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Palos and Orland townships

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THE 73rd Year, No. 10

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

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Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

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Thursday, March 6, 2014

Plans unveiled to rebuild larger Heights Rec. Center by Tim Hadac staff reporter The renewed drive to remodel and expand the Palos Heights Recreation Center took a cautious and measured step forward Tuesday night, as draft plans were rolled out before the City Council. “Palos Heights has excellent schools on both sides of Harlem Avenue—Districts 118 and 128 are phenomenal school districts,” said Parks and Recreation Director Michael Leonard. “Our public works department is excellent. We have excellent public safety and an excellent library. The only thing we are missing is an excellent parks and recreation facility.” Leonard made his remarks to the council, meeting as a committee of the whole to consider plans for the reconstruction of the city’s recreation center, a former school building, at 6601 W. 127th St. A decade ago, Palos Heights voters approved the concept of a brand new recreation center in an advisory referendum, by a vote of 1,827 to 1,249—but then, upon learning of the proposed price tag of $16.6 million, turned thumbs down on the plan seven months later in a binding referendum vote of 4,902 to 1,869.

Parks and recreation leaders back then “missed the boat” by asking for too much of voters with an unfortunate attitude of “We want to go large or go home,” Leonard said. He contrasted the 2004 failed push with the city’s present-day approach to expansion, which he called measured, thorough and respectful of Palos Heights taxpayers. Leonard said that expansion is consistent with the city’s Recreation Center Master Plan. The 60-page plan, produced in 2008, is available online at palosheights. org. The plan calls for renovation of the existing rec. center and expansion by acquiring a limited amount of District 128 land immediately south of the building. Draft plans unveiled at Monday’s meeting called for expansion of the current rectangular rec center into an L-shaped building that will include two junior-high school sized basketball courts that could be converted to a full-size court, a second-floor wellness center with walking/jogging track, a conversion of the current gym into a multi-purpose room, conversion of office space into kitchen space for cooking classes, expanded parking and more.

Leonard added that the space squeeze that forced the Palos Heights Senior Citizens Club to meet down the street at a local church will end, meaning the club will be welcomed back with elbow room to spare. He listed a number of reasons why the city should invest in a remodeled and expanded rec center, including a boost in quality of life and residential property values, increased job opportunities for local teens, more after-school activities to encourage physical and intellectual growth and discourage juvenile delinquency, and more. The price tag of the proposed renovation and expansion is about $6.2 million, Leonard said, or about $2 a week for the typical Palos Heights household over the life of the bonds. He, as well as Mayor Robert Straz and several aldermen, were quick to point out that the project would be funded through issuance of general obligation bonds, meaning the effort will not happen unless approved by voters in a binding referendum this fall. The plans also will not move forward unless agreed to by the District 128 board of education. City officials have presented plans

Photo by Tim Hadac

Palos Heights Parks and Recreation Director Michael Leonard discusses draft plans for the renovation and expansion of the city’s recreation center. Estimated cost: $6.2 million. to that board, but it has not yet taken any action to enter into a land agreement with the city. The draft plan unveiling was followed by a presentation led by Paul Hanley, a senior vice president with George K. Baum & Company. Hanley “coordinates a team of marketing, communications, polling and public affairs professionals who are involved in

issue framing, messaging, community opinion research and other public policy services,” according to a statement on the company website. Hanley outlined a strategy to educate and motivate Palos Heights taxpayers in favor of a renovated and expanded rec center. He claimed that his company has an 86 percent success rate

with local referenda and cited passage of a bond issuance in West Chicago as an example. He cautioned against what he called the “stealth campaigns” of some government bodies in attempting to get voters to approve large building projects. “When you do it that way, you roll the (See Heights, Page 4)

Mayor: State of Orland ‘in great financial position’ by Tim Hadac staff reporter Orland Park has weathered the recession and appears to be emerging stronger than ever, Mayor Daniel McLaughlin said in his annual State of the Village address last week. The address was delivered before nearly 250 members of the Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce at a luncheon served at Silver Lake Country Club, 14700 S. 82nd Ave. “There is so much I can talk about, that I really could go on for hours, but I want to be respectful of the time you are taking away from your businesses in the middle of the day,” the mayor told the assembled business leaders. “So I’ll talk about the three issues that most people find most important: finances and taxes, crime and police, and roads and traffic.” The “serious decline in sales tax revenues” the village endured in 2007-09 have turned into “major gains” in 2012-13, the mayor said. “We are just about where we were

before the recession hit.” McLaughlin added that Orland Park is now “in great financial position, and our bond rating from Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s is still in the top 10 percent of the country.” The mayor touted a home-rule sales tax initiated in 2006 as an example of smart planning on his administration’s part, saying that it has given the village “the resources for major road improvements and traffic congestion solutions” as well as property tax relief for homeowners. McLaughlin also reminded his audience that the village has aggressively matched county and state funds over the last two decades, putting up some $223 million of $502 million in public improvement projects. But the aggressive moves to build are balanced with fiscal restraint, the mayor added. “Our debt service is very reasonable, at 11 percent of our budget,” he said. “With a debt-to-EAV ratio of 4 percent, our debt is like having a $16,000 mortgage on a $400,000 home.”

The mayor recited a list of road improvement and traffic abatements the village has undertaken in recent years and briefly mentioned future improvements, including the widening of La Grange Road. “Orland Park is a safe community, and I’ve always said that we have the best police department in the state,” McLaughlin continued. “A good part of the credit has to go to the best police chief in the state. It’s hard to believe that [Police Chief] Tim McCarthy will be celebrating 20 years with the village this May,” as the audience burst into applause. McLaughlin then introduced a video that noted the sharp drop in crime in the village in recent years and its positive effect on businesses—particularly retail— in the village. The mayor also touched on downtown development. He pointed to the opening of the Ninety7Fifty luxury apartment complex as a “huge step forward” for the village. “In less than a year, it’s 80 percent leased and 75 percent

occupied—way ahead of projections and…a catalyst for future development,” he added. McLaughlin declined to name names, but he assured the audience that there is “a tremendous amount of interest” in the triangle area next to Ninety7Fifty and that village staff is having serious and substantial conversation with developers. “We expect some major development in the triangle [to be announced] in 2014,” the mayor added. He also reiterated something he had announced previously: the formation of an economic development advisory board. He encouraged chamber members to join by calling his office at village hall. McLaughlin also mentioned that his administration has embarked on an effort to “save and record” Orland Park’s history. He called upon everyone to share old photographs and village-related Photo by Tim Hadac memorabilia. “We have heard too Business leaders stood should to shoulder after the lunch event, as many times that someone just they clamored to congratulate Mayor McLaughlin on his presentation and jostled to get a few moments to press the flesh with his honor, and offer ideas of their own. (See Orland, Page 4)

Submitted photos

Pieces of history: McCord exhibits World War II artifacts Museum-quality artifacts from World War II will be on display in a new exhibit at McCord Gallery & Cultural Center in Palos Park from Wednesday, March 12 - Sunday, March 16. At left, among the relics will be a Hitler Youth armband and handmade wooden knife which were surrendered to an American soldier by a 14-year-old boy in the town of Berchtesgaden in southeastern Germany. The Hitler Youth (Hitler Jugend) movement began in 1922 and by 1936 membership had grown to six million. A decree called for compulsory youth service. By 1943, the Hitler Jugend was turned into a military reserve to replace manpower lost in the war, and by 1945, boys as young as 10 years old were drafted into the Hitler Jugend. During the Battle of Berlin, Hitler Youth members formed

a major part of the last line of German defense. Also included in the exhibit will be Adolf Hitler’s personal napkin ring (right), bearing a Nazi eagle and swastika flanked by Hitler’s initials. The silver ring, along with tableware, were a gift to Hitler on his 50th birthday from Albert Speer. The ring was obtained from the Berghof, Hitler’s mountain home. Ticket prices are $12 for the public and $10 for members of McCord. Veterans, students, and children are free. For more information call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org. McCord is at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange Road).


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The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

View from Trinity by Dr. Steven Timmermans

Counting the costs; reaping the benefits The Pew Research Center came out with a compelling study about college last month. You can check it out on line at http://www. pewsocialtrends.org/2014/02/11/ the-rising-cost-of-not-goingto-college/. Using census data and surveying more than 2,000 individuals, Pew researchers reached a number of significant conclusions. First, as they examined the 25- to 32-year-old age bracket, they uncovered a number of things about college graduates. Of those working full time, those who had graduated from college earned on average $17,000 a year more than those working full time with a high school diploma. Moreover, looking at in this age group, those with college degrees had a higher rate of employment, 89 percent compared to 82 percent of those with a high school diploma. A related finding indicates that those with a college degree were less likely to be unemployed. The study also found differences in perceptions about college and career for this age group. When tracing the link of college to preparation for career, 46 percent of college graduates indicate that higher education was very useful, whereas only 31 percent of those with high school degrees said the same. In addition, the college graduates pointed to their college education as also serving the purpose of providing the background they

needed to advance in their careers. Similar findings were found for other age brackets, but the differences were most pronounced among this young adult generation, making this study, I believe, an important consideration for young people and their parents. Some in today’s society are questioning the value of a college degree. But the numbers don’t lie; the added lifetime earning potential of a college degree should more than make up for any debt a student might accumulate when financing a college education. Remember, too, the measure of our lives is not completely tallied in quantifiable ways. Leadership may or may not bring a salary advantage, but good preparation for leadership in college will bring opportunity and blessings to many—something that is not easily measured. Nor is the value of lifelong friendships and the networks they create. These often are the results of going to college and building a strong foundation for life. In these soon-to-be spring months, as children and grandchildren are making college decisions, let’s encourage them to go to and complete college, knowing that the rewards—some tangible and others intangible—are invaluable. Steve Timmermans, Ph.D., is the president of Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights.

Letters Policy The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. Mail or bring Readers Write letters to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463, or e-mail us at theregional@comcast.net

Brewer, Garcia stand tall as champions of equal rights Jan Brewer and Orlando L. Garcia may not be household names, but the decisions they made Feb. 26 were monumental, and both individuals should be lauded as champions of equal rights who had the courage to take a stand against those who would deny those rights to some based on sexual orientation. Brewer is the governor or Arizona, the state where the Republican-controlled legislature amazingly approved a bill that would have given business owners the right to refuse service to gay people and others on religious grounds. Thankfully, Brewer did not let that happen. The Republican governor was under immense pressure to veto the legislation from business owners, who viewed the proposal as a financial disaster and a serious blemish to the reputation of a state that doesn’t need any more bad PR. I have no idea what motivated Brewer to veto this ridiculous legislation, but I’d like to think that one her first thoughts was to reject it simply because it was hateful and intolerant. Think about it for a moment. The legislation would have permitted a business owner who believed that marriage should be limited to a man and a woman to refuse goods and services to gay people. That’s the kind of forward, progressive thinking I’d be damn proud of

The B-Side by Bob Rakow as an Arizona resident. Of course, this is nothing new for the Grand Canyon State, which opposed making Martin Luther King Day a state holiday—a move that cost it the 1993 Super Bowl. The state also is known for prejudicial immigrant laws. Let’s understand something. Gay people deserve the same rights and civil liberties as anyone else, including the right to marry and raise children. They’ve fought for years for these rights, and no battle waged by intolerant folks who hide behind religion to justify their cause will hold them back at this point. That’s difficult for some people to appreciate. But time moves on, as does society—most of society, anyway. Try to recall pictures from the 1960s of separate drinking fountains for black people or television footage of black students being denied admission to a southern university. Those images seem bizarre 50 years later. But at the time, that sort of bigotry made good sense to many people. How will today’s

discriminatory behavior against gay people appear 50 year from now? Bizarre, I hope. The annual gay pride parade commemorates the anniversary 1969 Stonewall riots, an uprising between New York City youth and police officers following a raid of Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar. Four decades later, the NBA has welcomed its first openly gay player, and Missouri football player Michael Sam is expected to be a high pick in this year’s NFL draft. Meanwhile, there are those in Arizona who prefer things the way they’ve always been. The legislation, they argued, was designed to protect their religious freedoms. Brewer’s response was spot on. “Religious liberty is a core American and Arizona value,” the governor said, “so is no discrimination.” Brewer’s actions should not overshadow those of Garcia, a federal judge in Texas, who struck down the state’s ban on same-sex marriage. Garcia ruled that the laws restricting marriage to a man and a woman violated the United States Constitution. That’s a major victory in state like Texas. Garcia wrote that an amendment to the state Constitution that Texas voters approved in 2005 defining marriage as between a man and a woman — and two similar laws passed in 1997 and 2003 — denied gay couples the right to marry and

Inside the First Amendment

FCC study: Necessary report or ‘national news nanny’? by Gene Policinski The First Amendment establishes our right to a press free from intrusion, regulation or intimidation by the government. As to a right to be free from questions by a national “news nanny,” it’s all in how you view the ultimate intent. A few weeks ago, a Republican appointee to the Federal Communications Commission kicked up a fuss — particularly among conservative groups — about a planned FCC study of how journalists make news decisions. Commissioner Ajit Pai wrote an Op-Ed column Feb. 10 in The Wall Street Journal saying the commission’s “Multi-Market Study of Critical Information Needs,” or CIN, meant “the agency plans to send researchers to grill reporters, editors and station owners about how they decide which stories to run,” starting with a pilot program in Columbia, S.C. “The purpose of the CIN,” Pai wrote, “ ... is to ferret out information from television and radio broadcasters about ‘the process by which stories are selected’ and how often stations cover ‘critical information needs,’ along with ‘perceived

monitors” in every newsroom? Or a benign bureaucratic survey that began more than two years ago, created in cooperation with the very journalists it was intended to examine? Lest we forget, there’s nothing in the First Amendment that protects the press from questions, criticism and review, by anybody. But when government does so, it merits extra caution and concern — if not claims that that “media sky is falling.” The government’s record on good intentions and the news media can provide enough cause to worry. Just seven years after the Bill of Rights, with its First Amendment, was adopted, Congress approved and President John Adams signed a law that provided for prosecution of editors critical of either one. Within a few years the law was allowed to expire, having lost public support after more than a dozen journalists were jailed under the pretense of inciting war with France, which some saw as a mere excuse to eliminate political opponents. Attempts by the government to restrain the press prior to publication have, through the years, ultimately have been ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court, notably in

the so-called “Pentagon Papers” case in 1971 when the Nixon administration tried to prevent publication of a secret report on U.S. involvement in Vietnam. And the FCC itself created a prime example of good intentions-gone-wrong with the history of its Fairness Doctrine, enacted in 1949. The commission was concerned then about the concentration of news outlets in a few hands, and the doctrine required broadcasters to provide information and varied views on matters of public interest. Several decades later, it was evident virtually all electronic news outlets chose the safest path to avoid violating the doctrine: Providing no opinion. Once common “broadcast editorials” disappeared. Discarded by the FCC in 1987, the doctrine was made further obsolete by the proliferation of cable TV stations, and by the diversity of outlets and information available on the Internet — which some says makes the entire commission an anachronism and unneeded. Still, surveys show that broadcast TV remains the largest single medium by which the public gets news — and both liberals and conserva-

tives find reason to regularly criticize all or part of that news media. Newspapers clearly face financial hurdles — and tens of thousands of jobs in journalism have been lost in the past 20 years. Yes, how well the news media are meeting their obligation to readers, viewers, listeners and users is a worthy subject of study — and is regularly, by non-profit organizations, private media monitoring groups and an ever-vocal host of individual critics. Regulators doing that very studying should raise caution, if not the panic voiced by some commentators. Might not a “study of the studies” and reviews of oft-expressed criticism be more efficient and just as informative for that portion of the FCC’s examination of the news media today? In addition to providing its critics with an easy target, the pilot FCC study also provided its own benediction: “Go forth and CIN no more.”

Dena Faco (with granddaughBrenda Sullivan, Oak Forest “My favorite is ‘Green Eggs and ter Lexi Faco, 2), Palos Heights “I like ‘Hop on Pop’ just because Ham’ because it really works to get your kids to try new food. My it was cute. son is 21 and he loved this book when he was a child. He is my best eater. He has the attitude of, ‘Don’t be grumpy about new food if you haven’t tried it.’ He got that from this book.”

Marissa Wooten, Oak Forest “My son, Dominic, and I like ‘Green Eggs and Ham.’ We know it by heart. He makes me read it to him every other day.”

Kristie Ragsdale, Palos Heights “I like ‘Go Dog, Go’ because it reminds me of my mom taking me to the library. This is the first book I remember.”

station bias’ and ‘perceived responsiveness to underserved populations.’” Noting that the FCC has the power to renew or deny broadcast licenses, Pai wrote that the voluntary study was anything but that. He wondered why the study also included newspapers, over which the FCC historically has had no authority. As happens in today’s polarized political environment, liberal observers took a different tack, saying the study was prepared with the help of USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, and was simply part of an ongoing FCC obligation to periodically report to Congress on how well the public gets information it needs, and what hurdles may exist to improving that process. On Feb. 21, the FCC backed away from its plan. “Any suggestion the Commission intends to regulate the speech of news media is false,” FCC spokeswoman Shannon Gilson said. A revised study will be conducted, but journalists and news media owners will not be asked to participate. So: An outright assault on a free press — with, as the more florid claims said, official “news

Gene Policinski is chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute and senior vice president of the Institute’s First Amendment Center. He can be reached at gpolicinski@newseum.org.

demeaned their dignity “for no legitimate reason,” the New York Times reported. His ruling is the latest in a series of decisions overturning bans or lifting restrictions on same-sex marriage in several states. Virginia’s ban recently overturned and Kentucky was told to honor same-sex marriages performed in other states. In Oklahoma, the state’s amendment barring same-sex marriage was recently deemed unconstitutional. You see, the resistance is waning. Open-mindedness and acceptance is surpassing narrowmindedness and intolerance. Jan Brewer and Orlando are just two of the reasons why.

THE

REGIONAL NEWS

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This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.

V

iewfinder

What is your favorite Dr. Seuss book? (Asked at a Dr. Seuss storytime at the Palos Heights Public Library)

Photos by Joan Hadac

David Lopez, Palos Heights “I’d say ‘Green Eggs and Ham’ because I really enjoy the rhyming scheme. It’s always fun. Not many people realize this, but Dr. Seuss used only 50 words in this book. He wrote it on a dare that he couldn’t write a book in 50 words. That’s kind of cool.”


The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Two vie for GOP nomination to take on Lipinski Heights’ Brannigan serves on Palos Twp. board

Care Act who vows to repeal it. She proposes abolishing the federal inheritance tax and capiBrannigan is sharply critical the Democratic ballot. by Tim Hadac tal gains tax, as well as cutting Congressmen serve two-year of the federal Affordable Care staff reporter corporate tax rates and replacing terms and earn $174,000 a Act, which she says “was forced graduated personal income taxes upon me and my family, and now Two women, one from Palos year. with a flat tax. Brannigan and her husband, it’s unfortunately the law of the Heights, are vying for the opportuHarris also is an opponent of nity to do what no Republican has Mike, own Sherry’s Flower land. This law is an intrusion into amnesty for illegal immigrants been able to do since 1982—defeat Shoppe in Orland Park, and she our personal and professional and proposes fining businesses a Democratic congressman named says that her perspective as a lives, has caused the reduction caught hiring them. She also small-business owner will bring of healthcare services and has Lipinski. thinks that U.S. troops “have Sharon M. Brannigan, 52, of a fresh approach to Congress. led to the increase in premiums been at war for much too long, Palos Heights, will square off with “We understand the challenge of – this is not what was promised and it is time for them to come creating jobs in this economy,� to the American people. Diane M. Harris, 58, of Joliet. home,� and she opposes U.S. Mili“If elected, I will work tirelessly The primary election is set she said. tary aid to countries where U.S. She chides the Obama Adminis- to reduce the negative effects of for Tuesday, March 18, although Sharon M. Brannigan Diane M. Harris troops are not stationed. early voting started Monday. In tration as one that “seeks to pun- this job-killing legislation,� she Harris worked for 32 years as the fall mid-term election, the ish businesses across the nation� added. “Other means of taming to solving our cumulative finan- involvement as a volunteer leader with Palos School District 118 a liability representative with winner will face incumbent U.S. and has made it “increasingly dif- our healthcare issues should be cial woes.� Brannigan is relatively new to fundraisers as evidence of her ComEd and holds a bachelor’s Rep. Dan Lipinski, who served ficult for middle class families to tort reform, health savings acdegree in management from the the 3rd District since 2005. He hang on to what they have and counts and the ability for people the political arena, having been community spirit. Like Brannigan, Harris is a University of Phoenix. She is a succeeded his father, U.S. Rep. keep what they earn because of to purchase insurance across elected a Palos Township trustee William O. Lipinski. Dan Lipinski out-of-control spending, over taxa- state lines. Capitalism and the on a Republican-backed trustees’ self-described pro-life conserva- Republican precinct committeefree market are the proven keys slate in 2013. She also cites her tive and critic of the Affordable man in Will County. is unopposed for renomination on tion and over regulation.�

Two from Heights seek party nods for MWRD by Tim Hadac staff reporter Two Palos Heights men are running for commissioner of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District (MWRD). Three seats with six-year terms are up for grabs in the November election. Commissioners serve part-time and earn about $70,000 a year. The primary election is set for Tuesday, March 18, although early voting has already started. Brendan Francis Houlihan, 51, is one of 10 candidates running on the Democratic ballot. Herb Schumann, 62, is one of three candidates on the Republican ballot. Both are married with children.

Brendan F. Houlihan

Campaigning as an outsider and reformer, Houlihan pledges to end the practice of awarding no-bid contracts and “remove the stink of pay-to-play politics� at the MWRD. “As a former elected official that represented a vast portion of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District, I understand the needs and issues of the constituents,� Houlihan said. “I understand the importance of how our water is treated and the sustainability of Lake Michigan. “I will be an active commissioner in our community, educating residents across Cook County on ways to reduce our personal water usage and guard against flood damage that impacts our

homes,â€? he continued. “I will promote increased transparency at the Water Reclamation District‌always endorsing policies that allow many contractors to bid for business so that the district may choose the best possible provider for the job.â€? According to biographical information provided by the candidate, Houlihan attended Marian Catholic High School in Chicago Heights before graduating from Bishop McNamara in Forestville, Md., while his father served in the Veterans Administration in Washington, D.C. Houlihan attended Northern Illinois University and earned a degree in finance. He then worked at the Chicago Board of Trade, executing financial transactions for top-tier banks, Fortune 500 corporations and pension funds. In 2006, he was elected commissioner at the Cook County Board of Review, but lost a re-election bid in 2012. “As commissioner, I advocated for transparency in the property tax appeals process, and began the course to bring online tax appeals to homeowners, saving considerable paper usage in the office,â€? he said. “I facilitated an extensive educational community outreach program throughout the county to assist taxpayers. Recently, I have been the primary caregiver for our daughter while also managing the finances and marketing for a small family business.â€? Houlihan views himself as a better choice for MWRD commissioner than others “because of my experience as an elected

cago flooding issues get priority over the suburbs,� he stated. He added that he is “not satisfied with the ongoing efforts of the MWRD to address [flood-related] issues. I also want to have a discussion about the long-term future of the combined sewer system. It is not clear as to what direction the MWRD is going because parts of the county have separated their sewer systems and typical road reconstruction also separates the sewer systems. Is there a plan? official in Cook County and my Is there a time line? We hear the residency in the suburbs,� he said. excuse after a heavy rain that the “The Metropolitan Water Reclama- combined sewer systems get overtion District needs more suburban whelmed, but the TARP system representation, especially for the will not have all the answers.� Southland. I believe I can offer a Schumann said that local mayunique perspective as a resident ors typically find it difficult to work of Palos Heights. with the MWRD, and he criticized “While serving as commissioner the district for allegedly holding tax at the Board of Review, I fostered dollars in reserve, rather than usrelationships with mayors and oth- ing them promptly for flood control er community leaders that would and other worthwhile initiatives. be beneficial if I were elected to After he wins nomination on the MWRD,� he concluded. March 18, Schumann and the other two Republicans will have their work cut out for them in the fall. Herb Schumann Herb Schumann, 62, served as No Republican has been elected to Republican committeeman of Palos the MWRD since 1972. Township from 1986-2001 and as a Cook County commissioner from About the MWRD 1996-2002. He currently is emEstablished in 1889, the MWRD ployed as a property tax analyst is a government agency responwith the Cook County Board of sible for wastewater treatment and Review. stormwater management throughSchumann said that more sub- out Cook County. urban representation is needed at Its mission is to “protect the the district. “The MWRD board health and safety of the public in consists of nine Democrats, eight its service area, protect the quality of whom live in the city of Chicago. of the water supply source (Lake The Cook County suburbs are not Michigan), improve the quality of fairly represented on the MWRD, water in watercourses in its service and I question whether the Chi- area, protect businesses and homes

2014

Brendan Francis Houlihan

Herb Schumann

from flood damages, and manage water as a vital resource for its service area.� MWRD owns and operates one of the world’s largest water reclamation plants, in addition to six other plants and 23 pumping stations. MWRD treats an average of 1.4 billion gallons of wastewater each day. MWRD’s total wastewater treatment capacity is more than 2 billion gallons per day. The district’s Tunnel and Reservoir Project (TARP) is one of the country’s largest public works projects for pollution and flood control. Four tunnel systems total 109 miles of tunnels, 9 to 33 feet in diameter and 150 to 300 feet underground. One reservoir is in operation and construction is in progress on the two remaining reservoirs. MWRD owns approximately 9,500 acres of property in Cook County for its operations and controls 76.1 miles of navigable waterways, which are part of the inland

waterway system connecting the Great Lakes with the Gulf of Mexico. It also owns and operates 30 stormwater detention reservoirs to provide regional stormwater flood damage reduction.

Early voting Early Voting for the March 18 Gubernatorial Primary Election started Monday at the Palos Heights City Hall and continues through March 15, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Early Voting is also offered at Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., the Oak Lawn Village Hall, 9446 S. Raymond Ave., and the 5th District Cook County courthouse, 10220 S. 76th Ave., in Bridgeview. The Oak Lawn will be also open on Sundays, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Orland will probe water mains for leaks by Tim Hadac staff reporter

vey a regular part of village efforts of the space limitations, Schussler added. “There’s not much leeway to monitor water mains. “Leaks constantly happen,â€? In- there if you don’t get the snow A comprehensive survey de- gram said. “Your infrastructure pushed back. In other places in signed to detect leaks in all 354 continues to deteriorate. You town, like my street---ah, you’ve miles of Orland Park’s water improve it, it deteriorates. You got about three feet you can play mains won unanimous approval improve it, it deteriorates. It’s just with, and if you don’t get the snow pushed back all the way, it’s not at Monday night’s meeting of the life cycle of anything.â€? In other public works com- going to matter too much.â€? the Village Board’s Public Works He also advised village staff to mittee matters Monday evening, Committee. If approved by the full Village Trustee Edward G. Schussler III consider using front-end loaders Board, Orland Park will pay criticized village snowplowing and to remove large accumulations of snow and to identify open spac$53,100 to the M.E. Simpson Co. removal efforts. He pointed to examples where es where snow can be dumped of Valparaiso, Ind., to conduct the survey, expected to start “after village crews reportedly failed to with the consent of the property the snow leaves the groundâ€? and clear snow to enable mail delivery, owner. Schussler’s criticisms were which will take about 90 days, ensure drainage when snow melts, according to village Infrastruc- and allow parking, particularly carefully sandwiched between ture Maintenance Director John in the historic section of the vil- compliments. “Overall, the village staff has done a great job under lage. Ingram. Schussler encouraged village adverse conditions this winter,â€? Technicians conducting the survey “will use electronic listening staff to learn from this winter’s ex- he said twice. Criticisms were also heard in devices and check each valve, each perience. “We need to some things hydrant, each B-box [on the public differently,â€? he said. “There were the economic development stratway],â€? Ingram added. “A trained just some times this year when we egy and community engagement ear that listens to it can hear a could have [gotten the job] done, committee meeting. In a discusleak, hear the water flowing out but didn’t. The driver finished the sion of village signage and brandof the pipe. Once they identify a route, the snow wasn’t pushed ing, Trustee James V. Dodge Jr. leak like that, then they use a back far enough, and then the described the overall visual look correlator, which is attached be- next day it didn’t get done, the of village publications, signage tween two points, and they can next day it didn’t get done, and and website as lacking consistency. “It’s close to visual anarchy. pinpoint the exact location of the then it froze. “I think we need to look at cer- That’s got to stop,â€? he said. leak within the pipe.â€? Dodge also took a swipe at the “We’re anticipating finding tain, specific areas like the historic some of the small leaks that district and be more cognizantâ€? village slogan that declares Orland don’t rise to the surface, generally,â€? Ingram added. “This survey will help us improve our efficiency LECT UDGE HRIS AWLER and improve our water allocation. 15th Subcircuit Any leak we can detect early and fix promptly represents savings for the village.â€? Ingram told committee members Judge Chris Lawler has served and continues to the survey will be a first for the serve the community with these organizations: village. He did not speculate on Varsity and past Head Coach services to clients of how many leaks will be found and of the Junior Varsity teams. Catholic Charities. • Past member of the School what the projected savings will be. Southwest Bar Association Advisory Council He said after the meeting that he • Past President of the • Sunday collection counter Bar Association hopes to make the electronic sur• Mock Trial Class Coordinator

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Park to be the “World’s Golf Center,� a tag that dates back to the 1960s, but which has lost its luster as a number of area golf courses were plowed under in favor of residential housing. “We need a new slogan,� Dodge said. “The one we have may have made sense 25 years ago, but it’s ridiculous at this point. It makes us look dumb, quite frankly.� The next Village Board meeting is set for Monday, March 17. Committee meetings begin at 6 Photo by Tim Hadac p.m., with the full board meeting In the absence of Orland Park Mayor Daniel McLaughlin (who was at 7 p.m. The public is invited out of town Monday night), the Village Board meeting was chaired to attend. by Trustee James V. Dodge Jr.

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The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Orland Park’s indoor duathlon turns 12 Guy Petruzzelli, of Darien (left photo), won his sixth straight overall men’s title in the 12th running of the Orland Park Indoor Duathlon while Orland Park native Kelly Hansen (right photo) won her first women’s title Saturday morning at the Sportsplex. At center is a competitor wiping sweat from her face during the bike portion of the event. Pretruzzelli ran the race, consisting of a 1.5 mile-run around the track, 10 miles on a stationary bike and 1.5 more miles around the track, in 30 minutes, 35 seconds while Hansen finished in :36.10. Hansen lives in Chicago but was a St. Michael School graduate who also attended Providence Catholic High

School. She was known as Kelly Stack back then. Hansen’s husband, Andy, claimed the 29-under men’s title Saturday and other age-group champs were Orland Park’s Ray Peisker (30-35), Orland Park’s Brian Pautsch (36-40), Orland Park’s George Canellis (41-50), Palos Park’s, Frank Wappel (51-59) and Orland Park’s Larry McDonough (60 and older). Female age-group champs were Palos Park’s Karissa Wappel (29-under), Orland Park’s Mary Peisker (30-35), Karen Schwarz (36-40), Glenview’s Melinda Poulton (41-50), New Lenox’s Sally Podolski (5159) and Lockport’s Mary Donovitch (60 and older).

Dist. 230 board names Sandburg’s next principal among staff changes

Deb Baker

Jennifer Tyrrell

Derrick Smith

Three administrative hires, including a principal and associate principal at Sandburg High School and an associate principal at Stagg High School, were approved last week by the Consolidated High School District 230 board of education. The moves were made during a meeting at Stagg High School, 8015 W. 111th St., Palos Hills. The appointments take effect at the end of the current school year. “All three of these administrative hires come from within the school district,” said Superintendent Dr. James M. Gay. “They are great representatives of the strength of District 230’s teachers and administrators and will bring great stability to these positions.” Deb Baker was approved as principal for Sandburg High School. Last month, current Principal Dr. Julia Wheaton was named Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources as Liz John-

son retires following 37 years of service to the district. “The School Board is proud to approve the hiring of Deb Baker,” said board President Rick Nogal. “She is a strong leader who will continue to focus on student achievement while supporting the Sandburg community. A veteran administrator who has served each of District 230’s campus, she is passionate about the success of each student.” Gay said that Baker “returns to Sandburg High School, where she has taught and served as an administrator. Her knowledge, expertise and compassion will be an incredible asset. Deb is committed to collaboration and teamwork which will serve the Sandburg community well during this transition of leadership.” “It has been a pleasure to work with Deb over the past several years,” said Stagg High School Principal Eric Olsen. “Her leadership, intelligence, wit, and work

ethic will be greatly missed at the building. However, we are very excited to work with her in her new capacity as the educational leader at our sister school.” Baker has served each of District 230’s high schools since she joined the district in 2001. She was as an English teacher and then division chair for English, Music and ELL at Sandburg. She has also served as assistant principal at Andrew High School and associate principal at Stagg. Before joining District 230, she taught in Chicago Public Schools and at De La Salle Institute in Chicago. Prior to becoming an educator, Baker and her husband were retail business owners. Baker holds a master’s degree in educational administration and a bachelor’s degree in the teaching of English, both from the University of Illinois at Chicago. The board also approved Jennifer Tyrrell as associate principal of instruction at Stagg High School

Expert witness for prosecution testifies that Kustok shot his wife by Tim Hadac Staff reporter If Allan Kustok didn’t shoot his wife on the morning of Sept. 29, 2010, the killer was someone standing over her while wearing his T-shirt, shorts and glasses, an expert witness testified Tuesday at Kustok’s murder trial. In perhaps the most damning testimony yet as the trial began its third week, crime scene reconstruction analyst Rod Englert said that the pattern of blood stains in the Kustoks’ Orland Park bedroom made it clear—at least from his analysis—that Anita “Jeanie” Kustok could not have shot herself, deliberately or accidentally, as Allan Kustok has claimed for more than three years. Englert was on the stand for several hours and was the only person to testify Tuesday at the trial in the Bridgeview courtroom, according to published reports. Prosecutors showed a photograph of a crime scene re-creation in which Orland Park police posed

on a bed to show how they believe the shooting occurred. Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez was in attendance for the first time, sitting in the front-row along with Jeanie Kustok’s relatives. After the prosecution rests its case this week, Kustok’s defense team is expected to call its own crime scene analysis experts to counter Englert’s claims. Defense attorneys had sought unsuccessfully two weeks ago to stop Englert from testifying, according to published reports. What is not disputed by either side is that shortly after Anita Kustok’s death, Allan Kustok told police his wife shot herself with a .357 caliber revolver he allegedly had given her for their 34th wedding anniversary, because he said she feared for her safety while he was away on business trips. After the shooting, Kustok did not call any authorities and drove his wife’s body—reportedly wrapped in bloody bed linens--to Palos Community Hospital nearly

90 minutes after the gun was fired, police said. Anita Kustok, 58, was pronounced dead upon arrival at the hospital with a gunshot wound to the left cheek. The Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office declared the death a homicide from a gun fired inches from her face; the gunshot wound was not selfinflicted accidentally or otherwise, according to what Orland Park Police Chief Tim McCarthy said in 2010. The victim was reportedly right handed, which would not be consistent with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the left cheek, police said. The Kustoks’ children are former standout area athletes Zak and Sarah Kustok, who starred in several sports at Sandburg High School. Zak Kustok played quarterback at Northwestern University for three years while Sarah played basketball at DePaul University, was an anchor for Comcast SportsNet Chicago and currently works for the NBA’s Brooklyn Nets.

Submitted photo

Posing for a photo during a break in last week’s District 230 board meeting are President Rick Nogal (from left), Susan Dalton, Superintendent Dr. James M. Gay, incoming Sandburg Associate Principal of Instruction Derrick Smith, incoming Stagg Associate Principal of Instruction Jennifer Tyrrell, Vice President Patrick O’Sullivan, incoming Sandburg Principal Deb Baker, Kate Murphy Peterson, Secretary Kathy Quilty, Tony Serratore and Melissa Gracias. filling Baker’s slot at Sandburg. “Jen Tyrrell is a tremendous leader in our building, and the staff and administration look forward to the expansion of her leadership role,” said Stagg High School Principal Eric Olsen. “Jen’s experience in literacy training, data analysis, and curriculum will be invaluable to the school and the district. Jen is an amazing leader and of her greatest strengths is her ability to form positive relationships with students and staff.” Tyrrell is a Stagg High School graduate and has served Stagg High School students since 2005 as a physical education teacher and division chair for physical education, health and drivers education. In addition she has coached softball and tennis for the Chargers.

She is currently pursuing a doctorate in educational administration and supervision from Loyola University. She holds a certificate of advanced study in educational leadership from Lewis University, as well as a master’s degree in kinesiology-sport management and a bachelor’s degree in physical education, both from Western Illinois University. The board also approved Derrick Smith as associate principal of instruction at Sandburg, upon the retirement of Trish Gikas following 31 years of service. “Derrick demonstrates exceptional knowledge, training and skills in the areas of curriculum, instruction and leadership,” said Sandburg Principal Dr. Julia Wheaton. “He consistently demonstrates with students, staff and parents a strong ethical and profes-

sional code, maintenance of high expectations for himself and others and commitment to the collaborative decision-making process.” Smith is a Sandburg graduate and has served the school since 2005 as an English teacher and division chair for English and music. He also has supervised the school’s student newspaper and coached the freshman baseball team. Smith currently is pursuing a doctorate in literacy, language and culture from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He holds a master’s degree in educational organization and leadership from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a master’s degree in secondary education from St. Xavier University and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Orland

The event was declared a success by chamber President Rob Wehmeier, owner of Wehmeier Portraits (Continued from page 1) in Orland Park. “We decided to try something threw away boxes of pictures new this year, hosting the State of or some key items from Orland the Village as a luncheon (rather than a breakfast), giving more Park’s past.” The mayor had budgeted time people the opportunity to attend,” after his remarks to field ques- Wehmeier said. “Early-morning tions from chamber members, but meetings are difficult for many there were none—at least at first. people and we’re expecting the McLaughlin shattered an awkward lunch time meeting to be more silence when he looked at Village convenient.” McLaughlin’s remarks, along Manager Paul Grimes and quipped, Allan Kustok “It’s pretty bad when the village with videos he introduced, are Neither Zak nor Sarah has testi- manager’s writing a question,” as available via the village’s page on fied thus far. Zak appeared at the the audience erupted in laughter. Facebook. courthouse last week and made it clear to a newspaper columnist that he was only there to support his wife, Nicole, who testified about whether or not Jeanie feared for her own safety and wanted a gun for protection, as Allan Kustok has claimed. Sarah appeared at the trial last month during jury selection and sat in the gallery, behind her father. Mrs. Kustok was a longtime elementary school teacher who, at the time of her death, was teaching in a gifted program at Central Elementary School in Riverside. Photo by Tim Hadac

Heights

to add that the benefits would far outweigh the costs. No action was taken by alder(Continued from page 1) men at the committee meeting, and Leonard was not asking for any, dice,” Hanley said. “When you saying he simply wanted officials roll the dice, you can lose—and to look over the draft plans. The next steps, he said, include worse, you can lose the trust of the voters and even jeopardize shepherding the plan through important future projects, like a council committee, with presentation to the full council in roads and sewers.” Hanley’s company proposes April—assuming District 128 ofworking with the city to explain ficials are on board. Photo by Tim Hadac Palos Heights Mayor Robert Straz shares a lighter moment Tues- the renovation and expansion day night with Palos Heights resident Frank Salman, co-owner of plans to voters, gauge their reRoyalberry Waffle House & Restaurant, 6417 W. 127th St., after the sponse, solicit and incorporate Remember to council gave unanimous approval to a liquor license for the restau- feedback into plans. The price recycle this rant. Details about Royalberry’s success and its future plans can tag for the assistance would be be found in a story in the special section for St. Patrick’s Day in this as much as $40,000, city officials newspaper! said after the meeting, hastening week’s Regional News.

