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THE REGIONAL NEWS Named best small weekly in Illinois five times by the Illinois Press Association

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Serving Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities

76th Year, NO. 7 • 2 Sections

St. Laurence going co-ed, will enroll Peace girls ‘This is the Valentine’s Day gift of a lifetime’ By Tim Hadac Tears of joy were shed across the Southwest Side earlier this week, as Queen of Peace High School students, parents, alumnae and others cheered the news that their current students will be accepted this fall at their “brother” school, St. Laurence High School. “I don’t know if the timing is coincidental, but this is the Valentine’s Day gift of a lifetime. Our hearts are bursting with joy,” said

Chicago resident Michelle Garcia, an aunt of a currently enrolled Peace girl. “If I bump into anyone from St. Laurence today, I’m giving them a hug and a kiss. In fact, I might bake a heart-shaped cake and bring it over to the school.” This week’s news was largely predicted in a front-page story in last week’s Regional News, which revealed that St. Laurence—an all-boys school since its founding in 1961—was quietly surveying thousands of its alumni and presenting four options relating to possible responses to Queen of Peace’s announcement that it was closing its doors for good, due to declining enrollment and mounting debt. Three of those St.

Laurence options involved going co-ed in some way. This week’s decision was announced to St. Laurence students at an all-school assembly on Tuesday morning—and almost at the same time, to parents, alumni and other friends of the school via an email blast. Students who heard the news “were very supportive,” said St. Laurence spokesman Mike Madera, who added that as a 2010 graduate of the school, he finds the decision “smart and forward-thinking. This already is an exciting time of growth at St. Laurence, and this decision will make it even more so…it will ultimately make the school a

stronger and better place.” Queen of Peace students who choose to enroll at St. Laurence in the fall will still enjoy the benefits of all-girl classes. “It is a top priority to provide current St. Laurence and Queen of Peace students the single-gender education they signed up for, so all current and incoming students will remain in single-gender classrooms,” according to a statement by St. Laurence Board Chairman George Ruebenson and President Joseph Martinez, both alumni of the Burbank school. “This will allow our students to see very little change in their school day.

Supplied photo

A few Queen of Peace girls have worn the St. Laurence black and gold over See CO-ED, Page 2 the years, including as Viking cheerleaders at football and basketball games.

Palos Heights’ vacant buildings not an empty topic of Straz speech By Jeff Vorva

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sandburg junior Sophia Jablonski lets out a joyful yell after her name was announced for winning the Andrew Sectional bowling title in the wheelchair division at Orland Bowl. She will compete against one other bowler for the state championship in the wheelchair division in Rockford this weekend.

‘I’ve never felt this much excitement’ Sandburg’s Jablonski is a pioneer in IHSA state bowling By Jeff Vorva When she was in grade school, Orland Park’s Sophia Jablonski was onstage in 2011 performing “The Nutcracker” in Chicago with

members of the Joffrey Ballet. Now that she’s in high school, sports have taken over her life as the Sandburg junior plays baseball in Joliet and bowls. She qualified for the Illinois High School Association state meet Saturday. Oh, and she has done all of this despite the fact that she has cerebral palsy and needs to be in a wheelchair. Jablonski and Troy (Triad) High

School freshman Chenoa Stokes are the first two bowlers in the history of the IHSA to qualify in the wheelchair division of the state tournament. It has been offered since 2014, but Jablonski (who rolled a 459 in four games in the Andrew Sectional at Orland Bowl) and Stokes (253 at the Belleville East Sectional) were the first to take advantage of the new division this year and will

battle it out to become the first wheelchair state champion Friday and Saturday at Cherry Bowl in Rockford. Jablonski is stoked for her matchup with Stokes. “I’ve never felt this much excitement…ever,” Jablonski said after sectional action. “I was nervous but everyone was cheering

There are a couple of vacant buildings in Palos Heights getting plenty of attention from city officials — the former Mary Del Corsetieres building on Harlem Avenue and the former Dominick’s on 127th Street. Mayor Bob Straz talked about a variety of topics during his stateof-the-city address on Tuesday in front of approximately 150 people at the Palos Heights Recreation Center and hosted by the Palos Area Chamber of Commerce. The topics included the two vacant buildings and the good news/bad news scenarios with them. The good news regards the Mary Del building at 12221 Harlem Ave. Mary Del closed in 2015, and the building that sold bridal dresses and undergarments is in the process of being purchased and torn down by the city. The mayor has some special plans. “We will be able to accommodate more parking and we hope to make it in to a little town center,” Straz said. “We really don’t have a town center, per se. We have to adapt to the changes that are happening  in Palos Heights. We have all sorts of retail. We have a slew of restaurants now that need more parking. This is what we’re See SPEECH, Page 2

Straz and Mahoney to join forces at the dais next year By Jeff Vorva Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz is usually a one-man show when he gives his annual stateof-the-city message. Next year, he plans to have a co-star at the event, hosted by the Palos Area Chamber of Commerce. Straz announced Tuesday that he plans on sharing the dais with Palos Park Mayor John Mahoney. “I won’t have to talk as long — John is verbose as he is a lawyer,’’ Straz said with a laugh. Mahoney has been mayor since 2007 and has only had one state-of-the-village address in his career. “It takes a lot of work to put these on, but I have been enjoying going to other towns and watching their addresses,’’ Mahoney said. “We have a lot going on in our town and I look forward to doing this with Bob next year.’’

See BOWLING, Page 2

Anthony Caciopo is new editor of The Regional News From Staff Reports Anthony Caciopo has been named editor of The Regional News, effective Monday, the company has announced. The selection of Caciopo marks the culmination of a one-month national search that attracted 18 applicants and began after longtime editor Jack Murray retired for health reasons. In Murray’s absence, the paper had been co-edited by Tim Hadac, editor

of the Southwest News-Herald and Archer Journal News, and Jeff Vorva, sports editor of Southwest Regional Publishing. “One never Caciopo replaces an editor of Jack’s caliber,” said Mark Hornung, chief operating officer of Southwest Regional Publishing Co. “In

Anthony, we have recruited an unusually poised and accomplished successor who will build on the paper’s strengths and add to it important qualities of intimacy in our story selection; diversity and energy in our weekly journalism, photo journalism and design.” Caciopo, 57, is an experienced local editor, photographer and writer who resides in Palos Heights. He began his newspaper career with the Southwest News-Herald

as a freelancer, a reporter and an assistant editor to former editor Joseph Boyle. The Southwest News-Herald is a sister publication of The Regional News, and Boyle currently serves as editor of The Reporter, which also is owned by the Regional’s parent company, Southwest Regional Publishing Co. Caciopo left the Southwest News-Herald in 1992 to work

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz gave his state-of-the-city address on Tuesday See EDITOR, Page 2 and pointed out that there might be a city center on Harlem Avenue coming.

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2 Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Regional News

Palos Park already planning ‘Autumn’ fest

By Michael Gilbert Village Manager Rick Boehm has said planning for Palos Park’s Autumn in the Park festival is a year-round occurrence, and that was again proven to be the case Monday. Palos Park officials voted 3-0 at the Village Council meeting Monday to approve a pair of contracts pertaining to the twoday festival, which is to be held Sept. 15-16 on the Village Green, 8901 W. 123rd St. Commissioners Nicole Milovich-Walters and G. Darryl Reed were absent. The council entered into an agreement with the Elk Grove Village-based Record-A-Hit Entertainment in an amount not to exceed $6,800 to supply the attractions, generators and attendants for the fest. Officials also agreed to pay Ultimate Rental Services Inc., of Romeoville, an amount not to exceed $13,840 to rent tents, electrical equipment and portable flooring, lighting and staging. “There really isn’t much off time for the planning of this event,” said Boehm, who was the driving force behind creating the event six years ago and is also a member of the steering committee for the festival. “The proposals were out in late fall and due in early December. We’re thinking about the bands and what we can do better all the time. We critique our event a couple weeks after

Co-ed

Continued from Page 1 To foster collaboration, we will open up activities before and after school and will develop a selection of coed electives to provide students opportunities to interact.” The relatively small number of eighth-grade girls who took the entrance exam at Queen of Peace last month will not be offered spots at St. Laurence in the fall, officials said, but the school will begin marketing itself to both boys and girls and will accept both in the freshman class starting in the fall of 2018. At that point, St. Laurence’s plan is to educate freshmen and sophomores as separately as possible under one roof and then move those students into co-educational classes as juniors and seniors. St. Laurence officials also indicated they will not assume control of any Queen of Peace property, including its financial debt. They also were clear that the move does not represent a merger with Queen of Peace—that the girls will be St. Laurence students. Many questions about Queen of Peace itself remain unanswered, including what will happen to the Queen of Peace building and grounds at 7659 S. Linder. A Southwest News-Herald request for comment on St. Laurence’s announcement yielded a more general expression from Anne O’Malley, president of Queen of Peace.

and come up with ways we can make it even better.” Boehm said the contract for the “fun zone attractions,” which includes inflatables and a rock climbing wall, came in at just what the village had budgeted. The village contacted seven vendors but only Record-A-Hit submitted a bid; however their references checked and Boehm said he has no concerns hiring them. The company, which the village is contracting with for the first time, is to provide 12 attractions as well as the generators needed to power them, he said. The contract with Ultimate Rental Services includes a 60foot by 120-foot tent, as well as a number of food vendor tents, Boehm said. The village received five bids from qualified vendors, with Ultimate Rental Services coming in the lowest. The tent company the village has used the last three years came in around $900 more than Ultimate Rental Services, Boehm said. “We had [Ultimate Rental Services] out and walk the field and talk about what they are going to provide, and we are satisfied,” Boehm said. “They’ve got all the equipment, and they’ve done big events in the past. They have all the right references and staff to put this on, and that’s what we are concerned about.” Autumn in the Park has previously attracted more than 5,000

guests throughout the two days, and has been called one of “the best and biggest events” in Palos Park by village officials. This year’s event is expected to be no different, as fest-goers can anticipate plenty of food, fun and activities. The popular barbecue food contest and the apple pie competition are both scheduled to return, Boehm said.  So, too, is the live entertainment that performs both days on the Village Green, and the annual parade that kicks off Day 2 with many community groups and civic organizations marching. Boehm is the brains behind the festival, and along with members of the Autumn in the Park steering committee decided to turn the fest into a two-day event after witnessing the popularity of the first year. “The steering committee thought after the first year that since we had a good deal of success and figured that we are already spending money for the tent, generators and everything else on the site that to add another evening wouldn’t take much effort,” Boehm said. Boehm is confident the steering committee will do everything it can to make this year’s Autumn in the Park another fun-filled event for the entire family. He is just hoping Mother Nature cooperates. “We’re praying for good weather,” Boehm said. “You can never start too soon”

“We are grateful to the St. Laurence community and excited about what the future holds for our young women,” she said, in part. “While we are broken hearted to see Queen of Peace close, we find solace in the fact that many of our students will remain together until they graduate. The Queen of Peace leadership will work diligently with St. Laurence to make sure this is a smooth and successful transition for the students of both schools.” As they did a week ago, graduates of both schools, as well as mothers, fathers and even grandparents registered their opinions on Facebook and other social media sites. “A week ago, my daughter and her [Queen of Peace] classmates were panicked and distraught, holding each other and crying,” one mother posted in a Facebook group. “Today, they’re holding each other and crying—but for a very, very different reason. They’re relieved and overjoyed. They’re at peace. Thank you so much, St. Laurence. What you did today is literally life-changing for my daughter and her friends.” Going co-educational was something St. Laurence had started to consider, even before Queen of Peace announced its shutdown. “St. Laurence has seen growth in its enrollment in recent years, but the trends of Catholic education in Chicago cannot be ignored,” its statement on Tuesday added. “Fewer and fewer students are going to single-sex high schools.

Testing numbers have been on the decline at single-sex schools over the last decade, while coeducational high schools have seen an increase in test takers and historically experience far less volatility in enrollment.” St. Laurence officials made it clear Tuesday that their decision was not an act of charity. They said Peace students are “a strong group of young women who, should they choose a St. Laurence education, will offer our community a new and valuable dynamic as they Diane Snyder of Palos Heights serves one of the many types of candy samples made at the event. finish their high school careers together. These young women will bring intellectual opinions and experiences that differ from our male students, yet their familiarity and background with Queen of Peace’s STEAM program will align well with St. Laurence’s project-based curriculum. In the end, we believe our team-driven environment will only improve the exchange of ideas between students and help all of them prepare for the challenges ahead.” To begin the transition, St. Laurence was set to host two town hall-style meetings this week: one for parents of its own students and another for Queen of Peace parents. Left: Izdehar Nahhas, 8, of Palos Heights, squeezes hard on a cake-decorating tool to make designs with frosting. To a limited degree, the schools Above: Peanut butter cups with heart-shaped flourishes, have conducted co-educational along with many other types of candies, were sampled quickly activities over the years, most and enthusiastically. notably the inclusion of Peace girls in the St. Laurence band and rebranding it with Queen of trendsetter,’’ Geiger said. “Hope- we’re going to state together. She Peace’s name. fully next year we will see more definitely brings a lot of positivity Continued from Page 1 athletes come out and it will be to the team. If you are having a for me and the cheering always bigger and better. That’s what the bad game and feeling down and IHSA wants.’’ you see her smiling, it makes you makes me do better. I can’t wait Jablonski had plenty of people feel better.’’ for state. cheering for her during her hisJablonki’s mother, Naheda, said “I love my school and I love toric afternoon at Orland Bowl that Sophia was a lone surviving doing this — it means a lot.’’ including several members of triplet and was born at 25 weeks, For Jablonski, this is more than Sandburg’s bowling program. weighing 1 pound and 5 ounces. just about winning a state title. She Eagles junior star bowler Emsaid she is hoping that her par- ily Schrader, who qualified for She said she never imagined her ticipation in this postseason will the state tournament for a third daughter would end up on stage become an inspiration for other straight season and finished 10th or bowling. “This had been such a great wheelchair bowlers to participate. last year, is one of Jablonski’s experience for her,” Naheda said. Her coach, Joe Geiger, thinks biggest fans. that can happen. “I’m really proud of her — “And I am hoping that there are “I’ve talked to other coaches she was having so much fun,” so many others out there who see and they have athletes in their Schrader said. “She came down her story and what she has done buildings who could be a part of and cheered for me. It’s really and will be inspired to come out the wheelchair division, so she is a exciting for her and I’m glad and compete next year.’’

Photos by Anthony Caciopo

Diane Goerg (right), owner of Diane’s Place at 12306 S. Harlem in Palos Heights, mixes chocolate as part of her candy-making demonstration (and tasting) at the Palos Heights Library last Saturday. The event drew more than 25 sweets-lovers including (from left), Barbara Schaff; Theresa Devine with son, Shane; Pauline Pastore; Izdehar Nahhas and Shari Wenzel, all of Palos Heights, who stepped forward for an up-close look.

Candy-Making Day at the Palos Heights Library

Bowling

Editor Photo by Jeff Vorva

Continued from Page 1

The Mary Del Corsetieres building is scheduled to be torn down to make room for a village center and more parking. as a photojournalist for seven

Speech

Continued from Page 1 going to have to build.’’ Straz hopes that more parking will lead to luring more businesses to come into the downtown area. The mayor said the city needs to try something new to bring in business to Harlem Avenue. “Retail is changing. Twenty years ago was probably the last time all of the storefronts on Harlem were full,’’ he said. “How many of you would have envisioned shopping on your PC for everything? Or Amazon? Things change. Those small shops are not there anymore. There are some

that have thrived. But for a majority of them – people don’t go to them anymore. It’s a shame. Twenty years ago, there were no dollar stores. Walgreen’s didn’t have a food department. “The way goods are delivered has changed and we have to change.’’ One big change the mayor would love to make regards the old Dominick’s, which he calls “the eyesore we have to deal with.’’ The store closed in 2014 and the city has been handcuffed with a big, empty building. “The reality is Jewel Corporation controls the lease on that store until the year 2022,” Straz

said. “They are in no hurry to put somebody in there to compete with themselves. They are doing this not only to us but to 15 other towns in the Chicago area. We’ve met with them. We met with the president of Jewel. They said they would try to do something. Do you really think they are?’’  But the mayor is hopeful something can be done. “I have some cohorts who live in the Frankfort area and they turned the Dominick’s there into a movie theater,’’ he said. “If that takes off, maybe there will be someone who will be able to take this one and turn it into a theater or something similar to that.’’

years at Pioneer Press, a chain of west and north suburban weekly newspapers owned by Sun-Times Media Group. In 1999, Caciopo left Pioneer Press to write, edit and develop websites and newsletters for Brookshire Investments Inc., owner of OwnACondo.com and then REA Worldwide LLC, owner and RealEstateAuctions.com. “We are thrilled to welcome back Anthony to our family of newspapers,” Hornung added. “Since leaving the Southwest News-Herald, Anthony has picked up critical skills in photography, digital and niche publishing that will add enormously to the quality and quantity of publishing products we will offer our readers and

advertisers.” The Regional News is a fivetime winner of the IPA’s Kramer Memorial Trophy. It was founded in 1941, and then purchased in 1947 by Carl Richards. The

business remained in Richards family hands until October 2014 when it was sold to a local group that includes Hornung, Steven M. Landek, Mike Thiessen and Safaa Zarzour.

