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Orland Park Business Directory Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

THE 73rd Year, No. 8

REGIONAL NEWS — Illinois Press Association

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Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities.

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Thursday, February 20, 2014

Palos hospital CEO departs after some 90 days in charge by Tim Hadac staff reporter Palos Community Hospital’s new president and chief executive officer abruptly left his position last week, barely 90 days into his job. While Edgardo Tenreiro has confirmed that he is no longer employed at the hospital, neither he nor hospital officials would indicate whether he resigned or was fired, or what the reason behind the sudden departure was. Photographs of and references to Tenreiro have been stripped from the Palos Community Hospital website and Facebook page, including a photograph from earlier this month in which he helped accept a chamber of commerce award for the hospital, and a press release from last Oct. 9 that announced his selection as CEO. In that press release, hospital Board Chairman Edward Mulcahy had said, “On behalf of the board of directors of Palos Community Hospital, I am very pleased that Edgardo has been selected to continue the proud tradition of ser-

Wright, who had served at the hospital’s helm for more than three decades. Last month, Tenreiro said in a Crain’s Chicago Business interview that the hospital has “been losing about $1 million to a couple million dollars a month. It is a challenge, no question about it. It’s a combination of our costs being too high and our revenue not being high enough. On the revenue side, we’re going to have to work much closer with our physicians to identify ideas for growth. Our labor productivity is Edgardo Tenreiro not where we want it to be. You want to match your demand for vice established by the Religious the service with the labor that Hospitallers of St. Joseph. Mr. you have. In order to make that Tenreiro is highly qualified, and happen, you have to really focus I am confident that our hospital on being lean and Six Sigma (a and our community will benefit data-driven approach to measure greatly from his leadership.” quality), which are the tools that Prior to his brief tenure at Palos we’re going to be providing. You Community Hospital, Tenreiro have to cut costs at the same served as executive vice presi- time.” dent and chief operating officer of A hospital official said Tuesday General Health System in Baton that it is too early to speculate on Rouge, La. a timeline or details of a process At Palos Community Hospital, to search for a new president and he succeeded Sister Margaret CEO.

Heights bakery signs of life Cheerful, taste-tempting images were painted late last week on windows at a pair of storefronts at 12246-8 S. Harlem Ave. to announce the long-anticipated arrival of Bella’s Bakery & Breakfast. According to information on the windows, the new business will open next month and is hiring now. Some 15 part-timers are sought. The two storefronts had been home to the popular Baumann’s Bakery, as well as the longer-gone Gourmet Coffees Etc. Bella’s Co-owner Elvis Hall told The Regional News last month that the bakery portion of Bella’s will be open traditional bakery hours, roughly 6 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. The breakfast area will be open from about 6 a.m. to noon and will offer a variety of meals prepared from scratch, such as omelets, bacon and sausage, biscuits and gravy, french toast, raisin bread, and more.

Coyne, team go for the Gold

Who knew that the Russians love us?

by Jeff Vorva

Regional/Reporter correspondent Kevin M. Coyne headed to the Olympics last week to watch his sister, Kendall, play a little hockey for the United States. The Palos Heights resident offers up some of his experiences in Sochi.

From Russia With Lots of Love

Photo by Tim Hadac

A Russian costumed performer entertains the crowd in Sochi.

people to avoid wearing Team USA gear around Russia and if anyone asks where I’m from to say “Canada.” by Kevin M. Coyne I’ve decided to disregard that advice and I’ve had not one issue with anti-American SOCHI, Russia—I am at the comments or being harassed. world’s largest party. In fact, I’ve noticed the exact Last week I arrived and in opposite. There are thousands the first four hours of being of volunteers walking around in Russia I had a very attrac- Russia who are literally here to tive, elderly Russian rub the help spectators get to events. Team USA crest on my replica One Team USA trainer told hockey jersey and said to me: me about one Russian who “American.” served her breakfast and simply She proceeded to speak Rus- said “I love you, I am here to sian, gave me a hug and a kiss help. Do you want more panand asked for my American flag cakes?” She decided that she’s pin on my spectator pass—at going to get pancakes every least I’m assuming that’s what morning because this young she wanted. After speaking more Russian makes her morning Russian she took a photo of a complete. real life American. So far I’ve met five time That first experience really gold medalist U.S. speed skater set the stage for what to expect Bonnie Blair, who was a guest from the Russians. Prior to the of Stagg High School a few trip, I was told by numerous weeks ago. I was able to get

