ave., Orland Park. neighborhoods,” said Supervisor Employers can participate in Paul O’Grady. “Orland Township the morning session (10 a.m. to wants to protect its residents from any fraudulent activity that could put their home in jeopardy, so we encourage all residents to enroll in the Cook County Recorder of Deeds’ Property Alert Program without discount service. by calling our office today.” To register for this free proIt’s accident no accidentmore morepeople people trust It’s no trustState StateFarm. Farm. gram, call Rob Brongiel in the Erik R Nelson, Agent Erik R Nelson, Agent Orland Township office at 40310200S SRoberts Roberts Road Road 10200 Palos Hills, 4222. You will be registered online Palos Hills,ILIL60465-1539 60465-1539 Bus: Bus:708-430-7575 708-430-7575 with your Property Index Numerik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com ber (PIN) and sent confirmation once your registration is complete. If you do not know your PIN, a representative from the township will help you locate it. P040036 StateFarm FarmMutual Mutual Automobile Insurance Company in NJ), Bloomington, IL P040036 02/04 02/04 State Automobile Insurance Company (Not in (Not NJ), Bloomington, IL For more information about this program, call 403-4222.

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The Regional News Thursday, May 1, 2014

Photos courtesy Palos Lions Club

Kendall Coyne honored guest at Palos Lions’ Past Presidents Night The Palos Lions held Past Presidents night, attended by several club members and their families, on April 16 at Silver Lake Country Club in Orland Park Special guest speaker Olympic U.S. women’s hockey team silver medalist Kendall Coyne, of Palos Heights, related her experiences in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Kendall brought her silver medal and let guests take a close look at and hold it. “The Lions were amazed at Kendall’s ability to tell her story with such poise and graciousness,” said Palos Lions President Tom Crowhurst. He was especially impressed with Kendall’s passion for hockey and could see why she was an Olympian, he added.

Kendall’s escort, her mother Ahlise, shared her own Olympic experience, from a parent’s point of view. She is shown with Kendall and Crowhurst in the photo at left. The night to honor Lions past presidents has been a longstanding tradition each year for the club. Their mantle of office is the red jacket, symbolizing their leadership in service to the club. At right, past presidents shown with Kendall, holding her sliver medal, are Lions Gene Adams (from left), Forest Reeder, Frank Oswald, Tom Crowhurst and William Peacock. The Palos Lions will hold induction of new officers in June. In October the Palos Lions will celebrate 65 years of service to the community.

Submitted photo

Explore wildflowers with The Center Submitted photo

Heights Women cook up labors of love Eight members of the Palos Heights Woman’s Club, under the direction of Carol Miller, Home Life Department chairman, gave of their time last Thursday to prepare a special hearty luncheon for residents staying at the Ronald McDonald House in Oak Lawn. The ladies cooked and served a shepherd pie casserole, salad, croissants, and a dessert of apple pie with ice cream to families who stay at the house while a family member is a patient undergoing treatment at nearby Advocate Christ Medical Center. Shown are Eileen Lunter (standing from left), Susan Blais, Beverly Bronowski and Joan Meyers, and seated Dolores Justyn, Elaine McClure, Carol Miller and Hedie Alt.

The Center’s wildflower walker Helen Wann, of Palos Heights, is show amid the Virginia bluebells at Messenger Woods in nearby Homer Township. Messenger Woods is the topic of a luncheon on Tuesday, May 6, noon to 2 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. Lois Lauer will share slides and some Gwen Frostic poetry revealing the beauty of the spring woodland. Messenger Woods is well known for its gorgeous displays of spring wildflowers. Alesia says it looks like an ocean of blue when the Virginia bluebells are in bloom. Other flowers also abundant at Messenger Woods are the rare great white Trillium and blue-eyed Marys. Edward and Maria Sandstrom will share the photos and other mementos, which their grandmother inherited from her friend Belle Messenger, whose husband owned the woodland prior to it becoming part of the Will County Forest Preserve System. Alesia and Lauer also lead Tuesday evening wildflower walks at Messenger Woods and at The Center. The luncheon begins at noon, costs $17 per person, and requires advance reservations. For information about the luncheon or about wildflower walks, call The Center at 361-3650.

Senior Notes Free hearing screenings

will host Senior Fairs throughout the month of May to give area residents an opportunity to get South Suburban Hearing Health assistance with a variety of issues Center will be at Orland Town- from his expert staff, as well as ship, 14807 S. Ravinia Avenue, to local organizations, agencies and conduct free hearing screenings on businesses that provide services Wednesdays, May 7, June 4 and to the elderly. July 2, from 1 to 3 p.m. Orland Hearing Aid Center, 12910 S. LaGrange Road, will also be conducting free hearing screenings at the township on the following Tuesdays: May 20, June 17 and July 15 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. An appointment is necessary; call 403-4222.

Locally, the next senior fair will be held Monday, May 19, from 10 a.m. to noon, at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Pkwy in Palos Hills. For more information, call 312886-0481 or visit www.lipinski. house.gov.

ILLINOIS’

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Section 2

Page 1

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Guns a blazin’

Major league scouts, including one from the White Sox, put their speed guns on Sandburg pitcher Bryan Pall to gauge his velocity during last Wednesday's game against Shepard. Pall and the Eagles beat the Astros 13-1.

Bulldogs remain in perfect harmony All phases go for Richards in spotless week By Ken Karrson   Potent hitting? Check.    Reliable pitching? Check again.    Dependable defense? That gets the biggest check mark of all.    As Richards coach Brian Wujcik has asserted for a long time, success in baseball can often be found when a team proves competent in two of the three above-mentioned phases of the sport. But what has sparked the Bulldogs’ surge to the top of the South Suburban Conference Red standings and capturing of 15 wins in their first 18 games is efficiency in all three areas.    And without question, the X-factor has been Richards’ gloves. From outfielders Kyle Garrett and Eric Mallo and catcher Charlie Zeschke, to infielders AJ Sanchez, Noel Castro and Nate Natividad, the Bulldogs’ defense has been

rock solid thus far.   “Two errors in one game is, I believe, the most we’ve had,” Wujcik said. “Last year, when we made an error, it seemed like it cost us three runs. We haven’t had that kind of meltdown this year.    “This is the best defensive team we’ve had in quite a while, and it’s something we’re real happy to see. I really think it’s the difference between us being 15-3 and 11-7 and being in a tight race.”    Richards continued to distance itself from all SSC Red pursuers by knocking off four more conference foes last week. The Bulldogs entered the current week ahead of second-place Oak Lawn by four games and three up in the loss column.    The latest round of success began at Shepard’s expense, as the Astros were dispatched 17-5 on

Monday and 7-4 on Tuesday. Richards (15-3, 10-0) then followed up with a 12-0 demolition of Tinley Park on Thursday and 18-3 mauling of Hillcrest on Friday.    Wujcik pointed to the most competitive of those games as an illustration of how in sync this year’s club has been to date. Shepard actually outhit the Bulldogs 8-6 on Tuesday, but the latter took advantage of numerous Astros gifts in the second frame.   While Shawn Chiaramonte stroked a two-RBI single, that was the lone hit Richards produced during a five-run rally. Also part of the uprising were two walks, two hit batsmen, a wild pitch and Shepard error.   And when the Astros threatened to come back in their final atbat against a tiring Ryan Thompson, Wujcik put Nick Mejia on the

mound to hold off the charge. He wrapped a popout and strikeout around a free pass to nail down the victory for the ‘Dogs.   “We were a great five-inning ballclub last year, but then we’d have trouble in the sixth and seventh,” Wujcik said. “This year, we’ve closed the door on teams, either by getting a clutch hit or an out when we need it.”   Wujcik admitted, though, that he thought “Shepard lost the game more than we won it.” Were it not for the second-inning disaster, the Astros were in decent shape to knock off Richards, which hadn’t been the case at all one day earlier.    While Shepard coach Frank DiFoggio agreed that “two errors basically killed us,” he was happy to see the Astros make their District 218 sister school squirm a bit.   “We’re not going to quit,” DiFoggio said. “We’re going to fight and compete with whoever we’re

playing against, but I don’t think the confidence is there that we’re going to win.   “The effort is there, the want is there, but we’re not confident enough. We’re better than this talent-wise, but it’s almost at the point where we’re thinking, ‘What are we going to do to lose this game?’”    Sam Hermanas (double), Kevin Knoerzer (RBI single) and Bobby Peterka (bases-loaded walk) were key individuals in Shepard’s late rally. Eric Horbach and Kenny Gorski supplied the Astros with RBI hits in the first and fourth frames, respectively. ***    Three runs in their initial plate appearance got the Bulldogs off and running on Monday, and six more runs amassed over their next two at-bats put them on Easy Street. Unlike on Tuesday, Richards didn’t need assistance in order to prevail, as Sanchez

(two hits, including a double, three RBI), Mallo (two hits, including a triple, two RBI), Castro (two hits, four RBI) and Natividad (two-run double) spearheaded a 17-hit assault.    “We’ve scored early [in games] and gotten a lot of runs after two outs this year,” Wujcik said. “We don’t have to hit the panic button in the first or second inning if they’re hitting our starter around a little bit because we know we’re [also] going to hit the ball.”   Sanchez pocketed the victory for the Bulldogs by pitching all six innings and striking out eight. He gave up eight hits to Shepard, which was paced by Brett Smith (two-run double), Kevin Carmody (RBI double), Brendan Herrman (RBI single) and Jake Hart (RBI single).    “That Monday was a disaster,” DiFoggio said. “Richards jumped on us right away and they really (Continued on page 7)

Tightening their grip Return-trip reward

Knights increase divisional lead with wins Vikings rally on second day to beat Irish By Ken Karrson

IC did close to within 6-3 after scoring twice in the top of the Winning a tight contest enabled fourth, but the Knights responded Chicago Christian to tighten its right away with their own deuce grip on the Suburban Christian to maintain a comfortable advanConference Gold lead. tage. And then the Knights dealt From there, Christian rolled in Immaculate Conception an even with a 14-4 slaughter-rule victory bigger blow, both literally and that gave it a three-game lead figuratively, in the second game over IC in the standings. Aurora of a divisional doubleheader last Central Catholic, which squared Tuesday at Standard Bank Stadi- off twice with the Knights earlier um in Crestwood. After suffering this week, ended last week two a heartbreaking 1-0 defeat in the behind in the loss column, as did opener, IC basically fell apart in St. Edward. Game 2. While success against Aurora Five Chicago Christian runs in would obviously put Christian the bottom of the second gave it in a very favorable position to an edge it would never relinquish. repeat as SCC Gold kingpin, coach

Eric Brauer refused to look too far ahead. “There’s way too much time to go,” he said. “I expect us to be in a battle all the way to the end [of the regular season]. We’ve got some good teams, but no one in our division is really, really strong.” As evidence, Brauer pointed to his own club, which has won six straight matchups with divisional foes, but gone 0-4 in SCC crossovers. That ledger included setbacks versus Montini and Marian Central Catholic last Friday and Saturday, respectively. A year ago, the Knights (14-9, 6-4) went 5-1 in their crossover (Continued on page 7)

By Ken Karrson

“It was raining the entire game [on Monday] and it was tough,” One visit to Kankakee was all Lotus said. “It was pouring and it Pete Lotus had originally planned was very difficult to score without benefit of some walks.” for St. Laurence last week. The Fightin’ Irish had used two When Monday’s Chicago Catholic League crossover contest be- of those, plus a couple hit batsmen tween host Bishop McNamara and to collect their pair of runs in the the Vikings was halted by rain in first inning, but they were unable the third inning, however, Lotus to score after that. While pitcher was left with no choice but to plan Alex Hitney settled down and held a return trip down Interstate 57 Bishop Mac’s offense in check, his for Thursday. And considering St. Vikings teammates quickly gave Laurence was trailing 2-1 when him a lead to protect once action the game was suspended, another resumed. Five runs in the fourth and southern journey was an easy sell to his athletes, particularly since seven in the fifth gave St. Laua better weather day was forecast. rence an unexpectedly lopsided

13-2 triumph and kept prospects for a perfect week intact. And on Saturday, the Vikings completed the task by shutting out Providence Catholic 8-0 in their CCL Blue opener. Also banked in the win column last week was a 7-4 conquest of St. Joseph on Wednesday. The Chargers actually led 4-1 before St. Laurence staged a fifth-inning rally to overtake them. “It was one of those games where we were not having great at-bats and we let them hang around,” Lotus said. “We kind of struggled [early].” (Continued on page 3)

An imperfect 11 Caravan stop Crusaders’ streak By Ken Karrson

Painfully safe

Photo by Jeff Vorva

  The pained look of Eisenhower's Rachel Martin certainly isn't in reaction to her being able to dive back safely into first base before Shepard's Jalyn Stepney can apply a tag. The Lady Astros beat the Lady Cardinals 11-3 in an SSC Red matchup last Wednesday. Softball roundup begins on Page 3.

   The 10th was perfect, the 11th not so much.   Brother Rice rode a 10-game win streak into its Chicago Catholic League Blue opener on Saturday against Mt. Carmel. Six of the victories were rung up in league crossovers, and many of those were realized by wide margins, thanks to the Crusaders’ increasingly effective offense. That included a 12-2 demolition of St. Ignatius in five innings last Wednesday.   But in the Blue, it’s often a matter of “O’s” being shunned by overpowering pitching, which was exactly what occurred between Rice and the Caravan. Neither team, in fact, generated much in the way of noise, but three Crusaders errors proved costly to the locals.    One, in particular, administered big pain. When a ball hit by Jere-

my Houston in the second stanza was mishandled, Mt. Carmel’s A.J. Lewis raced home with the game’s first run.   Dave Dobrinich’s third-inning homer provided the Caravan with some insurance, but it was one of only four hits given up by Rice starter Brian Musielak. Still, that was enough to get the job done for Mt. Carmel, which used Marko Boricich’s two-hit outing as the impetus for a 2-0 triumph.    “It was a regional [or] sectional type of atmosphere Saturday,” Crusaders coach John McCarthy said. “It was a different level of pressure [and] that’s a great experience. For us, it’s great to be in those games.    “Marko was fantastic. He really kept us off-balance. [Our guys] were disappointed, but that’s the way baseball is some days.”    Despite receiving hits only from Mike Massey and Kevin Biondic (double), Rice (17-4, 6-1) wasn’t

without some scoring chances due to periodic wildness on Boricich’s part. Five runners were stranded between the first and second frames, the latter being the more frustrating situation as the Crusaders had filled the sacks with only one out.    Rice also wasted Biondic’s double, which led off the fifth, and was unable to capitalize after placing men on second and third in the seventh.    “It doesn’t have to do with [the number of] hits,” McCarthy said, referring to what the Crusaders needed to succeed versus the Caravan. “With us, it’s about situational hitting.”   While Rice couldn’t extend its winning streak at Mt. Carmel’s expense, McCarthy had few regrets.   “I’m very, very proud of these guys,” he said. “The kids gave it all they had and, hopefully, we can use this as a learning tool. (Continued on page 3)


2

Section 2 Thursday, May 1, 2014  

The Regional News - The Reporter

Hurts so dumb, take 2

From top to bottom Spartans’ fortunes run gamut last week the loss versus the Warriors, who constructed a 6-0 lead before the The good news for Oak Lawn Spartans finally erased their is, thanks to three league victories shutout in the fourth. Dunne last week, it now sits second in lasted less than two full frames the South Suburban Conference and put four men aboard via eiRed, albeit four games behind ther walks or by being hit with a pitch. division-leading Richards. “He looked tired,” Gerny said The bad news for the Spartans is that they also had to venture of his ace hurler. “He just didn’t outside the conference last week. have his [best] stuff. He didn’t And that’s when trouble brewed. have the same bite on his curve Losing to De La Salle and Wil- or pop on his fastball, and he had lowbrook might not have hurt some difficulty finding the strike quite so much had Oak Lawn zone.” put up a stronger fight against 6-10 each. However, in coach Bill Ger- Oak Lawn 1-0 ny’s opinion, the Spartans lacked Eisenhower Dunne fared better in last the same degree of tenacity that had been displayed earlier in the Tuesday’s SSC Red clash with the Cardinals, and so did the season. “It’s almost like they forgot Spartans as a team. Four runs what it’s like to play in a tight in the fourth inning enabled Oak game,” Gerny said. “Things didn’t Lawn to grab firm control of the go their way and they stopped proceedings. Justin Swatek’s two-RBI single having fun. It was kind of like was the critical hit in the rally. a slap in the face. “It’s one of those things where The Spartans benefited as well you start to wonder if losing is from an Eisenhower throwing ersomething they’re getting com- ror, which brought in two other fortable with, [but] if you start runs but also broke Witkowski’s thinking the worst, that’s what’s nose when the ball hit him flush going to happen. You want them in the face. Brandon Quillin and Mitch to look at a deficit as a challenge, not something impossible to over- Swatek knocked in earlier runs for Oak Lawn, which finished come.” De La Salle was ahead of Oak with 11 hits. “[The Cards’] record isn’t Lawn just 2-0 after four innings on Friday, but the Meteors broke great, but they’re not a team the contest open with a four-spot that ever rolls over for us,” Gerin the fifth. Another four-run out- ny said. “They always plays us burst in the sixth finished off a tough, so it was nice to see guys 10-0 rout, and then Willowbrook come out swinging the bats. It extended the Spartans’ misery by looked like our hitting was compinning a 9-2 loss on them the ing around.” As for Dunne, he pitched scorenext day. Oak Lawn collected a total of 10 less ball over four innings and hits in those two games, but it also fanned four while scattering five ended five of its plate appearances hits. Gerny felt Dunne wasn’t as with double plays. The Spartans’ sharp as usual, but praised him struggles were magnified by the as he “battled through” to earn fact that in three earlier outings a win. *** last week they collected a trio of Having missed out on a chance wins, including two by double-digto topple the Spartans, Eisenit margins. “It didn’t help us at all,” Ger- hower was less competitive on ny said, referring to Oak Lawn’s Wednesday. Four hits, including romps past Eisenhower (10-0) and Justin Slusinski’s two-run single Hillcrest (18-2). “We were feasting and Quillin’s RBI double, staked on the weak for three games and Oak Lawn to a 3-0 lead in the it makes you think you’re better second stanza and it cruised from there. than you really are. Zurek’s double made it 4-0 in “You wouldn’t think they’d lose [their edge] in a week. As a hitter, the third, then Quillin (a pair of you have to be more aware [at RBI singles), Dunne (two RBI, the plate] and more focused — one on a single), Justin Swatek you can’t just be taking hacks (RBI single) and Ray Walker (RBI single) all lent a hand to the atup there.” While nothing of note was gen- tack later on. Five extra-base hits erated by the Spartans (6-14, 5-3) were part of the Spartans’ 16-hit on Friday, they did garner seven barrage. All that offense was actually far hits on Saturday. Four of those — by Joe Dodaro (double), Kevin more than freshman Chad Cwik Zurek (RBI), Mitch Swatek and needed to triumph. The youngster Matt Witkowski (RBI) — were held the Cardinals to four hits. “He impresses me every time involved in Oak Lawn’s scoring, which took place in the fourth he goes out there,” Gerny said. “He’s got a baby face and he is and seventh innings. “Everybody was making solid rail thin — he looks like a freshcontact, but we couldn’t all get on man, not some grizzled veteran, the same page [for an extended but nothing seems to affect him. He shows a lot of composure and period],” Gerny said. Arm-weary Matt Dunne took figures out a way to adjust [when By Ken Karrson