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The Regional News

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Orland Park husband charged in wife’s slaying Shot once in the head; body found in garage By Tim Hadac A 60-year-old Orland Park man is held without bond this week, charged with murdering his wife at their home in the 14000 block of Sheri Lane. Raymond Homolka was due in court yesterday in Bridgeview, days after police said he killed his wife, Mary, also age 60, with a single gunshot to the head. Orland Park police said they were summoned to the home last Friday afternoon to conduct a well-being check and found Mrs. Homolka’s body in the garage. Her death was ruled a homicide the following day by the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office. In court on Sunday, prosecutors said that Homolka killed his wife and then tried to hide her body in the garage. He then allegedly used bleach to cover the crime and told police and relatives that she was in Las Vegas on vacation. Mrs. Homolka’s sister, Carol

Raymond Homolka

Mary Lou Homolka

Ann Watt, said that the marriage was the second for both Raymond and Mary Lou Homolka, according to published reports, and that the couple had been together about 20 years. Police were familiar with the Homolka home due to domestic violence calls and an assistant Cook County State’s Attorney wrote that the couple had “approximately 11 domestic-violence related incidents at their home, including domestic violence with a firearm.” In court on Sunday, family members described Mrs. Homolka as a friendly woman who loved animals—and also acknowledged that she felt trapped in what they said was an abusive relationship they tried to help her leave, according to published reports. Neighbors said they were aware of the sometimes stormy relation-

ship between the Homolkas and heard loud, angry exchanges of profanity between the two, according to published reports. Public records indicate that Raymond Homolka was in criminal court several times over the last 25 years, answering charges of aggravated battery, domestic battery, battery, resisting arrest and possession of an explosive or incendiary device. He was sentenced to 30 days in Cook County jail in 2012 on charges of aggravated battery and aggravated assault in connection with a fight that occurred at Petey’s II restaurant in Orland Park, according to a published report. A police blotter item in The Regional News last year noted that Raymond Homolka was charged with DUI and improper lane usage after police found him slumped behind the wheel of his SUV after it had hit a tree near 135th Street and Southwest Highway at 12:29 a.m. Dec. 23, 2015. In a statement, Orland Park police said that they and the South Suburban Major Crimes Task Force are conducting a joint investigation. Services for Mrs. Homolka had not been announced as of Tuesday morning.

‘Coffee with a Cop’ set in Orland Park The Orland Park Police Department hosts its next “Coffee with a Cop” on Monday, Feb. 20 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at Mariano’s Fresh Market, 9504 W. 142nd St. The community is invited to attend a morning of coffee and conversation to get to know members of the OPPD in an informal and friendly setting, according to

a statement from village officials. “’Coffee with a Cop’ offers the community a unique opportunity to ask questions, voice concerns and learn more about the department’s many efforts in our Orland Park neighborhoods,” said Chief Tim McCarthy. “I encourage everyone to come out and spend a few minutes getting to know your

community police officers. Coffee with a Cop is a national initiative supported by the United States Department of Justice and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. For more information, contact the village’s Public Information Office at (708) 403-6150.

POLICE BLOTTER: ORLAND PARK Two charged with DUI Orland Park police charged Chicago resident Christopher P. Amato, 36, with DUI, disobeying a traffic control light and unsafe backing on a highway after they curbed his SUV in the 14100 block of Southwest Highway at 1:25 a.m. Jan. 26. The vehicle was towed and impounded, and Amato is scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview on March 20. Evergreen Park resident Warren E. Larson, 65, was charged with DUI and failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident as police investigated a three-vehicle crash near 143rd Street and LaGrange Road at 9:17 p.m. Jan. 27. He suffered a cut on his forehead in the crash and

was taken by OFPD ambulance to Palos Hospital, where he was treated and released. His vehicle was towed and impounded, and Larson was given a court date of March 20 in Bridgeview.

Orland teen speeding at twice the limit, police say Police charged Sahar W. Abdulla, 18, of Orland Park, with speeding after they stopped her car in the 13700 block of South LaGrange Road at 8:20 a.m. Jan. 29. Her vehicle was spotted traveling at 78 mph, more than double the posted limit, according to the police report. The car was turned over to another person, police said,

and Abdulla is due in court in Bridgeview on March 14.

Tinley Park woman swiped 27 items, police say Tinley Park resident Connie L. Cholly, 53, was charged with retail theft after she allegedly stole 27 items worth a total of $770 from a department store in Orland Square Mall at 5:11 p.m. Jan. 22. An OPPD request for a felony charge was denied by the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, according to the police report. Cholly will answer to the misdemeanor charge on Wednesday in Bridgeview.

POLICE BLOTTER: PALOS PARK Retail theft Kristen D. Kozik, 24, of Orland Park, was issued a local adjudication ticket for retail theft at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 1, at Great Clips, 13002 S. LaGrange Road. Police were called to the hair salon by staff, who said Kozik stole haircare products worth about $100 after getting her hair washed and cut. She returned the items after police found her at the address she provided when making her appointment, according to the police report. She is due at a March 1 hearing in at the Kaptur Administrative Center, where she faces

a possible $100 fine.

Suspended registration Dominguez Jose Guadalupe Torres, 29, of Chicago, was charged with driving a car with suspended registration following a traffic stop at 5:24 p.m. Feb. 2, in the 12300 block of South 90th Avenue. He is due in court on March 28.

Suspended license Melinda Sheree Watson, 35, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended license following

a traffic stop in the 14200 block of South LaGrange Road at 7:48 p.m. Feb. 3. She was also cited for driving without insurance. She was also warned about having too many passengers, and failing to fasten one child’s seatbelt, police said. She is due in court on March 28. Michael R Dina. 57, of Palos Park, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 4:19 p.m. Feb. 5 in the 8100 block of West 123rd St. He was also cited for improper lane usage and driving without insurance. He is due in court on March 28.

POLICE BLOTTER: PALOS HEIGHTS Aggravated speeding Ryan R. Schau, 33, of Tinley Park, was charged with aggravated speeding following a traffic stop at 7 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 13300 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he was driving 80 mph in a 40 mph zone. He was also cited for driving without insurance. He is due in court on March 22.

DUI Jacob J. Kramer. 33, of Bridgeview, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 1:21 a.m. Saturday, in the 6300 block of West 127th Street. Police said he was also cited for speeding and improper lane usage. He is due in court on March 22. Joseph B. Golobic, 51, of Frankfort, was charged with DUI following a traffic stop at 2:25 a.m. Sunday, in the 13000 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was also cited for failure

to dim high-beam headlights. He is due in court on March 8.

Suspended license Keith W. Reed, 30, of Summit, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 1:10 a.m. Feb. 8, in the 11900 block of South Harlem Avenue. He is due in court on March 8. Jason Fabian Jr., 25, of Tinley Park, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 9:09 a.m. last Thursday, in the 12600 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was also cited for having no insurance and expired license plates. He is due in court on March 8. Chasity D. Williams, 23, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop in the 6400 W. College Drive, at 10:59 p.m. last Thursday. Police said she was also cited for using a cellphone while driving

and driving without insurance. She is due in court on March 22. Christian M. Matthews, 25, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 4:47 p.m. Saturday, in the 11900 block of South Harlem Avenue. Court information was not available.. Abdelhadi Al-Kurdi, 50, of Orland Park, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 8:43 p.m. Friday, in the 7600 block of West 135th Street. Police said he was also cited for having no rear registration light. He is due in court on March 30. Kristan Greene, 21, of Riverdale, was charged with driving on a suspended license following a traffic stop at 11:22 a.m. Monday, in the 11900 block of South Harlem Avenue. Police said he was also cited for driving without insurance, a front license plate, or registration. Court information was not available.

PACC officers past and present pose for an informal photo at the Palos Country Club.

3

Photo by Tim Hadac

Palos Area Chamber toasts success New officers installed for 2017 By Tim Hadac Dozens of business leaders and other key figures in the community celebrated past success and toasted future growth and prosperity at the Palos Area Chamber of Commerce’s 27th annual dinner, held recently at the Palos Country Club. The event also served as an officers’ installation. Incoming President Barb Bergamo drew a few smiles and nods of recognition from chamber veterans as she gently joked about how she was slowly drawn into a leadership role. “[Chamber leaders] asked me to join and said, ‘We need somebody who will move up and whatever’… so they picked on me, and little did I know…I said, ‘Oh yeah, sure, I’ll do it.’ So I did.” Kidding aside, Bergamo singled out her co-workers at CNB Bank for praise. “I do really have to thank my colleagues here at CNB Bank because the job does require a lot of time; and fortunately, I work with a great group of people,” she said. “And I do work closely with the mayor (Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz, a CNB executive); that does help, yes. They have given me the opportunity to serve on the board—which to me has been an awesome thing. So to my fellow employees at CNB Bank, thank you so much.” In keeping with tradition, several awards were given to outstanding members of the community. The President’s Award went to former Regional News Publisher Amy Richards, a PACC past president who was saluted for her “selfless giving to the community” by 2016 PACC President Bill Flowers, of Edward Jones investments. “It’s amazing how many things you’ve done for this chamber. We wouldn’t be in the good position we are without you,” Flowers said to Richards. “You’ve been an incredible inspiration to the community.” Also earning awards for leadership and service to the community were the League of Women Voters of the Palos-Orland Area, the Palos Heights Parks and Recreation Department, the Palos Park Public Library, Palos Heights TV (Channel 4) and outgoing PACC President Bill Flowers. Installed as PACC officers for 2017 were Flowers as chairman of the board, Bergamo as president, Stacy Schuble (digital marketing consultant) as vice president, Marty Linderborg as secretary, and Jim Daemicke (Daemicke Financial Group) and Stephen Georgiou (Computer Greeks) as treasurers. Serving on the board of directors are Michael Barbari, First Midwest Bank; Lori Mazeika, Palos Hospital; Bridget Sullivan, Waddell & Reed; Tom

Photo by Tim Hadac

Outgoing PACC President Bill Flowers accepts an award from his successor, 2017 President Barb Bergamo.

Mintle, Schmaedeke Funeral Home; Michelle Horist, Noral Jewelers, and Veronica Avila, First Merchants Bank. Continuing as PACC executive director is Mary Kay Spindler. “The chamber is there for you to use,” Bergamo told the audience. “If there is anything the chamber can do to help your business, or if you have any type of civic group you need help with, please call on the chamber. We are more than willing to help you out with any endeavors that we can. That’s what we’re here for.” Business owners and others interested in PACC membership are encouraged to call (708) 480-3025 or send a message to info@palosareachamber.org.


4 Thursday, February 16, 2017

Stalemate will result in huge tax hike You may have read a news story or two about the latest blistering report from New York-based S&P Global Ratings about Illinois’ fiscal and economic woes. But it’s far more brutal than anything reported by the media, and it pretty obviously lays the blame for much of the morass at Gov. Bruce Rauner’s doorstep while calling on legislators to assert “governing control.”  The title of the report was: “For Illinois, Having A Plan Beats No Plan.” That title refers to the Illinois Senate’s bipartisan attempt to forge a “grand bargain” of a balanced budget and non-budgetary reforms. The credit ratings agency took no position on the Senate plan itself, but claimed “if lawmakers were to begin asserting governing control over state finances, that could help alleviate some of the pressure currently bearing down on Illinois’ credit quality.” “Illinois’ fiscal crisis is, in our view, a man-made byproduct of policy ultimatums placed upon the state’s budget process,” S&P analysts wrote, then immediately added, “As we see it, the governor interpreted his election in 2014 as a mandate to pursue various institutional changes that the legislature has steadfastly opposed.” To my eyes, those two connected sentences blame Gov. Rauner and his longstanding refusal to negotiate a real budget that balances revenues and spending until his non-budgetary demands were approved by Democrats who could not ideologically accept most of them. Maybe you think you haven’t felt any direct effects of the stalemate.  But maybe you just didn’t realize that our state’s declining economic well-being of late is related to the inability of our Statehouse leaders to get their acts together. “We believe Illinois’ distressed fiscal condition and dysfunctional budget politics now threaten to erode the state’s long-term economic growth prospects,” S&P wrote. The agency claimed residents and businesses had already begun to “vote with their feet” to flee the state’s governing disaster. “(W)e have viewed the ability in the U.S. of residents to migrate easily from state to state as providing an implicit check on gross mismanagement. The recent outmigration pattern seen in the Census Bureau data suggests this phenomenon may have begun to assert itself in Illinois to the detriment of the state’s economic outlook.” In other words, lots of people are leaving Illinois because the government is so screwed up, and that’s making our economic situation even worse; which will, of course, worsen our government’s fiscal problems. With S&P blaming the governor so directly, it should be no surprise that some Democrats and labor union leaders still don’t want to negotiate with Rauner. But here are a few scary numbers for those who insist that the governor shouldn’t be given any political “wins” by acceding to some of his demands for non-budgetary items. Let’s start with $27.7 billion, the official projection of the state’s unpaid bill backlog for June 30, 2019, the end of Fiscal Year 2019. The Governor’s Office of Management and Budget projects the backlog will rise about $7 billion a year.  So, by January 2019, when the next governor is sworn into office halfway through that fiscal year, the backlog will be about $24 billion. Because so many state vendors, particularly social service providers, aren’t being paid on time, the Senate’s grand bargain includes borrowing $7 billion to pay off many of the state’s overdue bills. The plan budgets a billion dollars a year to make the bond payments. So, a similar plan to pay off vendors by whoever wins the 2018 governor’s race would have to borrow at least three times that amount, pushing the bond payments to more than $3 billion per year. That’s equal to about a percentage point increase in the personal income tax rate--just to make the bond payments. It’ll also cost a lot more to equalize state spending with revenues by then, particularly if the economy tanks into a recession, when revenues fall and spending pressures rise. But even that prediction is optimistic because it assumes financial institutions will actually loan Illinois that kind of money, which, by then, would equal 81.5 percent of total projected revenues.  Or, if they do, the interest rates will be usurious because the state’s credit rating will almost definitely be in junk bond territory by then.  Can you imagine how high the tax hike will have to go if Illinois can’t get a loan to pay off those vendors, or has to shell out for payday loan-level interest rates? If a Democrat does defeat Rauner, he or she probably wouldn’t be reelected because the first thing that new governor will have to do is jack those tax rates up to unheard-of levels. Food for thought.   

OPINION

The Regional News

RICH MILLER

Common sense approach to illegal immigration needed Not being a politician, President Trump probably rushed too quickly to crack down on the nation’s immigration problem. America has an immigration problem that’s not about losing jobs or even protecting civil rights; but rather is about being able to control who enters this country to keep the criminals out. An estimated 13 million illegal immigrants live in America. President Trump and others estimate about 3 million of them are engaged in crimes, other than being illegal. A common problem involves illegal immigrants who drive without insurance and get in accidents with other citizens who are left holding the bag. The illegal immigrant can hide and “disappear,” leaving the victim dealing with the terrible costs of bad accidents that sometimes involve serious injuries and hospitalization costs. That’s unfair. Illinois adopted a law allowing illegal immigrants to obtain a special driver’s license if they obtain insurance and pass basic driving instructions, including knowing and understanding English. It helps, but it’s not a solution. Politics has enflamed the debate, pushing people to either the extreme right or the extreme left. We need to get people back in the middle. The common-sense approach mandates a system that stops the illegal flow of immigration into America not just from Mexico, but from Canada, too. Both Canada and Mexico have large immigration. Canada will arrest and deport you, while Mexico did the same until only a few years ago. The largest illegal immigration into Mexico comes from Guatemala.