a quick photo with the beautiful, charming and talented Russian ice dancer Elena Llinykh, who won her first gold medal in Sochi. Prior to the USA and Canada women’s hockey game, I spotted Detroit Red Wings head coach, Mike Babcock. As a Chicagoan and American I had to swallow my pride and get a photo with one of the winningest coaches in the NHL. When I’m not meeting NHL coaches and gold medalists and taking photos with attractive Russian ladies, I’m taking photos of the beautiful scenery. It’s about 60 degrees here in Russia. It’s odd to see people sunbathing at the WINTER games.

This is it. The U.S. women’s hockey team, featuring Palos Heights’ Kendall Coyne, will play in the 2014 Winter Olympics gold medal game against Canada at 11 a.m. today, Thursday, at the Shayba Arena in Sochi, Russia. NBC will carry the game live. Canada beat the U.S., 3-2, in pool play We d n e s d a y for the United States’ lone blemish in the 2014 games. The U.S. and Canada have met for the gold in 1998, 2002 and 2010. Coyne, who has three goals and six assists in five games for the squad and her teammates out-

Kendall Coyne (left) hopes for a gold medal when the U.S. faces Canada today. shot Sweden 70-9 en route to a 6-1 scorching of Sweden in the medal-round semifinals. Scoring goals and assists is nothing new for her. The Sandburg High School graduate played three seasons in the area with the Chicago Mission and in 2009-10 notched 87 points (55 goals and 34 assists) in 46 games. She had 84

points in 45 games the previous year and 83 points in 66 games in 2007-08 for the Tier I Elite Hockey squad. In her first two years at Northeastern University, she became the 22nd player in that program’s history to topple the 100-point mark and just the third to accomplish it in less than two seasons.

Debunking some myths

Despite what you may hear about safety issues, Sochi is likely Photo by Kevin M. Coyne the safest place to be in the world. A view of the mountain tops in Sochi. The U.S. Olympic women’s hockey team, which features Palos Heights’ Kendall Coyne, hopes to be at the top of the mountain when it plays in the gold medal game (See From Sochi, Page 4) at 11 a.m. today.

Heights hears plans for new eatery in old Limestone spot by Tim Hadac staff reporter A Palos Heights City Council hungry for good news had their plates filled Tuesday night with the announcement that the Mondello City Grill will open in six weeks. The new eatery is set to fill the old Limestone City Grill space, 13415 S. Ridgeland Ave., Palos Heights. Owner Mario Mondello came before the council to answer any questions aldermen may have had about his application for a liquor license. It was given preliminary approval on Feb. 6 by the city liquor commissioner, Mayor Robert Straz. The new restaurant will “offer fine casual dining—a mid-grade Italian restaurant. It won’t be 100 percent Italian or 100 percent American, but rather right in between,” Mondello told council members. The eatery will have “a lot of hospitality and be a very warm and welcoming place,” he added. Mondello, a Hickory Hills

resident and longtime owner of Mario’s Salon, 11329 S. Harlem Ave., in Worth, will be a first-time restaurateur. “I’ve always helped my customers find restaurants and banquet facilities for their parties, weddings, showers, and I thought, ‘Why not do it for myself? Why not? God, I’ve been doing it so long, I can pull this off,’” he explained. “So, with the right people and right connections, I started really working on this for a couple of years, and I got it together. It all fell into place pretty easily, and I’m looking forward to making a strong name right there.” Asked whether Mondello’s City Grill will keep late hours, he replied, “Absolutely not. I don’t want to run a dive bar. I’m not doing that. I want to go home. I have two kids. If I did want a late-night bar, I would have jumped to some other town, with gambling machines.” Video poker machines are banned by

Palos Heights, Palos Park and Orland Park. His establishment will feature a “good product, good service, respectable service,” he added. “I very much have a good name, and I stand behind my name. I’ve worked too darn hard to screw it up.” His liquor license application sailed through the council and was approved via unanimous voice vote. As he accepted congratulations and wishes of good luck, Mondello acknowledged that the restaurant business is a challenge. “People say, ‘Oh, restaurant, restaurant, restaurant.’ But you know what? I’ve been in the hair salon business, and that’s just as hard. To please a woman…” he said, as several council members interrupted with laughter and light-hearted punch lines to finish the sentence. Mondello added that he will continue to own and operate his salon.