Bartosh (Reprinted from March 12, 2009)   Once again, it’s time to be amused by other people’s misery.   Now before everyone starts thinking I’m some sort of sadistic creep, let me remind you that I have no intention of laughing at genuine misfortune. Real folks with real problems deserve sympathy, assistance or whatever else we can offer that will make their plight a bit more bearable.    However, professional athletes are a different story altogether. Sure, there are ones who’ve dealt with serious family matters involving their children — Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee and Bears defensive back Peanut Tillman immediately come to mind — and they, too, should be treated with compassion.    What I’m referencing is those jocks who, through their own carelessness or stupidity, have brought physical injury upon themselves.   About two months ago, I chronicled the tales of roughly a dozen highly paid sports-world individuals who got hurt not during competition, but because of some bizarre maneuver they pulled off the field of play. The list was by no means a complete one, and after some dogged research done by others, I’ve compiled an update.   One thing I noticed is that golf is a very dangerous undertaking. It’s always been physically taxing, particularly for those 120-pound teenaged caddies toting 100 pounds’ worth of golf bags for businessmen whose post-round tips consist of stock-purchasing advice for the youngsters, who have no money to invest because they’ve just been stiffed.   But in the case of athletes, I’m talking real injuries. Amazingly, none was suffered during

actual play.    Hockey player Erik Johnson, for example, incurred a knee injury after getting his foot caught between the brake and accelerator of a golf cart during a St. Louis Blues team outing. (And you thought hockey was rough.)    Another Johnson, auto racer Jimmie, broke his wrist after falling off the roof of a golf cart. (And we trust this man to handle a machine that goes 200 miles per hour? You’d think a guy who drives for a living would understand the concept of sitting in and not on top of a vehicle.)   And just to prove that old adage of how things happen in threes, NBA player Jason Collins injured his elbow after his golf cart skidded and tipped over. (No wonder PGA players are made to walk instead of ride.)   Those maladies are just the tip of the iceberg. Here a few others to mull over:   • Do you wonder why the Detroit Tigers ranked as baseball’s biggest underachievers in 2008? The team’s collective IQ would seem to be working against it, at least if Brandon Inge and Joel Zumaya are illustrative of the squad’s membership.   Inge and Zumaya missed games for two decidedly non-baseball reasons: Inge hurt himself as he was moving a large pillow for his child, while Zumaya strained his arm by playing “Guitar Hero 2” a little too vigorously. And Zumaya isn’t the only person to take ersatz play beyond reasonable standards — cyclist Mark Cavendish’s Wii snowboarding adventure ultimately became a misadventure when he injured his calf muscle.   • Cavendish has nothing on skier Lindsey Vonn, who required four stitches in her thumb after failing in an attempt

to open a champagne bottle without incident. Vonn was planning to celebrate a victory, but the bubbly wound up being the perfect way to deaden the pain of injury and embarrassment.   • Let’s not ignore the strange tribulations of three baseball players: Bret Barberie, Steve Sparks and Kevin Mitchell.   As if once being married to air-headed TV personality Jillian Barberie wasn’t enough of a source for ridicule, Bret Barberie added to his woes by forcing himself out of the Florida Marlins’ lineup years ago because of an unfortunate episode involving chili juice.   Hey Bret, it goes in your mouth, not your eyes.    While the not-so-bright Sparks didn’t hurt his eyes, he also didn’t use his head when he tried to duplicate the strongman feat demonstrated by a group of motivational speakers, which consisted of ripping a phone book in half. The stunt caused the former Milwaukee Brewers pitcher to dislocate his shoulder.   The next time you contemplate that sort of thing, Steve, you might want to downsize. Why not practice with a copy of your major-league travel itinerary?    On second thought, the phone books would be smaller.    As for Mitchell, — well, let’s just say I’ve saved the best of the worsts for last. The longtime journeyman once vomited his way onto the disabled list by straining rib muscles during the up-chuck period and, another time, was a late arrival to spring training because he hurt himself eating a microwaved doughnut.    ESPN.com claimed the latter really happened. Who am I to argue, especially since I run the risk of straining something if I do so too vociferously?

Running on empty

Chargers’ offense hampered by mishaps By Ken Karrson   Thinking on their feet is a concept Stagg coach Matt O’Neill wants his players to embrace.    He’d be satisfied, though, if for the moment they simply thought about their feet and what those collectively mean to the Chargers’ offensive well-being.    O’Neill will be the first person to admit that outhitting opponents is not Stagg’s forte, and really hasn’t been for the past few seasons. The Chargers, as presently assembled, are a pitching- and defense-oriented bunch, with just enough potency on hand to make those two areas pay off handsomely.    That was the preseason expectation anyway. What has prevented Stagg from reaching its goal is a continued difficulty in generating runs — and the thing most responsible for that shortcoming is baserunning mistakes.    That was O’Neill’s analysis after a few of those mishaps undercut the Chargers in two SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue games versus Joliet West last week. The Tigers chalked up 4-3 and 5-1 wins, and both victories were realized, at least in part, because of Stagg’s errant habits on the bases.   In last Wednesday’s loss, for instance, the Chargers ran themselves out of a possible rally in the third inning by having one runner get picked off and another thrown out trying to steal. The score was tied 1-1 when that occurred.

EMPLOYEE OWNED

  Something similar also happened late in Tuesday’s encounter. Ethan Glaza’s single and a Joliet West error had allowed Stagg (611, 2-2) to draw within a run, but the comeback bid was snuffed out soon after with a putout at third base and another pickoff, this one a game-ender.    O’Neill took the blame for the out at third, saying his runner’s show of aggressiveness in trying to take an extra base was merely a matter of doing what the Chargers have been taught. As the coach stated it, he doesn’t “want us to lose by being defensive [in our baserunning approach].”   That being said, however, O’Neill wasn’t happy to see Stagg remove itself from so many promising situations. In their one-run defeat, the Chargers also failed to fully capitalize on two earlier bases-loaded circumstances.   “We’ve practiced baserunning more this year than we ever have in the past because I felt it was going to be important to us to be successful,” O’Neill said. “We’re not going to be in a situation where we’re going to outslug people.    “But we’ve still made more errors than we can imagine. We’ve had a lot of mental errors and I don’t know what the answer to [curing] that is.”    Compounding Stagg’s problems in its first meeting with the Tigers was a critical misstep in the field. An error on a would-be double-play ball not only extended

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Joliet West’s third at-bat, it led to two runs that enabled the visitors to expand their lead at the time to 4-0.    The Chargers got one of those markers back in the fifth on Jake Wimmer’s single, which brought home Mitchell Spencer, who had belted a double. A free pass and Joliet West error then filled the bags with just one out, but two strikeouts in a row doused the threat.    Stagg matched the Tigers’ sixhit output, but it couldn’t overcome four errors.    Peter Angelos’ sacrifice fly got the Chargers on the board right away last Wednesday, but their scoring stopped there despite a total of seven hits. Stagg also cost itself again on defense, where a dropped third strike and error were triggers for a four-run Joliet West eruption.   “Every play is magnified,” O’Neill said. “The good thing about this conference is we’re going to get tested every day — there are no games on the schedule where you can say, ‘There’s a win.’ [But] if we’re going to beat a Sandburg, a Lockport or a Providence Catholic, we’re going to have to be sharp in all areas.”   O’Neill said his goal for the Chargers is to “be better on Day 1 of the playoffs.” To achieve that, of course, Stagg needs to minimize its mistakes, but its players also can’t dwell on what has already happened.   “It stinks that we’re making them, and some of them are repetitive, but I want us to go out there with a mentality that we have nothing to lose,” O’Neill said. “In the scheme of things, it would have been nice to have beaten Joliet West, but it’s not so bad if we feel we learned something from those games.”    The Chargers were due to square off with Homewood-Flossmoor twice this week in SWSC Blue games and once with Lincoln-Way East. Rounding out the slate of contests is a conference crossover with Andrew on Saturday.

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needed]. “He seems very calm and collected, and I think our other players are picking up on that. So far he’s proving to be the real deal, and it’s exciting to think we’ve got him for another 3 ½ years.” Oak Lawn 18 Hillcrest 2 Even at full strength, the Hawks would have been considered an underdog against the Spartans last Thursday. When several Hillcrest players were ruled ineligible during the week, the SSC crossover contest was, in reality, no contest. Oak Lawn saw to that by scoring at least five runs over three consecutive innings. The Spartans had 14 hits and 25 baserunners, and the Hawks aided their hosts further with five passed balls. Among Oak Lawn’s offensive notables were Zurek (two hits, three runs, one RBI), Ryne Melnik (two hits, one RBI), Quillin (one hit, two RBI), Mitch Swatek (two-run double) and Bobby Beard (two-run single). “We were getting on baserunners and guys were driving the ball when they got a [good] pitch to hit,” Gerny said. “But we had to scale back later on. [Our subs] were hungry and wanting to hit, but we had to tell them to play station-to-station and not take extra bases because we don’t want to embarrass anybody.” On tap for the Spartans this week were two SSC Red games against Argo and one matchup with SSC Blue power Lemont. Gerny was anxious to see which Oak Lawn team would show up. “I really don’t know where we’re at right now,” he said. “We got the three wins we had to have [last week], but even though we had a winning week [overall], it didn’t feel like it.”

Statistics Eisenhower 000 000 1 — 1 Oak Lawn 110 400 x — 6 Oak Lawn 2B: Melnik. RBI: J. Swatek 2, Quillin, M. Swatek. WP: Dunne (2-2). Oak Lawn 031 231 — 10 Eisenhower 000 000 — 0 Oak Lawn 2B: Dodaro, Halim, Melnik, Quillin, Zurek. RBI: Quillin 3, Dunne 2, Slusinski 2, J. Swatek, Walker, Zurek. WP: Cwik (2-2). Hillcrest 002 00 — 2 Oak Lawn 058 5x — 18 Oak Lawn 2B: Caliendo, M. Swatek. RBI: Beard 2, Quillin 2, M. Swatek 2, Melnik, J. Swatek, Zurek. WP: Georgelos (1-0). Oak Lawn 000 000 — 0 De La Salle 200 044 — 10 Oak Lawn LP: M. Swatek (1-3). Oak Lawn 000 100 1 — 2 Willowbrook 240 300 x — 9 Oak Lawn 2B: Dodaro. RBI: Witkowski, Zurek. LP: Dunne (2-3).

Saturday satisfaction

RedHawks take two from Shamrocks By Ken Karrson Instead of resting on Saturday like much of the public does, Marist chose that day to do its best work. And not just for last week. After the RedHawks swept St. Patrick in an East Suburban Catholic Conference doubleheader, coach Tom Fabrizio declared his club’s overall performance as “probably our best baseball of the year.” “We pitched it great, we played great defense and we had timely hitting,” he said. “That’s all I really want from our guys. “Saturday couldn’t have been any better. We played well for 14 innings.” Marist downed the Shamrocks 2-0 in the opener behind Kyle Barrett’s two-hit, six-strikeout display and then rode another commendable pitching effort from Matt McKenzie (three hits, four strikeouts) to a 5-1 triumph in Game 2. “I wasn’t thinking our pitching was going to be a strength [this season], but it really has been,” Fabrizio said. “Our team ERA is at 2.5, which is very good. And we’ve been picking up the ball pretty well.” What has most often hamstrung the RedHawks (10-8, 3-1) this spring is an unsettled offense. Although Marist knocked out eight hits against St. Pat’s in the second game, that was something of an aberration. “We’re still hitting .208 as a team,” said Fabrizio, whose squad collected just four hits in Game 1 on Saturday. “What would it look like if we were hitting .308? We’d have 15 wins already. “They have the ability, but I don’t know if the kids are thinking too much at the plate. I’m confident we have the arms to

compete — if we swing the bats a little bit, we’ve got good things ahead.” That might include within the ESCC. While Fabrizio admitted the Shamrocks aren’t one of the league elites, he felt Marist’s success against them represented “a good sign” and that St. Pat’s might have popped up at a fortuitous time on the schedule, when the RedHawks were in the market for a psychological pick-me-up. “Hopefully, we’ll build on that,” Fabrizio said. With a win against ESCC heavyweight Joliet Catholic Academy also pocketed in the early going, Marist finds itself in the thick of the conference race at the moment. Two games apiece against St. Viator and Notre Dame this week would offer an even better look at the RedHawks’ long-range prospects. “Conference games are the ones that matter to me,” Fabrizio said. “I’m geared up for those, and until we’re mathematically eliminated that’s how it’ll be. And if you [continually] win three out of four, you’ll probably be at the top [by the end].” Barrett didn’t get a tremendous amount of batting support in Game 1, but Marist made the most of its scattered hits. Pat Meehan, Tommy Finwall and Rich Kairis all poked doubles, with the latter’s chasing in one of the RedHawks’ runs. Eric Hanson also smacked an RBI single for Marist, which tallied in the third and fifth stanzas. “We’re lacking a little [offensive] consistency, but we hit them when they counted,” Fabrizio said. Meehan, Kairis and Barrett Callaghan each produced a two-hit performance in the later game. Kairis (two), Meehan, Hanson and Grant Kenny supplied the RBI. Andrean (Ind.) 5 Marist 0 The 59ers, a Class 3A power

in Indiana, usually set up several contests against foes from Illinois each season, and last Thursday it was the RedHawks’ turn to meet up with them. Unlike on Saturday, however, Marist didn’t do enough to save its pitcher. Instead, Robert Hovey got tagged with a defeat despite only allowing four hits while striking out four. The RedHawks fanned eight times and garnered three singles, two of them by Kairis. “They’re a good team and we were really just flat,” Fabrizio said. “We booted two double-play balls in the first inning, and once we got down we didn’t battle back.” Although the loss came in nonconference play, Fabrizio didn’t want his guys to completely ignore it. That’s because he feels the 59ers are “the caliber of team we’ll see in the playoffs, [so] we have to be able to come out and play well.”

Statistics Marist 000 000 0 — 0 Andrean 400 001 x — 5 Marist LP: Hovey. St. Patrick 000 000 0 — 0 Marist 001 010 x — 2 Marist 2B: Finwall, Kairis, Meehan. RBI: Hanson, Kairis. WP: Barrett. Marist 110 000 3 — 5 St. Patrick 000 001 0 — 1 Marist 2B: Meehan. RBI: Kairis 2, Hanson, Kenny, Meehan. WP: McKenzie.


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, May 1, 2014 Section 2

3

Déjà vu all over again? Mustangs hope big week signals takeoff By Ken Karrson

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Shepard's Skylor Hilger slaps a single to start a Lady Astros rally in last Wednesday's SSC Red contest versus Eisenhower. Shepard posted an 11-3 win in Palos Heights.

Softball roundup

Lady Spartans hitting their stride By Anthony Nasella There are many intangibles Oak Lawn coach Brian Frangella can attribute to his team’s 6-1 effort last week that lifted the Lady Spartans over .500 for the season. But perhaps the most telling is that the 14 players who make up the roster are gaining confidence with each game. During the week, Oak Lawn (10-9) registered victories over Queen of Peace, Hillcrest, Argo and Bloom Township before posting a 2-1 record and third-place finish at the Elgin Larkin Slugfest. “We had a really good week, and I think it’s because the girls started believing in themselves,” Frangella said. “It’s made a difference, especially at the plate. We’ve been hitting the ball really well. We’re also getting much better at-bats. “We’ve been talking a lot about that this season -- the girls taking control of the at-bat and swinging at their pitch and not the pitcher’s pitch. It’s making a big difference.” The Lady Spartans opened with a 17-5 romp past the Pride on Monday, a win largely made possible by Reily McTeague, who finished with five RBI runs. Morgan Josza then drove in two to spur Oak Lawn's offense in its 13-2 conquest of Hillcrest in a South Suburban Conference crossover game two days later. Argo presented a much tougher obstacle on Thursday, but the Lady Spartans cleared it when Kaleigh Hayes drove in the deciding run in a 7-6 triumph. On Friday, it was Marissa Loya's turn to star as she homered and totaled four RBI to lead Oak Lawn past the Lady Blazing Trojans 6-4. At the Larkin Slugfest, the Lady Spartans opened with a 14-0 whitewash of the host school. Josza handcuffed Larkin with a two-hitter, and she got plenty of offensive support from Mia Loya and Heyden Landingham, each of whom delivered three hits and three RBI. Mia Loya continued her hot hitting in the next game, but her two-run homer represented the full extent of Oak Lawn's attack as it suffered an 8-2 loss to Hampshire. But instead of pining over the setback, the Lady Spartans roared back to blank Elgin 5-0 as McTeague accounted for all of Oak Lawn's RBI, three of them on a homer. Mia Loya logged the pitching win. Both Loya and McTeague were selected for the all-tournament team.

