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The Voice of Palos - Orland Since 1941

Your Independent Community Newspaper Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

THE 73rd Year, No. 25

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

2 Sections

Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Photo by Tim Hadac

Photo by Tim Hadac

Long may she wave As tattered U.S. Flags sit on a table, Palos Park resident Hank Turek readies one for the fire. The flag retirement ceremony was part of the 12th annual Salute to Old Glory Flag Day celebration at the Village Green, 8901 W. 123rd St., last Friday evening and hosted by the Knights of Columbus Crusaders Council 10145. See more photos of the event on Page 4.

Orland cops will get emergency response heroin overdose kits by Tim Hadac staff reporter Orland Park police will soon be equipped with injectable doses of naloxone so they can more effectively respond to heroin overdose cases. Officers will be trained to use naloxone kits as early as Wednesday, according to Police Chief Timothy McCarthy, who attended Monday night’s Village Board meeting as trustees gave unanimous approval to spending $4,000 to purchase 40 to 50 doses to implement the initiative. Naloxone use by first responders in recent years has been credited with saving tens of thousands of lives of people who otherwise would have died of heroin overdoses, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While local paramedics are already equipped with the lifesaving substance, McCarthy said

that police “often get there first and find [overdose] victims with the syringe still in their arm and the suspected heroin still there. So it’s not fool-proof, but it’s pretty easy for us to understand what happened and take appropriate action.” Orland Park saw six deaths from drug overdose in 2013, five of which were heroin overdoses, the chief said. One death so far this year was attributed to heroin overdose. “The heroin epidemic has affected the entire country, and more so in the Chicago area, and Orland Park is not an exception to that,” McCarthy said, as he called naloxone “a very good investment” that may “save a life or two along the way.” Trustee Dan Calandriello, a prosecutor who sees drug-related cases regularly, said that Orland Park’s $4,000 purchase will be (See Orland, Page 4)

Once touted as a cornerstone of the planned revival of Palos Heights’ struggling Harlem Avenue business district, the stalled Palos Place development has become something of a poster child for Harlem’s lethargic economic recovery. Palos Place plans were unveiled to City Council applause a year ago February, and the $4 million project—a three-story edifice with retail, offices and apartments-was supposed to be ready for ribbon cutting this month. But the old Ben Franklin building remains, untouched by the wrecking ball. A public hearing on the property is set for 7 p.m. Monday at City Hall.

Will overlay district help revive sluggish downtown? by Tim Hadac staff reporter Palos Heights is still waiting for the long-advertised “Exciting things are happening” to actually finally start happening at the proposed Palos Place redevelopment of the old Ben Frankin dime store in the heart of the Harlem Avenue business district. More than a year has passed since Bob Grossart and other residents who sit on the city’s ad hoc Business and Economic Development Committee cheered on the city’s passage of Palos Heights –based Brigid Capital LLC owner Michael Coogan’s plans to transform the long-vacant, boarded retail space into a three-story mixed use retail, office and residential building they hoped would draw traffic to ignite a retail resurgence on Harlem. The Palos Place site is the subject of a public hearing schedule for 7 p.m. Monday, June 23, at City Hall. The Plan Commission and Zoning Board of appeals will hear a petition to amend the plat approved last year by the city’s Planned Unit Development Commission, which recommended the City Council give Coogan the go ahead to find tenants to fill his proposed redevelopment, which he had optimistically forecast at the time could be completed by the end of this month of June, 2014. To do their part to help the city rejuvenate Harlem, sagging since boutique-type shops and small eateries began shuttering their door in the latter years of the Bush administration amid the housing Crash of 2007-08,

Grossart and fellow BEDC members propose the enfolding of the Harlem commercial thoroughfare within an overlay district, which the City Council discussed Tuesday night in a special committeeof-the-whole session devoted to the topic. So now, six years after the framers of the city of Palos Heights’ Comprehensive Plan recommended the creation of a Harlem Avenue Commercial Corridor Overlay District, the process is moving forward. Aldermen described Tuesday’s session as the first of 11 steps expected to culminate in the establishment of the Harlem overlay district later this year. Also participating were several members of the BEDC. “An overlay district is a set of development rules and regulations that get put on top of the base zoning district,” explained Douglas J. Hammel, a senior associate with Houseal Lavigne. “The zoning districts that are already in place will remain there, but the overlay is intended to provide another set of detail to accomplish specific objectives that relate to a certain part of the community.” Houseal Lavigne is a community planning and economic development consulting firm hired by the city in April to lead the effort. Other steps in the process will include a workshop for local business and commercial property owners, as well as developers, which was held yesterday at City Hall, 7607 W. College Drive. Later in the process, after a draft overlay district is readied, the public will be invited to review plans and offer input.

While final boundaries remain to be drawn, the Harlem Avenue district is expected to start near College Drive and extend south to about 127th Street. It may possibly include a thin slice of residential properties adjacent to Harlem. Aldermen and BEDC members weighed in with their views on what ails the Harlem business strip and what needs to be done about it. Both Mayor Robert Straz and Alderman Alan Fulkerson (3rd Ward) urged the relaxing of building height regulations need to be relaxed. “”It’s just so flat [along Harlem],” Straz said. “There’s no delineation at all.” Others, including Alderman Michael McGrogan (4th Ward), noted that the large number of building owners along the strip makes it difficult for consensus on many issues. Straz and others mentioned a lack of parking as a concern that may hinder significant growth in the corridor, and others suggested construction of a multi-tiered city parking garage. Fulkerson, as well as Alderman Jack Clifford (2nd Ward), both said the city needs to create more access points to allow pedestrians to cross Harlem Avenue safely. Other aldermen suggested that Houseal Lavigne reach out to business developers who may have considered locating on Harlem but took a pass for various reasons. Several pointed to what they said were the obstacles faced by Brigid Capital’s Coogan in trying to attract high-profile retail tenants to the stalled Palos Place development.

BEDC member Jean Gnap and others suggested installation of amenities that will encourage shoppers to linger and socialize, rather than get in their cars and leave immediately. Gnap also pointed to the weekly farmers market as an example of an idea that succeeds in bringing people to the area who might not otherwise shop there. Proponents of the district say the move will enable city planners to better manage the Harlem corridor, which most observers agree has devolved over the years into a sometimes confusing and disjointed jumble of retail businesses, offices, residences and more—made worse by storefronts that have stood vacant for years. Better management, proponents say, will enable the corridor to develop a more cohesive identity, making it more attractive to business tenants and customers alike. Establishment of such districts give cities “more specific control over important areas, like a downtown or Olde Palos here,” said Devin J. Lavigne, Houseal Lavigne principal and co-founder, at a City Council meeting in April. The move will mean development of more specific standards “for things like architecture, land use, activities—the process will give Palos Heights residents greater input on what they want to see in the corridor, which will give [commercial] property owners and the development community greater certainty” and thus facilitate revitalization of the long troubled corridor.

Photos by Mary Hadac

Palos Flying Club’s Learn to Fly Day takes off Taxiing a colorful model aircraft toward a runway is student pilot Salam Rafati, 12, of Burbank, under the watchful eyes of trainers Dennis DeGregorio, of Orland Park (left), and Ed Jongsma, of Tinley Park (photos from left). The trio took part in the Palos R/C Flying Club’s Learn to Fly Day, held last Saturday at Morrill Meadow forest preserve, 107th Street and La Grange Road. More than 50 people, mostly boys and girls, came out with their parents to learn how to fly radiocontrolled, model aircrafts, all at no charge. Turnout was at least double what was anticipated, according to club President J.R. Centeno. Ryan Brenz, of Hickory Hills, shows that even an infant can enjoy model aircrafts.

Founded in 1964, the club draws members from a broad range of communities. Saturday’s event was staged specifically to spark interest among young people. Winner of the day’s grand prize—a radio-controlled model aircraft—was Wesley Reardon, 2, of Worth, congratulated by his aunt, Veronica Collins (left), of Willow Springs, and his parents, Matt and Jessica Reardon. The lucky tot brought laughter to the group when he patted his pregnant mother’s belly and informed his sister that the plane is his. The club encourages everyone to watch its annual Scale Air Show, set for 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, July 6 at Morrill Meadow. For more information, visit palosrc.com online.


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The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

For the Public Safety

Parents: Know the apps that your kids are using From Palos Park Police Commissioner Dan Polk 1. Kik: Kik is a free mobile messenger app that allows kids to send messages to anyone else using the Kik app. Kik makes it easy to add video and picture to text messages. At first glance, Kik appears to be harmless enough. The appeal to kids and teens is that it allows them to remain in dialogue with their friends. The potential problem with the KIK app is that once someone knows your kids/teens user name, he/she can message your child. Anyone can send your child a text / photo / video message. This app has quickly become one of the top used of pedophiles. Because you can say you are anyone on Kik, strike up a “friendship” with an unsuspecting person and begin sending anything you want to their user name. 2. SnapChat: The app is popular among kids because it allows them to send pics to a friend and the pic is deleted within a few seconds. Understand that kids can send photos through this app and assuming that all evidence is being deleted within ten seconds. 3. Vine: A video sharing app created by Twitter, Vine obtained record numbers of subscribers within mere days of it’s release. Once your child/teen creates a Vine account, he/she instantly has access to all kinds of videos. With Vine’s capabilities of locating where users are, Vine has quickly become a predator’s app of choice. Want just an idea of what these are like? Google “best vine videos” and with one look at the top few rows of Google Images, you will see what kids are seeing. 4. Tinder: designed as an online dating app, users join, add a picture, and then are invited to browse pics of others nearby it has a geography feature in the app. Once someone clicks that they like a photo, a chat window opens up and you are invited to begin a conversation with the other person. Be aware — predators pose as “friends” online. They pose as 14-year-old girls or act like a 21-year-old male who is flattering you. They talk like a friend, and have pictures that “prove” their identity with your child/teen.

Beware shopper scams

Palos park police again warn consumers about a scam involving phony advertisements for employment as a secret shopper, mystery shopper, or investigative shopper. The scam might work this

way: People respond to an ad looking for a mystery shopper or a secret shopper. When they contact the company about the position, they are told they can earn money by purchasing items at different stores or dining at different restaurants. The company then sends an employment packet. The packet includes business evaluation forms, a training assignment, and a cashier’s check, often ranging between $2,000 and $4,000. The training assignment is to cash the check, pose as a customer, and wire the money to an address in Canada. The scam is that the check is fake. The check bounces after the person wires the money, leaving the person liable for the fake check. People who apply for the secret shopper or mystery shopper jobs are told by the company that they have only 48 hours to complete the assignment or they will lose the job. Consumers need to know that a legitimate company will never send you a cashier’s check out of the blue or require you to send money to someone you have never met. The scam artists use realistic looking documents, the ‘secret’ nature of the job, and the 48-hour deadline to pressure consumers into cashing the check and wiring the money quickly before the bank or the consumer can determine it was a fake check. By then, it’s too late. There are some legitimate mystery shopping jobs. How do you tell if the one you are looking at is real or a scam? But you should be skeptical of any secret shopper, mystery shopper, or investigative shopper companies that: • Advertise jobs for shoppers on the radio, in a newspaper’s classified or “help wanted” section or through unsolicited email. Legitimate secret shopper companies generally do not advertise for jobs in this manner. • “Guarantee” a job as a mystery, secret, or investigative shopper. • Charge a fee just for applying or charge a fee for access to secret shopping job opportunities. You should not pay any fee to apply or to obtain job information. • Appear to be located in places outside the country, such as Canada. If the company does not have an established office nearby that you can visit in person, be very cautious. • It is always a good idea to check with the Better Business Bureau and investigate any business offering this sort of employment.

Inside the First Amendment

Religious freedom trumps Islamophobia in Tenn. fight by Charles C. Haynes After four years of protests, lawsuits, vandalism, arson, and a bomb threat, American Muslims in Murfreesboro, Tenn., can finally celebrate the power of religious freedom to triumph over hate and fear — at least in the courts. Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court put an end to a lawsuit filed in 2010 challenging the permit issued by Rutherford County for construction of an Islamic Center near the city of Murfreesboro. By declining to hear the case, the High Court let stand a Tennessee Court of Appeals decision in favor of county officials. Opponents of the mosque — convinced that Muslims are a threat to their community — had tried various tactics to halt construction of the Islamic Center. In a lastditch legal maneuver, they filed suit, charging that the county had given inadequate public notice of a meeting to approve the site plan for the Center. Now the Supreme Court has

put an end to the legal drama — and the Islamic Center is in Murfreesboro to stay. A remaining lawsuit — this one challenging the right of the Islamic Center to build a cemetery — remains to be resolved. But supporters of the mosque are optimistic that the courts will soon dismiss this final legal challenge. Of course, history teaches that court victories don’t change minds and hearts overnight. Muslims in Murfreesboro have their new Islamic Center thanks to local officials doing the right thing, but they still face prejudice from those convinced that Islam has no place in America. What’s heartening about this saga, however, is how local government officials stood up for religious freedom. Despite strong public opposition, members of the county planning commission voted to treat the building application of the Muslim community like applications from any (Continued on page 3)

Readers Write It’s time we build a proper Rec Center

for any sports leagues which can not be handled by the present gym or perhaps using a gym in one of our schools. The community room in our library could be utilized for Game Nights/Card games and Craft Clubs/Social Groups. In a tight economy, we need to think outside the box. These are just some ideas. I did support the new library several years ago. With the slow economy and the many increases in our household budgets, I do not wish to pay additional taxes for the remodeling, re-purpose and expansion of the existing Recreation Center Barbara C. Diehl Palos Heights

Dear Editor: Navajo Code Talker Chester Nez was the last of the original 29 Code Talkers who the United States Marine Corps used in World War ll. Mr. Nez and the 28 other Marines set up the code to baffle the Japanese military and its government. The Japanese tried unsuccessfully to crack the code, but never

Dear Editor: Regarding the proposed bond issue for Recreation Center, I appreciated the public opinion survey sent out from the Palos Heights Parks and Recreation. Unfortunately, I missed the public meetings for comments so I thought I would list them here. At this time, I do not support recreation center improvements. Water rates have increased 15 percent for this year and will increase 15 percent for 2015. TheCook County Assessor’s Office just increased my assessed valuation and I can assume the same for other Palos Heights residents. This usually means a tax increase. Electricity rates starting July will increase from 4.8 cents per kwh to 7.074 per kwh in the municipal aggregation program. According to Crain’s, on the delivery

rate part of the bill, ComEd secured a $340 million rate hike which started in June; and filed for a $275 million rate hike for January 2015. According to the Fiscal Times, June 4, 2014, regarding health insurance, “... in March, America’s largest insurers reported that they expected to raise rates in 2015, and expect to offer premiums three times higher than in 2014.” According to Morningstar (How to handle the Market’s Mixed Messages – May 28, 2014), the bond market is telling us that interest rates are not going to be that high in the future, which means the economy is not going to be that strong. Economic growth is going to be fairly weak for the foreseeable future; the bond market tends to be a little smarter stock market. With all these increases and a very slow economy adding the additional tax for the Recreation Center improvements, will only increase the burden as to what we have to cut from our own budgets. As of July 2013, unemployment in Palos Heights was 10.2 percent per citydata. com. Approximately 20 percent of our citizens are retired. Moraine Valley Community College, which we pay taxes to, already offers programs that are listed under Senior and Adult Programs in the May 2014 Planning Update. If you check out their Summer 2014 schedule, they offer physical education and health, culinary arts (this summer – cake decorating, 50 Plus Ageless Learning for Art, Careers, Computers, Investing, and Special Interests; arts and crafts, dance lessons, T’ai Chi and yoga, hobbies, home improvement, music, including youth music, photography and video and personal development. According to the MVCC Summer Catalog, page 39, “The recently opened Health, Fitness & Recreation Center is available for Moraine Valley students, employees and community residents. Offering a large fitness center with state-of-the-art equipment, 3-court gymnasium, aquatic center ..., four fitness studios, locker rooms with private steam rooms, 1/10 mile indoor track,...” It has 60 fitness classes per week, personal training, instructional programs, open recreation, learn to swim, summer camp and a kid zone. They also offer many programs for teens and children. I realize there is a cost for this, but those who want to use it should pay for it. There are many restaurants/banquet facilities in the surrounding area who would love to have the business of holiday lunches and entertainment or cooking classes. There are also health clubs in the area that might want to work out a deal with the city

Kathy Muehlhausen “Mexico”

Laurie Ruiz “Brazil”

Leonor Salaz “Argentina”

Omar Gomez “Spain”

Dear Editor: Palos Heights residents, I just finished reading Karen Wright’s letter to the editor. Bravo Karen. I could not have said this better myself. My name is Brian Callahan and I have been a resident since 2000. I am raising my four children in our community. My wife was a preschool teacher at the Rec Center for many years. I coach sports at the Rec center. I am also one of the citizens asked by the Mayor to be a vocal advocate for the building of the Rec center. The proposal of the new Rec center is truly for everyone in our community. Many of you older residents have instantly jumped on the “NO” bandwagon. Please, pause and research this great plan before jumping the gun. In order for a community to grow and attract new members you have to offer amenities that interest them. Fair housing prices, good school, safe neighborhood are always on top of the list. But so are facilities for children, adults, and seniors. This plan answers all those categories! Get in your car and travel to Crestwood, Tinley, and Orland. Look at their Rec centers. They are like Disneyland compared to ours. That is a big draw to folks looking for a home. We need to compete with those areas if we want to continue and grow and be prosperous. We need new families to move to Palos Heights to assist in our growth. The cost of this project has also been spelled out in the survey. It will have little impact on our property taxes but reap great benefits for all. This is a Community project. We all should bare the costs of improving our area and what it offers. Seniors! This will give you a place to meet friends, stay healthy, join endless activities, and give your grandchildren a place to enjoy. A Win/Win. Let’s not be shortsighted. We have modern police and fire stations, a new library, and beautiful parks. It is time we build a proper Recreation Center. Brian J. Callahan Palos Heights

Honor a hero: Change offensive name of Redskins

did accomplish breaking it! There is a way to honor Mr. Nez and his 28 other Marines who set up this unbreakable code to help win the war in the Pacific theatre. The honor would be to do away with the “Redskins” name and change it to something else that would not be offensive to Native Americans! Daniel Snyder is the owner of the Washington “Redskins” football team, and Roger Goodell, is the Commissioner of the NFL (National Football League.) These two gentlemen were made cognizant of the racial slur that the “Redskins” means to the Native Americans. They are not pressured enough to make any changes. The only change they would make is when the corporate sponsors of the game of football would find the racial slur, “Redskins” offensive and make a public statement to that effect. That would only happen when the public stops buying the products that are advertised during the game of football on TV, or products advertised in the Washington “Redskins” stadium. Mr. Daniel Snyder [owner] and Roger Goodell [ commissioner] will not rid themselves of the “Redskins” name because it is the right thing to do, only because they do not feel any pressure from the general public! The Native Americans only make up a 1.2 percent population in the U.S. They by themselves do not have a strong enough voice in this matter. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said: “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that really matter.” Support the name change! Dean Koldenhoven Palos Heights

Not in support of added taxes for Rec. Center

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This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and This newspaper newspaper dedicated This dedicated to to however it may beisthreatened. the memory memory of those who the who gave gave theirlives lives to protect America’s their to protect America’s freefreedom of the press,whenever whenever and dom of the press, and however itit may may be be threatened. however threatened.

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iewfinder

Who do you think is going to win the World Cup this year? (Asked at Oak Lawn Pavilion) Photos by Emily Smas

George Ortega “Brazil”


The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

Public Works pair resigns

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Allegedly wrestled for money while on paid disability leave

they were “looking into the veracity of the allegations. We are completing that process now-gathering and verifying all of the evidence. “Misconduct on the part of any shy about taking whatever steps by Tim Hadac are necessary to appropriately deal employee will not be tolerated,” staff reporter the statement continued. “That with this.” Both had jobs in the Public said, the village also has an obliTwo Orland Park municipal employees have resigned in the wake Works Department, and their du- gation to adhere to very specific of allegations that they worked in ties including plowing snow in the procedures outlined in its labor professional wrestling jobs while winter. Slewoski had been on leave agreements and personnel policies. on paid disability leave from their since November, and Rollins began We are required to and have a his leave in February, according commitment to ensuring that due village jobs. process guidelines are followed. Frank Rollins Jr. quit on June to published reports. The allegations were made in That process began when we first 11, and Dan Slewoski did the same two days later, according to village an investigative report broadcast learned of this and we are moving spokesman Joseph S. La Margo. by a television news organization. forward with an investigation into “At this point, the village is In that report, the men said they this matter.” Village officials hastened to add, unable to comment any further were not violating the terms of on this situation, because it is a their medical leave and denied “Orland Park has 278 full-time employees and hundreds of partpersonnel matter,” La Margo told wrestling in the ring. Rollins reportedly told an in- time employees who work very The Regional News via email on Tuesday. Both had been employed vestigative reporter that he used hard and perform at a very high by the village for more than 15 village-owned equipment and fa- level for this community. They cilities to make wrestling promo- should not be judged by one or two years, he added. The statement appeared to be tional videos, but that he did so on individuals who may have broken at odds with a statement released his own time and with permission. the rules. We have a very dedicated In a statement issued earlier village staff, and our residents apby the village on June 4, which stated, in part, “…we will not be this month, village officials said preciate their service.”