Trump’s idea to build a wall sounds worse than it really is. All he is doing is reinforcing border restrictions that are in place to prevent people from entering the country illegally. We must know who is coming in and who is going out to protect our citizens. Every nation does the same thing. Many of the illegals crossing the border are like El Chapo Guzman, the murderous drug kingpin who runs the Sinaloa Drug Cartel and who has taken the lives of hundreds of thousands of innocent people including many Americans. El Chapo crisscrossed the Mexican-U.S. border for years but was arrested in 1993. He managed to bribe his way out of a Mexican jail, exploiting Mexico’s massive government corruption. He was only recently re-arrested and extradited to the United States where hopefully he will rot until he dies. Sinaloa is but one of a dozen cartels that operate in Mexico but rely on bribery and violence to protect their drug sales. The politics of immigration fuels the anger and the growing hatred that has divided this country. On the right, there is tendency to want to crack down hard. On the left, there is a tendency to issue a blanket amnesty and leave the borders open

READERS WRITE Palos Heights Woman’s Club hails efforts of retired editor

Jack Murray retiring — how sad. Jack has been with The Regional for over 25 years. He has been a friend of mine for many of those years. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax, a daily political newsletHe has been a friend of the ter, and CapitolFax.com. Palos Heights Woman’s Club for many years. The Palos Heights Woman’s Club owes much to Jack, as he attended many of our fund-raising events, meetings and social events. Jack always felt that the PHWC was an intricate part of Palos Heights and what we did for the community — The Gazebo in the Park, the bronze Owned and operated by Southwest Regional Publishing Co. statue outside the library, the Mark Hornung, Chief Operating Officer circulation desk in the library and the anniversary garden at The Business Side The News Side Lake Katherine. Donna Brown, Sales Director Jeff Vorva and Tim Hadac, Jack was always there to Monica Cotter, Finance Director Interim Editors take pictures, write articles and Debbie Perrewe, Classified Manager Dermot Connolly, Reporter cheer us on. He was always Mike Russell, Production Director Jeff Vorva, Sports Editor Rita Crosley, Pre-press Manager Lauren Ziemann, Art Director very interested in what we were Chuck Ingwersen, Designer doing for the community and made sure that the city of Palos Southwest Regional Publishing Heights was also aware of our 12243 S. Harlem Ave. endeavors. Palos Heights, IL 60463 We, the PHWC, hope that Phone: (708) 448-4000 the lady or gentleman taking Fax: (708) 448-4012 Jack’s place, which of course is Website: www.theregionalnews.com a difficult job to undertake, will email: TheRegional@comcast.net also see what our club does for the community and be aware Office hours: Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. of our future endeavors. We Deadlines look forward to working with Editorial: Noon, Saturday • Advertising: 5 p.m., Monday that person on publicity, letters Subscription rates: Local, delivered by mail, $48 a year in advance. Out-of-State, $58 to the editor, and many other a year. Single copies, $1. Postmaster: Send address changes to THE REGIONAL NEWS, functions. 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. We will miss Jack. We will miss his smile, his admiraThe Regional News cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material. USPS 419-260 Periodical postage paid at Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. tion for our city, and his good Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Palos Heights, IL, 60643 and nature. additional post offices under the Act of March 3, 1879. — Celeste Kappel, Palos Heights © Entire contents copyright 2015 Southwest Regional Publishing This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.

RAY HANANIA

for anyone to enter. “I fault people like Congressman Luis Gutierrez, who has advocated for immigration reform for two decades but has achieved nothing because he refuses to compromise. But Gutierrez benefits politically from the debate. As long as illegal immigration remains unresolved,  he will benefit politically.” The politics of illegal immigration needs to stop. In 1986, President Reagan signed a sweeping immigration reform bill that gave amnesty to every illegal immigrant  in the country before 1982. He also said he would tighten the border to prevent more foreigners from illegally entering the country, but he failed. And the problem started all over again. There is a middle ground. We need a reasonable immigration policy that imposes effective controls on who enters to keep the bad guys like El Chapo out. It also needs to show compassion for many illegal immigrants who have lived here for years abiding by our other laws while the issue has remained unresolved. No one has proposed a common-sense middle ground solution to end the problem. We can’t do that if everyone takes sides and calls each other names, fear-mongering for political benefit. That’s the real immigration challenge we face.     Ray Hanania is an award winning former Chicago City Hall reporter and political columnist. Email him at  rghanania@gmail. com.

Salutes commitment of retired editor For 25 years, Jack Murray,

a well-respected and prominent journalist, was a major contributor in multiple awards in the name of The Regional News newspaper. Jack was a champion and fearless fighter of all causes good for the betterment of our community’s children, schools, clubs, arts, businesses, parks, recreation, police, fire protection, places of worship and the elderly. Jack was never afraid to ask the most difficult of questions, which often times disturbed us and raised our consciousness. If you ever cut out a Regional newspaper photo of your child, club or organization, please thank Jack. Sadly, due to health complications, Jack has retired as editor of The Regional News. After 25 years of journalistic showcasing Palos Heights, Jack is in need of our help. We are honored to know Palos Heights’ very own “George Bailey.” Please show your gratitude for Jack by giving us a glimpse of “A Wonderful Life” by going to: https://www.gofundme.com/ jackmurray. — Mary Sodetz, Palos Heights

Finds Trump’s comments, actions impeachable Well, here we go again. President Trump has shown the world that he had no manners. Judge James Robart, of the U.S. District Court in the state of Washington, ordered a nationwide temporary restraining order against a travel ban for refugees that President Trump had ordered against seven countries. When President Trump was notified, he responded by saying, “This so-called judge,” and then called it ridiculous. It is evident that Mr. Trump does not understand the Constitution or the court system. Now Trump says that “if anything happens,

blame him (the judge).” That reaction is so juvenile. President Trump had an executive order for a travel ban against seven countries that just so happen to be Muslim countries. There was no reason to just pick on these seven countries. No person or persons had any connection to the 9-11 incidents from those countries. However, there is one country that has had 15 persons of the 19 involved in 9-11 and that country was Saudi Arabia. That question has to be asked of Mr. Trump and his chief assistant, Steve Bannon, as to why Saudi Arabia is not on the list of countries to be banned from travel? Fortunately, the Appeals Court in Washington upheld the stay on the travel ban. The refugees and immigrants can come into the U.S. Another of Trump’s major insults was the very derogatory comments he made about Judge Criel, of the U.S. District Court, who was to hear Trump’s case about his Trump University. He claimed that the judge was no good because he had Mexican parents. It is hard to imagine anyone saying such an insult, but especially a person who is our president. Australia has been a true friend of the U.S. In time of peace and war, they were with us. President Trump has embarrassed the American people again by having a heated exchange about the refugee issue by telephone with Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister of Australia. If President Trump does not control his conduct with Iran, he could get the U.S. into a nuclear war. There are peaceful ways to talk with an adversary about critical issues. But he has not demonstrated any professional conduct on any issue. If Trump starts a war with Iran,

they will answer by sending most of their nuclear weaponry aimed into Israel. Then it gets complicated! The American people deserve an honorable president and in only four weeks, he is not fit to be our president. The U.S. Congress should start the impeachment process for his removal from office now. — Dean Koldenhoven, Palos Heights

Ditto to letters on violence, immigration The letters in the Readers Write section of The Regional News on Feb. 2, from Sean M. Morrison, 17th District Cook County Commissioner, and Joseph Murzanski of Palos Heights reflect reality. There are multiple issues to be concerned about — unlike the single issue that Dean Koldenhoven of Palos Heights refers to as the “U.S. Refugee Resettlement System.” It takes a lot of intestinal fortitude (guts) for Sean Morrison to ask, “What will it take for the brutal reality of violence to hit home for elected officials of Chicago and Cook County to take additional action above and beyond existing measures?” He goes on to say, “We cannot continue to repeat the same conversation and apply the same stagnant strategies and methods to no avail.” Joseph Murzanski of Palos Heights says that “President Trump has identified the challenges that face Americans and is quickly acting upon them — the national debt, defense, immigration, infra-structure, foreign trade, jobs and terrorism are but a few issues that need to be addressed.” The refugee issue is related to illegal immigration, along with sanctuary cities that President Trump rightly questions. — Mary Cvack, Palos Park


BUSINESS

The Regional News

FINANCIAL FOCUS

What’s smarter – paying off debts or investing? If you’re just starting out in your career, you will need to be prepared to face some financial challenges along the way — but here’s one that’s not unpleasant: choosing what to do with some extra disposable income. When this happens, what should you do with the money? Your decisions could make a real difference in your ability to achieve your important financial goals. Under what circumstances might you receive some “found” money? You could get a year-end bonus from your employer, or a sizable tax refund, or even an inheritance. However the money comes to you, don’t let it “slip through your fingers.” Instead, consider these two moves: investing the money or using it to pay off debts. Which of these choices should you pick? There’s no one “right” answer, as everyone’s situation is different. But here are a few general considerations: • Distinguish between “good” and “bad” debt. Not all types of debt are created equal. Your mortgage, for example, is probably a “good” form of debt. You’re using the loan for a valid purpose — i.e., living in your house — and you likely get a hefty tax deduction for the interest you pay. On the other hand, nondeductible consumer debt that carries a high interest rate might be considered “bad” debt — and this is the debt you might want to reduce or eliminate when you receive some extra money. By doing so, you can free up money to save and invest for retirement or other goals. • Compare making extra mortgage payments vs. investing. Many of us get some psychological benefits by making extra house payments. Yet, when you do have some extra money, putting it toward your house may not be the best move. For one thing, as mentioned above, your mortgage can be considered a “good” type of debt, so you may not need to rush to pay it off. And from an investment standpoint, your home is somewhat “illiquid” — it’s not always easy to get money out of it. If you

COMINGS & GOINGS

Edward Jones

put your extra money into traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds, you may increase your growth potential, and you may gain an income stream through interest payments and dividends. • Consider tax advantages of investing. Apart from your mortgage, your other debts likely won’t provide you with any tax benefits. But you can get tax advantages by putting money into certain types of investment vehicles, such as a traditional or Roth IRA. When you invest in a traditional IRA, your contributions may be deductible, depending on your income, and your money grows on a tax-deferred basis. (Keep in mind that taxes will be due upon withdrawals, and any withdrawals you make before you reach 59½ may be subject to a 10% IRS penalty.) Roth IRA contributions are not deductible, but your earnings are distributed tax-free, provided you don’t take withdrawals until you reach 59½ and you’ve had your account at least five years. Clearly, you’ve got some things to ponder when choosing whether to use “extra” money to pay off debts or invest. Of course, it’s not always an “either-or” situation; you may be able to tackle some debts and still invest for the future. In any case, use this money wisely — you weren’t necessarily counting on it, but you can make it count for you. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

‘Buy American’ requirements are already law. This commonsense, bipartisan legislation is especially important now with interest from the President and the new Congress in passing a comprehensive and transformative transportation infrastructure bill.” The bill also sets domestic content standards for indirect purchases by U.S. Department of Transportation grantees, ensuring that tax dollars spent on aviation, highway, transit, and rail infrastructure will support U.S. manufacturing and mining jobs, rather than jobs in other countries. While “Buy America” has traditionally applied only to transportation projects, Lipinski said his bill would expand these requirements to a number of other federal grant programs. Lipinski said his legislation will help American companies

and workers by requiring federal agencies to publicly disclose “Buy American” waivers in the Federal Register and to explain their justification for the waiver. He added that this will also create a consolidated annual report that lists the total amount and dollar value of all foreign purchases and the number of waivers granted. This transparency will allow American companies to see where there are opportunities to sell to the federal government and put more Americans to work. Other organizations endorsing the bill include the AFL-CIO Transportation Trades Department, BlueGreen Alliance, Coalition for a Prosperous America, International Association of Machines and Aerospace Workers, Lake Carriers’ Association, Steel Manufacturers Association, Teamsters, and United Steelworkers.

Together We Cope to host fundraiser Together We Cope celebrates its annual dinner dance and auction at 7 p.m. Friday, March 3 at the Odyssey Country Club, 19110 S. Ridgeland Ave., Tinley Park. Reservations, at $100 per person, can be made by calling (708) 263-0302, ext. 6101 or krogge@ togetherwecope.org. This year’s event celebrates the courage of the agency’s client families, the dedication of TWC’s volunteers, compassion

of the staff and generosity of the donors. The dinner dance is Together We Cope’s major fundraiser each year, and supports client programs for food, clothing, shelter and emergency funds. Together We Cope is a nonprofit homeless prevention agency based in Tinley Park and serving residents of 27 south suburban communities. The evening includes a buffet dinner, open bar and entertainment by Chicago Keys Dueling

Pianos. Hundreds of items are featured in a silent auction, while other grand prizes will be offered in a live auction. Raffle prizes include $1,000 cash, a diamond and ruby necklace, and a 40-inch HD Smart TV. Several levels of sponsorships, as well as event program advertising, are available by contacting Linda Lopez, director of development, at (708) 263-0302, ext. 6104.

Photo by Bob Bong

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers restaurant now open in Oak Lawn.

Raising Cane’s opens in Oak Lawn Louisiana-based Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers opened its second Chicago-area restaurant in Oak Lawn on Valentine’s Day. The first opened Jan. 31 in North Riverside. The location at 11006 S. Cicero Ave. is the site of the former Abracadabra Salon and Spa and opened to the public at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 14. “The people of North Riverside welcomed our first area restaurant with open arms just a couple of weeks ago, and we can’t wait to start sharing our one love with Oak Lawn,” General Manager Melissa Cowell said in a release. “My awesome crew and I have already started partnering with the local community and we’re looking forward to opening our doors and showing our new neighbors just how great chicken finger meals can be.” Along with its focus on chicken fingers, Raising Cane’s is renowned for its commitment to active involvement in its local communities. On Feb. 8, Cowell and her fellow crewmembers volunteered their time at the Children’s Museum in Oak Lawn, interacting with the kids during story time and at the building stations and arts and crafts areas. The crew also helped with a deep cleaning of the facility. “The Children’s Museum is one of the true treasures of Oak Lawn, so we we’re honored to pitch in there for our pre-opening service project,” said Cowell. “And we’re just getting started with our outreach initiatives. We’ll be partnering with the schools and other local organizations in the coming weeks and months to do our part to support this wonderful community.” Hours will be Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to midnight. The eatery has about 75 employees. The company was founded by Todd Graves in 1996 and named for his yellow Labrador. The Oak Lawn location is the 311th in the chain. A third Raising Cane’s is projected to open in Naperville in April.

Aldi unveils nationwide remodeling plan Aldi last week announced that it will spend $1.6 billion over the next three years to remodel and expand more than 1,300 stores in the U.S. including stores in

BOB BONG Frankfort and Orland Park. That’s on top of its $3 billion plan to open 650 new stores in the U.S. by the end of 2018. One of those new stores will be built at the corner of Archer and Harlem avenues in the Garfield Ridge neighborhood of Chicago across the street from southwest suburban Summit. A company spokesman said, “We are committed to opening an Aldi store in Chicago at Archer Avenue and Harlem Avenue, with construction currently planned to begin in spring 2017 and an anticipated opening by the end of 2017.” The new store will be built on the former site of Joe & Frank’s Market, which will be razed, along

with two other buildings immediately south on Harlem Avenue and a couple of nearby homes. The new store will be an L-shaped format similar to the Aldi location at 132nd Street and LaGrange Road in Orland Park. After the new store opens, a traditional warehouse-style store operated by Aldi at 5775 S. Archer will close.