Crusaders (Continued from page 1)   “Our kids really battle and fight to the end. We never really feel like we’re out of a game, and that’s more [attributable] to their spirit — that’s something you can’t teach. The word we use is ‘compete,’ and they get after it every day.” Brother Rice 10 Gordon Tech 0    The Crusaders definitely got after it when they met the Rams last Monday. Pitching-wise, Ian McGinnis was in command as he fired a four-hitter, fanned eight and walked just two over four innings before giving way to Barry Biondic, who culminated a slaughter-rule win by striking out the side in the fifth.   As for batting, five players registered multiple-hit efforts. Andrew Dyke led the way with a 3-for-3 showing that included a homer and four RBI, but Kevin Biondic (one RBI, one run), Jake Barry (homer, double, two RBI, one run), Kyle Hilliard (homer, double, two RBI, one run) and Kevin Sullivan (double, two runs) all made their presences keenly

“Mia has really been doing a great job pitching,” Frangella said. “She was especially solid in the third-place game at Larkin.” Frangella said he really liked the quality teams his club got to compete against at the Larkin event. “That’s definitely one of the reasons why we go to this tournament every year,” he said. “We don’t get to compete against these teams too often. We did well.” To be sure, many individuals excelled for the Lady Spartans throughout the week. McTeague registered 13 RBI, Marissa Loya had 10 to go along with a pair of homers, Landingham racked up eight hits and five RBI, Hayes batted .480 with eight runs and four stolen bases, and Josza finished with nine hits and nine runs. “We really had a solid offensive output and we were getting players contributing in all facets of the game,” Frangella said. “Girls were stepping up in big situations [and] it was great to see. Of our 14 players on the roster, every one of them contributed at one point this [past] week. “I knew at the beginning of the year that this was a great group of girls, and it’s even better when they’re playing well.” Now, Oak Lawn will try to take its winning to the next level as it deals with a pair of SSC Red challenges in Richards and Shepard. “Those were two teams that we competed well against last year,” Frangella said. “I’m interested to see how we take those challenges on. I really want to see us take that next step." MARIST The Lady RedHawks improved to 14-3 after going 4-0 in East Suburban Catholic Conference play last week. Marist swept twinbills from Joliet Catholic Academy and Fenwick and has now won eight consecutive league contests. Brooke Wilson and Brooke Wyderski sparked the Lady RedHawks’ 9-1 win over the Angels on Tuesday, as Wilson slammed a bases-clearing triple and Wyderski unloaded a two-run homer for Marist. Also contributing was winning pitcher Zariya Gonzalez, who struck out eight JCA batters and went 2-for-3 at the plate with two runs scored. Four round-trippers on Wednesday laid the groundwork for a 20-4 mashing of the Angels. Going deep for the Lady RedHawks were Alexis Rogers, Wyderski, Gonzalez and Madison Naujokas. Rogers collected three RBI on her blast and five on the day, while each of the other players belted a two-

run homer. Rogers also tallied three times for Marist, which totaled 18 hits in the romp. Fenwick wasn’t much more of a challenge on Saturday, as it succumbed to the Lady RedHawks by scores of 10-1 and 13-3. Offensive heroines were plentiful as Marist knocked out 27 hits over the two contests. Wilson and Wyderski both stroked three hits in the opener, with the former including another homer and a double among hers and totaling three RBI. Naujokas and Bella Wilkinson backed their teammates with two hits apiece. Naujokas pounded out three more hits in Game 2, all of them going for extra bases. Along with her triple, two doubles and three RBI, the Lady RedHawks received a lift from Rogers (two hits, three RBI), Wilkinson (two hits) and Jillian Kenny (two hits). In the circle, Gonzalez (eight strikeouts in Game 1) and Lizzie Annerino (four strikeouts in Game 2) pocketed the victories. MOTHER MCAULEY Also posting four triumphs without a loss last week were the Mighty Macs, who took down Tinley Park (5-2), De La Salle (15-0), Marian Catholic (4-0) and Loyola Academy (6-4) in succession. Kara Bischoff swatted a tworun homer to aid Mother McAuley in its Monday conquest of the Lady Titans, while Amy Balich (3-for-4) and Morgan Fleming (2for-4, two runs) both added solo shots. Mady Ruppert drove in the Macs’ last run with a single. Bischoff (three runs) and Briana Gyrion (two-run double, three RBI) were McAuley’s principal figures in its rout of the Lady Meteors. Dara Sanders stopped De La Salle on two hits and struck out eight in five innings. Holly Marousek followed Sanders’ lead by tossing a shutout on Thursday. She silenced the Lady Spartans on four hits and got offensive assistance from Balich (two-run single), Emily Rux (RBI double) and Jen Crowley (RBI double). Rux went 3-for-3 with two RBI to fuel the Macs’ Saturday win over the Lady Ramblers. McAuley closed out the week with a 12-3 overall ledger and 7-0 mark in the Girls Catholic Athletic Conference. MT. ASSISI GCAC triumphs over Regina (7-4) and Queen of Peace (22-1) highlighted a 3-2 week for the Screeching Eagles. Mt. Assisi also took part in the Larkin Slugfest (Continued on page 5)

felt as well. Massey had one hit and tallied twice.    “If we get down, we look to come back,” McCarthy said. “If we’re in front, we look to bury them.”   Rice did so here by exploding for six runs in the second inning, which established an 8-0 edge for it. The Crusaders finished with 15 hits and augmented that production with spotless defense. Brother Rice 12 St. Ignatius 2    A five-run second put the Crusaders up 6-0 on Wednesday and they went on to bag a second straight five-inning triumph.   Mike Enriquez silenced the Wolfpack on two hits and notched 12 of the 15 outs on ground balls. He also whiffed a batter.    Dyke, Sullivan and Kevin Biondic headlined at the plate as they went a combined 9-for-10 with five doubles, nine RBI and eight runs. Eric Lieser contributed a triple and two RBI as Rice unleashed a 13-hit attack on St. Ignatius.    “It boils down to [the fact] we have great senior leadership,” McCarthy said, when asked what has fueled the Crusaders’ strong season to date. “We can’t do anything without the kids.    “It begins with great kids, and

our coaching staff has to put them in positions to where they can succeed. It’s an ongoing process, but it’s been a pleasant year for me.”   Rice was to tangle with Mt. Carmel in a rematch this week and then square off twice with Loyola Academy in another CCL Blue showdown. Also scheduled is a nonconference contest with Andrean (Ind.), which defeated Marist last week.

Statistics Brother Rice 262 00 — 10 Gordon Tech 000 00 — 0 Brother Rice 2B: Barry, Hilliard, Sullivan. HR: Barry, Dyke, Hilliard. RBI: Dyke 4, Barry 2, Hilliard 2, K. Biondic. WP: McGinnis (4-1). St. Ignatius 001 10 — 2 Brother Rice 150 33 — 12 Brother Rice 2B: K. Biondic 2, Dyke 2, Sullivan. 3B: Lieser. RBI: Dyke 6, K. Biondic 3, Lieser 2. WP: Enriquez (4-1). Brother Rice 000 000 0 — 0 Mt. Carmel 011 000 x — 2 Brother Rice 2B: K. Biondic. LP: Musielak (3-2). Mt. Carmel HR: Dobrinich. RBI: Dobrinich. WP: Boricich.

To paraphrase the immortal Yogi Berra, could it be déjà vu all over again? Mark Smyth and his Evergreen Park ballplayers certainly hope so. Doing repeat business is a savvy practice for commercial enterprises, and it’s a good thing for athletic teams, too — assuming the repetition is worthwhile. And in the Mustangs’ case, it is. A year ago, Evergreen used one big week of the regular season as a springboard for what was to follow — namely, the baseball program’s greatest playoff run ever. The state tournament is still a few weeks away, but the Mustangs decided last week was a good time to start making some serious noise once more. Interestingly, the week began with a rather quiet submission to Reavis. However, Evergreen rebounded to earn a two-game split with the Rams, then stunned Oak Forest 5-0 before crushing Rich East in both ends of a nonconference twinbill on Saturday. The Mustangs’ 8-0 victory in Game 2 pushed them over the .500 mark and, Smyth hopes, perhaps laid the groundwork for much bigger things to come. “It’s eerie [because] it’s been sort of a carbon copy of last year [in some ways],” he said. “After our nice run in the playoffs, we asked the [current] players, ‘Where are we going to turn it around in the regular season by doing something we didn’t do last year?’” The veteran leader got his answer on Thursday, when Frank Meisl fired a shutout at the Bengals and Evergreen (9-8, 5-4) made optimal use of its six hits. “I think that’s the first time we’ve beaten them since we’ve been in the [South Suburban] conference,” Smyth said. “It was a real big win and it should be a confidence booster.” The ensuing 20-2 and 8-0 destructions of Rich East indicated that the Mustangs had indeed developed plenty of self-assurance, but those two triumphs couldn’t overshadow the importance of what had come right before them. In particular, Smyth loved the work Meisl provided on the mound as he held Oak Forest to only four hits. “He was just unbelievable,” Smyth said. “He was painting the corners with his curveball and coming in with his fastball when he needed to keep them off-balance. He was dealing, and you got the feeling that one run might be enough. “He deserves to be 4-0 with the way he’s thrown [instead of 2-1]. He’s a great kid, a hard worker, and he listens [to instructions].” As it turned out, one run really

Vikings (Continued from page 1) Offensive difficulties have not been completely foreign to the Vikings (17-2, 6-1) of late. They were blanked by De La Salle in a recent outing and failed to generate a robust attack on a few other occasions. “Hopefully, it’s over, but every year we’ve gone through [something like] this,” Lotus said. “That’s kind of what we talked about — there’s going to be games where we don’t score 12 runs. The worst thing to do is to keep thinking about it and have unproductive at-bats.” A St. Joseph error and two hit batsmen aided St. Laurence’s comeback on Wednesday, but Rob Gutierrez (two RBI), Brad Wood (RBI) and Mike Kornacker all hit safely as well. Kevin White’s double in the sixth capped the Vikings’ scoring. John Riordan earned the pitching win in relief of Frank Greco. Riordan allowed only one hit over 3 1/3 innings and struck out five. *** White (two-run single), Greco (RBI single), Wood (sacrifice fly) and Nate Tholl (RBI double) all stepped forward to give St. Laurence a boost on Thursday. Their combined efforts put the Vikings in command versus the Irish and made the team's ensuing seven-run explosion icing on the victory cake. “We didn’t play great on Wednesday, so I was a little concerned [about Thursday], but I was confident we’d be able to score one run and get back into it,” Lotus said. Roger Wilson’s bases-clearing triple culminated St. Laurence’s second onslaught in impressive fashion. Preceding it were four other hits and RBI from Tholl (two), Riordan and Wood. The one-sided triumph was a bit unexpected, not only because of how close things were at the time of stoppage on Monday but due also to the Vikings’ history at Bishop McNamara. “It’s always a weird place to play,” Lotus said. “For a few years there, it seemed we were losing games in the last inning on home runs.”

was enough to secure success for Evergreen, which plated its initial marker in the fourth inning on Corey Miller’s RBI double, a hit that followed a Bengals error. A wild pitch gave the Mustangs another run in the fifth. Evergreen then finalized the verdict by erupting for a threespot in the bottom of the sixth. Again, a couple Oak Forest miscues figured in the proceedings, but Kevin Farmer also delivered an RBI double. According to Smyth, Mustangs player Brennan Quick said afterward that the experience “was fun” and that it “felt like a playoff game.” Was it enough to kick-start another prolonged Evergreen surge that will whisk it into the postseason on a high note? “Hopefully, that’s the case,” Smyth said. Evergreen Park 20-8 Rich East 2-0 The Mustangs looked every bit the contender in dismantling the Rockets twice. Smyth gave on-field time to everyone, and a number of athletes responded with big outings. Game 1 winner Kevin Gallagher was one such productive individual as he mowed down 10 Rich East batters on third strikes while surrendering just two hits. He was backed with a 13-hit attack spearheaded by the foursome of Farmer, Dan Kohler, Miller and Mark Martin, who collected 10 of those safeties. Kohler and Martin both scored four times, while Kohler and Miller were responsible for seven RBI between them. Joe Piet added two more RBI and six other Evergreen players knocked in one run. The second game was more of the same, as the Mustangs raced to a 7-0 lead in the opening stanza to defuse the Rockets. Martin went 3-for-4 with a double, two RBI and one run to lead the way. Aaron Green VanZee, Brian Pall and JR Wazio split the pitching chores. They combined to strike out 10 more hitters — Pall whiffed the side in his one inning of work — and Green VanZee yielded the only three hits Rich East mustered. Reavis 4-5 Evergreen Park 0-6 Pall was also solid on Wednesday as he held the Rams scoreless through three innings, but Reavis broke through with a three-spot in the fourth that put it in front for good. Evergreen wound up with only six hits, although two of them and a hit batsman occurred in the same inning to present the visitors with a golden scoring opportunity. However, that fifth frame ended quietly when the next two Mustangs batters hit into a double play and flew out, Those were the days when the Irish and St. Laurence fought to see who would rule over the Catholic League White. The Vikings have since become an integral member of the Blue Division, and today’s players really know nothing about Bishop Mac being one of St. Laurence’s main rivals of the past. “It’s different now,” Lotus said. “Those games that have the intensity that Bishop Mac had then are played against Providence, Mt. Carmel and St. Rita now.” St. Laurence 8 Providence Catholic 0 So respected have the Vikings become in the Blue Division that the Celtics trotted out their top gun, Jake Godfrey, to pitch to them on Saturday. Godfrey has been talked about as a potential high draft choice in Major League Baseball’s 2014 amateur draft, and as such he attracted a hefty number of scouts. Those talent evaluators also got a look at Kornacker, who was every bit Godfrey’s equal. In fact, St. Laurence’s ace held the upper hand as he silenced Providence Catholic on three hits while whiffing 12 batters. Godfrey was certainly no slouch, as evidenced by the four-hitter he threw. The Vikings didn’t solve him until the fourth inning when Kornacker singled, but that hit put St. Laurence’s attack in motion and got a threerun rally underway. A Celtics error and wild pitch both factored into the scoring, but so, too, did White’s RBI single. Wilson added a run-producing hit in the fifth and Mike Finger slammed a three-RBI triple to highlight another uprising one stanza later.

respectively. The SSC Red clash had actually gotten underway on Monday, but was suspended in the third inning because of rain. *** When the Rams drew first blood again on Tuesday, Evergreen was in danger of suffering a second straight defeat. But instead of folding, the Mustangs flowered, first by scoring once in their half of the first and then by exploding for five runs in the third to seize control. Martin, Corey Miller and Sean Miller all socked RBI doubles during the bigger rally, while Farmer and Ronnie O’Toole each contributed a run-scoring single. “Reavis is always really wellcoached,” Smyth said. “So whenever you can get those guys, you’ve done something because they don’t often beat themselves.” The Rams did commit a couple errors, but Evergreen created most of its own production by banging out 10 hits. “We tell them to grind it out, get the bat on the ball, and something good is [eventually] going to happen,” Smyth said. Something good definitely happened on the hill, where junior Joe Moran continued to perform admirably. Here, he struck out four and scattered seven hits. “He’s only had one bad outing — against Richards,” Smyth said of Moran. “He has an above-average fastball that moves and he’s been a nice surprise. We’re excited about what he can do.” Hillcrest and Tinley Park were on the Mustangs’ conference docket this week.

Statistics Evergreen Park 000 000 0 — 0 Reavis 000 301 x — 4 Evergreen Park 2B: C. Miller. LP: Pall (1-2). Reavis 3000 002 0 — 5 Evergreen Park 105 000 x — 6 Evergreen Park 2B: Martin, C. Miller, S. Miller. RBI: Martin 2, Farmer, C. Miller, S. Miller, O’Toole. WP: Moran (2-1). Oak Forest 000 000 0 — 0 Evergreen Park 000 113 x — 5 Evergreen Park 2B: Farmer, C. Miller. 3B: S. Miller. RBI: Farmer, C. Miller. WP: Meisl (2-1). Rich East 001 10 — 2 Evergreen Park 543 8x — 20 Evergreen Park 3B: Kohler, Martin, C. Miller. RBI: Kohler 4, C. Miller 3, Piet 2, Carpenter, Farmer, Green VanZee, Martin, Pall, Wazio. WP: Gallagher (1-0). Rich East 000 000 0 — 0 Evergreen Park 700 010 x — 8 Evergreen Park 2B: Martin, B. Walsh. RBI: Martin 2, B. Walsh 2, Farmer, C. Miller, S. Miller, Quick. WP: Green VanZee (1-2).

“The second time around [the order], we had much better atbats,” Lotus said. “We were much more selective about what we could handle against a pitcher with very good stuff. “We’re definitely going to see some good pitchers and guys who can hit [in the CCL Blue]. Every game is going to be a battle, but that’s kind of what we’ve prepared for.” A rematch with Providence this past Monday was slated to begin the Vikings’ week. A home-andhome series with Mt. Carmel on Wednesday and Saturday followed.

Statistics St. Laurence 010 57 — 13 Bishop McNamara 200 00 — 2 St. Laurence 2B: Tholl. 3B: Wilson. RBI: Tholl 3, Wilson 3, White 2, Wood 2, Greco, Riordan. WP: Hitney (5-0). St. Joseph 100 300 0 — 4 St. Laurence 100 051 x — 7 St. Laurence 2B: Miller, White. RBI: Gutierrez 2, White 2, Tholl, Wilson, Wood. WP: Riordan (2-0). Providence Catholic 000 000 0 — 0 St. Laurence 000 350 x — 8 St. Laurence 2B: Finger. RBI: Finger 3, Miller, White, Wilson. WP: Kornacker (5-1).