Regional sports editor Ken Karrson earns three IPA journalism awards In sports terms, Ken Karrson brought home a gold medal and a couple of bronze medals. The Reporter/Regional sports editor garnered three awards in the Illinois Press Association contest as winners were announced Friday at its convention in Springfield. Karrson won first place in the Class B headline writing contest with the judges saying “This headline writer knows how to draw eyes to stories. Great job, very creative.’’ His collection from 2013 featured “More southern comfort” about Chicago Christian’s baseball trips to Jacksonville, “Forgettable Momence” about Chicago Christian’s football team’s loss to Momence, “Meteor slighting” about St. Laurence’s football loss to De La Salle, “Tigers get AdamBombed” about Stagg quarterback Adam Pilota’s big passing night against Joliet West and a “A Crummy way to end’’ about St. Rita’s Julian Crum’s block of a Brother

to prevent injuries during summer football sessions. Reporter editor Jeff Vorva took second place to Karrson in headline writing. Headlines that appeared in the news section were “Disorder on the courts” about Oak Lawn’s basketball court controversy, “Doggone it’’ about the Richards Bulldogs’ state football championship loss, “High Tension” about an Oak Lawn resident’s displeasure with ComEd, “No Christmas Carol for Bury” about Oak Lawn trustee Carol Quinlan blasting Mayor Sandra Bury’s blog and “West Nile Nightmare” on Evergreen Park Ken Karrson Mayor Jim Sexton’s fight with Rice field goal hurting the Crusad- West Nile virus. The judges said “Great job ers’ chances to make the playoffs. Karrson’s Bartosh columns on writing headlines that make you athletes spitting, an athlete ap- want to read the story; particularly pearing on a Fruity Pebbles cereal enjoyed ‘Doggone it.’ ’’ Vorva also took honorable menbox and manners at the Master’s Tournament won third place as did tion for a photo series featuring an in-depth feature on the Illinois the end of a Chicago Christian High School Association new rules girls volleyball match.

Students reading at 4th-grade level is cause for concern in District 218 by Declan Harty For Regional Publishing Despite another successful year in the eyes of the school board, issues of reading levels still remain in District 218 high schools. More than 100 students in the district who participated in the Reading Plus programs at Richards, Shepard and Eisenhower High Schools were reading at a level of fourth grade or below, according to a Reading Plus report that was revealed at Monday night’s district board meeting at the Administration Center in Oak Lawn. The program, which has been used by the district in recent years, allows students to gain exposure to non-fiction novels and other pieces of literature at their appropriate grade level. According to the report, the data shows that while some students have progressed, there has been a dull in progress toward the appropriate grade reading level the students should be at. At Eisenhower high school, there were 59 students in the program at the beginning of the year with a reading level of fourth grade and below, however, in May there were 54 students. At Richards High School, the amount of students in the program with a reading level of fourth grade or below decreased by seven from 42 to 35. At Shepard High School, the number decreased by

First Amendment (Continued from page 2) other religious community. That took courage. At the height of the conflict, political candidates and anti-Muslim activists worked hard to whip up opposition to the Islamic Center in Murfreesboro and beyond. Even televangelist Pat Robertson weighed in, suggesting that county officials may have fallen victim to Muslims’ “ability to bribe folks” and warning of a future Muslim takeover of the city council. But through it all, county officials stood firm. Moreover, many local religious groups rallied in support of the Muslim community. Students at Middle Tennessee State University helped form Middle Tennesseans for Religious Freedom, a grassroots effort to counter anti-mosque protests. And the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty — one of the nation’s most effective defenders of free exercise

eight over the school year from 57 to 49 students. While the program yielded some results, some board members expressed hesitations and fears about the results that are displayed and what is impacted the students in the classroom. “There is a boredom factor,” said board member Johnny Holmes. “You have to engage in the program…These kids have missed the foundation that others have gotten and that foundation is a family-like atmosphere.” In addition to the reading levels, the board discussed various factors such as semester course failures, which decreased at all three schools. The meeting, which drew approximately 30 spectators, was used as a review of the just-completed school year, while keeping an eye looking toward the future. In other news from the district: • The board mulled the concept of a neuropsychology clinic opening at the beginning of the fall term in the administration center. The project, which reached some hesitation from some board members would create a clinic for students of district 218 to get what is being called the latest and greatest in neuropsychology. Along with other school districts, the clinic would hire several interns who are licensed school psychologists seeking licensure for neuropsychology who are willing to front the cost

of their interns. The amount of interns would vary from year to year based on the amount of people seeking the licensure. Board President Marco Corsi expressed hesitation and fear of the unknowing information that had not been hammered out such as the costs of utilities, whether the other school districts are invested for the long haul and the financial burden. “You don’t know what these expenditures are,” he said. • Board members kicked around a revision to the weighted grade policy, which had four parts to it. The board approved the first part, which included the weight of honors and advanced placement courses. The board approved the motion to have AP and honors courses carry an additional 1.0 weight to the grade point average. The remaining three parts of the motion were tabled for a later date. Those proposed parts were an elimination of class ranks, dual credit being awarded for AP and honors level courses, and making core and foundation classes available toany student in need of modified curricula. • The board discussed various building and maintenance projects for the summer including lawn care at Eisenhower, mechanical repairs at the Delta Summit Learning Center, a new childcare classroom at Shepard and new lighting and roadwork at Richards.

of religion for all — provided legal support. Despite this good news out of Tennessee, Islamophobia remains a national problem thanks to a cottage industry of anti-Muslim groups working to conflate terrorism and Islam in the minds of the American people. “Anti-Sharia bills” are pending in at least 10 state legislatures — all of them motivated by anti-Muslim bias and based on a distorted understanding of both Islamic and American law. (For an accurate understanding of Sharia in America, see “What is the truth about American Muslims?” at www.religiousfreedomcenter.org.) If past is prologue, however, Islamophobia in our country will fade as American Muslims become more visible in places like Murfreesboro. We have been down this road before. Not so very long ago, antiCatholic hatred was at its height in Murfreesboro — and across America. As described by Bob

Smietana in the Tennessean, in 1929 angry residents of Murfreesboro marched to the courthouse trying to block the construction of the town’s first Catholic Church. Today some 2,000 families are members of St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in Murfreesboro. Religious freedom trumped antiCatholicism 80 years ago — and religious freedom, if we work at it, will trump Islamophobia today. We may have a distance to go, but we have come a long way. Consider that six of the current nine justices on the U.S. Supreme Court — the very court that put an end to the fight to against the building of a mosque in Murfreesboro — are Roman Catholics. Only in America. Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum Institute, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20001. Web: religiousfreedomcenter.org Email: chaynes@newseum.org

Submitted photos

Library’s Palmer Award to Palos Lutheran Church The Palos Heights Public Library presented the George W. Palmer Distinguished Service Award last Thursday to the Palos Evangelical Lutheran Church for its cooperation with the library and continued use of its parking lot for overflow library patrons. Pictured presenting the award is library Board President President Tim Geary (right). Accepting the award for the church is its pastor, the Rev. David Waterstradt. This award, named after the late longtime library board member George Palmer, for whom Palmer Park in Palos Heights is also named, is presented periodically to an organization or individual for single or cumulative acts of outstanding service to the library. The designation of award recipients is to be determined by a vote of the library board. The Palmer award is the highest honor the library board can bestow.

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The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

Salute to Old Glory into the twilight’s last gleaming Philip Horton, of Orland Park, salutes Old Glory as it is run up a flagpole by Edmund Stangel, of Palos Heights, minutes after they retired a worn flag on the same pole. Both men represented the Reber-Tesmond Orland-Palos VFW Post 2604 (Photos clockwise, from upper left.) Knights of Columbus member Hank Turek, of Palos Park (left), and George Griffin, of Lemont, carefully bring the Stars and Stripes to the fire. About a dozen flags went up in smoke at the ceremony. Fourth Degree Knight Randy Johnson, of Orland Park, brought a touch of flair and dignity to the Village Green when he participated in the posting of colors at the start of the event. The evening’s centerpiece was a concert of patriotic music by the Southwest Community Concert Band, punctuated with remarks about the War of 1812, during which Francis Scott Key penned “The StarSpangled Banner,” by Knight Tim Kasper, event chairman and founder. Eighty men strong, the Crusaders Council draws members from four local Catholic parishes: Our Lady of the Woods, St. Francis, Sacred Heart, and St. Bernard.

Photos by Tim Hadac

Submitted photo

Congressman helps constituents fly Old Glory

Under the watchful eyes of parents, children gleefully explore the slide at Community Park on Tuesday evening.

Photo by Tim Hadac

Heights will monitor playgrounds after Oak Lawn slide booby trapped by Tim Hadac staff reporter

added that many parents in the city are aware of the incident in Oak Lawn and are already checking playground equipment on their Playground slides in Palos own, before they allow their chilHeights are now being checked dren to use it. five days a week for signs of maliThe tampering in Oak Lawn cious tampering, in the wake of a was the work of “somebody who’s June 5 discovery of drywall screws taken it upon themselves to ruin affixed to three slides at a park kids’ fun,” added Alderman Jack in Oak Lawn. Clifford (2nd Ward). The disclosure was made at Reaction from Palos Heights Tuesday night’s City Council parents and grandparents was meeting by Alderman Jerry Mcmixed Tuesday evening. Govern (4th Ward), chairman of “I’m glad the city is on top of the Council’s Public Safety Comthis,” said Allie Homolka, as she mittee, who praised city officials watched her four-year-old son, Mifor swift action to inspect the chael, play at the 34-acre Complayground equipment and keep munity Park, just south of City city officials abreast of the situaHall and the busiest park in Palos Heights. “From what I read in the news, the guy who booby-trapped the slides in Oak Lawn has not been found or arrested, so he’s still out there. If he did it once, he’ll do it again. It’s just a question of where and when.” Raymond Anderson, 63, a grandfather of four, took a more philosophical view. “We should always be watchful of our children, but let’s not overreact,” he said as he walked his dog near the playground at Palmer Park, 123rd Street and 73rd Avenue. “Palos Heights is not Oak Lawn. I just think sometimes that people scare the hell out of themselves by watching too much news Photo by Tim Hadac Alderman Jerry McGovern (right) praises city officials for swift action on TV or gabbing online in these to ensure safety at local playgrounds, as Aldermen Michael McGro- Facebook groups.” Local children, for their part, gan (left) and Jack Clifford listen at Tuesday’s City Council meeting. tion. Singled out for praise were City Administrator Dan Nisavic, Parks and Recreation Director Mike Leonard, and Public Works Director Scott Smith. “We’ve checked all of the parks in the city and have been doing it every morning since the Oak Lawn incident,” Nisavic told The Regional News after Monday’s meeting. The inspection schedule is open ended. “We’re going to do it until we get comfortable. It’s going to be every day until we say we stop,” he added. Nisavic said the city has notified local school districts of the stepped up action, and encourages everyone to be reasonably vigilant. He

seemed not to notice. The slide at Community Park was busy on Tuesday with young boys and girls scampering up the steps, squealing with delight on the slides and playing tag with each other. Also Tuesday, aldermen approved zoning variances that would OK outdoor signs larger and taller than what the city code currently allows. One is a sign at Harvest Bible Chapel, 6600 W. 127th St., and the other is at St. Mary Orthodox Church, 6330 W. 127th St. The St. Mary variance also will enable the church to erect 48-foot-tall spires on their site. Casting a lone vote against the signs was Alderman Robert Basso (2nd Ward), a consistent critic of variances, who told The Regional News after the meeting that he thinks businesses and others in the city should simply follow the law as written. In an unrelated matter, Basso— the chairman of the Council’s Municipal Grounds and Property Committee--noted that the city is looking for a local business, not-forprofit or other group to “adopt” the Palos Heights section of Route 83 through a program offered by the Illinois Department of Transportation. If no group steps forward, individuals are welcome to volunteer and should do so by contacting the Public Works Department at 361-1800. Adoption includes picking up roadside trash four times a year, Basso told The Regional News after the meeting.

Congressman Dan Lipinski’s offices in Orland Park, Oak Lawn, Chicago and Lockport will accept worn American flags for proper disposal. For more information, call 312-886-0481. For those looking for a replacement flag, his Washington, D.C., office can help constituents obtain an American flag that has been flown over the U.S. Capitol. Contact the office toll-free at 866-8225701 to find out more. If possible, his office can accommodate requests for flags that are flown at a specific date or time. If you’re a veteran, he will provide you with a flag for free. Here, Lipinski is shown at a Flag Day ceremony in Chicago.

Orland (Continued from page 1) “worth it times a million” if it saves even one life. Also Monday, members of the Village Board’s Parks and Recreation Committee gave unanimous approval to awarding $38,300 to Universal Asbestos Removal Inc., of Lemont, to remove asbestos from the buildings remaining at the old Orland Plaza, at the northwest corner of 143rd Street and La Grange Road. Removal is expected to be completed by the end of August, which will pave the way for the structures’ demolition. The committee also voted to accept a bid from GLI Services to purchase and install indoor playground equipment and place a new floor at the Franklin Loebe Recreation Center, 14650 S. Ravinia Ave. The $62,300 purchase will replace equipment that has seen significant wear over the past 17 years, trustees said. Also, on a 2-0-1 vote, the committee approved spending $9,600 for the purchase of pilates-related exercise equipment for the Orland Park Sportsplex, 11351 W. 159th St., from Mad Dogg Athletics/Peak Pilates. Calandriello, as well as Trustee Patricia A. Gira voted in favor, but Trustee Kathleen M. Fenton abstained after quizzing village officials about the proposed purchase and expressing skepticism about the process and the need.

Committee members also approved awarding $14,200 to AV TechSource to replace the sound system in the main boardroom at Village Hall. Officials have described the analog system as outdated to the point where replacement parts are no longer available. Members of the press and public, as well as trustees themselves, have complained about the system in recent months—especially microphones that cut in and out and amplification that is often inadequate in a cavernous room with a high ceiling. Finally, members of the Development Services, Planning and Engineering Committee continued the discussion of whether the village should allow businesses with outdoor signs—particularly those on La Grange Road--to incorporate electronic message boards—and if so, what restrictions should be placed on them. Fenton acknowledged that the Village Board is “very divided” on the issue and struggles to find a balance between ensuring a visually appealing retail corridor and giving businesses the flexibility they need to advertise their goods and services. “Orland Park business are here because they want to be here,” said Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Keloryn Putnam, who spoke at the meeting and urged the committee to move forward with a discussion that been kicked back and forth by the Village Board since 2010. “Nobody wants to put up an uglylooking sign that’s obnoxious.”


The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

5

Palos police carry the Torch for Special Olympics

Submitted photos

Palos Park Police Officer Ross Ricobene pauses for a photo with his fianceé, Michelle Dicianni, at a local leg of the Law Enforcement Torch Run Wednesday last week. The annual relay raises awareness and funds for Special Olympics Illinois. Nine Palos Park officers participated. Providing a bit of levity at the Torch Run was Officer Ricobene’s nephew, Lucca Cuttitta, who came dressed as Superman. In all, about 3,000 officers from all branches law enforcement participated in this year’s run in 23 different legs throughout the state. The run helped generate excitement for the Special Olympics Illinois Summer Games, held last weekend at various sites in Bloomington and Normal. More than 4,000 athletes competed.

Lock your car overnight: Thefts from unlocked autos prompt alert Palos Park police remind residents to lock their cars and report suspicious people lurking in area neighborhoods after victims reported two thefts from unlocked vehicles in the area of Woodland Trail between Wednesday night last week and the next morning. Cars left unlocked allow easy access for potential thieves, Police Chief Joe Miller said. “Make sure to lock your cars, just because it is in your own driveway, does not make it secure.” A 53-year-old Palos Heights woman told Palos Park police that her car was vandalized while it was parked at the Metra station at 8101 W. 121st St., sometime between 7:15 a.m. and 6:07 p.m. June 4. The victim discovered a fender to fender scratch on the passenger side of the vehicle, as well as a banana peel and dirt thrown atop the car. In other Palos Park police news, Shawn D. Mudd Jr., 23,

ing out any personal information. Police investigated and traced the call to Ponchatula, of Orland Park, was charged La., but were unable to locate with driving on a suspended the man who made the call. They license. Police curbed his car added that the number used to in the 13100 block of South La make the call was a “scammer Grange Road at 1:49 p.m. June 4 number” identified by other law after they said they saw several enforcement agencies. While the air fresheners dangling from the unidentified caller committed no rear view mirror. Bond was set crime, police used the incident at $1,500, and Mudd is due in to remind everyone to be wary court in Bridgeview on July 23. of unsolicited calls and to reA 64-year-old Palos Park man frain from giving out personal told police he believes a confi- information. Cathy B. Wytrwal, 25, of Lemdence artist attempted to gain access to his home computer. He ont, was charged with possession said he received an unsolicited of cannabis. She was a back-seat phone call at 7:15 p.m. June 11 passenger in a car stopped by from an unidentified man with police for a traffic violation in a South Asian or Middle East- the 12400 block of South Bell ern accent. The caller said he Road at 2:35 p.m. June 9. Police was from a computer services said they found a plastic bag company and asked the Palos containing cannabis in her purse. Park man to turn on his home Wytrwal is scheduled to appear computer. The man declined and at a hearing at the Kaptur Adhung up the phone without giv- ministrative Center on July 2.

PALOS PARK POLICE

Man detained at mall charged with forgery

Orland Park police charged Wesley Newsome, 34, of Mokena, with forgery, identity theft and unlawful possession of fraudulent identification after he allegedly tried to use an expired line of credit to purchase a $1,200 diamond ring at a department store at Orland Square Mall at 11 a.m. May 20. When the purchase was denied, Newsome then went into another department and attempted to buy more than $2,600 worth of clothing, bedding items and electronics, according to the store’s security staff. When he was turned down for that purchase, he allegedly applied for a new line of store credit with a fake driver’s license that used Newsome’s photo with the name and address of another man, from Iowa. Police said they contacted the Iowa man, who was on vacation in Europe and unaware that anyone was using his identity. Bond was set at $50,000, and Newsome is currently in custody, according to the fire prevention, personal safety and district residents. If space is avail- Cook County Department of Corinjury prevention, safety around able, children from outside the dis- rections website. He is scheduled utilities, railroad tracks, and severe trict may attend for a nominal to appear in court in Bridgeview weather preparedness. The pro- registration fee of $30. For more on Wednesday. In other Orland Park police gram also teaches children about information, or to download an required firefighter skills, and application, visit OrlandFire.org or news, Connor G. Dragel, 22, of reinforces the dangers of dealing call 349-0074. Applications are also Orland Park, and John W. Veswith strangers. Children also learn available at OFPD headquarters vardes, 22, of Oak Forest, were how to work together as a team. at 9790 W. 151st St. Applications charged with possession of cannabis. Their vehicle was curbed Participation is free to OFPD must be returned by July 1. by police in the 15000 block of South Harlem Avenue at 6:01 p.m. May 21 after police saw a necklace dangling from the rear view mirror, police said. A search of the vehicle yielded a cannabis cigar and a plastic bag containing cannabis, according to the police report. Dragel was given a municipal citation and a hearing date of June 10 at the Orland Park Civic Center. Police said that because Vesvardes had “a significant drug arrest in his criminal history,” he was given a court date of June 6 in Bridgeview. Paul D. Kolios, 20, of Orland Orland Fire Protection District photo Park, was charged with criminal Campers at last year’s fire and life safety camp. trespass to land. A plainclothes police officer said he saw Kolios in Orland Square Mall at 7:28 p.m. May 14 and recognized him from

Orland Fire Dist. offers annual fire and life safety camp for kids The Orland Fire Protection District is accepting applications for children ages 8 through 11 years to participate in its annual Kids Fire & Life Safety Camp, which runs July 15-18. Each session runs from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Fire District’s Training Center, 10728 W. 163rd Place, Orland Park. The Fire & Life Safety camp is dedicated to exposing schoolaged children to safety lessons that deal with potential hazards commonly found in homes and at schools. The camp sessions are designed to be fun, entertaining and educational, while offering attendees the experience and knowledge to keep themselves out of harm’s way. Campers will attend lectures and participate in hands-on lessons, including opportunities to participate in exercises designed to reinforce the program fundamentals. Topics explored and addressed include basic first aid and CPR, water and pool safety, bicycle safety,

Dist. 135 gets state security grant Orland School District 135 was awarded $126,000 through the Illinois School and Campus Safety Grant to enhance the district’s safety program to boost security at district schools. Risk and Safety Director Jerry Hughes reported the grant award to the board of education at its meeting on June 9. Board President Joe LaMargo said, “The district has an outstanding safety record and this grant will provide further opportunity towards ensuring the security for students, staff and visitors.” The grant was announced earlier

this year with eligibility based on successful applicants to purchase and install physical security enhancements in public elementary, secondary and post-secondary schools. “In an ever-changing world, we are doing our very best to uphold safety in the District,“ stated Board Member and Safe School Committee Chairman Gregory Okon during a recent meeting with District Administrators, Orland community leaders and local school officials. The district’s comprehensive safety plan encompasses many objectives such as transportation procedures, practice drills for various

incidents, and the establishment of secure school buildings. Superintendent Dr. Janet Stutz said, “The district is always looking for ways to further enhance safety procedures and our number one priority will always be to provide a safe learning environment for our students and staff.” Gov. Pat Quinn announced the availability of $25 million in safety grants this past January for Illinois public schools to strengthen security and provide equipment and training that can protect students and save lives. —Orland School District 135

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Palos Heights Police Department participants pound the pavement and run south on Harlem Avenue, near 123rd Street, early Wednesday last week. Seven Palos Heights PD officers ran the torch relay. The Palos contingent handed off the torch to another group of runners at a point just south of I-80 and La Grange Road in Mokena. Fundraising for the Torch Run continues. Orland Park police are planning a charity bike ride scheduled for Aug 23. For details, visit soill.org online and click on the “Torch Run” tab.