Orland Park Mayor Daniel McLaughlin delivers his annual State of the Village address last week at Silver Lake Country Club.

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The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

Palos Park man fatally shot in apparent robbery in Chgo. by Tim Hadac staff reporter A 66-year-old Palos Park man was shot in the chest and killed at about 2 p.m. last Saturday, in an apparent robbery on Chicago’s Southwest Side. Herbert Goode was the owner of Silver Cloud Galleries, 20 W. Ohio St., Chicago, a high-end, custom framing and fine art services firm. He was shot near 57th and Claremont, where his company maintains a production facility. Goode was shot several times and pronounced dead on Saturday afternoon at Mount Sinai Hospital. A Chicago police spokesman told The Regional News on Tuesday afternoon that no one has been charged in the killing and that the case remains under investigation. Goode is survived by his wife, Karen, son, Alex, and other family and friends, according to published reports. Goode was an animal lover and donor to animal welfare groups,

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launched the GoFundMe page, wrote that the lives of many people “have been touched by Herb, Karen, and Alex in some way. “You know the kind of people they’ve always been: the warmest, funniest, most vibrantly intelligent individuals in any room,” she continued. “You know that as a unit, they are the kindest, most thoughtful, and generously loving family anyone could ever have the good fortune to encounter. You know that no one in their orbit has ever been allowed to drift alone Herbert Goode because they welcomed everyone with open hearts.” In a Facebook post on Monday, his son said, and had volunteered his time over the years Alex Goode thanked everyone for to a number of community or- the outpouring of sympathy and support. ganizations. Submitted photos “We very much appreciate your To honor Goode’s memory, donations are being accepted at texts and emails...but please forgofundme.com. As of Tuesday af- give us if we do not answer your ternoon, nearly $2,000 has been phone calls at this time,” he wrote. raised and will be donated to the “No memorial arrangements have Getting ready for preschool next fall? Animal Welfare League, 10305 been made yet, and if you’ve read Parents and preschoolers are invited to visit Indian Hill School next Friday, March 14, from 10 to S. Southwest Highway, Chicago the articles or seen it on the news, 10:30 a.m., to come and play for a while to experience preschool at Indian Hill, 12800 S. Austin Ave. you know just as much about what in Palos Heights. Ridge. Family friend Lisa Conn, who happened as we do.” For registration information, call 597-1285 or visit the website at http://indianhill.palos128.org

Invitation to experience Indian Hill preschool

Sifting through the rubble First responders cope with death and destruction by Bob Rakow staff reporter A week has passed since a triple murder and suicide shook Oak Lawn—the latest in a series of tragedies that has battered the community in 2014. While many ultimately will forget the events, first responders continue to cope with the devastations. The most recent incident occurred last Wednesday when John P. Conta allegedly killed his parents—John and Janice Conta—and nephew at the family home in the 9800 block of 51st Avenue. Conta then set the house on fire and killed himself with a gunshot while in a car in the house’s garage, police said. An Oak Lawn firefighter who responded to the blaze saw Conta kill himself, officials said. The body of Conta’s nephew, 5-yearold Matthew Meier, was discovered in the house later in the day, they said. Family members celebrated the boy’s fifth birthday at the house the previous night, police said. That level of tragedy—suicide and the murder of a family members—can wreak havoc on the emotions of even the toughest and resilient first responders. “Especially when you have a tender-age (involved), I think it affects everybody,” said Oak Lawn Police Division Chief Mike Kaufmann. The October death of six-

month-old Vivian Summers, who allegedly was killed at the hands of her grandmother, Alfreda Giedrojc, a long-time Oak Lawn resident, was one of the most heinous crimes Kaufmann had witnessed during his career, the veteran officer said. “Everybody can relate to a young, infant baby. For all of us, it touches (the) heart,” Kaufmann said at the time. Both the police and fire departments offer various services to anyone affected by the tragedies that are part of the job. “It doesn’t stop when we leave the fire scene,” Oak Lawn Fire Chief George Sheets. Sheets said he and his commanders apply a “now-what” approach after a fire or other incident concludes. The health and welfare of the firefighters is at the top of that methodology, he said. Firefighters are offered a variety of resources, including services provided via the village’s employee assistance program or Genesis Therapy, village manager Larry Deetjen said. Sheets added firefighters often elect to talk with their colleagues during tough times. “You have the camaraderie of those firefighters that were there,” Sheets said. “We have individuals who have been here a long time.” The Chicago Police Department offered its peer counseling program to Oak Lawn’s first

Oak Lawn’s year of heartache So far, 2014 has been sad and tragic in Oak Lawn with seven deaths and three houses destroyed by fire. A closer look at these stories: Jan. 11: A house fire and explosion occurred in the 8900 block of 55th court. Two days later, Arunus Samoskia, 48, of Oak Lawn charged with two counts of aggravated arson and one count of residential arson and prosecutors said the man may have burned the house after an argument. There were no injuries. Jan. 28: Police found the body of 86-year-old Antionette Diesness in the snow near her house in the 8700 block of South Meade Avenue. She died of hypothermia due to cold exposure, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office. Feb. 8: Kathryn Lomec, 73, was pronounced dead shortly after her house on Lawrence Court caught fire. Feb. 11: Mary Bruce, 74, died at John H. Stroger Hospital in Chicago as a result of the Feb. 8 fire that killed Lomec. Feb. 26: Four people, including a 5-year-old, died in a suspected murder/suicide in the 9800 block of South 51st Avenue. Police suspected that John Conta Jr. shot John and Janice Conta and 5-year-old Matthew Meier, set the house on fire and then shot himself.

Submitted photo and text

Polish Daily News endorses Barrett Michael Barrett, of Orland Park, Democratic candidate for judge in the 15th Judicial SubCircuit is the endorsed candidate of the Polish Daily Newspaper. Pictured are Vice President Teresa Abick and President of the Polish National Alliance and publisher of Polish Daily Newspaper Frank Spula with Michael Barrett (center).

responders following last week’s incident. Some officers prefer to peers rather than supervisors about the rigors on the job, Kaufmann said. “Everybody is affected quite differently,” Kaufmann said. Deetjen agreed. “In additional to offering professional help, each individual copes with stress, violence and tragedy through their own networks consisting of family, loved ones, special friends, church and other support groups.” Oak Lawn Trustee Terry Vorderer, a retired village police officer, agreed that various incidents can affect first responders over the long haul. “Talking about these things does help,” said Vorderer, who joined the Oak Lawn force shortly after returning from a tour as an infantryman in Vietnam. He said the “macho, get over it” approach prevalent in his day is gone. In fact, the Oak Lawn Fire Department looked to therapy dogs this week to assist firefighters looking to cope with last week’s fire. On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, three golden retrievers from the K-9 Comfort Dogs program visited firefighters at Station 2, 6451 W. 93rd Place. The program is sponsored by Lutheran Church Charities and is designed to bring compassion to those affected by a calamity. “When anybody pets a dog, it relaxes them,” said Tim Hetzner, president of the charity. He added that some people will talk to dogs about their involvement in or feeling about an disaster before speaking with another person. “The dog serves a tool,” said Hetzner, who added that golden

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Two Oak Lawn policemen survey the aftermath of the suspected murder/suicide/fire scene on South 51st Avenue last Thursday. Oak Lawn police and firemen have seen a lot tragedy and destruction since the start of the New Year and first responders are coping in different ways. retrievers are used exclusively by the program because “by nature they are lovers.” Last week’s fire isn’t the only tragedy Oak Lawn first responders have had to cope with in recent weeks. In early February, a fire on the west side of the village lives of two elderly women. Kathryn Lomec, 73, was pronounced dead Feb. 8 shortly after a blaze at her house in the 10100 block of Lawrence Court, officials said. Her sister and caretaker, 74year-old Mary Bruce, died three days later at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County, according to news reports. There were no smoke detectors in the house and officials have not released the cause of the fire. In January, a fierce argument between an Oak Lawn man and his wife may have led the man

to burn down his house a few hours after the dispute, prosecutors said. Arunas Samoska, 48, was charged with two counts of aggravated arson and one count of residential arson Jan. 13 after appearing in Bridgeview Court where a request for bond was denied, according to police. Oak Lawn police and fire departments from several communities responded Jan. 11 to a house fire/explosion in the 8900 block of 55th Court. The house was engulfed with fire and required about one hour to extinguish. Prosecutors said Samoska poured gasoline throughout his home, including the living room and the bed in the master bedroom. The vapors ignited when he went to his garage to get more gasoline, prosecutors said. The explosion and subsequent

fire rendered the home a complete loss, officials said. No one was in the home at the time of the explosion and there were no injuries. The houses on each side of the fire were occupied but no one was injured. But fire has not been the only cause of tragedy in the community in 2014. In late January, an elderly Oak Lawn died from cold-related causes. Antoinette Diesness, 86, of the 8700 block of Meade Avenue, died from hypothermia due to cold exposure, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office. Heart disease and dementia were contributing factors in her death, the medical examiner said. A neighbor found her lying in the snow near her home, police said. She was the 17th reported cold-related death this winter in Cook County, authorities said.

Palos Heights woman charged with retail theft Palos Heights police arrested Catherine Anczerewicz, 70, of Palos Heights, and charged her with retail theft. Anczerewicz was detained outside a grocery store in the 12800 block of South Harlem Avenue at 1:34 p.m. last Thursday, police said. Store security staff claimed that she had stolen Easter baskets, cellophane bags and several items of food. She reportedly claimed she had purchased the items and allegedly presented an outdated receipt as evidence. Bond was set at $1,500, and Anczerewicz is due in court on April 4. In other Palos Heights police news, Artur P. Surman, 24, of Worth, was charged with driving without a license, no proof of insurance, and improper lane usage. His vehicle was pulled over in the 13000 block of South Harlem Avenue at 12:23 a.m. Feb. 26. Bond was set at $1,500, and Surman is scheduled to appear in court on March 13. Ramy Said, 34, of Oak Forest, was charged with possession of

mit, was charged driving on a suspended license and no proof of insurance. Police stopped her cannabis, failure to wear a seat- vehicle in the 12700 block of belt, and unlawful use of an elec- South Harlem Avenue at 8:28 tronic communications device. a.m. last Friday. Bond was set Police stopped his vehicle in the at $2,000, and Kieta’s court date 7100 block of West College Drive is April 4. Police charged Merline J. Davis, at 11:49 a.m. last Sunday. Police said they smelled burnt cannabis 30, of Chicago, with driving on in the vehicle, and Said allegedly a suspended license. Her vehicle admitted to possessing cannabis. was curbed by police in the 12700 Bond was set at $1,500, and Said’s block of South Harlem Avenue at 2:39 p.m. Feb. 25 after they court date is April 4. Police charged Sean Michael reportedly spotted a passenger in Gutierrez, 22, of Blue Island, the vehicle not wearing a seatbelt. with driving on a suspended Bond was set at $1,500, and Davis license and driving a vehicle is scheduled to appear in court with expired registration. His on April 4. vehicle was curbed by police in the 6800 block of West College Drive at 12:21 p.m. last Friday. Police said a random registration check revealed that the driver’s license of the vehicle’s owner had been suspended. Bond was set at $2,000, and Gutierrez is scheduled to appear in court on April 4. Therese N. Kieta, 54, of Sum-

PALOS HEIGHTS POLICE

Jessie Galeano, 23, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended license and driving a vehicle with expired registration. Police stopped his vehicle in the 12100 block of South Ridgeland Avenue at 7:54 a.m. Feb. 25. Bond was set at $1,500, and Galeano’s court date is April 4. Police charged Mohammad A. Alaqrabawi, 19, of Alsip, with driving without a license and driving a vehicle with no front license plate. His vehicle was curbed by police in the 6400 block of West 135th Street at 11:09 a.m. Feb. 25. Bond was set at $1,500, and Alaqrabawi is scheduled to appear in court on April 4.

Jesse White Endorses Barrett

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ELECT

MICHAEL BARRETT JUDGE–15TH SUBCIRCUIT P040036 P040036 02/04 02/04

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PUNCH 174 VOTE DEMOCRATIC


6

The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014 John B. Simon

Legal Notice

� � �

cookcountyclerk.com

� � �

OFFICIAL NOTICE OF ELECTION, SPECIMEN BALLOTS, REFERENDA/ QUESTIONS OF PUBLIC POLICY & POLLING PLACES OFFICIAL NOTICE: IS HERBY GIVEN, by

David Orr,

Cook County Clerk, that the Primary Election will be held in Suburban Cook County on:

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

The Primary Election will be held in election precincts under the jurisdiction of the Election Division of the Cook County Clerk’s Office.

The Polls for said Primary Election will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Locations are subject to change as necessity requires.

At the Primary Election the voters will vote on the following contests and referenda questions. Referenda/Questions of Public Policy will be voted upon in those precincts of Cook County under the jurisdiction of the Cook County Clerk in which a Unit of Local Government has requested the County Clerk’s Office to place said referenda/questions of public policy on the ballot.

TOWNSHIP OF PALOS

Cook County Official Ballot Democratic Primary Election Condado de Cook Boleta Oficial Elección Primaria Demócrata

Barrington Township

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Reyes) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Reyes) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

141 Bridget Anne Mitchell

157 Stephen J. Feldman

142 Alfred M. Swanson, Jr.

Style: 70-1

Pct(s): 3

write-in voto por escrito write-in voto por escrito

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Connors) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Connors) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Hill Veal) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Hill Veal) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

143 Maritza Martinez Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Connors) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Connors) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

162 Kelly Maloney Kachmarik

145 Kristal Rivers

Judge, 4th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Billik, Jr.) Juez, 4.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Billik, Jr.) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

146 Peter J. Vilkelis Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Egan) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Egan) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

171 Brian Joseph Stephenson

147 Daniel J. Kubasiak

172 John J. Mahoney

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Phelps Felton) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Phelps Felton)

173 James J. Ryan

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

175 Maureen Masterson Pulia

148 Patricia O'Brien Sheahan

Judge, 4th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Mulhern) Juez, 4.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Mulhern)

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

write-in voto por escrito Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of McDonald) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de McDonald)

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Doody, Jr.) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Doody, Jr.)

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

172 John S. Fotopoulos

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

173 Diana Embil

151 Cynthia Y. Cobbs 152 Linda L. Mastandrea write-in voto por escrito Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Neville, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Neville, Jr.) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Para votar por una persona que no aparece en la boleta, escriba el nombre de la persona usando el espacio designado ‘voto por escrito’, y conecte la flecha correspondiente.

No Candidate

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Sterba) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Sterba)

OFFICIAL NOTICE OF REFERENDA/QUESTIONS OF PUBLIC POLICY

174 Michael B. Barrett 175 Sondra Denmark 176 Chris Lawler

If you make a mistake, ask for a new ballot.

178 Robbin Perkins

write-in voto por escrito

Metropolitan Water Reclamation District Commissioners Comisionados, Dto. Metro de Reclamación de Agua

1 Richard J. Durbin

write-in voto por escrito voto por escrito

156 Mary Alice Melchor

Si comete un error, pida una boleta nueva.

No Candidate

United States Senator Senador de los Estados Unidos Vote for One / Vote por Uno

To the Voters of Unincorporated Palos Township A los votantes del municipio no incorporado de Palos

154 William B. Raines 155 Patricia S. Spratt

“Shall the Township of Palos have the authority to arrange for the supply of electricity for its residential and small commercial retail customers who have not opted out of such program?”

Palos Township Committeeman Miembro, Comision del Municipio Palos

“El municipio de Palos, ¿debería tener autoridad para organizar el suministro de electricidad para sus clientes residenciales y pequeños comerciantes que no han optado por retirarse de dicho programa?”

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 191 Robert E. Maloney

Vote for not more than Three

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 11 Tio Hardiman & Brunell Donald

Yes / Si

Vote por no más de Tres

Cook County Official Ballot Republican Primary Election

71 Cynthia M. Santos 72 Frank Avila

Condado de Cook Boleta Oficial Elección Primaria Republicana

73 Timothy "Tim" Bradford

12 Pat Quinn & Paul Vallas

16 Lisa Madigan Secretary of State Secretario del Estado

Instructions Instruccíones

75 Tom Courtney

To vote, draw a line to connect the arrow’s head to its tail. If you make other marks, your vote may not count.

Para votar, trace una línea para conectar la punta de las flechas a su cola . Si hace otras marcas, se podría invalidar su voto.

76 Adam Miguest

To vote for a write-in candidate, write name on line provided and connect corresponding arrow.

Para votar por una persona que no aparece en la boleta, escriba el nombre de la persona usando el espacio designado ‘voto por escrito’, y conecte la flecha correspondiente.

If you make a mistake, ask for a new ballot.

77 John S. Xydakis

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

78 Frank Edward Gardner 79 Kathleen Mary O'Reilley

1 James D. "Jim" Oberweis

80 Brendan Francis Houlihan write-in voto por escrito

18 Sheila Simon Treasurer Tesorero

write-in voto por escrito

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

2 Douglas Lee Truax write-in voto por escrito

write-in voto por escrito

Governor & Lieutenant Governor Gobernador y Teniente Gobernador Vote for One / Vote por Uno

19 Michael W. Frerichs

President of County Board Presidente de la Mesa del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

U.S. Representative, 1st District Representante Federal, 1.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

91 Toni Preckwinkle

31 Bobby L. Rush voto por escrito U.S. Representative, 3rd District Representante Federal, 3.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 31 Daniel William Lipinski State Central Committeewoman, 1st District Miembra, Comisión Central Estatal, 1.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 41 Michelle A. Harris State Central Committeeman, 1st District Miembro, Comisión Central Estatal, 1.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 42 Bobby L. Rush State Central Committeewoman, 3rd District Miembra, Comisión Central Estatal, 3.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

County Clerk Secretario del Condado 92 David D. Orr

State Central Committeeman, 3rd District Miembro, Comisión Central Estatal, 3.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

County Treasurer Tesorero del Condado

18 Judy Baar Topinka

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Treasurer Tesorero Vote for One / Vote por Uno

97 Maria Pappas County Assessor Asesor del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

19 Tom Cross 20 Bob Grogan

98 Joseph Berrios voto por escrito County Commissioner, 6th District Comisionado del Condado, 6.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 101 Joan Patricia Murphy

State Senator, 18th District Senador Estatal, 18.º Dto.

County Commissioner, 17th District Comisionado del Condado, 17.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

101 Jim Hickey

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 Monique D. Davis

Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Gordon) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Gordon) Vote for One / Vote por Uno 131 Shelly A. Harris

State Representative, 31st District Representante Estatal, 31.º Dto.

132 Susan Kennedy Sullivan

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

133 Freddrenna M. Lyle

61 Mary E. Flowers State Representative, 32nd District Representante Estatal, 32.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 André Thapedi

Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Murphy) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Murphy) Vote for One / Vote por Uno 134 David Ellis

73 James (Jim) Parrilli

Comptroller Contralor

96 William "Bill" Evans

42 Michael J. Madigan

State Representative, 27th District Representante Estatal, 27.º Dto.

13 Kirk W. Dillard & Jil Tracy

17 Michael Webster

95 Sylvester E. Baker, Jr.

51 Bill Cunningham

72 Herb Schumann

Secretary of State Secretario del Estado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

94 Tadeusz "Ted" Palka

41 Helen A. Ozmina-Barc

12 Dan Rutherford & Steve Kim

16 Paul M. Schimpf

93 Thomas J. Dart

U.S. Representative, 1st District Representante Federal, 1.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 31 Jimmy Lee Tillman

Eric M. Wallace

U.S. Representative, 3rd District Representante Federal, 3.º Dto.

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 Frances Ann Hurley State Representative, 36th District Representante Estatal, 36.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Steele) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Steele) Vote for One / Vote por Uno 135 Sharon Oden Johnson 136 John B. Simon

President of County Board Presidente de la Mesa del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Clerk Secretario del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Sheriff Alguacil del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Treasurer Tesorero del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Assessor Asesor del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Commissioner, 6th District Comisionado del Condado, 6.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

31 Sharon M. Brannigan

County Commissioner, 17th District Comisionado del Condado, 17.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

32 Diane M. Harris

101 Elizabeth "Liz" Doody Gorman

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

State Senator, 18th District Senador Estatal, 18.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate No Candidate State Representative, 27th District Representante Estatal, 27.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate State Representative, 31st District Representante Estatal, 31.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

Elgie R. Sims, Jr.

State Representative, 35th District Representante Estatal, 35.º Dto.

Vote por no más de Tres 71 R. Cary Capparelli

Attorney General Abogado Fiscal Vote for One / Vote por Uno

County Sheriff Alguacil del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Metropolitan Water Reclamation District Commissioners Comisionados, Dto. Metro de Reclamación de Agua Vote for not more than Three

11 Bill Brady & Maria Rodriguez

14 Bruce Rauner & Evelyn Sanguinetti

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Si comete un error, pida una boleta nueva.

State Representative, 36th District Representante Estatal, 36.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

United States Senator Senador de los Estados Unidos Vote for One / Vote por Uno

17 Jesse White Comptroller Contralor Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Pct(s): 3

Barrington Township

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 Martes, 18 de Marzo, 2014

74 Josina Morita

Attorney General Abogado Fiscal Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No / No

Style: 70-1

8196

Governor & Lieutenant Governor Gobernador y Teniente Gobernador

191 Sean M. Morrison

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Neville, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Neville, Jr.)

171 Patrick Kevin Coughlin

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Palos Township Committeeman Miembro, Comision del Municipio Palos Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of McDonald) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de McDonald)

No Candidate

No Candidate

write-in voto por escrito voto por escrito

150 Thomas J. Carroll

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Sterba) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Sterba) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Lowrance) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Lowrance)

177 John Michael Allegretti

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Lowrance) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Lowrance)

No Candidate

No Candidate

176 Martin D. Reggi

149 Caroline Kate Moreland

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Doody, Jr.) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Doody, Jr.) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Howse, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Howse, Jr.)

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

No Candidate

174 Daniel Lawrence Peters

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Howse, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Howse, Jr.)

Judge, 4th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Mulhern) Juez, 4.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Mulhern) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Phelps Felton) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Phelps Felton) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

177 Mary Beth Duffy

To vote for a write-in candidate, write name on line provided and connect corresponding arrow.

No Candidate

No Candidate

153 Carolyn Joan Gallagher Para votar, trace una línea para conectar la de las flechas a su cola . Si hace otras punta marcas, se podría invalidar su voto.

Judge, 4th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Billik, Jr.) Juez, 4.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Billik, Jr.) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Egan) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Egan) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

161 James Patrick Crawley

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Hill Veal) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Hill Veal) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

No Candidate

160 Andrea Michele Buford

Instructions Instruccíones To vote, draw a line to connect the arrow’s head to its tail. If you make other marks, your vote may not count.

No Candidate

No Candidate

158 Diana Rosario

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Burke) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Burke) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Reyes) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Reyes) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Burke) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Burke) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 Martes, 18 de Marzo, 2014

61 Kelly M. Burke

No Candidate

voto por escrito

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Arnold) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Arnold) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

State Representative, 32nd District Representante Estatal, 32.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate State Representative, 35th District Representante Estatal, 35.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 Victor C. Horne

102 Barbara Bellar Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Gordon) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Gordon) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Murphy) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Murphy) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Steele) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Steele) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Arnold) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Arnold) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

OFFICIAL NOTICE OF POLLING PLACE LOCATIONS LOCATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AS NECESSITY REQUIRES

The voting will be conducted at the following polling places for each of the aforesaid election precincts selected by the Cook County Clerk. Ward Pct # 8800001 8800002 8800003 8800004 8800005 8800006 8800007 8800008 8800009 8800010 8800011 8800012 8800013 8800014 8800015 8800016 8800017 8800018 8800019 8800020 8800021 8800022 8800023 8800024 8800025 8800026 8800027 8800028 8800029 8800030 8800031 8800032 8800033 8800034 8800035 8800036 8800037 8800038 8800039

PP 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039

Name NATIVITY BVM UKRANIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH PALOS PARK RECREATION CENTER PALOS HEIGHTS ADMINISTRATION BUILDING KRUEGER PARK GREEN HILLS LIBRARY ROSEBUD MOBILE HOME COMMUNITY PALOS HILLS COMMUNITY CENTER WORTHWOOD SCHOOL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF GOOD SHEPHERD PALOS PARK RECREATION CENTER ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN CHURCH WORTHWOOD SCHOOL PEACE MEMORIAL CHURCH PALOS HILLS GOLF COURSE LUTHERAN CHURCH OF GOOD SHEPHERD NATIVITY BVM UKRANIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH HICKORY HILLS COMMUNITY CENTER HICKORY HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH KRUEGER PARK CITY OF HICKORY HILLS SACRED HEART PARISH WILLOWBROOK BALLROOM AND BANQUETS HICKORY HILLS COMMUNITY CENTER NATIVITY BVM UKRANIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH UNIVERSAL SCHOOL CITY OF PALOS HILLS HICKORY HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH GREEN HILLS LIBRARY PALOS PARK RECREATION CENTER PALOS HEIGHTS ADMINISTRATION BUILDING SAVIOR DIVINE LUTHERAN CHURCH PALOS TOWNSHIP HALL OAK HILLS CONDOMINIUMS SACRED HEART PARISH PALOS HILLS COMMUNITY CENTER SACRED HEART PARISH PEACE MEMORIAL CHURCH CITY OF PALOS HILLS PEACE MEMORIAL CHURCH

Address 8530 W 131ST ST 8901 123RD ST 7607 W COLLEGE DR 9100 S 88TH AVE 8611 W 103RD ST 8800 S HARLEM AVE 8455 W 103RD ST 11000 S OKETO AVE 7800 W MC CARTHY RD 8901 123RD ST 13350 LA GRANGE RD 11000 S OKETO AVE 10300 131ST ST 7301 W 105TH ST 7800 W MC CARTHY RD 8530 W 131ST ST 7800 W 89TH PL 8426 W 95TH ST 9100 S 88TH AVE 8652 W 95TH ST 8245 W 111TH ST 8900 S ARCHER AVE 7800 W 89TH PL 8530 W 131ST ST 7350 W 93RD ST 10335 S ROBERTS RD 8426 W 95TH ST 8611 W 103RD ST 8901 123RD ST 7607 W COLLEGE DR 10040 S 88TH AVE 10802 S ROBERTS RD 13250 S 76TH AVE 8245 W 111TH ST 8455 W 103RD ST 8245 W 111TH ST 10300 131ST ST 10335 S ROBERTS RD 10300 131ST ST

Township HCap Access PALOS PARK Y PALOS PARK Y PALOS HEIGHTS Y HICKORY HILLS Y PALOS HILLS Y BRIDGEVIEW Y PALOS HILLS Y WORTH Y PALOS HEIGHTS Y PALOS PARK Y ORLAND PARK Y WORTH Y PALOS PARK Y PALOS HILLS Y PALOS HEIGHTS Y PALOS PARK Y HICKORY HILLS Y HICKORY HILLS Y HICKORY HILLS Y HICKORY HILLS Y PALOS HILLS Y WILLOW SPRINGS Y HICKORY HILLS Y PALOS PARK Y BRIDGEVIEW Y PALOS HILLS Y HICKORY HILLS Y PALOS HILLS Y PALOS PARK Y PALOS HEIGHTS Y PALOS HILLS Y PALOS HILLS Y PALOS HEIGHTS Y PALOS HILLS Y PALOS HILLS Y PALOS HILLS Y PALOS PARK Y Y PALOS HILLS PALOS PARK Y

NOTE: The letter (N) following the polling place address denotes that the polling place itself is not accessible to the handicapped although other parts of the facility may be accessible. An exemption has been granted by the State Board of Elections and signs are posted indicating if the whole building is accessible or if there is a special entrance.

Dated at Chicago, Illinois this 6th day of March 2014

David Orr

Cook County Clerk cookcountyclerk.com


The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

7

Community Notes Meet women mayors with League of Voters The League of Women Voters of the Palos Orland Area has invited the first women mayors of both Oak Lawn and Worth to speak at their next regular meeting this Saturday, March 8, at the Palos Heights Public Library. Coffee is on at 9:30 a.m., and the meeting begins at 10. Members of the community are invited to learn from these two leaders. In Oak Lawn, Dr. Sandra Bury won the office of village president over longtime Mayor Dave Heilmann. In Worth, Trustee Mary Werner became the village president. While both Palos Heights and Palos Park have had women mayors, the experience in Oak Lawn and Worth are each a first. The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization dedicated to an informed electorate. The League never endorses or opposes political candidates or parties. League meetings are al-

ways open to the public. For more information, call 3892888 or go to www.palosorlandlwv. org.

Heights Independence Day parade seeks chairman Organizers of Palos Heights’ Independence Day celebration seek a volunteer to serve as chairman of this year’s parade. Palos Heights will host its annual Independence Day celebration at Community Park with food, fireworks and fun on Thursday, July 3. The Independence Day Parade will begin at noon on Friday, the Fourth of July, and travel on Harlem Avenue. The committee is still looking for a chairperson for the parade, and other volunteers. If interested in volunteering at this event, contact Janet Campion at 385-0651 or Ryan Sparrow at Palos Heights Parks and Recreation 361-1807 or email Ryan at Rsparrow@palosheights.org

Orland Township Democrats Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

residents can recycle unwanted electronics, such as televisions, cell phones and computer parts.s White goods and air conditioners Orland Township Demo- will not be accepted.s The dropoff cratic Committeeman Daniel site is at the Orland Township J. McLaughlin and the Orland Highway Department, 16125 S. Township Regular Democratic Wolf Road, Orland Park. Later spring dropoff dates are Organization will host the organization’s St. Patrick’s Day Party April 12, May 10 and June 14.s For a complete list of accepted on Thursday, March 13. The festivities will begin at 6:30 items, visit www.orlandtownship. p.m. at the Riviera Country Club, org or call 403-5148. 8801 West 143rd St. in Orland Park. Tickets are $35 per person Palos 118 Sham with no charge for seniors. Event Rock ‘n’ Roll sponsorships are available at $500 for platinum, $300 for gold and Palos 118’s Parent Faculty As$200 for silver. For more informa- sociation is hosting their annual tion, call 860-5664. Sham Rock n Roll fundraiser this Saturday, March 8, from 7 to 11 p.m., at Palos Country Club, 131st Electronics recycling and Southwest Highway. at Orland Township The event features a live band, Sustainable Saturdays are back silent auctions, heavy appetizers, at Orland Township, from 8 a.m. domestic beer, wine, and soft to noon, on the second Saturday drinks. Tickets cost $55 at the of every month starting March 8 door. Visit the PFA/ Sham Rock ‘n’ Roll page on www.palos118. through November. On Sustainable Saturdays, org for more information.

Library Notes Heights library featured database Zinio has partnered with Recorded Books so libraries can offer a special edition of the Zinio service which allows patrons to download popular magazines to a computer, tablet or mobile device. You can view Zinio magazines via a web browser or an app. Please note, you must use your Palos Heights library card number and an email address to create an account at rbdigital.com/ palosheightsil/zinio, where there is also a help link and a “User Guide.” Bring your tablet, smartphone, or laptop to the library on Friday, March 14, at 10 a.m., to learn more about the Zinio digital magazine service.

Monday, March 10, at noon, to discuss “Hello Goodbye Hello : A Circle of 101 Remarkable Meetings” by Craig Brown, available for pick up at the library. Bring your lunch; refreshments and dessert will be provided. • Bring your projects to the Needle Club and enjoy the company of others while working on March 11, from 10 a.m. to noon. New members always welcome. • Today (Thursday) at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., join the program Take a Literary Look at 2013. It will give a variety of titles published in 2013 considered the best according to the Chicago Tribune, New York Times, and more. • Hear historian Jim Gibbons talk about the life of Eleanor Roosevelt this Sunday, March 9, at 2 p.m. As the wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the niece of President Theodore Roosevelt, she wielded tremendous power by influencing those who governed. And, the poor, the down trodden, and the oppressed, all had a strong ally in Eleanor. • On Tuesday, March 11, at 7 p.m., join Robert Rodriguez at

An Evening With Revolver: How the Beatles Re-imagined Rock 'N' Roll in the Studio, showcasing the height of the Beatles success using performance and promo clips, rare photos and unreleased audio of the group at work. Program registration is always appreciated. Register online at palosheightslibrary.org, by phone at 448-1473, or in person. All programs are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

Heights library youth programs

Teen Gaming Teen gaming will take place this Friday, March 7, between 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. For grades 6 and up. Lego Builders Children ages 4 and up can let their creativity soar while playing with Lego blocks on Sunday, Heights library March 9, at 2 p.m. upcoming programs Teen ACT/SAT help Monday, March 10 at 7 p.m. The following will take place at students in grades 6 and up will the Palos Heights Public Library, be introduced to shmoop, a da12501 S. 71st Ave. tabase that prepares students • Join the Lunch Bunch on for the SAT, PSAT, ACT & AP test. After School Club Enjoy stories, activities, crafts and snacks with your friends. This month’s theme is Finger Woodworking club Print Art. After School Club will Guests are welcome to attend. meet on Tuesday, March 11 at 4 p.m. for grades 1-3. Registration The Hickory Hills Wood WorkWidowed group is required. ers Club will meet Thursday, March 13, at 7 p.m. at Oak The Southwest Suburban WOW Tween Book Discussion Tuesday, March 11 at 7 p.m. View Community Center, 4625 widowed group will meet this FriW. 111th. St. in Oak Lawn. day, March 7, at 7 p.m., at Zion children in grades 3-5 are invited Guest speaker Jim Coonan will Lutheran Church, 17100 W. 70th to discuss Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo. demonstrate the construction of Ave. in Tinley Park. the Windsor Chair. Coonan gives A short monthly meeting precedes Chess Club Wednesday, March 12 at 7 p.m. classes in Windsor chair and entertainment and refreshments. children ages 6 and up can join stoolsconstruction in Ransom, Ill. All denominations welcome. our monthly club, play against each other and get tips from members of Stagg High School’s Chess Club.

Club Activities

PAWS Animal Shelter fundraiser dinner gala P.A.W.S. Animal Shelter is celebrating 40 years of pet rescue, hope and community volunteerism by hosting a celebration to mark this momentous occasion. This year’s gala will be held at The Odyssey Country Club in Tinley Park on Friday, March 21, and will feature dinner, dancing, live and silent auctions, raffles, entertainment and more! This year’s special master of ceremonies will be. Andy Avalos of Channel 5 News. Tickets are $60 with all profits going directly to the care of shelter animals. P.A.W.S. is a no-kill, volunteerrun organization that serves Tinley Park and its surrounding communities by providing a safe haven for abandoned, abused and unwanted animals. It also serves

the community through programs such as Pet Therapy for senior citizens, Humane Education and low cost spay/neutering. The 40th Anniversary Dinner Dance is the organization’s largest single fundraising event of the year and one that is critical to our existence. All monies raised will be used directly to provide care, comfort and medical assistance to the orphaned or abandoned animals in our shelter. If you cannot be there, P.A.W.S. relies solely on these events and support from the community. Donations are greatly needed to help offset our $20,000.00 monthly medical bills. For more information, visit the website at www.pawstinleypark. org.

Respect Life ministries will present Women’s Centers info and film

Dyed in the Wool The Palos Park Public Library

Simple Gifts Got yarn? Both the Worth Township Knitting and crocheting groups are looking for donations of yarn to enable them to continue supplying much needed lap robes for veterans at Hines Veteran’s Hospital. Yarn donations may be dropped off at Worth Township, receptionist, 11601 S. Pulaski Road in Alsip. The Township is open Monday – Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Please use the south entrance. (371-2900)

Photo by Joan Hadac

Joys of reading

Storyteller Brenda Sullivan, wearing “Cat in the Hat” attire, engaged local children and encouraged them to discover the joy of reading at an event last Sunday at the Palos Heights Public Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave. About a dozen boys and girls attended, along with their parents will host the American folk group Dyed in the Wool on Thursday, and grandparents. Library staff arranged Dr. Seuss books in the secMarch 13, at 7 p.m. Back by popu- ond-floor story time room to further entice the children’s curiosity. lar demand, Dyed in the Wool will flash their Celtic edge in an evening of traditional and contemporary song with live music that is sure to get all in the St. Patrick’s Day spirit. Register for this program by calling 448-1530 or visit the library online at www.palosparklibrary. org . The library is at 12330 Forest Glen Blvd. St. Alexander School in Palos sorships are available. The level Heights seeks sponsors for its first of sponsorships are: • Gold sponsorship of $1,000 or 5K Raider Run/Walk to be held Book & Film more includes company name and Saturday, April 5. The run-walk will begin at St. logo on participant t-shirts, finish The Book & Film Series returns to the Palos Park Public Alexander’s parking lot at 126th line banner, St. Alexander church Library on Wednesday, March 12, Street and 71st Avenue at 9 a.m. bulletin listing and all Race thank at 2 p.m., with the film “Captain for runners and 9:05 a.m. for you communications. • Sliver Sponsorship for $500 Phillips.” Tom Hanks stars in walkers. All ages are welcome to par- includes company name and logo this award-winning film about the 2009 hijacking of his Ameri- ticipate. The cost to register is on participant t-shirts and St. Alcan cargo ship by Somali pirates. $25 prior to March 19 and reg- exander church bulletin listing. • Bronze Sponsorship for $250 This movie is based on the real istration can be completed online life events from the ship’s cap- at www.stalexanderschool.com (a includes company name and logo tain’s book “A Captain’s Duty.” $2.25 online processing fee will in St. Alexander church bulletin listing. This program is free and open apply). "Our sponsorship program gives The registration fee includes to the public. All who attend will be entered in a raffle to win a free race entry, participant bib, Dri-Fit companies a great opportunity to promote their business to the locopy of the book. The library is T-shirt and post race snacks. The theme of the 5K is “Power cal Palos Heights community," a at 12330 Forest Glen Boulevard. Call the library to register at 448- Up For Technology.” All pro- 5K Raider Run/Walk committee 1530, or for more information, ceeds will benefit the school’s member explained. St. Alexander visit the library online at www. computer and and technology is a nationally recognized Blue Ribbon School. program. palosparklibrary.org. For more information and to The 5K Raider Run/Walk route will continue through the streets register for St. Alexander's 5K Mah Jongg of Palos Heights and finish back Run/Walk visit the school website The Palos Heights Public Li- at St. Alexander. A post-race rally at www.stalexanderschool.com, brary is looking for both experi- will be held at 10:30 a.m. and call the school's office at 448enced and novice American Mah awards will be presented to the 0408 or email Juliaobrienzwa@ comcast.net for sponsorship race winners. Jongg players. Business and corporate spon- information. Meet at the Library on Tuesdays, March 11 and March 25, at 1 p.m., to play with and learn from those who are experienced players. Bring your game with you. Also, the library is looking for donations of gently used American Mah Jongg games. Jaclyn Taylor Novak, of Orland point average or above. Local students named to the Space is limited; call to register Park, was named to the Miami Dean’s List are: Eman Sahloul, 448-1473; ask for Adult Services. University dean’s list. The library is at 12501 S. 71st Miami University in Oxford, Jon Altman, Omar Aldabe and Ave. Ohio, students who ranked in Yara Elboghdady, all of Orland the top 20 percent of under- Park; Hend Diab and Renee Habgraduate students within each bal, both of Palos Heights, and division for first semester 2013- Iman Abdallah, of Palos Park. *** 2014 have been named to the Ashleigh Hughes, of Palos dean’s list recognizing academic Park, has been selected to sing performance. the National Anthem at Wrigley *** Benedictine University in Lisle Field on June 4. She is a lifelong Stagg crafts show has announced students named Palos resident. call for vendors In addition to singing for the to the Fall 2013 Dean’s Recognized List. The Dean’s Recog- Chicago Cubs at Wrigley, she Crafters are sought for the nized List recognizes part-time will also being singing for the Stagg High School Music Boost- students who achieve a 3.5 grade Chicago Bandits softball team in Rosemont. ers annual arts and crafts show point average or above. Ashleigh, 13, is in the 7th Local recognized students are to be held Saturday and Sunday, March 22 and 23, at Stagg, 111th Giana Canfield, Deborah Sackett grade at Palos South. She is in Street and Roberts Road in Palos and Meghan LeMay, all of Orland the ALPS (gifted program) and Park, and Christina Bigoness, of student council. She served as Hills. student council president in 5th The show is well-received and Palos Heights. grade. She plays soccer, basket*** well-attended.s Cost is $95 per 80 Benedictine University in Lisle ball, softball, and when she’s not sq. ft. booth space for thestwo-day has named students named to busy doing that she is busy filling run of the show. For information or to receive the Fall 2013 Dean’s List. The out her application for the Naan application, call 974-7520 or Dean’s List recognizes full-time tional Junior Honor Society and students who achieve a 3.5 grade maintaining a perfect GPA. 361-8298.