Jeweler closes in Frankfort Dreher-Weber Jewelers at 21116 S. LaGrange in the Frankfort Crossing shopping center closed recently after 33 years in Frankfort. If you see a new business in town or wonder what happened to an old favorite, drop me a line at bobbong@hotmail.com. You can also catch up on Comings & Goings in other parts of the Southland at www.southlandbusinessnews.com and www. southlandsavvy.blogspot.com

Mortgage Rates Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of February 13) 30-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.125 4.160 0

15-year fixed

3.375

3.430

0

30-year fixed Jumbo

4.250

4.295

0

United Trust Bank (as of February 13) 30-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.125 4.146 0

15-year fixed

3.375

3.411

0

10-year fixed

3.250

3.303

0

Prospect Federal (as of February 13) 30-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.125 4.171 .25

20-year fixed

3.875

3.938

.25

15-year fixed

3.375

3.438

.25

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

IT’S TAX TIME ARE YOU READY? CALL A PROFESSIONAL

AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS Following are the property transfers in the area, according to the latest report, as received from the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office. The Regional News does not attempt to correct errors made by that office. Orland Park Vauvre Gina M De La to Shaker Ibrabim, 9219 Dexter Ct, $169,000; Holan Peggy to Naserallah Lamia, 11800 Boyne Ct, $294,000; Harrison Mark J to Reeves Eric, 15821 S 115th Ave, $376,500; Deutsche Bk Natl Trust Co to Pafia Krzysztof, 9200 140th St, Unit #202, $65,000; Wallenburg Mary F to Lapniewski Ronald R Jr, 14444 Maycliff Dr, $260,000; First Midwest Bk Tr to Gentile Tony, 15705 Brassie Ct, Unit

5

Jim Van Howe

Lipinski introduces ‘Buy American Improvement Act’ U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski (D-3rd) introduced the Buy American Improvement Act of 2017 that he said will create American jobs, promote the domestic manufacturing industry, increase transparency and accountability in government procurement, and ensure that taxpayer dollars are spent in the U.S. whenever practicable. “Despite the fact that too many Americans still can’t find good jobs, the federal government continues to buy many products outside our country instead of using our hard-earned tax dollars to buy American products and hire American workers,” said Lipinski. “The Buy American Improvement Act will change that. Specifically, my bill will apply ‘Buy American’ requirements to federal spending programs that are not covered in current law and will close gaping loopholes in programs where

Thursday, February 16, 2017

#157051N, $107,500; R Management & Investment Ltd to Peyton Daniel, 9865 Cordoba Ct, Unit #2D, $95,000; Standard B&T Co to Beran Michelle L, 7616 158th Ct, Unit #7616, $160,000; Bartelmey Keith L to Longawa Steve, 8311 Bob O’Link Rd, $270,000; Kesmat LLC to Pupo Daniel J, 11917 Old Spanish Rd, $342,000; Wolf Allen Jr to Glikis Paul P, 8224 Spyglass Cir, $330,500; Standard B&T Co Tr to Lukosevicius Almantas, 11131 Wisconsin Ct, Unit #3D, $112,500; Homeland Grp Inc to Kweder Kenneth E, 14050 Putney Pl, $353,000; Mccormick Michael R Tr to Sood Gagan, 10126 151st St, $151,000; Keenan Timothy to Atieh Fad-

waz, 9143 Fairmont Ct, Unit #62, $130,000; Braun & Aldridge Inc to Dorsey William P, 10554 Huntington Ct, $120,000; Davis Grover J to Wojtas Theodore J, 18154 Vermont Ct, Unit #244, $228,500; Grgantov Debra Ann Tr to Mullaney Linda M Tr, 17525 Kelsey Ln, $382,500; Kruk Arkadiusz to Mohammad Mahmud, 14051 Norwich Ln, Unit #304, $184,000; Kintonis Chris J Tr to Logan Daniel, 7807 Silver Ct, $345,000; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Szewczyk Dariusz S, 7512 Halasia Ct, $280,000. Palos Heights Ohara Jean C Tr to Xeros Helen, 12255 S Ridgeland Ave, Unit #4B1, $152,000;

Tyler Walter B Tr to Horn Janel, 12311 Nagle Ave, $356,000; Campbell June G Tr to Esposito Robert W, 13487 Turtle Pond Ln, Unit #13487, $341,000; Judicial Sales Corp to Masterbuilt LLC, 32 S Country Squire Rd, $220,500; Svanascini Michael to Simpson Patrick, 7309 S Choctaw Rd, $405,000. Palos Park Janik Pawel to Anthunadan Priya, 12852 82nd Ct, $510,000; Judicial Sales Corp to Capuano James J, 10400 W Bloomfield Dr, $340,000; Marquette Bk Tr to Mcelroy Thomas C, 11556 Old Prague Path, $212,000.

LIST YOUR TAX SERVICES HERE! Call 708-448-4000 and ask for Donna Brown for pricing, sizes and more information!


6 Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Regional News

DEATH NOTICES Donald R. Busch

Donald R. Busch age 83 of Palos Heights. Veteran U.S. Air Force Pilot who flew the F86 Sabre Fighter Jet. Beloved Husband for 56 years to Arlene nee Christensen. They were one of the first couples to be married in St. Alexander Church in Palos Heights.  Dear Father of Debra Walsh, Don ( Beth ) Busch & Jacqueline Jensen. Grandfather of Michael Walton, Joseph & Nicole Walsh, Heather & Mark Busch and Kimberly ( Greg ) Humiston. Brother of the Late Robert ( the late Grace ), Joan ( Jim ) Johnson, the Late William ( the late Christiane ), Margaret ( the late Gene ) Piraino, Dave ( the late Marilyn ), Paul ( Glenda ) & Michael ( Ellen ) Busch.  

Also surviving are many cousins, nieces and nephews.   Lifelong resident of the Palos area. The Busch family were the original settlers of the Palos Heights area. Memorial Visitation Saturday Feb. 18, 2017 9 am until time of Services 12 pm at the Kerry Funeral Home 7020 W. 127th Street Palos Heights, Il. Interment Private 50 year member of the International Union of Operating Engineers. In Lieu of Flowers memorials to St. Alexander Church 7025 W. 126th St. Palos Heights, Il. 60463 would be appreciated. www.kerryfh.com-708.361.4235-www.facebook. com/kerryfuneral

Jacob ‘Jack’ Weglarz Supplied photo

Owner Jim Long, Office Manager Deb Harmon, and the Molly Maid employees deliver baby donations collected for the Crisis Center during their annual Domestic Violence Awareness month drive.

Crisis Center awardees announced Longtime Crisis Center for South Suburbia supporters Patrick and Susan Frangella will be presented the Dianne Masters Award at the Crisis Center’s annual Heart to Heart Gala, set for Saturday, March 4 at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Alsip. “This prestigious award is named after the founder of the organization and recognizes individuals who emulate Dianne’s vision, commitment, and ability to overcome obstacles while creating a brighter future for men, women and children in crisis,” officials said in a statement. “Patrick and Susan are staunch supporters of community non-profits and regularly offer their assistance to help those in need,” officials added. “They show a consistent commitment to raising awareness and needed funding for victims of domestic violence. Their interest in the Crisis Center of South Suburbia began when a family member was in need of the services provided by the center.” “The Crisis Center guided our family member and provided much needed support at a critical time,” said Patrick Frangella. “We will be forever grateful to CCSS and are truly honored and humbled to be the recipient of the 2017 Dianne Masters Award.” The Crisis Center will present two other awards at the benefit,

including the Corporate Recognition Award, which recognizes consistent business donors who make significant contributions while demonstrating strong support for the Crisis Center’s mission. The 2017 Award will be presented to Molly Maid of Southwest Cook County, which has been a partner with the Crisis Center for South Suburbia since 2000. Owner Jim Long has worked with the Ms. Molly Foundation to provide the Crisis Center with annual donations in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The annual effort has resulted in thousands of dollars’ worth of in-kind donations. In addition, Ms. Molly Foundation and Molly Maid Southwest Cook County have granted more than $18,400 to the Crisis Center as a result of the Molly Maid participation. Most importantly, the efforts of the Molly Maid employees, under the leadership of Jim Long and Debbie Harmon, help to raise awareness of domestic violence throughout the community. The Crisis Center’s Courage Award recognizes an individual or organization that emulates selflessness, dedication and commitment to the CCSS mission under adverse conditions. This year’s award will be presented to Cyn-

thia Saldana, a staff member of the Crisis Center’s Court Advocacy Program. “In early 2016, Cynthia’s husband was shot and killed on the driveway of their home by Cynthia’s ex-husband,” according to a Crisis Center statement. “Cynthia suffered tremendously with not only the loss of her husband and the father of her four children, but emotionally and financially, as well. Despite these challenges, Cynthia returned to work as a court advocate, helping other victims of domestic violence.” The Heart to Heart Gala will include cocktails, a delectable four-course dinner, silent and live auctions, Grand Raffle with a top prize of $5,000, entertainment by The Jimmy O and Rhonda Lee Duo, and WGN Radio’s Andrea Darlas as emcee. Gala tickets ($100), raffle tickets, program ad space and sponsorship opportunities are still available. Interested parties can contact Christopher Beele at (708) 429-7255, ext. 118 for reservations and additional information. The Crisis Center for South Suburbia’s mission is to provide emergency shelter and other essential services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence and address the societal issues that contribute to domestic violence.

Crisis Center appoints new director Pamela Kostecki has been appointed as the new executive director of the Crisis Center of South Suburbia. “The Crisis Center has and will continue to play a unique and vital role in services for victims of domestic violence. The Pamela Kostecki Crisis Center is blessed with passionate employees, dedicated to ending the suffering that violence has fostered in their lives,” Kostecki said. “I am honored to have the opportunity to lead this amazing team of professionals in engaging the community, our stakeholders, and critical community partners to fully realize our shared vision for a world free of violence. ” Kostecki has over than 20 years of non-profit experience to her role, including direct services to homeless individuals, veterans, children, students and others.

The staff at the Crisis Center said that Kostecki’s experience as an executive director, adjunct professor, social worker, counselor and program manager makes her qualified for this new position. She also has experience in crisis intervention, conflict management, program development and management, along with analytical thinking and strategic planning will be valuable assets to her work at the Crisis Center, according to staff members. The Crisis Center for South Suburbia’s mission is to provide emergency shelter and other essential services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence and address the societal issues that contribute to domestic violence. “The board’s action comes with the fullest confidence that Ms. Kostecki will be an excellent steward of the Crisis Center’s mission, as well as a leader and advocate for our clients,” said David Anders, board president for Crisis Center for South Suburbia.

A meditation class is set for 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. Thursdays, Feb. 16 and 23, March 2, 9 and 16, and April 6, 20 and 27 at Orland Township headquarters, 14807 S. Ravinia. Class fee is $50 ($58 non-residents). Registration is required in person and must be done on Friday, Feb. 10, any time from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Certified hypnotherapist Renee Oswald will teach the meditation class.

Palos Health offers heart classes Palos Health is offering two heart-health classes later this month. Classes all take in the Palos Hospital auditorium, 12251 S. 80th Ave., Palos Heights. There is no charge, although reservations are encouraged. To register, visit paloshealth.com and

Charles Taylor

Charles W. Taylor, 94, died Sunday at his Palos Park home. Mr. Taylor was a circulation manager for trade magazines Survivors include his wife, Nataliya (nee Zhydyk); son, John S. Taylor; sister, Beverly Norton; and one grandchild. Visitation is from 3 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 at Schmaedeke Funeral Home, 10701 S. Harlem Ave, Worth. Services will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 at the funeral home. Entombment will take place at Fairmount Willow Hills Memorial Park.

Audrey Swanson

Renee M. Zatarski

Renee M. Zatarski (nee Dziwak), 59, died Monday at Palos Hospital. Mrs. Zatarski worked for many years with the Patio Restaurant-Bridgeview Restaurant. Survivors include her husband, Perry; son, Brian; sisters, Cheryl Lea and Dee School; brothers, Robbie Dziwak and Earl Jones; father, Robert Jones; and many other relatives and friends. Visitation is from 3 to 9 p.m. today (Thursday, Feb. 16) at the Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home, 11028 Southwest Highway, Palos Hills. Services are10:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 17 at the funeral home to St. Alexander Church, 7025 W. 126th St.,, Palos Heights, for 11:30 a.m. Mass.

For more information, call (708) 361-0219. PLOWS is a non-profit agency assisting seniors living in Palos, Lemont, Orland and Worth townships.

CLUB ACTIVITIES

The Southwest Suburban Widow/Widowers Social Club will meet from 7 to 9 pm Fridays, March 3 and April 7 at Zion Lutheran Church, 17100 S. 69th Ave., Tinley Park. The social club offers support to widowed of all faiths and ages. Some of its activities include monthly general meetings, restaurant outings, dances, trips and theater outings. For more information, call Danell Chmura at (630) 728-9368 or Bill Dolehide at (708) 342-6820.

click on Classes & Events. igible to receive an immunization • “Don’t Skip a Beat! Under- free of charge. A Medicare Part standing Atrial Fibrillation” is set B card must be presented at the for 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, time of vaccination. Those with an Advantage Medicare plan are Feb. 21. People who experience an irreg- not eligible for a free vaccination. Children 18 years of age and ular and/or rapid heart rate are at an increased risk of stroke, heart younger may also receive a vacfailure and other heart-related cination free of charge. Eligibility complications. Learn how medi- requirements apply. To make an appointment, call cations and other alterations can help manage this condition with- (708) 403-4222. out skipping your daily activities. • “In the Thick of It: Life on Blood Thinners” is scheduled for 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28 Puzzle on Page 7 Puzzle on Page 7 Palos Health pharmacists will answer all medication questions, including how blood thinners work and how to take them effectively.

Answers

Orland Township is offering flu shots for seniors 65 and older at the township office, 14807 S. Ravinia, by appointment. Residents 65 and older with Medicare Part B are el-

Visitation is from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 at Colonial Chapel, 15525 S. 73rd Ave., Orland Park. Mrs. Swanson will be lying in state from 10 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 when services begin at Trinity Lutheran Church, 6850 W. 159th St., Tinley Park. Interment will follow at Trinity Lutheran Cemetery.

SENIOR NOTES

Widowed will meet

Flu shots still available from Orland Twp.

10 hotels and 5 restaurants in Bedford Park. In honor of Jack’s contributions to their community, Bedford Park renamed West 67th Street “Jacob Weglarz Drive”. Jack loved adventure, and one of his great passions he shared with family and friends was boating. Jack enjoyed travelling on his boat on the Great Lakes, the Mississippi River, the Bahamas, the eastern seaboard from the Florida Keys to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the islands of the Caribbean. He was a member of the Chicago Yacht Club and the Ocean Reef Club of Key Largo, Florida, where he spent the winters of his retirement. He is survived by his loving wife, Cynthia, his sons, Jon, Mark (Vanya), grandchildren, Blake, Nate, and Olivia, many nieces and nephews, and his devoted caregivers Mirek and Jagoda Krajewski and Art Kohnhurst. Visitation will be Sunday at the Schmaedeke Funeral Home 10701 South Harlem Avenue, Worth, Il, from 3:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Family and Friends will gather Monday, February 20, 2017 at St. Alexander Catholic Church 7025 W 126th St. Palos Heights, IL. where a Mass of the Resurrection will be held at 10:00 A.M. Entombment Resurrection Cemetery, Justice, IL. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center of Palos Park, Capital Campaign, 9602 West Creek Road, Palos Park, Illinois 60464. Service information 708-448-6000 or www.schmaedekefuneralhome. com

Audrey L. Swanson, (nee Prange), 89, a Palos Park resident, died on Sunday. Mrs. Swanson was a homemaker. Survivors include a daughter, Barbara Anderson; “Her leadership and experience son, William Swanson; eight grandchildren; and are vital to the organization as seven great-grandchildren. we look forward with passion and vision to the future. “ A recipient of the Lewis University De La Salle Award for Service and Leadership in the CommuApplications must be filed by nity in 2009, Kostecki has been PLOWS to help March 1. PLOWS staff members recognized by her colleagues and with tax relief are available to screen seniors for the communities she has worked The PLOWS Council on Aging eligibility and assist with the apin for her strong work ethic and is advising people age 65 and older strategic leadership, according to to apply for a state program that plication process at no cost. the board. allows qualified persons to defer up Kostecki is a licensed clinical to $5,000 annually of the real estate social worker with the State of taxes on their personal residence. Many seniors living on fixed inIllinois. She holds a master’s decomes find that the Senior Citizen gree in social work from Aurora University and received her under- Real Estate Tax Deferral Program graduate education from Illinois allows them the financial freedom State University. She completed to remain in their own home, according to a PLOWS statement. the Mission-Based Leadership Deferred taxes are repaid with low and Organization Development interest at the time the property is program at Notre Dame Univer- sold or following the taxpayer’s sity, and is a certified trainer in death. Non-Violent Crisis Intervention. More information about the Crisis Center can be obtained at www.crisisctr.org.