ORLAND PARK POLICE a March 10 arrest on a charge of retail theft. The incident had prompted mall officials to ban Kolios from the premises for a year, police said. Kolios said he was unaware of a ban, according to the police report. He was set to appear in court in Bridgeview on June 2. Police charged Briana L. Sasso, 20, of Orland Park, with retail theft after she allegedly stole two blouses, valued at more than $60, from a department store in Orland Square Mall at 11:30 a.m. May 16. Sasso is scheduled to appear in court today in Bridgeview. Jessica A. McLaughlin, 22, of Evergreen Park, was charged with possession of cannabis. She was a passenger in an SUV stopped by police near 143rd Street and Harlem Avenue at 11:24 a.m. May 18, after police said they saw items

dangling from the rear view mirror. She admitted to having a cannabis blunt concealed in her clothing, according to the police report. McLaughlin was set to appear at a hearing at the Orland Park Civic Center on June 10. Police charged Lamar D. Green, 24, of University Park, with driving on a suspended license, and well as failure to wear a seatbelt. Police stopped his minivan near Orland Park Place and La Grange Road at 5:55 a.m. May 20. His vehicle was towed and impounded, and Green is scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview on June 27. Valerie M. Bureal, 27, of Richton Park, as charged with driving on a suspended license, as well as using a cell phone while driving. Police curbed her car in the 15900 block of South La Grange Road at 11:29 p.m. May 21. The vehicle was towed and impounded, and Bureal was given a court date of June 6 in Bridgeview.

Orland police will host Coffee with a Cop date Officers from the Orland Park Police department and community members will come together in an informal, neutral space to discuss community issues, build relationships and drink coffee. All community members are invited to attend. The event will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, June 25, at Panera Bread, 15252 S. La Grange Road. Coffee with a Cop provides a unique opportunity for community members to ask questions and learn more about the department’s work in Orland Park neighborhoods. The majority of contacts law enforcement have with the public happen during emergencies or emotional situations. Those situations are not always the most effective times for relationship building with the community and some community members may feel that officers are unapproachable on

the street. Coffee with a Cop breaks down barriers and allows for a relaxed one-on-one interaction. “We hope that community members will feel comfortable to ask questions, bring concerns, or simply get to know our officers,” said Chief Tim McCarthy. “These interactions are the foundation of community partnerships.” Coffee with a Cop is a national initiative supported by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. Similar events are being held across the county. Local police departments will strive to make lasting connections with the communities they serve. The program aims to advance the practice of community policing through improving relationships between police officers and community members one cup of coffee at a time.

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The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

School Notes Explore careers in manufacturing for high schoolers Moraine Valley Community College is now enrolling high school juniors and seniors into its free Exploring Careers in Manufacturing summer program, being offered at the Palos Hills campus, 9000 W. College Pkwy., July 7-31. Sessions meet Mondays through Thursdays from 9 a.m. to noon. Participants will receive an overview of vocational math and job readiness training, take field trips and learn from guest speakers who will promote careers in manufacturing. They also will learn about over 20 certificate Submitted photo and associate degree programs in Manufacturing offered at Moraine Valley. The Exploring Careers in ManSummer camp kids at Southwest Suburban Montessori in Palos Park enjoyed “The Week of the ufacturing project is being funded Artists” last week. After learning about the artists and their styles, the children tried their own skills at by the Walmart Brighter Futures 2.0 Project, which is helping to replicating the works done by Kandinsky, Pollock, Picasso, van Gogh and Warhol.

Week of the Artists at SW Montessori summer camp

move low-income, low-skilled participants into middle-skill occupations. Wages for middle-skill occupations start at or around $30,000 annually and $14.42 hourly. Middle-skill jobs require less than a bachelor’s degree but more than a high school diploma, and they represent nearly 50 percent of all new jobs in the U.S. labor market. To register for Exploring Careers in Manufacturing, call Lisa Cockerham, WBF 2.0 project manager, at or email her at cockerhaml@morainevalley.edu.

As adults are increasingly diagnosed with heart disease, having employees in the workplace who know CPR and first aid can mean the difference between life and death. Training in both of these areas is available at Moraine Val-

ley Community College. Classes can be customized to meet any company’s needs. This class is recommended for individuals as well as employees of small businesses. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires many businesses to have employees trained in CPR and basic first aid to help create a safe, supportive work environment. It also can help prevent possible liabilities that may arise from health-related incidents that occur at work. Moraine Valley also offers several CPR for Health Professionals classes. These classes assist current healthcare professionals with maintaining their CPR credentials and allow new healthcare students to earn their credentials. For more information, call the Corporate, Community and Continuing Education Department at 974-5735 or visit morainevalley. edu/ccce.

Justin Slattery, of Orland Park, has achieved a place on the University of Evansville Dean’s List for academic achievements during the Spring Semester 2014. Slattery is majoring in Creative Writing. To make the Dean’s List, a student at UE must earn at least a 3.5 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. *** Bellarmine University in Louisville, Ky., has named Palos Heights resident Maris Libera to the dean’s list for spring 2014. Libera is a freshman majoring in pre-nursing general, and previously attended Shepard High School. Bellarmine’s dean’s list recognizes students who receive a grade point average of 3.5 or above on a 4.0 scale. *** Two local students earned flight credentials this spring semester from the Institute of Aviation at the University of Illinois. They are Robert Grigus of Palos Heights, Commercial pilot airplane multiengine rating; and Neil Pelech of Orland Park, Certified flight instructor instrument-airplane designation. *** The following local students have been named to the spring 2014 Dean’s List at Beloit College in Beloit, Wis.: Joseph Hunhoff of Palos Park, and Madalyn McHale

of Orland Park. *** Parkland College student Frank L Weiss of Palos Heights was named to the school’s Dean’s List for spring semester 2014. *** Melissa Trentacoste of Orland Park was one of 250 students to graduate from Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa, on May 11. Trentacoste graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. *** The following local students have been named to the Carthage College in Kenosha, Wis., Dean’s List for academic excellence during the spring 2014 semester. Dean’s List honors are accorded Carthage students who achieve a 3.5 grade-point average while carrying at least 14 credit hours during a semester. Bridget Adams of Palos Heights, Lauren Baca of Palos Park, Annika Evenhouse of Palos Heights, Amanda Garrigan of Palos Park, Maura Melfi of Palos Heights and Allison Von Borstel of Orland Park. *** Clare Kennedy, of Palos Heights, a sophomore in the College of Nursing, was named to the 2014 spring semester Dean’s List at Creighton University in Omaha, Neb. ***

Moraine Valley offers CPR, first aid classes

Student News Chemistry. Mary Bradley is studying Psychology. James Bilder is studying Business Administration.

The following local students were named the Dean’s List for the spring semester at Lewis University in Romeoville. Orland Park Elizabeth Jesionowski is studying Organizational Communication. Magdalena Kaminska is studying Sport Management. Sevanna Wojciechowski is studying Liberal Arts. Daniel Pacella III is studying Aviation Flight Management. Kristina Zwolfer is studying Public Relations. Cody Marks is studying Aviation Maintenance Mgmt. Mark Sivak is studying PreEngineering. Taylor Quinn is studying Psychology. Michelle Krzystyniak is studying Broadcast Journalism. Laura Pindelski is studying Mass Communications. Jacob Schifano is studying Air Traffic Control Mgmt-B.S. John Hodul is studying Chemistry. Nicholas Anderson is studying Sport Management. Anthony Martinez is studying Biology. Peter Turek is studying Computer Graphic Design. Michelle Dion is studying Psychology. Dana Skwarski is studying Psychology. Zeferino Martinez is studying History. Christen Alcordo is studying Biology. Destiny Cerna is studying Human Resource Management. Nicholas Kaminski is studying Computer Information Systems. Lauren Besse is studying

Submitted photo

After an impressive high school career at Marist, Kaila Case, of Palos Heights, made the highly competitive cheerleading team at the University of Louisville. Kaila was joined by Marist Athletic Director Bob Lim and Marist cheerleading Coach Nicole White as she signed with the University of Louisville. Business Administration. Dana Pinkos is studying Elementary Education. Meghan Carmody is studying Special Education-Elem Educat. Laila Vigants is studying Nursing (Generic). Katherine Pula is studying

Nursing-Bachelor’s to BSN. Marta Zakrzewski is studying Nursing (Generic). Jessica Brostrom is studying Nursing (Generic). Palos Heights Amy Mlynarski is studying

Palos Park Theodore Karamanski is studying Biology. Kevin McKeown is studying Computer Science. Hannah Golz is studying Special Education. Kaitlyn Evoy is studying Special Education. *** Claire Oosterbaan, a biology B.S. major and a resident of Palos Heights, is on Butler University’s Dean’s List for the spring semester of the 2013-14 academic year. Recipients range from freshman to sixth-year pharmacy students. *** The print edition of the Lewis University student newspaper, The Flyer, has been recognized by the American Scholastic Press Association with a first place award for general excellence. Saule Grybauskas of Orland Park, a copy editor, was on the staff that won the award. ASPA judges referred to The Flyer is an “excellent school newspaper, which shows the creativity and journalistic knowledge” of the entire editorial and design staff. *** Nicole L. Kamzic, a senior business administration major, the daughter of Paul M. and Susan S. Kamzic of Orland Park, made the dean’s list for the spring semester at Monmouth College. A grade-point average of 3.5 or higher, while earning at least three academic credits during the semester, is required to be on the dean’s list. ***

Submitted photo

Orland Chamber scholars awarded The Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce awarded three scholarships to local high school students at a ceremony held in the Chamber’s office in June. Every year, the chamber awards three $1,000 scholarships to the children of current Chamber members. The 2014 recipients were Tara Enright, a graduate of Lincolnway-North High School; Nathan McCatty, a graduate of Sandburg High School and Anna Schieber, a graduate of Marist High School. The scholarships were awarded based on community service, school performance, activity involvement and employment during the school year. Shown are Scholarship Committee Chairman Paul Novak, of Waddell & Reed (from left); recipients Nathan McCatty, Anna Schieber, Tara Enright and Chamber President Rob Wehmeier.

LEGAL NOTICE


The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

Community Notes Palos Dist. 128 band car wash A car wash sponsored by Palos School District 128 school band will be held this Saturday, June 21, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Independence Junior High School, 6610 W. Highland Drive in Palos Heights. Enter the parking lot off Westgate Drive on Edgewood with a dirty car and leave with a clean car. All proceeds will go to the band program to assist in the purchase and repair of instruments, sheet music, and other educational activities. Rain date will be next Saturday, June 28, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please enter the parking lot off Westgate Drive on Edgewood. All proceeds will go to the band

program to assist in the purchase and repair of instruments, sheet music, and other educational activities!

Strawberry Fest at Palos United Methodist Chuch Palos United Methodist Church will hold its 24th annual Strawberry Fest will be held this Sunday, June 22, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Hamburgers, hotdogs, strawberry shortcake will be served. The event also includes a bake sale, craft and book sale, Bounce house, face-painting, snow cones, popcorn and cotton candy. Small petting zoo and pony rides. Tickets for lunch cost $8 adult; $4 children. The church is at 12101 S. Harlem Ave.

Neat Repeats 50 percent off sale this Sat.

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Neat Repeats Resale will hold its 28th anniversary annual storewide sale this Saturday, June 21, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Everything in both stores will be 50 percent. Select from women’s, men’s and children’s spring and summer fashions; holiday items, antiques, designer purses, housewares and more. Neat Repeats are located in Orland Park, at 9028 W. 159th St., and Worth, 7026 W. 111th St. All sales at Neat Repeats Resale benefit the clients served by the Crisis Center for South Suburbia. The Crisis Center for South Suburbia is a non-profit community organization that provides emerSubmitted photo gency shelter and other services Beautiful residential gardens are a mainstay in Orland Park. Open Lands of Orland Park will hold its for individuals and families victim- Open Lands Garden Walk & Bazaar this Sunday to help preserve open space in the village. In addition, ized by domestic violence. the village invites amateur residential gardeners to enter its separate, annual garden contest.

Benefits and Fundraisers Simple Gifts

Orland Garden Walk this Sunday

Open Lands of Orland Park open space within the village. will showcase some of the vil- The Open Lands Garden Walk lage’s loveliest gardens on its an- is one of the largest fundraisers Strike Out ALS 5K will benefit nual Garden Walk, a fundraiser Strike Out ALS the Les Turner ALS Foundation to help preserve open space in Musical instruments 5K at U.S. Cellular to help support research, patient the village. needed Attendees are invited to visRunners and join the Score services and educational programs and WXRT’s Lin Brehmer the for people with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Do you have a musical instru- it some of Orland Park’s best Les Turner ALS Foundation’s disease). ment that you no longer use and residential gardens this Sunday, Advance registration is $40. would like to donate it? June 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Strike Out ALS 5K on TuesThe Garden Walk and Bazaar day, July 15, and experience the Race day registration is $50 and State Rep. Monique D. Davis thrill of running on the warning will open at 5:30p.m. Free parking (D-27th District) is requesting begins at the Orland Park Civic track inside U.S. Cellular Field. is available at U.S. Cellular Field. instruments for volunteer music Center, 14750 S. Ravinia Ave., Separate from the Open The race begins outside the sta- Runners are encouraged to fund- teachers to teach music to children. where garden and craft vendors Lands Garden Walk, the vildium at 6:30 p.m. and features raise and prizes will be awarded If you are able to donate an sell their wares at the bazaar. lage of Orland Park Garden Advance tickets to tour the entertainment at each mile. New to the top 5 fundraisers. Each instrument, her office will accept Contest recognizes carefully this year, runners can celebrate Strike Out ALS 5K participant deliveries from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. gardens are $15 each and are created gardens maintained with family and friends at a post- will receive a Dri-Fit shirt. To at 1234 W. 95th St. in Chicago. available at the Village Hall, by their owners. Village resirace concert onsite at the ChiSox register in advance, visit www. The office will also pickup. Call 14700 South Ravinia Avenue; dents of single-family homes Recreation Administration, Bar & Grill. Proceeds from the Strikeoutals5k.org. (773) 445-9700 to donate. are invited to participate in this 14600 S. Ravinia Ave., and at annual contest open to amateur the village’s Sportsplex, 11351 gardeners. W. 159th St. More than 150 homeowners Tickets purchased the day of have entered the village’s conthe event this Sunday are $20 test since it was created in 1999. each. There is no charge to visit Landscape architects, contracthe bazaar at the Civic Center tors and professional gardeners associated with the garden walk. are not eligible to participate. Garden and craft vendors may Traditional and unusual gardens and those with speOrland Park Mayor Dan of the Police Department since Representatives in Washington, rent space at the bazaar for $25 cial features are welcome to McLaughlin will host his annual May of 1994. He retired from the D.C., after graduating college. He each. Vendor applications are enter. Judging will be based Summer Senior Coffee on Tues- United States Secret Service in currently serves as an assistant available on the village’s website on originality, creativity and day, July 1, from 10 a.m. to noon, October of 1993 after 22 years of state’s attorney with the Cook at orlandpark.org and at Recreoverall maintenance, as well as at the Orland Park Civic Center. service. His career included eight County State’s Attorney’s Office. ation Administration, 14600 S. “Our hope is that more resi- Ravinia Ave. the use of native landscaping, The presentation will include years assigned to the Presidential The Open Lands Commiscolor, texture, and the variety important information about Protective Division in Washington dents will become aware of the personal safety for seniors, pre- D.C. and 14 years as a criminal types of crimes where seniors are sion was created to preserve venting ruse burglaries, crimes investigator in the Chicago Divi- targeted,” said Mayor McLaughsion. Chief McCarthy also served lin. “Simply knowing what to look of opportunity and more. Area seniors are invited for as a special agent in charge of the for and how to avoid certain situacoffee, refreshments and to learn Chicago Division from 1989 until tions can prevent the crimes from occurring.” more about senior safety. Orland his retirement in 1993. “This should be a very pleasant Trustee Calandriello holds Park Trustee James Dodge will moderate the roundtable discus- a law degree from John Mar- and informative morning for all shall Law School and received who plan to attend,” the mayor sion. World of Frogs Featured at the event will be his undergraduate degree from said. cago Ridge. The Orland Park Civic CenOrland Park Police Chief Tim Mc- Marquette University, where he Bring your projects to the NeeCarthy and Village Board Pub- served as student government ter is at 14750 S. Ravinia Ave. Explore the world of herpetol- dle Club and enjoy the company of lic Safety Committee Chairman president. The Marist High Admission and parking for the ogy with the Frog Lady on Sat- others while working on Tuesday, School alum served as a staff senior coffee are free. For more urday, June 28, at 11 a.m., at the June 24, from 10 a.m. to noon. Trustee Dan Calandriello. McCarthy has served as Chief assistant for the U.S. House of information, call 403-6150. New members always welcome. Palos Park Public Library. Meet at the library and bring Learn the differences and similarities between reptiles your game to play American Mah and amphibians. There will be Jongg on Tuesday, June 24, at live specimens to observe. This 1p.m. Novice and experienced hands-on learning presentation is players welcome. Call Adult Serfor children of all ages. Children vices to register at 448-1473. Thursdays at the Movies on will receive a free raffle ticket for attending. The library is at June 26 will show the film “An12330 Forest Glen Blvd. Call to other Year”. There will be three showings: 10 a.m. (with subtitles), register, 448-1530. 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Meet doll collector Rose Jones, Pajama storytime and see her special collection of Children ages 2 to 7 are in- dolls from the 1980s to the presvited to wear their pajamas, bring ent on Thursday, June 19, at 2 their blankie and a little “bed- p.m. Bring a doll to share with time friend” and join in stories the group. Program registration is always and songs at Pajama Storytime on Thursday, June 26, at 7 p.m., appreciated. Register online at at the Palos Park Public Library. palosheightslibrary.org, by phone No registration is required. at 448-1473, or in person. All proThe library is at 12330 Forest grams are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. The Glen Blvd. library is at 12501 S. 71st Ave.

that helps with this effort. For more information, call 403PARK.

Orland Park garden contest entries sought

Coffee with Orland mayor will address crimes targeting seniors

and combination of plants and flowers used. Awards will be presented for first, second, and third-place winners, as well as honorable mention awards for special garden features. Applications for the Village of Orland Park Garden Contest are available at Recreation Administration, 14600 S. Ravinia Ave. and at the Village Hall, 14700 S. Ravinia Ave., or on the village’s website at orlandpark.org The deadline for entries for the garden contest is June 29. Judging will take place in July/ August and awards will be presented at a Village Board of Trustees meeting in September. Contestants need not be home at the time of judging. For more information call 403-7275.

Library Notes

Submitted photos

Flag Day gift Marking Flag Day, Elise Blinn, president of the Knoll Springs Society of the Children of the American Revolution, presented Palos Heights Administrative Librarian Elaine Savage with a new eagle finial (ornamental top) for the library’s American flag. Last spring, Elise received an American history essay award at the library. While there, she noticed that the library’s eagle finial had a broken wing. She took the prize money that she earned from the essay contest and bought the library a new eagle finial. The Knoll Springs society is a patriotic organization sponsored by the Swallow Cliff chapter of the DAR. Shown above are Swallow Cliff chapter Vice Regent Gale Shafer (from left), Marria Blinn, chapter parliamentarian; Elise Blinn, Elaine Savage and Marilyn Earnest, chapter historian. At right, Elise presents the new eagle finial to Mrs. Savage.

3 can come to the library to focus on this week’s them of Wild Things on Wednesday, June 25, at 1:30 p.m. Registration is required. Tweens: Snoopy and Woodstock – Kids in grades 4 and 5 can have fun with their friends at the library with this week’s theme of Snoopy and Woodstock on Thursday, June 26 at 1:30 p.m. Registration is required. Teens: Book Speed Dating – Kids entering grades 6 and up can meet new books and make bookmarks on Monday, June 23from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Registration is required. LEGO Builders – Meet your friends at the library and let your creativity soar while building with LEGO bricks on Wednesday, June 25 from 10-11:30 a.m. No registration required. Chess Club – weekly chess group on Wednesday June 25, at 7 p.m. No registration is necessary. Fun Fridays, Ben Franklin & the Levitating Frog – Children of all ages can learn about magnetism and electricity through Heights library experiments at this interactive Heights library adult programs science show with Dr. Art Friedyouth programs man on Friday, June 20 at 10 It’s not too late to sign up for the Adult Summer Reading proSummer Story Times – Regis- a.m. Registration is required. All programs are free and gram at the Palos Heights Public tration continues for the Palos Library and pick up your reading Heights Public Library’s Sum- open to everyone at the Palos log at the Adult Services Desk. mer Story Time sessions, which Heights Public Library, 12501 S. Help animals as you “Paws to started Monday. To sign up, visit 71st Ave. For more information Read” and donate to “Pennies www.palosheightslibrary.org or or to register for a program, visit www.palosheightslibrary.org, call for Pooches” at the library. All call 448-1473. proceeds will be donated to the The 1, 2, 3s: Wild Things – 448-1473, or stop by the Youth Animal Welfare League in Chi- Children entering grades 1 to Services desk.