St. Alexander School invites sponsors for 5K run/walk to benefit technology program

Student News

School Notes

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE NOTICE OF OF PUBLIC PUBLIC HEARING HEARING

Polish Daily News EndorsesBarrett Barrett Jessie White Endorses

City of of Palos Palos Heights Heights Liquor Liquor Hearing Hearing City

The Robert S. S. Straz Straz The City City of of Palos Palos Heights Heights Liquor Liquor Commissioner, Commissioner, Mayor Mayor Robert will hold a public hearing to consider the request for a Retailer’s Class H will hold a public hearing to consider the request for a Retailer’s Class H Liquor License, License, on on property property located located at at 7162 7162 W. W. 127 127 Street, Street, petitioner petitioner Liquor CNM Group, Group, d/b/a d/b/a Harvest Harvest Room/The Room/The Side Side Room. Room. Jackie Keenan, director of volun- which investigates the affects of CNM

teer services, will present the story of the Women’s Centers of Greater Chicagoland and how they are savings babies’ lives and providing a message of hope and help to more than 4,000 women every year. The three Chicago area centers provide counseling, free ultrasounds, material assistance and more in an effort to reach, inform and help pregnant mothers, using the most effective morally acceptable means, thereby saving as many unborn babies as possible from abortion. Keenan will also show a new documentary called “The 40 Film,”

abortion in our nation over the last 40 years. It includes appearances by 40 of the biggest names in the pro-life movement. The program is scheduled for Tuesday, March 11, at 7 p.m., at St. Michael Church, 14327 Highland Ave, Orland Park. The program is the latest in the 2014 Knowledge and Prayer Series sponsored by the Multi Parish Respect Life Ministries of St. Michael, St. Francis of Assisi, Our Lady of the Woods in Orland Park ,and St. Bernard and Annunciation Byzantine Catholic churches in Homer Glen.

The Liquor Liquor Hearing Hearing will will be be held held on on Thursday, Thursday, March March 20, 20, 2014 2014 at at 5:30 5:30 The p.m. at the City of Palos Heights, City Hall, 7607 W. College Drive, p.m. at the City of Palos Heights, City Hall, 7607 W. College Drive, Palos Heights, Heights, IL IL 60463. 60463. Palos Mayor Robert Robert S. S. Straz Straz Mayor City of Palos Heights City of Palos Heights Liquor Liquor Commissioner Commissioner

Pictured are Vice President Teresa Abick and President of the Polish National Alliance and Publisher of Polish Daily Newspaper, Frank Spula with Michael Barrett in the center.

ELECT

MICHAEL BARRETT JUDGE–15TH SUBCIRCUIT

PUNCH 174 VOTE DEMOCRATIC


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The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle “J.J.”

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Across 1. Nickel and ___ 6. Sends unwanted e-mails to 11. Jelly cousin 14. Scary bacteria 15. Shire of “Rocky” and “The Godfather” 16. “___ you kidding me?” 17. “Me and Bobby McGee” singer 19. Fisherman’s item 20. Picnic pest 21. Shoes with a swoosh on them 22. Part of a movie 24. Cut 25. Slightly open, as a door 26. Had fun with 29. Antoinette or Osmond 32. Tavern on “The Simpsons” 33. Skilled 36. Large coffee holder 37. First Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 40. ___ Paulo, Brazil 41. It’s red and white and goes on your head 43. Party thrower 44. Experts in stretching 45. Meet by chance 48. Good luck 50. First performance 51. Poker announcement 53. Halley’s ___ 54. Have lunch, say 57. Woman in a habit 58. “Ghost Dog” and “Night on Earth” director 61. Ending for Japan or Taiwan 62. Kindle purchase 63. Come after 64. ____ Moines (Iowa’s capital) 65. Thick, like fog 66. Slimy

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5. Walt before World or Land 6. Put coal in the furnace 7. Rock, ___, scissors 8. “___ Well That Ends Well” 9. 1002, in Roman numerals 10. Without, to the French 11. Wife of George, mother of Judy and Elroy 12. Stadium 13. It’s a little longer than a yard 18. “___ Talkin’” (Bee Gees hit) 23. Abel’s brother 24. “Help!” 26. Big birds of Australia 27. Ephron or Dunn 28. Former talk show host 29. Rank above capt. 30. Pie ___ mode 31. King: Sp. 33. Explosive letters 34. Not west 35. Inflict upon 37. Military lawyer, for short 38. “___ believe in yesterday”

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39. Owns 42. Screwdriver or hammer 43. Big song 45. Second try at a movie script 46. Better than all the rest, in hipster-speak 47. Common spice 48. Went for the gold? 49. Handy 50. Karate studios 52. Spun records 53. “It’ll be fun!” 54. Old name for Exxon 55. “For the Price of ___ of Tea” 56. Not we 59. “May ___ excused?” 60. Numero ___

From March 7, 1974

40 Years Ago This Week Unspoiled beauty: Palos forest preserves: Winter sports at Palos preserve [Swallow Cliff toboggan slides]. The Palos forest preserves comprise some 13,750 acres of mostly hilly, wooded and scenic parts of Cook County, and include almost 100 lakes, ponds and sloughs. They occupy 10,051 acres in Palos Township. The remaining 3,700 acres are situated in the adjoining townships of Orland, Lemont and Lyons. The first purchase of land by the infant forest preserve district of Cook County [established 100 years ago this fall] was authorized on Sept. 25, 1916, 42 parcels totaling 288 acres that became Deer Grove. The second purchase, of 80 acres, authorized on the same date, was in the Palos area. By 1918, 2,370 acres in Palos township had been acquired.

(Answers on page 4)

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The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

From March 4, 2004

10 Years Ago This Week Eyebrow waxing and football don’t normally go together, but they do at Hat Heads, a sports-themed salon for men in Palos Heights that opened in November. Matthew Drewry, 3, of Orland Park, sat very still in his fire engine seat while stylist Beata Gronski carefully cut his hair.

(Answers on page 4)

© 2009 Hometown Content

St. Xavier University loses its voice

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT? Put those conceal carry guns away and don’t shoot the messenger. Last week’s WHATIZIT? was of an MRI machine. When the shutterbug asked medical personnel if he could shoot this gadget for WHATIZIT?, it was under the strict condition that anyone who guessed a CT machine would be wrong, even though the two are similar. These medical folks are even stricter than the WHATIZIT? Board of Directors, and we all know what a tough bunch of cookies those people are. Sooooo… don’t shoot the messenger. R.J. Oahueke was the first to come in with the right answer. Others who got it right were Palos Heights’ Crystine Busch, Chicago Ridge’s Dan Higgins, Worth’s Linda Martin, Theresa and George Rebersky, Sandy Joiner, Jerry and Carol Janicki, Gene Sikora and Celeste Cameron and Hickory Hills’ Ken Osborne, Betty Beegle, and Janice Mastro. We did have people guess an MRI and a CT machine so half credit is given and you know what that means. It means half of the name gets in the paper. So Rob Sol of Oak Lawn and Ja Merch of Evergreen Park get the partial nod. This week’s clue: Back to you. Send those guesses by Monday night to thereporter@comcast.not with WHATIZIT? in the subject line. Don’t forget your name and hometown.

We probably haven’t heard the last from Robert Maszak. A few minutes before he called his last St. Xavier University contest as the school’s official public address announcer for football and basketball, he was already saying that he was willing to sub next year if needed. He will miss this gig. Maszak, 69, has been announcing at various schools and sporting events for 52 years including more than a decade of service at the Chicago campus, where he was also a supervisor of student teachers. The Homewood resident called his last game — an 84-61 men’s basketball victory over the University of St. Francis last Wednesday in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference quarterfinals. Both the men and women’s teams are nationally ranked in the top 10 and will begin play in their respective NAIA national tournaments Wednesday. His final season was historic with the success of the two squad and men’s basketball star Brad Karp breaking the all-time scoring record at the school. He has loved what he has done but said he needs to step away. “Driving at night was getting to me,” the Homewood resident said. “I can still do it but it’s starting to get tough. I don’t want to endanger anybody. So that’s enough.’’ He said he has announced for more than a half decade at Joliet Junior College, Illinois State University and Bloom High School as well as various little league baseball organizations in the south suburbs. “I really like doing the little leagues because the kids love to hear their names,” he said. Maszak said that a 2010 Gatorade Replay Game between Bloom and Brother Rice’s boys basketball team 10 years after the two teams battled in a controversial supersectional finish to a battle

it’s an even sweeter sound when the press has been broken for a few days. The press was rolling again Monday morning after last week’s nightmarish breakdown that caused the Reporter and Regional to come out a day later than usual. The company publishes several by Jeff other newspapers and magazines Vorva in the Chicago area and a lot of in Aurora as one of his favorites. that had to be outsourced. It was a This time the game was played at bad, bad week for boss Pat Beedie SXU and Brother Rice avenged and his crew. the loss. Nothing much good comes out “That game was just fantastic,” of something like this but it was Maszak said. “We were right there good to hear from our readers who and Dwyane Wade [an honorary got in touch with us last week. coach] and his body guard with We received a flood of phone a gun were standing right next calls on Thursday and Friday to me. I also did a Harlem Glo- morning with people wondering betrotters game at Bloom. I got what the heck happened. We also hit with a bucket of water. They had a few people stop by the office don’t me I wasn’t going to be but to visit. Most of them were great I stepped away from the mic and about it and talked about how they got me.’’ this is the first time the paper Now he’s stepping away from didn’t get to their homes on time the mic again — but likely not for the first time ever. for good. It’s nice to hear from that we’re still a part of their lives and routines. That’s what comPressing issue There is nothing like hearing munity journalism is about and the humming of the press when it’s touching that they missed us you work for a newspaper and for 24 hours.

Notes north of the Cal-Sag

Chickens are clucking

A great source of comedy comes from the Oak Lawn Cowardly Blog. The chickens are madder than wet hens because they found out about “three disturbing mass emails sent by apparently fictitious senders that were apparently designed to attack the business relationship the [Cowardly Blog] enjoys with its readers have been labeled ‘libelous’ and direct violations of the Illinois Electronic Mail Act.’’ Apparently, this other group of anonymous cowards is providing fake headlines that credit “actual newspapers’’ including your favorite newspaper, the Reporter. The cowards are thinking of getting a lawsuit together against the other cowards. The good news to come out of this is that the Cowardly Blog said that its lawyer is Dennis Brennan, so now we have an actual name associated with the Cowardly Blog. So we wish Mr. Brennan all the luck in the world in exposing those anonymous bad guys that…well…kind of do what the blog that he represents does.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Mark Anzilotti (left) and Lance Barrows of Regional Publishing check out copies of a newspaper Monday, minutes after the company’s press was repaired.


The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM • PrairieStateVet.com It’s been 14 years since we instituted our reduced vaccination schedule for dogs and cats and in January 2000. At that time, I said I would report back to you with our findings. Well it’s been a generation of pets now, and I am glad to be able to say that we have seen no increase in the incidence of any of the viral diseases for which we vaccinate, specifically, canine distemper, canine parvovirus, feline distemper complex and feline leukemia disease. In the fall of 1999 we had already decided that it was time to follow the emerging science and go to a reduced vaccination protocol. In November of 1999 we contacted Dr. (General) Richard Ford at the University of North Carolina and told him of the proposed vaccination protocol that we wanted to institute in our clinic and he signed off on our protocol. Dr. Ford is one of our country’s foremost experts on animal vaccinations. Two things were noted with the new protocol. The first two years into the change we took a big hit in clinic gross income. This was not unexpected and we got around that be making small adjustments in all of the other fees. The second, and most unexpected thing was client resistance to the change. We began Jan. 2, telling clients, “Starting this year we are going to give Poppy a three year rabies vaccination, next year we’ll give her a parvovirus vaccination, three years from now we’ll give her a distemper vaccination and 4 years from now we’ll start the cycle again. That way instead of nine vaccines in three years she will get three”. The resistance we

and began officially relabeling their products with longer duration of immunity (DOI) statements. As more DOI studies are done I believe we will find ourselves extending the time between certain vaccines even more. You may wonder why some vaccines such as leptospirosis and borellia (Lyme) are still recommended yearly. Unlike the viral vaccines discussed above, vaccines for bacterial diseases (bacterins) produce only short durations of immunity and are thus boosted yearly.

Submitted photo

Meet Joanna, Ted and Julia from Worth. met was surprising. People had been so ingrained since the l950’s with the idea that every dog and cat needed to get every vaccine ever made under the sun shot into their pets every year of their life. It was tiresome explaining the whole thing over and over to each client. I was like pulling teeth. I think it took us a good two years before we had everyone on board. Not only did we see no increase in diseases by following this reduced vaccination schedule, we were very glad to see a reduction in the cases

of AIHA (autoimmune hemolytic anemia). Vaccines are only one of many things that can trigger AIHA (a condition where the immune system attacks the bodies own red blood cells) but some years into the new protocol we found ourselves reflecting on how fewer AIHA cases we were treating anymore. I do believe there was a definite correlation between the simultaneous reductions. As more veterinarians nationwide began adopting staggered three year protocols the vaccine companies finally saw the light

Coyote-pet attacks Last week we learned about a local pet owner who went out into their backyard and found several pieces of their small dog. Yesterday in the clinic, a client told me about someone who went out back and found their dog’s bloodstained leash, but no dog. This morning I scouted my yard and followed coyote tracks from 82nd Court, over my back fence, alongside the west wall of my house by the bedroom windows, over the other side of the fence and through the front yard down to 131st Street. Be alert. In my distress I called to the Lord; I cried to my God for help. From his temple he heard my voice; my cry came before him, into his ears. The earth trembled and quaked, and the foundations of the mountains shook; they trembled because he was angry. Smoke rose from his nostrils; consuming fire came out of his mouth; burning coals blazed out of it. —Psalms 18: 6-8.

Submitted photo, sponsored by Joy’s Best Friends, Ltd. Best Bites.

Happy Birthday Arnie Hi, I’m Arnie, the Boxer boy. This Saturday is my 1st Birthday and my Mom said I can have a celebration! Saturday, March 8, come in for your 10% Discount* and a party favor** for your Best Friend & wish me my 1st Happy Birthday! Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road in Palos Park. 708-448-1515. Visit us online at www.joysbestfriends.com. Follow US on Facebook.com/ JoysBestFriendsBestBites. Best Bites March Sale—Fromm Pet Foods $5 Off Large Bag; $3 Off Med. Bag & $2 Off Small Bags Not valid with other offers. *some exclusions apply **while supplies last.

Health Beat Children’s vaccinations for the underinsured

include DTaP, DTaP-Hep B-IPV, DTaP-IPV-Hib, DTaP-IPV, Hep A, Hep B, Hep B-Hib, HPV, MeOrland Township, 14807 S. ningococcal, MMR, IPV, PneuRavinia Ave., now provide im- mococcal, Rotavirus, Tdap and munizations to local underin- Varicella. Adult vaccines are ofsured children at its monthly fered to Orland Township residents only and are available at immunization clinic. Vaccines are available to chil- a discounted rate. Adult vaccines dren 18 and under who are either include HPV, Pneumococcal, Hep uninsured, underinsured, Medic- A, Tuberculosis, Hep B, Tdap, aid-eligible (includes All Kids), IPV, Meningococcal, Hep A-Hep Native American or Alaskan Na- B, MMR, Typhoid and Shingles. tive. Underinsured means that Proof of residency is required. For more information, or for the child has health insurance, but it does not cover any vaccines, upcoming immunization clinic certain vaccines, or it has a fixed dates, call 403-4222 or visit www. dollar limit or cap for vaccines, orlandtwp.org. and once that cap is reached a child is ineligible. With valid proof Cost advantages of Orland Township residency, of CCRC living vaccines are free of charge. For children residing outside of the Continuing care retirement township’s boundaries, a $20 ad- communities (CCRCs) provide a ministration fee per vaccine will single location for independent be collected. An up-to-date shot living, assisted living, memory record is mandatory to receive support, rehab and skilled nursany vaccine, and children must ing settings. They not only ensure be accompanied by a parent or a continuum of care for older legal guardian. adults, but also the opportunity Available children’s vaccines for people to enjoy more enriching

independent and social lifestyles, said Kevin McGee, president and CEO of Smith Senior Living. “While the popularity of CCRCs continues to increase, many people still don’t realize that residing in these communities is within their financial reach.” Smith Senior Living sponsors two CCRCs—Smith Crossing in Orland Park and Smith Village in Chicago’s Southside Beverly neighborhood. Helping older adults compare the cost-advantages of residing in a CCRC and learn how to select one was the purpose of workshops recently conducted by McGee and Smith Senior Living CFO Ray Marneris. Called, “R e t i r e m e n t Planning 201— Understanding Financial Plans and Options,” they were second in a fourpart series of education programs sponsored

by Smith communities. To attend the next workshop, “Retirement Planning 301—The Housing Market and Downsizing,” from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 18, call Smith Crossing at 326-2300. To attend at Smith Village from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, March 20, call (773) 474-7300.

Palos hospital class: advance directives Advance directives are important for all adults, not just the elderly. Palos Community Hospital offers a free class from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 11, to explain the details. Serious illness and death aren’t easy to discuss, but you can make it easier by having a living will and other advance directives in place. Put your loved ones at ease by making your wishes known regarding such treatment efforts as resuscitation and life-support. This class will held at the

hospital, 12251 S. 80th Ave., Palos Heights. Topics include the Illinois Power of Attorney for Health Care (short form), Illinois Department of Public Health: Uniform Do-Not-Resuscitate Advance Directive form, and the Living Will. For more information or to register for the class, visit the hospital website at http://bit.ly/ advdirect or call 226-2300.

Orland Township monthly immunizations Orland Township offers its next monthly immunization clinics on Saturday, March 8, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and Tuesday, April 8 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Township office, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave. Vaccines are available to children 18 and under who are either uninsured, underinsured, Medicaid-eligible/All Kids (card needs to be displayed), Native American or Alaskan Native. Underinsured means that the child has health insurance, but it does

not cover any vaccines, certain vaccines, or it has a fixed dollar limit or cap for vaccines, and once that cap is reached a child is ineligible. With valid proof of Orland Township residency, vaccines are free of charge. For children residing outside of the township’s boundaries, a $20 administration fee per vaccine will be collected. An up-to-date shot record is mandatory to receive any vaccine, and childrenmust be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Children’s vaccines that are available include DTaP, DTaPHep B-IPV, DTaP-IPV-Hib, DTaP-IPV, Hep A, Hep B, Hep BHib, HPV, Meningococcal, MMR, IPV, Pneumococcal, Rotavirus, Tdap and Varicella. Adult vaccines that are available include HPV, Pneumococcal, Hep A, Tuberculosis, Hep B, Tdap, IPV, Meningococcal, Hep A-Hep B, MMR, Typhoid and Shingles. For additional clinic dates and adult immunization prices, visit Orland Township www. orlandtwp.org.

Death Notices Aldona Brazis

Photo by Tim Hadac

Heights’ veteran medalist Tom Strack, of Palos Heights, shows the medals — three golds and one bronze — he won competing in weight-lifting events at a Special Olympics meet held Feb. 20 at UIC. That was the same date fellow Palos Heights resident Kendall Coyne and her U.S. hockey teammates won silver medals at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. A former longtime Special Olympian multi-medalist figure skater, Strack enjoyed watching the recent Winter Olympics, especially figure skating. A hero of his is skater Jason Brown, a bronze medalist in the team event Sochi. Brown used to instruct skaters at the Crestwood ice rink, Strack noted. He called the opening ceremonies of the Sochi games “phenomenal.” Strack intends to next compete in weight-lifting Special Olympics events in Bloomington during Father’s Day weekend.

neral Monday from the Robert J. Sheehy & Sons Funeral Home, in Orland Park, to St. Julie Billiart Church, Mass. Interment St. Mary Cemetery. Dedicated volunteer at Palos Community Hospital for 22 years. Usher at St. Julie Billiart Church for 20 years. In lieu of flowers, prayers would be appreciated.

the Woods Church, Mass. InterProud sister-in-law to Vinment private. cent (Debra) and Eugene (Lisa) Zanella. Loving niece to many aunts Mary Reidy Zanella Mary Bridget Reidy Zanella, and uncles in Ireland, England formerly, of Palos Heights, died and Chicago. Dear cousin and friend of Feb. 22. many. Loving wife of Dean Zanella. Visitation and funeral was held Proud mother of one week old twins Anna Grace and Nora at the Robert J. Sheehy & Sons Funeral Home, Orland Park, to Joan. Cherished daughter of Neil and Incarnation Church, Mass. Interment Good Shepherd Cemetery. Joan Reidy. In lieu of flowers, contributions Dear sister of Thomas (Jackie), Elizabeth Longsdorf to the Zanella Children’s Trust Elizabeth Longsdorf, nee and Patrick (Raechel) Reidy. Kind and generous aunt to Fund, c/o State Bank of CounKwasteniet, 92, of Palos Park, died Feb. 24 at Providence Griffin, Molly, Padraig, Maeve tryside, attention Mary McNally, 15980 Parker Rd., Homer Glen, Healthcare & Rehabilitation in and Mary Celeste Reidy. Adored daughter-in-law of IL 60491 would be appreciated; Palos Heights. Visitation was held at Colonial Agnes and the late Lawrence contributions may be made to the charity of your choice. Chapel funeral home in Orland Zanella. Park on Feb. 28 until time of the funeral service. Interment was private at Chapel Hill Gardens South Cemetery in Oak Lawn. Mrs. Longsdorf is survived by her son, Gary Dorn; her daughter, Alicia Taylor; her brother, Peter Robert L. Johnson We believe that refinancing Robert L. “Bob” Johnson, of Kwasteniet; four grandchildren or purchasing the home of and five great-grandchildren. Orland Park. Mrs. Longsdorf was born in Beloved husband of 62 years to your dreams should be a Hull, Iowa. She was a retired Pat Johnson (nee Williams) comfortable and Loving father of Kathy (Tom) retail saleswoman at House of pain-free process. Wrzesinski, Bill (Melissa) John- Mary, Oak Lawn, and The Towne We offer the following son, Ed (Peggy) Johnson, Carol Shop, Worth. programs for residential (Rick) Aspan and Tom (Pam) mortgages: Johnson Bernard Rekus Proud grandfather of Amy Bernard “Bernie” • Fixed Rate Loans with (Brad) Andrekus, Sara (Tom) Rekus, of Orland terms ranging from LOOK FOR AREA Weathers, Emma (Anthony) Da- Park.Loving father 10 to 30 years MORTGAGE RATES EVERY vidson, Joe (Joanne) Johnson, of Brian (Andrea) • Adjustable Rate Loans WEEK IN THE REGIONAL Jenna and Dave Johnson, Amanda Rekus. • Balloon Loans NEWS! A P P LY and Dan Aspan and Jennifer and Dearest grandfather of Olivia W! O N Kristin Lucas. and Emilia Rekus. Cherished great-grandfather of Fond brother of Welda (Frank) Aidan, T.J., Annabel, Noah and Hedrick. Jack. Kind uncle of many nieces and Dear uncle of many nieces and nephews. nephews and caring brother-inVisitation and funeral from the 12330 S. Harlem Avenue | Palos Heights, IL 60463 law, friend to many. Robert J. Sheehy & Sons Funeral ph 708/728-9900 | www.utbhome.com Visitation was held Sunday, fu- Home, Orland Park, Our Lady of Aldona Brazis, nee Sokas, 96, of Palos Heights, died Feb. 27 at Emeritus of Burr Ridge. Visitation was held at Schmaedeke Funeral Home on March 2. A funeral Mass was offered at Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church in Chicago on March 3. Burial was at St. Casimir Cemetery in Chicago. Mrs. Brazis is survived by her daughters, Beverly Opelka, Donna Raymond, Marilyn Klecka and Susan Pines; 10 grandchildren and 16 grandchildren. Mrs. Brazis was born in Chicago. She was a professional pianist. She was a longtime member of Chicago Lithuanian Women’s Club, and active member and choir participant of the Knights of Lithuanian Council 112. She was an accomplished pianist and accompanied her dear husband of 67 years in his singing career.

Financing a home should be exciting and easy!


The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

Legal Notice

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cookcountyclerk.com

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OFFICIAL NOTICE OF ELECTION, SPECIMEN BALLOTS, REFERENDA/ QUESTIONS OF PUBLIC POLICY & POLLING PLACES OFFICIAL NOTICE: IS HERBY GIVEN, by

David Orr,

Cook County Clerk, that the Primary Election will be held in Suburban Cook County on:

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

The Primary Election will be held in election precincts under the jurisdiction of the Election Division of the Cook County Clerk’s Office.

The Polls for said Primary Election will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Locations are subject to change as necessity requires.

At the Primary Election the voters will vote on the following contests and referenda questions. Referenda/Questions of Public Policy will be voted upon in those precincts of Cook County under the jurisdiction of the Cook County Clerk in which a Unit of Local Government has requested the County Clerk’s Office to place said referenda/questions of public policy on the ballot.

TOWNSHIP OF ORLAND

Cook County Official Ballot Democratic Primary Election Condado de Cook Boleta Oficial Elección Primaria Demócrata

Barrington Township

Style: 70-1

Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Steele) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Steele) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Neville, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Neville, Jr.) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

135 Sharon Oden Johnson

153 Carolyn Joan Gallagher

136 John B. Simon

write-in voto por escrito

142 Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Burke) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Burke) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Hill Veal) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Hill Veal) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

145 Kristal Rivers

160 Andrea Michele Buford

146 Peter J. Vilkelis

161 James Patrick Crawley

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Egan) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Egan) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

162 Kelly Maloney Kachmarik

173 Diana Embil

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Howse, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Howse, Jr.)

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Sterba) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Sterba)

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

149 Caroline Kate Moreland

174 Michael B. Barrett

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Lowrance) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Lowrance)

175 Sondra Denmark

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

177 Mary Beth Duffy

To vote, draw a line to connect the arrow’s head to its tail. If you make other marks, your vote may not count.

Para votar, trace una línea para conectar la de las flechas a su cola . Si hace otras punta marcas, se podría invalidar su voto.

To vote for a write-in candidate, write name on line provided and connect corresponding arrow.

Para votar por una persona que no aparece en la boleta, escriba el nombre de la persona usando el espacio designado ‘voto por escrito’, y conecte la flecha correspondiente.

If you make a mistake, ask for a new ballot.

United States Senator Senador de los Estados Unidos Vote for One / Vote por Uno 1 Richard J. Durbin

12 Pat Quinn & Paul Vallas Attorney General Abogado Fiscal Vote for One / Vote por Uno 16 Lisa Madigan Secretary of State Secretario del Estado Vote for One / Vote por Uno 17 Jesse White Comptroller Contralor Vote for One / Vote por Uno 18 Sheila Simon Treasurer Tesorero Vote for One / Vote por Uno 19 Michael W. Frerichs

Bill Foster

State Central Committeewoman, 1st District Miembra, Comisión Central Estatal, 1.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 41 Michelle A. Harris State Central Committeeman, 1st District Miembro, Comisión Central Estatal, 1.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 42 Bobby L. Rush

Dorian C. Myrickes

State Central Committeewoman, 3rd District Miembra, Comisión Central Estatal, 3.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 41 Helen A. Ozmina-Barc State Central Committeeman, 3rd District Miembro, Comisión Central Estatal, 3.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 42 Michael J. Madigan

Napoleon Harris

State Senator, 18th District Senador Estatal, 18.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 51 Bill Cunningham State Representative, 27th District Representante Estatal, 27.º Dto.

Metropolitan Water Reclamation District Commissioners Comisionados, Dto. Metro de Reclamación de Agua Vote for not more than Three Vote por no más de Tres

State Representative, 28th District Representante Estatal, 28.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 Robert "Bob" Rita State Representative, 35th District Representante Estatal, 35.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 Frances Ann Hurley

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 August (O'Neill) Deuser 62 Nichole Serbin State Representative, 38th District

Style: 70-1

Pct(s): 3

Barrington Township

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 Martes, 18 de Marzo, 2014

To vote, draw a line to connect the arrow’s head to its tail. If you make other marks, your vote may not count.

Para votar, trace una línea para conectar la punta de las flechas a su cola . Si hace otras marcas, se podría invalidar su voto.

To vote for a write-in candidate, write name on line provided and connect corresponding arrow.

Para votar por una persona que no aparece en la boleta, escriba el nombre de la persona usando el espacio designado ‘voto por escrito’, y conecte la flecha correspondiente.

If you make a mistake, ask for a new ballot.

72 Frank Avila

2 Douglas Lee Truax

Si comete un error, pida una boleta nueva.

State Representative, 38th District Representante Estatal, 38.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

United States Senator Senador de los Estados Unidos Vote for One / Vote por Uno 1 James D. "Jim" Oberweis

No Candidate

74 Josina Morita

Governor & Lieutenant Governor Gobernador y Teniente Gobernador

Metropolitan Water Reclamation District Commissioners Comisionados, Dto. Metro de Reclamación de Agua Vote for not more than Three

75 Tom Courtney

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote por no más de Tres

write-in voto por escrito

73 Timothy "Tim" Bradford

76 Adam Miguest 77 John S. Xydakis 78 Frank Edward Gardner

11 Bill Brady & Maria Rodriguez

71 R. Cary Capparelli

12 Dan Rutherford & Steve Kim

72 Herb Schumann

13 Kirk W. Dillard & Jil Tracy

73 James (Jim) Parrilli

14 Bruce Rauner & Evelyn Sanguinetti

79 Kathleen Mary O'Reilley

write-in voto por escrito write-in voto por escrito write-in voto por escrito

Attorney General Abogado Fiscal Vote for One / Vote por Uno 16 Paul M. Schimpf Secretary of State Secretario del Estado Vote for One / Vote por Uno 17 Michael Webster

President of County Board Presidente de la Mesa del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno 91 Toni Preckwinkle

Comptroller Contralor Vote for One / Vote por Uno 18 Judy Baar Topinka

County Clerk Secretario del Condado

Treasurer Tesorero Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 92 David D. Orr

19 Tom Cross

County Sheriff Alguacil del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

20 Bob Grogan

93 Thomas J. Dart

U.S. Representative, 1st District Representante Federal, 1.º Dto.

94 Tadeusz "Ted" Palka

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 31 Jimmy Lee Tillman

95 Sylvester E. Baker, Jr. 96 William "Bill" Evans

U.S. Representative, 3rd District Representante Federal, 3.º Dto.

County Treasurer Tesorero del Condado 97 Maria Pappas County Assessor Asesor del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

County Commissioner, 6th District Comisionado del Condado, 6.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 101 Joan Patricia Murphy

101 Jim Hickey Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Gordon) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Gordon) Vote for One / Vote por Uno 131 Shelly A. Harris

133 Freddrenna M. Lyle Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Murphy) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Murphy) Vote for One / Vote por Uno 134 David Ellis

No Candidate County Sheriff Alguacil del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Treasurer Tesorero del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Assessor Asesor del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Commissioner, 6th District Comisionado del Condado, 6.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

101 Elizabeth "Liz" Doody Gorman

No Candidate State Representative, 27th District Representante Estatal, 27.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate County Commissioner, 17th District Comisionado del Condado, 17.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

32 Diane M. Harris

Vote for One / Vote por Uno voto por escrito

No Candidate County Clerk Secretario del Condado

31 Sharon M. Brannigan

State Senator, 18th District Senador Estatal, 18.º Dto.

98 Joseph Berrios

President of County Board Presidente de la Mesa del Condado Vote for One / Vote por Uno

County Commissioner, 17th District Comisionado del Condado, 17.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

132 Susan Kennedy Sullivan State Representative, 37th District Representante Estatal, 37.º Dto.

The voting will be conducted at the following polling places for each of the aforesaid election precincts selected by the Cook County Clerk.

191 Daniel J. McLaughlin

Condado de Cook Boleta Oficial Elección Primaria Republicana

71 Cynthia M. Santos

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 Monique D. Davis

OFFICIAL NOTICE OF POLLING PLACE LOCATIONS LOCATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AS NECESSITY REQUIRES

Orland Township Committeeman Miembro, Comision del Municipio Orland

write-in voto por escrito

31 Bobby L. Rush

31 Daniel William Lipinski

No Candidate

Instructions Instruccíones

61 Al Riley

80 Brendan Francis Houlihan

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Cook County Official Ballot Republican Primary Election

State Representative, 38th District Representante Estatal, 38.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

U.S. Representative, 1st District Representante Federal, 1.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

U.S. Representative, 3rd District Representante Federal, 3.º Dto.

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of McDonald) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de McDonald)

write-in voto por escrito

Vote for One / Vote por Uno 11 Tio Hardiman & Brunell Donald

write-in voto por escrito

write-in voto por escrito

Si comete un error, pida una boleta nueva.

Governor & Lieutenant Governor Gobernador y Teniente Gobernador

No Candidate

178 Robbin Perkins

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of McDonald) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de McDonald)

State Representative, 28th District Representante Estatal, 28.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

102 Barbara Bellar

Roycealee J. Wood

Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Gordon) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Gordon) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Murphy) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Murphy) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

State Representative, 35th District Representante Estatal, 35.º Dto.

Judge of the Appellate Court (Vacancy of Steele) Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones (Vacante de Steele)

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

61 Victor C. Horne State Representative, 36th District State Representative, 37th District Representante Estatal, 37.º Dto. Vote for One / Vote por Uno 61 Margo McDermed 62 Gayla Smith 63 Arthur Lukowski

No Candidate Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Arnold) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Arnold) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

191 Elizabeth "Liz" Doody Gorman

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

176 Chris Lawler

150 Thomas J. Carroll

Orland Township Committeeman Miembro, Comision del Municipio Orland Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Lowrance) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Lowrance)

172 John S. Fotopoulos

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate Linda Tibensky

No Candidate

171 Patrick Kevin Coughlin

152 Linda L. Mastandrea

Instructions Instruccíones

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

148 Patricia O'Brien Sheahan

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Sterba) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Sterba) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Howse, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Howse, Jr.)

voto por escrito

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Phelps Felton) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Phelps Felton)

No Candidate

No Candidate

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Doody, Jr.) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Doody, Jr.)

147 Daniel J. Kubasiak

Judge, 15th Subcircuit (Vacancy of Doody, Jr.) Juez, 15.º Subcircuito (Vacante de Doody, Jr.) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Phelps Felton) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Phelps Felton) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

write-in voto por escrito

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Connors) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Connors) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

No Candidate

158 Diana Rosario

143 Maritza Martinez

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Hill Veal) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Hill Veal) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Egan) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Egan) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

157 Stephen J. Feldman

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Reyes) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Reyes) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

No Candidate

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Reyes) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante of Reyes) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 Martes, 18 de Marzo, 2014

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Connors) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Connors) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

156 Mary Alice Melchor

151 Cynthia Y. Cobbs

Pct(s): 3

No Candidate write-in voto por escrito

155 Patricia S. Spratt

141 Bridget Anne Mitchell

Vote for One / Vote por Uno

No Candidate

154 William B. Raines

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Arnold) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Arnold) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Neville, Jr.) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Neville, Jr.)