HEALTH BEAT Orland Twp. sets meditation class

Jacob “Jack” Weglarz passed away peacefully on February 12th in his Palos Park home surrounded by family. He was born in Chicago, April 5, 1934, to John and Rose, who met and married in Chicago, after immigrating from Szczawnica, Poland. Jack was the youngest of four brothers, Henry, Roman, and John. He attended St. John of God grammar school, then Lindblom High School. He earned a degree in business education from Chicago Teachers College, taking two years off to serve in the U.S. Army in Korea. During college, he worked part time for Talman Savings & Loan. Following graduation, he received a fellowship from the University of Pittsburgh, where he earned a master’s degree in marketing and market research. He put his skills to work first as a buyer for Marshall Field in Chicago and then as a Market Analyst for American Standard Corporation, while rehabilitating homes as a side-business. This side business became his main business when Jack’s team scaled up and eventually rehabilitated thousands of homes in the Chicago Southland. In the process, Jack also became a prominent and innovative real estate broker, who created several brokerage companies and new marketing products to serve the community. Jack then became interested in creating his own real estate projects from the ground up, and was instrumental in the growth of many areas including Orland Park and the revitalization of the Midway airport area through his development of the Midway Hotel Center that now includes

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The Regional News

Thursday, February 16, 2017

7

CROSSWORD PUZZLE Shepard AP English students challenged to ‘change the world’ When they learn the depth of the “Change the World” assignment, it’s easy to imagine Shepard High School students with their jaws falling open. The project, a mountain of work comparable to what students will encounter in college courses, causes Advanced Placement English students to extend themselves as never before. But teacher Jeff Vazzana offers no apologies. “This is one of my favorite units from the whole year. Kids really get to put their English skills to work,” he said. Topics this year included food waste, altering the District 218 health curriculum, how minority groups can work together to benefit one another, how to help immigrant students adapt to America, and preventing animal cruelty. They interviewed experts or leaders in the community. Then, based on their research and interviews, they developed a plan of action to “change the world,” or at least an aspect of theirs. Finally, they must deliver a presentation to Vazzana and their peers on all they learned and the solutions they propose. While the enthusiasm and capabilities of the teams never surprises him, Vazzana found this year’s projects especially well-developed. “This year, the kids were particularly tenacious. They called mayors, interviewed (Shepard and District 218) administrators, and really dug deep to elicit the change they wanted to see. I’m proud of how above-and-beyond this group of students went,” he said. A good example: The group that studied how to prevent animal cruelty contacted the Animal Welfare League in Chicago Ridge to bring an injured dog to school. The presentation, featuring Mindy the Chihuahua, was conducted in this way “so that their classmates could really feel the effects of animal abuse,” Vaz-

Submitted photo

Shepard High School student Thamer Yasin holds Minday, a Chihuahua that had suffered terrible abuse before rescue. Yasin invited representatives from the Animal Welfare League to school to serve as guests during the presentation on prevention of animal cruelty — part of the “Change the World” project in AP English.

zana said. Such dedication offered a kind of subtext to the assignment: Students learned the extent of their capabilities. “This kind of work absolutely helps students in both the real world and in college. In the real world, people have to make phone calls, look people in the eye and ask questions, and figure out answers to problems. This project really helps them do just that — they get to take a look at the world around them, figure out what they don’t like about it, and try to make a change,” Vazzana said.

STUDENT NEWS Palos Heights resident makes Loyola list Palos Heights resident Anna Romando has been named to the first semester dean’s list at the College of Arts and Sciences of Loyola University of Chicago.

Palos Park woman earns honor at Kansas State University Palos Park resident Lindsey Finger has earned academic honors for the fall semester at Kansas State University. She is a senior majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. The criteria for semester honors at Kansas State University is the completion of at least 12 graded hours with a grade point average of 3.750 or above.

Local students earn University of Iowa honors A number of local students have been cited for academic excellence at the University of Iowa. Making the dean’s list for the fall semester were Orland Park residents Mark Biangmano, Nora Bush, Ally Carey, Jack Duffner, Casey Gartlan, Erik Krause, Daniel Kusper, Michael Leyden, Michael Moore, Mara O’Connor, Benjamin Salvador, Angela Schab,

Michael Vennetti, Tori Vennetti and Michael Zaremba. Palos Heights residents earning the honor include Karsyn Hettlinger, Trenton Hettlinger, Meagan Mueller and Elizabeth Stachowiak. Palos Park residents named to the list are Kathryn Gabel and Erin O’Leary.

Four local students earn University of Iowa degrees Four local students recently earned bachelor’s degrees from the University of Iowa. Orland Park resident Kyrstin Rogers was awarded a degree in Anthropology. Nicole Tatro, of Orland Park, received Biomedical Engineering degree. Nathan White, also of Orland Park, earned a Chemical Engineering degree. Palos Heights resident Zachary Zwierz received a degree in Health and Human Physiology.

Across 1 One capsule, say 5 Metaphorical sticking points 10 Jacob’s twin 14 App that connects riders with drivers 15 Hard pattern to break 16 Prominent giraffe feature 17 *Sing on key 19 Skedaddle 20 “Please, I’ve heard enough,” in texts 21 Speaker on a soapbox 22 Cutlass automaker 23 Jungle adventure 25 Store with Kenmore appliances 27 Sloppy 30 Corsage flower 33 Players in a play 36 Severely injure 38 Crystal-bearing rock 39 Illuminated 40 *Try, with “at” 42 Civil War soldier 43 Desert building brick 45 Fashion magazine that’s also a French pronoun 46 In-flight predictions: Abbr. 47 Trickery 49 Discourage 51 24-__ gold 53 Draft choices 57 Whitewater ride 59 One with a bleeping job 62 Feel sorry about 63 Notable periods 64 Make available, as merchandise ... and a hint to the start of the answers to starred clues 66 Law business 67 Entices 68 Continent explored by Marco Polo 69 “__ old thing” 70 Lyric poem 71 Neighbor of Kent. Down 1 Tear conduits

2 Bush successor 3 Sans __: type style 4 Make a mistake 5 Compelling charm 6 Pro __: in proportion 7 Share a border with 8 Lushes 9 Hi-fi system 10 Implement, as laws 11 *Underestimate 12 Breezed through, as a test 13 Luau instruments 18 Days of old 24 Tsp. or tbsp. 26 Constellation named for a mythological ship 28 Rescue 29 On-ramp sign 31 Original thought 32 Belles at balls 33 Not naked 34 Teacher’s helper

35 *Cattle enterprise 37 Bachelor party attendee 40 Estate beneficiary 41 Warm up for the game 44 “I’m baffled” 46 Unit of work 48 Bring down the running back 50 Make, as a living 52 Prepare to drive, as a golf ball 54 Wipe clean 55 Altercation 56 Family auto 57 Foul callers, at times 58 Operatic song 60 Fictional sleuth Wolfe 61 Went like the wind 65 It may be tipped by a gentleman (Answers on page 6)

SUDOKU The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

Orland Park student on dean’s list at Iowa State Orland Park resident Nicholas Waters has been named to the dean’s list at Iowa State University’s College of Human Sciences. Dean’s list students have earned a grade point average of 3.5 or higher.

(Answers on page 6)

LIBRARY NOTES Several new programs added at Palos Heights Library A slate of activities for the week ahead has been announced at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. For more information, or to register for a program, call (708) 448-1473. • “Book & Film Series” is set for 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb.16. The library will show the 96-minute film “Sully,” based on the book “Highest Duty” by Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger It stars Tom Hanks and is directed by Clint Eastwood. All participants will be entered into a raffle to win a paperback copy of the book.

• Author and licensed clinical psychologist Jessica Loftus will talk about her book “Tails of Bad Habits” as told by her cat, PurSneakity, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16. • “Sunday @ the Cinema” will feature the 111-minute film “Florence Foster Jenkins” at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19. Meryl Streep stars in this award winning film about the true story of Florence Foster Jenkins, a New York heiress who dreamed of becoming an opera singer, despite having a terrible singing voice. • “Getting Started With Mango Languages” is set for 2 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20. Discover how to access, create an account and get

started using Mango Languages. With more than 70 languages offered, Mango builds both language and cultural understanding around real-world communication skills. Basic computer skills required. • “Easy One-Pot Meals” starts at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21. Chef Rose Deneen will demonstrate three easy one-pot complete meals, including vegetable risotto, chicken and dumplings and macaroni and cheese. Learn how to use an electric pressure cooker to make the risotto. Samples and recipe handouts will be provided. Seating is limited. Registration is required. • “Tuesday Evening Book

Township Officials of Illinois (TOI) Scholarship are now available. This year, TOI will award seven $1,500 scholarships. Much like the Orland Township application, the eligibility criteria and application procedures are clearly stated within the application. The deadline for this application and all required documentation is Wednesday, March 1. “With tuition costs rising, the generosity of the donators to help these kids with their financial burden is a great investment not only in our community’s future, but for these bright, positive young minds as well,” Orland Township Supervisor Paul O’Grady added. “Many local students are in need of assistance as they embark into their next educational opportunity and having the chance to meet some of those early demands is something we are all very dedicated to providing.” For more information, call (708) 403-4222.

tured topic of the next Squeaky Weal lecture set for 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23 in the Warde Academic Center’s Butler Reception Room located on Saint Xavier University’s Chicago campus, 3700 W. 103rd St. Admission is free, and the event is open to the public. Featured lecturer is Sister Jeanne Christensen, RSM. Religious sisters “are among the leaders in efforts to raise awareness, rescue victims and eliminate this abuse in the world,” according to an SXU statement. Sister Christensen is a Justice Advocate for Human Trafficking for the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas. She serves on the Board of Directors of U.S. Catholic Sisters against Human Trafficking and chairs the educational resources group. Sister Christensen also works to educate the public on the issue of trafficking and efforts toward a solution. The Squeaky Weal Lecture Series, sponsored by Saint Xavier’s Center for Religion and Public Discourse, is designed to “provide occasions for thoughtful consideration of issues of public

SCHOOL NOTES Orland Twp. offers scholarships Applications for the 2017 Orland Township Scholarship Foundation scholarships are now available at the Orland Township office, 14807 S. Ravinia. Local high school guidance offices also are offering the applications. Completed applications are due by Friday, Feb. 24, and may be submitted in person at the Township office or by fax at (708) 403-4260. Township Supervisor Paul O’Grady, the President of the Scholarship Foundation, and the Township Board of Directors will approve 22 scholarships totaling $16,500 this year: one $2,000 scholarship, eight $1,000 scholarships, and 13 $500 scholarships. Scholarships for graduating high school seniors are awarded based on leadership skills, commitment to community service, academic history, extracurricular activities, recommendations, essay writing, and any additional relevant accomplishments. A selection committee reviews all the applications presented and judges the submissions on the criteria mentioned. Separately, applications for the

SXU to explore human trafficking Human trafficking is the fea-

Discussion” begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21. Come to the library to discuss “Homegoing” by Yaa Gyasi, a novel that traces a single bloodline across seven generations. Copies of the book are available at the front desk. New members always welcome. • “Basic Genealogy” starts at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22. Want to research your family history but don’t know where Photo by Joe Boyle to start? Join Public Services Librarian Beth Stevens for this introduction to the basics of genealogy research. Discover how to The clue for this week’s Whatizit photo (above) is: Water walk. use Internet and library resources Send your responses with your name and hometown by noon Monto help build your family tree day to thereporter@comcast.net. and how to interpret and record We had a few readers who knew last week’s photo quiz. The correct the data you collect. answer was the Hamilton B. Maher Community Center at 3450 97th St., just across the street from Klein Park (also known as Circle Park) in Evergreen Park. This was previously a school and is now used as a recreation facility where a variety of meetings also take place. Evergreen Park resident Rich Rahn had the right answer. Evergreen Park resident John Schikora also knew it was the Hamilton B. Maher concern, with a focus on religious, Community Center. John informed us that Maher was a justice of moral, and/or ethical implications the peace until 1964 when the state removed that position. He was for the common good,” according elected village clerk in1965 and served until 1985, when he died at to an SXU statement. For more 85 years of age. Oak Lawn resident Steve Rosenbaum also knew it was the Maher information, contact the Center for Center. He said he knew Maher personally and mentioned that he Religion and Public Discourse at was known by his nickname of “Ham.” (773) 298-3809.

WHATIZIT?

Palos Heights Seniors Club Welcomes New Members! The Palos Heights Seniors Club is welcoming new members during February at their new meeting location, The Palos Heights Recreation Department. The club meets at 1 p.m. on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month throughout the year. Besides an opportunity for socializing, the calendar of events includes live entertainment, interesting speakers, luncheons and escorted trips. Membership in the club is open to senior men and women residents of Palos Heights for annual dues of $20. For more information, call Edna Craig, president, 708-448-7498.


8 Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Regional News

COMMUNITY NOTES Founders Crossing DAR to aid with bird count Members of the Founders Crossing Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution will participate individually in the Great Backyard Bird Count, set for Feb. 17-20. Thanks to the affiliation of several organizations, the GBBC is organized each year to help count bird species, around the world, during the same three day period. The rules of the count would permit a visit to Lake Katherine in Palos Heights for participation, according to a DAR statement. The time required is 15 minutes of observation a day and a report of the count online. The observer registration, as well as directions, are available online at GBBC/birdcount.org. The members will be counting in their individual backyards or neighborhood preserves as a part of chapter conservation activities. An awareness of local natural resources, and sustainable use of them, along with recycling, are in keeping with the national Society’s interests. The chapter Conservation Committee Chair, Rita Travis, is a founder and director of the Bluestem Festival to be held May 20 at the University of St. Francis in Joliet. The Founders Crossing Chapter NSDAR meets on the second Saturday of each month. The March 11 meeting will take place at the Old Homer Town Hall, 16057 S. Cedar, Homer Glen, at 10 a.m. The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution is a service organization celebrating 126 years since its founding. Visit the Society’s website at dar.org or watch the “Today’s DAR” video at YouTube. DAR is an ancestral organization comprised of women who have proven a direct lineal descent from a man or woman who served in the American Revolution. For information about the Founders Crossing Chapter, call Regent Christina Bannon at (773) 208-1156 or Registrar Susan Snow at (708) 751-5154.

Palos Village Players to perform The Palos Village Players will present the first play of their 76th season, “The Game’s Afoot,” by Ken Ludwig at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 17, 18, 24 and

25, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19 at Palos South Middle School, 13100 S. 82nd Ave. “It is December 1936 and Broadway star William Gillette, admired the world over for his leading role in the play Sherlock Holmes, has invited his fellow cast-members to his Connecticut castle for a weekend of revelry. But when one of the guests is stabbed to death, the festivities in this isolated house of tricks and mirrors quickly turn dangerous,” according to a publicity blurb. “Then it’s up to Gillette himself, as he assumes the persona of his beloved Holmes, to track down the killer before the next victim appears. The danger and hilarity are non-stop in this delightful whodunit set during the Christmas holidays.” The cast includes Steve Hoxworth of Villa Park; Ben MacRae of Naperville; Rebecca May, Jackie Harney, and Bryan Riess of Orland Park; Scott Hickstein of Lemont; Shelly Burnett of Palos Heights; and, Yvonne Ambrose of Frankfort. The play is directed by Jimmy Mazeika of Burbank and he is assisted by Mary Tuminello of Orland Park, and Lindsay Latanski of Palos Park. The producer is Jim Sharp, of Orland Park. Tickets are $18 ($15 for students and seniors) and can be reserved by credit card at palosvillageplayers.com or by calling 877-PVPTIXS (877-787-8497). Hackney’s Restaurant, 123rd and LaGrange Road, offers a discount of $5 for anyone attending a performance. Reservations are available at (708) 448-8300. Season tickets are available online or at the box office for $50.

Seek Irish women for queen contest Single women of Irish heritage, ages 18-26, are invited to enter Gaelic Park’s Irish Festival Queen Contest. A new Irish Festival Queen and a runner-up will be selected at Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th St., Oak Forest, on Saturday, March 4. The newly selected queen will participate in ceremonies, contests, Irish Fest and all of the activities during the month of March. She will also be given the high seat atop the Gaelic Park float in the St. Patrick’s Day parades. Gifts, including a $750 travel

voucher, will be presented to the queen. The newly elected runner-up will also participate in the activities and receive prizes. Registration fee is $10, and entry deadline is Friday, March 3. Applications are available at Gaelic Park’s front office. Call Gaelic Park at (708) 6879323 for further information.

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Irish TV star coming to Gaelic Park Irish stage and television star Tony Kenny and his show, Irish Celebration, are coming to Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th St., Oak Forest, on Saturday March 11. In addition to Kenny, the show features comedian/songwriter Seamus Kennedy, 2015 winner of Best Irish Performer Victoria Kenny, the Trinity Dublin Band starring Ciaran Mitchell and Eeimear Reilly and The Dublin City Dancers. Doors open at 7 p.m., and tickets are $25. Call Gaelic Park at (708) 687-9323 to reserve tickets or for more information.

Convenient Locations OAK FOREST PALOS HEIGHTS 12727 S. Ridgeland Ave 5459 W. 159th St. 708.535.8905 708.293.0121

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Saturday, February 25 9 am - 10 am

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Beginners and advanced students will get personal guidance from Lenox Wallace in her watercolor class.