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4

Section 2

Thursday, May 1, 2014    The Regional News - The Reporter

SXU sports summary

Softball team sets national record Establishing a program record is certainly noteworthy. Eclipsing a national standard, however, is headline-worthy. St. Xavier University's softball team got a chance to accomplish both feats last Wednesday. Although visiting Judson University scored one run in each end of a Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference doubleheader, it waited until the fourth inning to do so in the opener. And by blanking the Eagles for the first 3 1/3 frames, the Cougars surpassed California Baptist's four-year-old national mark for consecutive shutout innings by that same amount. SXU is now No. 1 in NAIA annals with 60 2/3 scoreless innings in a row. And by virtue of their 3-1 and 6-1 victories, the No. 9-ranked Cougars stretched their winning streak to 21 games, which bettered Submitted photo by two the school standard that Jenny Vanek was one of several Moraine Valley College batters who played a key role in the was set in 2013. Cyclones' sweeping of three recent doubleheaders The record setting didn't stop there, either. Senior pitcher Megan Nonnemacher's Game 1 win gave her 80 for her collegiate career, which equaled SXU's alltime best individual effort. In raising her season ledger to 17-1, By Maura Vizza Nonnemacher tossed a five-hitter and struck out six. Moraine Valley College’s softEven with Nonnemacher proball team made it a point to double viding another sterling display in its pleasure in recent outings. the pitching circle, the Cougars The Cyclones had a sweep needed to rally. They expunged time as they captured both ends a 1-0 deficit in the sixth stanza, of three straight doubleheaders using RBI singles from junior to run their unbeaten streak to Shannon Lauret and freshman eight games. Win No. 9 in a row Franchesca Graffeo, plus junior was gained at Oakton College’s exMegan James' sacrifice fly to get pense before the latter turned the on the board. tables in Game 2 last Thursday. SXU jumped in front early in Without question, Moraine’s Game 2, as RBI hits from Graffeo most impressive exhibition came and junior Katie Sears staked it to against McHenry College, which a 2-0 edge in the second inning. gave up 35 runs in the span of Two more runs were tallied in only 10 innings and suffered a the fifth, courtesy of a Judson pair of lopsided Illinois Skyway error and senior DH Ariel HinCollegiate Conference defeats as ton's sacrifice fly. a result. The April 17 outcomes Sophomore Nicole Nonnemachfavored the Cyclones by scores of er — who fanned 16 Eagles, 11-2 and 24-2. walked no one and allowed just Moraine coach Mike Veen optfour hits in gaining the pitching ed for station-to-station play in victory — contributed a run-scoran attempt to keep the margins ing triple on the offensive side in reasonably close, but even that the sixth. She then crossed the couldn’t slow the Cyclones’ onplate herself on junior Amanda slaught. Janay McGovern led Hainlen's bunt. Moraine’s first-game blitz with *** a 4-for-5 showing and four RBI. Megan Nonnemacher was feted Also getting involved were Krisby both the NAIA and CCAC for tie Bagus (4-for-5, two doubles, her work during the week ending one RBI), Amie Raynor (3-foron Easter by being chosen as the 5, double, five RBI) and Carly Pitcher of the Week for each entity. Trinley (3-for-5, two doubles, four She received the awards within RBI). Raynor was the winning hours of one another. pitcher. Nonnemacher's sister, Nicole, Trinley and McGovern continwas similarly recognized in the ued their hot hitting in the second week ending March 18. contest, the former doing so with Megan Nonnemacher threw a 4-for-5 effort that included a three shutouts, allowed just sevhomer, double and four more RBI. en hits and struck out 23 batters McGovern was an able accomplice in 23 innings to earn her dual as she supplied three hits, includhonors. She held opponents to a Submitted photo ing a double, and five RBI. Carly Trinley was solid both in the field and at the plate for .091 average over that span and Behind that duo were several Moraine Valley College during its recent nine-game win streak. issued only seven bases-on-balls. other notables, a group headed The whitewashes gave her a up by Ari Bulthuis and Dana career-best 11 for the season. Cummings, who went a combined neers a 1-0 advantage in Game that same day as the former made Nonnemacher, who sports a 17-1 6-for-7 with five RBI. Bulthuis 1 before overtaking Prairie State. off with a 4-1 triumph. record, currently ranks fifth in socked a homer and also drew two Raynor again was a dual threat the NAIA in earned-run average BASEBALL walks, while Cummings had two as she held the Pioneers’ sticks (0.71) and eighth in opponents' The Cyclones don’t like to make batting average (.160). doubles among her three hits. For in check while aiding Moraine’s good measure, Bulthuis notched attack with two doubles and a it easy. *** pair of runs. Cummings (two hits, Their latest win last Monday the pitching victory. In a showdown for CCAC suMegan Beckow and Jazmine including a triple) and McGov- came after they lost an early lead Ramirez both produced two-hit, ern (one hit, one run) were other and were forced to rally, which they did well enough to secure two-RBI performances. Each of contributors. McGovern’s two-run walk-off an 8-7 victory over North Central Ramirez’s safeties went for two bases, while one of Beckow’s was homer ended Game 2 via slaugh- College’s JV squad. ter rule. The blast was one of Seamus Brennan was on fire as a round-tripper. two hits for her. Vanek (run), he reached base five times -- twice *** Harper College was the Cy- Cummings (run), Trinley (double, with base hits, twice with walks clones’ next sweep victim as it run) and winning pitcher Bulthuis and once after getting plunked fell 8-3 and 13-9. Moraine squan- (double, run) also hit safely for by a pitch. Robert Neylon and Kyle Belluomini both provided dered a 6-0 lead in Game 2 before the Cyclones. “In the first game, our defense one triple and two RBI. breaking the tie that had been was stellar,” Veen said. “That’s *** created by the Bulldogs. It was a rough outing for MoRaynor (two runs), Bulthu- what’s winning us these games. is (two runs) and Jenny Vanek Our pitchers aren’t getting many raine last Wednesday as it lost (triple, five RBI, one run) all had strikeouts, but batters are hitting 10-1 to ISCC leader Waubonsee College. two hits for the Cyclones in the to our tough defense. “We’re playing really well [and] The score was not indicative opener, while Cummings contributed a hit, RBI and run. Vanek, now is the perfect time for it to of how well the Cyclones played. Facing a top competitor, Moraine Trinley and Cummings all stroked come together.” *** only faltered in the number of a pair of hits in the nightcap, with Moraine was down 4-0 in its gifts it handed the Chiefs, who Vanek and Trinley each including first game versus Oakton, but it benefited from 10 free passes and a double among hers. Raynor, who went 4-for-4 with a battled back and Trinley’s two- three hit batsmen. The Cyclones held Morton Coldouble in Game 2, was the pitcher RBI triple in the sixth finally pushed the Cyclones in front 5-4. lege to two hits in their 11-0 rout of record in both contests. Raynor made that one-run margin of the Panthers last Thursday. *** Prairie State College couldn’t hold up by striking out the last Mike Levigne pitched the shutout slow the Moraine express, either, batter she faced and stranding an for Moraine, while Mike Rankin (four hits) and Jason Hine (three as it dropped 5-2 and 8-0 decisions Oakton runner on first. Oakton brought Moraine’s win hits, four RBI) were the offensive last Tuesday. The Cyclones spotted the Pio- streak screeching to a halt later ringleaders.

Moraine athletics wrap

Cyclones softball team has sweep time

premacy, Olivet got the upper hand on SXU last Thursday. The No. 4-ranked Tigers, who entered the doubleheader tied for first with the Cougars, won the opener 5-2 to snap the latter's 21-game unbeaten streak. Game 2 was stopped by darkness after eight innings with the score tied at 2-all. That deadlock halted Olivet's NAIA-leading 43game win streak, but the Tigers still earned both the top seed in the CCAC Tournament and regular-season crown by virtue of their earlier triumph. Olivet built a 4-0 advantage in Game 1 on Lindsey Krippel's threerun homer and Erika Tatum's RBI double, both of which came in the first two innings. Sears' single and Nicole Nonnemacher's sacrifice fly shaved the deficit in half in the sixth, but SXU could get no closer. Megan Nonnemacher suffered just her second loss in 19 pitching decisions despite striking out nine. She gave up seven hits, four more than the Cougars mustered. Game 2 remained scoreless into the fourth, when Nicole Nonnemacher smacked a oneout double and Hainlen blasted a two-run homer. That lead lasted until Krippel went deep with her own two-run shot in the sixth. SXU loaded the bases with one out in the seventh, but had its rally stifled by a double play. The Cougars then escaped jams of their own in the bottom of the seventh and eighth. Nicole Nonnemacher fanned 10 and scattered seven hits while going the distance in the circle. *** Senior Katie Houlihan and freshman Savannah Kinsella both had three-hit days as the Cougars split a nonconference doubleheader with Purdue University Calumet last Friday at Community Park in Munster, Ind. SXU grabbed the opener 4-2 before dropping a 1-0 verdict in Game 2. Houlihan's fielder's choice and Lauret's double staked the Cougars to a 2-0 lead in the second inning of Game 1. After the Peregrines tallied once in the bottom of that same frame, SXU responded with junior Sarah Saunders' RBI hit to re-establish a two-run cushion, and the Cougars also answered one other PUC rumbling by taking advantage of a seventh-inning throwing error to set the final margin. Megan Nonnemacher earned the win by scattering eight hits and striking out seven. Nicole Nonnemacher's 13-strikeout, two-hit gem was wasted in the second game as SXU could not break through on the scoreboard despite collecting seven hits. Houlihan and Kinsella both stroked a pair of hits for the Cougars, who left eight runners stranded. The Peregrines used a second-inning solo homer to create their margin of victory. *** SXU swept two games from Siena Heights (Mich.) University on Saturday, with a 4-0 Game 2 triumph representing the Cougars' 27th whitewash of the season. They also defeated the host

school 6-2 in the opener. Nicole Nonnemacher pitched the shutout to raise her record to 17-3. She gave up just three hits and fanned 10, although Siena Heights did coax an uncharacteristically high five walks from her. Supporting Nonnemacher offensively were sophomore Kasey Kanaga (3-for-4, one RBI), James (two hits, triple, two RBI, one run) and Houlihan (RBI single). Siena Heights struck first in the opener and was ahead 2-1 after two innings, but Hainlen's RBI single in the third pulled SXU even. The Cougars then went ahead to stay with a four-run outburst in the fourth, a rally highlighted by Sears' two-RBI double. Megan Nonnemacher garnered her 20th victory of the year by tossing a five-hitter with four strikeouts. *** SXU (42-5-1) completed its regular schedule on Sunday with yet another doubleheader sweep, this latest one coming at Concordia (Mich.) University's expense by scores of 4-3 and 4-0. The Nonnemachers once again stood tall in the pitching circle. Megan Nonnemacher whiffed six and tossed a four-hitter to win the opener, while sister Nicole threw a one-hitter and fanned five to complete the sweep. Nicole Nonnemacher increased her career strikeout total to 503, second all-time in Cougars annals behind Megan Nonnemacher's 693. Kinsella went 4-for-7 on the day with a double, two runs and one RBI to spark SXU's attack. Her RBI single was part of a four-run third inning that gave the Cougars their Game 1 victory. Also contributing to that uprising was Kanaga, who was hit by a pitch with the bases filled. Kinsella, Hinton (double), Graffeo and James were SXU's RBI people in the second contest. The Cougars host the CCAC Tournament starting today. They'll enter the event as the No. 2 seed behind Olivet. MEN'S GOLF After trailing Cardinal Stritch University by just two strokes heading into Day 2 of the CCAC Championship, the Cougars overtook the Wolves to capture the tournament title by seven shots last Tuesday and, with it, secure an automatic berth in the NAIA Men's Golf National Championships. The 63rd annual national tournament will take place May 1316 at LPGA International Golf Course in Daytona Beach, Fla. SXU posted a team score of 618 (310-318) to beat out 11 other conference squads at George Dunne National Golf Course in Oak Forest. Junior Kyle Bahnick carded a two-day score of 151 (76-75) to tie for the top spot among individuals, while senior James Kerr (153; 79-74) finished in a tie for third. Seniors Kirby Brown (157; 78-79) and Brendan Ryan (158; 78-80) completed the Cougars' scoring by tying for the Nos. 7 and 9 positions, respectively. Freshman Robert Lively (162; (Continued on page 7)

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1 - 8 0 0 - C D C - I N F O ( 1 - 8 0 0 - 2 3 2 - 4 6 3 6 ) • w w w. c d c . g o v / s c re e n f o r l i f e

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Section 2

5

Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella   With a pair of shutouts to its credit last week, Shepard’s girls’ soccer team moved two steps closer to a South Suburban Conference Red championship.   The Lady Astros (9-4) maintained their grip on first place as the league schedule got reduced to four matches. And Shepard coach Scott Wilkins couldn’t be happier with how his squad is proceeding.    “We’ve been really playing good lately,” he said. “We were having some challenges getting things going earlier in the season, but I think we’re going the right way. Everybody is starting to understand their roles and those who are assuming roles of leadership.”   The Lady Astros’ first whitewash came against Argo, which dropped a 2-0 SSC Red verdict. Netminder Heather Banis was credited with the shutout, while Tiffani and Christina Kotas supplied Shepard’s goals.    Tiffani Kotas scored before intermission and Christina Kotas added her goal shortly after the second half got underway.    “Tiffani and Christina are providing outstanding senior leadership,” Wilkins said. “Both of them are scoring a lot of goals this year and both are really stepping up as outside midfielders for us. After their goals, we played good defense and kept the possession of the ball really well.   “We were really happy with our second-half effort. When we’re able to control the ball, it usually works out well for us.”    Fresh off that success, the Lady Astros kept the momentum going against Joliet West on Saturday as they registered a 1-0 triumph behind Kelly Evancich’s marker and more strong goaltending from Banis, who made three saves en route to notching her fifth shutout of the year.   Evancich’s goal came halfway through the first half, when Shepard had the wind at its back.   “It was a real windy game,” Wilkins said. “We were playing against the wind in the second half, so we were just trying to keep the ball on the ground and keep possession of it. We did a great job again in the second half.”    Wilkins said he has been pleased with Evancich’s season-long performance, which has resulted in 11 goals to date.   “Kelly has really stepped up and taken on a significant offensive role this year,” he said. “The goals that she has scored have been solid.”   Also shining for Shepard has

been Banis, who missed her freshman year after tearing her ACL in the season’s second match. She played basketball this winter for Shepard and has maintained her athletic edge by competing in soccer.    “Heather has been doing a solid job for us,” Wilkins said. “We’re hoping she’ll be around for the next couple of years. She provides good leadership and knows how to control things in front of her.”   Next up for the Lady Astros are matches versus Oak Lawn and Bremen, which could help determine Shepard’s ultimate fate within the SSC Red.    “We have four more conference games left,” Wilkins said. “Hopefully, we can wrap the conference up in the next couple of games.” ***   Sandburg also won twice via shutout last week as it blanked Homewood-Flossmoor 2-0 in a SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue match and edged Benet Academy 2-0 in a Thursday nonconference encounter at Wheaton North.    Emily Osoba and Sam Messina did the scoring for the Lady Eagles (7-2-1, 3-0) versus the Lady Vikings, while Jayna Kozlowski and Rachel Mokersky took care of the offensive business against the Lady Redwings. ***   Behind goals from Hannah Henderson and Erin O’Leary, Stagg (4-4-2, 2-0) defeated Joliet West 5-2 in an SWSC Blue match on Thursday. BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL   Stagg dropped a hard-fought, three-set verdict to Lockport after winning Game 1 of the SWSC Blue match. The Porters prevailed 25-27, 25-19, 25-22.    Trevor Crain put down 10 kills for the Chargers, while Trevon Velasco was also strong along the net with six blocks. Nick Stanek dished out 28 assists and Sean Runyon finished with 18 digs. ***   Ivan Magana’s nine kills and two service aces led visiting Shepard (6-12, 1-2) to a 25-23, 26-28, 25-18 triumph over TF United last Thursday. Dave Prince added three solo blocks for the Astros in the SSC crossover match. BOYS’ WATER POLO   Sandburg’s attempt to win the Brother Rice Tournament fell short on Saturday night, as it lost 9-8 to Lockport.    The Eagles (17-6) found themselves behind 2-0 after the first quarter before fighting back to tie the game at 4-all by halftime. Zach Roper (five goals) spurred Sandburg’s comeback and also