Judge of the Circuit Court (Vacancy of Burke) Juez de la Corte de Circuito (Vacante de Burke) Vote for One / Vote por Uno

8196

10

Ward Pct # 8600001 8600002 8600003 8600004 8600005 8600006 8600007 8600008 8600009 8600010 8600011 8600012 8600013 8600014 8600015 8600016 8600017 8600018 8600019 8600020 8600021 8600022 8600023 8600024 8600025 8600026 8600027 8600028 8600029 8600030 8600031 8600032 8600033 8600034 8600035 8600036 8600037 8600038 8600039 8600040 8600041 8600042 8600043 8600044 8600045 8600046 8600047 8600048 8600049 8600050 8600051 8600052 8600053 8600054 8600055 8600056 8600057 8600058 8600059 8600060 8600061 8600062 8600063 8600064 8600065 8600066 8600067 8600068 8600069 8600070 8600071 8600072 8600073 8600074 8600075

PP 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075

Name ORLAND PARK CIVIC CENTER ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 3 VILLAGE OF ORLAND HILLS ROBERT DAVIDSON CENTER JOHN A BANNES SCHOOL HELEN KELLER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SILVER LAKE COUNTRY CLUB ORLAND HILL COMMUNITY SENIOR CENTER ORLAND HILL COMMUNITY SENIOR CENTER RIVIERA COUNTRY CLUB JOHN A BANNES SCHOOL FERNWAY SCHOOL FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH JOHN A BANNES SCHOOL CENTURY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ORLAND PARK SPORTSPLEX HELEN KELLER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ORLAND PARK SPORTSPLEX FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ORLAND PARK SPORTSPLEX SILVER LAKE COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE OF ORLAND HILLS FAITH CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH ORLAN BROOK CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION ORLAND HILL COMMUNITY SENIOR CENTER CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH SILVER LAKE COUNTRY CLUB ORLAND PARK SPORTSPLEX FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ORLAND TOWNSHIP LIBERTY SCHOOL PRAIRIE SCHOOL CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH PRAIRIE SCHOOL ORLAND HILL COMMUNITY SENIOR CENTER RIVIERA COUNTRY CLUB ORLAND PARK CIVIC CENTER ORLAND PARK SPORTSPLEX LIBERTY SCHOOL HELEN KELLER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHRISTA MC AULIFFE SCHOOL CHRISTA MC AULIFFE SCHOOL FAITH CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH CHRISTA MC AULIFFE SCHOOL FERNWAY SCHOOL PARKVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH LIBERTY SCHOOL MCCARTHY PARK RECREATION BUILDING HELEN KELLER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FAITH CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH LIBERTY SCHOOL ROBERT DAVIDSON CENTER PRAIRIE SCHOOL RIVIERA COUNTRY CLUB ROBERT DAVIDSON CENTER ORLAND TOWNSHIP HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT FAITH CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH LIVING WORD LUTHERAN CHURCH PARKVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH FAITH CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH TINLEY PARK POLICE DEPARTMENT ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 3 ORLAND TOWNSHIP HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT LIVING WORD LUTHERAN CHURCH MC CARTHY PARK RECREATION BUILDING CENTURY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL VILLAGE OF ORLAND HILLS FAITH CHRISTIAN REFORM CHURCH PARKVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH MC CARTHY PARK RECREATION BUILDING TINLEY PARK POLICE DEPARTMENT FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ORLAND PARK SPORTSPLEX

Address Township HCap Access 14750 RAVINIA AVE ORLAND PARK Y 15101 WOLF RD ORLAND PARK Y 16033 S 94TH AVE ORLAND HILLS Y 14700 PARK LN ORLAND PARK Y 16835 ODELL AVE TINLEY PARK Y 7846 W 163RD ST TINLEY PARK Y 14700 S 82ND AVE ORLAND PARK Y 16553 S HAVEN AVE ORLAND HILLS Y 16553 S HAVEN AVE ORLAND HILLS Y 8801 W 143RD ST ORLAND PARK Y 16835 ODELL AVE TINLEY PARK Y 16600 88TH AVE ORLAND PARK Y 15101 S 80TH AVE ORLAND PARK Y 16835 ODELL AVE TINLEY PARK Y 10801 W 159TH ST ORLAND PARK Y 11351 W 159TH ST ORLAND PARK Y 7846 W 163RD ST TINLEY PARK Y 11351 W 159TH ST ORLAND PARK Y 15101 S 80TH AVE ORLAND PARK Y ORLAND PARK Y 11351 W 159TH ST 14700 S 82ND AVE ORLAND PARK Y 16033 S 94TH AVE ORLAND HILLS Y 8383 W 171ST ST TINLEY PARK Y 7500 SYCAMORE DR ORLAND PARK Y 15633 ORLAN BROOK DR ORLAND PARK Y 16553 S HAVEN AVE ORLAND HILLS Y 7500 SYCAMORE DR ORLAND PARK Y 14700 S 82ND AVE ORLAND PARK Y 11351 W 159TH ST ORLAND PARK Y 15101 S 80TH AVE ORLAND PARK Y 14807 RAVINIA AVE ORLAND PARK Y Y 8801 W 151ST ST ORLAND PARK 14200 S 82ND AVE ORLAND PARK Y 7500 SYCAMORE DR ORLAND PARK Y 14200 S 82ND AVE ORLAND PARK Y 16553 S HAVEN AVE ORLAND HILLS Y 8801 W 143RD ST ORLAND PARK Y 14750 RAVINIA AVE ORLAND PARK Y 11351 W 159TH ST ORLAND PARK Y 8801 W 151ST ST ORLAND PARK Y 7846 W 163RD ST TINLEY PARK Y 8944 174TH ST TINLEY PARK Y 8944 174TH ST TINLEY PARK Y 8383 W 171ST ST TINLEY PARK Y TINLEY PARK Y 8944 174TH ST 16600 88TH AVE ORLAND PARK Y 11100 ORLAND PWY ORLAND PARK Y 8801 W 151ST ST ORLAND PARK Y 16801 S 80TH AVE TINLEY PARK Y 7846 W 163RD ST TINLEY PARK Y Y 8383 W 171ST ST TINLEY PARK 8801 W 151ST ST ORLAND PARK Y 14700 PARK LN ORLAND PARK Y 14200 S 82ND AVE ORLAND PARK Y 8801 W 143RD ST ORLAND PARK Y 14700 PARK LN ORLAND PARK Y 16125 S WOLF RD ORLAND PARK Y 8383 W 171ST ST TINLEY PARK Y 16301 S WOLF RD ORLAND PARK Y 11100 ORLAND PWY ORLAND PARK Y 8383 W 171ST ST TINLEY PARK Y 15101 S 80TH AVE ORLAND PARK Y 7850 W 183RD ST TINLEY PARK Y 15101 WOLF RD ORLAND PARK Y 16125 S WOLF RD ORLAND PARK Y 16301 S WOLF RD ORLAND PARK Y 16801 S 80TH AVE TINLEY PARK Y 10801 W 159TH ST ORLAND PARK Y 16033 S 94TH AVE ORLAND HILLS Y 8383 W 171ST ST TINLEY PARK Y 11100 ORLAND PWY ORLAND PARK Y 16801 S 80TH AVE TINLEY PARK Y 7850 W 183RD ST TINLEY PARK Y 15101 S 80TH AVE ORLAND PARK Y 11351 W 159TH ST ORLAND PARK Y

NOTE: The letter (N) following the polling place address denotes that the polling place itself is not accessible to the handicapped although other parts of the facility may be accessible. An exemption has been granted by the State Board of Elections and signs are posted indicating if the whole building is accessible or if there is a special entrance.

Dated at Chicago, Illinois this 6th day of March 2014

David Orr

Cook County Clerk cookcountyclerk.com


The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

Smart financial moves for women On March 8, we observe International Women’s Day, a celebration of women’s economic, political and social achievements. Yet women everywhere still face challenges — and here in the United States, one of their biggest challenges may be to gain the resources they need to enjoy a comfortable retirement. So, if you’re a woman, what steps should you take to make progress toward this goal? Your first move should be to recognize some of the potential barriers to attaining your financial freedom. First of all, a “wage gap” between women and men still exists: The median earnings of full-time female workers are 77 percent of the median earnings of full-time male workers, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Also, women drop out of the workforce for an average of 12 years to care for young children or aging parents, according to the Older Women’s League, a research and advocacy group — and this time away from the workforce results in women receiving lower pensions or ac-

every year, if your salary increases, try to boost your contributions to your retirement plan. • Consider growth investments. Some evidence suggests that Jim women may be more conservative Van Howe investors than men — in other words, women may tend to take fewer risks and pursue “safer” investments. But to help build the resources you will need for a cumulating much less money in comfortable retirement, consider their employer-sponsored retire- growth-oriented vehicles in your IRA, 401(k) and other investment ment plans. To give yourself the opportunity accounts. • Talk to your spouse about to enjoy a comfortable retirement lifestyle, consider these sugges- Social Security. If your spouse starts collecting Social Security tions: • Boost your retirement plan at 62 (the earliest age of eligibilcontributions. Each year, put in ity), the monthly benefits will be as much as you can afford to your reduced, perhaps by as much as traditional or Roth IRA. A tradi- 25 percent. This reduction could tional IRA grows on a tax-deferred affect you if you ever become a basis, while a Roth IRA can grow widow, because once you reach tax free provided you meet certain your own “full” retirement age conditions. Also, take advantage (which will likely be 66 or 67), of your employer-sponsored, tax- you may qualify for survivor deferred retirement plan, such as benefits of 100 percent of what a 401(k), 403(b) or 457(b). At the your deceased spouse had been very least, contribute as much to receiving — and if that amount earn your employer’s matching was reduced, that’s what you’ll contribution, if one is offered. And get. Talk to your spouse about

this issue well before it’s time to receive Social Security. (You may also want to talk to a financial advisor for help in coordinating survivor benefits with your own Social Security retirement benefits.) • Evaluate your need for life insurance benefits. Once their children are grown, some couples drop their life insurance. Yet, the death benefit from a life insurance policy can go a long way toward helping ensure your financial security. Again, talk to your spouse about whether to maintain life insurance, and for how much. International Women’s Day is a great occasion for commemorating women’s accomplishments. And by making the right moves, you can eventually celebrate your own achievement of attaining the financial security you deserve. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Beware utilities phone scam On the heels of the bitter cold temperatures that have hit Chicago and Northern Illinois, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) is issuing a warning on scam artists that are targeting individual consumers and businesses with the false claim that their utility bills are delinquent and their service is in danger of being disconnected. The BBB has received calls from concerned consumers and businesses who state that they have received calls from individuals claiming to be from either ComEd or Nicor making demands that they immediately make pay-

ment on their alleged delinquent accounts. Whether the payment demand is purportedly for ComEd or Nicor, the callers ask that the consumers purchase a gift card or a Green Dot card and then call back with the card information to make a payment. Jessica LaSala, Manager of the Sports Page Bar in Rockford says their business has received a number of calls from a telephone number assigned to the Pontiac, IL area. The consumers who called the BBB report that the calls came from a blocked phone number. “If a consumer receives one

of these calls they should never provide any personal or financial information to the caller” says, Steve J. Bernas, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “Instead they should contact their utility company’s customer service department and verify that a call was made”. Additionally, if you suspect that the call is fraudulent or you may be a victim of a scam you should contact your local police department. For more information on scams, visit http://www.bbb.org/ —The Better Business Bureau

Orland seeks economic development commissioners to work with new panel Economic development continues to be a priority for the Village of Orland Park as Mayor Dan McLaughlin revised an existing Village Board committee and created a new seven member village commission. “Each of the village trustees chairs a committee of the Village Board,” McLaughlin said. “Trustee Jim Dodge has chaired the board’s Technology and Community Outreach Committee for the last few years and we’re changing that up to again focus on economic development.” Dodge’s newly named committee is the Economic Development Strategy and Community Engagement Committee. “The village’s retail base is very strong and Orland Park has one of the lowest vacancy rates in the

Chicago area,” McLaughlin said. “We’re now focusing on the I-80 Corridor and other office and nonretail areas.” “The Village Board participated in a series of workshops where we created the village’s strategic plan. Broadening economic development in the village and building on the village’s existing strengths is one of the board’s key priorities,” Dodge said. “The mayor has asked me to make a concerted effort to accomplish this village board objective and I’m looking forward to working with both the advisory board and our new village board committee.” The board’s strategic plan includes building on the community’s existing strengths with the creation of a business retention program helping existing

Career & Business

businesses and industries. The board called for the development of strategies to attract more professional services to the village including medical and professional offices. In the I-80 Corridor, the board’s plan is to create a zoning district to attract new non-retail businesses and to complete a targeted industry study to determine the best industries and businesses to bring to the corridor. “We’re going to look at the types of industries we want to attract and how zoning changes could help companies come to Orland Park,” Dodge said. Prerecession tenants of Orland Park’s I-80 Corridor include St. Xavier University, The Horton Group Insurance and American Technical Publishers. “We need to diversify the village’s tax base. We have a great retail base but now we need to again target light industrial and corporate headquarters,” Dodge said. “Orland Park has everything these companies need and it’s our job to make sure they know this.” The economic advisory board will work with the board’s newest committee. The Economic Development Advisory Board is a separate village commission comprised of seven area people willing to volunteer to help with the village’s economic development efforts. “I’m looking for business oriented people who can help with the village’s economic development initiatives,” McLaughlin said. “We want to attract corporate type businesses bringing advanced jobs to the village,” he said. “We’re looking for people who will come up with ideas and will be able to help us execute them,” Dodge said. Those interested in volunteering to serve on the village’s Economic Development Advisory Board are invited to send a letter of interest with a current resume to the Mayor’s Office at the Village of Orland Park; 14700 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park, IL 60462. —Village of Orland Park

11

Business Notes Moraine Valley LinkedIn forum Learn how to make the most of LinkedIn at Moraine Valley Community College’s town hall forum. This free event, which is part of the college’s Career Paths and Coffee adult information sessions, is today (Thursday), from 4:30 to 7 p.m., in Building M on campus, 9000 W. College Pkwy in Palos Hills. LinkedIn is one of the best virtual ways to network with others and cultivate contacts in the career world. It’s also a good source to help grow businesses or develop new or existing careers. The facilitator for this event is J.D. Gershbein, CEO of Owlish Communications, and LinkedIn super-strategist. Gershbein will interact with participants who have questions or opinions on LinkedIn and urge an atmosphere of discussion. He is considered a top influencer in the field of social business, and has been a guest on FOX News Chicago, WGN AM Radio and in the Chicago Tribune. He also blogs for NBC Chicago on topics related to LinkedIn. Sign-in and networking begins at 4:30 p.m. with light refreshments before the presentation at 5 p.m. In addition to this event, Career Paths and Coffee sessions are monthly hour-long gatherings on all three of Moraine Valley’s campuses. They provide information for adults interested in learning about programs and resources or enrolling at Moraine Valley. To register for the speaker event go to mvcclinkedintownhall.eventbrite.com.

Submitted photo

Alex Meredith, chef at Smith Crossing in Orland Park, loves his work.

Chef’s passion for cooking a family trait Alex Meredith has joined Smith Crossing as the continuing care retirement community’s executive chef. The continuing care retirement center is at 10501 Emilie Lane in Orland Park. Meredith describes himself as “a proper chef, classically French trained,” and says he’s comfortable preparing a variety of regional cuisines—Southern Cajun, New England, Southwest and California—as well as a variety of ethnic foods. Having worked for country clubs in Lake Forest and Winnetka and as executive sous chef at Japoni Sante, Meredith is motivated to consistently provide food that people love and enjoy. “I’m absolutely thrilled to have such a large audience,” he says, noting that nearly 300 Smith Crossing residents dine on his food each night. “With restaurants, you don’t always know how many you will serve on any given day. And at Smith Crossing, I’m eager to face the challenge of keeping dining experiences fresh and interesting for my ‘regular’ diners.” A team player, Meredith acknowledges the talent and reli-

ability of his seasoned staff. He credits his love for his profession to the fact that his father is a chef—as were his uncle and grandfather. At 16, Meredith started working part-time as a dishwasher at a steak and chop restaurant, eventually working his way up to fry cook and grill cook before graduating from high school. He later enrolled at Sullivan University in Louisville, Ky., preparing for a career in hotel and restaurant management. While working as an intern in the kitchen at the Broadmoor, a five-star resort in Colorado Springs, Colo., he decided to study culinary arts as well. Meredith is committed to fostering relationships with Smith Crossing residents and members of the Smith Crossing dining committee. “I value feedback, and I feel I need this in order to provide food that people truly savor and enjoy,” he says. “Everyone is so nice here. I’ve already met more people here than I did in years of working elsewhere.” Meredith lives in Chicago’s Edgewater neighborhood with his cat, Stella.

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Submitted photo

Associate Producer Megan Etlinger is shown on the set at WYCC. Not yet 30, she has worked at WYCC PBS Chicago for five years. This year, she won an Emmy for “Food on the Go!” and was nominated for an Emmy for “In the Loop.” She also works on the WYCC Mystery Marathon productions. She has also created all three of the student programs for interns, production assistants and shadows at WYCC. Etlinger is helping to produce the 30-minute weekly, “In The Loop,” which airs on Channel 20 (WYCC) on Thursday evenings at 7 p.m. Etlinger grew up in Palos Park and went to Stagg High School before college.

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The Regional News Thursday, March 6, 2014

OUTPATIENT SERVICES

BUILDING ON EXCELLENCE. OUTPATIENT SERVICES

Our new Outpatient Pavilion offers an array of services in one comfortable, modern facility. Opening in early 2014, the Outpatient Pavilion will provide the Southland with a wide range of specialists and services under one roof. Featuring state-of-the-art imaging, surgical suites and the Heart and Vascular, Cancer and Neurosciences Institutes, the new Outpatient Pavilion will offer superior care, along with added privacy and comfort.

For more information, call 1.800.3.ADVOCATE or visit advocatehealth.com/christoutpatient


Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest No place like home

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 2

Page 1

Spartans’ surge inches them past Mustangs By Ken Karrson

The Regional News - The Reporter Ken Karrson, Sports Editor sports@regionalpublishing.com Thursday, March 6, 2014 Section 2 Page 1Photo by Jeff Vorva Sandburg’s Eric Straka drives in for a left-handed layup last Tuesday night in Orland Park. Visiting Homewood-Flossmoor defeated the Eagles 56-53 in a SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue contest.

An outbreak of heartache Eagles come up short in two more contests By Ken Karrson Thirty-five years ago, the Eagles rock group hit the top musically with “Heartache Tonight.” Last week, another group of Eagles reached bottom in a psychological sense, and the heartache was spread over two nights. Sandburg’s sad songs on the basketball court actually extended beyond its two most recent contests, which ended in gut-wrenching SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue setbacks against Homewood-Flossmoor (56-53) and Bolingbrook (54-51) on Tuesday and Friday, respectively. Those dual defeats were preceded by several other frustrating finishes. “In our last five games, we’ve been either winning, tied or down by one possession in the final minute,” Eagles coach Todd Allen said. “And we lost all five. I’ve never had a stretch like this — those are five really, really tough losses.

“The kids battled hard, so obviously we’re disappointed. That’s at least seven or eight games [this season] where, if one possession goes differently, we win. It’s challenging for everybody and a test to your character to keep your head up [through that], but you’ve got to hang in there. “I can’t give our players enough credit. It’s been really difficult, but the kids are continuing to come to practice and working hard.” While both of last week’s losses were tough to swallow, Allen was especially bothered by the one suffered at Bolingbrook. What made it stand out was that in the last seven seconds, Sandburg (9-17, 59) missed a shot near the basket and then committed a turnover. The miscue came right after Allen believed one of his players had been fouled. The Eagles not only were deprived of free throws, but they were also not granted a timeout when Allen was frantically asking for one. “I know they’re sometimes

reluctant to call a foul in that situation,” he said, referring to officials. “But then give us the timeout and let the kids decide the game.” Friday’s game seemed to pretty much be decided after the Raiders constructed a 12-point lead in the third quarter. But following a timeout, Sandburg rallied and got its deficit below double digits heading into the final stanza, then Niko Kogionis buried a 3pointer on the visitors’ initial possession. “Down six in the fourth quarter, you’re in good shape,” Allen said. “At that point, it’s anybody’s game.” Kogionis wound up with 17 points to pace the Eagles. Fellow guard Alec Martinez tossed in 11 and Eric Straka totaled nine. Bolingbrook limited Sandburg forward Niko Cahue, its season scoring leader, to just five points. The Eagles canned seven 3point shots in all, two more than (Continued on page 6)

A last championship for Chappetto

Dorothy and Toto weren’t the only ones who longed to be home. Oak Lawn basketball players have enjoyed performing in front of Spartans fans this winter, so much so that opponents have found road wins increasingly difficult to come by. Evergreen Park was the latest foe to discover the magic Oak Lawn weaves on its own floor. When the two South Suburban Conference Red neighbors met Friday night in a regularseason finale, the Mustangs were in control much of the way. A slew of first-half free throws boosted them into a nine-point lead by intermission, and Evergreen was still ahead by that same margin when the clock showed less than five minutes remaining in the contest. But just when an unfavorable outcome seemed in the offing for the home team, it rallied. The Spartans allowed only two Mustangs field goals over the final 4:40, although Jordan Brown’s hoop at the 51-second mark did give Evergreen a 63-60 lead. However, Mitch Swatek then played the hero’s role for Oak Lawn. After sinking 6-of-7 free throws in the period, the senior hit a shot with 10 seconds left that inched the Spartans ahead by one. When the Mustangs - who had turned the ball over right before that — couldn’t respond to Swatek’s bucket, they found

themselves on the short end of a 64-63 score. “Boy, we didn’t play well, but we found a way to win,” Oak Lawn coach Jason Rhodes said. “We really had no business winning that game, to be honest.” So why did they? Besides Swatek’s 13-of-15 exhibition at the line and career-high 25 points, perhaps the most important thing the Spartans (11-14, 5-8) had going for them was a typically involved home crowd. “Our fans created a great atmosphere, and for the most part they’ve been good-spirited,” Rhodes said. “We were fortunate to have a lot of our conference games near the end [of the schedule] at home.” Even Rhodes’ coaching counterpart gave props to the Oak Lawn faithful for making their presence felt in a noticeable manner. “If I wasn’t working it, I’d be in the stands out there,” Evergreen boss Pat Flannigan said. “Oak Lawn threw a [heck] of a party. It was a packed house and they were into it.” Out of it for the Mustangs for most of the second half was Jacquet McClendon. The Evergreen senior got tagged with a second technical foul early in the third quarter and had to leave the court. While Flannigan agreed with the first of those calls, he felt McClendon was unfairly penalized after making a steal and dunk. Following the basket, McClendon was searching out his defensive assignment and, according to

Flannigan, officials misinterpreted McClendon’s stare for an act of taunting. “I can see what the official saw, but you’ve got to understand the situation,” Flannigan said. “If high school kids can’t get excited after a dunk, then we’re in the wrong profession. “It seemed to me to be a decision made at halftime. If I did that in the classroom, held a grudge, it’d be a long day.” Flannigan said the Mustangs were undeniably harmed by the removal of “one of the best athletes at our school,” but he also didn’t hesitate to credit the Spartans for hanging tough in the face of adversity. And, in Rhodes’ opinion, Oak Lawn wasn’t spared some bad calls of its own — as evidence, he pointed to Evergreen’s 21 made free throws in the opening half. “It was just weird,” Rhodes said. “We had five kids with two fouls at the end of the first half - I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like that before. We just had a hard time getting into a rhythm, both because of the whistles and [the Mustangs’] zone defense [that] gave us some trouble.” After finding themselves locked in a 17-all tie at the beginning of the second quarter, Oak Lawn suddenly slipped in arrears by double digits as a quartet of Evergreen players scored while the Spartans were missing four shots and turning the ball over on four other possessions. Tyler Sorbellini led the Mustangs’ charge with a (Continued on page 5)

Watching their guarding grow RedHawks’ defense continues to excel on eve of playoffs By Ken Karrson Marist’s “D” has rated an “Aplus” of late. Actually, RedHawks coach Gene Nolan has long considered defense one of his basketball team’s strong suits this season, but even he was impressed with what Marist did over the last five games of its regular schedule. During that span, every one of its foes shot less than 40 percent from the field and four of them were unable to crack the 40-point barrier. The team that did, St. Viator, managed to defeat the RedHawks, but its output in a 49-40 East Suburban Catholic Conference victory last Wednesday in Arlington Heights represented a season low for a single contest.

And the Lions were no slouch - while topping the 70-point mark in over a dozen outings this winter, they lost only once in league play and finished second to stateranked Marian Catholic in the ESCC standings. “They’re really good and they’ve had a great year,” Nolan said of the Lions. “They’ve got a couple of Division I guards, and probably a third.” Marist (19-9, 4-4) isn’t quite so blessed. Its most recognizable player, Nic Weishar, is best known for football, and the RedHawks began the 2013-14 campaign with next to nothing in the way of proven experience. But early on, Nolan’s players embraced the concept of defense, and it has paid off handsomely with a record that

has likely taken a majority of people by surprise. “It’s something you can be consistent at,” Nolan said of playing defense. “They have very good defensive instincts and I think they take pride in it. It’s definitely our identity.” And it’s definitely what kept the RedHawks in the hunt versus St. Viator on an evening when the locals went 4-of-15 behind the arc and connected on just 39 percent of their attempts from inside 3-point territory. With the Lions sinking only 36 percent of their field-goal tries, committing a dozen turnovers and picking up just one point from the foul line, Marist stayed competitive the entire way. (Continued on page 6)

Bulldogs coach will step down from post at season’s end By Ken Karrson Richards’ last regular-season game had more finality attached to it than usual. When the Bulldogs bested District 218 sister school Eisenhower 108-87 at D-Wade Court Friday night to collect an outright South Suburban Conference Red championship, it could have easily been viewed as the latest example of basketball business as usual. After all, the league crown was Richards’ ninth in a row, giving it more consecutive league titles than any other Bulldogs athletic program has ever managed. “When you’re going through it, you get so bogged down in the negative stuff [that] you tend to lose sight of the good a lot,” Richards coach John Chappetto said. “Nine [straight] conference championships is a really good thing.” What made it particularly special to the veteran leader was that it was also the last one he’ll enjoy as Bulldogs boss. Early last week, the 43-year-old Chappetto notified Richards athletic director Ken Styler that he would be stepping down as varsity coach at the end of this, his 12th, season. The announcement was made public on Friday. “There’s so many factors and a million reasons why, I guess,” Chappetto said. “You put it all together and it’s time.” Chappetto said his family - wife Julie and young sons Charlie, 12, and Louie, 8 - didn’t talk him into his decision; the boys, in fact, were “devastated,” according to their dad. However, Chappetto said consideration for them was at the forefront of his choice, and he cited a mid-December moment as one that registered especially strong. “I’m going to work at 7:30

[a.m.], getting in the car, and I almost cried,” Chappetto said. “You’re watching them grow up and you miss them and a lot of the things they’re doing. This is getting too hard [for me] to do. “We all have mixed emotions about this - there’s definitely some scary parts for me, too. But I’ll be around [the family] more, and that can’t be anything but good.” That same word pretty much described the Bulldogs’ showing on Friday as well. Pitted against the Cardinals and their fast-paced, Grinnell College-style of play, Richards responded with a big dose of Josh Meier. The Chicago State Universitybound center, who had missed the Bulldogs’ two previous contests for non-basketball reasons, delivered a momentous performance as he racked up 47 points, 27 rebounds, four assists and four blocks. Meier’s single-game scoring ranked second in Richards history, topped only by a Dwyane Wade outing 14 years ago, while his rebounds were the most ever. Meier is the Bulldogs’ career leader in rebounds and blocks, and No. 3 in scoring. “He’s had some major ups and downs this year, but from start to finish he was really good,” Chappetto said of his big man. “It looked like he had that moment where he thought, ‘Hey, this [prep career] is getting near the end.’” Even with Meier in full attack mode, however, Richards (16-11, 9-4) couldn’t distance itself from Eisenhower until the fourth quarter. The Bulldogs led just 50-44 at intermission, although Chappetto didn’t think that was too bad considering three of his regular-rotation players were saddled with three first-half fouls and point guard Dedrick Shannon

had two. Reserves Ameer Hussein and Carl Williams picked up some of the slack, and Richards’ switch to a zone defense for part of the third stanza also aided its cause. A couple steals and scores from Spencer Tears helped out as well. “Your coaching [in a game like this] totally becomes how you sub,” Chappetto said. “You’ve got to really get a bunch of people prepared because you never know who you’re going to have to use.” Two driving layups by Thaer Othman and Deon Alexander’s pair of baskets gave the Bulldogs a jump start in the fourth frame, and Meier supplied the last 12 of his points. Meier included nearly a dozen dunks among his night’s production. Alexander backed Meier with 16 points, 14 of them coming in the second half. Othman added nine, while both Shannon and Hussein totaled eight. Shannon also distributed a team-high nine assists. Richards survived 21 turnovers, in part because it connected over 50 percent of the time (41-of-80) from the field. The ‘Dogs also sank five more free throws than Eisenhower despite attempting seven fewer shots at the stripe. The Cards made good on just 8of-42 3-point tries. “You’re a lot better off when they’re not scoring,” Chappetto said of Eisenhower, which lost for only the second time in its last 10 outings. “If you can get Photo by Jeff Vorva it past that first wave [of defenders], you’re probably going to get a lot of easy shots. “The last game was a real nice gift. I’m glad we did it. I’m very St. Xavier University’s Darius Draper, who began his collegiate basketball career at the University fortunate.” of St. Francis, keeps his pass away from former teammate Logan Timmons and sets the Cougars up Chappetto wasn’t only talking for a basket last Wednesday night. SXU beat the Fighting Saints 84-61 in a Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Tournament quarterfinal game in Chicago. Story on Page 3. (Continued on page 6)

Passing out of trouble


2

Section 2 Thursday, March 6, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Historically speaking, we’re pretty clueless

Bartosh Here’s a little secret about history: We’re not very good at it. Oh, there are exceptions, I’m sure, but by and large the average American doesn’t put a whole lot of thought into what took place before his or her arrival on the planet. That’s neither a criticism nor an indictment, just a fact. And usually, age plays a significant role — the younger the people, the less history is apt to mean to them. That’s somewhat understandable, seeing as how they don’t have as many personal events from which to draw comparisons between yesterday and today. Of course, that lack of knowledge isn’t as big an educational hindrance as it once was, thanks to the advent of the Internet. Instead of having to pour over dusty volumes of the written word for hours at the library, hoping to gain enough insight to pass the next exam before everything leaks back out of our heads, we now have everything right at our fingertips. And we can customize our search down to the most minute detail. Nevertheless, we, as a whole, remain basically uninvolved with history. That’s sad, seeing as how studying the past can often give us an idea of what may lie ahead. Admittedly, it’s not an exact science, but man, as a functioning and fallible being, really hasn’t evolved behaviorally as much as some social groups would like us to believe. Complete equality between the sexes on an emotional scale? Never going to happen, simply because men and women are guided by different stimuli. Some of that is due to surroundings, but much of the disparity is merely inherent within each sex. But that doesn’t mean we can’t foster a better understanding of one another, or between other groups that seemingly don’t have a great deal in common. As I pointed out to my son many years ago while he was learning about 19th-century America, many of the happenings he was reading about sounded at least vaguely familiar because man was repeating a number of them 200 years later. And certain parts of history should never be forgotten, nor should they be revised to make

various segments of society feel better about themselves. What happened happened, for better or worse, and the most we can hope for is to develop a clearer understanding of why something may have occurred and then try hard not to repeat those acts deemed repugnant. Why the lecture on history? It was prompted by a recent sports story I read. It appeared on the online versions of several eastern newspapers because it involved a young Baltimore Orioles minor leaguer named Josh Hart. Perhaps you saw it, too; if not, here is a brief rundown. Hart, the 37th pick in last year’s amateur draft, was recently introduced to baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson by Orioles manager Buck Showalter while visiting the team’s training camp. Showalter asked the 19-year-old Hart if he knew who Robinson was, and the youngster said he didn’t. Showalter, whose father was a high school principal, then told Hart to do some research, write a one-page paper on Robinson and return it to the manager the next day — in person, not via email. To his credit, Hart did as he was instructed without balking and later told an Internet sports site he learned a lot about Robinson. And Hart was properly respectful of Showalter, who some may believe overstepped the boundaries of a baseball manager. “He takes his job as strictly business, and I respect that,” Hart said to MASNsports. com, referring to Showalter. “Whatever he says, it’s done, and that’s a big plus. You’ve got to show him respect all the way.” So kudos to Hart for being an upright guy. The question is, how much should we have expected a 19-year-old kid to know about someone who retired roughly 40 years ago? Hart did say he knew Robinson was a Hall of Famer, which is commendable. As an AfricanAmerican player, though, Hart probably should have been more aware of something else: that Robinson was the first black manager in major-league history, an appointment that obviously opened new leadership doors for minorities within the sport.

This reminds me of when Jackie Robinson’s No. 42 got retired by baseball on the 50th anniversary of his ascension to the majors. I remember reading back in 1997 about some then-active minority players claiming to not understand why 42 was receiving such special treatment, a sad commentary indeed. Being able to rattle off career stats is impressive, but numbers alone don’t always give full representation of a person’s influence within his field. And I’m sorry, but there is no excuse for being completely unaware of iconic figures. I’m reminded of a story a friend once told me. My buddy had been giving a younger coworker a hard time about not knowing who R&B singer Lou Rawls was and soon rattled him enough to where he replied: “Well, I may not know who Lou Rawls is, but I’ll bet you don’t know who Bill Monroe is.” Without missing a beat, my friend replied, “He’s a bluegrass guitarist,” a response that sent the young guy’s chin slamming to his desk. My pal quickly added that while he couldn’t name any songs for which Monroe was famous, he was aware of the man himself because he was legendary in his particular musical genre. And that’s the point here — we should know about the movers and shakers who came before, especially when they’ve earned a reputation in the same profession where we practice our own trade. That doesn’t necessarily mean a robotic recitation of statistics or accomplishments, just an awareness of why they were important. Had Buck Showalter asked Josh Hart about Mark Belanger or Tom Phoebus or Andy Etchebarren — all former teammates of Frank Robinson’s — Hart could have been excused for not knowing anything. As I said, he at least associated Robinson with the Hall of Fame, but how many guys his age — or older — wouldn’t have known even that much? I applaud Buck Showalter for making Hart do some studying and learn more about perhaps the greatest Oriole of them all. There was only one thing wrong with Showalter’s teaching moment. It was short by a few million students.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marian Catholic’s Ashton Millender (21), plows into Oak Lawn’s Brooke Annerino while Marian’s Gabrielle Cooper tries to get a handle on the ball in Thursday’s sectional matchup. Marian, the defending Class 4A champion, won 67-62 in overtime at the Bloom Sectional.

Girls’ basketball roundup

Lady Spartans go down fighting By Anthony Nasella With a team full of talented and hungry players to start the season, Oak Lawn coach Janet Meyers said an early goal was for her Lady Spartans to advance deeper into the postseason. After defeating Mother McAuley for the first time in school history the previous week to win a Class 4A regional championship, Oak Lawn kept its downstate hopes alive with a thrilling 6156 victory over Marist -- another first for the program -- in last Tuesday night’s Bloom Township Sectional semifinal. And then the Lady Spartans went toe-to-toe with defending state champion Marian Catholic in Thursday’s championship contest. Assuredly, Oak Lawn opened the eyes of the other group of Lady Spartans, who watched a sevenpoint lead disappear in the final 43 seconds of regulation. Marian got the last say, emerging triumphant by a 67-62 count in overtime, but not before discovering a 28-win Oak Lawn squad was the real deal.

Supporting cast shines in Stagg win By Ken Karrson Memo to anyone who thinks Stagg can’t function adequately without Max Strus in a starring role: You’re wrong. The Chargers proved as much Friday night, when their senior standout was battling foul problems. That hasn’t always been true this season — Stagg coach John Daniels quickly cited four examples of his team struggling, and ultimately suffering defeats, when Strus had at least four fouls attached to him. At Joliet West, Strus was benchbound for a large chunk of the second half, which seemingly would have been a big boon to the host Tigers. But Kevin White and friends ruined any victory plans Joliet West might have housed. White’s 28 points represented the most obvious asset, but four other Chargers not named Strus tallied between seven and 13 points to create some offensive balance, and Stagg rode that out to a solid 77-62 SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue triumph. The win, which followed a 49-45 home conquest of Joliet Central on Tuesday, enabled the Chargers to conclude their regular schedule on a definite high note. Stagg, which faced either Richards or Kennedy this past Tuesday in a Class 4A Shepard Regional semifinal game, entered the postseason with a school-record-tying 21 victories and after landing in third place within their division, just one game behind runner-up Homewood-Flossmoor. Nine of Daniels’ last 11 clubs have wound up among the top three finishers in their conference. This was the Chargers’ inaugural year in the SWSC Blue after switching over from the Red Division. “The size of this side - teams are bigger, stronger and much more physically dominant,” Daniels said of the SWSC Blue. “It didn’t really hurt us [in the Red] that we’re small.”

Stagg (21-7, 9-5) obviously wasn’t hurt very much in the Blue, either. “It’s nice when you have players like Max Strus and Kevin White, let’s be honest,” Daniels said. “Max is going to lead us in every category except assists this year, and he’s second in assists. He’s so physically gifted and he’s the best player in our conference.” So how did the Chargers fare so well with him being a missing person for some of Friday’s contest and totaling a below-par 13 points? “We’re definitely deeper [this season], and it was great to see the other guys step up and carry us,” Daniels said. “In the other ones, they didn’t.” Stagg’s best defender, Nick Sims, displayed his offensive side by tossing in 13 points to match Strus’ output. Sebastian Kolpak added nine points and five rebounds, and both Jeff Goral and freshman John Contant tallied seven points. Daniels continued to be impressed with Contant, who included among his scoring a threepoint play in the late going that extended the Chargers’ lead to 11 points. “If he misses, they’re going the other way with numbers [in their favor],” Daniels said of the Tigers. “But he’s got that attitude. He’s got moxie and he’s a winner. Since we brought him up, our practices are a lot better than they were a month ago.” Contant’s charity toss was part of a 5-of-5 exhibition for him at the stripe during the fourth quarter. White converted four free throws and, as a team, Stagg was a perfect 13-of-13. The visitors clicked on all but six of their 37 foul shots for the evening. Much to Daniels’ delight, Joliet West chose to accelerate the game pace right from the start, and it only got faster as the Tigers grew more desperate later on. “I loved it,” Daniels said. “Teams like Sandburg slow us

down and frustrate us. They grind it out and it’s not our style. “We’re built to play [teams like Joliet]. When they came after us full-court, we were cutting them up. Max and Kevin have a nice chemistry and they get the ball to one another.” The Chargers’ 21st win allowed them to equal the school’s 201011 club for most victories in one season. Strus moved up to the varsity as a freshman that year and Stagg has triumphed 78 times since then. Stagg 49 Joliet Central 45 Most of a 10-point edge the Chargers held after three periods vanished during the final frame last Tuesday, but White’s three-point play and a Sims 3pointer helped Stagg stave off the Steelmen in an SWSC Blue confrontation. “We just sort of maintained,” Daniels said. “We were fortunate to have that 8-to-10-point lead most of the way.” The Chargers prevailed despite committing 23 turnovers. Helping them survive the mistakes was aggressive work on the glass, as Stagg prevented Joliet Central from getting many second-chance points. Strus posted a double-double of 20 points and 10 rebounds, White pitched in with 11 points and six assists, and Sims also netted 11 points to propel the Chargers.

Statistics Joliet Central 8 7 8 22 - 45 Stagg 12 10 11 16 - 49 Stagg Scoring: Strus 20, Sims 11, White 11, Kolpak 3, El Hannouny 2, Stratinsky 2. Rebounds: Strus 10. Assists: White 6. Stagg 16 19 16 26 - 77 Joliet West 12 11 15 24 - 62 Stagg Scoring: White 28, Sims 13, Strus 13, Kolpak 9, Contant 7, Goral 7. Rebounds: Strus 8, Kolpak 5. Assists: White 5.