The Center sets event slate The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, is offering several events in the days ahead. For more information, or to register for a program, call (708) 361-3650. • “Men’s Point Of View” is set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21. Al Wagner will be the discussion leader for the book “Without You, There Is No Us” by Suki Kim. • A collage class will run on six Wednesday mornings beginning Feb. 22, from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Instructor April Schabes will have students experiment with color and composition to create mixed-media collages. Class fee is $120. A list of required supplies is available in the office. • “Mommy & Me Art: Homemade Play-Doh Workshop: will run from 11 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Feb. 22. Instructor Karen Signore will show students how to make a batch of homemade Play-Doh using natural ingredients. The class will color the PlayDoh with natural dyes and use fragrant herbs, spices and essential oils to scent the dough. There will also be time to explore and experiment with the play dough using a variety of tools and materials. Participants will go home with a ball of homemade Play-Doh and a list of dough recipes and fun activity ideas to try at home. The class is designed for mothers or

grandmothers with children ages 3-6, but the instructor is open to family members of all ages attending. Workshop fee is $10 per person. • “Watercolor Painting” will be held on six Wednesdays beginning Feb. 22, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday evenings with Lenox Wallace feature structured lessons for beginning watercolorists with critique and guidance in composition, values, textures, negative painting, brush stroke usage and more, while experienced painters work individually with occasional guidance and critique. Opportunities will arise to expand the advanced students’ painting experience. Individual and group critiques will point out what has worked and how to improve that which has not. Class fee is $120 and a list of required supplies is available in the office. • “Creative Art Journaling” is scheduled for Friday Feb. 24, from noon to 3 p.m. Instructor April Schabes will help participants create a colorful artistic record of days, thoughts and experiences through words, collages, photos, poems, magazine images, drawings and watercolor. The annual class fee for 2017 Creative Journaling is $110; If you join in February, the price is $105 for the rest of the year.

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SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, February 16,2015 2017 Thursday, March 5,

Vorva,Sports SportsEditor Editor••sports@regionalpublishing.com sports@regionalpublishing.com KenJeff Karrson,

Southwest • Section 2, Page 1 1 Southwest • Section 2, Page

STATEMENT GAMES

Area athletes flying into state competition

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Freshman Maddie Giglio (above) burst onto the scene for Sandburg/Stagg by qualifying for state in four events. Sandburg/Stagg’s Maddy Roe (right) soars through the air during the floor exercise Thursday at the Oswego Sectional.

As a Madd-er of fact, Sandburg/Stagg co-op teammates dominate sectionals By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

A few years ago, the Sandburg/Stagg co-op girls gymnastics team had the Anna/Hannah one-two punch with Anna Girlich and Hannah Mussallem leading the way. This year, it’s the Maddy/Maddie Show. Junior Maddy Roe is heading to the Illinois High School Association state meet on Friday and Saturday at Palatine High School for the third time in her career. She will compete in four of

the five events. Freshman teammate Maddie Giglio will join her and also will compete in four events. Roe finished 21st in the state in allaround as a freshman and last year took eighth in the state in the vault, ninth in all-around and a disappointing 11th in her bread-and-butter event — the balance beam — after falling twice. The two area stars won all five events on Thursday at the Oswego Sectional, which is just the second time in Sandburg-Stagg history that has happened. It also happened in 2009 when Krystyn

POWERING TO PALATINE Area girls gymnasts who will participate in the IHSA state meet Friday and Saturday at Palatine High School:

SANDBURG/STAGG CO-OP

• Maddie Giglio: All-around, floor, beam, vault • Maddy Roe: All-around, vault, beam, bars

Misheck won all five of her sectional events. Misheck is the team’s co-coach

with veteran Mike White. Giglio tied Lyons’ Olivia Kalata with a 36.5 in the all-around while Roe finished fourth with a 36.425. Roe was in a little trouble after falls on the beam and the floor exercise, but recovered to win on the uneven bars (9.45) and vault (9.5). “It was rough, I’m not going to lie,” said Roe, a Stagg junior from Palos Heights. “It wasn’t going the way I expected it to go. Things happen, but it’s all about the comeback. I was upset and used the aggression and anger and gave it my all in the last two events. What

else are you going to do?” White thinks Roe has a shot at a state title in the beam. Giglio is making a huge first impression in an area that is not rich in gymnastics. She won all-around, the beam (9.325) and floor exercise (9.325) and tied for fifth on the vault. “I wasn’t as nervous as I thought I would be, but I was nervous,” Giglio said. “Once I saw my score on the beam, I gained confidence.’’ Despite the strong 1-2 punch, Sandburg-Stagg finished fifth in the sectional with a 136.825.

Richards’ Wozniak rolls perfect game to end sectional By Aaron FitzPatrick Correspondent

Photo by Jason Maholy

Marist’s Diata Drayton has the upper hand against Nick Sondag of Waubonsie Valley in the Downers Grove North Class 3A Sectional title match at 220 pounds.

Despite being marked man, Drayton stays unbeaten By Jason Maholy

CLINCHING TO CHAMPAIGN

Correspondent

Diata Drayton believes no wrestler in his weight class can beat him when he is at his best. “That’s my mentality — the winner’s mentality,” the Marist senior said after winning the 220-pound title last Saturday at the Illinois High School Association Class 3A Downers Grove North Sectional. And Drayton must be at his best every time he steps on the mat. He will enter the state tournament 40-0, and as the wins piled up this season while the losses remained at zero, he became a marked man. He understands that for a while now he has had to be prepared to thwart every opponent’s greatest effort as they’ve tried to drop him from the ranks of the unbeaten. “It only makes me work harder because everyone’s gunning to beat me, so I’ve got to do my best out there,” he said. Drayton cruised to the sectional title, pinning Adnane Lanaati of Oak Lawn in 2:21 and Jesus Lopez of Glenbard East in 44 seconds before handling Nick Sondag of Waubonsie Valley, 11-3, in the championship bout. Sondag entered the final 36-1.

A list of area wrestlers who will compete at the IHSA individual state meet in Champaign from Thursday through Saturday:

CLASS 3A

• Sandburg: Pat Nolan (120 pounds), Patrick Brucki (195), Cole Bateman (220) and Malik Scates (285). • Stagg: Domenec Zaccone (113) and Noah Price (132) • Marist: Jacob Dado (120) and Diata Drayton (220)

CLASS 2A

• Brother Rice: Hassan Johnson (120), Angel Granado (126), Rahman Johnson (145), Dominick Murphy (152), Paul Gilva (160), Jake Hutchinson (170), Scott Sierzega (220) and Myles Ruffin (285). • Richards: Basil Muhammad (113) and Anthony Quinn (195)

Drayton will be making his third appearance at the state tournament, which begins today at the University of Illinois’ State Farm Center in Champaign. He placed fourth last season at 220 pounds. See WRESTLING, Page 2

You can’t beat perfection. For 12 frames, Richards High School senior bowler Alexandra Wozniak was as good as a bowler can be during last week’s Oak Lawn Sectional Saturday at Palos Lanes in Palos Hills. In the sixth and final game of the tournament, Wozniak rolled a perfect 300 and helped lift the Lady Bulldogs to the state tournament, which starts Friday at Cherry Bowl in Rockford. Richards head coach Emily Gesell said Wozniak is “the calm through the storm,” for the Bulldogs. That description was tested in the sectional as Wozniak continued to post one “X” after another on the scoreboard. As the strikes piled up, so did the crowd around her lanes to witness a rarity in the sport. Wozniak, whose previous best was a 279, appeared to be calm and just having fun after each frame. However, she said that internally it was just the opposite, especially in the later frames. “I’ve been shaking since the ninth frame,” Wozniak said. “I had a rhythm going but I pulled that last ball. You need a little luck in bowling sometimes.” Wozniak said the thought of a perfect game never enters her mind during a match. “Of course it would be awesome if I did, but I didn’t think it was going to happen today,” she said. “Well, maybe after seven strikes I thought maybe I could do this.” Gesell said Wozniak has always had the potential for a 300 game. “I knew she had it in her. She’s one of our most consistent and level-headed bowlers,” said Gesell. “I knew she had the potential to do that this year, but over those last couple of balls it was, ‘All right, Alex. Stay calm. Just stay calm.’” How does a coach deal with the situation as she watches one of her own try to achieve perfection? “I may appear calm, but inside I’m a little bit jittery,” Gesell. “It happened. So I guess I was calm enough.” Wozniak’s score solidified a spot for Richards in the state tournament for the second year in a row

Photo by Aaron FitzPatrick

Richards’ Alexandra Wozniak soaks in her 300 game at the Oak Lawn Sectional.

ROLLING TO ROCKFORD Area participants in the IHSA state bowling tournament Friday and Saturday in Rockford: TEAMS • Richards • Oak Lawn INDIVIDUALS • Emily Schrader (Sandburg) • Sophia Jablonski (Sandburg, wheelchair division)

and propelled her to a second-place individual finish with a 222.7 average. She finished just six pins behind sectional champion Serenity Quintero of Waubonsie Valley. Waubonsie Valley also brought

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See BOWLING, Page 4


2

Section 2 February 16, 2017

The Regional News - The Reporter

FOCUS ON COLLEGE SPORTS

SXU women’s team closing in on double figures for triple figures

By Jeff Vorva

set loss to St. Ambrose on Feb. 7. Former Marist setter Aaron Kummer had 23 assists and three block assists against the Bees.

For the ninth time this season, the St. Xavier University women’s basketball team went over the century mark as the Cougars, ranked third in the nation in NAIA Division II, beat Roosevelt, 103-78. That sets a school season record for most 100-ormore-points games in a season. Brittany Collins led the Cougars (25-2 overall and 16-2 in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference) with 17 points, 11 rebounds and five blocked shots. Men’s basketball: The Cougars’ Quinn Niego scored 21 points and added nine rebounds in a 6955 victory over Roosevelt on Saturday. Kyle Huppe (17 points) hit a 3-point basket to spark a run in which the Cougars outscored Roosevelt 21-7 to close the game. Men’s volleyball: The Cougars dropped a 2519, 25-23, 25-14 decision to No. 9 Lourdes on Saturday. Evergreen Park native Dan O’Keefe had six kills and four digs for the Cougars. O’Keefe was also strong with 12 kills in a four-

Moraine Valley

Sports Editor

SXU’s Thomas Matonis racks up a kill on Feb. 7 in a four-set loss to St. Ambrose.

Women’s basketball: The Cyclones owned a 2019 lead over South Suburban College on Saturday but blew the game open in the final three quarters for a 75-49 win. Michelle Borgen led the Cyclones (26-2) with 26 points while Erin Drynan had 20 points, 18 rebounds, six blocks and five steals. Men’s basketball: Moraine Valley dropped an 86-71 decision to South Suburban, which is ranked seventh in the nation. LeRon Williams had 18 points for the Cyclones.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Trinity Christian College Women’s basketball: The Trolls beat Governors State, 79-70, on Saturday as Celina Wanta and Breanna Toppen each scored 20 points. Men’s basketball: TCC dropped an 88-83 decision to Governors State as Trey Johnson had 21 points. Myles Birgans added 20 as the Trolls shot 73 percent in the second half.

FOCUS ON HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

A break in the action: No surprise: DeJarld named National Coach of the Year Hands-on Shepard By Jeff Vorva AD busts wrist during Astros hoops practice Sports Editor

Her team won three national championship honors. Her top player was named first-team AllAmerica. So it’s no surprise that Mother McAuley volleyball coach Jen DeJarld earned a National Coach of the Year honor from PrepVolleyball. com. The Migthy Macs finished the season 40-1 and won the Illinois High School Association Class 4A state title. That, coupled with playing a schedule that featured some top national teams, earned the Mighty Macs the mighty distinction of national champions by PrepVolleyball.com, USA Today/AVCA and MaxPreps. Junior hitter Charley Niego was named firstteam All-America by FloVolleyball, while sophomore setter Nancy Kane was named honorable mention. DeJarld’s honor comes 12 years after PrepVolleyball.com named former Macs coach Nancy Pedersen National Co-Coach of the Year.

Skating to nationals

S

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Shepard freshman Jenna Bader and Palos Heights eighth grader Gia Swanson advanced to the U.S. Figure Skating Synchronized Skating Championships starting Wednesday at the BMO Harris Bank Center in Rockford. They recently took second place in the Midwestern Synchronization Skating Sectionals in Fargo, N.D. Last year, Shepard’s Diana Garcia was a regional champion.

The dotted line

Brother Rice quarterback Dino Borrelli announced he will play football at St. Ambrose

Jen DeJarld, shown celebrating Mother McAuley’s state title in November, was named the PrepVolleyball.com National Coach of the Year.

next year. Sandburg’s Mike Murphy is heading to Illinois Wesleyan University and Chris Toth committed to the College of DuPage. St. Laurence baseball pitcher Angel Sandoval is heading to the University of St. Francis.

New AD at St. Rita Roshawn Russell was named the athletic director at St. Rita. Russell graduated from the school in 2008

Supplied photo

Gia Swanson (left) and Jenna Bader have qualified for a national skating event in Rockford.

and will continue his position as director of admission and sophomore basketball coach. New St. Rita President Mike Zunica of Palos Park will retain the athletic director position until July 1. He has held that position since 2009. Russell earned his master of business management degree at Fontbonne University. He also served as assistant men’s basketball coach, after two years as a graduate assistant. He was a four-year starter on the St. Rita basketball team.

FOCUS ON HIGH SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY SPORTS

Longtime Oak Lawn coach Kleemann honored The Oak Lawn Community High School boys’ basketball program honored longtime coach Mark Kleemann for his 43 years of contributions and dedication with a ceremony and commemorative plaque on Alumni Night. “It is difficult to put into words,” Kleemann said. “It was such a special night. (Head coach) Jason Rhodes was so generous with his comments and kind thoughts.’’ This celebration of Kleemann’s career comes as the veteran teacher and coach plans on retiring at the end of the school year. It is ending a career filled with involvement in the school and in athletics. Kleemann is a member of the Board of Directors of the Illinois Basketball Association, and he is a board member of the Basketball Museum of Illinois. In addition, Kleemann has held many positions at OLCHS including seven years as athletic director and nine years as assistant boys’ basketball coach. Kleemann was also honored earlier this month by the girls’ basketball program. Kleemann earned his 300th win during the last home game of his coaching career at Oak Lawn. The team honored Kleemann with a rocking chair.

Wrestling

Continued from Page 1 “It feels good; I worked hard for it,” he said of earning one last opportunity to win a state title. “I wrestled a lot over the summer, different guys, to help me get better. I said that I wouldn’t let (losing his final match of the season) happen again, so I’ve worked to get better and better every time out.” The biggest difference for Drayton this season is that he’s able to push himself late in matches when both he and his opponents are tiring. “Even though I’m up, I try to get more take-downs,” he said. Domenic Zaccone of Stagg also will enter the state tournament unbeaten after taking the Downers Grove North Sectional

hepard High School Athletic Director Curry Gallagher had participated in about a dozen practices this school year in trying to get to know his school’s athletes and for them to get to know him. On Feb. 8, he broke his right wrist during a boys basketball practice. It happened on the same day Chicago legend and Milwaukee Bucks star Jabari Parker suffered a season-ending knee injury, so it was a hard day on the hardwood for some. Gallagher went up for a drive after a shot fake and… “I did a terrible job with my layup and I fell,” he said. “I tried to break fall with my wrist and broke my JEFF VORVA the wrist.’’ Making the As of early Monday, he was waitExtra Point ing to hear when surgery will be performed. This is a guy whose last surgery was in 2015 — to have a brain tumor removed. The 40-year-old was optimistic about that procedure, despite losing hearing in his left ear, and said he is “blessed to be on the good side of the green.’’ So even though his wrist hurts like heck, you won’t hear any whining from him now. “I’m still going to go through with the practices,” he said. “It’s a lesson in perseverance. It’s parallel to the kids, who have to fight through their injuries and support their teammates. The two winter sports I have left were boys swimming and cheerleading. I will go and talk with those athletes. “But hopefully I’ll be able to heal and participate in the spring team practices. It’s going to be a month’s healing process, so I should be back to participate again.’’ In the fall, he said he started doing these practices so that he could learn from the student-athletes and they could see him as more than a guy behind a desk, Gallagher said he played football, baseball, tennis and bowling in high school in Philadelphia and ultimate Frisbee on the club level in college. He tried his hand at triathlons before his family (wife Carrie, daughters Deidre and Brigid and son Liam) started to grow. He has worked at Marist, St. Ignatius and Richards before landing the AD job at Shepard. Thus far, he said there haven’t been too many surprises along the way. But he said his eyes were opened as to how physically demanding the competitive dance team practice was. “To do all of the spins required and some of those routines — I really struggled,” he said. “I told the athletes after practice that I would love to see the football players or basketball players participate and they could learn what a challenge and workout it really is.’’ Shepard Athletic Director Curry Gallagher, shown in the fall practicing with the girls tennis team, broke his wrist practicing with the boys basketball team on Feb. 8. This school year, he is trying to practice with all of the school’s sports teams.

Supplied photo

Oak Lawn’s Mark Kleemann was honored with a rocking chair by the girls basketball team.