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The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle

THE

REGIONAL Archives

"Let It Rain" Across 1 Capital of Egypt 6 Composer Johann Sebastian ___ 10 Slender and fit 14 Tom Hanks or Paul Newman 15 In addition 16 Go up 17 Like some bread 19 A long, long time 20 Put in the mailbox 21 Asner and Bradley 22 Marks permanently 24 Possesses 25 Soaking 26 Larger, as a price 30 Restaurant feature 35 Company in an early 2000s scandal 36 Husbands' counterparts 37 Electronics brand 38 Actor Alda 39 Was guilty 40 Pulled tight, like a rope 41 Gun (the motor) 42 Long-term spies 43 Where Hobbits live 44 Hairdressers 46 Stadiums 47 Lowest two-digit number 48 Part of WPM 49 Narrow waterway 52 By way of 53 Choir voice 57 Tall tale teller 58 It can be clogged by leaves 61 "___ Brockovich" 62 Actress Winslet 63 Supermarket section 64 Studies

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Down 1 Crow sounds 2 Dull pain 3 "Blame ___ the Rain" 4 ___ Gold (pretzel brand) 5 Iron ___ 6 Poets 7 "Woe is me!" 8 Show set in Las Vegas 9 Sharpen 10 Didn't do an original drawing 11 Area for creative thinking, it's said 12 "Understood"

50 Years Ago This Week Truck flips – A semi-trailer owned by Gateway Transportation Co. overturned at 119th and Harlem Avenue at 5 p.m. Monday when the brakes failed as it turned the corner. The driver, Stan Novak, 45, of Chicago, was not hurt. Another car, driven by a Tinley Park man, was slightly damaged by the truck. Hyland was uninjured. Palos Heights firemen were called to wash gasoline from the street. Firemen are Roger Bushee (from left), Jack VanBruggen and Allen Sumnock. Police rerouted traffic on Harlem Avenue for about an hour while the truck, damaged very little, was righted by a wrecker

45 Gets new information 46 Name in the Garden of Eden 48 Technology magazine 49 Wintertime transportation 50 One of four on a Ford 51 "You shouldn't have done that!" sounds 52 Participate on Election Day 53 Song for one 54 Final 55 Scrabble piece 56 Dollar bills 59 Faucet 60 River blocker

(Answers on page 12)

From June 17, 2004

The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

10 Years Ago This Week The red, white and blue was honored at the second annual Palos Flag Day patriotic celebration held Saturday evening on the Village Green, behind the old Palos Park Village Hall. [The event continues today as the Salute to Old Glory celebration organized by local Knights of Columbus, held last Thursday evening on the Village Green.] Amid the ceremonies that included patriotic songs performed by Stagg High School musical groups, Joe Rafferty (left) and Bob Paucky, both of Orland Park American Legion Post 111, burned retired flags in the ceremonial pyre at the close of the program.

(Answers on page 12)

Medium

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT?

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Sudoku Puzzle #3075-M

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Former EP couple hits home run with Challengers Field In the heart of a Tinley Park neighborhood stands a new baseball field in which there is a game or two going on just about every day involving special needs kids and adults. And it warms the hearts of hundreds of volunteers who made it happen including Denis and Lois Murphy. This couple is receiving a lot of credit from TP officials for the opening of Challengers Field, a $300,000 facility with artificial turf that has provided many hits, runs and smiles. The Murphys lived in Evergreen Park 28 years ago. Denis went to St. Bernedette and Evergreen Park High School. Lois attended Northwest Elementary School and Evergreen Park High School. Her maiden name is also Murphy and they still have friends and family in the Evergreen Park community. But they have really made a big mark in Tinley Park. One of their four sons, Kyle, is a special needs athlete who has neurofibromatosis, which is a seven-syllable word meaning the growth of tumors anywhere from the spinal cord to the brain. Kyle is 24, and his parents have been a part of the Challengers

the grand opening of the field on May 18 and said the major league scouts would flock to the field to scout future phenoms. “Good luck and just try to keep track of all of this talent,” Korwin said. “These players can help you by Jeff Vorva win a World Series. That is a Killer Korwin guarantee.’’ Another guarantee is that ChalLeague since 1994. The vision for the new field lengers Field will make a lot of came about two years ago, De- players, parents and friends happy for a long time. nis said. Lois was amazed at the outpour“We played on a dirt field and we were kind of handicapped be- ing of love from the hundreds who cause we only had the field for one showed up for the opening ceremonight and we split it with three nies, which included a parade, the teams,” he said. “We wanted to Andrew High School band, White expand and make it a safe surface. Sox mascot Southpaw, speeches That’s how we started this project. and other activities. “It’s beyond words – it’s awe“We can play seven days a week some,” she said. “We were waitif we want.’’ The Challengers have 64 ath- ing for this day to come and it’s letes in the organization and hope everything and more than we to expand it to more than 120 in expected.’’ the coming years. Athletes from Evergreen Park, Tinley Park, A new celebration Orland Park, Frankfort, Mokena, We’re going to change a little Oak Forest and Steger play ball something that has made me there. scratch my head for a while. The senior member of all the When Regional Publishing puts players is Orland Park’s Brian out a special section on a given “Killer” Korwin, who has been community, it has gone out of its with organization since it start- way to make the cover of the seced 20 years ago. Korwin made a tion focus on a big event coming speech via his computer during to town, such as we did for the

Notes otes north of the Cal-Sag

Hickory Hills’ Street Fair in last week’s paper. The trouble is, a vast majority of the section is about the town itself and the businesses that are in it and not the event. People who just look at the cover of these sections might think it is just about the event itself and may not even want to crack it open if they are not interested in it or can’t attend it. In changing up the ‘we’ve-always-done-it-like-that’ mentality, the Reporter is tossing a curveball. This week, the special section for Evergreen Park will be called “A Celebration of Evergreen Park and Day in the Park.” Evergreen Park gets the top billing and rightfully so, because this section will be full of great stories and photos that our people have put together over recent months along with some businesses bragging about what they bring to town. Sure, there will be valuable information about the Day in the Park and six photos on the cover are from last year’s event. But the true stars of the section are the peeps and businesses in your community, and we are going to try to reflect that from now on.

The wizards of WHATIZIT? knew their food stuff when it came to last week’s photo of Mariano’s logo leaf. These stores are popping up all over. Willow Springs’ Harrison Debre was the first to gobble up our contest and spit it out with a correct guess. Others who were nutritionally fortified were Orland Park’s Val Artis and Lisa Keysboe, Palos Heights’ Janet Lombard, Worth’s Frank and Donna Hirsch, Mary Kurdziel, Theresa (see Page 1 of the Reporter) and George Rebersky, Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald, Oak Lawn’s Jim and Donna Perisin, Evergreen Park’s Henrietta Mysliwiec, Chicago’s Marge Klockowski, Tinley Park’s Jennifer Kibbon and the Friday Night Ladies Poker Club from Oak Lawn, Orland Park and Oak Forest. We owe one to Worth’s Gene Siroka, whose correct guess two weeks ago of parsley and sage was never recorded in the books. Now it’s official and he is a better man for it. We owe another to Hickory Hills’ Janice Mastro, whom last week we referred to as Jane, which the miserable Board of Directors found to be a Tarzan-like mistake. Heads rolled. And we owe one to Palos Hills’ Goldie Xirafakis, who was not recorded in the books due to technical difficulties. That was a shame because Goldie gave us sage wisdom about parsley and sage, saying: “These herbs are used for cooking and their medicinal properties, and had some meaning/roles in ancient times/traditions as alluded to in the song’s lyrics.” The clue for this week: Guess what’s in my head? Send those guesses to thereporter@comcast.net with WHATIZIT? in the subject line by Photos by Jeff Vorva Monday night. Don’t forget your Denis and Lois Murphy, right photo, are formerly of Evergreen Park but are making an impact in Tinley Park as they had a big hand in name and hometown. creating Challengers Field to serve athletes with special needs. In the left photo are new helmets specially made for the facility.


The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

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Photos by Mary Hadac

Pet-Palooza helps stock Orland Township pet pantry Riding her stuffed toy pony to a third place finish in the Best Dressed category at last Saturday’s PetPalooza event in Orland Park is Abby, an 11-year-old miniature dachshund, with her owner, Maureen Jurisic, of Joliet (left). More than 2,000 men, women and children attended the 4th annual pet fair and parade, sponsored by Orland Township Supervisor Paul O’Grady and the board of trustees and held at township headquarters, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave. Smiling for the camera are Paula Huyer, who works with Regional News Pick of the Litter columnist John Fleming, DVM, at Prairie State Veterinary Clinic in Orland Park, and her spaniel BB (center).

Those in attendance were asked to donate pet food to Crashy’s Closet, the township’s pet pantry, which provides assistance to pet owners of limited means—especially important in the prolonged, sluggish economy, according to event Chairman Bill Brady, a township employee. Pet-Palooza also included pony rides and miniature train rides for children, exhibits by businesses and not-for-profits offering pet-related goods and services, on-site animal adoptions, free advice from local veterinarians, and more. Enjoying a quiet moment with 3-year-old Chloe is Sam Melilli, of Orland Park (right). Those unable to attend Pet-Palooza but who want to aid the pet pantry are encouraged to call 403-4222.

Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM • PrairieStateVet.com At Pet-Palooza in Orland Saturday, I had several people ask me about food allergies in their dogs. I hate dealing with food allergies since they are a pain in the butt to diagnose in the majority of cases and people often don’t have the patience or desire to follow through with the recommendations. A dermatologist friend of mine once told me that the hardest part of his practice was getting people to try a food elimination trial. A food allergy is a reaction to food by the body’s immune system. Food allergy is different from food intolerance such as lactose intolerance. In most situations, protein in the food causes the immune reaction. Often the protein source is form animals (meats, eggs or dairy protein), but occasionally a carbohydrate can also be involved. Common foods that induce allergies in dogs include beef, chicken, dairy, wheat gluten, corn, and soy protein. Dogs and cats can be sensitive to more than one of the above. Itchiness, licking, and chewing of the paws, flank, groin, neck and ears are common signs. Cats often scratch their faces and ears. The itchiness continues through all seasons of the year. Some dogs may have recurrent ear inflammation and infections. GI signs such as chronic vomiting, diarrhea, belching, and frequent BMs

Submitted photo

Meet Scott and Blue from Mokena. Blue is a 2-year-old Australian cattle dog. may also occur. It is common for both GI and skin signs to occur together and these problems tend to persist or recur. No decent blood test exits to diagnosis a food allergy. I know there are such tests out there but

they are not very accurate and can lead people down a wasteful, time-consuming path. A dietary food trial that involves feeding an elimination diet for two to three months is the best way to go. The ideal diet includes a new, highly

digestible protein source, moderate protein content and no food additives. Elimination diets include a homemade diet, a commercial diet containing a novel (never fed before) protein and/or carbohydrate source, or a commercial diet composed of hydrolyzed (broken down into fragments) protein. It is this latter, hydrolyzed, food that we recommend if you’re going to go through the time, expense and effort to rule out a food allergy. The food that we are currently recommending is AnallergenR by Royal Canin. This food is available at PetSmart. They may have samples for you to see if your pet will eat it and if you decide to try it your vet will have to write or call in a script for it. If the pet responds to the initial elimination diet, the diet can be continued if it is complete and balanced and formulated to meet the requirements of an adult animal. If a homemade diet was used and was successful, consultation with a veterinary nutritionist (BalanceIt.com) is recommended if you intend to use the diet long term. Prognosis for treating a food allergy is good as long as the pet is not re-exposed to the food ingredient or ingredients that trigger the immune response. He who gets wisdom loves his own soul; he who cherishes understanding prospers. —Proverbs 19:8

Health Beat Support group for loved ones of clergy abuse victims

and support groups for survivors, call Jessica Loftus at 448-1306 or email her at swchicago@snapnetwork.org.

Community College’s Current Nurse Update Refresher course. The 10-week RN Refresher course includes an online component, theory classes and cliniThe Survivors Network of those cal work at Little Company of Abused by Priests (SNAP) is formNurse refresher Mary Hospital, 2800 W. 95th ing a Southwest Suburban supupdate course St., in Evergreen Park. The fee port group for friends and loved ones of survivors who have been Practicing nurse professionals is $1,599. The next course begins abused by clergy members. who wish to broaden their health- in September. Students will re-establish a Meetings are held locally on the care knowledge or nurses who are third Wednesday of the month returning to a healthcare setting solid medical-surgical foundafrom 7 to 8:30 p.m. Seating is after a prolonged absence can learn tion. The course also addresses limited, so registration is required. comprehensive theory and get clini- basic nursing care concepts, prinFor details on this support group cal experience in Moraine Valley ciples throughout the life span

biologically and psychosocially, and concepts relevant to current registered nursing practice. Submitted photos Proof of immunizations and required documentation are due two weeks before the first class. Attendance at every class is mandatory or the student will be dropped without a refund. To request an information packSome 135 residents, families and staff members participated in et or for more information, call the college’s Corporate, Community the 70th anniversary of D-Day remembrance ceremony held at Smith and Continuing Education area Crossing, a continuing care retirement community in Orland Park. Top, Smith Village residents Walter Swiatkowski (from left), Joanne at 974-5735 or visit morainevalFrederick and Mike Frederick attended the 70th Anniversary of Dley.edu/ccce. Day luncheon. Above, Oak Lawn residents Charlie Barkmeier (left) and his brother, Ray, explore an authentic Red Cross ambulance from World War II that was on display for the D-Day observance honoring area veterans in Orland Park.

Smith Crossing hosts D-Day remembrance

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Summer projects It’s summer and it’s time for some municipal and school projects. In the left photo, workers erect new overhead stoplights in Palos Heights on Friday at 123rd Street and Harlem Avenue while in the right photo, the main entrance of Stagg High School is torn up for improvements.

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The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014 South Palos Township Sanitary District Consumer Confidence Report Annual Drinking Water Quality Report For the period of January 1 to December 31, 2013

Death Notices Janet A. Boomsma

Janet A. Boomsma, nee Mulder, 86, of Palos Park, died on June 12. Memorial visitation is to be held at Palos Heights Christian Reformed Church in Palos Heights this Friday, June 20, at 4:30 p.m. until time of memorial service at 5:30 p.m. Interment is to be private at Chapel Hill Gardens South in Oak Lawn. Mrs. Boomsma is survived by her sons, Milton, Robert and David; her daughter, Patricia; her sister, Henrietta Hovinga, seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Mrs. Boomsma was born in Chicago. She was a homemaker.

Photos by Emily Smas

Palos Lutheran rummage sale for good cause

IL0310140 This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the South Palos Township Sanitary District water system to provide safe drinking water. The source of Drinking water used by South Palos Township Sanitary District is Purchase from The City of Palos Heights. For more information regarding this report, contact: Harold Cowger (708) 935-2159 or attend a District Board meeting held on the 3rd Wednesday of each month at the District Office located at 8102 West 119th Street Suite 1130, Palos Park, Illinois 60464. Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

Andrew J. Lanenga

Eulene Viskocil

Andrew J. Lanenga, 60, of OrEulene Viskocil, nee Hamland Park, died on June 8Source at Pals monds, 96, of Palos Heights, of Drinking Water The sources of drinking waterin (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, streams, ponds, reservoirs, Hills Healthcare Palos Hills. formerly oflakes, Tinley Park, died springs, and groundwater wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves Visitation was and, held June at material, on June naturally occurring minerals in some cases,11 radioactive and can 10. pickup substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. be present in source Microbial Colonial Chapel funeral homeContaminants in Or- that may Visitation was water heldinclude: at Colonial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, land Park. A funeral wasInorganic held contaminants, Chapelsuch funeral on canJune agricultural livestock operationsservice and wildlife. as salts andhome metals, which be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and at Palos Heights Christian Reformed 12. A funeral service was held gas production, mining, or farming. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water and residential uses. Organic chemical contaminants, including Church on June 12.runoff, Interment was at the funeral home onsynthetic Juneand13. volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also, at Skyline Memorial Park. Interment was held at Chapel come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the of oil and gas miningGardens activities. Drinking water, including bottled Mr. Lanenga isresult survived byproduction his and Hill South cemetery water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of wife, Jane; son, Adam Lawn. contaminants doeshis not necessarily indicateSluis; that waterhis poses a in healthOak risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effectsBanjeglav can be obtainedand by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotlineis at (800) 426-4791. Inby sisters, Laura Linda Mrs. Viskocil survived order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain Maracic; his brother, Matthew, herregulations sons, Kenneth Thomas; contaminants in water provided by public water and systems. FDA establish limits and fro contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. grandchildren Some people may be more and vulnerable to many nieces and nephews. three four contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immune-compromised persons such as persons with Mr.undergoing Lanenga was born in Evergreat-grandchildren. cancer chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should green Park. He formerly worked Mrs. Viskocil was born in seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen risk of infection by Cryptosporidium microbial contaminants available Safe as a the compound processor for Gand&other Milan, Tenn. are She wasfroma the homeDrinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). W Electric. maker. Susceptibility to Contamination The Illinois EPA considers all surface water sources of community water supply to be susceptible to potential pollution problems. The very nature of surface water allows contaminants to migrate into the intake with no protection only dilution. This is the reason for mandatory treatment for all surface water supplies in Illinois. Chicago’s offshore intakes are located at a distance that shoreline impacts are not usually considered a factor on water quality. At certain times of the year, however, the potential for contamination exists due to wet-weather flows and river reversals. In addition, the placement of the crib structures may serve to attract waterfowl, gulls and terns that frequent the Great Lakes area, thereby concentrating fecal deposits at the intake and thus compromising the source water quality. Conversely, the shore intakes are highly susceptible to storm water runoff, marinas and shoreline point sources due to the influx of groundwater to the lake. Throughout history there have been extraordinary steps taken to assure a safe source of drinking water in the Chicago land area. From the building of the offshore cribs and the introduction of interceptor sewers to the lock-and-dam system of Chicago’s waterways and the city’s Lakefront Zoning Ordinance. The city now looks to the recently created Department of the Water Management, Department of Environment and the MWRDGC to assure the safety of the city’s water supply. Also, water supply officials from Chicago are active members of the West Shore Water Producers Association. Coordination of water quality situations (i.e., spills, tanker leaks, exotic species, etc) and general lake conditions are frequently discussed during the association’s quarterly meetings. Also, Lake Michigan has a variety of organizations and associations that are currently working to either maintain or improve water quality. Finally, one of the best ways to ensure a safe source of drinking water is to develop a program designed to protect the source water against potential contamination on the local level. Since the predominant land use within Illinois’ boundary of Lake Michigan watershed is urban, a majority of the watershed protection activities in this document are aimed at this purpose. Citizens should be aware that everyday activities in an urban setting might have a negative impact on their source water. Efforts should be made to improve awareness of storm water drains and their direct link to the lake within the identified local source water area. A proven best management practice (BMP) for this purpose has been the identification and stenciling of storm water drains within a watershed. Stenciling along with an educational component is necessary to keep the lake a safe and reliable source of drinking water.

Houses of Worship

The Rev. Dave Waterstradt, pastor of Palos Lutheran Church in Palos Heights, and head organizer Ashley Esquivel welcomed bargain hunters to the church’s rummage sale last Friday morning (above). Shoppers look through generous piles of items donated by the community for the church’s two-day rummage sale that ended Saturday afternoon. All proceeds will go to benefit Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. “I want the people of Palos Heights to know that we are looking out for our community and that we are being good neighbors,” Waterstradt said.

Faith United Methodist Church, Orland Park The church will offer Vacation Bible school, Jungle Safari, where kids will explore the nature of God, from Sunday, July 13 through Friday, July 18, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. For ages 3 through 5th grade. Cost is free. To register, contact the church office at 444-8560 or complete

and return the registration form found at www.faithumcop.org. For more information, email Kim at kids@faithumcop.org. The church is at 15101 S. 80th Ave.

a.m. at The Center at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Led by the Rev. Chris Hopkins, the service is for families with children of any ages. Weather permitting, the service will be held out of doors by the Wayside Chapel new labyrinth on the west side Palos Park South Palos Township Sanitary District Regulated Contaminants Detected 2013 0316000 Chicago of Southwest Highway. In in-Definition of TermsMaximum Levelan Goal outdoor (MCLG); The level of a contaminant in drinking weather, water below which there known or clement theis noservice ThisContaminant Sunday famexpected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. will that move indoors. (361-3650) ily service will be The held Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): highestat level 10 of a contaminant is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Level Found: This column represents an average of sample result data collected during the CCR calendar year. In some cases, it may represent a single sample if only one sample was collected. Range of Detections: This column represents a range of individual sample results, from lowest to highest that were collected during the CCR calendar year. Date of Sample: If a date appears in this column, the Illinois EPA requires monitoring for this contaminant less than once per year because the concentrations do not frequently change. If no date appears in the column, monitoring for this contaminant was conducted during the Consumer Confidence Report calendar year. Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. ND: Contaminant Not detectable at testing limits. N/A: Not applicable

Billy Graham’s “My Answer”

Car shows will benefit Elim From Elim Christian Services

the event as “an opportunity to gain support in Indiana for Elim, allowing clients of Elim to come Do you like 1960s and ‘70s mus- out and spend time looking at the cle cars, ‘50s and ‘60s classic cars, cars, trucks, and motorcycles and hot rods, trucks and motorcycles? interacting with the other people Then come out this Saturday, at the show. This is all about raisJune 21, to one of two great car ing money for a great cause and having a venue to interact with shows that benefit Elim. Elim’s friends at Schepel Buick/ each other.” Scott’s Garage has been in busiGMC/Cadillac, 3209 W. Lincoln Highway in Merrillville, Ind., will ness for nine years. This organihost the 18th annual Charity Cus- zation has devotedly supported tom Car, Truck, and Motorcycle and invested in its community. Show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to When asked about the upcoming event, Scott’s Garage co-owner benefit Elim. Closer to home, Elim’s friends Paul Iannarone said: “The day at Scott’s Garage will hosting their is about having fun and helping fourth annual Elim Benefit Car those with special needs! So, bring Show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at your families out to socialize, tell Elim’s East Campus in Palos your kids about the cars and moHeights, 13020 S. Central Ave. torcycles, and enjoy the nice surThe Scott’s Garage Car Show will roundings of the forest preserves also include its first art and craft and live DJ music. Everyone likes show and new Kid Zone – fun for to talk about their cars and mothe whole family. The day will torcycles!” Families will also enjoy provide time for enjoyable con- this year’s addition of an arts and versation and storytelling about crafts show and new Kids’ Zone. Both shows promise lots of great vehicles in the past and memories they carry. Parents, you can cars, trucks, motorcycles, and food take your kids down memory lane – with proceeds benefitting chilwhen seeing the cars you used to dren and adults with disabilities served by Elim Christian Services. know so well. Schepel Buick/Cadillac/GMC Elim’s mission is to equip chilhas been in business for 44 years. dren and adults with disabilities This organization has devotedly to achieve to their highest Godsupported and invested in its com- given potential. Elim pursues this munity. Tom VanProoyen, gen- mission by providing educational, eral manager of Schepel, views vocational, and therapeutic ser-

vices to over 1,000 persons with developmental disabilities. For more information on the Schepel Buick/Cadillac/GMC Car Show, inquire online at www. schepel.com or call John Mucha at (219) 769-6381. To find out more about the Scott’s Garage Car Show, Art Show, and Kid Zone, email them at elimshow@ scottsgarage.net, visit www. scottsgarage.net., or call 396-2082. Information on both shows can also be found at www.elimcs.org or by calling 293-6509.