She also opened the extra session with a drive to the hoop that handed the Lady Spartans a 55-53 lead over their namesakes from Chicago Heights. Before fouling out with a minute to go, Brooks converted a three-point play. A Brooke Annerino 3-pointer had Oak Lawn within 63-61, but Marian’s Ashton Millender tallied all but two of her club’s 14 overtime points to help it outlast the Lady Spartans, who trailed by no more than six points at any period stop. “Despite being down six at the end of third quarter, we just kept fighting,” Meyers said. “In the final minute, the kids, and especially LaTondra, responded. Brooke hit the big 3 to pull us back within two points, but Marian was solid from the free-throw line — that’s what championship teams do.” Oak Lawn’s slower-than-normal start to the contest was due to missed layups and just a 4-of-11 performance from the floor. Mahmoud helped keep things close with her rebounding. (Continued on page 5)

The tie that’s fine

Astros second in SSC Red after edging Argo By Ken Karrson

Plenty in reserve

“Marian Catholic is a great team and the defending state champs,” Meyers said. “We knew that coming in, but we were also playing our best basketball of the season. We were peaking as a team and excited about the challenge. We put ourselves in a position to win, but we just couldn’t get over that hump to grab the lead. “A lot of people didn’t think we would have a chance in that game, and I’m so proud of my girls for how they competed. They stepped up for us and showed how hard we’ve been working and that we were very capable of winning that game.” LaTondra Brooks (23 points), Jannah Mahmoud (16 points, 10 rebounds) and Brianna Markusic (10 points) were the Lady Spartans’ leading performers, and it was Brooks stepping forward at crunch time. With Oak Lawn facing a 53-46 deficit in the closing moments, Brooks nailed a 3-point shot, forced a jump ball that regained possession for her team, and then hit a total of four free throws over the last 20 seconds to create a 53-all deadlock.

This tie didn’t promote sisterkissing, but it probably made Tony Chiuccariello want to hug his players. No one, including the Shepard coach himself, had penciled in the Astros as a South Suburban Conference Red contender prior to the start of the 201314 basketball season, not after a heavy amount of graduationinduced personnel losses. And a quick glance at Shepard’s sub-.500 ledger would seem to indicate that the general lack of expectation was justified. When the Astros met up with SSC foes this year, however, they frequently flexed some muscle. It wasn’t quite enough to dislodge now-nine-time defending divisional champ Richards from the top spot, but no one at Shepard minded being second-best. The Astros (10-16, 7-6) shared that runner-up position in the SSC Red with Eisenhower by the end of Friday night. While the Cardinals were being beaten by the Bulldogs — a team Shepard had defeated a couple weeks earlier - the Astros slipped past Argo 59-58 in Palos Heights. Shepard trailed by one point after Brian Smith drilled a 3pointer for the Argonauts at the 18-second mark, but Jacob Littleton answered twice at the charity stripe with 3.8 seconds remaining after getting fouled while driving to the basket. Interestingly, the Astros’ end-of-the-game scenario closely mirrored one they had faced recently against Peotone. On that occasion, Chiuccariello let his guys play through, but Shepard was unable to score in a 3-on-3 situation. Here, he requested a timeout when Littleton got the ball to midcourt. “I tried it the exact opposite way,” Chiuccariello said. “If I had to do it again, I’d do what I did before, but [this time] I wanted to make sure everyone was on the same page. It was fortunate [Argo] didn’t change defenses because you bring that into the equation.” The Astros had one foul to give before sending their visitors to the line, and they used it. Nick Heidinger then batted an inbounds pass away, leaving the Argonauts with just one full second to release a final shot. Argo sharpshooter Tyler Mitch-

ell did indeed fire away, but his attempt banged off the rim and sealed the verdict for Shepard. Once the win became official, Chiuccariello praised his players, who had dropped a 64-57 decision to Plainfield Central three days earlier. “The boys did a real nice job,” Chiuccariello said. “It took some character on the guys’ part. I’ve used the word ‘resilient’ a lot, but if we lose on Tuesday, they [usually] find a way to bounce back. “They knew what was at stake here — you want to have a winning conference record, and we were able to get second place. This game was as back-and-forth as you can get, but the guys played above their collective individual talents [all season] and they maximized everything they had.” Littleton paced the Astros with 24 points, which included a 7-of8 display at the foul line. Kyle Longfield canned all six of his freethrow attempts and finished with 14 points and seven rebounds, while Darren Cohen contributed eight points, seven boards and four assists. Heidinger led the rebounding effort with 10. The 6-foot-4 Longfield’s return from a lengthy, injury-related absence was cited by Chiuccariello as a positive influence in Shepard’s play during the latter part of the schedule. “Kyle was a big loss [before],” he said. “He gives us something on the boards and is an inside presence scoring-wise.” The Astros prospered despite shooting just 36 percent. A seasonlow seven turnovers, slight 32-30 rebounding advantage and Argo’s own forgettable 39 percent success rate from the floor all benefited Shepard, which is serving as a Class 4A regional host this week. It opened play on Monday versus Hubbard. Plainfield Central 64 Shepard 57 The Wildcats continued their mastery over the Astros last Tuesday night, but only after the latter went down to the wire with their visitors. Just two points separated the clubs with 1:06 remaining, but Shepard was unable to overcome a couple late mishaps. “It’s kind of tough [when] you played a good game and you put yourself in a position to win at the end,” Chiuccariello said. “Both

games [last week] were extremely competitive.” The fact the Astros were in the hunt was perhaps a bit surprising, seeing as how Plainfield Central held a distinct edge in height. Members of the Wildcats’ roster included one 6-foot-8 player and three others who stand 6-6. “I always joke about what’s in the water out there,” Chiuccariello said. “They’ve always had height, but we were doing a nice job [in the first half] of being in our gaps — if they fed the post, we were there to double down [defensively].” That solid work without the ball helped the Astros gain a firstquarter lead, which they continued to hold through halftime. The two teams were deadlocked at 44-all after three periods. Littleton (17 points, two assists), Zack Haxel (11 points on 5-of-5 shooting, two assists), Longfield (10 points, eight rebounds) and Cohen (eight points, two assists) all lent a hand to Shepard’s offense. The Astros boasted a better field-goal percentage than Plainfield Central (44-40), but the Wildcats dominated on the glass (37-15, including 11 offensive rebounds) and outscored the Astros 22-9 at the foul line. “They’ve had a nice run against us,” Chiuccariello said of Plainfield Central, which won’t be on next year’s schedule, although the two could square off in the Romeoville Tournament at Christmas. “We’ve never beaten them.”

Statistics Plainfield Central 9 18 17 20 - 64 Shepard 11 21 12 13 - 57 Shepard Scoring: Littleton 17, Haxel 11, Longfield 10, Cohen 8, Lawson 5, Heidinger 4, Gorski 2. Rebounds: Longfield 8. Assists: Cohen 2, Haxel 2, Heidinger 2, Littleton 2. Argo 14 16 14 14 - 58 Shepard 20 5 18 16 - 59 Shepard Scoring: Littleton 24, Longfield 14, Cohen 8, Haxel 6, Heidinger 4, Lawson 3. Rebounds: Heidinger 10, Cohen 7, Longfield 7. Assists: Cohen 4.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, March 6, 2014 Section 2

3

Neighborhood letdown Vikings come up empty against Reavis By Ken Karrson The showdown became a letdown for St. Laurence. Neighborhood rivalries tend to bring out the best in athletic teams, but such was not the case last Tuesday night in Burbank, where the Vikings clashed with Reavis in their final outing of the regular season. Considering how competitively his club had been playing for the past several weeks, St. Laurence coach Mark Sevedge anticipated this meeting with the Rams featuring a continuation of that strong play and serving as an ideal springboard into the Class 3A tournament. Instead, the Vikings engaged in a disappearing act. Not a real one, of course, but definitely missing was the emotional edge with which they had been performing of late. And making the 56-42 setback worse was that St. Laurence players and coaches had almost a week to stew over it before taking the court again. The Vikings opened play in their own regional this past Monday versus Gage Park. Sevedge had planned to give his guys a day off on the Wednesday following the Reavis game, but he changed his mind after the loss. “It was a defensive-minded practice — we barely used the basketball for two hours,” Sevedge said. “We worked on guarding each other hard and getting back to basics.” A shortcoming for St. Laurence (5-21) versus the Rams was its inability to disrupt Reavis’ interior attack. While the Vikings were firing away at an acceptable 40 percent clip from 3-point land, the Rams countered with a 65 percent success rate inside the arc, a mark that included a 13-of-15 display before halftime.

Behind that exhibition, Reavis outscored St. Laurence in each of the first two periods and took a 31-21 lead into intermission. “What hurt us is the physicality Reavis plays with,” Sevedge said. “I thought we had some energy and were ready to play, and I thought we did a pretty good job of guarding the ball. “[But] I don’t think we defended them the way we planned. We didn’t do a good job of working around guys in the paint. They executed and they got way too many easy baskets.” That also resulted in several fouls being called on the Vikings in fairly rapid succession. They were ticketed six times in the opening frame while the Rams avoided any infractions. “I felt our kids kind of got down on themselves when the whistles went against us a little bit,” Sevedge said. “We couldn’t catch a break and a lot of things snowballed. [And] when [Reavis] had the lead, they waited until they got an easy layup before they shot.” Eddie Puha was the Rams’ main man, but Matt Gurgone pretty much offset his foe’s 22-point production with 19 markers of his own, which included five 3point buckets. A bigger issue for St. Laurence was its inaccuracy in other areas. Sevedge estimated that the Vikings missed “a minimum of 5-to6 point-blank shots. Some were contested, but some weren’t.” And after not taking any trips to the free-throw line before halftime, St. Laurence went just 6-of-16 from there the rest of the way. “That killed us,” Sevedge said of the two trouble spots. “We left some points out there.” With Rich Lamb (eight points, five rebounds) and Tim Delaney

(six points) offering Gurgone a bit of support, the Vikings never let the contest get completely beyond their reach. However, they also didn’t possess enough across-theboard firepower to make a serious charge at Reavis over the last 16 minutes. The loss ended St. Laurence’s three-game win streak over its Burbank neighbor. “Because of the rivalry, it’s [usually] a good game at the end of the season to get fired up for,” Sevedge said. “Maybe we grew content with the way we had played against them the last three years, but I thought they came out hungry and wanted it a little more. Our guys weren’t tough enough. “With the way we’ve been playing against some of the best teams in the [Chicago] Catholic League, this was one of our worst defeats in probably a little more than a month. We just didn’t play very well and they deserved to win — they were the better team [on that night].” Right after the game, Sevedge thought he would be preparing the Vikings for a playoff opener versus Urban Prep Charter/Bronzeville after the top two sectional seeds, BoPhoto by Jeff Vorva gan and Hyde Park, were removed from the field because of violating St. Xavier University’s Munir Smith attempts to dribble out of trouble during last Wednesday night’s the IHSA’s maximum-games rule CCAC Tournament quarterfinal matchup with the University of St. Francis in Chicago. regarding scheduling. Both schools were reinstated, though, and St. Laurence went back to being pitted against its original play-in opponent, Gage Park.

SXU sports summary

Cougars win CCAC men’s hoops tournament

Statistics St. Laurence 11 10 13 8 - 42 Reavis 16 15 11 14 - 56 St. Laurence Scoring: Gurgone 19, Lamb 8, Delaney 6, Forberg 5, Cummings 2, Radford 2. Rebounds: Lamb 5. Assists: Cummings 2, Radford 2.

Two steps back Knights stumble twice in final week By Ken Karrson After appearing to have taken one giant step forward the week before, Chicago Christian took two steps in the opposite direction last week. It’s definitely not the way coach Kevin Pittman hoped his Knights would conclude their regular schedule, especially seeing as how some improvements had been made of late. Those had most recently translated into a convincing win over Guerin Prep and a spirited battle against longtime rival Illiana Christian that, while not ending in victory, did reinforce Pittman’s belief that his squad had finally turned a corner. But suddenly Chicago Christian went adrift once more. A fourthperiod slowdown proved costly in a 59-44 defeat against another familiar foe, Timothy Christian, last Tuesday, and then the wheels fell completely off three nights later as Montini dominated the Knights pretty much from the get-go in what eventually became a 68-46 Suburban Christian Conference triumph for the Broncos. “We probably played our worst game in two months,” Pittman said, referring to the league setback. “I was disappointed with our performance and our effort. It was a lousy game. “Sometimes you show up and you just kind of stink that day it happens in high school, college and the pros. It was an absolute breakdown in every area. There’ve been bright spots [in other contests]; there weren’t any of those here.” Montini wasted no time getting the jump on Christian (8-18, 2-8), doing so with a 20-12 scoring advantage in the first quarter. From there, the deficit widened substantially, with the Broncos holding sway by an insurmountable 58-31 margin at the thirdperiod stop. “Defensively, we had zero life,” Pittman said. “We couldn’t have prepared any better for them, but our rotations were poor and guys were gambling on defense.” Montini did most of its damage inside the arc, where it buried 56 percent of its shots. That enabled the Broncos to overcome 15 turnovers and 16 missed free throws. No Knights player notched more than nine points. T.J. Deck-

er supplied that number, while Trevor Wolterink and Bradford Fitzpatrick finished with eight and seven points, respectively. Christian’s shooting languished in the mid-20s - it actually did better from long range (5-of-18) than inside the 3-point line (8-of-34) - and 16 miscues also undermined the Knights. “It wasn’t for lack of opportunities,” Pittman said of Christian’s rather meager output. “We had looks down low - on one possession, we had four inside shots and couldn’t hit one. We couldn’t get many shots to fall [throughout the evening].” The only good thing, in Pittman’s opinion, was that the loss didn’t represent the end of the Knights’ 2013-14 campaign. They were in action again this past Monday in the Class 3A Plano Regional, where they met up with Joliet Catholic Academy. Pittman was not crazy about having to travel, particularly when St. Laurence is hosting its own Class 3A regional. However, he did like the fact there was no clearcut favorite entering the event at Plano. “This is a winnable regional for a lot of teams down there,��� Pittman said. “[Assistant coach] Wally [Ottenhoff] called it ‘the season of sudden life’ because it doesn’t matter where you’ve been or what you did before. We’re all starting over.” And putting its last regularseason performance as far in the rearview mirror as possible wouldn’t be a bad idea. “[Losing] becomes a battle against the mind,” Pittman said. “After a while, until you can win a game, in the back of your mind that doubt remains.” Timothy Christian 59 Chicago Christian 44 Beating the Trojans, who will once again share a conference address with the Knights when the latter joins the Metro Suburban next fall, would have erased a good deal of that doubt. However, Chicago Christian had no answer for Timothy Christian star Connor VanderBrug last Tuesday. The 6-foot-5 Trojans forward made his presence felt immediately when he nailed a 3-point shot on his team’s first possession. He added another long ball, plus a two-point basket right after that to stake Timothy to an 8-0

On the edge... and right on target! Straight talk from Bartosh in Sports Southwest

advantage and force Pittman to burn an early timeout. “That was disappointing,” Pittman said of Vander Brug’s exploits, which didn’t end until the Trojan had piled up 31 points and grabbed 16 rebounds. “We had worked a lot in practice about, ‘Hey, let’s make someone else beat us,’ but he was their only scorer [of note].” The Knights again struggled with their marksmanship and posted a sub-par 29 percent accuracy rate. They did take reasonably good care of the ball - their nine turnovers were five fewer than Timothy’s total and, in Pittman’s view, the primary reason they stayed in contention - but having to chase from the outset put Chicago Christian in an uncomfortable position. “We played a pretty decent game against Timothy Christian and we didn’t feel we were out of that thing until midway through the fourth quarter,” Pittman said. “But you can only exert energy to get back in the game so many times before that reserve is exhausted. “I’m so tired of talking about close games and us not being able to get over the hump. I’m never ready to lose. We’ve been kind of searching for that signature win, and not being able to get it has kind of hurt us [psychologically].” Wolterink (13 points) and Jay Spencer (10 points, eight rebounds) were the Knights’ main men on Tuesday. Marcus Parker contributed seven points, while Blaine Wright totaled six points, three assists and three steals.

Statistics Chicago Christian 10 11 9 14 - 44 Timothy Christian 14 12 11 22 - 59 Chicago Christian Scoring: Wolterink 13, Spencer 10, Parker 7, Wright 6, Boss 3, T, Decker 3, Fitzpatrick 2. Rebounds: Spencer 8. Assists: Washington 3, Wright 3. Steals: Wright 3. Chicago Christian 12 8 11 15 - 46 Montini 20 17 21 10 - 68 Chicago Christian Scoring: T. Decker 9, Wolterink 8, Fitzpatrick 7, Wright 6, Washington 4, J. Decker 3, Boss 2, Leo 2, Spencer 2, Van Buren 2, Parker 1. Rebounds: Spencer 5. Assists: Wright 3 assists. Steals: Spencer 2, Van Buren 2, Wright 2.

Not one, but two surprises awaited St. Xavier University basketball fans in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Tournaments. Only one was welcomed, however. That would have been the men’s team’s upset of NAIA Division II top-ranked Cardinal Stritch on the latter’s home court. By beating the Wolves 85-74 on Saturday in Milwaukee, the Cougars not only avenged two regular-season losses, but claimed the conference tourney title for themselves. SXU’s women weren’t as fortunate. After winning the regular-season CCAC North Division championship, the Cougars were unable to play for the tournament crown. Olivet Nazarene threw up that roadblock in Friday’s semifinal matchup, which the Tigers captured by a 91-89 score when Miranda Geever hit a runner just before the final buzzer. SXU, with its top-five national ranking, will still receive an invitation to the NAIA Division II Tournament, which begins Wednesday in Sioux City, Iowa. The Cougars men, meanwhile, will travel to the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, Mo. Each SXU club was to learn the identity of its opening-round foe this past Wednesday. That gave men’s coach Tom O’Malley and his athletes a little time to enjoy their biggest triumph of the season, which snapped Stritch’s 18-game unbeaten streak. The Wolves, who had last lost at Panella Court on Jan 19, 2013, stopped a 17-game Cougars win streak earlier this season. “I’m floating,” O’Malley joked about his postgame reaction to Saturday’s conquest. “It was a good one. I was elated for the kids.” Those kids made Stritch have to play from behind right away. No. 7-ranked SXU (29-4) tallied 15 unanswered points during a 5 ½-minute span of the opening half to seize an 18-3 lead. Five players contributed to the Cougars’ getaway. Jack Krieger hit three layups, Stagg alumnus Darius Draper scored on a dunk and jumper, and former Wolves player Michael Simpson buried a 3-pointer to lead the assault. While SXU was racking up points, Stritch committed five turnovers and missed four shots. Simpson, who had struggled in his initial return to Milwaukee, was just fine here as he tossed in 17 points. He was one of three double-digit scorers for the Cougars, along with Krieger (25 points on 9-of-15 shooting) and Brad Karp (19 points). “He played like a champ,” O’Malley said of Simpson, who drilled 11-of-12 free throws, including six in a row in the closing moments that staved off the Wolves’ final comeback bid. “We got off to a great start [because] we did a lot of things we haven’t been doing. I felt we were pretty well prepared and I think we were hyped up [at the outset] — the kids felt they had to come out that way.” And all that energy was properly channeled. “We were a little more patient offensively,” O’Malley said. “We ran our sets and we were on target with all our shots. We were closer to what we normally shoot.” O’Malley’s standard game goals are for SXU to shoot at least 50 percent from the field, 40 percent from 3-point territory and

80 percent at the line. Against Stritch, those respective numbers stood at 56, 50 and 79 percent. Another positive for the Cougars was their rather meager total of 12 turnovers. Not surprisingly, the Wolves didn’t go down easily. They battled back from a 50-30 deficit with a 13-2 run that was culminated by Derek Semenas’ 3-point basket. Chad Mazur’s long ball then drew the hosts within 59-56 with 9:03 left before two Karp layups and Krieger’s jumper restored some breathing room for SXU. One more Krieger hoop extended the Cougars’ edge back out to 10 points (71-61) with 4:10 remaining, but Mazur’s 3-pointer soon had Stritch within 79-74. Simpson then finished the Wolves off at the free-throw line. Semenas (19 points), Mazur (14) and Tony Smit (16) paced Stritch, but O’Malley was happy with his guys’ ability to render Tyler Semenas something of a nonfactor this time around. In the Wolves’ victory over SXU in Chicago, he torched the Cougars with 26 points and 11 rebounds; those stats dipped to six and five, respectively, this time around. “I think we did a much better job on the Semenas kid and they got only eight points from their big guys,” O’Malley said of Stritch. “We got a lot of worthwhile minutes from our bench, and they gave us 13 points and six rebounds. “The biggest thing [about this win] is I think it’ll give our kids a lot of confidence. It’s a refreshing thought going into the [national] tournament like this, but it’s not going to make it any easier. “When you’re ranked, the bull’s-eye’s on you all season long, but now is the big time. It only takes five wins now.” SXU’s 29th triumph equaled last year’s total. O’Malley has coached three 30-win Cougars teams during his 17 seasons at the helm. St. Xavier 73 Roosevelt 59 Three sizable runs were key elements for the Cougars Friday night, as they used those to dispatch the Lakers in a semifinal matchup in Milwaukee. Karp’s 3-ball kicked off the first of those spurts, which occurred with seven minutes left in the opening half. SXU broke a 20-all tie with a 13-5 run, then went on a 16-6 tear early in the second half to snap another deadlock. Karp’s layup culminated the surge. The Cougars finally delivered the knockout punch with a 13-6 run in the last three minutes. A pair of Krieger 3-pointers beat back Roosevelt’s challenge after the Lakers had climbed within 57-51. Karp, recently chosen for the All-CCAC first team, had 20 points and seven rebounds to lead SXU. Krieger (18 points), Simpson (16 points, 10 assists) and Josh Mawhorr (nine points, seven rebounds) also chipped in for the Cougars, who fired away at a 51 percent clip, dished out 16 assists and committed only nine turnovers. Despite statistics that seemingly indicated the contrary, O’Malley felt SXU had been at less than its best. He wasn’t the only one who thought so — an announcer for the Stritch-Robert Morris University semifinal clash stated after that game was over that “if St. Xavier plays the way they did tonight, they’re going to have a hard time [on Saturday].”

“That was the way I felt myself,” O’Malley said with a chuckle. “I didn’t feel we played very well against Roosevelt, and I thought both Cardinal Stritch and Robert Morris played extremely well.” Were the Cougars guilty of perhaps looking beyond the Lakers to their possible date with the Wolves? O’Malley didn’t believe so. “We talk about, ‘Don’t think ahead -- just think about the next game in front of you,’” he said. “From a Friday night to a Saturday afternoon doesn’t give you much time to do anything else.” St. Xavier 84 Univ. of St. Francis 61 One game lacking drama was the Cougars’ tourney opener last Wednesday against the Fighting Saints at the Shannon Center. SXU saw to that by netting the game’s first 16 points, seven of which came from Karp (25 points, six rebounds, five assists). With Simpson (13 points, nine assists, five rebounds, three steals), Mawhorr (13 points, six rebounds) and Krieger (10 points, five assists) giving their offense even more juice, the Cougars were never challenged. They outrebounded the University of St. Francis 39-21 and canned 56 percent of their field-goal attempts. — Ken Karrson WOMEN’S BASKETBALL While posting a solid regularseason record of 26-4, the Cougars encountered very few disappointing moments. The shocking loss to Olivet on Friday night at the PUC Fitness Center in Hammond, Ind., certainly qualified as one, however. “Most teams would love to be 27-5 at the end of the season, but we really wanted to be in the championship [game] of the conference tournament,” SXU coach Bob Hallberg said. “It didn’t happen, [so] now we just need to get our confidence level back up for the national tournament.” The semifinal contest proved to be a tale of two halves, as the Cougars were in control for most of the first half. Their 56 percent shooting laid the groundwork for a 54-47 halftime advantage, but the situation changed dramatically after the break. SXU went 14-of-38 from the field over the last 20 minutes. “That was a tough loss,” Hallberg said. “The whole key for the ballgame was we went into a lull in the second half. We missed some easy shots under the basket and a couple of key free throws, [and] they were hot from the 3-point line.” Junior forward Morgan Stuut, who repeated as the CCAC Player of the Year, had another huge game, totaling 33 points and 15 rebounds for her 24th doubledouble of the campaign. Along the way, she broke the single-season scoring record for SXU women as her total of 667 points moved her past Erin Hannemann, who tallied 646 points during the 200809 season. Stuut also became the first female Cougar to eclipse 400 rebounds in a season. She currently has 414. Junior guard Suzie Broski had a big night for SXU as well with 27 points on 12-of-23 shooting. Senior guard Niara Harris added 13 points. “I was very happy to see Niara come off the bench against (Continued on page 5)


4

Section 2

Thursday, March 6, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Community sports news Bromberek to step down as Marist softball coach

Submitted photo

Nariman Jaber, who recently became Moraine Valley College’s single-season leader in blocked shots, had 10 points to help the Cyclones win their opening game in the Region IV women’s basketball tournament.

Moraine athletics wrap

No repeat possible for Cyclones By Maura Vizza Given its struggles during the regular season, Moraine Valley College had only one way in which it could return to the National Junior College Athletic Association Division II men’s basketball tournament. The Cyclones had to emerge as champion of the Region IV Tournament. But last Thursday, Kishwaukee College saw to it that Moraine’s postseason hopes got dashed immediately. Already the owner of a 45-point victory over the Cyclones this year, Kishwaukee didn’t appear to have much to fear. Moraine, however, exhibited a great deal more fight in the rematch, just not enough to stay alive in the playoffs. Instead, the Cyclones (8-22) were shown the exit door after absorbing an 89-74 defeat. Last March, Moraine not only captured

the Region IV crown, but went all the way to the national title contest before suffering a loss. The runner-up finish in the NJCAA Division II Tournament was the Cyclones’ best in program history. Against Kishwaukee, Moraine was as close as eight points during the second half, thanks to double-figure scoring from four individuals. Cameron Juillerat led the attack with 19 points, but also making measurable contributions were Des’nique Harris (14 points, 10 rebounds), Johnte Shannon (14 points, four steals) and Kyle Ward (11 points, 11 assists, 10 rebounds). The Cyclones were unable to reduce their gap any further, though, because of some crucial misses — including a few layups — down the stretch. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Cyclones (22-10) advanced

Sports wrap Marist narrowly missed making it a three-peat for local schools at state team wrestling. While Sandburg didn’t get a chance to defend its back-to-back state championships Saturday at U.S. Cellular Coliseum in Bloomington, the RedHawks were poised to pick up where the Eagles had left off. After collecting five wins during one six-match sequence, Marist not only fought back from a sizable deficit, but it created something similar for highly touted Oak Park-River Forest. But the Huskies, who were without two wrestlers because of injuries and had a third dealing with the remnants of illness, climbed out of what eventually became a 15-point hole. Victories in the final two matches sealed the deal for Oak Park, which defeated Marist 31-22 for the team title. Highlighting the RedHawks’ surge was 106-pound Jimmy McAuliffe, who pinned Jay Renteria. Renteria was runner-up at the previous week’s individual state meet. The Huskies countered, however, with Davonte Mahomes’ verdict over Peter Andreotti at 170. Andreotti, a 1,000-yard rusher during the football season, had finished third at state at 160 pounds one week earlier. Other winners for Marist versus Oak Park included Nick Lukanich (113), Mike Mullaney (126), Ameen Hamden (132), Ethan Benoit (182) and Tom Ford

(heavyweight). The RedHawks’ team finish was their best at state since 1997, when they also took second. Marist earned its spot opposite Oak Park on the strength of earlier triumphs over Lincoln-Way Central (32-15) and Marmion Academy (27-25). The latter win was not realized until Mario Leveille scored a 3-2 decision over the Cadets’ Michael Callahan at 138 pounds.

BOYS’ SWIMMING When Stagg captured the Sandburg Sectional on Feb. 22, the Chargers realized one of their preseason goals and immediately focused on the next one: a top12 finish at last weekend’s state meet in Evanston. And while Stagg fell short in its quest — it scored 10 points and placed 30th — Chargers coach Jason Carr summed up the state experience, and season as a whole, as a great accomplishment. The benefits, he said, will extend beyond athletes on the current squad and positively affect future members of the program. “I’m very happy for the kids,” Carr said. “It was a very good experience and the kids loved it. And we’re only losing three seniors from the sectional team and just one from state — three of the four relay members from the 200 and 400 will be back next season. “I’m excited for the future and possibly [having] even more kids going downstate for next season. This season was definitely one of the best seasons that Stagg has had since I’ve been here.” Freshman Lucas Smiarowski, 11 12 1 juniors Evan Johnson and Zack 2 10 Amendola, and senior Harlan 9 11 12 1 3 Long teamed up for an 11th-place 2 10 finish in the 400-yard freestyle relay in Saturday’s finals and 9 3 garnered all-state honors in the 12 1 11 process. The relay unit actually 2 10 improved its standing between 9 3 Friday and Saturday, as it had nosed out Lake Forest by just .34 seconds in the prelims for the 12th us know know you want LetLetus you want and final qualifying spot. On Satafterschool programs in in your area.area. urday, the Chargers completed the afterschool your Letprograms us know you want afterschool programs in your area. Call 1-800-USA-LEARN. race in 3:11.25 and were only .02 Call 1-800-USA-LEARN. seconds in arrears of 10th-place Andrew. “When we qualified for Satur-

Call 1-800-USA-LEARN.

Rice closes regular basketball place his athletes where they’ll have the greatest chance to prosseason with a rush per, Podgorski also recognizes the

If momentum means anything heading into the state basketball tournament, Brother Rice should be in fine shape. When the Crusaders squared off with fellow Chicago Catholic League member De La Salle this past Tuesday in the Class 4A Whitney Young Regional, they did so with a full head of steam on their side. They acquired it by virtue of a 73-37 thrashing of Tinley Park in their regularseason finale last Wednesday. Once again serving as Rice’s difference makers were seniors Ray Rubio and Quinn Niego, who tallied 31 points between them on combined 11-of-17 shooting. However, nine other Crusaders also put their names in the scoring column, including Mike Shepski and Kevin Baldali, each of whom tossed in nine points. The former was Rice’s rebounding leader with eight boards. As a team, the Crusaders (1413) clicked on 59 percent of their field-goal tries while their defense limited the Titans to 23 percent accuracy. The teams shot 40 and 7 percent, respectively, from beyond the 3-point arc. Sixteen of Rice’s 26 total baskets came off assists. The Crusaders jumped out to an 18-4 lead in the opening period and outscored Tinley in every quarter after that, twice by at least eight points. They erupted for a total of 26 points in the third stanza.

St. Patricia’s students receive

need to not leave too many events open, which proves costly when compiling team scores.

“I’m going to prepare them mentally and physically for the big picture, which is always state or a personal record,” he said. *** On the boys’ side, Evergreen coach Ray Mankowski isn’t afraid to think big, either, even though he does not have the same amount of proven talent as Podgorski does with the girls’ squad. What Mankowski does have is numbers -- the Mustangs entered the indoor season with over 40 team members, and the seventhyear coach’s goal is to add roughly 20 more to that total before beginning the outdoor schedule. “The greater numbers we have, the more successful we can be,” Mankowski said. “Numbers will push our kids to be successful.” Leading Evergreen into competition will be junior distance runner Matt Przeslicke, who was a state qualifier in cross country and owns the school’s fastest time ever in the 3,200-run. Senior Juwan Smith is another Mustang who’ll participate in the longer races, while senior Don Oresky (hurdles), junior Don Lewis (sprints) and sophomore Kameron Brown (jumps) should all be pivotal performers in their respective events. Mankowski also likes sophomore Joey Ryan, who is working on his own to prepare for the pole vault. “We have a good core group of athletes who are hard workers,” Mankowski said. “We also have a lot of young talent that should be good once we start our [outdoor] meet season.” The Mustangs were only eighth in their sectional last spring. While Mankowski is reluctant to select a specific finishing position for his current troops, he is not discounting the possibility of individual excellence. “Qualifying six or more events for the state meet [is a goal],” Mankowski said. “We have a lot of talented individuals, and if they are working hard and the weather is good, we have a very possible chance of this happening, no matter what sectional we are in. “[We want to] have an athlete or relay [unit] run on Day 2 of the state meet. This would almost guarantee them of getting a medal.” *** Evergreen girls’ soccer coach Thea Johnson will try to lift the Lady Mustangs over the .500 level this spring after they posted an 8-10 ledger in 2013. Evergreen went 4-7 in the SSC Red and took third in the final standings. Seniors who return to lead the Lady Mustangs include defenders Kelly Shine and Colleen Elizinga, forwards Monica Yapan and Abby Valentino, and midfielders Zoe Monks and Dorothy Kalafut. Juniors Beth Grazevich and Amanda Grabowski are also in the veteran mix, as are sophomores Korti Lewis and Olivia Torres. Grazevich was a starter on defense as a sophomore. Evergreen is without a proven goalie and, in Johnson’s opinion, would also benefit from a controlling central midfielder. However, she likes her athletes’ work ethic and the number of them that have shown interest in playing soccer. “With so many players, finding the right combination of girls will be important,” Johnson said. “We are missing three key players from last year, [so] it will be vital that the seniors step and take a strong leadership role and get the team mentally on the right track from the start. “[We will be] starting off practices immediately instilling fundamental skills and principles to be used throughout the season.”

into the semifinal round of the leadership awards Region IV Tournament by slipping Michael Morgan and Ginni past Morton College, 74-67, in last Bouck, a pair of 8th-grade stuThursday’s quarterfinal clash. dents at St. Patricia, were chosen That win was Moraine’s third to receive the Southside Catholic over the Panthers this season, but Conference’s Christian Leaderdefinitely its most difficult. The ship Awards for 2013-14. Cyclones were ahead only 30-29 Morgan and Bouck, both of at halftime, and even Moraine’s whom are involved in athletics 10-0 run during the second half at the school, earned their honors couldn’t put it on Easy Street. after submitting essays that disMorton drew to within six points cussed Christian leadership and a few times after that before the being role models in sports. Cyclones finally closed the deal for themselves. Maggie Yandel and Katie McEvergreen girls’ track team Gann, who were recently chosen carries high hopes for the All-Illinois Skyway ColThere is no shortage of confilegiate Conference first and secdence among members of Everond teams, respectively, tallied 18 green Park’s girls’ track team as points apiece to pace Moraine. Ai- Inductees announced for the 2014 outdoor season looms. leen Gorman chipped in 12 points That’s what winning a sectional and eight rebounds, while career GCAC Hall of Fame Five former athletes from championship will do. blocks leader Nariman Jaber The Lady Mustangs did that showed off her offensive side by area schools will be among the nine individuals representing the in 2013 after placing third in the tossing in 10 points. 2014 induction class for the Girls South Suburban Conference Red, Catholic Athletic Conference Hall and coach Garrett Podgorski sees of Fame. no reason why Evergreen can’t The group will be honored on revisit its most recent past. That Sunday, March 23, at Monastero’s goal certainly appears well within Ristorante, 3935 W. Devon in Chi- reach, thanks to the return of a cago, as part of the 39th anniver- half-dozen Class 2A state qualisary of the GCAC’s formation. fiers. The distance events should be day in the 400, there was a big The keynote speaker for the event celebration,” Carr said. “It was will Cook County Board president a Lady Mustangs strong point, as senior Leeza Campbell and nice to advance to Saturday and Toni Preckwinkle. Among the inductees are Moth- juniors Emily Radgowski and compete so close to our [District 230] sister school Andrew. And er McAuley alumnae Kathy Burns Jill Siemiawski all got a taste of what’s neat is that the guys are and Mary Coleman Hambly, Mt. Charleston last May. Also makclose [relationship-wise] with the Assisi graduates Alexandra Steel ing the downstate trip a year ago Sallay and Karen Schissler Van were throwers Taylor Tillman and guys from Andrew.” Also on Saturday, Amendola Assen, and Queen of Peace prod- Jordan Annang, and jumper Tyra took ninth in the 100-butterfly uct Melissa Vandry. All five women Smith. As if that didn’t represent a (51.19 seconds) and 12th in the played volleyball, and Sallay also 100-backstroke (52.40) as an in- ran track for the Screeching Ea- deep enough talent pool from dividual, while Smiarowski was gles. Van Assen was Mt. Assisi’s which to draw, Evergreen also welcomes back three record set12th in the 200-individual medley final volleyball coach. Former athletes from Good ters. Senior Erica Carradine es(1:56.37). Smiarowski missed advance- Counsel, Mother Guerin and tablished a school standard in the ment to the finals in the 500-free Lourdes, and a basketball official 55-meter dash indoors, fellow upby three spots after placing 15th round out the list of inductees. perclassman Rianna Carson did Doors open at 3 p.m., a cash bar likewise outdoors in the 100-dash overall (4:40.12) during Friday’s prelims. He was only .61 seconds will be available from 3-4, and din- and senior Hope Thomas set a behind the last qualifier. Long also ner will be served at 4. Tickets are Lady Mustangs indoor mark in had a near-miss in the 100-breast- $35 per person. Checks should be the triple jump. “Like always, if all the talent can stroke, where he was kept out of made payable to the Girls Catholic the top 12 by .14 seconds after Athletic Conference and mailed to stay healthy and get better at each winding up 15th in the prelims Trinity High School, c/o Rosaria meet and practice, the year looks Cicchetti, 7574 W. Division St., to be another great season,” Podwith his time of 59.25. gorski said. “The team consistently The 200-medley relay quartet River Forest 60305. For additional ticket informa- has state qualifiers in the throws — which was also comprised of Smiarowski, Johnson, Amendola tion, contact Cicchetti at 771- and jumps, [and] the sprint squad and Long — took 16th on Friday 8383, ext. 303, or rcicchetti@ is very deep with talent.” Podgorski’s concern is finding in 1:37.09, which was less than Trinityhs.org. For all other infora full second away from the cut- mation, contact June VerSchave capable bodies to fill in some other off time for qualification. Long at (630) 257-7358 or jverschave@ events, such as the hurdles and relay races. While he wants to (32nd in the 200-free in 1:46.26) mtassisi.org. and Johnson (34th in the 50-free, 22.25; 35th in the 100-free, 49.23) also swam in individual prelim events. “We had good swims at state with kids in the top 12, as well as [being] close at 14 and 15,” Carr said. “When the 400-yard freestyle relay team competed on Friday, we weren’t sure if we had finished 12th or 13th. We knew we were right there. “We achieved the goal of winning sectionals. And while our second goal was a top-12 finish, obviously the most important goal was getting as many of the guys to advance to Saturday.” *** Sandburg’s three state qualifiers all finished with respectable times during Friday’s prelims, but were unable to move on to the next day’s finals. David Apps finished 17th in the 200 IM (1:57.70), while both diver Dean Boures (164.15 points) and Kevin Stratton (53.13 in the 100-backstroke) occupied the No. Submitted photo 24 position in their respective St. Patricia student-athletes Michael Morgan and Ginni Bouck each received a leadership award events. from the Southside Catholic Conference.

Marist takes second at state team wrestling By Anthony Nasella

Marist’s softball players will get one more opportunity to win some state hardware for Denise Bromberek. Bromberek, who guided the Lady RedHawks to a Class 4A championship in 2012, has announced she will step down as head coach of the program at the end of the 2014 season. Bromberek, the only varsity coach Marist has had in softball, plans to move with her family to Utah. Since the school went coed in the fall of 2002, Bromberek has posted a record of 307-107. She reached 300 wins faster than any other softball coach in state history, and her victory total ranks fifth all-time in Illinois high school annals. The 2012 title was the first captured by any girls’ team at Marist. The Lady RedHawks have also collected two sectional crowns, nine regional championships and four East Suburban Catholic Conference titles during Bromberek’s coaching tenure. “When we were looking to start the program 11 years ago, we knew Denise was the right fit,” Marist principal Larry Tucker said. “She has been such an asset to the Marist community, academically and athletically. Her leadership has helped produce many outstanding young women over the years. She will be missed.” Athletic director Bob Lim was equally effusive in his praise for Bromberek. “Coach Bromberek has been vital in putting Marist girls’ athletics on the map,” he said. “She has succeeded in establishing our softball program as one of the best in the state. Her commitment to excellence, and to her student-athletes, is what makes her a phenomenal coach and educator. “Denise is also highly respected in the softball community, and a person like that is difficult to replace.” Individuals with previous softball playing and coaching experience who are interested in pursuing the head-coaching position for the 2015 season should email a cover letter, resume and list of references to Lim at lim.robert@ marist.net by March 14.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 2

5

SXU

Photo by jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn’s Brooke Annerino drives by Marian’s Ashton Millender while Spartan forward Jannah Mahmoud tries to stop Millender.