ALL IN to host tryouts ALL IN Southwest will host tryouts for its spring travel season. The first tryout is March 12 at the Swanson Center, 6652 S. 78th Ave., Bedford Park. Sixththrough-eighth graders tryout t from noon to 1 p.m., ninth and 10th graders try out from 1 to 2 p.m. and 11th and 12th graders from 2-3 p.m. The second date is March 13 at the Frontier Field House, 9807 Sayre Ave., Chicago Ridge. Sixth-through-eighth graders try out from 6 to 7 p.m., ninth and 10th graders from 7 to 8

crown at 113 pounds. The sophomore pinned two opponents and beat another by technical fall before earning a hard-fought 6-4 decision over Tommy Russell of St. Rita in the title match. Zaccone took fourth last season at 106 pounds and has ambitions to be a three-time state champion. That, of course, means he must win that first title this weekend. Despite his unblemished record, he acknowledged he has some work to do if he hopes to be atop the podium Saturday evening. “I just didn’t like the second and third periods (in the title match), how they went,” he said. “There’s a lot to improve on based on today. The semifinal match felt great, got two take-downs and back points right away, but then started getting slow.” Zaccone doesn’t think much

p.m. and 11th and 12th graders from 8 to 9 p.m. For more information visit wwwaiathletics.com

Shooters host tryouts The South Side Shooters girls third though 11th grade tryouts are Feb. 16, Feb. 21 or Feb. 23 from 6:30-8 p.m. at Stagg High School and March 7 and March 9 from 7 to 9 p.m. Players need to attend just one night. For more information, contact Gary Ferguson at 630-935-1150 or visit www.shootersbball.com.

Photo by Jason Maholy

Sandburg’s Pat Brucki is unbeaten against Illinois wrestlers and is gunning for his first state title this weekend.

about being undefeated — his focus is on dominating his opponent every time he steps on the mat, he said. After falling short of a state championship

last season, he doesn’t take anything for granted. “Coming into this year it was like, ‘OK, you need to step up your game. If you want to be a three-

time state champ you’ve got to get this first one. I’ve been working on everything to be the best. (Being undefeated is) fine, but I don’t really pay attention to it. I just try to pay attention to what’s in front of me. Numbers are numbers; when you’re wrestling there’s no numbers out there.” Pat Brucki of Sandburg is the other area wrestler who won a title in Downers Grove. The twotime state medalist will head to Champaign 40-1, and he’s unbeaten against Illinois wrestlers. He easily defeated Mason Kroening of Waubonsie Valley, 17-5, in the semifinals at 195 pounds, then beat Illinois Matmen’s No. 2-ranked wrestler, Downers Grove South’s Sergio Villalobos, 20-5, in the final. Other state qualifiers via the Downers Grove North Sectional are a pair of 120-pounders, Ja-

Photo by Jeff Vorva

cob Dado of Marist (second place) and Patrick Nolan of Sandburg (fourth place); along with Noah Price of Stagg, who finished fourth at 132; Cole Bateman of Sandburg, third at 220; and Malik Scates of Sandburg, third at 285.

Class 2A Brother Rice is sending eight wrestlers to state, including Thornridge Sectional champs Hassan Johnson (120 pounds) and Jake Hutchinson (170). Other Crusaders who qualified were Angel Granado (126), Rahman Johnson (145), Dominick Murphy (152), Paul Gilva (160), Scott Sierzega (220) and Myles Ruffin (285). Richards will bring two wrestlers to Champaign — Basil Muhammad (113) and Anthony Quinn (195).


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, Feburary 16, 2017 Section 2

3

AREA HOOPS AT A GLANCE BOYS Brother Rice Chicago Christian Evergreen Park Marist Oak Lawn Richards St. Laurence Sandburg Shepard Stagg

W-L STREAK NEXT

22-3 17-7 15-9 22-3 8-17 10-12 10-15 13-11 10-12 16-8

W11 W7 W2 W2 L1 L4 L1 L2 W1 W1

CCL Tournament at Ridgewood, Fri.; IHSA Class 3A Tournament at Argo Feb. 24 hosts St. Patrick, Fri. hosts Argo, Thurs. at Reavis, Friday, at Ag Science, Wed. CCL Tournament hosts Homewood-Flossmoor, Fri.; at Bolingbrook, Tues. hosts Eisenhower, at Manteno, Tues. at Lockport, Fri.

* Records through Sunday, Feb. 12; compiled by Jeff Vorva.

GIRLS Chicago Christian Evergreen Park Marist Mother McAuley Oak Lawn Queen of Peace Richards Sandburg Shepard Stagg

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist fans can cheer both the girls team, which is seeded second in Class 4A sectional play, and the boys team, which has a key East Suburban Catholic Conference showdown with St. Patrick at home on Friday.

W-L

STREAK

19-9 20-7 25-4 20-8 16-13 26-3 13-13 10-17 9-21 10-16

L1 W4 W4 W2 W4 W1 W1 L3 L7 L5

NEXT

Season completed IHSA 3A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 3A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals

* Records through Sunday, Feb. 12; compiled by Randy Whalen.

BOYS BASKETBALL

FOCUS ON HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL

RedHawks eyeing icing on the cake: an ESCC title

Rice makes it to CCL tourney semis with OT victory over St. Laurence By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

By Phil Arvia Correspondent

Whenever things got close between host Marist and St. Viator in the fourth quarter Friday — and despite the RedHawks’ 12-point edge heading into the period, things did get close — Marist managed to will itself to answer. RedHawks came out ESCC LOGJAM of The a timeout with a set play Top five teams in the that created a layup for Justin East Suburban Catholic Brown. Brown threw the exConference standings tra pass to find a cutting Bobheading into this week: by Hawkinson for another laMarist 6-1 yup. David Daniels threaded 5-2 the needle to get a dunk for Notre Dame St. Patrick 5-2 Brown. “There were a lot of what Marian Catholic 5-2 St. Viator 5-2 we call ‘one mores,’ ” Marist coach Gene Nolan said. “We were very unselfish. When you get the defense to play the third, fourth, fifth side of the floor, that’s when you get good looks.” Or you can give it to point guard Maurice Commander, who after the Lions cut Marist’s lead to four points, drove from the top of the key for a left-handed lay-in, forced two turnovers and added a pair of clinching free throws all in the final two minutes of a 46-37 win. As a result, Marist (23-3, 6-1 in the East Suburban Catholic Conference) celebrated Nolan’s 43rd birthday with the win over the Lions and the team needs one more win to clinch a share of its first league title since 1997. The RedHawks have a one-game edge over St. Patrick, St. Viator (9-14 overall), Marian Catholic and Notre Dame with two to play. On Friday, Marist hosts St. Patrick with a chance to clinch on Senior Night. “One more to seal this deal,” Commander said. “The conference championship is really big for us.” Against St. Viator, Commander was huge for the RedHawks, leading the way with 20 points. Brown added 10 points and 10 rebounds, Daniels seven points and Hawkinson eight boards. “Maurice did everything you could ever ask a point

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist guard Maurice Commander and coach Gene Nolan confer during a game earlier in the season. On Friday night, Commander scored 20 points in a win over St. Viator on Nolan’s 43rd birthday.

guard to do,” Nolan said. “He made big shots, he made tough shots. I thought the pace of the game was the pace he dictated and he played tremendous defense.” St. Viator got scoring from just four players — Daniel Morton led the Lions with 12 points and Jeremiah Hernandez added 11 — while shooting 13-of-39 (33 percent) from the field for the game. It was precisely the effort Nolan was looking for after the RedHawks played sloppy in a Tuesday win over Chicago Ag. “The coaches felt like we didn’t live up to the standards we usually play at,” Brown said. “They worked us pretty hard in practice to get us back to the state of mind we need to play with. It got us back to playing through and off each other.” Previously, Marist had just been off — owing perhaps to cumulative weight of three losses in five games after starting the season 19-0, or losing Morgan Taylor to a broken wrist in the Jan. 24 loss to St. Rita, or something else entirely. “It’s a confluence of things,” Nolan said. “As a coach, I know it’s normal to go through it. It’s how you respond to it that will determine the sort of team you have. “At this point in the season, there’s things you have to be doing at a different level. I don’t believe we played that way Tuesday, but I also thought we had our two best practices of the year since then and tonight was a very good night.”

A dozen days after beating St. Laurence 60-45 in a Chicago Catholic League South battle in Chicago, Brother Rice had to face its foe again on Sunday in the CCL tournament quarterfinals. This time, it wasn’t as easy. Mike Shepski hit a 3-pointer to send the game into overtime. He also had another game-tying trey and added what turned out to be the game winner in Brother Rice’s 4441 victory at Fenwick. The Crusaders were scheduled to face St. Joseph in the semifinals on Wednesday at Fenwick. St. Joseph is coached by Gene Pingatore, who won his 1,000th and 1,001st games in the first two rounds of what will be the final CCL Tournament. League officials are restructuring the league and eliminating the tournament. The championship is at Loyola at 8 p.m. Friday. Josh Niego scored 33 points for Brother Rice in a 72-61 win over Marmion to reach the quarterfinals.

South Suburban Red closing up For most of the South Suburban Red season, Richards has enjoyed a comfortable lead over the rest of the field, but after Evergreen Park knocked off the Bulldogs, 77-72 on Friday night, things have tightened up. Richards entered this week 6-4 and was scheduled to host Shepard on Tuesday, visit Reavis on Saturday and host Oak Lawn Feb. 24. Evergreen Park entered this week 6-5 and was scheduled to host Reavis on Tuesday and visit Argo on Feb. 24.

First team eliminated Chicago Christian’s girls basketball team

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Brother Rice’s Josh Niego scored 33 points in the Crusaders’ first-round win over Marmion in the final CCL Tournament on Saturday.

was the first area team eliminated from the postseason as the Knights dropped a 77-36 game to Illiana Christian, in the Chicago Christian Class 2A Regional final on Thursday. The Knights finished 19-9 in coach John Natanek’s first season — a huge turnaround from the 8-20 mark from last season.

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Section 2 Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Regional News - The Reporter

Images from another busy sports week

Balloons in a basket were a part of Evergreen Park’s Senior Night celebration for the girls basketball team on Feb. 7.

SXU men’s volleyball coach Bob Heersema gathers his troops during a four-set loss to St. Ambrose at the Shannon Center.

Shepard’s Kylie Radz yells instructions to her teammates during a recent game at Evergreen Park

Sandburg enjoyed a postgame pose after a historic sectional performance Saturday. In the front is Sophia Jablonski, one of the first two wheelchair bowlers to ever compete in an Illinois High School Association postseason event. In the second row, left, is junior Emily Schrader, who qualified for the state tournament and to the right is Zoe Schultz, who has helped Jablonski out all season. In the back row is Sandburg coach Joe Geiger and assistant Tim Walsh. Sandburg-Stagg girls gymnastics coach Mike White whoops it up as junior Maddy Roe performs on the uneven bars at the Oswego Sectional on Thursday.

St. Ambrose’s Morty Berglind, a Marist graduate, gets ready to let loose with a serve during a four-set men’s volleyball win at St. Xavier University on Feb. 7. He finished with eight kills and six digs in his homecoming.

Stagg’s Sydney Downs tries to get by 6-foot-5 HomewoodFlossmoor star Eva Rubin during a loss on Feb. 7 in Palos Hills.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Stagg’s Nicole Vacha drives to the basket against Homewood-Flossmoor.

Evergreen Park’s Kacey Gardner (left) lets teammate Emma O’Grady (No. 12) know she is open during a win over Shepard on Feb. 7.

Bowling

Continued from Page 1 home the sectional title with a 6,212, followed by Richards (5,949), York (5,428) and host Oak Lawn (5,407). It is Richards’ ninth appearance in the state tournament. The Bulldogs finished fourth in 1977 and 1986. Last year, the team took 13th and Wozniak finPhoto by Jeff Vorva ished 36th. Sandburg’s Emily This is Oak Schrader finished 10th in the state last year and Lawn’s state will return this season. debut as a team. Oak Lawn high scorer Allison Hebel said the team is looking forward to the challenge. “It’s crazy,” said Hebel. “We’ve been looking forward to it this whole season. We thought we had a really

Richards qualified for state for a second straight year. From left to right: Phoenix Lopez, Katie Strache, Gina Bartkus, Caitlyn Solomon, Alexandra Wozniak, Peyton Attig, Sarah Coffman and Mia Jones.

strong team coming this year and we have a lot of great freshman and sophomores who are helping us. It’s great to finally make it.”

Andrew sectional Sandburg junior Emily Schrader, who finished 10th in the state last year,

took fourth place in the Andrew Sectional Saturday at Orland Bowl and earned a return trip to Rockford. She opened with a 169 and needed a big finish in her last five games to qualify. She followed with a 257-227 to finish the morning session with a 653. She rolled a 204-228-266 for a 698 to vault

Photos by Aaron FitzPatrick

Oak Lawn qualified for the state tournament for the first time in school history. From left to right: coach Jim Mallek, Lena Rayas, Mia DiGrazia, Stephanie Gasca, LeAnne Kommenich, Jayna Greiman, Hailey Gershom, Allison Hebel and coach Kelly Rumel.

up the standings. “I was thinking too much the first game,” she said. “I was overhooking and changed my ball. It seems like lately my first game of each set has been lower. But I can’t get down on myself.’’ Eagles junior Sophia Jablonski be-

came one of the first two bowlers in Illinois to compete in the wheelchair division and she rolled a 459 in four games to qualify for state. — Sports Editor Jeff Vorva contributed to this report.


The Regional News - The Reporter

  

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Call 708-417-5983 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE NORTHERN TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, -v.PAMELA CRAWFORD, OXFORD BANK AND TRUST, 10429 SOUTH AUSTIN AVENUE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, CHRISTINE BOYLE, MYRIAM MCREADY, RAYMOND CRAWFORD, MARGARET WALSH, EDWIN M. CRAWFORD IV, CONOR P. CRAWFORD, CATHERINE CRAWFORD, MADELINE PACKER, PATRICK CRAWFORD, WILLIAM CRAWFORD, CAITLIN CRAWFORD, CATHERINE CRAWFORD AS LEGAL GUARDIAN FOR JACK CRAWFORD, A MINOR, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF EDWIN M. CRAWFORD, JR., DECEASED, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 14 CH 04025 10429 S. AUSTIN, #B Oak Lawn, IL 60453 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 15, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 16, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10429 S. AUSTIN, #B, Oak Lawn, IL 60453 Property Index No. 24-17-214-023-1002. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $89,901.92. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff s attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD., 29 E. Madison, Ste. 950, CHICAGO, IL 60602, (312) 372-2020 Please refer to file number 16-5300-406. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales.

“10 in the Park� NEW as of 7/7/11 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.BRIAN JOYCE, BANK OF AMERICA, NA, RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, RIVIERA REGAL CONDOMINIUM UMBRELLA ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF GARRY JOYCE, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, WILLIAM P. BUTCHER, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR GARRY JOYCE (DECEASED) Defendants 16 CH 007310 11120 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT 3A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 5, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 7, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11120 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT 3A, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-101-116-1063. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-1606269. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-16-06269 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 16 CH 007310 TJSC#: 36-14269 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I713346

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For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.BRETT C. BENFIELD, EAGLE RIDGE VILLAS III ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 15 CH 011438 18145 OHIO COURT ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 14, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 16, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 18145 OHIO COURT, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-32-400-029-1145. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-15-12148. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-15-12148 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 15 CH 011438 TJSC#: 36-14633 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I713628

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.KISHA J. YORK, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, WESTGATE VALLEY TOWNHOMES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 15 CH 016492 1403 SPYGLASS CIRCLE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 9, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 13, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1403 SPYGLASS CIRCLE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-31-404-056-1170. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-15-17309. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-15-17309 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 15 CH 016492 TJSC#: 36-14485 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I713297

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAMP 2002-HE2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-HE2; Plaintiff, vs. PILARITA G. ESPINOSA; VICTOR F. ESPINOSA; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF PILARITA G. ESPINOSA, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF VICTOR F. ESPINOSA, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 6599 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-14-115-024-0000. Commonly known as 8530 West Broadmoor Drive, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 WA16-0071. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I714741

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF KURT F SCHMID, IF ANY, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., KURT F SCHMID JR, INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF KURT F SCHMID, DECEASED, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 15 CH 15475 12600 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 18, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 9, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12600 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-26-414-015. The real estate is improved with a single family home with an attached 2 car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number 11688. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. 11688 Attorney Code. 60489 Case Number: 15 CH 15475 TJSC#: 37-804 I714037

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-11CB MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-11CB; Plaintiff, vs. MATTHEW J. SPECKHART; LISA M. SPECKHART; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MATTHEW J. SPECKHART, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF LISA M. SPECKHART, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 28814 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, March 10, 2017 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-33-204-022-0000. Commonly known as 12857 South Brian Place, Palos Park, IL 60464. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a mixed use property which may be used as commercial and/or residential. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W12-4204. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I713866

121736

client

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“ I FEEL LIKE

A FISH WITH NO WATER.� –JACOB, AGE 5

HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 29 E. Madison, Ste. 950 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 372-2020 E-Mail: smichaels@hrolaw.com Attorney File No. 16-5300-406 Attorney Code. 4452 Case Number: 14 CH 04025 TJSC#: 36-14331 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

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Section 2 Thursday, February 16, 2017

  

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The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Section 2

7

Senior Spotlight Eat healthy at 50 and beyond

Seniors can overcome feelings of apprehension about going to the gym.