Q: You’re always telling people to go to church, but all the churches I’ve been to are so boring I can’t stand it. You’ll probably tell me just to keep looking, but why should I? Besides that, I enjoy having a day to myself. — K.W.W. A: Let me ask you a question: What exactly are you seeking in a church? In other words, what would a “good” church be like, in your opinion? What do you hope to get out of it? I don’t know how you’d answer, but let me suggest how you should answer. First, when we gather with other believers, we should worship God; that is, we should focus on Him, and our hearts and minds

South Palos Township Sanitary District Consumer Confidence Report Annual Drinking Water Quality Report For the period of January 1 to December 31, 2013 IL0310140 This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the South Palos Township Sanitary District water system to provide safe drinking water. The source of Drinking water used by South Palos Township Sanitary District is Purchase from The City of Palos Heights. For more information regarding this report, contact: Harold Cowger (708) 935-2159 or attend a District Board meeting held on the 3rd Wednesday of each month at the District Office located at 8102 West 119th Street Suite 1130, Palos Park, Illinois 60464. Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

Source of Drinking Water

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and groundwater wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pickup substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also, come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits fro contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immune-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Susceptibility to Contamination

South Palos Township Sanitary District Regulated Contaminants Detected 2013 0316000 Chicago -Definition of Terms-

Park Women at Heights Market The Palos Park Woman’s Club was a newcomer last week to the Palos Heights Farmers Market’s community tent, where they held a white elephant sale to raise money for their many charities. For years the cub ran the Palos Park Farmers Market, which is not taking place this year. Club members were impressed with how well the Palos Heights Farmer’s Market is run. Shown are members Patricia Burger, Nancy Mitchell, Mary Ann Parkins, Marie Arrigoni, Lucy Crocilla and Patricia Bailey. In September, the club host a Sell it Again, Palos! community garage sale event at the Palos Park Metra station. For those restricted from having a garage sale, rummage sale, yard sale, etc., information to sell your own rummage as a vendor is at the club’s website palosparkwc.wordpress.com.

Engaged? Getting Married? Share the Happy News! The Regional News invites couples or their parents to submit for publication engagement or wedding announcements. There is no charge for this service offered to community residents. The announcements must be typed, doublespaced and sent with a photograph of the couple. JPEGs or high quality photographs are preferred. (Sorry, photographs cannot be returned) E-mail announcements to: TheRegional@Comcast.net Mail announcements : The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463

By-product of drinking water Haloacetic Acids no goal for 5/23/2013 7 7.4 - 7.4 60 ppb N chlorination (HAAS)* the total Total By-product of drinking water no goal for 5/23/2013 50 46 - 46 80 ppb N Trihalomethanes chlorination the total (TThm)* Not all sample results may have been used for calculating the highest level detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur on the future.

LEGAL NOTICE

The Illinois EPA considers all surface water sources of community water supply to be susceptible to potential pollution problems. The very nature of surface water allows contaminants to migrate into the intake with no protection only dilution. This is the reason for mandatory treatment for all surface water supplies in Illinois. Chicago’s offshore intakes are located at a distance that shoreline impacts are not usually considered a factor on water quality. At certain times of the year, however, the potential for contamination exists due to wet-weather flows and river reversals. In addition, the placement of the crib structures may serve to attract waterfowl, gulls and terns that frequent the Great Lakes area, thereby concentrating fecal deposits at the intake and thus compromising the source water quality. Conversely, the shore intakes are highly susceptible to storm water runoff, marinas and shoreline point sources due to the influx of groundwater to the lake. Throughout history there have been extraordinary steps taken to assure a safe source of drinking water in the Chicago land area. From the building of the offshore cribs and the introduction of interceptor sewers to the lock-and-dam system of Chicago’s waterways and the city’s Lakefront Zoning Ordinance. The city now looks to the recently created Department of the Water Management, Department of Environment and the MWRDGC to assure the safety of the city’s water supply. Also, water supply officials from Chicago are active members of the West Shore Water Producers Association. Coordination of water quality situations (i.e., spills, tanker leaks, exotic species, etc) and general lake conditions are frequently discussed during the association’s quarterly meetings. Also, Lake Michigan has a variety of organizations and associations that are currently working to either maintain or improve water quality. Finally, one of the best ways to ensure a safe source of drinking water is to develop a program designed to protect the source water against potential contamination on the local level. Since the predominant land use within Illinois’ boundary of Lake Michigan watershed is urban, a majority of the watershed protection activities in this document are aimed at this purpose. Citizens should be aware that everyday activities in an urban setting might have a negative impact on their source water. Efforts should be made to improve awareness of storm water drains and their direct link to the lake within the identified local source water area. A proven best management practice (BMP) for this purpose has been the identification and stenciling of storm water drains within a watershed. Stenciling along with an educational component is necessary to keep the lake a safe and reliable source of drinking water.

Submitted photo

Definitions: Action Level Goal (ALG): the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected

risk to health. be ALGsfilled allow for awith margin ofpraise safety. Actionand Level: thesage concentration a contaminant which, if exceeded, is ofheard through the triggers word should treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Christ” (Romans 10:17). thanksgiving. Date The center Action Levelof our 90th #about Sites Lead & Copper MCLG Units Violations Likely Source of Contamination Sampled (AL) Percentile Over AL Finally, through church we learn faith is Jesus Christ, and when Erosion of natural Deposits; Leaching from wood preservestivs; corrosion of Don’t just we realize who He is and what from other believers. household plumbing systems. 0.089 0 Copper 9/18/2012 1.3 ppm attend theN weekly service; seek He has done for 1.3 us through His Water Quality Results death and Test resurrection, we can’t other opportunities for fellowship Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: the level of contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or help worship and God. with others. Make sure of your expectedbut risk to health. MCLGs allow for praise a margin of safety. Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as Then we should also come to- commitment to Christ, and then close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Residual Disinfectant LevelGod’s Goal or MRDLG: of a Him drinking water disinfectant belowto which is no ask to lead you a there church gether to learn from Wordthe level known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial as it is preached and taught. God where you not only won’t be bored, contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is butof you’ll grow in your faith. wants us tothatgrow stronger ourfor control convincing evidence addition of a disinfectant isin necessary microbial contaminants. Definitions: the following tables contain scientific terms and measures, some of which may require explanation. (Send your queries to “My Anfaith and become more like Christ ppb: micrograms per liter or parts per billion- or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water. na: not applicable. — and this will happen as we let swer,” c/o Billy Graham, Billy GraAvg: regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples. ham Evangelistic Association, 1 God’s Word take root in our hearts ppm: milligrams per liter or parts per million – or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water. and minds. Ask God to help you Billy Graham Parkway, Charlotte, Regulated Contaminants N.C., 28201; call 1--(877) 2--GRAfocus on& the sermon the Disinfectants Highest and Range of readCollection Disinfection Level Levels MCLG MCL Unitsor Violation of Contamination HAM, visit Likely theSource Web site for the ing of Bythe Bible. The Bible says, Date products Dectected Dectected Graham Evangelistic Asso“Consequently, faith comes from Billy MRDL Chlorine 0.7 0.6 - 0.8 MRDLG = 4 ppm N Water additive used to control microbes. ciation: www.billygraham.org.) hearing the1/1/2013 message, and the mes=4

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG); The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Level Found: This column represents an average of sample result data collected during the CCR calendar year. In some cases, it may represent a single sample if only one sample was collected. Range of Detections: This column represents a range of individual sample results, from lowest to highest that were collected during the CCR calendar year. Date of Sample: If a date appears in this column, the Illinois EPA requires monitoring for this contaminant less than once per year because the concentrations do not frequently change. If no date appears in the column, monitoring for this contaminant was conducted during the Consumer Confidence Report calendar year. Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. ND: Contaminant Not detectable at testing limits. N/A: Not applicable Definitions: Action Level Goal (ALG): the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety. Action Level: the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Date Action Level 90th # Sites Lead & Copper MCLG Units Violations Likely Source of Contamination Sampled (AL) Percentile Over AL

Copper

9/18/2012

1.3

1.3

0.089

0

ppm

N

Erosion of natural Deposits; Leaching from wood preservestivs; corrosion of household plumbing systems.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: the level of contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: the level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Definitions: the following tables contain scientific terms and measures, some of which may require explanation. ppb: micrograms per liter or parts per billion- or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water. na: not applicable. Avg: regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples. ppm: milligrams per liter or parts per million – or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

Regulated Contaminants Collection Date

Highest Level Dectected

Range of Levels Dectected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation Likely Source of Contamination

MRDL 1/1/2013 0.7 0.6 - 0.8 MRDLG = 4 ppm =4 no goal for Haloacetic Acids 5/23/2013 7 7.4 - 7.4 60 ppb the total (HAAS)* Total no goal for 5/23/2013 50 46 - 46 80 ppb Trihalomethanes the total (TThm)* Not all sample results may have been used for calculating the highest level detected evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur on the future. Chlorine

Violation Summary Table

The South Palos Township Sanitary District is pleased to announce that no violations were recorded during 2013. DATA TABULATED BY CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF WATER MANAGEMENT

Source Water Location

The City of Chicago utilizes Lake Michigan as its source water via two water treatment plants. The South Water Purification Plan serves the southern areas of the City and Suburbs. Lake Michigan is the only Great Lake that is entirely contained within the United States and is the second largest Great Lake by volume with 1,180 cubic miles of water and third largest by area.

Source Water Assessment Summary

The IEPA implemented a Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) to assist with water shed protection of public drinking water supplies. The SWAP inventories potential sources of contamination and determined the susceptibility of the source water to contamination. The IEPA has completed the Source Water Assessment Program for our supply. Further information on our community water supply’s Source Water Assessment Program is available by calling the City of Chicago, Department of Water Management at (312-742-7499. For more information with regard to Source Water Protection Efforts, you may access the IEPA website at (http://www.epa.state.il.us/cgi-bin/wp/swapfact-sheets.pl.)

2013 Voluntary Monitoring

The City of Chicago has continued monitoring for Cryptosporidium, Giardia and E. coli in its source water as part of its water quality program. To date, Cryptosporidium has not been detected in these samples, but Giardia was detected in 2010 in one raw lake water sample collected in September 2010. Treatment processes have been optimized to provide effective barriers for removal of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in the source water, effectively removing these organisms in the treatment process. By maintaining low turbidity through the removal of particles from the water, the possibility of Cryptosporidium and Giardia organisms getting into the Drinking water system is greatly reduced. In 2013, CDWM has also continued monitoring for hexavalent chromium, also known as chromium-6, USEPA has not yet established a standard for chromium-6, a contaminant of concern which has both natural and industrial sources. Please address any questions or concerns to DWM’s water Quality Division at (312-742-7499). Data reports on the monitoring program for chromium-6 are posted on the City’s website which can be assessed at www.cityofchicago.org. Unit of Measurement

2013 Water Quality Data Table Footnotes

ppm - Parts per million, or milligrams per liter ppb - Parts per billion, or micrograms per liter NTU - Nephelometric Turbidity Unit, used to measure cloudiness in drinking water %< 0.5 NTU - Percent samples less than 0.5 NTU PCi/l - Pico curies per liter, used to measure radioactivity TURBIDITY Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of water quality and the effectiveness of our filtration system and disinfectants. UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS: A maximum contaminant level (MCL) for this contaminant has not been established by either state or federal regulations, nor has mandatory health effects language. The purpose for monitoring this contaminant is to assist USEPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water, and whether future regulation is warranted. FLUORIDE Fluoride is added to the water supply to help promote strong teeth. The Illinois Department of Public Health recommends an optimal fluoride range of 0.9 mg/l to 1.2 mg/l. SODIUM There is not a state or federal MCL for sodium. Monitoring is required to provide information to consumers and health officials that are concerned about sodium intake due to dietary precautions. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, you should consult a physician about this level of sodium in the water. * Highest Running Average computed quarterly Contaminant (unit of measurement) Source of Contaminant

MCLG

MCL

Highest Level Decteted

Range of Dections

N/A

TT(95%<0.3NTU

100%

100% - 100%

N/A

TT(1NTUmax)

0.18

N/A

2

2

0.0205

0.0204 0.0205

0

10

0.77

0.519 -0.767

10

10

0.362

0.362 - 0.362

10

10

0.362

0.351 - 0.362

Typical

Violation

Date of Sample

Turbidity Data TURBIDITY (NTU/Lowest Monthly %<0.3NTU)

Soil runoff. TURBIDITY (NTU Highest Single Measurement.)

Soil runoff. Highest single measurement.

Inorganic Contaminants BARIUM (ppm) Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits. ARSENIC (ppb) Erosion of natural deposits; runnoff from orchards; Runnoff from glass and electronics production wastes SELENIUM (ppb) discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from mines. NITRATE (AS NITROGEN) (ppm) Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits. NITRATE & NITRITE (ppm) Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Total Organic Carbon TOC

The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set by the IEPA

Unregulated Contaminants

Water Quality Test Results

Disinfectants & Disinfection Byproducts

Violation Summary Table

N

Water additive used to control microbes.

N

By-product of drinking water chlorination

N

By-product of drinking water chlorination

because some results may be part of an

The South Palos Township Sanitary District is pleased to announce that no violations were recorded during 2013.

SULFATE (ppm)

ND -11.9

N/A

N/A

11.9

N/A

N/A

7.84

7.42 - 7.84

4

4

0.9

0.856 - 0.822

0

5

1.38

1.30 - 1.38

3/17/2008

0

15

0.88

0.09 - 0.88

3/17/2008

Erosion of naturally occuring deposits SODIUM (ppm)

State Regulated Contaminants FLUORIDE (ppm) Water additive which promtes stong teeth

Radionactive Contaminants COMBINED RADIUM 226/228 (pCi/l) Decay of natural and man-made deposits. GROSS ALPHA excluding radon and uranium (pCi/L)

Decay of natural and man-made deposits. One of the main goals of the water department is to keep our valued resident s informed about their water quality. The South Palos Township Sanitary District would like to invite you to call Harold “Bud” Cowger, District Water Operator, (708-935-2159) with any questions you might have regarding this report.

Respectively Submitted,

Bud Cowger Harold “Bud” Cowger, District Water Operator

South Palos Township Sanitary District - 8102 W 119th Street, Unit 1130 Palos Park, Illinois 60464 -708-448-3166 Peter Costa, President - John Walsh, Vice President/Treasurer - Lawrence Pichman, District Clerk


The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

What can vacation trips teach you about investing? Summer is almost here — which means it’s officially vacation season. You may be looking forward to “getting away from it all,” but, as you know, vacations actually require a fair amount of planning. And it might surprise you to learn that some of the efforts required for successful vacations can impart some valuable lessons in other areas of your life — such as investing. Here are some vacation-related moves that you may want to transfer to the investment and financial arenas: • Secure your home. If you’re going on vacation for a week or so, you may need to take some steps to safeguard your home: stopping your mail and newspaper, putting on a timer to turn on lights, alerting your neighbors that you’ll be out of town, and so on. But while it’s important to secure your home today, you will also want to help ensure it will be there for your family in the future, should anything happen to you. That’s why you’ll want to maintain adequate life and disability insurance. • Know your route. If you are driving to your vacation destination, you will want to plan your route beforehand, so that you can avoid time-consuming delays and detours. And to reach your financial goals, such as a comfortable retirement, you will also want to chart your course — by creating an investment strategy that is de-

Jim Van Howe

signed to help you work towards those goals based on your specific risk tolerance, investment preferences and time horizon. • Keep enough gas in the tank. As you set out on a road trip, you need a full tank of gas in your car, and you’ll have to keep refueling along the way. And to “go the distance” in pursuing your financial goals, you will need to have sufficient “fuel” in the form of investments with reasonable growth potential. Without a reasonable amount of growthoriented vehicles in your portfolio, you could lose ground to inflation and potentially fall short of your objectives — so, over time, you may need to “refuel” by reviewing your portfolio and rebalancing if necessary. • Protect yourself from getting burned. If your vacation plans include a stay at the beach, you’ll need to protect yourself and your family from the hot sun — so make sure you’re all using sunscreen. When you invest, you can also get “burned” if you are not careful — especially

11

if you are inclined to chase after “hot” investments. By the time you hear about these so-called sizzlers, they may already be cooling off, and, even more importantly, they just might not be appropriate for your goals and risk tolerance. Instead of becoming a “heat-seeking” investor, focus your efforts on building a diversified array of quality investments appropriate for your needs. If you only own one type of financial asset, and a downturn hits that asset class, your portfolio could take a big hit. But by diversifying your holdings, you can help reduce the effects of volatility. Keep in mind, though, that diversification, by itself, can’t guarantee profits or protect against loss. As we’ve seen, some of the same principles that apply to creating a vacation may also be applicable to your investing habits. So, put these principles to work to enjoy a pleasant vacation — and a potentially rewarding investment experience. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Submitted photo and text

It’s bicycle week at Palos Heights Farmers Market Free bicycle helmets, RBikes and Chiro One at next market

Palos Heights Police Officer Kevin Apostal will be at the Farmers Market at 10 a.m. Wednesday, June 25, to distribute free bicycle helmets to children. The Palos Heights Woman’s Club will be on hand to assist in the proper fitting of the children’s helmets. Additional bicycle safety information will be available. Representatives of Richards Bicycles, aka RBikes.com, at 11933 S. Harlem Ave. in Palos Heights, will also be on hand with information about bicycle maintenance and have some new bikes on display. This week’s Community Tent guest is Chiro One. Chiro One’s vision is that all human beings discover their full potential. We serve that vision by providing free health and wellness information to individuals and families in our surrounding communities. Currently, we have 41 chiropractic wellness centers in the Chicago area. Through our Community Outreach Programs, we reach out to local businesses, various schools and charitable organizations to share the benefits of living a wellness-based lifestyle. As a value added service for your employees and their families, our free health screenings include educational information, posture checks and a question and answer period. We offer these screenings at various corporations, fitness centers and universities, and at athletic and philanthropic events. We are located right here in Palos Heights at 7202 W. College Drive. Congratulations to Debbie Roebuck, of Palos Heights, winner of the June 11 Pampered Chef Father’s Day BBQ basket raffle. Future raffles will be held at the Pampered Chef tent. Stop by to see all they have to offer. Richert/Phillips Farms is offering a CSA again this year. CSA, or Community Supported Agriculture, is actually “buying into the farms”. The farmers are guaranteed income from the “shareholders”, who in turn are offered the first fruits of the pickings. Full and half shares are available. More information is available at the stand, or call 574-274-6019. Applications will be accepted through the end of June. An ever-expanding variety of spring fruits and vegetables are in the market every week. Strawberries and rhubarb, asparagus, kohlrabi, peas, lettuces, spinach, kales, onions, radishes, fresh herbs and more are available now. Other market offerings include hormone free, free-range eggs, butter and cheeses, bakery items and organic breads, beef, pork, Amish chickens, olive oil and vinegars, local honey, syrup, jams, perennial and annual plants and herbs, tamales, pizza products and pesto, pasta sauces, Italian peppers and salsas, SoZo coffee and drinks, Shaklee products, Pampered Chef, and knife sharpening services round out the mix of weekly market offerings. Stop at the City Tent and pick up the latest recipe from Dr. John Principe MD of the WellbeingMD Center for Life. Pick up or have endorsed the 2014 Frequent Shopper Card. New this year; bring a friend and receive double credit on your card! Make sure to sign up for weekly email updates. Photo notecards, featuring Palos Heights and farmers market scenes, are back again this year. They sell for $4, or three/$10. Proceeds benefit the market. Raffle tickets for the 2014 Car Classic are also available at the City Tent. The tickets are $20 each, or six/$100, and all proceeds of the Car Classic benefit the city’s Beautification Committee. The Classic Car event will be held Thursday, July 17, along Harlem Avenue. Submitted photo The Palos Heights Farmers Market is open Wednesdays, rain or shine, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., at A state grant will allow the Forest Preserve District of Will County to replace and improve the Native American Longhouse at Isle a la Cache Museum in Romeoville. Thousands of school children visit the 12217 S. Harlem Ave. More information can be found at www.palosheights.org join our email update list, or follow us on Facebook. longhouse annually to learn about Potawatomi life and the 18th Century fur trade.