Basketball roundup (Continued from page 2) “The missed free throws and missed easy shots obviously hurt,” Meyers said. “Nerves are going to play a part, especially with 17- and 18-year-old kids. We were hanging in there, and I told the kids at halftime we just had to keep pecking away and put ourselves in the position to win. “One of Marian’s key players, [Teniya] Page, broke us down in the first half and we did much better against her in the second half. We kept Millender contained in the first, but she took it to us in the second half. They have a lot of weapons [and] we tried to keep them under control. “It’s disappointing because we were so close, but we played hard and followed our game plan.” *** Brooks (18 points), Mahmoud (14 points, 12 rebounds), Markusic (four points, seven rebounds) and Duneya Shatat (10 points) all contributed greatly to the Oak Lawn attack in its triumph over Marist. Annerino, meanwhile, converted a big layup with 10 seconds left to give the Lady Spartans a threepoint lead. Mahmoud then made two free throws with four seconds remaining to ice the contest and put Oak Lawn in its first-ever sectional championship game. Just as the Lady Spartans were to do a couple nights later, the Lady RedHawks went down swinging. Marist narrowed its deficit to 55-53 on a basket by Tehya Fortune (eight points) and then had a chance to pull even when Bri Rosa stole the ball. Rosa’s potential breakaway layup was denied, however, as a determined Brooks knocked the ball away. The latter then delivered on the offensive side with her own layup that put Oak Lawn ahead 57-53. A 3-pointer from Brooke Wyderski (17 points) brought the Lady RedHawks back within one at the 26-second mark of the fourth quarter, but Annerino and Mahmoud then joined forces to fend off Marist once and for all. “We really had been taking everything one game at a time,” Meyers said. “We never tried to look too far ahead, despite our goal of advancing further. “The kids were pumped up to play Marist and we had a real strong first quarter. We were up 23-12 and played well in the first couple minutes of the second quar-

ter, but then we kind of lost our focus and got careless -- and you can’t get careless against a good team like Marist. “They outscored us 15-8, but we were still up 31-27 [at halftime]. We came out more focused in the third quarter and we were up 4539 at the end, [so] we knew we just had to hang on in the fourth quarter.” But Meyers also knew, without a doubt, that the fourth quarter would be more than just a lesson in survival. “Marist came at us and we were able to hold them off,” Meyers said. “We had big plays by several players. That block by LaTondra Brooks, though, was incredible. But we knew that other players besides LaTondra would have to step up “In our loss to Hillcrest, everyone kind of backed up and tried to let LaTondra take it over, and that wasn’t successful for us. It was nice to have everyone contribute to the win.” While getting them ready for Marist, Meyers brought her athletes back to their earliest goal. “All year, we had talked about [how] our goal was to get further into the postseason than we had ever reached previously,” she said. “We had worked all season with that in mind and we worked really hard in practice. “We kept preparing for what would be waiting for us at the end of the season. That was our focus to advance, and we accomplished that with the win over McAuley. We had never gotten past the first game of sectionals, so we knew the game against Marist was a big hurdle to get over.” In the end, Meyers and her players relished a season filled with firsts for a program that had been on the verge of a breakout for the past two years. “We set the school record in wins, won conference again, and we won both [regular-season] tournaments we competed in,” Meyers said. “We beat both McAuley and Marist for the first time and had so much hope about the postseason. We’re a little disappointed that we were so close and unable to take it to the next level, but this team restored excitement in the basketball program. “The school hallways were jumping and excited about basketball. We had a lot of people come to the games and watching on highschoolcube. A lot of people were excited about Oak Lawn girls’ basketball, so that was great to see the atmosphere at the school. “The girls worked hard and they deserved the recognition.”

EVERGREEN PARK The Lady Mustangs started strong in last Tuesday’s Class 3A Solorio Sectional semifinal against Phillips, but they were unable to sustain the early energy and fell short of a championship-game berth by six points, 45-39. Zoe Monks scored 13 points and Megan Pfister added 10 to lead Evergreen Park (15-15), which jumped out to an early 10-point lead. However, the edge was just 16-11 at the end of the first quarter and four points at halftime. The Lady Wildcats chipped away further and began to make their run toward the end of third stanza and beginning of the fourth, eventually constructing a 10-point advantage of their own. The surge coincided with Pfister having to exit the game for five minutes with a sprained ankle. When she returned, Pfister caught fire, scoring seven of her points in the final frame while keeping her team within two in the closing minute. However, some unforced Lady Mustangs turnovers, coupled with clutch free throws by Phillips, put an end to Evergreen’s playoff drive. “We were confident going into the game,” Lady Mustangs coach Bruce Scaduto said. “We were pretty much prepared. We were ready for their man-to-man [defense]. We came out kind of hot and kind of flattened out from there. “We were still feeling confident by the end of the first quarter, [but] Phillips started to press us in the second quarter and one of our players got in foul trouble, which hurt us a bit. We went into halftime up by four, but we had a hard time scoring in the third [period]. Things just weren’t going our way and they were slowly coming back. And losing Pfister for those minutes, Scaduto said, definitely didn’t help. “Megan saw things slipping away while she was on the bench,” he said. “She came back with some fire, even though she was wobbling a bit. She did everything she could to get us back in it.” Scaduto said the Lady Mustangs’ shooting betrayed them -- “We didn’t get good looks [in some instances] and we missed some easy shots,” he said -- but that couldn’t take away from what Evergreen had already achieved in the tournament. “It wasn’t our night, but winning back-to-back regionals was nice,” he said. “It didn’t come out the way wanted in the sectional, but we’re starting to get some wins and advancement in the playoffs. It’s all been good.”

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn’s LaTondra Brooks looks for an open teammate in last Thursday’s sectional loss to defending state champion Marian. Brooks scored seven points in the final 43 seconds of regulation to send the game into overtime.

(Continued from page 3) Olivet,” Hallberg said. “She had been sick and didn’t play in the quarterfinal game. We need her guard play and offense.” Things looked promising early for the Cougars after they built a 20-12 lead on a layup by Broski. Harris’ 3-pointer gave SXU a 4730 edge with four minutes left in the first half, but the Tigers closed out the session with a 177 run, which was fed by five 3pointers. Layups by Stuut and Broski early in the second half pushed the Cougars’ lead back into double digits, but Olivet used a 10-4 surge to cut the deficit to five (64-59) with just over 13 minutes to play. “We didn’t have the offense clicking like we did in the first half,” Hallberg said. “Olivet did nothing spectacular; they were consistent both halves. “Our downfall was the second half. We shouldn’t have been in that position, resulting in poor execution, ill-advised passes and unforced turnovers.” A 3-pointer by Tigers guard Liz Bart tied the score at 74-all with 6:32 remaining and the game stayed tight the rest of the way, which set the stage for Geever’s late-game heroics. Olivet finished with 17 3-point baskets in 39 attempts, a 44 percent success rate. “Three-point shooting has always been Olivet’s strength,” Hallberg said. “They were especially effective in that part of the game. We just would have liked to have ended the conference tournament on a more positive note.” St. Xavier 64 Calumet College 42 The Crimson Wave were no match for the Cougars last Wednesday, as the latter rolled to a victory in the tournament quarterfinals at the Shannon Center. Broski tossed in 18 points for SXU, which boasted four doublefigure scorers in all. Also stepping forward were freshman guard Sidney Prasse (13 points, including three 3-pointers), Stuut (12 points, game-best 14 rebounds) and Jordan Brandt (11 points, four assists). Defense was also a huge ingredient in the locals’ mastery. The Cougars limited Calumet College of St. Joseph to 17 second-half points, but the Wave were in serious trouble long before that. SXU broke from the gate with an 11-3 burst and held leads of as many as 15 points in several instances before intermission. The Cougars were ahead by only nine (34-25) at halftime, but a 16-1 run that got underway near the 11-minute mark allowed them to pull away for good. “We didn’t get out to a fast start again, but then we exploded for a 15-2 spurt that put us in control,” Hallberg said. “Some of our younger players have really progressed offensively during the course of the season. “Against Calumet College, we were highly successful, and sometimes I don’t know if I should put my [best] defensive or offensive combination on the floor. Sometimes I question myself. Thankfully, we have a week of practices to look at combinations for the NAIA national tournament.” —Anthony Nasella MEN’S TRACK Due to splitting up their squad the weekend of Feb. 22, the Cou-

Spartans (Continued from page 1) basket and two free throws. Behind David Stacy’s 3-pointer and field goal, the Spartans roared back to within 30-28, only to see Evergreen (13-13, 3-10) answer with a 7-0 run. Tony Weathersby delivered a bucket and the Mustangs also made good on five charity tosses. Weathersby’s 3-pointer capped an opening flurry by Evergreen in the third frame, and the visitors were ahead 46-34 three minutes into the session. It was 49-39 after an Issac Matthews foul shot at the 2:38 mark, but the Mustangs went scoreless for the remainder of the period and Oak Lawn drew within four on two Swatek baskets and a pair of free throws. “I was so happy for him,” Rhodes said of Swatek. “He’s our glue guy — he rebounds, distributes, moves well without the ball [and] guards the other team’s best player. But I thought he was very aggressive offensively in this game.” Stacy supported Swatek with 21 points and eight rebounds, while Josh Prince gave the Spartans a third double-digit scorer with 12 points. He augmented his offense with team-best totals of nine rebounds and five assists. Oak Lawn clicked on only 39 percent of its field-goal tries - including just 4-of-20 from 3-point range — but it grabbed 10 offensive rebounds and set up all but five of its 19 buckets with an assist. The Spartans went 22-of-28 at the foul line. “I think we won more of the 50-50 balls,” Rhodes said. “Balls that were knocked around, we

Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Xavier University’s Josh Mawhorr fires an outlet pass after grabbing a rebound during last Wednesday night’s CCAC Tournament encounter with the University of St. Francis. gars took part in two different meets to complete their final tuneup before the NAIA meet. Some SXU athletes traveled to Grand Valley State in Allendale, Mich., where junior Janis Pastars’ national-qualifying time in the 3,000-meter run provided the highlight. He registered an “A”qualifying clocking of 8 minutes, 39.7 seconds. Also turning in solid performances were sophomore Rexford Wiafe in the 800 (1:56.83, just .18 seconds off the qualifying standard) and John Stancato in the 60- and 200-dashes (7.16 and 22.53, respectively). “I feel very bad that Rex missed the qualifying mark in the 800,” Cougars coach Ed McAllister said. “He has worked extremely hard and deserved to make it to nationals. [And] Janis keeps getting stronger with each race.” SXU’s remaining athletes competed at the University of Chicago’s Margaret Bradley Invitational and achieved similar results. Leading the way was freshman Abel Hernandez, who won the 5,000-run in 15:38. “Abel showed that he is well on the way to making a mark for himself in the future,” McAllister said. Junior Brandon Gentry gave the Cougars a fourth place in the triple jump (12.49 meters). SXU will be represented in the NAIA Indoor Track & Field National Championships, which begin today in Geneva, Ohio, by three runners. Brian Corcoran and Shane Kenney will both be part of the 1,000 field, while Pastars qualified in the mile run. MEN’S VOLLEYBALL Middle blockers Sam Kull and

J.T. O’Connell both produced solid performances, but the Cougars were unable to ride those to victory against No. 6-ranked Clarke University last Tuesday night. Instead, the Crusaders swept past SXU in three sets (25-16, 25-22, 25-16) at the Kehl Center in Dubuque, Iowa. Kull put down 10 kills and served two aces on the Cougars’ behalf, while O’Connell finished with nine kills and a pair of assisted blocks. Freshman setter Moises Lopez totaled 29 assists, three digs and two block assists to further aid SXU and senior rightside hitter Jacob Siska chipped in four kills, five digs and an assisted block. Clarke racked up 40 kills — eight more than the Cougars — and committed just seven hitting errors for an impressive attack percentage of .458. *** The Cougars’ school-record-tying 16 service aces enabled them to cruise to a 25-8, 25-15, 25-11 Great Lakes Division road victory over Cincinnati Christian College on Saturday afternoon. Kull notched five of the aces, to go along with five kills and seven total blocks. O’Connell put down nine kills and did not make any hitting errors, while Lopez dished out 19 assists and had two assisted blocks. Also chipping in for SXU (3-11, 3-3) was freshman Dan O’Keefe, who registered 10 digs. The Cougars finished with 22 kills and just seven errors for an attack percentage of .326. SXU hosts Lourdes (Ohio) University in another conference match on Saturday at 4 p.m.

got to them.” “I thought we had it put away,” Flannigan said. “It’s hard to put your finger on it. It was a bunch of little errors, things you can’t quite control, [like] missing a layup, making a pass we don’t normally make or a turnover. We had about six or seven kids that did little things like that. “We didn’t get a shot off [before time ran out] — those are the killers. You want to end it with the ball at the rim, not lying on the floor.” Weathersby was the Mustangs’ offset to Swatek as he, too, produced 25 points, to go along with six rebounds and three steals. Matthews was Evergreen’s only other double-figure man as he recorded 10 points. He also had five assists and three steals. The Mustangs, who met Lindblom this past Tuesday in a semifinal contest within the Class 3A St. Laurence Regional, sank 43 percent of their field-goal attempts and shot 78 percent at the line. Oak Lawn 51 Lindblom 48 The Spartans were able to triumph on their own Senior Night, but they kept the Eagles from doing likewise last Tuesday. Oak Lawn gained a win while playing in a pint-sized gymnasium. “It was a bandbox - similar to Mt. Carmel’s old gym, only smaller,” Rhodes said. “On sideline-inbounds plays, you were a foot in bounds. They had a good crowd and you couldn’t hear each other or hear play calls. “[But] it was cool. I like to take our kids out of their comfort zone, and the kids really enjoyed going over there and playing.” A 5 p.m. varsity game time added to the strangeness of the day

— “There was sunlight streaming through the windows when we started,” Rhodes said — but the Spartans dealt with the conditions with relatively little trouble. They could never shake Lindblom, but a slight rebounding edge and five more successful charity tosses were enough to push Oak Lawn over the top. Swatek was again the Spartans’ ringleader with 16 points, which included a 7-of-8 effort from the stripe, and five rebounds. Joe Cosenza (10 points), Prince (six points, eight rebounds), Stacy (six points, seven rebounds, five assists, three steals, three blocks) and Nate Jones (six points) all contributed as well. Oak Lawn played Kenwood Academy, Rhodes’ former team, this past Monday in the Class 4A Oak Lawn Regional. “I think that school is a special place,” Rhodes said of Kenwood. “I still follow what they do, but it’ll be weird to play [against] them.”

Statistics Evergreen Park 17 22 10 14 - 63 Oak Lawn 15 15 15 19 - 64 Evergreen Park Scoring: Weathersby 25, Matthews 10, Cheatham 7, Sorbellini 6, Oladejo 5, Brown 4, McClendon 4, Moran 2. Rebounds: Weathersby 6. Assists: Matthews 5. Steals: Matthews 3, Weathersby 3. Oak Lawn Scoring: Swatek 25, Stacy 21, Prince 12, Jones 6. Rebounds: Prince 9, Stacy 8. Assists: Prince 4. Oak Lawn 11 15 9 16 - 51 Lindblom 15 13 7 13 - 48 Oak Lawn Scoring: Swatek 16, Cosenza 10, Jones 6, Prince 6, Stacy 6, Samra 4, Nelson 3. Rebounds: Prince 8, Stacy 7. Assists: Stacy 5. Steals: Stacy 3. Blocks: Stacy 3.


6

Section 2

Thursday, March 6, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Trinity sports report

Spring has not sprung for Trolls By Tim Cronin Once upon a time, there was a thing called spring. It usually started even before the official solstice, and baseball teams could get in a game or two along the way without traveling a thousand miles to do so. Not this year. Trinity Christian College is among those schools that have been frozen out so far this season. The Trolls are 0-4, and those games almost shouldn’t count on the record, for there will have been two weeks between pitches when they take the field again — weather permitting, of course. They haven’t played since Feb. 24, when they dropped a twinbill to Brescia in Owensboro, Ky., by scores of 2-0 and 5-1. Since then, a doubleheader against Grace College and two slated with Harris Stowe State have been wiped off the calendar. The plan is to embark on a Florida trip to such postcard places as Winter Haven and Frostproof, Photo by Jeff Vorva with games beginning Monday. Homewood-Flossmoor’s Tai Odiase, who scored 25 points against Sandburg, tries to get around There will be 10 games in five Eagles defender Niko Cahue as Cahue’s teammate Eric Straka looks on last Tuesday night. days, which will give fourth-year coach Justin Huisman a fair idea of the depth of his pitching staff, if nothing else. Even with six players graduated from last year’s squad, it should be good, based on the five returning seniors alone. Danny Britt, Vince Van Schouwen and Drew Chibe will lead the way, with Britt’s 3.49 earned-run average across 80 innings ranking as the best among the trio. Add a quartet of transfers -- including sophomore J.T. Yocum (Lewis University) and juniors Brad Kopale (South Suburban College) and Bob Wilmsen (Moraine Valley College) — and Huisman will have plenty of potential starters from which to choose.

Bulldogs (Continued from page 1)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Sandburg’s Mike Piazza saves a loose ball from going out of bounds last Tuesday night versus Homewood-Flossmoor.

Eagles (Continued from page 1) the Raiders, but the hosts totaled 20 buckets to Sandburg’s 18.

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Homewood-Flossmoor 56 Sandburg 53 The Eagles were in an even deeper hole last Tuesday versus the Vikings, who rode center Tai Odiase’s 18 first-half points to a 38-19 advantage. H-F was ahead by 15 at the third-period stop and by that same margin three minutes into the fourth frame. However, Sandburg players refused to wave the white flag. Instead, they proceeded to make a game of it, as improved defense caused a few Vikings turnovers and disrupted the visitors’ attack. H-F managed only one field goal over the final eight minutes. “It wasn’t anything drastic,” Allen said. “We were just getting a few stops and converting at the other end. Other than Odiase, they didn’t have anybody score in double figures. “We only played [well] in the

second half, but when we finally started to play defense and hit some shots, [we became competitive]. We had said, ‘Let’s try to make it a single-digit game with under four minutes to go.’ We didn’t quite do that, but we kept whittling it down.” Still, plenty of ground needed to be made up, and when the Eagles were staring at a 55-45 deficit with 1:50 left, it appeared as though their defensive handiwork would go for naught. But Straka, Martinez and seldom-used senior Mike Piazza all nailed 3pointers in the late going - Piazza deposited four long balls on Senior Night in Orland Park - and the heat was put on H-F. The Vikings’ edge eventually got shaved to two points. A free throw made it a three-point differential, but Sandburg still had a chance to tie — two, in fact, on its final possession, but it misfired both times from beyond the arc. “It would have been a storybook ending, but we weren’t able to make enough plays at the end,” Allen said. The Eagles’ comeback was en-

gineered without much help from either Cahue or Kogionis. The two, who are averaging a combined 28 points per game this season, notched only 10 points between them. Coming forward in their place were the aforementioned trio of Straka (14 points, nine rebounds, four assists), Piazza (12 points) and Martinez (10 points). “We had a lot of other guys step up for us,” said Allen, whose squad drilled 10 3-pointers on the evening Sandburg met Eisenhower this past Monday in an opening-round matchup within the Cardinals’ Class 4A regional.

Statistics Homewood-Flossmoor 20 18 11 7 - 56 Sandburg 11 8 15 19 - 53 Sandburg Scoring: Straka 14, Piazza 12, Martinez 10, Cahue 7, T. Demogerontas 4, Kogionis 3, Manthey 3. Rebounds: Straka 9. Assists: Straka 4. Sandburg 11 15 13 12 - 51 Bolingbrook 16 15 176 - 54 Sandburg Scoring: Kogionis 17, Martinez 11, Straka 9, Cahue 5, T. Demogerontas 5, Ruzevich 4, Vorva 2.

about this particular contest. He was also referring to a number of other memorable moments during his head-coaching career, including the winning of a Class 4A title six years ago. “There’s no way I would ever have dreamt of a state championship, but I felt a lot of pressure to keep it up,” Chappetto said. “There’s no way I can be like it didn’t matter, [so] every game is

RedHawks (Continued from page 1) A missed free throw on the front end of a 1-and-1 - one of four such happenings for them in the game - with 3:45 remaining in the fourth quarter prevented the RedHawks from perhaps pulling even at 37-all, but the visitors were still nipping at St. Viator’s heels after that. With 1:10 left, a mere four points separated the clubs. “We just didn’t shoot well enough to balance out that good defense,” Nolan said. “If we could have made some shots, like we usually do, we could have won this game.” Jeremiah Ferguson (17 points, six rebounds, four assists) was the lone Marist player to tally in double figures, but that lack of firepower wasn’t too costly in the first half. Thanks to their solid work without the ball, the RedHawks limited the Lions to a point per minute before intermission and trailed by only five at the break. “I thought we were as engaged defensively as we have been all year,” Nolan said. “It might not

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Benny Collesano and Brett Husiman, back in the swing after a long injury rehab, will add depth. Senior Peter Krygsheld returns his .305 average to the plate and his speed -- 17 steals last season — to the basepaths. He’ll lock down either third base, his spot last season, or shortstop. Senior Steve Brewer appears settled in at second base, while Joe Presutti will be back in right field, looking to exceed the seven homers he clouted last season. The Trolls improved as the season went on last year, finishing 25-24 while compiling an 18-12 mark in Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference play. They made it to the NAIA Tournament for the first time, thanks to a runner-up placing in the conference tourney. *** • Schedule: Monday, vs. Aquinas University, 8:30 a.m.; vs. Clarke University, 1:30 p.m. (Auburndale, Fla.); Tuesday, vs. Clarke (2), 9 a.m. (Leesburg, Fla.); Wednesday, vs. St. Ambrose University (2), 12:30 p.m. (Winter Haven, Fla.); Mar. 13, vs. Aquinas University (2), 11 a.m. (Frostproof, Fla.); Mar. 14, vs. Trinity International University (2), 9 a.m. (Lakeland, Fla.). SOFTBALL Fifth-year coach Missy Bolhuis’ team starts the season in Florida on Saturday with the first of five twinbills featuring seven teams. The openers are against Cornerstone and Grace. There are six seniors among the Trolls’ 14 returnees, plus a crop of six new faces for a 20-person squad, the largest in recent times. That gives Bolhuis options she didn’t have before. One no-brainer for her is relying on Brianna Brugioni as the ace of

the pitching staff. Brugioni struck out 91 batters last year and led Trinity with 19 RBI, playing third base on those days she wasn’t in the circle. Mattie McGuire (3.29 ERA) and Michelle Interrante will flip-flop between pitching and first base. They and the rest of the staff will be caught by dependable Kaleigh Velasquez. Figure on Anna Phillips to return to the leadoff spot with her .356 average and penchant for stealing, with Ballan Reynolds (.290) and Tori Grzincic (.257) also expected to be regulars again. In the field, Grzincic may take over second base, while there will be battles for both shortstop and third base. The added depth from the expanded roster should provide incentive across the board. *** • Schedule: Saturday, vs. Cornerstone University, 4 p.m.; vs. Grace College, 6 p.m.; Monday, vs. Marian University, 8 a.m., vs. Ave Maria, 10 a.m.; Tuesday, vs. Marian, noon; vs. Spring Arbor, 2 p.m.; Wednesday, vs. Ave Maria, 2 p.m.; vs. St. Xavier University, 4 p.m.; Thursday, vs. Mt. Vernon Nazarene (2), noon (all games in Clermont, Fla.). TRACK & FIELD Anna Bos and Andy Reidsma will carry National Christian College Athletic Association honors into this week’s NAIA Indoor Championship in Geneva, Ohio. Both were feted as athletes of the week for their exploits at the NCCAA indoor meet. Bos finished second in the 5,000-meter run while eclipsing her school record by almost 30 seconds with a time of 17 minutes, 32.61 seconds. Reidsma, meanwhile, was runner-up in the men’s 3,000 and also anchored Trinity’s two relay teams.

stressful. It takes its toll.” Chappetto had mulled over the possibility of walking away at the conclusion of a trying 201213 campaign, but opted not to because he “didn’t want to leave on that note. This year wasn’t perfect, but that last year kind of left a bad taste in our mouths.” “I didn’t know how I was going to do it,” Chappetto said of relinquishing his position. “I didn’t want to make it the ‘John Chappetto Going-Away Tour,’ but I [also] didn’t want to be one of those guys who says [he’s thinking about] it every year.”

Richards tried to extend Chappetto’s stay on Monday, when it tangled with Kennedy in a play-in game at the Shepard Regional. If successful there, the Bulldogs were to meet Stagg on Tuesday.

be [considered] a glamour thing to hold a team to 16 points in a half, but to our kids it is. The casual fan might have thought it was an ugly game, but the pace favored us [because it was] a game that didn’t flow and wasn’t fluid. “We try making teams feel like they can’t get comfortable in their offense. Our kids believe in each other, and if you have five great individual defenders who also play good team defense, you can be successful [on a steady basis]. We’re going to need that in the state tournament.” Marist wound up as the stingiest squad in the ESCC in average points per game surrendered, and Nolan feels “this team is in the conversation of being one of the best defenses we’ve ever had.” He did admit, however, to being uncertain at the outset of the current season as to what might be forthcoming. “After all the kids we graduated, we weren’t sure what we had,” Nolan said. “Anything this year has developed through the year, but these are tough kids. You can’t ask every kid to be great at everything, but you build up those things they are great at.” Brian Holland tossed in nine points and Weishar totaled five points, 10 rebounds and four assists for the RedHawks, who began play in the Class 4A King Regional this past Tuesday against the host Jaguars. “We’ll have our hands full, but I think we got better because of

this [St. Viator] game,” Nolan said. “It’s been a great year and a fun year.” Marist 54 Agricultural Science 37 Certainly, there was plenty of fun in store for the RedHawks last Thursday, when they wrapped up the regular schedule by notching a lopsided win over Chicago Agricultural Science in a game that had originally been postponed because of bad weather. In front of a Senior Night crowd, Nolan started five of his six seniors. Weishar volunteered to be odd man out, but according to Nolan, he wasn’t the only one thinking along those same lines. “They’re givers, not takers, and that’s so important in a team sport,” Nolan said. “It was just a statement on Senior Night from seniors who really care.” Despite the makeshift lineup, Marist raced to a 10-0 lead as Ryan Tucker (3-point basket), Weishar and Andre Turner all delivered early hoops, the latter’s coming on a layup off a Weishar assist. The RedHawks were up 16-8 at the quarter stop and 3519 at halftime, and the visitors weren’t in any position to stage a second-half comeback. The Cyclones went 3-of-13 from 3-point land and were at 37 percent accuracy within twopoint territory. They did make seven free throws, but Marist’s defense allowed only four offensive rebounds and forced 12 miscues. Ten RedHawks reached the scoring column, with Holland (11 points), Weishar (nine points, seven rebounds, seven assists, three steals) and Tucker (seven points, four assists) showing the way. Marist shot 45 percent from the floor, 42 percent from 3-point range and 72 percent at the charity stripe, but what Nolan especially liked was the RedHawks’ total of 18 assists, which represented a season-best effort.

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Eisenhower 24 20 20 19 - 87 Richards 24 26 26 32 - 108 Richards Scoring: Meier 47, Alexander 16, T. Othman 9, Hussein 8, Shannon 8, Catledge 6, Williams 6, Anagnostopolous 4, Tears 4. Rebounds: Meier 27. Assists: Shannon 9. Blocks: Meier 4.

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Marist 6 5 14 15 - 40 St. Viator 4 12 17 16 - 49 Marist Scoring: Ferguson 17, Holland 9, Weishar 5, Lerma 4, Hawkins 3, Burrell 2. Rebounds: Weishar 10. Assists: Ferguson 4, Weishar 4. Steals: Lerma 3. Agricultural Science 8 11 7 11 - 37 Marist 16 19 14 5 - 54 Marist Scoring: Holland 11, Weishar 9, Tucker 7, Lerma 6, Rivard 6, Hawkins 4, Ferguson 3, Hill 3, Turner 3, Burrell 2. Rebounds: Weishar 7. Assists: Weishar 7, Tucker 4. Steals: Weishar 3.


The Regional News - The Reporter

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For Sale

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For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, SERVICING L.P. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOHN F. BRENNAN A/K/A JOHN F. BRENNANN, CARROLL A. BRENNAN D e f e n d a n t s � 08 CH 027392 7455 W. UTE LANE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 20, 2009, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 31, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7455 W. UTE LANE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-218-009. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-08-19142. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-08-19142 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 08 CH 027392 TJSC#: 34-3514 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I593782

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MANUEL IBARRA D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 018277 14354 PINEWOOD DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 6, 2013, Auction.com, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on April 9, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive (in the Auction.com room), CHICAGO, IL, 60654, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 14354 PINEWOOD DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-07-106-001. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-17772. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-17772 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 018277 TJSC#: 33-25122 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I591946

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ANDRIUS BALTAKYS, SCENIC TREE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 004481 8425 W. 101ST TERRACE UNIT #107 PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 17, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 14, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8425 W. 101ST TERRACE UNIT #107, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-11-302-003-1240, Property Index No. (23-11-302-002 underlying). The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-02692. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-02692 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 004481 TJSC#: 34-2153 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I590681

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MONICA LINARES A/K/A MONICA OROSCO, MARYANN MORENO A/K/A MARY ANN MORENO A/K/A MARY ANN PEREZ, RAFAEL LINARES, 7951-7959 W. 112TH PLACE TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., S/I/I TO CAPITAL ONE BANK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 10011 7955 WEST 112TH PLACE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 29, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 20, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7955 WEST IN THEPLACE, CIRCUIT COURT COOK COUNTY, 112TH PALOS HILLS, OF IL 60465 Property Index ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY No. 23-24-100-161-0000. The real estate is improved DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONwith a 4 or more units townhouse with an attached 2 car AL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR INTEREST garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the IN highest bid by BY PURCHASE FROM DEPOSIT certified funds at the close THE of theFEDERAL sale payable to The INSURANCE CORPORATION ASparty RECEIVER OF Judicial Sales Corporation. No third checks will WASHINGTON BANK FKA WASHINGbe accepted. The MUTUAL balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid MARQUETTE by the purchaser not to MARQUETTE BANK FKA NATIONexceed $300,SUCCESSOR in certified funds/or due AL BANK, TO wire TCFtransfer, BANK, isSUCwithin twenty-four (24) hours. fee shall beGARFIELD paid by the CESSOR TO BANK OF No CHICAGO mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate RIDGE AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE PROVISIONS pursuant to its credit bid AGREEMENT, at the sale or DATED by any OF A CERTAIN TRUST mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor THE 14TH DAY OF MAY 1977, AND KNOWN AS acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in TRUST NUMBER 77-5-5, ORLAND GOLF VIEW and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1204744. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1204744 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 10011 TJSC#: 34-384 I589563

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For Sale For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY A S � TRUSTEE FOR HSI ASSET SECURITIZATION C O R P � TRUST 2007-NC1; P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � WOJCIECH KOPEC AKA WOJCIECH MAREK K O P E C ; � DOROTA KOPEC; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON R E C O R D � C L A I M A N T S ; � D e f e n d a n t s , � 12 CH 23202 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on January 10, 2014 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, April 11, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-14-219-047-0000. Commonly known as 10343 South 84th Avenue, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled at most only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's a t t o r n e y . � Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F12050317 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I593153

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ARTA GASHI A/K/A ARTA BUSTAMI, HICKORY POINTE CONDOMINIUMS, CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA), N.A. Defendants 12 CH 024614 9440 S. 79TH COURT UNIT #3SE HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 21, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 21, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9440 S. 79TH COURT UNIT #3SE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-01-303-019-1009. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-11094. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-11094 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 024614 TJSC#: 34-2610 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I591782

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“10 in the Park” NEW as of 7/7/11 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.ROMAN MIASKOWSKI, EDYTA MIASKOWSKI, FIRST MIDWEST BANK, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED AUGUST 5, 2008 A/K/A TRUST NUMBER 1-7623, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF FIRST MIDWEST BANK U/T/A DATED AUGUST 5, 2008 A/K/A TRUST NUMBER 1-7623, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 13 CH 017636 9114 S. 82ND AVENUE HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 7, 2014, Auction.com, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on April 9, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive (in the Auction.com room), CHICAGO, IL, 60654, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 9114 S. 82ND AVENUE, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-02-418-024. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-16962. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-16962 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 017636 TJSC#: 34-830 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I591442

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.


8

Section 2 Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Christ Lutheran Church, Orland Park, has an evening janitorial position open. Interested parties need to fill out an application. Applications can be downloaded from www.christlutheranorland. com and click Facility Use. This position includes general housekeeping duties 4 evenings a week and Saturdays (15 -19 hours total). Job is contingent on successful completion of drug screening and background checks.

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This newspaper strives to monitor the classified ads it prints. However, when an ad is submitted from outside this area, it is often impossible for us to check its credibility. Therefore, we suggest caution when answering ads with offers that seem too good to be true.

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The Regional News - The Reporter

and each program. It’s reflected in the research our faculty spearhead, the patents we earn, and the awards our students win. We don’t do any of these things for the accolades. We do them because we think there’s no such thing as too ambitious.

siu.edu


The Regional News - The Reporter

7

Thursday, March 6, 2014 Section 2

Out & About

9

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Videoview

Broaden Your Horizons This week

Mary Lou Edwards

Stories from the heart luncheon

Stories from the Heart by local author Mary Lou Edwards will be presented at a luncheon program on Tuesday, March 11, from noon to 2 p.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park. Author and humorist Mary Lou Edwards returns to The Center to share more stories and memoirs from her poignant and at times hilarious coming-of-age memoirs of her childhood in Chicago’s Bridgeport neighborhood. Edwards blends ingredients of family complexities with divine irreverence. Her slice of life stories reveal a time that was, and yet, is. The luncheon begins at noon, costs $17 and requires advance reservations. For more information, call The Center at 3613650.

‘Letters to Sala’ at Mother McAuley Mother McAuley Liberal Arts High School juniors Elizabeth Khouri, of Palos Hills, and Jessica Pedroza, of Orland Park, will appear in the school’s upcoming production of “Letters to Sala” this Friday and Saturday, March 7 and 8, at 7 p.m. in the Auditorium. Khouri and Pedroza are members of the Theatre Seminar I class at Mother McAuley, which is composed of juniors from McAuley and Brother Rice. As part of the class, the students work in all stages of production, including building the set, finding costumes and props and performing in the show. The dramatic play “Letters to Sala” is adapted from the book “Sala’s Gift” by Ann Kirchner and tells the story of a young girl’s survival during wartime Germany. She was sent through seven Nazi labor camps during a five-year period, writing more than 350 letters about her experiences. Miraculously, she was

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able to hide these letters and resurfaces them 50 years later, when she shows the letters to her daughter and granddaughters. Khouri will portray various characters in the performance on Friday evening. Throughout the show, she will play Sala’s sister as well as three different girls Sala befriends in the labor camps. The ability to move so fluidly between characters speaks to her acting skills. Pedroza will portray Caroline, Sala’s granddaughter, in the performance on Saturday evening. The role is demanding and gives Pedroza an opportunity to shine. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door. McAuley is at 3737 W. 99th St. in Chicago.

1. Dark Horse, Katy Perry, featuring Juicy J, Capitol Records (Universal) 2. Happy, Pharrell Williams, Backlot Music 3. Talk Dirty, Jason Derulo, featuring 2 Chainz, Warner Bros. 4. Say Something, A Great Big World & Christina Aguilera, Epic 5. Drunk in Love, Beyonce, featuring Jay Z, Sony 6. Counting Stars, OneRepublic, Interscope Records 7. Timber, Pitbull, featuring Kesha, Mr.305/Polo Grounds Music/RCA Records 8. Pompeii, Bastille, Virgin (Universal)

Family pottery

(NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.) STARTING THIS WEEK: “THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE”: Having won the survival competition doesn’t mean easier times for Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence) — far from it, in fact — in the well-done first film sequel from Suzanne Collins’ novels. What’s intended as an inspirational victory tour causes an unexpected rebellion, prompting officials to put Katniss into another Hunger Games in a strategy to solve their problem. Returning cast members also include Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, Stanley Tucci and Donald Sutherland; among notable newcomers are Philip Seymour Hoffman and Jena Malone. DVD extras: audio commentary by director Francis Lawrence and producer Nina Jacobson; deleted scenes. *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on Bluray and On Demand) “12 YEARS A SLAVE”: The true story of Solomon Northup — a free man in the North who was kidnapped and became enslaved in the South — is told in director Steve McQueen’s superb telling of Northup’s own book, which resulted in nine Oscar nominations including best picture and best actor for Chiwetel Ejiofor as Northup. The film put co-star Lupita Nyong’o on the awards fast track for her wrenching portrayal of another slave; additional cast members include a chilling Michael Fassbender, Sarah Paulson, Benedict Cumberbatch, Sarah Paulson, Alfre Woodard, Michael K. Williams, Paul Dano and Brad Pitt ... who also was a producer of the movie. **** (R: AS, N, P) (Also on Blu-ray; starts March 18 on On Demand)

A pottery class for families will be hosted at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts on Wednesdays, March 12 and 19, from 6:30 to 7:30 pm. The Log Cabin Art Center is located at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Instructor Heather Young invites families with children of any age to make spring flower pots, using pinch pot and coil pot techniques and adding surface textures and details of their choice. They build the pots on March 12 and come back to glaze their creations on March 19. The class fee is $16 per person and includes all supplies and two kiln firings. Advance reservations are required. Call The Calligraphy class A new session of Calligraphy Center at 361-3650. Classes begins at The Log Cabin Center for the Arts on Monday Vibraphonist afternoon, March 10, 1 to 3:30 Glenn Ellison p.m., at 12700 Southwest HighVibraphonist Glenn Ellison way in Palos Park. will present an evening of music Led by artist Marge Boyd of at The Center, 12700 Southwest Frankfort, calligraphy students Highway, Palos Park, on Sunlearn the beautiful art of fine day, March 16, beginning with a lettering. In the course of a corned beef dinner at 5:30 p.m. year, calligraphy students learn Music instructor and band the uncial, italic, and book-hand director Glenn Ellison, with styles of writing. They also cre- vocalist Sally Kokos, will enterate a small handmade book to tain the audience with a vibrawhich they add lettering and phone program including popuother decorations. lar swing standards from Glenn The class meets every Mon- Miller, Duke Ellington, Lionel day for six sessions and costs Hampton, and Frank Sinatra. $103. A list of required supplies Ellison will explain and demonis available at The Center. Ad- strate the use of the vibraphone, vance registration is required. a member of the percussion famCall 361-3650. ily of instruments. Ellison is performing as part Gospels study group of the Emerson Hill series at A Gospel study group will meet The Center. The evening will at The Center ,12700 Southwest begin with supper at 5:30 p.m., Highway, Palos Park, on four followed by the recital at 6:30 Mondays beginning March 10, p.m. Supper cost $18 per perat 10:30 a.m. son and requires advance resParticipants will view a DVD ervations. For reservations and series in which the Rev. Bill further information, interested Burke takes on the personas persons should call The Center of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and at (708) 361-3650. John as they speak to their early Spring papermaking Christian communities. Following the viewing, Rich Homa will workshop lead the group in discussion. “OLDBOY”: In director Spike Artist Marilyn VandenBout of Everyone is welcome. There Evergreen Park will offer a pa- Lee’s take on a celebrated Korean is a class fee of $5 per week and permaking workshop on Wednes- melodrama, Josh Brolin plays an pre-registration is required. Call day, March 19, from 6:30 to 8:30 advertising man abducted and The Center at 361-3650. p.m. at the Log Cabin Center kept in a room for 20 years while for the Arts, 12700 Southwest the outside world is led to believe he killed his wife. After his twoHighway in Palos Park. Men’s point of view VandenBout will help students decade imprisonment ends, he’s spirituality group A men’s spiritual discussion to create spring-colored hand- determined to find whoever was group will meet at The Center made papers that can be used for responsible for his long captivity ,12700 Southwest Highway, cards, stationery, picture mats, or ... and the outcome definitely isn’t Palos Park, on Tuesday March collages. The class cost $14 plus pretty. Elizabeth Olsen, Sharlto $5 materials fee. Advance regis- Copley (“District 9”) and Michael 11, at 7 p.m. Bill Hopkins will lead a discus- tration is required. For further Imperioli (“The Sopranos”) also sion about the book “The Ethio- information, call (708) 361-3650. star. DVD extras: two “makingpian Tattoo Shop” by Edward Hays. Hopkins suggests that 2014 2012 42nd participants read the following four parables from the book: “The Magi,” “The Cobbler,” “The Magic Folger’s Coffee Can,” and “The Judgment Day.” Known as Men’s Point of View, Saturday, March 8th, 2014 - 10am to 5pm the discussion group was formed Sunday, March 9 th, 2014 - 11am to 4pm last fall by Hopkins, along with Dan Morley, George Harris, and John Andringa.