Trinity sports report

inched it in front by tallying in the opening minute of the second half.   The Porters responded with three straight goals, but the Eagles forged another deadlock at 7-all when Majd Ibrahim scored with 4:07 left in regulation. However, Lockport got the final say with two more tallies in the remaining time.   Roper did put Sandburg in a position to tie with a goal, but a turnover in the last 18 seconds dashed any hopes the Eagles had of creating the need for overtime. ***   Stagg beat Bradley-Bourbonnais (14-10) and Lincoln-Way Central (11-8) in a pair of SWSC crossover affairs last week.   Connor Kaufmann netted five goals and Zack Amendola scored four times to lift the host CharPhoto by Jeff Vorva gers past the Boilermakers. Lane Hollin made 17 saves for Stagg. Shepard pitcher Nikki Alex kept Eisenhower's bats in check during last Wednesday's game in    Amendola netted six goals and Palos Heights. Holin was credited with 13 saves to lead the Chargers in their othdouble was the critical blow versus senhower (11-3) and Morton (9-2). er win. the Lady Rebels as it snapped a Tinley Park beat the Lady Astros GIRLS’ WATER POLO 3-all tie and elevated the host Lady 11-1 on Wednesday.    Stagg dropped a 13-1 decision to Alyssa DeChene's two homers Knights. Trisha Belgrave added Lincoln-Way Central in an SWSC a two-run homer for Christian. and five RBI were the main incrossover last Wednesday. (Continued from page 3) Sam Kubik (3-for-4, three runs) gredients in Shepard's romp past BOYS’ TENNIS drilled a three-run homer for the the Lady Mustangs in an SSC Red on Saturday.    After getting shut out by LemSabrina Miller belted a pair of Lady Knights in their win over confrontation last Tuesday. Jalyn ont in an SSC crossover last Tues- solo homers and Molly Murphy the Lady Trojans, while Pittman Stepney (two hits, three RBI) and day, Shepard rebounded to take (3-for-4, three RBI) supplied a provided two hits, four runs and Jenna Huisenga also went deep down Riverside-Brookfield 4-2 on two-run triple to lift the Ea- two RBI in the five-inning contest. for the Lady Astros in the victory. Wednesday. Among Wednesday’s gles (5-10, 3-3) over Regina on Davina Gutierrez (one-hitter, 13 It was Alex Joiner's turn to clear winners were the No. 1 doubles Tuesday, while Amber Anderson strikeouts; two-run double) and the fence on Thursday, and her tandem of Brian Spoon-Kyle Mc- was Mt. Assisi’s headliner versus Belgrave (3-for-4, two-run homer) three-run round-tripper was the Namara. the Pride on Thursday. Anderson were Christian’s headliners in its most telling blow in Shepard's GIRLS’ TRACK hit a grand slam and three-run triumph over the Lady Broncos. blasting of the Lady Cardinals.   Shepard won four relays en round-tripper, finishing the day Gutierrez was also solid in the Pitcher Nikki Alex provided the route to securing the team crown with eight RBI in all. circle against IC, as she allowed Lady Astros with eight strikeouts with 184 points at Friday’s RichShe wasn’t alone, though, in just four hits and an unearned in the circle. ards Invitational. Marist (127) was applying a hurt to Queen of Peace run. However, that lone markSarah O'Kelly went 4-for-4 with second and Eisenhower (81) third (3-9, 0-5). Also enjoying good days er was enough to pin the Lady two RBI on Shepard's behalf last in the eight-team meet. were Miller (4-for-5, five RBI), Knights (6-7, 2-3) with a defeat. Saturday, a performance that    The Lady Astros finished first in Terri Dearth (three hits, including Pittman (two hits, including a keyed its triumph over Morton. the 400-meter relay (49.6 seconds), a homer and double, five RBI) and triple) was Christian’s offensive SANDBURG 800-relay (1:48.2), 1,600-relay Jen Desparros (3-for-3). The Lady Eagles split a pair of mainstay. (4:12.5) and 3,200-relay (10:16). games last week as they topped RICHARDS Pitchers Kellie Tomaskovic Individual winners for Shepard and Dana Bunting combined The Lady Bulldogs raised their Lincoln-Way East 3-1 in a Southincluded Zipporah Allbritton in on a five-hitter and struck out ledger to 11-4 after racking up West Suburban Conference Blue the 400 (1:03.7) and Jada Jackson three Pride batters between them. wins over Argo (12-2), Reavis (11- matchup on Tuesday and then in the discus (117 feet, 9 inches). Morgan Sanchez (double) and Ge- 3) and Oak Park-River Forest (7-6) wound up one run short of Plain*** field Central (8-7) one day later. nae Grabowski (RBI single) were last week.    Sandburg finished fourth at its Peace’s notables. Sarah Herold pitched a one-hitHailey Czerwinski had two hits, own 11-school invitational last The Eagles lost their first out- two runs and an RBI to pace Rich- ter and fanned 12, versus the Lady Thursday by scoring 54 points. ing at Larkin, 9-5 to Elgin, de- ards in its Tuesday victory over Griffins and also assisted SandMeet-champion Lincoln-Way East spite Miller’s two-run homer. She the Lady Argonauts. Lady Bulldogs burg's offense by scoring twice. had 160 points, and Thornton (75) socked a grand slam and three-run pitcher Sara Kiziak stopped Argo Katie Krzus, Lauren McCaughey and Mother McAuley (62) also dinger against the host school in on five hits and struck out eight. and Briana Soltis all recorded RBI bettered the Lady Eagles’ total. the next game, and those were The Lady Rams were dis- singles for the Lady Eagles.   Supplying first-place finishes enough to give Mt. Assisi a 10-9 patched with similar ease in anHerold and Briana Soltis both for Sandburg were Casey Jensen win. other SSC Red matchup one day smashed solo homers for Sandin the 1,600 (5:33.87) and RayphThe afternoon ended with the later. Kiziak was the winner again burg (9-8) in a losing cause against ina Foma’i in the shot put (35-1). Eagles on the short end of a 13-5 as she equaled her strikeout total Plainfield. BADMINTON finale versus St. Edward. Dearth of the previous afternoon and held QUEEN OF PEACE    Shepard defeated Argo 15-0 in (3-for-4, three RBI, two runs) Reavis to just three hits. Sara Before losing to Mt. Assisi, the an SSC Red match last Wednes- missed by a single of hitting for Tobin went 5-for-6 and tallied Pride slipped past Argo 8-6 last day. twice to lead Richards' offense. the cycle. Wednesday as Jasmine Escobedo The triumph gave Lady BullCHICAGO CHRISTIAN socked a three-run homer to lead The Lady Knights took three of dogs coach Julie Folliard 600 for the way. four games last week, losing only her career. STAGG Emily Wetzel's two-run homer to Immaculate Conception by a Homewood-Flossmoor and 1-0 count in a Suburban Chris- and three RBI catapulted RichLincoln-Way East handed down tian Conference clash on Friday. ards past Oak Park on Friday. SWSC Blue defeats to the Lady SHEPARD Chicago Christian’s victories were The Lady Astros ran their re- Chargers last week, doing so by run homer in the first inning. collected against Ridgewood (6-4) Two more runs came on Steve on Tuesday, Timothy Christian cord to 11-5 by defeating three respective 6-1 and 12-2 scores. Kyla Frain slugged a solo hoBrewer’s single in the sixth. Bob (13-3) on Wednesday and Walther of four foes last week. Suffering losses to Shepard mer for Stagg (2-8, 1-3) against Wilmsen went the distance for Lutheran (10-0) on Saturday. the victory, scattering seven hits. Kaycee Pittman’s three-run were Evergreen Park (12-2), Ei- the Lady Griffins last Wednesday.    Brewer and J.T. Yocum accounted for three RBI in the first inning second at-bat. came on Tyler Edgar’s single in of Game 2, Trinity adding another O’Meara (two-run double), Ron the sixth, which briefly gave the on a McCaw sacrifice bunt in the Clark (double), Max Kerfin and visitors a 1-0 edge. second. McCaw doubled to knock (Continued from page 1) Josh Novak all smacked RBI hits Interestingly, this game was the in one more run in the fourth, in the frame, and a couple of 18th Christian had played either after which Britt homered to make encounters. it 7-0 and give Benny Collesano “Our pitching and defense have those guys were also key figures on the road or at a neutral site. plenty of cushion en route to the definitely come a long way, and during a six-run uprising in the It has competed only five times complete-game win on the hill. we’re pretty pleased with both,” sixth that created a game-ending in Palos Heights thus far, a place    Earlier in the week, the Trolls Brauer said. “Our team ERA is 10-run differential between the that was extremely good to the trounced Purdue University Cal- 2.51, and in the 13 games since teams. Along with Kerfin (dou- Knights in 2013, when they went umet 10-3, with a five-run fifth our Florida trip, we’ve given up ble) and Clark (sacrifice fly), the 18-3 at home. “We’ve gotten a good experiinning being the key. The day’s seven unearned runs; we gave up Knights’ later fireworks featured second game was rained out. 23 in our first 10. We’re just not input from Zach Frieling, Jack De ence [from that] and, hopefully, *** scoring enough runs [right now].” Vries and Mike Santarelli, each of that’s preparing us for the play  • The Numbers (through SatLuckily for Christian, one was whom knocked in one run without offs,” Brauer said of his club’s frequent road tours. urday): 23-18 overall, 15-10 CCAC, enough to net a win in Game 1 benefit of a base hit. Freshman Dan Vos logged the “In the past, if we’d be sitting 10-7 home, 8-7 road, 5-4 neutral. on Tuesday. The Knights tallied Leaders: Joe McCaw, .389, 56 it on Sean O’Meara’s fifth-inning pitching victory by tossing the first at 14-9 with a veteran group, I’d hits, .590 slugging percentage, 41 single, one of just five hits they five stanzas on a yield of five hits. be disappointed. But we’re still He whiffed 10 and walked three. learning and we’re just trying RBI, 4 HR; Lance Lammers, Mc- managed off IC’s ace. Caw, 11 steals each; Danny Britt, Making sure Chicago Christian For the season to date, Vos and to get as good as we can be as Benny Collesano, Drew Chibe, 4 required no more than that to Bolhuis have combined to sur- quickly as we can.” wins each; Vince Flores, 2.70 ERA; prosper was Christian Bolhuis, render just 14 earned runs over Brad Kopale, 3 saves; Chibe, 41 who fired a one-hitter and fanned 70 innings. Statistics 3 strikeouts. 11 while going the distance on the Montini 2 Chicago Christian 000 010 0 — 1   • Schedule: TBA. hill. For the season, the junior has Chicago Christian A leadoff triple in the sixth led Immaculate Conception 000 000 0 — 0 TRACK & FIELD piled up 56 strikeouts in only 31 to the deciding run for the Bron- Chicago Christian 2B: McCarthy. RBI:   The Trolls are running at a 2/3 innings. high clip entering this weekend’s “It was just a pitchers’ duel cos, who squeezed out a low-scor- O’Meara. WP: Bolhuis (5-2). CCAC Championship at Olivet and a great battle,” Brauer said. ing triumph over the Knights on Immaculate Conception 001 201 — 4 Nazarene. “Christian got the first guy out in Thursday. 051 206 — 14 Kerfin’s two hits amounted to Chicago Christian   Andy Reidsma added another all seven innings, which was big. NAIA qualifying number to his “We’re still young and inexpe- Christian’s total for the day. One Chicago Christian 2B: Clark, Kerfin, resume by running 10,000 meters rienced —I [might] have seven of those safeties drove in a run. De O’Meara, Wolterink. RBI: Frieling 3, Clark in 29 minutes, 51.58 seconds at new people on the field at any Vries tallied both of the Knights’ 2, Kerfin 2, O’Meara 2, De Vries, Novak, last weekend’s Hillsdale College given time — but I know when markers, one of them on the front Santarelli. WP: D. Vos (4-2). Relays. The time, which broke Christian pitches we are a very end of a double steal. 010 100 0 — 2 Adam Schoenle performed well Chicago Christian Trinity’s existing record in the confident team. His experience 020 001 x — 3 event by almost 90 seconds, definitely prepared him for that for Christian in his initial start- Montini ing assignment as he pitched into Chicago Christian RBI: Kerfin. LP: Schoenwas good for fourth place in the [type of game].” race. Matt Schaap’s 17.34 in the Brauer wasn’t surprised, how- the sixth inning. Montini notched le (1-1). 110-meter high hurdles also set ever, that the Knights faced a nine hits off him, but the majority Chicago Christian 000 010 0 — 1 of them were scattered. a school mark. difficult test. 000 030 x —3 3 Marian Central    The women’s 1,600-relay team, “They’re much improved from Marian Central 1 Chicago Christian 2B: Novak. RBI: Edgar. anchored by Courtney Kalous, set years before,” he said of IC. “And Chicago Christian The Hurricanes became the LP: D. Vos (4-3). a Trolls standard with its 4:04.99 [with them] having just beaten clocking. The leadoff runner for Aurora Central Catholic twice, 14th squad held to three runs that quartet, Ashley Jourdan won we knew they were going to be or less by the Knights this spring, SIGN UP TO GET FREE the 1,500 in 4:43.20. a worthy opponent. We were lucky but that didn’t prevent Marian AMBER ALERTS Central from securing an SCC GOLF to get that first one.” ON YOUR CELL PHONE. crossover win on Saturday in   • Scoring leaders (through *** April 16): Logan Vos, 75, Aug. 30, Brauer didn’t want to venture Woodstock. wirelessamberalerts.org Again, Christian’s bats were Sept. 20; Jonathan Zandstra, 76, a guess as to whether or not IC Sept. 21, April 12; Spencer Ten- players were demoralized after quiet as they produced only four Haken, 77, April 11; Scott Ebbel- Game 1, but they certainly could hits. One of them was Novak’s ing, 78, Aug. 31; Tim Hoeksema, not have been feeling good about double that opened the seventh 79, Aug. 31; Brian Deckinga, 79, staring at a 5-0 deficit in the sec- inning, but the Knights made no A child is calling for help. April 16. ond contest following Christian’s headway after that. Their lone run

Softball roundup

Trolls softball most improved in league By Tim Cronin   The goal all along for Trinity Christian College’s softball team was simple: finish in the top six and make the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Tournament.   Achieving it, however, wasn’t easy. The Trolls didn’t assure themselves of a playoff berth until the final game of the conference schedule, when they hung on for a 4-3 victory over the University of St. Francis to lock up fifth place with an 11-9 league record.    The tourney begins today, with Trinity (23-23 overall) expected to face St. Xavier University (42-51) in the opener on the Cougars’ field. The championship game is Saturday, with the winner advancing to the NAIA Tournament.   Just getting to the postseason is a big plus for the Trolls, who had won no more than 12 games in any of the past four seasons, which included last year’s 12-32 mark. Nearly doubling that total this year, and coming up only one short of it in conference play alone, marks Trinity as the most improved team in the conference and may earn coach Missy Bolhuis postseason plaudits.   The road to the conference tournament reached the finish line last Thursday at the Route 83 Complex. The Trolls led 4-1, half of the offense coming from Bailan Reynolds’ two-RBI double in the bottom of the third, before USF mounted a two-out rally in the top of the seventh.   Kiley Southall singled and scored when older sister Lexi doubled her home. Then Natalie Ward singled to bring in Lexi Southall, closing the gap to 4-3. The threat to Trinity’s success and its postseason berth ended when the Fighting Saints’ Tori Johnson made the final out.    Reynolds led the Trolls’ attack with three RBI, adding to her team’s lead with a sacrifice fly in the fifth. Kaleigh Velasquez’s RBI single in the sixth, which scored Mattie McGuire, proved to be the winning blow among Trinity’s 11 hits, while Brianna Brugioni picked up the victory on the mound by scattering 10 hits.   The Trolls preceded the victory with a 3-0 loss to the Saints

and followed it by beating Lindenwood-Belleville 3-1 and 5-1 in their final home games of the season. Trinity also dropped a pair to Wheaton College, 1-0 and 3-0, as the locals were held to five hits in the opener and a single safety in the nightcap. ***   • The Numbers (through regular season): 23-23 overall, 11-9 CCAC, 11-7 home, 4-9 road, 8-7 neutral. Leaders: Samantha Radunz, .444, .611 slugging percentage; Jayme Love, 55 hits; Love, Bailin Reynolds 19 RBI; Anna Phillips, 9 steals; Tori Grzincic, 3 HR; Brianna Brugioni, 9 wins, 78 strikeouts, 1.94 ERA; Mattie McGuire, 2 saves; Brugioni, McGuire, 11 complete games each.   • Schedule: Today, in CCAC Championship. BASEBALL   The battle for a playoff spot brightened for the Trolls, thanks to a 6-1 record in conference play last week. That raised their record to 15-10, third-best in the CCAC, entering this past Tuesday’s season-ending doubleheader against sub-.500 Trinity International University.    The Trolls are 13-3 — 10-3 in conference play — since April 10, when they were 10-15 and 5-7 entering a nonconference twinbill with Ashford University. Sweeping those games triggered the big run that climaxed on Saturday with 16-5 and 6-1 routs of Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais.    Trinity Christian had dropped the series opener at Olivet by a 10-0 margin in eight innings, but its offense was on full display when the action shifted to Palos Heights. Game 1 of the doubleheader featured slugging by Mark Munizzi (4-for-5, four RBI), Joe McCaw (3-for-4, four RBI) and Danny Britt (3-for-6), with Jimmy Hinkleman grabbing the win by pitching into the sixth inning.    The Trolls picked up five of their six runs in the sixth inning of the nightcap, Peter Krygsheld’s double knocking in two of them in the course of his 3-for-5 day. Vince Van Schouwen picked up the victory.    Wednesday’s sweep of Cardinal Stritch University by identical 8-2 scores started with Britt’s three-

Knights


6

Section 2

Thursday, May 1, 2014   The Regional News - The Reporter

Community sports news Water polo athletes honor Caliendo

Members of the boys’ water polo teams at Sandburg and Andrew honored Jane Caliendo by wearing Warrior T-shirts created to support her battle with cancer during a match last week. Caliendo is the wife of Eagles coach Jim Caliendo and has been involved herself with Sandburg’s swimming and water polo programs in the past. Eagles athletes have sold T-shirts and wristbands to raise money, and also performed charitable acts on the Caliendos’ behalf.

Palos Hills to host Pitch, Hit & Run competition The Palos Hills Community Resource and Recreation Department will host a Pitch, Hit & Run competition for youngsters aged 7-14 on Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. at Glacier Park, 101st Street and 78th Avenue. Participation is free. Registration is being accepted at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. For more information, call 4304500.

Marist volleyball team drops three-set heartbreaker

After winning the first set against Maine South, Marist came up just short in the next two games and suffered a tough volleyball loss last week. The Hawks prevailed by scores of 22-25, 25-23, 28-26. Jake Moran starred for the RedHawks (5-8) in a losing cause as he registered team-best totals of 10 kills, six service aces and six blocks. Tom Inzinga tied Moran for team leadership in the latter category. Also lending a hand were Brian Barry (eight kills), Luke Mayer (12 digs), Dan Anzelino (nine digs), Tim Hauser (18 assists) and Aaron Kummer (six assists).

Six Vikings sign letters of intent

Six St. Laurence student-athletes made their college plans known last week by signing national letters of intent. The group included four baseball players and two lacrosse players. Baseball signees were Mike Miller (University of Hawaii), Orland Park's Roger Wilson (University of St. Francis), Alex Hitney (Heartland Community College) and Nate Tholl (John A. Logan College). Also signing letters were lacrosse athletes Bryce Foulk (Lourdes College) and Oak Lawn's Jeff Sadecki (Robert Morris University).

St. Laurence names basketball coach

Jim Maley, who helped Kenwood Academy basketball players make improvements both on and off the court, has been named St. Laurence’s varsity hoops boss. Maley replaces St. Laurence alumnus Mark Sevedge, who was not retained after five seasons as head coach. In three years at Kenwood, Maley guided the Broncos to 46 wins in 80 games. More importantly, athletes’ grade-point averages escalated during that same period while their absence rates fell.

“As a result of what our coaching staff built, Kenwood Academy will be a serious contender for a [Chicago] Public League championship next year and will have at least three players in line to earn [NCAA] Division I scholarships,” Maley said in a statement. “I’m committed to creating those same results for the Vikings. “During the interview process, I was overwhelmed with confidence in the direction, vision and leadership of [St. Laurence] president Joe Martinez, principal James Muting and athletic director Tim Chandler. We seem to share the same set of values and beliefs, which was the deciding factor for me in taking the job.” Prior to arriving at Kenwood, Maley was the head JV coach and a volunteer varsity assistant at Glenbard West. His JV squad captured a conference title. Maley, a two-time Illinois Basketball Coaches Association All-State selection and West Suburban Conference Player of the Year while a student at Lyons Township, played a year of college ball at Northwestern University before finishing his career at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts. “We are thrilled to add a coach of Jim Maley’s caliber to our athletic department,” Chandler said. “First and foremost, his commitment to academics and developing the whole person really stood out in the interview process. Add in his impressive basketball credentials, including his experience in turning around a program, and it was a no-brainer for the committee. “It was very apparent that Coach Maley is a basketball junkie and he is going to work tirelessly to restore the proud tradition of St. Laurence basketball.”