Grant will replace native longhouse Beware these common summer scams at Isle a la Cache fur trade museum A $270,000 state grant will fund a new Native American longhouse at the Forest Preserve District of Will County’s Isle a la Cache Museum in Romeoville. The existing longhouse, which opened in 2003, has deteriorated and needs to be replaced. The new longhouse will be built with manmade materials that are more weather resistant. The longhouse project is expected to be completed in the summer of 2015. “This grant allows us to replace an 11-year-old structure, something the District would not have been able to do otherwise,” said

Lynn Kurczewski, superintendent of public programs and education for the Forest Preserve District. The grant also will be used to add interpretive signs, trees and lighting to the site and to make it more compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. “Since 2003, the longhouse has been an integral part of our educational field trip program,” Kurczewski said. “More than 4,000 students visit the longhouse each school year to learn about Pottawatomie life during the late 1700s.” Isle a la Cache Museum, at 501

E. Romeo Road, offers visitors an adventure in 18th century history, when the “Illinois Country” was home to French voyageurs and native Pottawatomie. The Museum features interactive exhibits of the Great Lakes fur trade of the 1700s. The Forest Preserve District operates one of 47 Illinois museums that will receive state capital investment grants totaling $20 million to improve their facilities and develop new exhibits, according to a press release from the governor’s office. The grants are part of Quinn’s Illinois Jobs Now! construction program.

Submitted photo

Radio name shares tips Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce President Rob Wehmeier poses for a photo with radio personality Catherine Johns. Johns was the speaker at the chamber’s May monthly membership meeting held at Silver Lake Country Club. Johns coaches entrepreneurs and professionals on becoming more dynamic in their sales presentations, networking and speaking engagements.

Summer is a great time to take that long-overdue vacation or make much-needed home repairs, but as the weather heats up, so do scams. The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about these popular summer scams. • Beware of summer concert ticket scams. Before paying for concert tickets online, make sure the seller is reputable. Oftentimes, phony sellers will trick consumers into wiring money with no intention of sending real tickets. Most concert venues now allow ticket holders to print tickets from personal computers, which also gives scammers the opportunity to sell the same ticket over and over to unsuspecting consumers. Be wary of sellers who: offer a sad tale as to why they cannot use the tickets; only accept cash; want the money wired or transferred through a prepaid account; and/ or pressure you to act quickly. • Be wary of high pressure door-to-door sales tactics. Many legitimate companies use door-todoor sales, and various city ordinances regulate solicitors to protect residents from unscrupulous individuals. However, consumers need to watch for individuals who try to work their way around the system to line their pockets. Many door-to-door salesmen offer deals for everything from driveway paving to air conditioning repair to security systems. Before saying yes, get all promises in writing, including start and finish dates. Never sign a contract that has an open-ended completion date or blank spaces • Keep your belongings safe during your move. Summer is the peak time of year for changing residencies, and unlicensed movers and dishonest scammers are waiting to take advantage of the busy season. Always research the company and check out the mover’s BBB Business Review at bbb.org. Not all price quotes online or over the phone are legitimate (or binding), and crooks are not likely to send an estimator to your home in advance. Also remember that the lowest estimate can sometimes be an unrealistic, low-ball offer, which may cost you more in the end.

• Don’t let a scam ruin your vacation. Fake travel agents and websites are known for touting too-good-to-be-true deals in the hopes of getting your money in return. Whether it’s a fake timeshare rental or a falsely promised Disney vacation, don’t let a vacation scam take you for a ride. Make sure the offer is legitimate by checking bbb.org first. If there is no BBB Business Review on the company, dig deeper. Google the phone number or website to see if others report problems.

• Beware of job scams that can turn a hot summer cold. Finding summer employment is a top priority for most college and high school students. Don’t let the seasonal job hunt turn into a huge waste of time and money. Always be wary of employers who require fees for training and background checks, or who tout “no experience needed.” BBB considers these red flags for employment scams. Find out more about scams and sign up for scam alerts at BBB Scam Stopper (bbb.org/scam).

Mortgage Rates Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of June 16) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed Jumbo 30-year fixed

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United Trust Bank (as of June 10) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES 4.250 3.375 3.250

Prospect Federal (as of June 16) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES 4.250 3.875 3.250

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The Regional News Thursday, June 19, 2014

Submitted photos

‘Express Yourself’ exhibit at McCord: Meet the artists at reception this Friday The students of Maria DeCaprio-Sunta have chosen the theme for their exhibit at the McCord Gallery & Cultural Center. It’s interesting to see how Debbie Albrecht, Danielle Lange, Phyllis Levine, Laurie Faklis, Karen Knittle, Joan Kocim, Patricia Thomas-Mentzel, Joan Niebr, Darlene Gibbons Reindl, Lynda Schiappa, Nina Thorp and Karol Witous-Griewe have chosen to express themselves in watercolor, acrylics and mixed media. The exhibit runs through Saturday, July 12, and the public is invited to meet the artists at a reception

this Friday, June 20, from 6 to 8 p.m. Instructor Maria DeCaprio Sunta and Joan Niebr are shown with Joan’s watercolors “Birdie It’s Cold Outside” and “How Does Your Garden Grow” (left). At right, Laurie Faklis’ Snowy Egret is a watercolor and mixed media collage. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is located at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th & LaGrange), Palos Park. For more information call 708-671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org.

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Submitted photo

Longest Day milestone commemoration During a 70th anniversary of D-Day observance held on June 6 at Smith Crossing continuing care retirement center in Orland Park, Mayor Dan McLaughlin (standing) visits with World War II veterans residing at Smith Crossing, 10501 Emilie Lane in Orland Park. The Second World War veterans are Nick Zaglifa (from left), Jack Dakes and Bernie Nash.

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Palos Park Public Library patrons Allison Tanis and her sister Faith, with their horses Sahr and Bunny, found another way to get to the library to check on a museum pass and the summer reading program.

Senior Notes FireKeepers Casino trip with Orland Twp. Orland Township offers a trip to FireKeepers Casino Thursday and Friday, Aug. 7 and 8. Stops include Clara’s Lansing Station in Battle Creek, Mich., for lunch and a guided tour of this historical landmark. At FireKeepers Casino in Battle Creek, enjoy all hotel amenities, swimming pool, bars and restaurants and time at the casino. Transportation will leave at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 7, and will return at 6 p.m. on Aug. 8. Tickets cost $175, includes lunch, hotel accommodations, a $20 casino package and $5 each day for food. Purchase ticket at the township office, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave. in Orland Park. (403-4222)

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Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor sports@regionalpublishing.com

Locals help Celts win state crown By Frank Gogola   While baseball features individual duals within each game, a cohesive team is necessary to weather the ups and downs of a typical season.    Orland Park natives Ben Salvador and Matt Diehl were not on Providence Catholic coach Mark Smith’s preseason list of projected starters, but both wound up helping the Celtics capture the Class 4A championship Saturday in Joliet.   Salvador’s absence from that list was understandable: He hadn’t played baseball as a junior, choosing instead to focus his athletic energies on soccer. But when another Orland resident, outfielder Matt Payton, suffered an elbow injury in hockey and was forced to miss the 2014 baseball campaign, Salvador’s presence on the roster suddenly became more meaningful.    “Ben stepped in from the first day and never looked back,” Smith said. “He was our catalyst offensively all season long from that

leadoff spot.”   Salvador patrolled center field for the Celtics in all 42 games while batting first in the lineup and utilizing his speed when he got on base. He went 1-for-4 with one run scored and one RBI in the state semifinal game against Prairie Ridge on Friday and added another hit and RBI on Saturday versus fellow Chicago Catholic League Blue member St. Rita.   That RBI in the finale gave Providence an insurance run in the sixth and enabled it to complete an unexpected run to the top of Class 4A with a 4-1 victory.    “I will never forget this for the rest of my life,” Salvador said. “The team chemistry is what got us here. We’re brothers is basically all I’ve got to say — we’re brothers.   “I just love this team. Everyone, up and down the lineup, they helped, even guys coming off the bench [and] making big plays. I’ll never forget it.”   Diehl was one of those bench guys who got pressed into service. (Continued on page 2)

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Section 2

Page 1

Summer baseball roundup

Knights are already in midseason form By Ken Karrson

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Orland Park's Ben Salvador is all smiles after receiving his medal for helping Providence Catholic capture the Class 4A baseball championship on Saturday with a 4-1 win over fellow Chicago Catholic League Blue member St. Rita at Silver Cross Field in Joliet.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Providence Catholic players, some of whom hail from Orland Park and Oak Lawn, celebrate the winning of a Class 4A title Saturday.

   While the spring baseball campaign officially ended less than a week ago, Chicago Christian’s summer squad is already operating at midseason form.    At least that was true five games into the schedule, as the Knights picked up wins in each. Included among the conquered foes were Walther Christian (9-1), Romeoville (10-0), Stagg (7-5), Andrew (8-5) and Illiana Christian (10-9).    Since rain interrupted play for a couple days at a number of sites, Chicago Christian’s ability to see action that many times was in itself noteworthy. Even more surprising has been the manner in which the Knights have prevailed.    “The offense has been very solid so far,” said coach Eric Brauer, whose squad’s biggest weakness in the spring was a somewhat meager attack. “We’re getting a lot of contributions from a lot of different guys. We’re playing pretty well and I’m pleased with it.”    Christian is returning 12 players from its 17-man spring roster, so the varsity experience is an obvious plus.   “We haven’t seen any real dominant pitching,” Brauer said. “You’re not going to see a lot of aces because they’re playing travel ball. That contributes [to our production] a little bit, too, but our seniors are really leading well with a good attitude.”   One of those seniors-to-be, Christian Bolhuis, has been the ringleader thus far. His game-winning double in the bottom of the seventh last Friday against Illiana was part of a 9-for-18 start at the plate for Bolhuis, who is also 2-0 with a 0.00 earned-run average over six innings as a pitcher.   Ron Clark and Adam Schoenle are two other springtime vets Brauer cited as reliable contributors in the early going. Brauer admitted that opportunities for newcomers might not be too plentiful, but one individual chipping in versus the Vikings was sophomore-to-be Josh Hill, who went 2-for-3.   While beating their longtime rival was nice, the Knights’ victories over Stagg and Andrew gave Brauer greater satisfaction.    “Those are games we have typically not won — it was only the second time we’ve beaten Stagg in the summer and the first time

we’ve beaten Andrew,” he said. “They have more bodies, [so] if we’re missing a couple guys, that makes a big difference.”   Christian’s lineup was pretty much intact, but the Chargers’ wasn’t as coach Matt O’Neill went with a junior-heavy group. That didn’t diminish the Knights’ accomplishment in his eyes, though — O’Neill acknowledged “they threw some good arms at us.”   Besides Bolhuis, Christian’s best pitchers to date have been Trevor Wolterink, Jack De Vries and Tom Hassel. Only the latter is a newcomer.    “The biggest thing this summer is we’ve been focused on attitude — attitude about themselves, about the team, about what we’re trying to do,” Brauer said. “We’ve had good buy-in from the guys.”    And that, Brauer says, is vital to the Knights’ well-being.    “If we don’t show up and compete in the summer, we have no chance,” he said. “We are battling that [size differential].”    Christian is annually the smallest school participating in the Illinois Baseball Coaches Association summer league, and for many years it sat out completely. That changed upon Brauer’s arrival in Palos Heights, and the Knights have steadily improved each season.    “[The mindset years ago] was, ‘Let’s show up and see what happens,’” he said. “We don’t fight that battle anymore. And I have no doubt in my mind that winning games in the summer carries over into the [following] spring.   “We’ve won 160 games the last six years in the spring. That speaks for itself in terms of how we go about things.” STAGG    The Chargers were one of those teams negatively affected by last week’s wet weather, as the meeting with Christian was their lone outing.    Unlike Brauer, O’Neill has some definite holes to plug heading into 2015. His three regular outfielders from this spring and three of his four infielders must be replaced.   “We’ve got three guys at first base who can swing it a little bit,” O’Neill said. “We’ll have to move one of them to the outfield and another will probably DH. I think there’s some ability level [elsewhere], but it’s the same thing (Continued on page 2)

Sandburg settles for second best State title string stops at five

and competitive cheerleading.   The softball program contributed to the streak by winning it   Sandburg’s softball team was all in 2010. Badminton and boys' three innings away from keeping volleyball were also part of the the streak alive. title mix.    After rallying, the Lady Eagles   This latest surge brought to held a 3-2 lead over Warren four 18 the number of sports chaminnings into Saturday's Class 4A HIGH FIVE TITLES pionships Sandburg teams have championship contest in East PeoA LOOK AT SANDBURG’S collected in all. That's tops among ria. Sandburg couldn't maintain CHAMPIONSHIP RUN IN THE the 13 schools covered by this pathat advantage, however, and PREVIOUS FIVE YEARS per, as is the run of five straight suffered an 8-4 loss. years with at least one title.    A second-place state finish was 2008-09:    Making the achievement particstill better than most would have Competitive Cheerleading ularly noteworthy is that it's been predicted for a team that had lost 2009-10: Softball spread over eight programs. With 15 games during the regular seafour championships each, wrestling son, but when the Lady Eagles 2010-11: and boys' volleyball lead the way. couldn't reach the mountaintop Badminton, Boys' Volleyball    Next in line is Mother McAuley an impressive school run was 2011-12: Wrestling, with 15 championships, all but one officially halted. Competitive cheerleading of which were earned in volley  Softball was Sandburg's final 2012-13: Wrestling ball. Following the Mighty Macs, chance in the 2013-14 school in order, are Richards (seven), year to claim a state crown in athletics, something that had A total of seven championships Marist (five), Chicago Christian been accomplished at least once were garnered during that span, (five), Brother Rice (three), St. in each of the previous five years. including two apiece in wrestling Laurence (two), Oak Lawn (one) and Stagg (one).   Shepard, Evergreen Park and Queen of Peace are still seeking their first state crown and Mt. Assisi closed its doors in early June without ever winning the top prize. Thirty of the 57 local titles have been claimed by boys' teams.   Besides Sandburg's five consecutive championship years, the best runs were put together by McAuley and Christian. The Macs won three straight volleyball crowns from 1980-82, while the Lady Knights managed the same feat in girls' track between 1990 and 1992.   Richards' titles have come in football (two), wrestling (two), boys' basketball, boys' volleyball and girls' volleyball. Marist reigned supreme twice in both boys' volleyball and wrestling and once in Photo by Jeff Vorva Sandburg won state titles in at least one sport for five straight baseball, while Christian's other years until the 2013-14 campaign, the best run ever by an area championships were gained in girls' volleyball and girls' basketball. school. By Jeff Vorva

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sandburg's softball team, seen here in an earlier playoff game, finished second to Warren in Class 4A on Saturday.

Fairy-tale season ends against Warren By Frank Gogola The postseason's feel-good story lacked an appropriate ending. Being runner-up is certainly nothing of which to be ashamed, however, and that's where Sandburg landed after Warren defeated it 8-4 in the Class 4A softball final Saturday in East Peoria. The Lady Eagles were ahead 3-2 after four innings but were unable to hang onto the lead. What made Sandburg's playoff run so impressive was that it followed a somewhat average regular season, one in which the Lady Eagles lost 15 times. But after dropping a decision to Lockport on May 23, Sandburg found another gear and peeled off seven

straight victories to position itself opposite Warren. Pitcher Sarah Herold cited the Lady Eagles' 4-3 triumph over Barrington in 13 innings one day after the setback against Lockport as the key element in their revival. “Barrington, they’re a good team — everybody knows it,” Herold said after Sandburg's supersectional conquest of Naperville Central. “For us to just beat them, I think it really motivated us. “[It was] like, ‘Listen, guys, we can do this. Yeah, we lost to Lockport or [Lincoln-Way] East, but we beat Barrington.’” Herold, a postseason fixture for the Lady Eagles (24-16), battled uncharacteristic wildness early on versus Warren as she put two

batters aboard in the top of the second inning by hitting them with pitches. That set the table for a two-run double. Sandburg retaliated in the fourth, using Kristen Zarate's single, a Lady Blue Devils error and Cierra Adamus' squeeze to inch in front by one. The edge proved to be short-lived, though, as Warren struck for a deuce in the fifth, tacked on three more runs in the sixth and finished off its scoring with a seventh-inning homer. The Lady Eagles' only answer to all that noisemaking was Bri Soltis' sacrifice fly in the bottom of the seventh. Sandburg, which was seeking (Continued on page 2)


2

Section 2 Thursday, June 19, 2014  

The Regional News - The Reporter

Rodman decides to do the write thing Bartosh   (Reprinted from Feb. 7, 2013)   Hey, Dr. Seuss, guess what? You have company.   Children’s books are an important component of the literary world. While they may seem trite to adults, we’re no longer looking at them through innocent eyes or with an untainted conscience.    Of course, many of us would probably benefit from a rereading. Based on the public actions I witness from a fair amount of folks these days, long forgotten are basic niceties such as politeness, honesty, sharing and showing consideration for others.   And if a barnyard animal or talking piece of machinery happens to be the one instructing us in print, the message is no less important. Maybe they’ll succeed where Dr. Phil has failed.   There is a knack, though, to composing a book that is designed to attract a very young audience. Heavy-handedness won’t work, and the morality tale must be presented in a simple, yet effective manner.   Oh, and all smart aleck-ness must be curbed.    That last part is probably the toughest for most writers to follow. As a rule, we’re tempted to poke fun at things that seem silly, but unless they desire to influence the next generation of Lindsay Lohan clones, children’s-book authors will refrain from mining the cheap laugh.    So, as you can see, only certain individuals are cut out to create kids’ books. We must be careful about who is granted access to little ones’ minds and allowed to influence them.    The aforementioned Dr, Seuss was long ago given a thumbs-up, although the bizarre wordplay found in his books might lead one to believe his own mind was somewhere other than the real world — around Jupiter perhaps, or Haight-Ashbury, circa 1967. Nevertheless, kids have

been exposed to him for years without negative repercussions other than a strong desire to incorporate “gox,” “zans” and “wump” into their everyday speech.   Speaking of exposure, that brings us to Dennis Rodman.    Rodman, you say? We thought you were talking about children’s authors, though goodness knows why a sports columnist would be doing so. That’s exactly why — Dennis Rodman has joined that particular literary circle.    His qualifications as an author certainly are open to debate, especially when the subject matter he covered in the epic “Bad As I Wanna Be” made adults blush. And childish antics shouldn’t be considered an adequate resume-filler for being a storyteller to tots, either.    Those of us old enough to remember Rodman’s two greatest gifts — an ability to rebound a basketball and to self-promote — might find it difficult to fathom that he is most likely a nonentity to the younger generation.   Remember, though, today’s youths tend to view history as something that occurred last November, so unless they stumbled upon some old NBA footage or “TMZ” happened to ridicule one of his cinematic efforts, Rodman rates as a nobody. But while he has receded into the background, Rodman never completely disappears.   And his latest reappearance comes complete with a little thing called “Dennis The Wild Bull,” which surprisingly does not chronicle his days with Michael Jordan and Phil Jackson. No, “Dennis The Wild Bull” — which, in case you were already making purchase plans, is only available on Amazon.com via an unaffiliated seller — is about a lower-case-“B” bull who is taken away from his family and forced to live with other bulls in a rodeo.   Dennis, like the human writer who shares his name, swims a bit upstream from the other creatures around him. While

some bulls may have one ring through their nose, Dennis has two, which is actually easy to overlook given the fact that he also has flowing red hair, a tattoo and red stubble under his chin.    There is no evidence that Dennis the bull has a wedding gown or feather boas secretly stashed away for those special evenings spent on the farm.    Interestingly, though, Dennis the author might have stumbled onto something decent. The point of the story is that Dennis the bull, despite his differences, winds up being accepted by those around him and everyone becomes friends.    While Rodman and co-author Dustin Warburton obviously pattern the book’s character after Rodman, the tale’s payoff would work under any circumstances. So instead of just promoting tolerance toward an outlandish character, maybe “Dennis The Wild Bull” will get kids — and, just as importantly, their parents — to dig below the surface whenever they encounter anyone who doesn’t quite fit the standard definition of “normal.”   That could mean someone confined to a wheelchair or having some sort of physical disfigurement, a person dealing with developmental issues, or simply an individual of different ethnicity or religious background. Accepting people like that and treating them as equals would seem an easy-to-enact behavior, but it’s proved too difficult a concept for a great number of people to grasp.   So as amazed as I am to be admitting this, perhaps Dennis Rodman as children’s-book author isn’t as far-fetched an idea as I initially thought. I just hope that the new, insightful Dennis doesn’t get mixed up with the old, let-me-kick-a-courtside-photographer-in-the-groin Dennis because I fear the latter might become a bad influence.    And the next thing you know, Rodman will be doing a book tour in the nude.

Community sports news Palos Heights to sponsor flag Tatra Foundation sponsoring Hickory Hills resident Fiona Hehir, will attend St. Norbert Colcamps football league lege. Her brother Patrick, a 2012   The Palos Heights Parks and   The Tatra Foundation will sponRecreation Department is accepting registration for an NFL Flag Football League it will sponsor this fall.   Coed teams are being formed for youngsters entering grades 3-8. Games will be played on Sundays from Sept. 7-Nov. 2 at Shepard and in-season practices will be conducted one day per week.    The cost is $76 for residents, $96 for nonresidents, and the deadline to enter is Aug. 8 unless all spots are filled before that. All participants will receive a team jersey and participation award.   Individuals can sign up at the recreation department, 6601 W. 127th St.

Baseball skills evaluations to take place at Oak Lawn H.S.

  Oak Lawn High School will host a baseball-skills evaluation on Wednesday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The event will be presented by U.S. Baseball Academy and My Pro Day.   The session is open to players aged 6-18, regardless of ability level. For more information, visit www.MyProDay.com

Reach for it

sor a soccer camp for children aged 5-12 and ski-jumping school for ages 7-12 this summer.   Hickory Hills will be one of two sites for the soccer camp. Ski jumping will be held at a facility specializing in that. The cost of the latter is $275, which includes two bus trips.    For more information, call 7280464 or visit info@ultrafoundation.org.

Marist grad, is already a student there.   Basketball player Halle Engel will continue her athletic and scholastic careers at Blackburn College in Carlinville, Ill., and cheerleader Kaila Case of Palos Heights will enroll at the University of Louisville.