1. Thor: The Dark World, Walt Disney Studios Motion Everyone is welcome. No fee Pictures, PG-13 is charged, but pre-registration 2. Gravity, Warner Bros., PG- is requested. Call The Center at 13 361-3650. 3. Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2, Sony Pictures. PG 4. Captain Phillips, Sony Pictures, PG-13 5. Ender’s Game, Summit Entertainment, PG-13 6. Riddick, Universal Pictures, R 7. Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa, Paramount Pictures, R 8. Insidious, Chapter 2, FilmDistrict, PG-13 9. Carrie, Sony Pictures, R 10. Lee Daniels’ The Butler, The Weinstein Company, PG-13

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by Jay Bobbin

Glass Sale & Show

www.20-30-40glasssociety.org

of” documentaries. *** (R: AS, N, P, GV) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand) “HOURS”: One of the last films completed by the late Paul Walker (“The Fast and the Furious”), this drama casts the actor as a man whose personal dilemmas are compounded by the arrival of Hurricane Katrina. The cataclysm hits just as his wife gives birth prematurely, and as his newborn daughter struggles to

survive in a New Orleans hospital that’s being evacuated, the man has to make several immediate and desperate choices. DVD extra: music video. *** (PG-13: AS, V) (Also on On Demand) “THE GRANDMASTER”: Ip Man, the martial arts master whose disciples included Bruce Lee, has gotten a lot of movie attention lately. Part of that wave is this Oscar-nominated (Continued on page 10)

Submitted photo

Orland students display artworks at the library Orland School District 135 students celebrate National Youth Art Month with a student art exhibit at the Orland Park Public Library throughout the March. A reception highlighting the students will be held on Wednesday, March 12, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., at the library, 14921 S. Ravinia Ave. The community is invited to view and enjoy the artwork of students in 1st through 8th grades created in a variety of mediums. Each year, District 135 art educators work with the library in creating the community month-long exhibition as a way to commemorate National Youth Art Month. Shown are Center School 2nd-graders Taylor Wilbanks and Nick Bestrick, displaying their mosaic projects.

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10 Section 2

Thursday, March 6, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Voices soar at Orland Township’s Senior American Idol auditions by Megan St. John Orland Township The tension was thick as the contestants waited for their numbers to be called. One by one they left the waiting area and entered the audition room where they had two minutes to wow the judges and claim their spot as a competitor in this year’s Senior American Idol. As voices boomed, the room filled with one colorful melody after another. And as the judges tapped their feet to the a capella beats, it was apparent the contenders were hitting all the right notes. More than 20 people auditioned on Feb. 20 for Orland Township’s 2014 production of Senior American Idol. With each voice possessing a tremendous amount of musical talent and its own unique style, the judges faced a difficult task when it came time to pick the 16 contestants who would be singing in the spotlight at the show in May. Orland Township’s Senior American Idol took the stage for the first time in 2013; 16 participants competed in front of a panel of judges and more than 700 audience members for the title of Senior American Idol. This year’s event, which will be held at Georgio’s Banquets in Orland Park from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Tuesday, May 6, is sure to be another hit. “Senior American Idol is a wildly entertaining event that not only gets our seniors in-

by Jeraldine Saunders ARIES (Mar 21-Apr. 19): Actions speak louder than words. You may put too much emphasis on appearances and charm this week, when it’s what you actually do that concerns people the most. Performing a kind act for someone will get you further than meaningless sweet-talk. TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Don’t pick favorites. To satisfactorily strike a compromise in the week ahead, you must find a solution that benefits everyone equally. Beware of those who may try to buddy up to you just to get a bigger slice of the pie. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t jump to conclusions. When a situation may have those around you ready to take immediate action this week, it may be wiser to adopt a waitand-see approach. Don’t allow uncertainty and fear to spur a poor decision. CANCER (June 21-July 22): There are two sides to every story. Don’t accept someone’s viewpoint as gospel simply because that was the one you heard first. Make sure you have all the facts at your disposal before reaching any conclusions in the week ahead.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Accentuate the positive. Make an effort to focus on the good things going on in your life during the coming week. Being optimistic will make you more appealing to others and soon you’ll find the dice rolling in your favor. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There’s no shame in taking a short-cut. You shouldn’t wear yourself out in the upcoming week when you can achieve your goals with minimal effort. Use free time to socialize and share ideas with those around you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.): Enjoy tea for two. While you may not be ready to declare someone your soul mate, you can spend a pleasant afternoon in the week ahead with a person you’re proud to call a friend. Don’t plead poverty when it comes time to pay the tab. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Good friends don’t cost a thing. With that in mind, you’d be well served by spending the day with your inner circle of close pals rather than going on a shopping spree. The best way to spend money this week is to not spend it at all.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Make sure that the only toes you’re standing on are your own. You may be able to accomplish your goals with ease, but in doing so you may infringe upon someone else’s territory. Think things over before taking action in the week ahead. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Change your perspective. You may be too close to a matter to see things objectively, so it may be in your best interest to get some distance so you can look at the situation from a different angle. Ignore unfounded suspicions this week. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The only thing to fear is fear itself. In the week ahead, you may find that your doubts are the only thing holding back your progress. Be careful that those with whom you’ve placed your trust are truly dependable. PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Ignoring a problem won’t make it go away. In fact, the longer you leave a situation to fester on its own, the worse it will get. In the week ahead, take immediate action to set things right before they get out of hand.

Submitted photo

singer casts Oscar Isaac in the “DELIVERY MAN” (March title role; Carey Mulligan, John 25): Vince Vaughn plays a onceGoodman and Justin Timberlake frequent sperm donor troubled also appear. (R: AS, P) when many of his offspring want “DEVIOUS MAIDS: THE to know who their father is. (PG(Continued from page 9) COMPLETE FIRST SEASON” 13: AS, P, V) adventure from writer-director miss it.” (March 18): Eva Longoria reteams FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE Tickets for Senior American Wong Kar Wai, with Tony Leung with “Desperate Housewives” KEY: AS, adult situations; N, as the kung fu legend whose Idol cost $30, available now at mentor Marc Cherry as executive nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; the Orland Township office, experiences in 1930s China producers of this Lifetime series; GV, particularly graphic prompted him to pass his lessons 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland stars include Susan Lucci. (Not violence. and skills to another generation. Park. rated: AS, P, V) Martin Scorsese is credited as “FROZEN” (March 18): A the film’s American “presenter.” Why not dine young woman (voice of Kristen DVD extras: two “making-of” Bell) seeks her runaway sister out tonight? documentaries; behind-the(voice of Idina Menzel), who scenes footage; interview with Support your can turn anything or anyone to Bruce Lee’s daughter Shannon. ice, in the animated Disney hit. local restaurants! in the hospital in the remake of *** (PG-13: AS, P, V) (Also on (PG: AS) Blu-ray) “A Farewell to Arms.” (In 1957, “COLD COMES THE I went to Rome with Elaine as NIGHT”: Now legendary — her secretary for the making of this David O. Selznick film and and much-honored — for his Landscape Architects & Contractors got a rousing education for three ruthlessness as Walter White months. Elaine and I each had dibs on TV’s “Breaking Bad,” Bryan on Rock, who was then married Cranston adds another heinous and we had no clue that he was character to his resume in this gay. He was a dynamite guy in any suspense tale. He plays a criminal case.) When the clips of Elaine’s whose failing eyesight prompts then fiance, Ben Gazzara, came him to take a motel owner (Alice up, I had to gulp with memory of Eve, “Star Trek Into Darkness”) what a talent the actor was and hostage, forcing her to help him how good-looking. Likewise, later recover money taken from him I was struck emotionally by a few by a corrupt policeman (Logan scenes of Elaine’s late husband, Marshall-Green). An ever-shifting John Bay, a comic genius who died game of “Whose side are you on?” all too young. Elaine follows that then develops. DVD extras: deleted by saying she was happiest then scenes. *** (R: AS, P, V) (Also on and never found such happiness Blu-ray and On Demand) COMING SOON: “THE again. Except for the documentary BOOK THIEF” (March 11): • Snow & Ice Removal • Custom Hardscapes ending about 17 times (and I guess A youngster (Sophie Nelisse) endures the tension of World War • Property Master Planning/ Phasing there is so much about Elaine Stritch, I suppose it couldn’t help II by stealing books and sharing • Ponds & Water Features itself) I would give this great effort them with others. (PG-13: AS, • Retaining Walls & Natural Stone an A-plus. The same A-plus I have V) “HOMEFRONT” (March given Elaine since the moment I • Landscapes Design first met her and this is biased, as 11): Sylvester Stallone wrote • Garden Design & Lawn Maintenance she has added so much to my life. the screenplay for this action tale, casting Jason Statham as • Free Estimates There aren’t many friendships like this. We have never quarreled; we an ex-DEA agent who faces off have always been truthful with one against a drug kingpin (James another and I have only the laughs Franco). (R: AS, P, V) “INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS” to remember. So I say to her - keep on keeping (March 11): Joel and Ethan Coen’s www.beverlyenvironmental.com on! Fear of falling? Get a walker. portrait of an early-1960s folk

Pat O’Neal impressed the judges with her beautiful voice at Senior American Idol auditions held on Feb. 20. She will be performing in the show, which will be held on May 6 at Georgio’s Banquets in Orland Park. Tickets cost $30, available at the Orland Township office. volved in the community but also benefits the Orland Township Scholarship Foundation,” said Supervisor Paul O’Grady. “It’s a fun night that supports a great cause- you won’t want to

Liz Smith by Liz Smith

New documentary glorifies the great Elaine Stritch “OLD AGE ain’t no place for sissies!” Elaine Stritch, the unmitigated queen of Broadway, evoked this Bette Davis quote more than once in her night at the Paley Center in the East 50s. Stritchie was back in town from her “retirement” in Birmingham, Mich., to celebrate the kick-off of the coming HBO documentary on her life and times, made by the popular Chiemi Karasawa. It’s called “Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me” and the audience, crammed into an overflowing little auditorium (they needed Lincoln Center for the phenomenon that is my longtime friend Elaine) went wild over and over for the film clips — past and present — of their favorite. THE audience boasted at least two of theater’s greatest directors, George C. Wolfe and Jack O’Brien, and there may have been more. Hard to tell in the crush but there were also talents galore who all glory in Elaine’s fame and longevity. HBO airs this in the spring. To add luster to this enterprise, one of the producers — named Alec Baldwin — was there in person to open things up. (Need I add that Mr. Baldwin is the paparazzi-gossip column’s favorite target these days and an actor of note himself. Elaine won an Emmy playing his horrible mother in TV’s late lamented “30 Rock.” Also noteworthy was an appearance in the film of the late

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James Gandolfini, speaking and showing his amused and sexy appreciation of Elaine. The film also offers Tina Fey, Hunter Ryan Herdlicka, Paul Iacono, Cherry Jones, Nathan Lane, Ramona Mallory, Tracy Morgan, John Turturro and the great producer Hal Prince. Mr. Prince, who made the hit “Company,” provided the best sumup of Elaine Stritch — vulnerable, still a Catholic schoolgirl under her veneer of frightened vulgarity, confused and ever picking herself up off the floor of life. MY own personal best “like” moment in this 80 minutes of uphill-downhill history of a giant, electrifying talent faltering into the inevitable, is when Elaine is trying to record the Stephen Sondheim score from “Company.” She can’t get it right for herself, or for Sondheim, but keeps trying until she does and dances in triumph around the studio. That — and sentimentally for me — the film clip of a young Elaine singing a duet with actor Russell Nype in 1953. This was in Chicago when I first met her. She was touring as the lead in “Call Me Madam” — playing a diplomatic, middle-aged role when she was still younger than springtime. She did the part much better than Ethel Merman on Broadway. I also relished clips of Elaine as the nurse with bottles of brandy in (E-mail Liz Smith at MES3838@ her bosom, visiting Rock Hudson aol.com.)

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 3

Thursday, March 6, 2014

SouthSide iriSh Parade SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014

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A swing at some myths about St. Patrick’s Day Mama mia, it’s almost time for St. Patrick’s Day. Pip, pip, cheerio, it’s almost time for St. Patrick’s Day. Gie it laldy, it’s almost time for St. Patrick’s Day. On March 17, let’s break out the ziti, steak and kidney pudding or cock-a-leekie soup. Why? Because St. Patrick is either Italian, English or Scottish but he was not Irish. A few years ago, I was at church and our priest told us the story on how St. Patrick was actually Italian but was brought to Ireland as a slave, where he made his bones as a missionary and bishop. It you can’t believe your own priest, who can you believe? But the Internet begs to differ. And if you can’t believe the Internet, what can you believe? The three prevailing theories is that this man is either Italian, English or Scottish and there might even be a second St. Patrick in the mix to confuse things even more. But who cares, St. Patrick’s Day is all about having fun eating and boozing it up, right? Well… According to History.com, St. Patrick’s feast was “a somber occasion in quiet prayer at church or at home. That started to change

when Irish i m m i grants living in the United States began organizing parades and other events on March 17 as a show of pride.” And about this corn beef and cabbage? Hist o r y. c o m debunks that, too. “On St. Patrick’s D a y , countless merrymakers in t h e

United States, Canada and elsewhere savor copious plates of corned beef and cabbage,’’ the site says. “In Ireland, however, a type of bacon similar to ham is the customary protein on the holiday table. In the late 19th century, Irish immigrants in New York City’s Lower East Side supposedly substituted corned beef, which they bought from their Jewish neighbors, in order to save money. “That’s not to say salt-cured beef isn’t a traditional Irish dish; pork, however, has historically

J-Pegs By Jeff Vorva been more widely available on the Emerald Isle.’’ Oh, and about the wearing of the green? My wife Maggie, who is Irish, is a big believer in wearing that color on March 17 while I tend to forget. Well. My new favorite website History.com comes to my aid. “The Irish countryside may be many shades of green, but knights in the Order of St. Patrick wore a color known as St. Patrick’s blue,” it said. “Why did green become so emblematic of St. Patrick that people began drinking green beer, wearing green and, of course, dyeing the Chicago River green to mark the holiday he inspired? The association probably dates back to the 18th century, when supporters of Irish independence used the color to represent their cause.’’ So there are plenty of myths and opinions out there about this holiday and we’ll probably never know what’s right or what’s wrong. If you wear a blue shirt, savor some cock-a-leekie soup and stay at home quietly and pray, you may be more in the spirit of St. Patrick’s Day than those who are eating and drinking to excess. But it might not be as much fun.

FUN at FOX’S ~ St. Patrick’s Day Weekend and All of March!

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Getting a jump on St. Patrick’s Day Sailor Diez of Milwaukee (top photo) visited Oak Lawn on Sunday and took home quite a haul of prizes as the 15-month-old competed in the Irish Princess contest at the Oak Lawn Hilton, sponsored by the Illinois Natural Pageants. Avangeline K., of Central Illinois (bottom photo) gets ready to take the stage for the contest, which featured girls from various ages showing off talent, beauty and personality.

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2

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 3

The Regional News - The Reporter

Evergreen Park sees enormous progress Submitted by The Village of Evergreen Park The Village of Evergreen Park has, indeed, seen a year of tremendous progress in the vitality and strength of its community. The former Golf Course property nears its complete conversion to retail and green space. The land was sold by its owner to a developer; the Village purchased the western half of the property to keep as park area, known as 50Acre Park. The driving range opened during the summer of 2013 to tremendous success. Currently, the famed “sledding hill� is open to kids of all ages. In fact, the recent snowfall gave residents the perfect opportunity to use the venue during the Christmas vacation. When the park officially opens this spring, we will see a dog park, disc golf, a small farm, and a perfect place to enjoy a pastoral scene. This area, combined with the other parks in the Village, works out to almost 100 acres of green space contained within what would be considered a small geographic region. The eastern half of the property opened during the summer, making a home for a Menards, a Meijer Department Store, Michael’s Crafts and Ross Dress For Less. It has been a smooth conversion. Evergreen Park bid a farewell to a longtime recreational tradition when Bleekers closed its doors in the fall of 2013. The property was sold to Binny’s Beverage Depot, which opened to great fanfare for the holidays. They have even paid homage to Bleekers, with a little museum area containing treasured souvenirs from the storied bowlAcross the street, the building formerly occupied by Karson’s Restaurant underwent a major transformation as Pappys owner George Pappas re-invested in the neighborhood. His “Tavern In The Green� is a beautifully renovated dining establishment which looks to be here for the long term. Groundbreaking took place at the site of the old Webb Ford property in late October, as the lot will soon be transformed into a Mariano’s Fresh Market, along with a PetSmart store. But Evergreen Park is about more than the big box stores. We continue to support our mainstay local stores that have been the bread and butter of this community for many years. In fact, a vacant lot near 95th and California has been converted into a municipal lot to help provide parking spaces for those small businesses in and around that area. Evergreen Park continues to welcome entrepreneurs who have the desire to set up shop in the Village. All Evergreen Park Departments continue their efforts to provide residents with the best in services. The Police Department, under the guidance of

Chief Michael Saunders, ensures that the Village is a safe place to work and to live. The Fire Department, under Chief Ron Kleinhaus, responds immediately to every emergency. The Public Works Department maintains the streets, identifying streets that need repair and maintenance, and then keeping the roadways clean during inclement weather. The Water Division responds immediately to water-related issues; a new meter-reading program ensures that water usage is correctly recorded. The Evergreen Park Recreation Department continues a fine tradition of community events throughout the year. The highlight of the summer, of course, is the Annual Independence Parade and Fireworks Show. Tens of thousands of people turn out for this safe and family-oriented event. Another Recreation Department highlight is the Free Summer Concert series in Klein Park. In addition, the Community Center is the first stop of village residents to keep their children active in a wide-range of events, classes and programs. The Youth Commission keeps a safe place available for kids from 6th grade through High School, with games, refreshments and good fellowship. The Office of Citizens Services was quite shaken with the passing of Director Jolene Churak this past autumn. Jolene was a great friend to countless people in and around Evergreen Park and she will be missed beyond measure. One of Jolene’s great strengths was keeping a strong support staff, which is why Mary Ann Diehl is more than qualified and ready to take the helm as Citizens Services Director. Not only has the village seen enormous progress in 2013, but it continues a tradition of progress over the last decade or more under leadership of Mayor James Sexton, Village Clerk Cathy Aparo and the Board of Trustees, currently Carol Kyle, Mary Keane, Dan McKeown, Mark Marzullo, Jim McQuillan and Mark Phelan. Former Trustee Jerry Bosch continues on the Village as Chairman of the Evergreen Park Historical Commission, as well as Legislative Liaison to the Mayor. As always, the Mayor has an open door policy at the Village. Any resident or prospective entrepreneur is welcome to stop by the Administration Building, or call and talk to the Mayor about any issue. A new and improved website has increased communication between the Village and its residents, located at www.evergreenpark-ill.com. The Village of Evergreen Park, now 120 years old, looks forward to continued growth in the future, keeping our focus on what is best for the community and its residents.

Photo by Art Morhgan

Brother and sister Irish dancers from McNamara Irish Academy, Abbie (age 10) and Ethan (age 7) Nelson perform for the South Side Irish Parade Grand Marshal announcement. The Mulliganeers, a Chicago-based charity, was tapped collectively as grand marshal.

Area charity, The Mulliganeers, tapped as parade’s Grand Marshal County Fair Foods named parade honoree The South Side Irish Parade Committee gathered amid single-digit temperatures on the first Thursday morning in February to announce the 2014 Parade Grand Marshal and honoree during a ceremony held at local Beverly neighborhood grocery store, County Fair Foods. This year’s parade Grand Marshal is the Mulliganeers, a Chicagoland non-profit organization dedicated to fundraising for children facing extensive medical challenges and their families. Since 1995, the volunteerbased group has been giving kids a second chance providing needed financial assistance and a circle of support to families throughout Chicago including many in the Beverly and Mount Greenwood communities. The Parade Committee also selected County Fair Foods as this year’s Honoree as the family-owned, independent grocer, kicks off its 50th

   

                         

 

  

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anniversary on Western Avenue along the parade route. “The original co-founders of the parade launched a tradition that has now become an annual celebration of faith, family, community and Irish heritage and culture�, said Kevin Coakley, co-chair of the parade committee. In 1979 Coakley’s father, Pat, helped create the parade along with his friend George Hendry. “The first parade began with myself and 16 other neighborhood kids marching around the blocks of 109th Street, Washtenaw and Talman,adds Coakley.� Coakley reflected on how the parade has grown from the inaugural group pushing a baby buggy covered with Shamrocks and 26 flags of Ireland to today’s 100 entries and thousands of participants in the mile-long march down Western Avenue. “The Mulliganeers share the same mission of Kevin’s father and other event founders,� said Tom McGourty, co-chair of the parade committee. “This year’s Grand Marshal helps us keep our tradition alive as we continue to illustrate ways to celebrate faith, family and community. The Mulliganeers began with a group of friends who often heard tragic stories involving children. They decided to work together and began to build the volunteer based fundraising organization that helps families dealing with life changing circumstances such as accidents and medical diagnosis.� To date, the Mulliganeers have been able to distribute $4.3 million dollars providing over 260 kids and families with support at the most challenging times. “We are extremely honored to be the 2014 South Side Irish Parade Grand Marshal,� said Mulliganeer executive board member, Mike Zindrick. “We look forward to joining this annual tradition.� Three families who have received assistance from the Mulliganeers also attended the ceremony sharing some of their personal day-to-day struggles and triumphs as well as how the Mulliganeers have made their lives a little easier.

Photo by Art Morhgan

Looking forward to spring, banners commemorating the South Side Irish Parade Grand Marshal and honoree were unveiled at a ceremony at County Fair in Beverly. Parade Honoree County Fair Foods hosted the event in their south parking lot where two, colorful, six-foot long banners honoring both the Mulliganeers and County Fair Foods were unveiled as they hung from the store’s silo tower. “We are thrilled to be a part of the Beverly, Morgan Park and Mount Greenwood communities,� said Tom Baffes, president of County Fair Foods. “County Fair is often referred to as the ‘town square’ among area residents for the feeling of community that is shared in the way they do business,� said Coakley. “We are pleased to honor them for not only being a successful local business but for also supporting the community over the last 50 years, supplying us with countless local jobs, and continuing support for neighborhood schools, parishes and institutions�, adds Coakley. County Fair was also moved

by the charitable work of the Mulliganeers and announced a plan to help support the Mulliganeers as they host a “Drop a Mulligan for the Mulliganeers� donation day at County Fair on Saturday, March 8, as everyone ramps up for Parade Day. Area residents are encouraged to join in the effort, learn more about the organization and how they too can help give kids a second chance. The 2014 South Side Irish Parade is scheduled to step off on Sunday, March 16, at noon on 103rd and Western Avenue. Last year’s Parade attracted over 155,000 spectators and participants.The South Side Irish St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Heritage Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that works hard to ensure a safe, family-friendly event. For donation information, call Julie Reilly at (630) 7249321 or mulliganeers.julie@ yahoo.com.

Fox’s: A wonderful family place Submitted by Fox’s Restaurant Fox’s Restaurant and Pub is a wonderful place to take your family to celebrate the holidays, good grades or anything else that you decide to with your family. As far as family friendly restaurants go, Fox’s Restaurants provide a great Italian restaurant menu that will be enjoyed by your entire family. There are a number of different Italian restaurants in the greater Chicago area, and there are plenty that are really fancy and require its guests to dress up in order to visit them. However, many

families that are looking for a night out, with their children and relatives, find it is a huge hassle to get all dolled up for a night out, and then do not go to places where they have to wear suits and ties, and dresses for dinner. On the other hand, there are some occasions where it is nice to get your family dressed up and celebrate certain occasions, but lacking a place to do so creates additional problems for families. Fox’s Restaurant poses the ideal solution to this quandary, in that the restaurants we own, allow you to come in for a casual dinner when you decide you don’t want to cook,

and give you a very nice atmosphere to go when you want to dress up and celebrate a night on the town. We strive to produce the best Italian-American food for our patrons, which is why we have hired the best chefs, the friendliest hosts and hostesses, and the most efficient servers in the area for our businesses. Every visit to Fox’s Restaurant is a new experience for the food you order, and give you the perfect outlet to enjoy Italian food brought to you, or good, classic, American cuisine if you are not in the mood to try something from distant shores.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, March 6, 2014

See what everyone is talking about at the 2014 Kids Expo Expect family fun at the 2014 Kids Expo. Ronald McDonald, Bricks 4 Kidz, Juggling Dave, and the Radio Disney Road Crew Chicago are just some of the highlights of Family Time Magazine’s 9th Annual Kids Expo 2014, set for March 22nd and 23rd at the Tinley Park Convention Center, 18501 S. Harlem Avenue. Excitement is at an all time high as the weekend draws near for what promises to be the biggest and best Kids Expo ever with new attractions. “We have so many great attractions planned for this year’s expo. Families will not want to miss this weekend event,” said Caroline O’Connell, Family Time Magazine’s publisher and creator, as well as the founder of the Kids Expo. This year the Kids Expo will have a large petting zoo courtesy of Santa’s Village Azoosment Park. Children will sure to be pleased with a large selection of animals to interact with. The animals for the large petting zoo consist of goats, sheep, ducks, chickens, rabbits, mini-donkey, llama and calf. Don’t miss this fun attraction! The Kids Expo is thrilled to have the Lavin-Cassidy Irish Dancers performing this year. The Lavin-Cassidy Irish School of Irish Dancing has inspired appreciation for the art of Irish Dance for more than 25 years. You won’t want to miss the Lavin-Cassidy Irish Dancers on stage at the 2014 Kids Expo! Another fun attraction for the kids is a three-hole putting course provided by Putting Around Town. Putting Around Town encourages youngsters to get involved with miniature golf through their fun courses. Home Depot will also be at the 2014 Kids Expo on Saturday. They are bringing with them

3

All Things Irish Orland Township Democrats Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

Orland Township Democratic Committeeman Daniel J. McLaughlin and the Orland Township Regular Democratic Organization will host the organization’s St. Patrick’s Day Party on Thursday, March 13. The festivities will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Riviera Country Club, 8801 West 143rd St. in Orland Park. Tickets are $35 per person with no charge for seniors. Event sponsorships are available at $500 for platinum, $300 for gold and $200 for silver. For more information, call 860-5664.

Switchback, Irish duo live

Theatre at the Center, 1040

Submitted by Brigid Bullington

Section 3

Ridge Road, Munster, Ind., will treat audiences to an oldfashioned St. Patrick’s Day celebration with the awardwinning Irish duo, Switchback, on Sunday, March 16 at, 7:30 p.m. American roots blended with Celtic soul, the musical partnership of Brian FitzGerald and Martin McCormack has achieved commercial success for over two decades. The duo recently released their 15th album, “Kanoka,” continuing their career-long interest in roots and American music. Coupled with a traditional Irish dinner preceding the performance, the night is sure to have everyone feeling the luck of the Irish this year! The dinner portion of the evening will include customary Irish favor-

ites such as Cream of Broccoli Soup, Corned Beef & Cabbage, Red Potatoes, Rye Bread, Irish Soda Bread and Irish Whiskey Cake. A cash bar will also be available. Individual tickets are $35. Dinner will be served from 5:30 to 7 p.m. for an additional $20 per person. Individual tickets are $35. Dinner will be served from 5:30 to 7 p.m. for an additional $20 per person. To purchase individual tickets call the Box Office at 219-836-3255 or Tickets.com at 800-511-1552. Gift certificates, perfect for all special occasions, are also available by calling the Box Office at 219-836-3255. For more information on Theatre at the Center, visit TheatreAtTheCenter.com.

Rep. Burke and Sen. Cunningham invite for Coffee and Conversation

Jack Bullington, Delaney Bullington, Kylie Collins, Conor Finn, In an effort to collect comLibby Gibbons, Kayla Harper, Courtney Mayo, Maura McInerney, munity input for this legislaInstructor: Laura Stack-Finn. tive session, state Rep. Kelly Burke, D-Evergreen Park, their Home Depot Workshop, a scooter, a Maru & Friends and state Sen. Bill Cunningwhere kids can build and create doll, and a bike. There will be a ham are hosting a “Coffee and climbing wall, inflatable bounc- Conversation” event Saturday a racecar. Over 13,000 people are ex- ers, singing and dancing, face March 15. “It’s important to maintain pected to attend this year’s Kids painting and pony rides. communication and Expo, which will run from 9 The cost for this year’s expo open a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, March is $10 for adults, $4 for children transparency so that con22nd and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 12 and younger, and free for se- stituents have an opportunity March 23rd. niors 65 and older and military to express their concerns,” More than 100 vendors are ex- personnel with identification. Burke said. “I encourage resipected at this year’s expo. They Parking is free. For more infor- dents to attend and bring any will showcase all things kids, mation about Kids Expo 2014, questions or ideas for this legfrom products and services to call (815) 806-8844 or visit www. islative session.” The event will be held from familytimemagazine.com. Visit camps and water parks. The expo will also include www.familytimemagazine.com 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Chicago Ridge Public Library, exciting giveaways, including for a $2 Off coupon.

10400 S. Oxford Ave. in Chicago Ridge. In addition to sponsoring legislation to improve policies in the state, Rep. Burke will have an active role in the state’s budgeting process this legislative session as a member of the House Appropriation Committees on General Services and Higher Education. “As Illinois continues to recover from the economic recession, we have to cut wasteful spending and protect the essential programs on which people depend,” Burke said. “We have to spend within our means, just as the families that we represent are forced

to do every day. I look forward to talking with local residents about the pressing issues that we face here in our area so that I can best advocate for their needs in Springfield.” For more information, call Burke’s constituent service office at 425-0571 or email kburke@kellyburkerep36. org. Burke represents the 36th District, which includes Evergreen Park and parts of Oak Lawn, Chicago Ridge, Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Palos Park, Willow Springs and Worth, and portions of Chicago’s 18th and 19th wards.

Some stats on the Irish in America Originally a religious holiday to honor St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the fifth century, St. Patrick’s Day has evolved into a celebration for all things Irish. The world’s first St. Patrick’s Day parade occurred on March 17, 1762, in New York City, featuring Irish soldiers serving in the English military. This parade became an annual event, with President Truman attending in 1948. Congress proclaimed March as IrishAmerican Heritage Month in 1995, and the President issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year. 100,003 — Population of South Bend, Ind., home to the Fighting Irish of the University of Notre Dame. About 10.4 percent of South Bend’s population claims Irish ancestry. 24.1% — Percentage of the Boston metropolitan area population that claims Irish ancestry, one of the highest percentages for the top 50 metro areas by population. Boston is home of the Celtics of the National Basketball Association. 78,390 and 16,167 — Population of New Rochelle, N.Y., and Moraga, Calif., home to the Gaels of Iona University

and St. Mary’s College of California, respectively. During college basketball’s March Madness, you will typically see these universities compete on the court, no doubt rooted on by some of the 8.4 percent of the New Rochelle population and 15.5 percent of the Moraga population that claim Irish ancestry.

Population

34.1 million—Number of U.S. residents who claimed Irish ancestry in 2012. This number was more than seven times the population of Ireland itself (4.6 million). Irish was the nation’s second most frequently reported ancestry, trailing only German. 22.6% — Percentage of the population in Massachusetts that claims Irish ancestry, which is among the highest in the nation. New York has 2.5 million people claiming Irish ancestry, which is among the most of any state. 39.2 years old — Median age of those who claim Irish ancestry, which is higher than U.S. residents as a whole at 37.4 years. 34.2% — Percentage of people of Irish ancestry, 25 or older, who had a bachelor’s degree or higher. In addition,

93.4 percent of Irish-Americans in this age group had at least a high school diploma. For the nation as a whole, the corresponding rates were 29.1 percent and 86.4 percent, respectively.

Economics

$59,220 — Median income for households headed by an Irish-American, higher than the $51,371 for all households. In addition, 7.4 percent of family households of Irish ancestry were in poverty, lower than the rate of 11.8 percent for all Americans. 41.1% — Percentage of employed civilian Irish-Americans 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations. Additionally, 25.9 percent worked in sales and office occupations; 15.9 percent in service occupations; 9.3 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations; and 7.7 percent in natural resources, construction and maintenance occupations. 68.9% — Percentage of householders of Irish ancestry who owned the home in which they live, with the remainder renting. For the nation as a whole, the homeownership

rate was 63.9 percent.

Places

16 — Number of places in the United States that share the name of Ireland’s capital, Dublin. The most recent population for Dublin, Calif., was 47,156. If you’re still not into the spirit of St. Paddy’s Day, then you might consider paying a visit to Emerald Isle, N.C., with 3,669 residents. Other appropriate places in which to spend the day: the township of Irishtown, Ill., several places or townships named Clover (in South Carolina, Illinois, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin) or one of the seven places that are named Shamrock.

The Celebration

25.9 billion — U.S. beef production in pounds in 2012. Corned beef is a traditional St. Patrick’s Day dish.

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St. Alexander School invites sponsors for 5K run/walk to benefit technology program St. Alexander School in Palos Heights seeks sponsors for its first 5K Raider Run/Walk to be held Saturday, April 5. The run-walk will begin at St. Alexander’s parking lot at 126th Street and 71st Avenue at 9 a.m. for runners and 9:05 a.m. for walkers. All ages are welcome to participate. The cost to register is $25 prior to March 19 and registration can be completed online at www.stalexanderschool. com (a $2.25 online processing fee will apply). The registration fee includes

race entry, participant bib, Dri-Fit T-shirt and post race snacks. The theme of the 5K is “Power Up For Technology.” All proceeds will benefit the school’s computer and and technology program. The 5K Raider Run/Walk route will continue through the streets of Palos Heights and finish back at St. Alexander. A post-race rally will be held at 10:30 a.m. and awards will be presented to the race winners. Business and corporate sponsorships are available. The

level of sponsorships are: • Gold sponsorship of $1,000 or more includes company name and logo on participant t-shirts, finish line banner, St. Alexander church bulletin listing and all Race thank you communications. • Sliver Sponsorship for $500 includes company name and logo on participant t-shirts and St. Alexander church bulletin listing. • Bronze Sponsorship for $250 includes company name and logo in St. Alexander church bulletin listing.

“Our sponsorship program gives companies a great opportunity to promote their business to the local Palos Heights community,” a 5K Raider Run/ Walk committee member explained. St. Alexander is a nationally recognized Blue Ribbon School. For more information and to register for St. Alexander’s 5K Run/Walk visit the school website at www.stalexanderschool.com, call the school’s office at 448-0408 or email Juliaobrienzwa@comcast.net for sponsorship information.

Annual St. Patrick’s Concert at Gaelic Park Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th St, Oak Forest, IL will host its annual St. Patrick’s Concert on Saturday March 15th, 2014. Paddy Homan will be accompanied on stage by some of Chicago’s most entertaining and talented musicians, Dennis Cahill on guitar, Teresa Shine on fiddle and the

legendary John Williams on accordion. Paddy Homan, a native of Co. Cork, Ireland is a natural entertainer, elevating traditional Irish songs to new heights, and who adds a layer of warmth and familiarity to all of his performances. He has earned his place beside a wide variety of talented

musicians who are recognized as the best in the business. Paddy Homan has received many awards, with the latest being 2014 Live Ireland Music Awards Best Male Vocal Album “The Hard Way Home” Doors open at 6.30pm with concert starting at 7.30pm. Admission is $20.00 and tick-

ets can be purchased in advance. In addition, The Cross Keys School of Irish Dance will perform an exhibition of Irish step dancing. For further information, please contact Gaelic Park at 708-687-9323 or visit the website at www.chicagogaelicpark. org.

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4

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 3

The Regional News - The Reporter

Annual St. Pat’s Extravaganza Submitted by Zante Lounge

Submitted photo

Queen of Peace students register to vote Deputy registrars from the Cook County Clerk’s office visited Queen of Peace High School in Burbank on Feb. 13 to register eligible students to vote. Due to a change in Illinois law, citizens who will be 18 years old on Election Day, Nov. 4, are now able to register to vote in the coming March primary elections. This was exciting news to many of the students who decided to take advantage of this opportunity. A number of juniors and seniors who met the age criteria registered and are excited for the opportunity to begin voting. Here, Peace seniors Angela Crea and Cassidy Oleksy register to vote.