Golf outing at Cog Hill

Mt. Assisi Academy will sponsor a golf outing on Monday, May 19, at Cog Hill in Lemont. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. that day, with lunch to follow at noon and a shotgun start at 1 p.m. The event will also feature auctions, raffles and various contests. The cost is $150 per person, and includes a round of golf with cart, lunch, dinner and refreshments. Visit www.mtassisi.org for more details.

NAYS tournament headed to south suburbs

Submitted photo

Jim Maley is the new varsity basketball coach at St. Laurence.

Submitted photo

Sandburg water polo players have been strongly supporting Jane Caliendo, the wife of Eagles coach Jim Caliendo, during her battle with cancer.

Homewood will be the site of another National American Youth Sports basketball tournament this spring. The event, which will feature competition for both boys and girls in six brackets apiece, will run May 23-25 at the Homewood Park District. The deadline for entry is Friday. The cost is $160, and every

Submitted photo

Six St. Laurence athletes signed letters of intent last week. Pictured are (back, from left) Jeff Sadecki and Bryce Foulk; (front, from left) Alex Hitney, Roger Wilson, Nate Tholl and Mike Miller. team is guaranteed a minimum of three games. For more information, call 1-866-352-9215 or visit www.northamericanyouthsports. org.

Oak Lawn takes second in fishing event

Oak Lawn High School placed second among 31 teams in the District 230 fishing tournament, which recently was held on the Des Plaines River. Highlighting the Spartans’ performance was junior Andy Jensen’s catch of a 4.65-pound bass, the largest ever snagged in the event’s seven-year history. Thanks largely to Jensen, who also caught a second fish, Oak Lawn claimed big bass honors at the tourney.

Annual Shepard football camp set for May 18

The sixth annual Shepard Youth Football Camp will be held Sunday, May 18, from 2-4 p.m. at the school's football field. Registration for the camp, which is open to ages 6-14 (grades 1-8), will be taken at 1 p.m. that same day. The cost is $10, and includes a T-shirt and pizza. Players must supply their own cleats/gym shoes, shorts and practice T-shirt. Astros varsity coach Dominic Passolano, who guided Shepard into the state playoffs in four of his first five seasons in charge of the program, will lead the non-padded camp, which seeks to develop the skills and teamwork necessary to participate in the sport. There is no weight limit or experience level necessary for individuals to take part. For more information, contact Passolano at 371-1111, ext. 3362,

individual drills, and team play. Former Cyclones volleyball coach Gloria Coughlin will host a camp in that sport July 14-17 from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily. The program, which is open to players entering grades 5-9, will improve fundamental skills through individual attention and group work. Moraine women's tennis coach Nicole Selvaggio will instruct youngsters entering grades 5-12 in the fundamentals of her sport July 7-10. Sessions for those in grades 5-8 will go from 9-10:30 a.m. each day, with ones for grades 9-12 to follow from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The cost of each camp is $70, and all three will be held in the school's new Health, Fitness & Recreation Center gymnasium. For more information, call 974-5727 or visit www.morainevalley.edu/Athletics.

Girls' basketball camp to be offered at SXU

St. Xavier University women's basketball coach Bob Hallberg will host his annual basketball camp for girls aged 7-15 the week of June 16-20 at the Shannon Center. Sessions will run from 1:30-4 p.m. daily. Participants will be grouped according to age and Submitted photo ability, and Hallberg will activeJunior Andy Jensen caught two fish, including the largest bass, to ly teach each day. SXU assistant help Oak Lawn High School place second at the 31-team District coaches and players will also be 230 fishing tournament. on hand to instruct campers. The cost is $135 per individuAthletic director and former al, and includes a camp T-shirt. or email dominic.passolano@ men's basketball coach Bill Finn Enrollment is on a first-come, chsd218.org. will lead a hoops camp from July first-served basis. Applications 14-17 for youngsters entering are available through the SXU Moraine to conduct summer grades 3-8. Each session will run athletic department or online at from 9-10:30 a.m. The camp is www.sxucougars.com under the sports camps Moraine Valley College will con- designed to develop and improve "summer camps" link. For more information, call Lauduct three youth sports camps fundamental basketball skills through instruction, group and ra Kurzeja at (773) 298-3785. this summer.

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The Regional News - The Reporter    Thursday, May 1, 2014 Section 2

7

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Jim Roche drove in the first run for Sandburg in its 13-1 victory over Shepard last Wednesday.

Bulldogs (Continued from page 1) just pounded us that game. They were catching it, they were throwing it and they were hitting it.    “We responded [early], but we could never rally enough to stay close.”    A trait DiFoggio noticed in the Bulldogs was the one he feels his own athletes are still seeking.   “You could see it with that Richards bunch — they have something where they believe that they’re not going to lose,” DiFoggio said. Richards 12 Tinley Park 0   An eight-run fourth inning brought last Thursday’s SSC crossover contest to a premature halt via the slaughter rule as the ‘Dogs bombarded the Titans with a 15-hit attack. Mike Marchione (two-run triple), Castro (two-RBI double) and Mallo (triple) played the biggest roles in the fourth, but also chipping in Richards’ behalf

SXU (Continued from page 4) 78-84) was 20th for SXU. A total of 58 individual golfers competed in the CCAC event. “Our goal from the beginning of starting our program two years ago was to win our conference [and] make it to the national championship with the team that started it all off,” Cougars coach Mike Mandakas said. “I’m very proud of all eight players on our team, as we have had a great year. This comeback victory will give us some momentum going into the national championship.” WOMEN'S GOLF Freshman Taylor Thompson overcame a four-stroke deficit entering Day 2 of the CCAC Championship by firing a final-round 79, and that effort was enough to lift her to the individual title last Thursday at Gleneagles Golf Course in Lemont. "Taylor played great all season long, but grew up real fast when everything was on the line," Mandakas said. "We made it her goal from the beginning of the season to win the conference championship in her freshman season. "She is improving every tournament and I'm excited to see how many more victories she has [forthcoming] in her young collegiate golf career." Thompson's two-day total was 160. With two other golfers also placing among the top 20, the Cougars took fifth in the team standings with a cumulative 785 score. Olivet Nazarene captured the title with a 671. SXU's other high finishers were freshmen Courtney Dudgeon (182; 91-91) and Katie Reno (191; 89-102), who wound up tied for 14th and 20th place, respectively. Rounding out the Cougars' scoring was freshman Ashley Anderson, who carded a 252 (130-122), which landed her in the 31st position . BASEBALL The Cougars suffered a pair of one-run setbacks last Tuesday, as Olivet Nazarene University swept a CCAC doubleheader, 4-3 and 5-2, at Watson Field in Bourbonnais. SXU (18-25, 12-10) managed

were Mejia, Sanchez and Shane Mills, each of whom stroked an RBI single.   Zeschke contributed a couple RBI singles before that, and Castro (single) and Mejia (sacrifice fly) drove in a run apiece as the Bulldogs raced to a 4-0 advantage after two frames.    Richards carries a team batting average only 11 points shy of .400 and that’s with only minimal help so far from Danny Estrella, who has been used sparingly while recovering from a serious injury suffered near the end of the 2013 summer campaign.   “When Danny’s in the lineup, it’s as solid as [any] we’ve had,” Wujcik said. “Guys up and down the lineup can put the ball in play, get on base, leg out doubles and drive guys in.”   Wujcik considers his 2004 squad, which won 30 games, his best one of the past 21 years but states “this team certainly rivals it,” particularly in the area of hitting. The current group’s exhibition versus Tinley made another pitching win for freshman Angelo

Smith (four strikeouts, three hits) a sure thing. Richards 18 Hillcrest 3    The Hawks were no match for the ‘Dogs on Friday, especially after the latter erupted for a dozen runs in their initial at-bat. Three errors and a passed ball undermined Hillcrest in the first inning, but Richards also inflicted damage with its sticks as doubles by Thompson (two RBI), Natividad (one RBI) and Sanchez (one) led the way.   The Bulldogs nearly batted around the order twice before being retired. Applying the finishing touches on the rout were Andrew Schramm (two-run homer), Castro (two-run single), Chiaramonte (RBI double) and Jason Avery (RBI single).   Brett Thomas stopped the Hawks on six hits and whiffed four as Richards triumphed for the 14th time in its last 15 outings.    “When the sectional [grouping] first came out, I thought we’d be lucky to be a 10 or 11 seed because it was such a minefield,”

only four hits in the opener, which made things difficult for Cougars pitcher Scott Vachon. The senior scattered eight hits and walked only one while whiffing three batters. Sophomore Alec Barnhart had one hit and scored twice for SXU, while junior Bryan Villanova tallied the Cougars' other run. The latter also hit safely once. SXU's markers came on two Tigers errors and a successful double steal. The Cougars grabbed a 2-0 lead at the outset, but Olivet pulled even in its initial at-bat. Single runs in the third and sixth innings put the Tigers ahead to stay, as SXU left the bags filled after plating its final run in the top of the seventh. Barnhart's groundout and senior Chris Klein's sacrifice fly gave the Cougars another 2-0 advantage in Game 2, and junior hurler Dan Wetzel protected that lead into the sixth. However, Olivet made plenty of noise during its next trip to the plate and piled up all five of its runs. SXU narrowed the gap to 5-4 on RBI hits from seniors Tom Keating and Brad Myjak (double) in the eighth, but it went down in order in the ninth. Wetzel struck out five and surrendered eight hits in a losing effort on the hill. *** Klein's three hits, which included a solo homer in the fourth inning, lifted the Cougars to a 5-1 nonconference victory over Purdue University Calumet last Thursday. SXU finished with 13 hits in nine innings. Also contributing multiple-hit days were Barnhart (double, two runs) and Keating (double, two RBI, one run). Keating's two-bagger and freshman Bryan Polak's single handed the Cougars a 2-0 lead in the third. Klein drove in SXU's next two markers with his round-tripper and an RBI single in the sixth, then Keating completed the Cougars' scoring with his eighth-inning single, which followed Barnhart's double. Senior Dan Maton threw four innings of scoreless relief and was credited with the pitching victory. He struck out three and allowed just two hits. Freshman Adrian Luna fanned four in two stanzas of work. ***

Fifteen hits led to eight runs for the Cougars in Game 1 of a Saturday twinbill, but after posting an 8-2 victory over Robert Morris University, they were unable to complete a sweep. Instead, the Eagles earned a split with a 10-0 romp in the second contest. SXU was up 5-0 by the fourth frame, courtesy of clutch hits from Myjak (two-run single) and Klein (RBI double), plus sacrifice flies from Barnhart and junior Damon Softecheck. After Robert Morris tallied once in the fourth, the Cougars put the game away with three more runs in the sixth as Barnhart (two-RBI single) and Myjak (sacrifice fly) led the charge. Klein was the winning pitcher as he fired a six-hitter, struck out nine and walked no one in a route-going performance. Six hits was all SXU could muster in Game 2, and those weren't enough to save it from defeat. Villanova claimed two of the Cougars' safeties. The Eagles, meanwhile, piled up 16 hits, including four that went for extra bases. They scored at least one run in every inning but the fifth. *** Vachon, who was one of five seniors honored in a pregame ceremony on Sunday, delivered a timely performance on the hill as he struck out six and scattered seven hits versus Robert Morris. Most importantly, he blanked the Eagles over nine innings, which ensured that the run SXU tallied in the second inning held up as the difference in a 1-0 triumph. That victory gave the Cougars (20-26, 14-11) a one-game lead over Robert Morris for second place in the CCAC North Division standings. Polak went 4-for-4 with two stolen bases to pace SXU's offense. He also accounted for the contest's lone marker when he crossed the plate on the front end of a successful double steal executed along with freshman Ryan Pellack. Other hitting notables for the Cougars were Klein and Keating, both of whom swatted doubles off Eagles hurler Kyle Bledsoe. SXU was to wrap up its regular season this past Tuesday with a conference doubleheader against Purdue-North Central.

Shepard pitcher Brendan Hermann and his Astros teammates had a rough day against Sandburg last Wednesday. Wujcik said. “We don’t have the pedigree of a lot of other teams in our area — we don’t have all-staters or D-I recruits — but we have guys who want to win. Now, we’d probably be a four or five seed.”   Two SSC Red clashes with Reavis began the current week for Richards, and a sweep of the Rams would pretty much put the Bulldogs on the brink of a divisional title. Of their remaining seven conference foes, only Lemont and TF South would appear capable of offering anything in the way of a serious threat.   But Wujcik prefers to not examine the situation too closely.   “We’ve been playing all three facets of the game pretty darn well and I just want to enjoy it,” he said. Sandburg 13 Shepard 1    On a number of past occasions, the Astros proved a rather thorny problem for the Eagles. Even though Sandburg was successful much more often than not, rarely did the victory come without some anxious moments.    None of those were in evidence last Wednesday, though, as Eagles pitcher Bryan Pall dominated the proceedings. The University of Michigan-bound hurler quieted Shepard on two hits and fanned nine, and Sandburg used both that mound performance and some robust hitting to take down the Astros in just five innings.    Alec Martinez was the Eagles’ offensive headliner as he delivered four hits and three RBI. Sandburg tallied three times in its initial at-bat and seven more times in the second frame to place Shepard on the brink of what eventually became a slaughter-rule defeat.    “We were losing the day before to Lincoln-Way North [before rain intervened], so we were trying to get on [our players] a little bit about not letting up,” Eagles assistant coach Chuck Peters said.    The message was obviously received, much to DiFoggio’s dismay.    “We got the doors blown off us on Monday [by Richards] and we got murdered on Wednesday,” he said. “[Hermann] wasn’t finding the zone and he’s one of our best strike throwers. They hit him all over the place and we weren’t going to match their offense.”   Adam Gregory’s groundout, which followed a walk to Peterka and Hart’s single, drove in the Astros’ lone run in the fourth inning. Bremen 12 Shepard 5   The Braves kept the Astros headed in a downward spiral by doling out an SSC crossover loss on Thursday. The setback was Shepard’s seventh in a row.    The two clubs exchanged scoring during each of the first three innings, but Bremen had a pair of two-run uprisings that helped it build a 5-3 edge. Three runs in the fourth stretched that lead out, then the Braves applied the finishing touches with a four-run sixth that was aided by two As-

single as part of the Eagles’ motros errors.   “We went down early and it mentum-shifting four-run third was in our eyes — ‘Here we go inning. again,’” DiFoggio said. “It was one   Matthias Dietz handled the of those things this [past] week pitching chores with little diffiwhere things didn’t go our way. culty, save for a long homer he surrendered in the late going, a We were snake-bit.”    One plus for Shepard (5-11, 3-6) ball Peters deemed the hardest was that it got its offense on track hit off the big hurler thus far this well enough to pound out 12 hits. season. Dietz whiffed 12 batters Half of those were evenly split and now has 47 strikeouts in 35 between Peterka and Knoerzer, innings. each of whom had a double and    The only flaw, although it didn’t prove fatal here, was four errors at least one RBI.    Offsetting that good work, how- committed by Sandburg. ever, was a little shakiness in the   “It wasn’t our best defensive field. Besides the aforementioned game, but if we score some runs miscues in Bremen’s half of the with [Dietz] pitching, we’re going sixth, the Astros also gave their to win,” Peters said. “Baseball’s a foe an unintentional boost with crazy game sometimes, but if we a dropped third strike and error play defense and hit a little bit, I in the second stanza, which set like our chances against just about anybody we play [at any time].” up a score.   “It’s routine plays that are   Sean Leland logged the victohurting us and I just can’t fig- ry in the second matchup with ure it out right now,” DiFoggio Bolingbrook, doing so by tossing a said. “It’s not for lack of practice, four-hitter and fanning nine. That but it’s not translating on to the improved his ledger to 3-1 and dropped his earned-run average [game-day] field.” Joliet West 4 to 0.80 over 26 innings. Shepard 3    The Eagles accumulated just six   The Astros pushed the Tigers hits, but they scored five times in into extra innings on Saturday, the fourth stanza. Dan Dziadkowbut they couldn’t avoid an eighth iez claimed one of Sandburg’s RBI. consecutive loss, which represents the longest skid Shepard has en- Statistics dured since DiFoggio’s inaugural campaign. He is now in his 17th Richards 324 413 — 17 season as Astros coach. Shepard 020 030 — 5    “We’ve lost eight in a row, but Richards 2B: Natividad, Sanchez. 3B: in five of the eight we had a good Estrella, Mallo. RBI: Castro 4, Sanchez shot to win it,” DiFoggio said. “It 3, Mallo 2, Natividad 2, Zeschke 2, Chijust didn’t work out for us one aramonte, Estrella. WP: Sanchez (3-0). way or the other. We just didn’t Shepard 2B: Carmody, Smith. RBI: Smith get out of our own way.” 2, Carmody, Hart, Hermann. LP: Gregory   On Saturday, Mark Albrecht’s (1-3). single gave Shepard an early 1-0 lead, but Joliet West responded Shepard 100 100 2 — 4 with three runs in its first two Richards 050 002 x — 7 plate appearances. Not until the Shepard 2B: Hermanas. RBI: Gorski, Horfifth did the Astros answer, but bach, Knoerzer, Peterka. LP: Smith (2-3). they finally pulled even on a Richards 2B: Mills. RBI: Chiaramonte 2, Tigers throwing error and Hor- Mallo, Sanchez, Zeschke. WP: Thompson bach’s single. (4-0).   Shepard had an opportunity to strike one inning before that, Tinley Park 000 00 — 0 but a runner was thrown out at Richards 310 8x — 12 the plate. Richards 2B: Castro, Mallo. 3B: Mallo,    “It was my bad read,” DiFoggio Marchione. RBI: Castro 3, Marchione 2, said. “I was trying to push the Mejia 2, Zeschke 2, Mills, Sanchez. WP: action to try to get us out of our Smith (3-0). funk.”   Joliet West loaded the bases Hillcrest 000 03 — 3 with one out in the bottom of Richards (12)31 2x — 18 the eighth and then notched the Richards 2B: Chiaramonte, Natividad, deciding marker on a short fly ball. Sanchez, Thompson. HR: Schramm.   “This kind of has become an RBI: Thompson 3, Castro 2, Schramm albatross,” DiFoggio said of his 2, Avery, Chiaramonte, Estrella, Natividad, team’s bad luck over the past Sanchez. WP: Thomas (3-1). couple weeks. “But the moment we get that [next] ‘W’, I think 000 10 — 1 we’re going to take off. It would Shepard 371 2x — 13 not surprise me if we go 11-5 in Sandburg Shepard RBI: Gregory. LP: Hermann (0-1). our next 16 games.” WITH NO WATER. Sandburg 9-6 Sandburg 2B: Landgraf. RBI: martinez Bolingbrook 4-1 3. WP: Pall (2-1).–JACOB, AGE 5 DESCRIBING ASTHMA   Besides their rout of the As212 304 0 — 12 tros, the Eagles picked up two Bremen 111 000 2 — 5 SouthWest Suburban Conference Shepard Shepard 2B: Knoerzer, Peterka. RBI: PeBlue victories last week over the terka 2, Albrecht, Gregory, Knoerzer. LP: Raiders.   Martinez poked another three Horbach (2-1). hits and drove in one run for WITH WATER. 100 020 00 — 3 Sandburg (12-4, NO 4-0) in its first Shepard 210 000 01 — 4 win against Bolingbrook. Dan Joliet West AGE Shepard 5 2B: Peterka. RBI: Albrecht, HorSantiago chipped in–JACOB, two hits and ASTHMA bach. LP: Hermann (0-2). Mike Jenteo smackedDESCRIBING a two-run