Baseball. basketball camps to be held at Richards

  Baseball and basketball camps Marist athletes signs letters of will be presented by Richards’ varsity coaches this summer. intent    A baseball skills camp and girls’   Eight student-athletes who re- basketball camp both run June cently graduated from Marist have 23-26, and a second baseball camp made their college choices official will be presented in a pair of twoby signing letters of intent. day blocks: June 30 and July 1,   Three members of the Red- and July 7 and 8. Hawks' lacrosse team will remain   Registration fees and particiteammates when they enroll at pants’ ages vary. For more deSt. Ambrose University in the tails on any of the programs, call fall. Orland Park resident Connor 499-2550. Falls, Evergreen Park resident Sean Prendergast and Nelson Velez will attend the Davenport, Iowa, school. NAYS tournament coming to   Male soccer players Charlie Bolingbrook in July Earner (Oak Lawn) and Bren-   A National American Youth dan McHugh are both headed to Sports basketball tournament will the University of Dubuque and a be held July 23-27 at various sites member of the girls' soccer squad, in Bolingbrook.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

  Sandburg's Alec Martinez reaches out to grab a rebound against Downers Grove North in the Stagg Summer Shootout. The Eagles split six games at the two-day event.

Celtics

(Continued from page 1) The junior replaced Phil Kunsa in right field after the latter was ejected in the first inning of the semifinal game following a collision at first base as he was running out a ground ball.    Kunsa’s ejection drew an automatic one-game suspension, which he served in the championship contest. That meant Diehl was needed again on Saturday.   “I knew I had huge shoes to fill with Kunsa gone,” Diehl said. “He was one of our best hitters. I just took it pitch by pitch and I just tried to fill in for him as best I could.”   Despite appearing in only 16 games and taking 13 at-bats prior to Saturday, Diehl had his coach’s trust when he took the field. Diehl only recorded one hit in five atbats in the two state contests, but Smith termed Diehl’s leadoff single during a six-run sixth inning in Friday’s 8-7 semifinal victory over Prairie Ridge “a huge hit” and said it was “what started that whole sixth-inning rally.”   “No one thought we could do this,” Diehl said. “We had one of the worst records coming into these playoffs, but we took games one at a time and just kept winning. It was an unbelievable journey.    “It’s just incredible. It’s unreal [and] I can’t believe this actually happened. It’s great.”    While Salvador and Diehl both hail from Orland, the decision to attend Providence was an easy one for each.    “They have an incredible baseball program,” Diehl said. “It’s a great school. I just fit in great here. I love this school.”    Salvador echoed a similar sentiment, saying his 22-minute commute from Orland to New Lenox was “not bad at all” and definitely worthwhile now that he helped the Celtics reach prep baseball’s promised land.    “I came to Providence because my two brothers went here, and I

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Providence Catholic's Ben Salvador, an Orland Park resident, was the leadoff hitter in Saturday's Class 4A championship game versus St. Rita at Silver Cross Field. just know the community that it has,” Salvador said. “Everything we do, we do for the community. I’m just glad that we could bring home a state championship for the community of Providence.”    Justin Davis (Orland Park) and Richard Yusa (Oak Lawn) played roles for the Celtics throughout the season, although neither saw tournament action.   Davis had been Providence’s fifth starter on the hill but was not called on after Smith shortened his pitching rotation for the postseason. Yusa was the starting catcher, but like Payton he had to deal with an injury suffered while playing hockey.    Yusa was playing both sports at the same time because the two seasons overlap. Sophomore Jimmy Jeffries, who substituted for

Yusa on hockey days, became the Celtics’ full-time backstop.    “[Yusa] stepped to the side and said, ‘Jimmy’s playing better than I am. I understand it. I’ll be here if you need me,’” Smith said. “And that’s what a great team player he was.”    On the St. Rita side, sophomore Mateo Zunica (Palos Park), senior Jake Drada (Orland Park) and junior Dylan Helstern (Oak Lawn) were local products who contributed to the Mustangs’ season.    “What you saw in the Final Four tells you everything you need to know about the sport of baseball,” said Palos Park native and St. Rita coach Mike Zunica. “How many losses did we have and how many losses did the other teams have? What were [the Celtics] — a six seed? Who knows? It’s a cruel sport.”

clashed with the Lady Griffins for a third time this spring. The two SouthWest Suburban Confer(Continued from page 1) ence Blue members split a pair its second state championship in of regular-season meetings, with five years, outscored its opponents Lincoln-Way East capturing the 37-8 during the seven-game win- more recent encounter. ning streak. But Sandburg rode Herold's strong performance in the circle Sandburg 5 to postseason success. Herold, who Lincoln-Way East 1 had been victimized by the Lady The Lady Eagles saw a familiar Griffins the last time, stopped face in Friday's semifinal as they them on four hits while striking

out six and walking only one. Lincoln-Way East's lone marker was unearned. Herold also contributed three hits of her own to aid the Lady Eagles' offense. Other principal figures were Katie Krzus (3-for-4 with a homer and four RBI) and Karli McLaughlin (RBI single). Krzus' round-tripper, a two-run blow in the sixth, was her seventh of the year.

Baseball

of their own largesse — a sixrun TF South fourth stanza, for example, featured only two hits but opened with four straight free passes. However, Astros coach Frank DiFoggio adopted a straightforward take on things.    “Now, the nervousness is gone,” he said.    Jake Fredrick (RBI double) and Travis Pruim (two-run single) were trigger men at the plate for Shepard. Also doing well was pitcher Tyler Walters, who missed all of the spring campaign but threw two solid innings versus the Rebels.    “It was a typical summer-league game — some things were good, some things were bad,” DiFoggio said. “I didn’t have a lot of guys there, but that’s something I’ll be dealing with all summer. Most of the guys I have [on the roster] are dual- and three-sport athletes or on travel teams.”   And truth be known, DiFoggio doesn’t mind working with younger players in June and July.   “I know everybody looks at summer differently, but I think it’s about getting new guys accustomed to playing on the varsity,” he said. “Summer’s about learning about guys, getting comfortable and growing confidence. This time of the year it’s about delayed gratification — you don’t worry about wins or losses or if you go 0-for-4.”   Although Pruim, Brett Smith, Ken Gorski and Ricky Mundo were the only springtime veterans available to DiFoggio on Thursday, it will be a far different story next March. With 13 returnees, DiFoggio admitted there “aren’t going to be many question marks going into next year.”   As has been the case for a decade, Shepard’s experienced players will be swinging wooden bats this summer. Pitching-wise, projected 2015 leaders Smith and Adam Gregory will see limited mound duty. EVERGREEN PARK    With school still in session last week, the Mustangs have delayed the start of their summer season. And even when play does get underway, it won’t last long — Evergreen Park coach Mark Smyth plans to pull the plug around Independence Day.    “We’re going to play 10 games, then be in the Lockport Tournament,” he said. “Most of the kids are on a travel team and the school year’s going so late as it is, let them have their summer a little bit.”   Smyth feels that, despite the shortened schedule, the Mustangs will be able to accomplish what is necessary.   “We’ve got to find a couple position guys,” he said. “That’s what summer’s come down to so you can hit the ground running in the spring.”

Sandburg

(Continued from page 1) for us every summer: We try to fill the open spots.”   What O’Neill may miss most about the program’s recent graduates isn’t measurable statistically. Rather, it was a group intangible: cohesiveness and the ability to play as a team.   “I hope these seniors-to-be learned that from [the departed guys],” O’Neill said, “and I hope they play with some confidence. It never hurts when you step on the field that you feel you have a chance to win.” BROTHER RICE   Multiple-game series are not typically the domain of high school baseball teams, but the Crusaders and Marian Catholic bucked that trend last week by squaring off three times.   Only one of those affairs was originally scheduled. However, Brother Rice was searching for games after one against St. Laurence was halted prematurely by rain and another versus De La Salle was cancelled altogether due to the Meteors’ extended stay in the Class 3A state tournament.    While the Crusaders triumphed just once, their two losses certainly didn’t rank as embarrassing. Rice dropped 2-0 and 2-1 verdicts.    “That’s one thing we were really happy about — the pitching was there and we played good defense,” Crusaders coach John McCarthy said. “We had some [good] arms at the lower levels.”    Sophomore-to-be Ryan Kutt continued to display the form he did as a contributing varsity freshman, while newcomers Jack Nelligan and Jack Duzek also gave Rice a lift on the mound. Two other new arrivals, Jake Ridgway and Zac Sefcik, stepped forward offensively in the Crusaders’ triumph over the Spartans, the former doing so with a couple of doubles.    “There’s a lot of shuffling going on,” McCarthy said. “We want to give everybody some time and let them showcase their ability, and guys are trying to find out what their roles are and are [sometimes] pressing a little bit. When you press, it’s tough to play good baseball.   “There’s a learning curve and we’ll take some lumps, but we’ve got to be patient.”   One plus is that Rice’s freshman and sophomore squads both earned Chicago Catholic League Blue titles in 2014.    “That shows they can do it under adversity,” McCarthy said of his younger players. “It helps [them] knowing we expect to succeed and that’s what we expect every year, but it’s a burden, too, because the guys haven’t done it [on varsity].

We need to get them confidence and give guys a lot of different opportunities, but we’re very excited.”   The Crusaders’ matchup with St. Laurence was stopped after four innings last Tuesday. The Vikings were ahead 1-0 at that juncture, courtesy of Anthony Rios’ RBI groundout. Preceding that play were Tommy Farrell’s walk, a stolen base and balk.   Like McCarthy, St. Laurence boss Pete Lotus’ biggest source of gratification was, understandably, pitching and defense. Junior Anthony Robles did not surrender a hit over four frames and fanned two.   Robles’ emergence would be a welcome sight for the Vikings following the graduation of staff aces Mike Kornacker and Brad Wood, who spent a combined seven seasons on the varsity roster.   “It is different [this summer] and there’s definitely going to be some new guys [in the rotation],” said Lotus, whose two most tested hurlers are Frank Greco and John Riordan.    “I definitely think the past couple summers we had a much more definitive view on what kids could do. It was pretty much cut-and-dried that it was those guys who would play certain positions, and you realize [now] there’s some things you took for granted that we’d be able to do because we’d done it before.   “There’s a lot more competition [this summer] and that’s a healthy thing. We’re getting back to [teaching] a lot of the very simple things and part of that is really fun.”   While this isn’t the first time Lotus has had to do some rebuilding, he said the current situation is reminiscent of what he dealt with his first couple years on the job.    “We had tough, scrappy kids that found ways to win,” Lotus said.   St. Laurence’s rookies, while new to the varsity, aren’t strangers to success. The Vikings’ freshman and sophomore clubs both finished second, one game behind Catholic League Blue champion Brother Rice.    “I don’t think there’s going to be much of a hiccup in how we play the game,” Lotus said. “We’ll really try and stress development. We’re in kind of a gray area, but I’m excited to see how it goes.    “I want our guys to know we’re not necessarily up-and-comers — they have a certain level to uphold. I hope we take that next step forward.” SHEPARD   Despite jumping out to a 5-0 lead last Thursday, the Astros were unable to close the deal against TF South. Instead, the Rebels rallied to pocket a 12-6 victory.    Two younger Shepard pitchers got roughed up, largely because


The Regional News - The Reporter

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.CYNTHIA A. RIDDLE AKA CYNTHIA RIDDLE, THE TOWNHOMES OF GEORGIN WOODS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 13 CH 24841 14416 South 90th Court Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 22, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 23, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 14416 South 90th Court, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-10-221001-1006. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $171,710.09. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 24841 TJSC#: 34-8249 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I609007

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS TRUSTEE, F O R � CWMBS, INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH T R U S T � 2007-18, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH C E R T I F I C A T E S � SERIES 2007-18; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � MICHAEL P. CODY; KELLI L. CODY; STATE BANK O F � COUNTRYSIDE; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MICHAEL P. CODY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS A N D � LEGATEES OF KELLI L. CODY, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 09 CH 9909 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 20, 2010 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, July 7, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 24-30-323-006-0000. Commonly known as 12555 South 69th Avenue, Palos Heights, IL 60463. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff's Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W 0 9 0 4 9 4 . � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I610413

Publisher’s Notice

Thursday, June 19, 2014 Section 2

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����������������� IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Wells Fargo Bank, NA P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � John C. Boerner aka John Conrad Boerner; Barbara Boerner; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 16732 Sheriff's # 140439 F13060235 WELLS Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on July 30, 2014, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 8517 West 87th Place, Hickory Hills, Illinois 60457 P.I.N: 23-02-117-003-0000 Improvements: This property consists of a Single Family Home. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I607572

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FIRSTMERIT BANK, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR-IN-INTEREST TO GEORGE WASHINGTON SAVINGS BANK Plaintiff, -v.MICHAEL McELREE, individually, ADELINE McELREE, individually, MICHAEL McELREE, as Trustee Under Trust Agreement Dated February 20, 2006 known as the Michael A. McElree Living Trust, ADELINE McELREE, as Trustee Under Trust Agreement Dated February 20, 2006 known as the Adeline McElree Living Trust, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF TRUST AGREEMENT DATED FEBRUARY 20, 2006 KNOWN AS THE MICHAEL A. McELREE LIVING TRUST, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF TRUST AGREEMENT DATED FEBRUARY 20, 2006 KNOWN AS THE ADELINE McELREE LIVING TRUST, HERITAGE CONDOMINIUM PHASE III ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 52686 8810 W. 140 STREET #1A Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 28, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 7, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8810 W. 140 STREET #1A, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-03-400-044-1011. The real estate is improved with a condominium. The judgment amount was $177,816.45. Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HOWARD AND HOWARD ATTORNEYS, PLLC, 200 S. MICHIGAN AVE., SUITE 1100, Chicago, IL 60604, (312) 372-4000. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HOWARD AND HOWARD ATTORNEYS, PLLC 200 S. MICHIGAN AVE., SUITE 1100 Chicago, IL 60604 (312) 372-4000 Attorney Code. 46359 Case Number: 10 CH 52686 TJSC#: 34-9416 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I611124

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION A.J. SMITH FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK Plaintiff, -v.WILLIAM GEORGE A/K/A GEORGE WILLIAM, LOVELY GEORGE, PNC BANK N.A. SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, MISSION HILLS- ORLAND PARK, L.L.C., UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 2012 CH 36289 17549 SAN BERNARDINO DRIVE Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 22, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 23, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17549 SAN BERNARDINO DRIVE, Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-32-204-006-0000. The real estate is improved with a two story residence. The judgment amount was $474,479.27. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Kimberly A. Padjen, GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC, 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410, CHICAGO, IL 60604, (312) 332-6194. Please refer to file number 45149. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410 CHICAGO, IL 60604 (312) 332-6194 Attorney File No. 45149 Attorney Code. 90334 Case Number: 2012 CH 36289 TJSC#: 34-7629 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I610358

6-19-14

Serving Your Community for 30 Years

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN I N T E R E S T � TO WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff, v s . � VALDAS KERULIS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE F O R � COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A.; Defendants, 11 CH 26548 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on April 16, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, July 18, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-14-106-007-0000. Commonly known as 8717 WEST VAIL DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1115605. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I611527

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION ONEWEST BANK, FSB (D/B/A FINANCIAL FREEDOM, A DIVISION OF ONEWEST BANK, FSB) Plaintiff, -v.THE PRIVATEBANK AND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 12/11/2006 A/K/A TRUST NO. 6975, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE PRIVATEBANK AND TRUST COMPANY U/T/A DATED 12/11/2006 A/K/A TRUST NO. 6975, 11323-27-31 ROBERTS ROAD MANAGEMENT CORPORATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, WILLIAM P. BUTCHER, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR ROSEMARY MARTINOTTI (DECEASED) Defendants 13 CH 022780 11327 S. ROBERTS ROAD UNIT F PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 15, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 17, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11327 S. ROBERTS ROAD UNIT F, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-24-100-132-1006. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-22142. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-22142 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 022780 TJSC#: 34-6932 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I608694

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.ADELE KEALY AKA ADELE T. KEALY, SALT CREEK CREDIT UNION, CATALINA VILLAS CONDOMINIUM II ASSOCIATION Defendants 12 CH 10923 15123 Heather Ct. Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 17, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 18, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15123 Heather Ct., Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-13-200027-1028. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $212,882.72. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 12 CH 10923 TJSC#: 34-8098 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I609219

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.UNKNOWN SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE MARGARET GORDON MAY LIVING TRUST DTD 09/05/97, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE MARGARET GORDON MAY LIVING TRUST DTD 09/05/97, ROBERT MAY AKA BOB MAY, ELIZABETH ARMSTRONG, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, WILLIAM BUTCHER, SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE, HIDDEN VALLEY CONDOMINIUMS, UNIT THREE, ASSOCIATION Defendants 11 CH 15782 10845 SOUTH 84TH AVENUE UNIT 1B PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 1, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 2, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10845 SOUTH 84TH AVENUE UNIT 1B, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-400-091-1002, Property Index No. 2314-400-091-1017. The real estate is improved with a brick condominium; attached parking. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce. com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1104237. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1104237 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 11 CH 15782 TJSC#: 34-5455 I609610

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Section 2 Thursday, June 19, 2014 The Regional News - The Reporter

Real Estate

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC

Plaintiff,

Plaintiff,

-v.-

-v.-

ADORACION L. DUQUE

13 CH 15056

NIJOLE PANKIENE, THE HILLS OF PALOS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, CITIBANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CITIBANK, FSB, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS

8937 Biloba Ct. Orland Park, IL 60462

Defendants

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 30, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 31, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8937 Biloba Ct., Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-10-403-026-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $280,185.46. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 15056 TJSC#: 34-8245 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I609010

11 CH 010984

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, -v.ROBERT J. GRAH, JILL M. SOUTHCOMB, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. Defendants 13 CH 016283 15640 PEACHTREE DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 25, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 2:00 PM on July 2, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15640 PEACHTREE DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-15-408-004. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-37536. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-37536 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 016283 TJSC#: 34-5628 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I609888

Defendants

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9 CINNAMON CREEK DRIVE UNIT #3S PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 9, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 2:00 PM on July 16, 2014, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9 CINNAMON CREEK DRIVE UNIT #3S, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-200-015-1106; 1118; 1130. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-11-02249. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-02249 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 010984 TJSC#: 34-6993 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I611879

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � JOSE CANDELAS A/K/A JOSE REFUGIO C A N D E L A S ; � ELSA CANDELAS A/K/A ELSA PATRICIA C A N D E L A S ; � BANK OF AMERICA, NA; CITY OF CHICAGO; D e f e n d a n t s , � 10 CH 36415 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on April 9, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, July 11, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 18-34-411-020-0000. Commonly known as 8607 SOUTH KEAN AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 0920031. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I610588

12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

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Garage Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION ACCESS CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, v s . � FRANK EVERS A/K/A FRANK B. EVERS; C H E S T N U T � CHESTNUT HILLS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF FRANK E V E R S � A/K/A FRANK B. EVERS, IF ANY; UNKNOWN O W N E R S � AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants, 13 CH 26254 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on March 31, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, July 7, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 9147 S. Roberts Road, Unit 208 Hickory Hills, II. 60457. P.I.N. 23-01-306-027-1016 & 23-01-306-027-1032. The mortgaged real estate is a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Mr. Greg Czaicki at Plaintiff's Attorney, Walinski & Associates, P.C., 221 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois 60601-1320. (312) 704-0771. 5 0 0 0 8 / G C � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I610524

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, O N � BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE HOME E Q U I T Y � ASSET TRUST 2002-2, HOME EQUITY P A S S - T H R O U G H � CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-2 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � BRIAN W. SMITH, MARY T. SMITH, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S . � D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 3017 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 27, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, July 7, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-26-305-008-0000. Commonly known as 12416 South Iroquois Road, Palos Park, IL 60464. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. David C. Kluever at Plaintiff's Attorney, Kluever & Platt, L.L.C., 65 East Wacker Place, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 236-0077. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I610486

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, June 19, 2014 Section 2

Out & About

5

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Broaden Your Horizons This week Discovery Isle   Discovery Isle will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on Wednesdays now through Aug. 27 at the Isle a la Cache Museum, 501 E. Romeo Road, Romeoville.    Each session will feature a different activity or demonstration focusing on plants, animals or history. Programs may be held indoors or outside on level paths or natural surfaces across uneven terrain. No registration is required for the free program. For more information, visit ReconnectWithNature.org.

Blown glass ornament workshop at McCord McCord Gallery & Cultural Center in Palos Park will present two workshops this Saturday, June 21, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2:30 — 5:30 p.m., with instructors John Landin and Elektra Musich. In this workshop you will learn how to create a beautiful glass ornament by using glass tubes filled with your favorite colors. You will use a torch to heat them and blow them into one-of-a-kind wonders — an activity for friends and family. No glass experience is necessary to participate and all materials are included in the cost of the class, which is $75 or $65 for members of McCord. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is located at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange Road). Call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org.

Day camp at Children's Farm   Several new Farm Explorers day camp programs have been added to the summer schedule at the Children's Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. Children in grades 2 through 6 may attend the five-day programs beginning June 23 and 30, July 7 and 28, and Aug. 4, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.    The new sessions were added to give more children an opportunity to participate, after the previously announced weeks of day camp filled to capaci-

mat will change if it is raining. 361-3650.

ty. The farm also continues to offer its traditional overnight camp for young people in grades 5 through 12, with one and two week sessions beginning June 29, July 13, July 20, and July 27.    All of the camps, whether one week or two, overnight or daytime, are designed for children who love animals and nature. Camp are filled with fun and excitement as campers learn to ride horses, care for animals, hike in the woods and creeks, and make campfires. They enjoy campouts, hayrides, games, crafts and new friends.    Call 361-3650 or email thechildrensfarm@sbcglobal.net for registration information.