It is that time of the year again, the Chicago River is dyed green, Western is packed with parade goers and Zante’s Lounge of Orland is transformed into O’Zante’s. This year they are starting off their three day extravaganza on Saturday, March 15th with Too White Crew, the one and only tribute band to the golden era of hip hop. Too White Crew is going to get your rump shaking in the heated tent at 8 p.m. Before you can even catch your breath the resident DJ will start his set inside the bar and keep you going until 3am. On Sunday, March 16th, Zante’s has a family friendly day set up with an all-ages show with the best Beatles

Favorite cover bands, Maggie Speaks at 8:30 p.m. Just in case you didn’t get enough the first time, Black Cadillac will take the stage again inside the bar at 10 p.m. followed by “God of Sound” DJ Dontas closing out the night. There will also be a raffle going on during the Extravaganza where a lucky winner will win a Trip for two to Ireland, airfare and hotel included. Keep a look out for the beautiful “Green Zante Girls” that will be “heating up” the tent during both events. Come join O’Zante Lounge and celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on March 16th and 17th. For more details call Zante Lounge at 708-364-0100 or check them out at www.zantelounge.com. Zante Lounge is located at 8888 W. 159th St. Orland Park.

cover band American English. Face painting will start at 5pm to get everyone nice and festive. At 6 p.m. Zante’s Lounge will be serving a complimentary Corned Beef dinner buffet. Of course it’s first come, first serve, while it lasts, so get there early. Trinity Irish dancers will start off the night in the heated tent at 6pm followed by American English. Black Cadillac will be playing all of your favorite hits ranging from the 80’s, classic rock, dance and new pop. Then take in the traditional Irish performance from the Emerald Society Bag Pipes & Drums at 8 p.m. After soaking in this classic Irish performance get ready to dance and sing the night away with everything from 50’s classics to top 40 hits that just dropped last week performed by one of Chicago’s

The origins of Chicago’s green river Shades of green are everywhere on St. Patrick’s Day. But arguably no green is more distinctive come Patty’s Day than the green flowing water of the Chicago River, which is dyed green each year in honor this beloved holiday. A series of natural and manmade rivers and canals with a combined length of 156 miles, the Chicago River runs through the city of Chicago, Ill., including its center. Today the river is comprised of the Main Stem, North Branch and the South Branch, which gets much of its water from Lake Michigan. The river has long been a center of industrialized operations, helping to foster trade to Illinois and other areas of the midwest. The Chicago River is also a tourist destination that takes on a new persona each season in late winter, when it becomes “green” and serves as the centerpiece of St. Patrick’s Day festivities in the Windy City. On the weekend closest to St. Patrick’s Day, workers add 40 pounds of powdered green vegetable dye into the water to turn the river green. The dye takes some time to dissipate, but eventually the river runs green in honor of St. Patrick. Dyeing the river green has been a tradition for more than 40 years, and it’s a tradition that actually arose out of a fluke discovery. In 1961, Stephen Bailey was speaking with a fellow plumber and noticed the plumber’s white coveralls were stained Kelly green. Bailey inquired as to how the coveralls got so green, and it was discovered that a fluorescein dye used to detect trace sources of illegal pollution being discarded into the river water was responsible. Bailey wondered if this dyeing of the water could become an annual tradition in

Residents of Chicago, Ill. see green in their city each St. Patrick’s Day, when the waters of the Chicago River are dyed green. Irish sea. While it is unlikely the green hue would remain, perhaps with some leprechaun magic, a green water highway could truly connect Chicago to Ireland. Various cities have tried to emulate the green river, but have not been able to achieve the same, vibrant green as Chicago. The dye mixture is a closely guarded secret. In 2009, First Lady Michelle Obama, a Chicago native, requested that the White House fountains be dyed green to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and perhaps bring a touch of home to Washington, D.C.

honor of St. Patrick’s Day and set forth a plan to achieve just that. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has since outlawed the use of fluorescein for this purpose, since it has been shown to be harmful. Now the St. Patrick’s Day Parade committee uses the vegetable dye, which is believed to be much safer. Because of connecting waterways, it is feasible that the green water of the Chicago River can flow into the Illinois River, to the Mississippi River, then out into the Atlantic gulf stream, and finally to the

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The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 3-A

5

SouthSide iriSh Parade SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014

Parade steps off at Noon • Western Ave. at 103rd to 115th St.

‘If it were not for the parade, I would not exist’

South Side Irish Parade Queen McSweeney calls event a second Christmas By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

Supplied photo

West Beverly native Maeve McSweeney has deep ties to the South Side Irish Parade and is the 2014 queen.

TC Pub and TC Too are Southside must-dos Submitted by TC Pub TC Pub in Oak Lawn finished its renovations nearly a year ago, and it is virtually unrecognizable from the old paneling walls and horseshoe bar most of us remember. The only original items left in the establishment are the glass

cooler doors that house 100+ bottled beers, ciders, hard teas and lemonades. Besides the bottled beer, TC Pub offers 28 draft beer options ranging from Miller Lite, to Abita’s Purple Haze (Raspberry flavored beer), to Firestone’s Double Jack (Double IPA beer with a (Continued on page 6)

Maeve McSweeney understands the importance the South Side Irish Parade has had on her life. “If it were not for the South Side Irish Parade, I would not exist. Twenty-five years ago, my father and mother met the day of the parade while listening to Irish music,� said McSweeney, the queen of the 36th version of the parade. McSweeney’s mother, Julia, was born in Ireland, and her father, Timothy, is of Irish descent. “They have instilled in me an obvious pride. I’ve been attending the South Side Irish Parade since I was born, and it has been a huge part of my life. When I was a child, I always looked forward to the parade, as it was a time for

family, friendship, and faith,� said McSweeney, a sophomore at Marquette University. The parade steps off at noon, March 16 at 103rd Street and Western Avenue and runs through the heart of the Beverly community to 115th Street. McSweeney fondly recalls the many parade-day celebrations at her home in the West Beverly neighborhood. “My house would become filled with family and friends from as close as down the block to as far as the north side and Ireland,� said McSweeny, a graduate of St. Ignatius College Prep. “My dad’s brother actually met my mom’s friend 15 years ago on the Parade Day at our house and got married as well.� McSweeney decided to enter the contest for parade queen on a lark.

“I actually saw a link of Facebook to apply to be the queen, so I just decided to on a whim. I was really surprised and honored when I won. I really did not think I was going to win at all, but I just applied because I thought it would be a good experience,� McSweeny said. She added that serving a parade queen is just the latest way she’s participated in her culture. “There have been many years—from winning essay contests, Irish dancing, marshaling and being with my parish—that I have participated in the South Side Irish Parade. I even created the new parade banners that have been hung on Western Avenue for the past two years,� McSweeney said. “I see myself as a role model for other girls of Irish descent, and that is a huge undertaking that I am very honored to have.�

But McSweeney’s involvement in Irish culture extends well beyond parade participation. “I am actively engaged in my culture through Irish ballads and songs that I sing or play on the tin whistle and flute. I also recently began to learn Gaelic through Irish language classes in the hopes to become fluent,� she said. McSweeney was one of 10 candidates who took part in the selection process held during a parade fundraiser at 115 Bourbon Street in Merrionette Park. She also will ride in the downtown Chicago St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 15 and compete in the Chicago Rose of Tralee contest as the South Side Irish Rose. “I think the parade is all about faith, family, and friendship as well as the tradition that goes along with it,� she said. “I have (Continued on page 7)

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6

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 3-A

The Regional News - The Reporter

47th edition of Ireland On Parade to be held at Chicago Gaelic Park Submitted by Chicago Gaelic Park Ireland on Parade, the wonderful exhibition of the music and dance of Ireland, celebrates its 47th Anniversary at Chicago Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th St, Oak Forest, on March 7, 11, 12, 13, & 14th. Ireland on Parade under the direction of the late Martin Fahey, began in 1967 at Ford City and after 11 years moved to the Glendora House where it stayed for 13 seasons before moving to Gaelic Park. Gaelic Park is proud to continue to host this multi-generational tradition which is part of the 10-day celebrations in honor of Ireland’s patron

Saint, Patrick. Participating in Ireland on Parade this year are McCormack/Fay School of Irish Dancing, Identity Irish Dance Chicago, Cross Keys School of Irish Dancing on Friday March 7, McNamara School of Irish Dancing, Maiden Street School of Irish Dance, Mullane Healy Godley School of Irish Dance on Tuesday March 11, Weber School of Irish Dancing, Foy School Of Irish Dancing, Tooromeen School of Irish Dancing on Wednesday March 12, Blackbird School of Irish Dance, Mulhern School of Irish Dancing, Irish Music Session with Pat Finnegan and friends on Thursday March 13, Eil-

ish Sullivan School of Irish Dance, Trinity Irish Dancers and Lavin Cassidy School of Irish Dancing on Friday March 14th. The doors open each night at 5:30 p.m. and there is free admission. Delicious hot food is available for purchase each evening at 5:30 p.m. In addition there will be exhibitions of Ceili Dancing and Set Dancing, Sean O’Donnell on accordion, and musical entertainment provided by the Irish Musicians an organization which consists of local artists who are dedicated to the perpetuation of traditional Irish music. Along with Ireland on

Parade, there will be many more activities going on at Gaelic Park during the month of March. The annual Irish Fest Queen Contest will take place on Sunday March 2, the St. Baldrick’s Head Shaving fundraiser where all donations benefit the fight against children’s cancer will take place on Saturday March 8, the St. Patrick’s Concert featuring Paddy Homan with Dennis Cahill, John Williams and Teresa Shine will also take place on Saturday March 15 and south side Irish Sunday is on March 16. New this year is “A Taste of Ireland� on Saturday March 8 where you will get a true feel for traditional Ireland with samples

Blackbird School of Irish Dance of Irish food and drinks, storytelling, Irish step-dancing, knitting and crochet demonstrations, Irish soda baking demonstration and much more.

For starting times and all the details regarding the St. Patrick’s season, call Gaelic Park at 708-687-9323 or visit the website at www.chicagogaelicpark.org.

Mother McAuley focuses on S.T.E.M. Wins regional science bowl and places 2nd in various competitions at math regional contest Submitted by Mother McAuley variety of competitions, including High School individual and team rounds. Molly Clifford ‘16 (Mt. Greenwood) won Mother McAuley Liberal Arts 2nd Place in the Geometry Written High School is looking to the future Individual Competition; Erin and exploring ways to provide Coghlan ‘14 (Morgan Park) and their students the competitive Marlena Sweiss ‘15 (Oak Lawn) advantage needed to gain won 2nd Place in the Junior/ The McAuley Science Bowl Team won the regional title on February admittance to top universities and Senior Two-Person Competition; 22 and will travel to Washington D.C. in April to compete in the to succeed in the global workforce. Kelly Calcagno ‘17 (Orland Park), National Championship. Back row, left to right: Tiffany Anderson One facet of this mission is their Madeleine Murphy ‘17 (Mt. ’14, Diana Sanchez ’14, Rayn Davis ’14, Siobhan Bennett ’14, commitment to providing students Greenwood), Faith Primozic ‘17 Montana Ford ’14 and Julianna Magnan ’15. Front row, left to with opportunities which support (Palos Heights), Lindsey Tryban right: Jessica Marchetti ’15 and Sarah Dynia ’15. Photos by Jeff Vorva their growth and inertest in ‘17 (Alsip), Molly Clifford ‘16 (Mt. Irish baby names have several meanings from traditional to STEM areas: science, technology, Greenwood), Kaitlyn Johnson ‘16 The success of these academic Physics or Advanced Physiology modern. engineering and math. (Matteson), Yinshuo Liu ‘16 (Hyde teams speaks to both the Honors through Saint Mary’s McAuley offers academic teams Park) and Lauren Turnbull ‘16 knowledge and skills students University in Winona, MN, or for the students to join, including (Plainfield) won 2nd Place in receive from Mother McAuley in College Algebra and Trigonometry the Science Bowl Team and long- the Freshman/Sophomore Eight- math and science, as well as the Honors through Moraine Valley time math team, known as the Person Competition; and Meghan students’ strong interest in the Community College. Math Macs. Students on both Baker ‘15 (Oak Lawn), Maureen two subjects. In response to this Expecting parents whose child one About Mother McAuley teams have the opportunity to Berglind ‘15 (Palos Heights), Mary interest and the school’s mission, is likely to arrive on or near St. Kevin: handsome Liberal Arts High School compete against high schools in Kate Curran ‘15 (Oak Lawn), Aileen McAuley has taken a step forward Patrick’s Day may want to give Neal: champion Founded in 1956 by the Sisters the Chicagoland area. Mallon ‘15 (Oak Lawn), Maggie and added two new science classes the child a traditional Irish Oscar: deer lover The Science Bowl Team O’Grady ‘15 (Evergreen Park), to the curriculum for the 2014- of Mercy, Mother McAuley Liberal name to commemorate the occa- Rafferty: abundance participated in the Regional Science Ellie Rowe ‘15 (Tally’s Corner), 2015 school year: Engineering Arts High School currently sion. There are several different Seamus: supplanter Bowl on February 22 at Evanston Erin Coghlan ‘15 (Morgan Park) Principles, which is open to seniors educates nearly 1,200 young and beautiful names to give both Tiernan: little lord High School. The girls answered and Morgan Fleming ‘14 (Beverly) considering an engineering career, women grades 9 through 12 and boys and girls. The following are questions covering topics of general won 2nd Place in the Junior/Senior and Earth and Space Science, is the largest all-girls high school some traditional Irish monikers GIRLS science, biology, chemistry, physics, Eight-Person Competition. Eight also a senior-level class that will in the country. McAuley promotes and the meanings behind the Aideen: little fire math, astronomy, earth science other students participated in the cover topics including Geology, a single-gender education names. Aine: merciful and computer science. The round- contest but didn’t place: Emily Meteorology and Astronomy. Both platform that encourages young Aislin: dream robin format included a double Gildea ‘17 (Palos Park), Marie departments offer honors, AP and women to grow in faith, envision BOYS Bidelia: exalted elimination each round, but the O’Neill ‘17 (Oak Lawn), Mary college credit classes in addition their future and discover their Aidan (Aiden): little fire Brianna: high, noble eight-person Mighty Mac team could Jennings ‘16 (Oak Lawn), Meghan to the Advanced and Academic talents through a challenging Airell: nobleman Bridget: lofty not be defeated and brought home a Rokas ‘16 (Palos Heights), Jenny tracks. AP classes include AB and motivating academic and Artan: little bear Caitlin: pure Regional win for the first time since Buschbach ‘14 (Oak Lawn), Julia Calculus, Statistics, Chemistry, co-curricular program. Mother Banagher: pointed hill Cassidy: curly-haired 2010. This victory earned Tiffany Geraghty ‘14 (Mt. Greenwood), Biology and Physics. Students McAuley’s tradition of excellence Barry: fair-haired Dympna: little fawn Anderson ‘14 (Morgan Park), Maura Joyce ‘14 (Mt. Greenwood) also have the opportunity to earn has made it a top choice for allBradan: salmon Elish: of noble kin Siobhan Bennett ‘14 (Palos Park), and Sara Nolan ‘14 (Kennedy transfer college credit by taking girls private education in the Brendan: prince Erin: Ireland Rayn Davis ‘14 (Wrightwood), Sarah Park). Physics Honors, AP Physics, Chicago area. Brennan: sorrow Faylinn: graceful woman Dynia ‘15 (West Elsdon), Montana Brian: high, noble Fiana: vine Ford ‘14 (West Pullman), Julianna Cagney: descendant of the Finola: fair-shouldered Magnan ‘15 (Orland Park), Jessia advocate Kaitlyn: pure Marchetti ‘15 (Gerfield Ridge) and Dugan: dark-colored Kathleen: pure Diana Sanchez ‘14 (Blue Island) Ennis: descendant of Angus Keira: black-haired and coaches Dr. Roz Iasillo, Faolan: wolf Kerri: dark McAuley’s STEM Coordinator, and Fearghus: strong man Maeve: intoxicating Dr. Tom Juliano, McAuley faculty Finn: fair Naomh: holy member, an all-expense-paid trip to Finnegan: white Noreen: honor Washington, DC from April 24-28, Gannon: son of a fair-haired Roisin: rose 2014 to compete for the National one Siobhan: God is gracious Championship. McAuley is currently Kellan: son of a bright-haired Tara: tower one of 24 middle school and high school teams to make it to the championship, and the only team from Illinois. Regional competitions began in January and will continue to run through March.

  Come pamper yourself and recieve The same day, the Math Macs competed in the Math Regional  Contest at Chicago State University. The Math Macs competed at Chicago State University in the Math Regional Contest. Pictured are The young ladies participated in a the students who won second in their various competitions.

Irish baby names

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TC Pub

make your mouth water – newly added is the roasted red pepper chicken wrap which feature a (Continued from page 5) house made red pepper aioli. 9.5% ABV). The bartenders can Can’t get out tonight for dinner? mix you up something from the They have just started delivery Specialty Drink and Martini List service, call 708-425-4252 to like a Dreamsicle Martini. place your order. On top of the extensive TC Pub opens at 7 a.m. Monday drink selection, TC’s kitchen through Saturday and 11 a.m. is offering up a full menu with on Sundays. And for all you something for everyone. And early birds, breakfast is being this is not your average bar fare served and it is fantastic.Never – homemade French fries, onion would have expected this from a rings, even the tortilla chips for neighborhood corner pub. the nachos! Pub burgers made The overwhelming success at in house and wraps that will TC Pub prompted ownership to

Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter

TC Pub’s B.L.T. Wrap (left) and Friday’s Ribeye Special (right).

open a second location, TC’s Too – a country themed bar at 9906 Southwest Highway. A private party room has just been built and the renovations in the main bar are near completion. Plans for a kitchen are in the works. Funny signs and country knickknacks cover the walls and moonshine is available (the legal kind of course). Draft beers is served from mason jars and the shot glasses are little tin cups giving you a good ole country feel as you sit in this cozy bar. TC’s Too is open from noon to 2 a.m. every day of the week.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 3-A

7

Irish Princesses Clara Mueller, left, of Chicago waves a sword during the Irish Princess contest Sunday in Oak Lawn. Sailer Diez, above, of Milwaukee uses a cup as a prop on stage during the Irish Princess contest Sunday. Nina Morales, right, of Joliet gets into the St. Patrick’s Day spirit in the Irish Princess contest Sunday at the Oak Lawn Hilton.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Why are shamrocks considered lucky? Various symbols and imagery breathe life into St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. In addition to Kelly green clothing, leprechauns and Irish flags, shamrocks are commonly seen decorating homes and people. The word “shamrock” comes from the Irish seamrog, which is the diminutive form for the Irish word for clover, and translates roughly to “young clover.” Clover is a grass-like plant, and bees frequently use clover flowers as a prime source of pollen for honey production. Three- and four-leaf clovers are a stable of Irish imagery and are commonly referenced upon the arrival of St. Patrick’s Day. Prior to Christianity and the work of St. Patrick,

the Druids believed that they could thwart evil spirits and danger by carrying a shamrock. A three-leaf shamrock would enable them to see the evil spirits and escape in time. A four-leaf clover was said to ward off bad luck and offer magical protection. The Druids helped establish the clover as a Celtic charm, and other folklore indicates clovers helped people see fairies and chase the little sprites. Around 400 AD, in many areas of the world, including Ireland, pagan beliefs were being pushed out in favor of Christianity. The Irish were slowly converted to a new method of thinking, and this included a new way of looking at some

once-popular Pagan symbolism. According to Christian teachings, Eve is said to have carried a four-leaf clover out of the Garden of Eden when Adam and she were cast out by God. Some believe that those who grasp four-leaf clovers hold a bit of paradise in their hands. Some Christians also thought clovers were a symbol of the Holy Trinity, and some stories suggest that St. Patrick used a shamrock to teach principles of the Trinity to the masses. A three-leaf clover represents the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Should a four-leaf clover be found, it is considered the Trinity plus God’s grace. The four-leaf clover looks like a cross, giving four leaf clovers special mean-

ing to some people. Of course, the rarity of four-leaf clovers makes some people who find them feel as if luck is on their side. Among naturally occurring clovers, the odds of finding a four-leaf clover instead of the more common three-leaf clover is 10,000 to 1. It may take some effort and quite a bit of luck to locate one with four leaves, and a five-leaf clover is considered by many to be unlucky. Since the 18th century, the shamrock has been a symbol of Ireland. It was used as an emblem by rival militias and later was incorporated into the Royal Coat of Arms in the United Kingdom, alongside the rose of England and thistle of Scotland.

The Carraig Pub hosts St. Baldrick’s fundraiser The Carraig Pub at Gaelic Park, 6119 West 147th Street in Oak Forest will host a St. Baldrick’s Foundation fundraiser on Saturday March 8, starting at 3 p.m. All donations will benefit the fight against children’s cancer. More than

70 St. Baldrick’s volunteers, sponsored by donations from friends and family register for the Gaelic Park event and shave their heads in solidarity for children with cancer. St. Baldrick’s is the world’s largest volunteer driven fundrais-

ing event to fight childhood cancer. More information on the foundation can be found on their website at www.stbaldricks.org.

and a cash bar available. The Carraig Pub will open at 11 a.m. and pub food will be served from 1 p.m. until 10 p.m. Call Gaelic Park at 708-6879323 for more information or visit our website at www.chicagogaelicpark.org.

A small sprig of clover could bring the holder quite a lot of luck, according to folklore.

St. Patrick’s Day is ripe with tradition

Each March 17, people the world over slip into something green, A delicious hot food buffet take in a neighborhood parade will be available for purchase and enjoy St. Patrick’s Day festivities. A day to honor Ireland’s patron saint, St. Patrick’s Day is ripe with traditions and history, much of which is largely unknown to the celebrating masses. In honor sacred places and helping to conof St. Patrick’s Day, the following trol people’s behaviors. Historians are some handy pieces of trivia to believe this was one for leaders to impress friends and family each establish societal rules. day of March leading up to the big Descriptions of leprechauns and day. tales of their antics have survived 1. St. Patrick was not Irish. He in Ireland for centuries. When the was born in Britain to an aristoIrish began emigrating to America cratic family. His early life was not during the Great Potato Famine, particularly religious, but he had they brought with them their mya religious conversion in his teenthology and stories. However, the age years. tale of the leprechaun has changed 2. The largest St. Patrick’s Day over time. Parade is not held in Ireland. That The Irish-American view of the honor belongs to New York City, leprechaun differed from the more where the annual St. Patrick’s traditional Irish view. Americans Leprechauns have long been a Day Parade draws more than a saw leprechauns as frivolous and part of Irish folklore. million spectators each year. silly. Leprechauns were depicted 3. Thirteen million pints of with broad, pug noses and out-of- at times, hateful illustrations of Guinness are consumed on St. style ratty clothing. Many negative leprechauns. Patrick’s Day. That’s double the stereotypes Americans directed at Leprechaun mythology has been amount consumed on other days. the swarms of Irish immigrants ar- alive and well in Ireland for more 4. Although many people wear riving in the United States were than a thousand years and will likely some form of green in honor of exemplified in the insensitive and, live on for centuries more.

Explaining the mythical leprechaun Celtic culture is ripe with legends and myths that help to entertain and explain the mysteries of life. Among such lore are leprechauns, which are mythological figures that continue to impart whimsy into St. Patrick’s Day celebrations even now. The word “leprechaun” is derived from the Irish lu chorpain, meaning “small body.” Various attributes have been used to describe leprechauns. While the origins and the history surrounding leprechauns differ, one common thread is that these creatures are surrounded in magic. Some believed leprechauns were descendents of the Goddess Danu and the Tuatha De Danaan. They inhabited Ireland long before the Celts arrived, and when the Celts did come, brandishing iron swords that could penetrate the leprechauns’ magic, leprechauns

fled to underground abodes in the soil shielded by magical, hidden entrances. Some say leprechauns still reside under the damp soil. Other stories describe leprechauns as smart, devious creatures of fairy folk who were the only fairies to have a profession other than cattle trading. Leprechauns were shoemakers to the fairies who took the shape of men wearing green or red coats and hats and participated in mischief. Leprechauns hoarded all of their gold coins in a pot under a rainbow. Catching a leprechaun was tricky, as these “wee folk,” as they were often described in folk tales, were quite adept at remaining out of arm’s reach. Should one be captured by a human, folklore stated that the leprechaun must grant three wishes to earn his release. Some viewed leprechauns as serious sorts, keeping people away from

Royalberry Restaurant adds spirits to menu By Tim Hadac Staff Reporter Restaurants in the Southwest Suburbs is about to liven things up. Royalberry Waffle House & Restaurant, 6417 W. 127th St., is expected to add wine, beer and spirits to its beverage menu soon, after approval of a liquor license by the Palos Heights City Council. “We’re well known for our breakfast and lunch, but then we expanded to start serving dinner,” explained Royalberry co-owner and Palos Heights resident Frank Salman. “We want to be able to accommodate our customers who may want a glass of wine or beer with their dinner.” Salman also plans to offer Mimosas and Bloody Marys, especially popular among the weekend breakfast crowd. “We have a lot of requests for that,” he added. Royalberry stands ready to start serving. An elegant bar space near the rear of the cozy-yet-chic eatery was added last year, when Salman and his brother, Zeek, remodeled the restaurant in the wake of a small kitchen fire, transforming tragedy into triumph. “We added the bar because we thought that one day, we may be offering beer, wine and liquor—or at least juice,” Salman said with a smile as he gestured to a topof-the-line juicer that has proven popular with diners who favor freshly-squeezed orange juice.

Exactly what kinds and brands of wine, beer and spirits will be offered is still being determined, Salman said earlier this week. He plans to talk with customers and others to gauge interest. “But if I can make it, we’ll serve it,” he laughed in response to a question about mixed drinks. “We have the best customers anywhere, and this is all about serving them in the best way possible.” Salman said he may be looking to add an employee or two to his staff of 25 to ensure that the bar operates smoothly and Photo by Tim Hadac responsibly. As busy as Roy- Carafes of ice water will soon be joined by beer, wine and spirits at the bar in alberry was before Royalberry Waffle House & Restaurant, according to Frank Salman, co-owner of its rebirth last fall, the popular Palos Heights eatery since 2004. its popularity has surged in recent white linen tablecloths, white lin- did. We actually sold out of food, months. “It’s been great,” Salman said. en napkins,” he continued as he that’s how popular it was.” Royalberry will celebrate its “Ever since the remodeling, we’ve offered an example of the restauhad to hire more staff—a cook, bus rant’s popularity. “The reaction 10th anniversary in September. people, waitresses, hostesses—just from our customers was amazing. “I love Palos Heights. It’s a great We did not have a liquor license at place to live, and it’s also a great to keep up. “We recently had a Valentine’s that point, so it was ‘bring your place to do business,” Salman condinner special. It was beautiful-- own alcohol,’ which a few people cluded.

McSweeney (Continued from page 5) family come from all over the Chicago area as well as Ireland just for the parade. It is almost like a second Christmas with all the celebration we have surrounding the parade,” she said.

St. Patrick’s Day, green was once considered an unlucky color in Ireland. 5. The city of Chicago really gets into the festivities, going so far as to dye the Chicago River green, which the city has been doing since 1962. 6. Evidence suggests there never were any actual snakes for St. Patrick to drive out of Ireland. It stands to reason snakes were a metaphor for the evil of paganism. 7. There are roughly 33 million U.S. residents of Irish ancestry. That number is nearly 9 times the population of Ireland. 8. St. Patrick was not the first person to bring Christianity to Ireland, as monasteries had been built long before St. Patrick’s arrival. 9. In Ireland, St. Patrick’s Day has traditionally been a religious occasion. Until the 1970s, many stores and pubs were closed. 10. There are about 60 churches and cathedrals named for St. Patrick in Ireland. One of the most famous is St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin. The mission of the Chicago Rose of Tralee is to provide enrichment opportunities that will encourage young women of Irish descent to be exemplary role models for tomorrow’s youth and to make a positive difference in the world. The Winner of the Chicago Rose of Tralee will receive an all-expense paid trip to Ireland.

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8

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Section 3-A

The Regional News - The Reporter

Personal training can help you achieve your fitness goals

Gaelic Park’s South Side Irish Sunday Submitted by Chicago Gaelic Park On South Side Irish Sunday, March 16, come to Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th Street, Oak Forest, for a full day of events. Doors will open at 1:00 p.m. with four stages of continuous entertainment for the entire family. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for kids 12 and under. Entertaining in the Emerald Room is the popular, lively local group, The Larkin & Moran Brothers at 1:30 p.m. This local group is a big favorite at Gaelic Park. Their music is a great blend of traditional and contemporary Irish songs. Arranmore brings its contemporary folk music with an Irish flair at 5:30 p.m. Once an Irish pub band, this group is now an international sensation. Today, Arranmore has evolved into what is best described as a Celtic/Folk/American Music act. Their musical diversity brings these Irish roots

to a broader-range audience. The Dennehy School of Irish Dance displays its wonderful step dancers at 7.30 p.m.

Submitted by Palos Health & Fitness

The festivities in the Tara Room include Rico Quinn on stage 1:30 p.m. and Highland Reign at 6 p.m. A delicious hot food buffet will also be available starting at 1.30pm. Popular Irish dishes such as Shepherd’s Pie, Corned Beef Dinners, Fish and Chips and various sandwiches will be available for purchase.

Larkin & Moran Brothers (above) and Arranmore (right).

In the Carraig Pub, local sensations John Dillon will perform at 1:30 p.m. and Gerry Dignan at 6 p.m.

The Celtic Room hosts children’s entertainment beginning at 1.30p.m. with the Dublin Deceptions Magic Show, A Bit “o� the Magic at 3:30 p.m. and the Shamrock Shenanitraditional Irish atmosphere gans Magic Show at 5 p.m. for the entire family to celeAll in all, Gaelic Park pro- brate South Side Irish Sunday, vides a great venue, with a no matter what the weather.

MARCH 1– 17

   

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t Massages

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Everyone’s a winner! Must bring in ad for entry. One entry per household. Offer valid for non-members only. Some restrictions may apply. CALL FOR DETAILS 708.226.0555 8FTU"WFBUSE4U t 0SMBOE1BSL *5BLFB7JSUVBM5PVSBUQBMPTmUOFTTDPN FIND US ON

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Shamrock Shenanigans Magic Show

Are you looking for an effective way to enhance your fitness routine this winter? Try working out with a certified personal trainer. “People of all ages can benefit from a personal trainer,� says Scott Byrdak, fitness manager at Palos Health & Fitness Center. “From learning the proper exercise technique, to increasing your confidence, to helping you stay committed to fitness, there are many advantages to personal training.� The trainer will begin by working with you to determine your individual fitness goals and create a personalized exercise plan that includes a combination of cardiovascular (aerobic) exercise; resistance exercises that strengthen muscles, tendons and bones; and stretching Please call Gaelic Park at to increase the range of motion. (708) 687-9323 for more inforThe trainer will also recommation or visit our website at mend exercises designed to adwww.chicagogaelicpark.org. dress any health barriers that might interfere with your ability to succeed. “Mental and physical obstacles can get in the way of achieving your goals. By developing a plan that suits your specific interests and needs, a personal trainer can assist you in eliminating these barriers,� says Byrdak. In addition, personal trainers teach you how to work out the right way to maximize the effectiveness of exercise and help you avoid injury. “If you’re using improper technique it will take much longer to see results, if at all. Even worse, you could hurt yourself,� says Byrdak. Many people fail in their fitness routines because they lose motivation. “Personal training provides accountability. It is a set appointment, so you feel committed to getting yourself to the fitness center. A personal trainer can inspire you to focus on the progress you’re making toward achieving your ultimate goal. The scale might show that you still have weight to lose, but a personal trainer can help you appreciate improvements you

Saturday, March 15 th

St. Patrick’s luncheon at Gaelic Park

Annual St. Patrick’s Concert

Featuring Paddy

Homan, Dennis Cahill, John Williams & Teresa Shine ď‚&#x; Admission $20.00 Doors Open 6:30pm ď‚&#x; Concert 7:30pm A Show by

Cross Keys School of Irish Dancing 7:30pm On Stage Richie Z Pub Food Served 3:00pm - 10:00pm $10.00

6:30pm On Stage Enda

Thursday, March 6 th

Kivlehan andEnda MaryKivlehan Rose 6:30pm On Stage and Mary

Sunday, March March 1616 th Sunday, th

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7:30pm On Stage

Irish Music Session with Pat Finnegan & Friends

Doors Open 1:00pm Admission $5.00 - Kids 12 & Under $3.00

Four Stages of Continuous Entertainment Delicious Hot Food Buffet in

Pub Food Served 5:00pm - 9:00pm th

Friday, March 7

7:30pm On Stage Gerard Haughey Pub Food Served 5:00pm - 10:00pm

1:30pm On Stage

The Larkin & Moran Brothers 5:30pm On Stage Arranmore

Saturday, March 8 th

7:30pm On Stage Dennehy School of Irish Dancing

4:00pm On Stage Richie Z 8:00pm On Stage Rico Quinn Pub Food Served 1:00pm - 10:00pm

1:30pm On Stage Rico Quinn

6:00pm On Stage Highland 1:30pm On Stage John

5th Annual Oak Forest Fleadh

6:00pm On Stage Gerry

Step off is at 11:00am on 157th and Cicero Ave.

Reign

Dillon Dignan

Children’s Stage

St. Baldrick's Foundation

Head Shaving will take place starting at 3.00pm.t Proceeds benefit the fight against children's cancer. hill,

Delicious Hot Food Buffet Available 3:00pm

1:30pm Dublin

Deceptions Magic Show Bit “O� the Magic 5:00pm Shamrock MagicShow Show Shamrock Shenanigans Shenanigans Magic 3:30pm A

A Taste of Ireland

Celebrate with Irish Music, Song, Step-Dancing, Ceili & Set Dancing

Celebrate with Irish Music, Song,

Doors Open 5:30pm – Free Admission Delicious Hot Food Buffet Available 5:30pm

Music by The Irish Musicians & Sean O’Donnell

Dance School Schedule

Friday, March 7 th 7:00pm Show by

7:00pm Show by

Weber School of Dancing 7:30pm Show by

Foy School of Irish Dancing 8:00pm Show by

Tooromeen School of Irish Dancing

Thursday, March 13

th

6:30pm Show by 7:00pm Show by

Identity Irish Dance Chicago

Mulhern School of Irish Dancing

Cross Keys School of Irish Dancing

Irish Music Session with Pat Finnegan & Friends

Tuesday, March 11 th 6:30pm Show by

Gaelic Park Ceili Dancers 7:00pm Show by

McNamara School of Irish Dancing 7:30pm Show by

Sunday, March 9 th

8:00pm

Friday, March 14

th

7:00pm Show by

Eilish Sullivan School of Irish Dance 7:30pm Show by

Trinity Irish Dancers

Mullane, Healy, Godley School of Irish Dance

Lavin Cassidy School of Irish Dancing

8:00pm Show by

Monday, 17 th Monday, March March 17

10:00am Mass

Annual St. Patrick’s Luncheon

Followed by Irish Breakfast ď‚&#x; Admission $8.00

Featuring Corned Beef & Cabbage Doors Open 12:00pm ď‚&#x; Lunch Served 1:00pm

Sunday Classic Carvery

Entertainment By Gerry

Dignan

7:30pm Show by

Maiden Street School of Irish Dance 8:00pm Show by

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Delicious Hot Food Buffet with Carving Station

Blackbird School of Irish Dance

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3:00pm – 8:00pm

Gaelic Park Set Dancers

McCormack/Fay School of Irish Dancing 7:30pm Show by

7:30pm ng Get a true feel for traditional Ireland with samples of Irish food and drinks, story-telling, Irish Step-Dancing, Ceili & Set Dancing, Knitting and Crochet demonstrations and much more.

Wednesday, March 12 th

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5:00pm Jan’s

Pub Food Served 5:00pm - 10:00pm

Friday, March 14

th

7:30pm On Stage Billy

O’Donoghue with Laurence Nugent

Pub Food Served 3:00pm - 10:00pm

Puppets Lavin Cassidy School of Irish Dancing 6:00pm On Stage The Ploughboys

5:30pm On Stage

8:30pm On Stage

Irish Music Session with Pat Finnegan & Friends

Admission $25.00 On Stage Joe Cullen 4:00pm Shamrock Shenanigans

Thursday, March 13 th ing

Delicious Hot Food Buffet Available 4:00pm 3:00pm On Stage Tim

may be missing, such as how your energy level has increased or how you’re feeling stronger,� says Byrdak. When choosing a personal trainer, there are several things to consider. First, look for a trainer who is certified by an accredited, nationally recognized program such as the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Council on Exercise, the National Strength and Conditioning Association, or the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Second, search for a trainer with a bachelor’s degree in exercise science, kinesiology, health/fitness, or physical education. These certifications and degrees indicate that the trainer has the most up-to-date information, knowledge and skills. Next, ask for information about the trainer’s background to learn more about his or her interests or areas of special training. “If your goal is to train for a 5K race, a trainer with a strong background in training runners would be helpful. Likewise, a golfer might benefit from a trainer who has a special interest in that sport,� says Byrdak. Finally, consider the trainer’s hourly rate. Most fitness centers offer specially priced training packages that include multiple sessions at a cost savings. How many sessions will it take to achieve results? “The number of sessions really depends on the person. Some people prefer to make a weekly set appointment with their trainer while others meet once a month to check in for fresh ideas so they don’t get bored. Typically, it takes at least eight weeks to see some type of change in your body composition,� says Byrdak. Palos Health & Fitness Center, located at 15430 West Ave in Orland Park, offers personal training for center members and nonmembers alike. All trainers have degrees in a health or exercise field and are certified by an accredited, nationally recognized program. For more information, please call Ben Plotner, Fitness Supervisor, 708.226.0555, bplotner@ powerwellness.com, or visit www. palosfitness.com.

O’Shea

7:00pm On Stage Gerard Haughey Pub Food Served 10:30am - 10:00pm

A traditional corned beef and cabbage luncheon will be served on Monday, March 17, with doors opening at noon and lunch served at 1 p.m. at Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th St, Oak Forest. The delicious hot lunch inRose cludes soup, salad, traditional corned beef & cabbage luncheon, dessert and tea/coffee. Live entertainment is provided by Joe Cullen. In addition, The Cross Keys School of Irish Dance will perform an exhibition of Irish step dancing. Admission is $25 and reservations are required for the luncheon. For further information, please contact Gaelic Park at 708-6879323 or visit the website at www. chicagogaelicpark.org.

Gaelic Park invites supporters to march in four parades The Oak Forest Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with the City of Oak Forest, will host the fifth annual Oak Forest Fleadh on Cicero Avenue between 151st Street and 157th Street, on Saturday, March 8th, 2014. The Fleadh, Gaelic for “festival�, will include a 5k race, open bike ride, and a family parade which will include the Gaelic Park float and the newly crowned Irish Fest Queen. The family parade will kick off at 11 a.m. from 157th Street and travel north along Cicero Avenue to 151st Street. A complimentary shuttle will be provided by Gaelic Park to take participants to the parade and from the parade. In addition, Gaelic Park will also participate in the Tinley Park Parade on Sunday, March 9, the Chicago downtown parade on Saturday, March 15, and the Southside Irish Parade on Sunday March 16. Buses will depart from Gaelic Park, 6119 W. 147th Street, Oak Forest, for both the parades. Call Gaelic Park at 708-687-9323 to make bus reservations, or visit Gaelic Park’s website at www.chicagogaelicpark. org for more information on this and other upcoming events.


20140306 regional news