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Section 2 Thursday, May 1, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

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For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-FF4, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-FF4 Plaintiff, -v.SAWSON HADDAD A/K/A SAWSON R. HADDAD, RAJAEI HADDAD A/K/A RAJAEI J. HADDAD A/K/A RAY HADDAD, CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, INLAND BANK AND TRUST, MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC, INTEGRA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 1999 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1107004, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 028055 17128 POINTE DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 15, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 16, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17128 POINTE DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-29-313-003. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-18640. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-18640 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 028055 TJSC#: 34-6217 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603058

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NA AS TRUSTEE FOR WASHINGTON MUTUAL ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES WMABS SERIES 2006-HE4 TRUST Plaintiff, -v.NAGLA T. ELHASSAN A/K/A NAGLA ELHASSAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., CIT LOAN CORPORATION F/K/A THE CIT GROUP/CONSUMER FINANCE, INC., WORLDWIDE ASSET PURCHASING, LLC, BROOK HILLS HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 09 CH 043338 11765 S. BROOKSHIRE DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 4, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 6, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11765 S. BROOKSHIRE DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-30-310-004. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-26139. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1409-26139 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 043338 TJSC#: 34-4267 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603478

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � BRANDON NELSON AKA BRANDON M NELSON, DEENA NELSON AKA DEENA J NELSON D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 04779 6441 WEST 123RD STREET PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 6 0 4 6 3 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 13, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 15, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 6441 WEST 123RD STREET, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-30-407-001-0000. The real estate is improved with a one level red brick single family house with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1100810. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1100810 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 11 CH 04779 TJSC#: 34-3015 I601396

For Sale

PALOS PARK: 4 OPEN HOUSES SUNDAY 1-4 PM EXTRAORDINARY PROPERTIES!

46 Old Creek Road $750,000 4 acres adj. For Pres; small house & barn.

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., P l a i n t i f f � V . � ELIZABETH PACURA; STONY CREEK CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 25926 Property Address: 6 WEST STONEBRIDGE COURT UNIT A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 10-036585 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 22, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on May 30, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 6 West Stonebridge Court, Unit A, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-14-400-071-1055 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $ 244,902.07. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I598703

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, P l a i n t i f f � V . � UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF HARRY SMIDT, JR. A/K/A HARRY SMIDT, DECEASED; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A.; HARRY SMIDT A/K/A SANDY SMIDT; EMMETT SMIDT A/K/A SKIP SMIDT; CANDACE NOWOBIELSKI A/K/A CANDY NOWOBIELSKI; BRIAN SMIDT; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN O C C U P A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 34174 Property Address: 10406 BROADMOORE DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 12-062362 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 26, 2014, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on May 20, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 10406 Broadmoore Drive, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-14-115-015-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $207,395.70. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I601358

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTEE FOR CSMC TRUST 2011-11 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ABED MUSTAFA; D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 16204 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 26, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, May 30, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 24-29-406-003-0000. Commonly known as 12519 SOUTH MENARD AVENUE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1310343. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603335

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ROBERT L. BREGIN A/K/A ROBERT LOUIS BREGIN SR., MARY MARGARET BREGIN A/K/A MARY M. BREGIN, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 030636 522 LAKE TRAIL DRIVE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 10, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 12, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 522 LAKE TRAIL DRIVE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-28-305-017. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-19472. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-19472 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 030636 TJSC#: 34-4515 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603967

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � RAEDA SHEBAN; THOMAS CHARLES ESTATES TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION; DELL FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 6651 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on June 6, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 8530 West Thomas Charles Lane, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. P.I.N. 18-35-307-035-0000. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 651-6705. 1 2 0 3 1 5 6 5 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603274

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � JASON DULANEY; KATHRYN M. DULANEY A/K/A KATHRYN DULANEY; GLENMOOR C O N D O M I N I U M � ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF JASON DULANEY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF KATHRYN M. DULANEY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD C L A I M A N T S ; � D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 25592 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on February 14, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, May 9, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-01-318-026-1014. Commonly known as 9435 South 79th Avenue, Unit 102, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff's Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W 1 2 2 0 9 2 . � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I598641

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ARUNAS ZABIELSKAS; MINDAUGAS S T A N E V I C I U S ; � VIKTORIJA RAADAVICIUTE; CITIBANK N.A. FKA CITIBANK FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK; CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA), N.A.; D e f e n d a n t s , � 10 CH 16604 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on February 28, 2014 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, May 30, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-11-208-003-0000. Commonly known as 8011 West 98th Street, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call William E. Dutton, Jr. at Plaintiff's Attorney, DUTTON & DUTTON, P.C., 10325 West Lincoln Highway, Frankfort, Illinois 60423. (815) 8 0 6 8 2 0 0 . � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603293

8500 W. 128th St.

$749,000 On lake: fish, boat, view. Very private location.

12102 Spring Drive $897,000 2.94 acres, spectacular setting. Rehab or tear down. 11801 S 85th Ave.

$649,000 Pretty 1 woodsy acre, truly roomy, comfortable.

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$179,000 A 2 bedroom charmer.

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Palos Park, IL 60464

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For Sale

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST BY PURCHASE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK FKA WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Plaintiff, -v.SAED HAMMAD, LILIAN KANAN, GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, BROOK HILLS HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION, BROOK HILLS TOWNHOME OWNER’S ASSOCIATION Defendants 12 CH 35359 17302 Highwood Dr. Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 12, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 13, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17302 Highwood Dr., Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-30-407008-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $302,783.10. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 12 CH 35359 TJSC#: 345417 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603070

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL ILLINOIS, INC. Plaintiff, -v.FIRST MIDWEST BANK AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED AUGUST 14, 1992 A/K/A TRUST NO. 13336, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF FIRST MIDWEST BANK, AS PURCHASER OF THE LOANS AND OTHER ASSETS OF PALOS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY FROM THE FDIC, ACTING AS RECEIVER FOR THE SAVINGS BANK AND PURSUANT TO THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE ACT U/T/A DATED AUGUST 14, 1992 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1-3336, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MICHAEL GONZALEZ A/K/A MICHAEL A. GONZALEZ, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 11 CH 023713 16801 S. WOLF ROAD ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 22, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 3, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 16801 S. WOLF ROAD, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-29-100-037. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-18596. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1411-18596 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 023713 TJSC#: 34-2241 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I590716

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 1, 2014 Section 2-A

Real Estate

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11

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For Sale

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, -v.JOLANTA SUSKA, STANISLAW BOBAK, GEORGE N. REVELIOTIS D/B/A REVELIOTIS, P.C., F/K/A LAW OFFICE OF GEORGE N. REVELIOTIS, P.C., CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., GREEN OAKS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 13 CH 18600 8431 W. 99TH TERRACE, APT. 305 Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 5, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 8, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8431 W. 99TH TERRACE, APT. 305, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-11-301-006-1181 Vol. 0151. The real estate is improved with a multi-family residence. The judgment amount was $118,232.61. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 541-9710. Please refer to file number 13 7983. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 541-9710 Attorney File No. 13 7983 Attorney Code. 40342 Case Number: 13 CH 18600 TJSC#: 34-2422 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I598854

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NA; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � JOHN D. CONNEELY; MAURA CONNEELY; STATE B A N K � OF COUNTRYSIDE; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND N O N R E C O R D � CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 10 CH 35707 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on February 11, 2014 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, May 16, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-03-219-007-0000. Commonly known as 9010 Woodland Drive, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. W10080052 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I600508

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS I N D E N T U R E � TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE I N V E S T M E N T � TRUST 2004-4, Plaintiff, v s . � GERARD HANNON AND MARGARET BROWNE N / K / A � MARGARET HANNON, PRAIRIE BANK AND T R U S T � COMPANY, Defendants, 12 CH 5450 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 22, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 9120 South 87th Court, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. P.I.N. 23-02-310-011. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The judgment amount was $232,783.39. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Ira T. Nevel at Plaintiff's Attorney, Law Offices of Ira T. Nevel, 175 North Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 357-1125. Ref. No. 12-00246 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I603232

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Wells Fargo Bank, NA P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Maryam Alrazzaq aka Maryam A. Alrazzaq; Nader Alghoul; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 42269 Sheriff's # 140130 F12090436 WELLS Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on June 2, 2014, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 10111 South 81st Court, Palos Hills, Illinois 60465 P.I.N: 23-11-406-023-0000 Improvements: This property consists of a Single Family Home. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I597948

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC. Plaintiff, -v.MICHAEL A. SALIM A/K/A MICHAEL SALIM, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK, N.A., CITY OF CHICAGO, SHIRLEY C. SALIM, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 09 CH 040565 7832 W. OAK RIDGE DRIVE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 26, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 2:00 PM on May 28, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 7832 W. OAK RIDGE DRIVE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-25-300-063. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-09-33365. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1409-33365 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 09 CH 040565 TJSC#: 34-4170 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I604075

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION P l a i n t i f f , � v . � WALTER LESNICKI, HELENA LESNICKI, PNC BANK, N.A. S/B/M TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, JACEK LESNICKI A/K/A JACK LESNICKI D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 21626 7448 WEST 105TH STREET A/K/A 10447 SOUTH 75TH AVENUE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 20, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on May 22, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 7448 WEST 105TH STREET A/K/A 10447 SOUTH 75TH AVENUE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-13-204-021. The real estate is improved with a one story single family home with a two car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1313142. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1313142 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 21626 TJSC#: 34-3118 I601457

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION MIDFIRST BANK, P l a i n t i f f � V . � DEAN R. ILKANIC A/K/A DEAN ILKANIC; MICHELE R. ILKANIC A/K/A MICHELE ILKANIC; BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL I, INC.; SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BENEFICIAL ILLINOIS, INC. D/B/A BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO. OF ILLINOIS, D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 25904 Property Address: 8034 WEST 93RD STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 13-069968 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 6, 2014, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on June 9, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 8034 West 93rd Street, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Permanent Index No.: 23-02-420-011-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 256,869.98. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I596777

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12 Section 2-A

Thursday, May 1, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Go see ‘The Other Woman’ but take mom to another film With Mother’s Day around the corner, you might be looking for something fun to do with mom, but taking her to see “The Other Woman� is probably not the greatest idea. It’s a movie that has some lowbrow humor and a decent amount of sex talk which may make it uncomfortable to watch with your mother, but don’t let that deter you from seeing it yourself because it’s surprisingly decent. The movie is about Carly, a New York city lawyer played by Cameron Diaz who finds out her boyfriend Mark, played by Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, is actually married, when she shows up to surprise him at his house. When she rings the doorbell, who should answer but Mark’s wife, Kate, played by Leslie Mann. In a bit of only-in-movie magic, Carly and Kate become friends who bond over the man who screwed them both over, both literally and figuratively. The two find out that there is a third younger and better looking mistress, Amber, played by Kate Upton. Amber becomes the third member of the group and they decide they are going to go

Pinto’s Popcorn Picks by Tony Pinto after Mark to get him back for lying to them. All they ever seem to talk about is Mark, Mark, and Mark, it gets repetitive. How does a guy so bland get three women who are so out of his league? That is a huge question that the movie doesn’t seem to care to answer. Mark is your stereotypical rich businessman with no personality. We can assume his money is why gets the women. The movie tries to be empowering to women, but most of the time it just plays into standard stereotypes. The plot gets tired and predictable at points, but it’s never slow moving. Most of the movie plays into the tired revenge clichÊs of other movies. Nothing is really too original about this movie, which isn’t always a bad thing. If the wheel is not broken you don’t have to fix it. Diaz and Mann have this ex-

cellent dynamic on-screen together dynamic that shows as one of the few bright spots of the movie. At one point in the movie Mann’s character brings up how Upton’s character brings the group’s average up, and that’s really all she’s there for. It shows through in Upton’s acting, that she only got the role based on her beauty. Even with her lack acting skill, Upton is properly cast as a mistress, while the same can’t be said for Cameron Diaz. Isn’t she is a little too old to be playing a mistress? It’s not a movie that will keep you laughing at all times, but it has a few good laughs that make it worth watching. At times you could call it the female equivalent of movies like “The Hangover� or “Superbad,� in relation to its comedic style. Just because it’s not recommended to watch this movie with your mother, doesn’t mean she shouldn’t see it. Overall it’s a movie that all women can enjoy, but ultimately you might be better off waiting until it comes out on DVD because it’s not worth the ticket price. Mark Pinto’s grade: B

– 20th Century Fox photo

“The Other Woman� is a decent movie, but you might not want to view it with your mother.

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast

Broaden Your Horizons This week Palos Village Players comedy

laughter circle? It’s a group of people who want to laugh. Not from jokes or comedy routines, but rather from laughter for the sake of laughter! Research shows that laughter strengthens the immune system, reduces stress and anxiety, alleviates pain, and helps people get along better. O’Brien is a registered nurse and an advanced certified Laughter Leader. The cost of the laughter circle is $5, which O’Brien donates to The Center. Advance registration is appreciated. Interested persons should call The Center at 3613650.

The Palos Village Players will present their second play of the 2014 season, “My Three Angels,â€? by Sam and Bella Spewak , at 7:30 p.m. on May 2, 3, 9 and 10, and 2 p.m. on May 4 at the Palos Park Recreation Center, 8900 W. 123rd St. in Palos Park. The Philadelphia Enquirer called the play a “completely captivating comedy.â€? Tickets are $15 for adults and $12 for students and seniors. Tickets can be reserved by calling 1-877-7878497) Or, dine eat at Hackney’s, 123rd and LaGrange Road, buy Pottery open studio your tickets from them and save benefits night $5 on the cost of your meal. Call Two Pottery Open Studio parHackney’s at 448- 8300 for resties will be hosted at the Log ervations. Cabin Center for the Arts on Wednesdays, May 7 and 14, 6:30 Sister Act Cantata to 7:30 p.m. The Log Cabin Art Vesper services are held every Center is located at 12700 SouthSunday, at 12:30 p.m. and 4:30 west Highway in Palos Park. p.m., in the Wayside Chapel at Pottery instructor Heather The Center, located at 12700 Young invites adults or families Southwest Highway in Palos with children of any age to a Park. night of creative pottery, in orThis Sunday, the Center Sing- der to raise funds for The Ceners will present a Sister Act Can- ter Barn to be Wild Campaign. tata during both services. Led Young invites folks to come and by Penny Wills, of Palos Park, make platters, pigs, or whatever the Center Singers Choir will else they choose to create out of sing a collection of songs from clay. The items will be kiln-fired, the popular film “Sister Act.â€? glazed, fired again, and ready for For more information, call pickup a week after that. The Center at 361-3650. Refreshments will be shared and a display of Young’s handCompassionate made pottery will be on sale, knitters and crocheters with all proceeds benefitting the A new knitting and crochet- Barn to be Wild fund. Young is ing group called Peaceful Hands aiming to earn $1,000 for the will meet this Saturday morn- Center-wide benefit. ing, May 3, at 10:30 a.m., at The The benefit open studio fee is Center, 12700 Southwest High- $20 per person. Advance reserway, Palos Park. vations are required. Call The Led by master knitter/cro- Center at 361-3650. cheter Georgann Ring and Pastoral Director Chris Hopkins, The Bridge Teen the group will make prayer Center events shawls or other handmade items Meditation and Silence - 4 for those in need. This is not a class. Basic knitting or crochet- to 5:30 p.m. today (Thursday), ing competency is necessary. The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 This group provides a creative S. 71st Court, Orland Park, is opportunity to heal and show encouraging people, from all compassion to those who are ill religious backgrounds and beliefs, to participate in the Naor discouraged. Registration is requested. Call tional Day of Prayer. Students will spend time in prayer and 361-3650. meditation or just spend a few moments in peace and quiet to Horse class reflect and nurture your soul. An educational class about • Yoga — 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. tohorses will be held at the Childay, reset set your emotions and dren’s Farm this Saturday, May give your body a good workout; 3, from 11a.m. to 1p.m. The open to all skill levels. farm is at 12700 Southwest • Karaoke — 7:30 to 10:30 Highway in Palos Park. p.m. this Friday, May 2, Karaoke Taught by Dr. Kati Lucas, Night with food samples from DVM, the class will focus on baMeijer. sic horse health issues and char• Art Studio Night - 7:30 to acteristics such as breeds and 10:30 p.m. May 3, gallery night colors. Participants are asked to for artists and admirers alike. wear closed-toe shoes and long Students are encouraged to pants in order to stand next to bring some of their own works the horses during the class. of art, or to just stop by to look The class fee is $15. Advance at other student’s pieces. reservations are required. Call • Around the World: Mexico The Center at 361-3650. — 4 to 5 p.m. May 6, celebrating Cinco de Mayo and Mexican Laughter Circle culture by experiencing Mexico A monthly Laughter Circle through photos, native food, and meets this Sunday, May 4, at an art project. • Voice Coaching — 5 to 6 p.m. 6 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. May 7 and 21, The Bridge Teen Laughter leader Kathy Center will hold group voice O’Brien brings laughter and coaching lessons with Ben from all its benefits to the Laugh- Parker Music. • Fashion Photography — 5 ter Circle program. What’s a

by Jeraldine Saunders

to 6 p.m. May 7, 14 and 21, The Bridge Teen Center will hold a fashion photography program to help students learn about what goes into taking great photographs. Students will learn camera functions, where to shoot, what to wear, lighting and more. • Archery — 4 to 6 p.m. May 8, The Bridge Teen Center will hold an archery program with The Forest Preserve District of Cook County in which students will learn how to safely use a bow and arrow. • A Present for Mom — 4:30 to 6 p.m. May 8, The Bridge Teen Center is hosting a program for students to make a homemade gift for their mother figure for Mother’s Day. For more information on any program, call 532-0500.