   The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, will host its monthly Womantalk coffee hour and discussion on Tuesday, June 24, from 10 to 11:30 a.m.   Ladies are invited to join the discussion of “Simple Abundance” and other readings by Sarah Ban Breathnach. There is no cost, but advance reservations are required. Ladies are invited to bring a picnic lunch if they would like to stay after the discussion. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Stepping stone art workshop

Spiritual Companionship

Womantalk discussion

  A family stepping stone art workshop will be offered at The Center on Wednesday, June 25, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. or from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The workshop is held at the Children's Farm on the east side of 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.   Instructed by Heather Young, participants make a cement garden stepping stone, inlaid with prints of woodland leaves and pretty stones. Young says this is a fun and easy outdoor project. The class fee is $8 per person. Advance reservations are required. Call The Center at (708) 361-3650.

  Spiritual Companionship is available each Tuesday at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.   Spiritual Companion Kathy Fontaine guides a person in prayer, meditation, and dialogue. Fontaine has been trained at the Institute of Spiritual Companionship in Chicago and is known to the Palos community as a spiritual growth leader and former kindergarten teacher. According to Fontaine, spiritual companionship is “holy listening.” The cost of Fontaine’s one-on-one service is $20 per hour, which she donates to The Center’s camp scholarship fund.   For further information about Summer solstice Spiritual Companionship appointlabyrinth walk ments, interested persons should   A celebration of the summer call The Center at 361-3650. solstice will be held this Saturday, June 21, from 8 to 10:30 Collage workshop p.m., at The Center's labyrinth garden, 12700 Southwest High-    April Schabes will offer a collage way, Palos Park. workshop on Wednesday, June 25,   Pastoral Director Chris Hop- from 1 to 3:30 p.m., at the Log kins will lead the group in Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 star-watching and a celebration Southwest Highway, Palos Park. of gratitude for summer's bounty   Schabes is a local artist, who and long days of light, and then sees collage as an opportunity invite participants to walk the to “play in your own world of labyrinth which will be ringed artistic expression with a fun by candlelight. Participants are and easy art form.” Students asked to bring lawn chairs, bug will learn an easy technique of spray, and small snacks to share. paint-staining paper towels and   The summer solstice celebra- embellishing them with rubber tion costs $10 and registration is stamp images, creating a beach required. The registration fees or a garden motif. will be contributed to a new in-   The collage workshop costs formation kiosk in the labyrinth $18 plus a $5 materials fee. Adgarden. The evening is not vance registration is required. weather dependent, but the for- Call 361-3650.

Videoview by Jay Bobbin   (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)   STARTING THIS WEEK: “THE LEGO MOVIE”: With the popularity of the toy building blocks over several generations, it’s somewhat surprising this film didn’t happen before it did ... but there surely will be more chapters, given the box-office success and high entertainment factor of this immensely enjoyable animated feature. Chris Pratt voices a Lego figure mistakenly thought to be the only one capable of stopping a power-crazed executive (voice of Will Ferrell). Morgan Freeman, Liam Neeson, Elizabeth Banks and — as Batman — Will Arnett also are heard. DVD extras: “making-of ” documentaries; audio commentary by cast and crew; deleted scenes; outtakes. **** (PG: AS) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)   “THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL”: Writer-director Wes Anderson’s comedy-drama offers many familiar faces, but the most valuable player is Ralph Fiennes, outstanding as the concierge of the title site. He’s eager to service the needs of every guest ... even if that means going beyond the normal bounds of duty where some of the female clientele are concerned, but that dedication eventually gets him into big trouble. Adrien Brody, Bill Murray, Jude Law, Willem Dafoe, Edward Norton, Owen Wilson, Tilda Swinton, Jeff Goldblum, Saoirse Ronan and Mathieu Amalric also are in the huge cast. DVD extras: theatrical trailer; five “making-of” documentaries; two promotional featurettes; stills gallery. *** (R: AS, P, V)   “HOUSE OF CARDS: THE COMPLETE SECOND SEASON”: It doesn’t take long for the surprises to start coming in the sophomore round of the acclaimed Netflix drama series, as the scheming Francis

Underwood (Kevin Spacey) ascends to the U.S. vice presidency. His wife, Claire (Golden Globe Award winner Robin Wright, who also makes her directing debut in this season), uses her new power to advocate for legislation with personal relevance to her. Molly Parker joins the cast as a congresswoman who inherits Underwood’s former place as House majority whip; Jodie Foster also is among the episode directors. DVD extras: five “making-of” documentaries. *** (Not rated: AS, N, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray)   “JOE”: Nicolas Cage is no stranger to action projects, but this drama is as much a character study. He plays the title character, an ex-convict who’s doing his best to go straight — but that becomes difficult when he befriends a youngster (Tye Sheridan, “Mud”) whose father is abusive. Joe then has to make a decision whether to do something about the situation in his own way. DVD extras: two “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by co-star Brian Mays, director David Gordon Green and composer David Wingo; deleted scenes. *** (R: AS, P, V) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)   “WALK OF SHAME”: The plot is paper-thin, but Elizabeth Banks’ natural charm helps this comedy as much as possible. She plays a local television newscaster who arrives in Los Angeles for a job interview that disappoints, then proceeds to have a one-night stand with a bartender (James Marsden). The next morning, she finds her car gone — along with her purse, phone and business attire — and with the prospect of another job, she embarks on a wild race through the city to make that appointment. A winning Banks is hampered by weak material; Oliver Hudson, Willie Garson and Kevin Nealon also appear. ** (R: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray)   “RED SHOE DIARIES: SEASON ONE”: Producer Zalman King (“9 1/2 Weeks,” “Wild Orchid”) brought his knack for sexually infused drama to series

television with this Showtime anthology. A pre-”X-Files” David Duchovny is the link between the stories as Jake, who seeks to understand why his girlfriend committed suicide by using a pseudonym and inviting women to forward diary entries about their own relationships. Ally Sheedy, Matt LeBlanc, Sheryl Lee (“Twin Peaks”) and Maryam d’Abo (“The Living Daylights”) are among the guest stars. *** (Not rated: AS, N, P)   COMING SOON: “300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE” (June 24): A naval battle coincides with the ground war between the Greeks and the invading Persians; Sullivan Stapleton (“Strike Back”) and Eva Green star. (R: AS, N, P, GV)   “WINTER’S TALE” (June 24): A couple’s (Colin Farrell, Jessica Brown Findlay) love transcends time and all sorts of perils. Russell Crowe and William Hurt also star. (PG13: AS, V)   “BAD WORDS” (July 8): A man (Jason Bateman, who also makes his directing debut here) decides to compete against much younger rivals in a spelling bee. (R: AS, N, P)   “UNDER THE SKIN” (July C 15): The body of a young woman (Scarlett Johansson) is overM taken by an alien that wreaks Y havoc on the male population of Scotland. (R: AS, N, P, V) CM   “THE RETURN OF THE KING: DELUXE EDITION” MY (July 22): Before there were CY the Peter Jackson-directed “The Lord of the Rings” movies, there CMY was this animated feature from the Rankin-Bass studio, now Kremastered. (Not rated)   “THE WALKING DEAD: THE COMPLETE FOURTH SEASON” (Aug. 26): More changes in the “game” await Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) and the other survivors of the zombies’ rampage. (Not rated: AS, P, GV)   FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

Surprisingly 22 jumps ahead of 21 for laughs When is a sequel ever as good as the original? In the case of “22 Jump Street,” it surpasses the previous “21 Jump Street.” With the newly released “22 Jump Street,” the rebooted franchise is alive and kicking. The films are based upon the late 80’s television series “21 Jump Street” that stared Johnny Depp. The movie is about cops Schmidt and Jenko going undercover in college trying to find out who the new drug supplier is. There is not much more you need to know than that. The film brings back all the main characters from the original including Schmidt and Jenko played by Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum respectively. It doesn’t just bring back the same people, it brings back the same plot. The only difference is that now they are in college instead of high school. They pretty much tell you that it’s the same plot line early on in the film and hammer that into your brain throughout. “22 Jump Street” does play off the fact that it is a sequel, but the film seems to make it work. There is a scene at the be-

Pinto’s Popcorn Picks by Tony Pinto ginning where Metro City Deputy Police Chief Hardy, played by Nick Offerman, gives them the new case and warns them about reboots stating “It’s always worse the second time around.” “22 Jump Street” is an exception to the rule. Lame and corny jokes like that are all around in the movie and it seems to work in this case. The humor in the film is surprisingly not too low-brow, which is an unforeseen occurrence. It’s sophisticated in its humor, but it still stays in touch with its demographic of young adults. One of the best scenes is actually during the credits which you should stay to watch as they lay out what might be the next sequels. Medical school, anyone? Or, how about culinary school? It does have some unfortunate jokes, including ones about Maya

Angelou and Tracy Morgan. The film’s two stars Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum work well together. Their onscreen relationship is what makes the movie worth watching. They act like an old married couple and it’s just hilarious to watch. That’s one of the main gags played throughout the movie that they are in a real relationship. They elevate this movie from so-so to good. Ice Cube is brought back as Captain Dickson and has a few scene-stealing roles throughout. We even get a cameo from Queen Latifah as Ice Cube’s wife. Directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, who directed the first one and also the hugely successful kids’ movie “The Lego Movie,” this duo proves it can direct anything from kids’ movies to adult comedies and do them well. At its heart, this is a buddy cop movie that is hilarious. What more can you ask for in a summer comedy? Nothing. If you’re looking for something enjoyable that’s not too serious, this is a great movie for you to see. Pinto’s Grade: A-

Liz Smith by Liz Smith

Rolling Stone chooses ‘I Walk the Line’ as the greatest country song, ever!   “I FIND it very, very easy to be true, I find myself alone when each day is through/Yes, I’ll admit that I’m a fool for you. Because you’re mine, I walk the line.”   Lyrics from the great Johnny Cash-composed song, “I Walk the Line.”    That song has been chosen by Rolling Stone magazine as No. 1 in the Top 25 Greatest Country Songs of All Time. And it is hypnotic in every way.    Others included in the Top 10 — Patsy Cline’s “Crazy,” Hank Williams’ “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” Tammy Wynette’s “Stand By Your Man,” Ray Charles’ “You Don’t Know Me” and Dolly Parton’s “Jolene.”   Loretta Lynn’s “Don’t Come Home A’ Drinking (With Lovin’ On Your Mind.)” is No. 19, but I feel with its strong feminist stance, it should be higher up. (Along with Loretta’s groundbreaking “The Pill.”)   PEOPLE who stepped into a posh women’s shoe store on East 64th Street off Lexington Avenue found themselves buying something else last week. They were joining a book party for the blonde bombshell author, Barbara Taylor Bradford’s new one, “Cavendon Hall.” Barbara and her tycoon husband, Robert, found themselves signing books, ordering E versions and making nice. She is one of the most successful moneymakers in the world of international fiction.    When you get a new tale from Barbara you are joining hundreds of thousands of readers in the BTB fan club. She has been translated into more languages than you and I even speak.    Barbara is my co-chair for the Literacy Partners gala fundraiser, happening June 17 at Cipriani 42nd Street. No one ever had a SBee_5x5_ad.pdf 1 3/7/2014 better, more glamorous and generous pal. No wonder knowing

New Yorkers lined up to buy her new novel and in the bargain they are also raising money to help 2 million adults learn how to read and write and make themselves over into useful citizens.   Donna Karan — hooray! In The New York Times recently, the famed American designer got a big write-up, as if she were a fashion beginner. At age 65, she looks about 30 and acts as if she is just starting out to become what she already became, an unending fashion force. The Times lists her in a success trio with Ralph and Calvin.   Aimee Self says we failed to mention — when writing about actress Nancy Olson — that she was once wed to songwriter Alan Jay Lerner! So there. Hope I’m not going to have to list all his wives!   Nancy Thomsen applauds our point about women screaming on the daily TV shows.    She adds: “So I watch most of these programs with the sound off. Lately, I have basically stopped watching almost everything; the exception being the wonderful CBS Morning News with Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell. Their program is civilized, gentle, and informative, and always interesting. No screaming there.”   MAGGIE VESSEY, the popular 800-meter runner, is also making strides in fashion. She is designing outfits fit for racing. She says her clothes are “out there.” (Tarzan, Peter Pan!) But they are still functional when it comes to the finish line.     A LOVELY note from actor Hal Holbrook, about his late adored wife, Dixie Carter: “By some movement of fate today I was editing one of the final chapters of a memoir I have written, about the courageous fight Dixie put up against cancer ... and how dear it was that she spent more time worrying about and 12:41:02 PM encouraging other patients than she did herself. When I read what

you said, that Dixie was ‘quite spiritual and uplifting. She didn’t hit you over the head with it, but her faith was strong’ — it was a home run, Liz. That was Dixie.”   It’s always nice to have a “scoop.” (Whatever such a thing is these days!)   But something like Mr. Holbrook’s note is so much more appreciated and genuine. And something I like to share.   IF YOU want to read a truly incisive article about the career of Tom Cruise and how the intrusions of the Internet and YouTube affected his image, find the May 28-June 3 issue of The Village Voice.   Amy Nicholson hits paydirt, tracking how Tom (and his longtime press rep Pat Kingsley) kept Cruise below the radar, personally, even as his career soared. But when Kingsley, finally too hardpressed, left off working for Tom, it coincided with the rise of the Internet, and little things — such as Tom’s millisecond jump on Oprah’s couch, came to live in infamy. It’s all fascinating. And author Nicholson points out that no matter what the Internet gossips tell us, Tom Cruise is still a major draw who has never had an out-and-out flop.   (His latest sci-fi action film, “Edge of Tomorrow” is receiving nice buzz, as is his co-star, the divine Emily Blunt.)   END-THOUGHT: My various editors occasionally warn me about being “too political.” I am here merely to entertain, they say. Okay. Fine. I will simply peek over the political ledge and venture this — what would Republicans have said if President Obama had allowed captured soldier Bowe Bergdahl to die in captivity?   I wrote recently on the “fake outrage” of Internet trolls. Well, that extends to politicians, too.    (E-mail Liz Smith MES3838@aol.com.)

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6 Section 2

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Wolfgang Puck’s Kitchen

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast

by Wolfgang Puck

by Jeraldine Saunders

Fire up the grill for a rib feast   Firing up the grill this summer always brings out the creativity in many outdoor cooks. And, while standard fare like hamburgers and hot dogs are always welcome, I think many many want to showcase their grilling skills with something more ambitious.    Which often leads to ribs. There’s something robustly primal about cooking, serving and eating ribs: the slab-like racks; the savory-sweet aromas; the act of cutting the cooked racks into individual pieces; the pleasures of gnawing the tender meat right off the bones. And there’s another advantage, too. In spite of what you might think, ribs are incredibly easy to cook, especially since they don’t require too much time on the grill.   That fact may surprise you, since ribs do need generous cooking time to reach tenderness. However, I find that the best way to achieve tender results is o do most of the cooking in the oven at relatively low heat. Only when the ribs have been cooked to tenderness in this way do I then finish cooking them over a hot grill, which adds a wonderfully crusty surface that’s lightly glazed with the caramelized traces of the marinade you used to flavor the ribs.    Try my recipe for ribs this summer, and you’ll see what I mean. Add a side of my simple coleslaw, and enjoy a classic meal any dad — and his family — would love. CHINOIS HONEY-MARNATED SPARE RIBS Serves 4 to 6 2 pounds baby back ribs, in one or two whole racks Freshly ground black pepper 1-1/2 cups rice wine vinegar 1/2 cup soy sauce 1/2 cup mushroom soy sauce, or additional regular soy sauce 3 tablespoons honey 1/2 cup minced garlic 1/4 cup minced fresh ginger 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves 2 scallions, minced 1 small jalapeno pepper, halved,

stemmed, seeded, deveined and minced   Start preparing the ribs a day before you plan to cook them. With clean hands, rub both sides of the rib racks with the black pepper. Place the racks meaty side down in a roasting pan.    In a mixing bowl, stir together the vinegar, soy sauces, honey, garlic, ginger, cilantro, scallions and jalapeno. When the honey has dissolved completely, pour the mixture over the ribs. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight to marinate the ribs.   About 1-1/2 hours before you plan to serve the ribs, preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Drain off and discard the marinade from the ribs. Put the roasting pan, uncovered, in the oven and roast the ribs for 45 minutes.   While the ribs are roasting, heat up the fire in an outdoor grill; or, alternatively, preheat the broiler.    Remove the ribs from the oven and transfer them to a platter to carry to the grill. Grill the rib racks directly over the heat until nicely browned and crispy, 2 to 3 minutes per side, turning them with grill tongs. Alternatively, broil the racks until nicely browned on both sides.   Transfer the ribs to a clean cutting board. With a sharp knife, cut through the meat between the bones into individual ribs. Pile them on a platter and serve immediately, accompanied by coleslaw. WOLFGANG’S COLESLAW Serves 4 to 6 1 medium head green cabbage 1 medium organic carrot, trimmed and peeled 1 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons toasted caraway seeds Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper Pinch sugar    Make the coleslaw about 2 hours before you plan to serve it.   With a large, sharp knife, cut

  ARIES (March 21-April 19): Danger beckons. You may the cabbage vertically in half. Cut be reckless and overly fond of out the core from each half. Place risk-taking in the week ahead. each half cut side down on a cut- Your path to success could hit ting board and, with the knife, roadblocks unless you learn to cut crosswise into thin slices, follow through and carry projects separating the slices into shreds to completion. and putting them in a large non-   TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Falling down is part of life. As a reactive mixing bowl.   Using a box grater/shredder baby, you never learned to walk over another mixing bowl, shred without toppling over a few times. the carrot into long, thin strips. In the week ahead, don’t curse With a clean hand, pick up the bruises or skinned knees as you shredded carrot in handfuls and learn new skills. squeeze out excess liquid, trans-   GEMINI (May 21-June 20): ferring each squeezed handful to You know the devil is in the details and aren’t bashful about startthe bowl with the cabbage.   Add the mayonnaise, vinegar, ing a dialogue. You’re willing to caraway seeds, salt and pepper delve deeply into secrets and can to taste, and a pinch of sugar to work your way into someone’s the bowl. Toss well to combine good graces in the week ahead. the cabbage and carrot and thor-   CANCER (June 21-July 22): oughly coat the strips with the You have a chance to rest on those dressing. Adjust the seasonings lovely laurels this week. There may be a controversy brewing at to taste, if necessary.   Cover the bowl with plastic home or on the job, but you can opt wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours. out of it and enjoy some R and R. Stir the mixture before serving.   LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll

never see a rainbow unless you endure a little rain. This week, you can look forward to enjoying some of the best life has to offer, even if you have to trudge through some of the worst to get there.   VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Get a grip. Hold on to that favorite coffee cup so it doesn’t break, and keep a tight grip on that credit card so you don’t accidently overspend on impulse items in the week ahead.   LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When sparks fly, you may see a beautiful sight, or it can simply mean there’s friction in the air. In the upcoming week, don’t let the excitement of something new blind you to facts.   SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The hardest thing to do is to have the patience to wait for the right timing. In the week ahead, you might be tempted to make premature starts on work projects. Get your ducks in a row first.   SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You can have your

cake and eat it, too, as well as get some extra scoops of ice cream while you’re at it. This week, you may be energized by activities during your spare time and soothed by peace and tranquility at home.   CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The caterpillar thinks life is ending, while the butterfly thinks life is just starting. In the week ahead, remember that there’s more than one way to view great transformations in your life.   AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your fascination with all things new age or new-fangled could get out of hand this week. You prefer the latest technology, but this could irritate other people if you force your ideas on them.   PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Awesome new friends and interests could lighten the load. Focus on participating in group activities during the week ahead. Guard against friction over someone’s impulsive spending habits.

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The City of Hickory Hills Presents The Annual

5-29-14 color both papers

SundayJune June29th 30th-- 10am 10am –7pm Sunday - 7pm

Fotolia.com

Using this recipe, the ribs are pre-cooked in the oven, then transferred to the grill to brown.

Hickory Hills Park District HickoryPresents Hills Park District Presents Sunday 11:30 am - 3:30 pm Rides for the Kids/Adults Car Show And Enter your car $20 Car Show (at the event) Sunday $15.00 pre-registration 11:30 a.m.—3:30 p.m.

(KaseyFor Meadow Park— Rides The Kids Botton of the Hill) • Wind Jammer Swing Ride $2.00 • Giant Inatable Slide $2.00 Wind Jammer Swing Ride • Monster Truck Bounce $1.00 Monster • Kids Ferris Truck Wheel Bouncer $1.00

250 Foot Zip Line Ride

Bingo Tent Sunday 12 Noon to 6 pm

Musical Entertainment In The Beer Garden Located in the TCF Bank Lot

“Kick-Off “Kick-Offtotothe theFair” Fair”

Saturday June 29th

Saturday, June 28th The Neverly Brothers The Fabulous Jah Moe performing 7:00 - 10:00 pm 7:00 –10:00 pm Food Entertainment Beer

Sunday,June June30th 29th Sunday

• Captain ClassMiller VI Band 12:00 p.m. 12:15–3:00 - 3:15p.m. Logical Confusion • Heartland Star 4:00 3:45–7:00 - 7:00 pm

All Bingo proceeds ver 100 O donated to: rs Craftveer 100 SertomaAll Speech & Hearing, O& Bingo Proceeds rs Hickory Hills ndroarfste ted Donated to: VeC Chamber of Commerce and#5220 loca Johnson-Phelps VFW Post t Fair & oad e e r t S Hickory Hills rtns dRors ee Hills Chamber of Commerce obV R n o SeniorAthletic Task Force St. Patricia Association


20140619 regional news