Seniors can overcome gym intimidation Regular exercise and a nutritious diet are two of the best things seniors can do to maintain their health. Exercise can delay or prevent many of the health problems associated with aging, including weak bones and feelings of fatigue. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a person age 65 or older who is generally fit with no limiting health conditions should try to get two hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, while also including weight training and muscle-strengthening activities in their routines on two or more days a week. Individuals often find that gyms have the array of fitness equipment they need to stay healthy. But many people, including older men and women who have not exercised in some time, may be hesitant to join a gym for fear of intimidation. Some seniors may avoid machines and classes believing they will not use the apparatus properly, or that they will be judged by other gym members. Some seniors may feel like gyms

do not cater to their older clientele, creating an atmosphere that is dominated by younger members and loud music. Such misconceptions are often unfounded, as many gyms welcome older members with open arms. But even if seniors find gyms intimidating, they should still sign up for memberships. In such situations, the following tips can help seniors shed their fears and adapt to their new gyms. • Start the process slowly. Shop around for a gym that makes you feel comfortable. Get fully informed about which classes are offered, and the benefits, if any, afforded to older members. • Get a doctor’s go-ahead. Make sure to clear exercise and gym membership with your doctor prior to purchasing a membership. He or she also may have a list of gyms where fellow senior patients have memberships. • Build up gradually. Begin with exercises you feel comfortable performing. Spend time walking on the treadmill while observing other gym members. Tour the circuit of machines and

Women • Not physically active: 1,600 calories • Somewhat active: 1,800 calories • Active lifestyle: between 2,000 other equipment. Find out if you and 2,200 calories can sample a class to see if it Men might be a good fit. • Not physically active: 2,000 • Find a gym buddy. Working out with a partner in your age calories • Somewhat active: between group may encourage you to keep going to the gym and increase your 2,200 and 2,400 calories • Active lifestyle: between 2,400 comfort level. You each can offer support and enjoy a good laugh and 2,800 calories through the learning process. When choosing foods to eat, • Don’t get discouraged. Anyone working out for the first time, the NIA recommends eating many regardless of age, will feel some- different colors and types of vegwhat out of place until exercise becomes part of a routine. Give it some time before throwing in the towel. Once you catch on, you may discover you enjoy working out. • Choose a senior-friendly gym. Some gyms cater to senior members. They may offer “SilverSneakers” classes at their facility. Other niche gyms may only accept members of a certain age group. Investigate these gyms if working out with a younger crowd is proving too great a deterrent. Fitness is important for healthy seniors. It can prolong life, help seniors maintain healthy weights and reduce their risk of injury.

because smell and taste are so closely related, foods enjoyed for years may no longer tantalize the taste buds. That can be problematic, as many people instinctually add more salt to foods they find bland. According to the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, older adults should consume no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That equates to roughly 3/4 teaspoon of salt. Older men and women should resist the temptation to use salt to add flavor to foods, instead opting for healthy foods that they can still smell and taste. In addition, men and women should mention any loss of their sense of smell to their physicians, as such a loss may indicate the presence of Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s disease. Maintaining a healthy diet after 50 may require some hard work and discipline. But the long-term benefits of a healthy diet make the extra effort well worth it.

A soft reset for Mary McAloon and her mother, Elizabeth Walsh

Submitted by Mercy Circle

Aging men and women may find that technology helps them simplify their everyday lives.

get in and out of their showers and bathtubs. Such bars are both effective and inexpensive, and some do not even require any drilling to install. Specialty grab bars, tub grips and tub transfer benches are just a few additional products that can make bathing easier for seniors who have lost or are starting to lose some of their physical strength. • Get “smart” on the road. Seniors who are experiencing mild difficulty driving can make getting about town that much easier by plugging their smartphones into their vehicles or making use of the various apps that have become standard in modern vehicles. For example, the maps app on a smartphone can be connected to a car and direct seniors to their destinations, saving them the trouble of remembering all the ins and outs of how to get a particular destination. Seniors also can employ apps to help them find their vehicles should they forget exactly where they parked in crowded parking

etables and fruits. Phytochemicals are substances that occur naturally in plants, and there are thousands of these substances offering various benefits. The Produce for Better Health Foundation notes that a varied, colorful diet incorporates lots of different types of phytochemicals, which the PBH says have disease-preventing properties. The NIA also advises that men and women over 50 make sure at least half the grains in their diets are whole grains. Numerous studies have discovered the various benefits of whole grains, which are loaded with protein, fiber, antioxidants and other nutrients. Whole grains have been shown to reduce the risk for diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer. Another potential hurdle men and women over 50 may encounter is a change in their sense of smell and taste. A person’s sense of smell may fade with age, and

Close to Home: Mercy Circle resident Elizabeth Walsh rejuvenates her life

How seniors can simplify tasks The ability to perform everyday tasks is something many people take for granted. But as men and women approach or exceed retirement age, many may start to struggle with chores and tasks they have performed for decades. Physical limitations are a common side effect of aging. But such limitations do not have to prove too big a hurdle for seniors to clear. In fact, there are many ways for seniors to simplify everyday tasks while maintaining their independence. • Embrace technology. Even the proudest Luddites cannot deny technology’s potential to make seniors’ lives easier. Seemingly simple tasks like shopping for groceries and vacuuming a home can be difficult for seniors with dwindling or limited mobility. But seniors with Internet access in their homes can order their groceries online and then pick them up instore or have them delivered, saving them the trouble of walking around the store. With regard to vacuuming, autonomous vacuum cleaners have removed the need to use traditional vacuum cleaners. Certain autonomous vacuums employ sensors to detect dirty spots on the floor, and these vacuums can even be programmed to clean the home while residents are out of the house. • Upgrade bathrooms. Tasks associated with personal hygiene also tend to be taken for granted until they become difficult. But a few simple bathroom alterations can help seniors safely navigate the bathrooms in their homes so they can maintain their personal hygiene without fear of injury. Grab bars can be installed on shower walls so seniors can safely

A balanced diet is an integral element of a healthy lifestyle for men, women and children alike. But while kids and young adults might be able to get away with an extra cheeseburger here or there, men and women approaching 50 have less leeway. According to the National Institute on Aging, simply counting calories without regard for the foods being consumed is not enough for men and women 50 and older to maintain their longterm health. Rather, the NIA emphasizes the importance of choosing low-calorie foods that have a lot of the nutrients the body needs. But counting calories can be an effective and simple way to maintain a healthy weight, provided those calories are coming from nutrient-rich foods. The NIA advises men and women over 50 adhere to the following daily calorie intake recommendations as they attempt to stay healthy into their golden years.

lots. Such apps can increase seniors’ comfort levels on the road while helping them maintain their independence. • Downsize. Whether downsizing to a smaller home or simply downsizing a lifestyle, seniors may find that living smaller is akin to living simpler. Empty nesters may find they no longer need several bedrooms in their homes, and moving into smaller homes can reduce their daily workloads while also clearing out clutter that can make performing everyday chores more difficult. Men and women accustomed to hustle and bustle may also find that cutting back on professional and/or personal commitments gives them more energy for everyday activities while enriching the commitments they continue to maintain. Aging men and women can employ various strategies to simplify their lives and maintain their independence well into their golden years.

Mary McAloon’s mother, Elizabeth Walsh, always had a busy life. Mrs. Walsh was a secretary at City Colleges of Chicago until she retired almost 30 years ago, about the same time McAloon’s father died at age 63. Mrs. Walsh’s daughter explains, “My Mom went to Renaissance Academy classes and history classes. She went on adventurous trips, including expeditions to India and Africa.” Mrs. Walsh also traveled to visit McAloon’s two brothers and two sisters, who live with their families in other places across the country. When Elizabeth Walsh lived in a second-floor condo at 99th and Central Park in Oak Lawn, she attended daily mass at a nearby catholic church. Last summer, Mrs. Walsh, had “a medical event,” as McAloon says, that required rehab for a month. “It was clear my Mom would not be able to handle the stairs at her condo.” Elizabeth Walsh and her children faced a stark choice: Either they would hire a caregiver to live with her or she would move into assisted living, an option she had always rejected. “My Mother never told me the woman across the hallway at the condo, her friend, was Sister Alice Feehan. Sister Alice had moved to Mercy Circle. I said, ‘Mom, they are having fun over there,’ and why don’t we just give it a try. My Mom visited Mercy Circle and while she wasn’t thrilled about the decision to give up her own place, she agreed to move in.” McAloon, the oldest of Elizabeth Walsh’s children, is the only one who lives nearby. She also is the only one of Elizabeth Walsh’s children who is retired. Until four years ago, McAloon was a special needs supervisor with Chicago Public Schools. But now, she visits her mother at least three days each week.

Photo by Robert Knapp

Mary McAloon, daughter of Mercy Circle resident Elizabeth Walsh.

“I like that there are so many smart people there,” McAloon says. But other conveniences have been a blessing for our whole family. “A doctor has office hours at Mercy Circle. A podiatrist visits Mercy Circle, so I don’t have to take her to the foot doctor anymore. And a great coincidence is my Mom’s hairdresser has a salon on the first floor. And best of all, my mother has company during three meals a day served in the dining room and plenty of activities with other residents.” Thanks to the physical therapy routine at Mercy Circle, McAloon says, Elizabeth Walsh is healthier, happier and much more active. “She hated to be confined to a wheelchair and now she only needs a walker,” McAloon explains. “After her medical incident, she could no longer go to daily Mass. Now she attends Mass almost every day in the chapel at Mercy Circle.” “I know how hard it is to move after you have been living on your own,” says Sister Alice Feehan, who again is Mrs. Walsh’s neighbor, this time at Mercy Circle, and who helped her friend adjust to her new home. “But look at the community we found here at Mercy Circle. The beauty of it is in the people, just a wonderful feeling that is difficult to describe in words.” Looking back, Mary McAloon does not know how her mother lived on her own as long as she did. “These Sisters are wonderful and now Mercy Circle is admitting more laypeople. The

apartments are so nice and they encourage us to bring Mom’s own furniture.” One of Mary’s brother and his family visited Mercy Circle at Thanksgiving and a sister and her family visited Mercy Circle at Christmas time. Then Elizabeth Walsh “came home to my house,” on Christmas Day, Mary explains. “My grandmother, my father’s mother, always told me that nothing good comes after age 90,” Mary McAloon says, “She was wrong.”

About Mercy Circle

Welcoming older adults from all walks of life, Mercy Circle is a continuing care retirement community (CCRC) on the southwest side of Chicago near the Village of Evergreen Park. The not-for-profit has a no-entrance-fee policy and a five-star CMS rating. Sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy West Midwest, it is the only faith-based retirement community in the area. Mercy Circle offers spacious residences at all levels of care, along with thoughtful amenities, life enrichment programs, and opportunities for an engaged social life and fostering friendships. The senior living community provides a variety of dining options. In addition to programs and activities, sharing interests and making friends, Mercy Circle has activities designed specifically for each setting. For more information or to schedule a private appointment, please call 773.253.3600.


8 Section 2

Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Regional News • The Reporter

Senior Spotlight Smith Crossing residents enjoy tail wags from Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Submitted by Smith Senior Living For the last three years, Walter Olchawa and Abigail, his Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, have spent Wednesday afternoons from 1 to 3:30 p.m. visiting residents and staff at Smith Crossing, a life plan community at 10501 Emilie Lane in Orland Park. Olchawa of Orland Park and his six-year-old registered therapy dog start their weekly routine by checking in with the receptionist at the main lobby. Then, they visit with residents seated in front of a large fireplace in the nearby club room. “There she is,” said one resident, extending hand to Abigail. The dog responded by bowing her head and wagging her tail. “It’s Abigail, she’s here,” said another resident, talking excitedly into a smart phone. “I’ll call you back!” The scene repeats itself many times with residents dropping whatever their doing to pet the little brown and white dog with long floppy ears. Olchawa, a retired pharmacist, also gets a charge out of the exchanges. “With my career, I was so used to being around people,” he said. “Retire? What was I going to do? This keeps me interacting with people. It also keeps me out of trouble!” Besides greeting people in common areas, Olchawa knocks on the apartment doors of residents he knows will appreciate seeing Abigail. Smith Crossing resident Ginger Jarris moved from Naperville in 2014 to be closer to her daughter. She was all smiles recently, when welcoming Olchawa and Abigail into her apartment. The visit included a lesson in the dog’s lineage. “Cavalier King Charles Spaniels were bred by King Charles to be lap dogs and bird dogs,” Olchawa explained. As if on cue, Abigail accepted Jarris’ invitation to sit with her on a love seat. The dog then placed her head in Jarris’s lap. “But she’s also a good bird dog,” Olchawa continued. “One time a robin landed on the path where we were walking and Abigail took off like a bullet. I was running after her through the bushes, saying, ‘Abigail, where are you?!’” “Did she get the robin?” Jarris asked. Abigail looked intently at Olchawa, as if anticipating his response. “She had the bird in her mouth.” Olchawa said. “She’s a good girl, she’s a beauty,” said Jarris, smiling. Another resident Olchawa and Abigail visited was Gertrude Oliveri. “Where’ve you been?” she joked. “We didn’t miss you, Walter. We missed Abigail, of course. She’s the hit of the parade here!” To earn official registration with Therapy Dog International, Abigail requires a dog’s ability to understand and respond to simple commands. Abigail also was trained not to be startled by wheelchairs, walking devices and other dogs. To keep her certification, she must pass an annual physical and have all current vaccinations. Abigail visits residents in independent living, assisted living, memory support and skilled nursing care at Smith Crossing, as well as patients in the community’s Green Leaf rehab facility. “It means the world to be able to touch and pet and snuggle with a dog,” said Sally Morse, an Orland Park resident, recovering from a fall on ice that shattered her hip. “That’s one thing I really miss about being here—with my dog. Seeing Abigail sure helps.” Olchawa and Abigail are just two of many volunteers who serve residents at Smith Crossing and Smith Village, 2320 W. 113th Place in Chicago’s Beverly neighborhood. To learn more about volunteer opportunities at either community, consider attending a monthly volunteer orientation. Visit http://www. smithcrossing.org/about-us/volunteer-opportunities or http:// www.smithvillage.org/about-us/

All are welcome

“Here I don’t have to do it alone”

Photo of Fr. Jack Farry

When you move to Mercy Circle, you’ll find an engaged community—perfect for couples and individuals. “I’m enjoying my life,” says Fr. Jack Farry, who lives in an assisted living apartment at Mercy Circle. “And I’m meeting other people who share my interests.”

Visit Mercy Circle

Please join us for a tour and refreshments during our Sunday open house event

from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. on February 19, 2017

❆ Mercy Circle requires no entrance fee, has earned a five-star CMS rating, and promotes a spirit of inclusion and hospitality. Photo by Waldemar Reichert

Walter Olchawa, a retired pharmacist, volunteers every week at Smith Crossing with Abigail, his Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

volunteer-opportunities Or call Shelly Genis, Smith volunteer coordinator, at 708-326-2424.

About Smith Senior Living

Smith Senior Living, a not-forprofit organization serving older adults, sponsors the only life plan communities in the Southwest sector of metropolitan Chicago. An innovative leader in providing the finest services and care for seniors, Smith established its first community in 1924, on the same city block where Smith Village stands today.   

Both Smiths provide spacious independent living residences and apartments for assisted living, as well as memory support and skilled nursing care. In addition, they offer short-term rehab programs for residents and others who have had surgery or a medical incident. For more information about how Smith Senior Living can help seniors enjoy their retirement, contact Smith Crossing at 708-326-2308 or SmithCrossing. org, and Smith Village at 773-4747303 or SmithVillage.org.

We provide lifestyle programs for independent living residents, as well as healthcare services for assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing residents.

For more information or to schedule a private appointment, please call 773-253-3600

Sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy West Midwest 3659 West 99th Street Chicago, Illinois 60655 773-253-3600 mercycircle.org


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