Upcoming Meditation retreat

A daylong meditation retreat will be hosted on Thursday, May 15, at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Pastoral Director Chris Hopkins will lead a day of “letting go� of our own agendas and thoughts as we seek a greater connection with God. The day will include time for dialogue, quiet meditation, centering prayer, and walking the labyrinth. The cost per participant is $45, which includes lunch, leadership, and supplies. Advance registration is required. For more information, call The Center at 361-3650.

German kultur, architecture tour

Palos Fine Arts is sponsoring its 10th annual Architectural & Art Tour “Discover Chicago’s Deutschland� on Thursday, May 22. Visit St. Michael’s Church, which became the largest Ger(Continued on page 13)

   ARIES (March 21-April 19): A quest for excitement and glamour leads you by the nose. Early in the week, you might think you’re right when you’re actually wrong, so wait until late this week to make crucial decisions and changes.    TAURUS (April 20-May 20): For a predictable outcome, wait until conditions are more predictable. People might not respond favorably to requests for assistance. You might not be satisfied with results if you make changes early in the week.    GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Pursue the most enjoyable things before you knuckle down to the mundane. You may be attracted to the exotic and unusual in the week ahead, but don’t be sidetracked from following through on important obligations.    CANCER (June 21-July 22): Play it footloose and fancy free. Experience the thrill of meeting new people in the week ahead who fascinate you, but keep in mind that they might not remain in your life very long. Be prepared for a few surprises.    LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Concentrate on being a communityminded citizen. Your home or neighborhood could be the center for social functions or activity this week. Lend a helping hand to a new acquaintance or do some social networking.    VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): An impulsive purchase could foster a repulsive result. It’s possible that you think something is worth more than you pay early this week. This may be a good week to write down your ideas or make a presentation.    LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Political expediency isn’t always polite. You may prefer to employ diplomacy even when others hit below the belt. In the week ahead, you may need to adjust your responses to deal with some uncomfortable truths.    SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the week ahead, enjoy the fruits

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of your labor. Fight the urge to be a moody loner and hook up with a warm and ardent companion. Don’t be concerned if you don’t see immediate results.    SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sometimes the best thing you can do is not think or obsess about problems, but to simply have faith. Avoid making major purchases in the first part of the week and don’t dispose of outworn possessions.    CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): When other people throw you to the wolves, it may give you the opportunity to return leading the pack. The early part of the week offers challenges, but if you don’t give up or overreact you’ll gain the upper hand.    AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t trade one problem for another. You may end up over your head if you change horses midstream. Avoid becoming involved in petty spats or romantic misunderstandings during the

first half of the week.    PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A significant other could offer a sense of purpose and push you in the right direction this week. Listen to sound advice from experts if your piggy bank is concerned. Play hard, but remember to work just as diligently.

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 1, 2014 Section 2-A

Out & About

13

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Videoview by Jay Bobbin    (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)

Submitted by Beverly Arts Council

Children take part in last year’s BAC camp.

BAC announces summer camps Enrollment is under way for Beverly Arts Center’s Summer Arts Experience day camp for children ages 5 to 12. Located at 2407 W 111th St. in Chicago, BAC is convenient to families in the southwest Chicago metro area. And with five two-week sessions at $274 per session, campers participate in a full range of classes including visual arts, ceramics, dance, theater, fitness, music and computer arts. Making a decision now has its benefits: Friday and Saturday, May 2 and 3, are Super Savings Days, with a 20 percent discount on registration for BAC members and 10 percent savings for non-members. Register

at http://www.beverlyartcenter. org/_camps/sae.php. SAE campers meet from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Camp is organized into five themed-sessions, starting on Tuesday, June 17; Tuesday, July 1; Tuesday, July 15; Tuesday, July 29; and Tuesday, Aug. 12, with the final session concluding on Thursday, Aug. 21. A fully-supervised period of crafts and games starting at 8 a.m.—is available for SAE campers at $60 per two-week session. Children ages 3 to 5 are offered a Pre-Arts Academy program. This camp runs from Monday, June 2, to Thursday, Aug. 14, and is available in two- and four-

day-per-week options organized into three- and four-week sessions. Four-day campers meet from 9:30 until 11:30 a.m. on Monday through Thursday. Twoday campers meet from 9:30 until 11:30 a.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays or on Tuesdays and Thursdays; they also can opt for 12:30 until 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Three-week sessions are $68 for two-day and $125 for four-day; four-week sessions are $90 and $175, respectively. Super Savings Days apply here, too. Register at http://www.beverlyartcenter.org/_ camps/prearts.php. —Submitted by Beverly Arts Center

Liz Smith by Liz Smith

New memoir, ‘The Star Shiner,’ nails Studio 54 era    “STARS CAN ask the strangest things of artists and then make the job impossible to do. It is a great relief when an artist has a few like that in their career. Unfortunately, mine was littered with neurotics.”    So writes make-up man Evan Richardson, who flourished in the good-old-bad-old days of the ‘70s/’80s when anything went.    EVAN has written a memoir, “The Star Shiner: Memoir of a Celebrity Make-Up Artist,” which concerns his career and his personal life — mother, lover, the AIDS years, finding God. The career aspects of his life are fascinating. His personal tale less so — at least, the average reader looking for gossip, might think so.    The problem with this often funny and fascinating work is crystallized in the quote above. Evan, talented, handsome and smart, was also quite “entitled.” He was prickly, easily offended and apparently unaware that he was operating in a business in which not only were the stars “neurotics,” but so were (and are) their “service people” — hairdressers, make-up artists, stylists, gofers, assistants, etc. It doesn’t seem to occur to him that he might have brought some “attitude” along with his paints and powders.    THE AUTHOR starts his life of celebrity-dom with a bang, getting to know the likes of Tallulah Bankhead and Lucille Ball. (The Bankhead tales are classic — but then everybody who crossed Tallulah, even for a minute, came away with a great story; she was inexhaustibly delightful or offensive, but never boring!)    Richardson moves on, working at Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. His life and career zoom into high gear during the licentious, cocaine-laced disco era of the ‘70s and ‘80s. His vignettes about the likes of Bette Midler, David Bowie, Shirley MacLaine, Madonna, Gloria Vanderbilt, Barbara Walters, Liza Minnelli, Paul Newman, supermodels galore and Elizabeth Taylor are colorfully written and seem pretty much on the money. (Certainly from his point of view.) But there’s the rub. Evans’ point of view seems naive and challenging.    Did he really expect every one of these stars to “behave” according to his standard of politeness? Yes, he did. And when they didn’t, which seems quite often in his life, he never forgot or forgave. Nor did he seem to understand that asking, say, of David Bowie, “Do you have a mother?” might result in Bowie bolting from the make-up chair.    But I’ve rarely read as good a wrap-up of the Studio 54 days — its rise and fall — as Evan Richardson chronicles. It’s so incisive I tore out those pages and sent them to a friend who is writing a history of those times.    THE celebrity piece de resistance of “Star Shiner” is the entire chap-

ter he devotes to Elizabeth Taylor. Evan worked with Taylor in 1980, while she was still married to John Warner and again in 1982 after her Broadway triumph in “The Little Foxes” and the Warner divorce. (He attended to her during her campy “General Hospital” stint.) Neither were good times for La Liz, and he presents her as rude, inebriated, inconsiderate, late and fiercely protective of her image in terms of her appearance. (There was a battle of wills over how much eyeliner she should wear. Guess who won?)    Evan wasn’t even terribly interested in Elizabeth Taylor, but the incidents so “scarred” him, he refers back to her constantly, as his idea of a bad person, a thoughtless star.    I believe it, from his point of view, anyway. One wonders, however, how he came across to her?    Elizabeth did not suffer fools or egos in need of massage. But Evan already knew, from the likes of fellow make-up artist Way Bandy and photographer Francesco Scavullo, that Taylor was never on time, did not apologize for her lateness and expected to be treated like, well — Elizabeth Taylor. I know for a fact that Elizabeth was extremely generous and nice. My partner in writing, Denis Ferrara, and I had worked with, and around and in concert with La Liz almost the whole of her amazing career!    But she was spoiled. This had been a part of her DNA since the age of nine. (Mike Todd said: “Of course, she’s spoiled. I spoil her. )    Most who worked with ET loved her, because they accepted her eccentricities. Evan expected her to accept his. Or at the very least, accept his advice on her make-up. Silly! She’d been putting it on with a trowel since her 20s, despite pleas from friends that she looked much better with less. She certainly wasn’t going to listen to good sense at the age of 50.

   Evan does, at least, give Taylor credit in the end for rehabilitating herself and working tirelessly, for the rest of her life, to combat AIDS.    SO, THERE’S a lot of stellar juice in “Star Shiner” and maybe some will find his personal story compelling.    Richardson does a bang-up job on the mise en scene of an era and people. On that level, his is a fascinating historical document.    P.S. Two little tales of Elizabeth and hairdressers come to mind. Back in 1975, she was staying at New York’s Lombardy Hotel, just before her second break with Richard Burton    My Denis told me he had chatted with the hairdresser at the Lombardy salon who told him he (the stylist) was being summoned upstairs to do Taylor’s hair. He told Denis: “Oh, she is just lovely. Beautiful. But very, very sad. She cries a lot. The bad thing is, she has such wonderful hair, but all she wants is tease, tease, tease. I do as she wants, of course!”    A year later, Taylor had the hairdresser Arthur Bruckel in her entourage. One afternoon, the omnipresent Denis stopped him outside the townhouse where Elizabeth was staying, saying, “Can’t you do something with her hair? Pull it back!”    Bruckel, a terrific guy, laughed and said, “I have no control. Wanna bet she’s up there right now ratting that hair?”    But evidently he had some control. That very night Elizabeth emerged in a simple black velvet gown, her hair slicked into a sleek chignon. She looked sensational. She was on her way to a Liza Minnelli concert. Just before Bruckel got in the car with Taylor, he winked at my guy, “Are you happy now?”    He was.    (E-mail Liz Smith at MES3838@ aol.com.)

   STARTING THIS WEEK: “LABOR DAY”: Adapted by director Jason Reitman (“Juno”) from Joyce Maynard’s novel, this drama about an escaped convict and the woman he takes captive doesn’t jell completely, but the teamwork of Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin keeps it watchable. So does a certain edible, a peach pie, which they bond over preparing in the kitchen ... and don’t be surprised if you have an urge to run right out and get your own after seeing this film. Tobey Maguire narrates the story as the adult incarnation of Winslet’s son, who’s played nicely on-screen by young Gattlin Griffith; Clark Gregg, J.K. Simmons and James Van Der Beek also appear. *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)    “THE LEGEND OF HERCULES”: The famed Greek strongman gets a makeover in the persona of Kellan Lutz (“Twilight”) in this passable retelling from director Renny Harlin (“Cliffhanger”). The son of Zeus crosses his scheming monarch stepfather (Scott Adkins), resulting in Hercules being sold into slavery and having to battle very literally to survive, all the while determined to return home and set things right there. Roxanne McKee (“Game of Thrones”) and Johnathon Schaech also star. DVD extra: audio commentary by Lutz and Harlin. ** ((PG-13: AS, V) Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)    “HILL STREET BLUES: THE COMPLETE SERIES”: One of television’s most acclaimed police dramas becomes available on home video in its entirety, with a sterling ensemble cast led by Daniel J. Travanti as Capt. Frank Furillo, leader of a big-city precinct that has more than its share of problems. That’s not just with suspects but among the squad members themselves; stars also

include Veronica Hamel, Dennis Franz (who would work again later with executive producer Steven Bochco on “NYPD Blue”), Michael Conrad, Bruce Weitz, Charles Haid, Michael Warren and Betty Thomas. Here’s a show just made for binge watching. DVD extras: retrospective documentaries; audio commentary by, and interviews with, cast and crew members; outtakes. **** (Not rated: AS, P, V)    “MR. SELFRIDGE: SEASON 2”: A multiple Emmy winner for “Entourage,” Jeremy Piven continues to redefine his television image as Harry Gordon Selfridge, the American founder of a London department store, in this PBS series, with these episodes currently airing on “Masterpiece Classic” ... meaning that early viewers of the video set will see several stories before they’re broadcast. As the business’s fifth anniversary approaches, Selfridge’s estranged wife, Rose (Frances O’Connor), returns, while the approach of World War I poses new concerns. Polly Walker joins the cast. *** (Not rated: AS) (Also on Bluray)    “DEVIL’S DUE”: As if pregnancy doesn’t pose challenges under normal circumstances, a young couple (Allison Miller, Zach Gilford) get a dose of supernatural terror while awaiting their first child’s birth in this rather familiar thriller. The tale has a “Paranormal Activity” sensibility, since the husband documents the wait for the baby on video ... but that also clues him into how much his wife is changing in the process, and definitely not in a good way. Costars include Vanessa Ray (“Blue Bloods”). ** (R: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray)    “DYNASTY: THE EIGHTH SEASON”: The posh 1980s ABC serial about Denver’s oil-rich was starting to wind down its run at the time of these episodes, available in two volumes. The spinoff series “The Colbys” had ended, so Jeff and Fallon (John James, Emma Samms) were brought back into the main fold, and someone else resurfaced ... Carrington family enemy Matthew Blaisdel, played again by founding cast member Bo Hopkins. The clan also faced trouble from another source, Sean

Top DVD Rentals

Top Pop Singles

   1. Homefront, Millennium Films, R    2. Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues, Paramount Pictures, PG-13    3. The Wolf of Wall Street, Paramount Pictures, R    4. Out of the Furnace, Relativity Media, R    5. August: Osage County, The Weinstein Company, R    6. Gravity, Warner Bros., PG13    7. Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones, Paramount Pictures, R    8. Frozen, Walt Disney Studios, PG    9. 12 Years a Slave, Fox Searchlight Pictures, R    10. The Book Thief, 20th Century Fox, PG-13

   1. Happy, Pharrell Williams, Backlot Music    2. All of Me, John Legend, Columbia    3. Dark Horse, Katy Perry, featuring Juicy J, Capitol Records (Universal)    4. Talk Dirty, Jason Derulo, featuring 2 Chainz, Warner Bros.    5. Let It Go, Idina Menzel, Walt Disney Records    6. Pompeii, Bastille, Virgin (Universal)    7. Team, Lorde, Lava Music/ Republic Records    8. Turn Down for What, DJ Snake & Lil Jon, Columbia    9. The Man, Aloe Blacc, Interscope Records    10. Counting Stars, OneRepublic, Interscope Records

Rowan (James Healey), Alexis’ (Joan Collins) newest husband. John Forsythe and Linda Evans also continue as stars. *** (Not rated: AS, P, V)    COMING SOON: “VERONICA MARS” (May 6): Former teen sleuth Veronica (Kristen Bell) tries to clear ex-flame Logan (Jason Dohring) of murder in the fan-funded movie sequel to the television series. (PG-13: AS, P, V)    “HER” (May 13): Director Spike Jonze won an Oscar for his script about a professional letter writer (Joaquin Phoenix) who falls for a computer system’s voice (Scarlett Johansson). (R: AS, N, P)    “I, FRANKENSTEIN” (May 13): Aaron Eckhart plays the synthetic man, who is of great interest to the leader (Bill Nighy) of an army of the undead. (PG13: AS, P, V)    “ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON” (May 13): The Netflix series stars Taylor Schiling as a prison inmate. (Not rated: AS, N, P)    “LONE SURVIVOR” (June 3): Navy SEALs find themselves in extreme danger during a mission in Afghanistan; Mark Wahlberg stars in the true story. (R: AS, P, V)    “JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT” (June 10): Chris Pine assumes the role of novelist Tom Clancy’s CIA man, seen here in the early stages of his career; Kevin Costner and Kenneth Branagh (the film’s director, too) also star. (PG-13: AS, P, V)    FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

Broaden Your Horizons (Continued from page 12) man parish in the city by 1892, travel past the site of Haymarket Riot, and the historic Germania Club founded in 1865. Also visit Dinkel’s Bakery and the Dank Haus German Cultural Center to view their special exhibit, “Lost German Chicago.” Lunch at the Chicago Brauhaus in the Lincoln Square neighborhood will include choice of Wiener Schnitzel or Sauerbraten. Participants will have time to explore Lincoln Square, and such German-related spots as Merz Apothecary and Gene’s Sausage Shop. The motor coach will leave from Palos Park Recreation Center at 8:30 a.m. and will return approximately at 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $85/Palos Fine Arts member, $95/non-member. To make a reservation, send your check, payable to Palos Fine Arts, and include your phone number and choice of entree, to Phyllis Adams, 11700 Matterhorn Circle, Palos Park, 60464. For more information, call 4483383, or visit www.palosfinearts. com. Reservations are limited.

Plan a play date with your Kids!

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DRURY LANE THEATRE 100 Drury Lane

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April 23 June 7

drurylane.com 630.530.0111


14 Section 2-A

CelebrateMom

Thursday, May 1, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

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Regional news 20140501