Also Tuesday, Mayor Straz responded to a question about Olympic hockey medalist (and Palos Heights resident) Kendall Coyne by saying that he hopes to invite her to be the grand marshal of the city’s annual Fourth of July parade. A complaint about noise generated by truck engine braking was voiced by Walter Arvesen, who lives on 119th Place, just west of Harlem Avenue. He said that in the 25 years he has lived in the area, he and his neighbors have grown accustomed to engine braking noise as “a part of life, like motorcycle engines,” but “it seems to be more noticeable now, and when the weather is nice, I like to open my windows at night.” Arvesen said that trucks eastbound on College Drive, as they approach Harlem Avenue, frequently engage in engine braking. “And there’s no need for that. I think they’re just trying to save wear and

Photo by Tim Hadac

Mondello City Grill owner Mario Mondello (left), restaurant manager Joanie Nicosia and Alderman Jeffrey Key (1st Ward) share a lighter moment after Tuesday night’s City Council meeting, where the new establishment received a license to sell liquor. tear on their brakes. Either that or they’re going too fast in the first place.” Arvesen requested that “No

Engine Braking” signs be posted on College Drive. Straz promised that city government would look into it.




The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

View from Trinity by Dr. Steven Timmermans

History gives us reasons for hope amid uncertainty I was recently at a meeting of Christian college leaders from across North America. At one session, we collectively identified the top three concerns facing Christian higher education. The greatest concern was this: How do we protect our right to engage fully and freely in the public square of higher education while maintaining deeply held convictions? It’s not just one type of faith-based institution presenting this concern. Catholic, evangelical and other colleges and universities are concerned, because there seems to be a movement afoot in Washington that could lead to shutting off faith-based institutions if they won’t give up certain moral stances (e.g., the sanctity of life) upon which these institutions are founded and out of which policies flow. A second concern is related to the financial sustainability of the model we have for higher education in America. Families do their best, for public and private higher education alike, but a college education in many instances places a financial strain on families. Of particular concern are middle class families that have seen wage stagnation now for a number of years. Moreover, we are all anxious about the increasingly heavy debt loads students accumulate during their university years. Finally, college and university leaders were concerned about the many technologies that now have been integrated into every corner of life. Sometimes these technologies are distracting, such as students using mobile devices during class. Other times these technologies are daunting, as faculty members need to retool to incorporate the greater possibilities the use of these technologies provide for teaching and learning. And still other times, these technologies are used in a way to directly compete with more traditional college and university study. Not a very encouraging gathering of leaders. However, as I reflect upon these challenges, I’d invite you to consider a bigger sweep of history by considering a bit of our shared past.

Many of us are products of immigration, be it two, three, or even more generations ago. Do you think our fore bearers were without anxieties? Most often, distressing conditions on the British Isles or across continental Europe stimulated thoughts of immigration— thoughts that wrestled with facing the need to learn a new language and perhaps leave behind aspects of culture and belief. Likewise, in the dark days of World War II, it appeared that Hitler was unstoppable and Japan would go to any length. Sons were sent off across the seas and all pitched into the war effort. Moreover the days of war came on the heels of the Great Depression—no small financial strain for families during those decades. Certainly, our parents, grandparents and great grandparents must have trembled with fear at times. Whether during times of immigration or war, hope was never lost. In fact, it was hope for a new day that fueled the pathway of immigration. It was hope that good would be victorious that led to America’s participation in that world-wide war. And it was hope that allowed families to rebuild their futures after the depression. It is no different today as families dream of better futures for their children, futures that often include furthering their education at college. Indeed, institutions of higher education, despite the challenges, are accomplishing admirable work as they equip students with knowledge, critical thinking skills, and leadership values; and as they support our youth in their efforts to discover, serve others, and make a true difference in this country and the world. Whether in higher education or in any other area of human endeavor, the future is uncertain and anxiety seems to take over. Yet, we need to be mindful of those who came before us, stepping forward with faith and hope—a mindset that we need to hold onto each and every day.

Readers Write Scam uncovered thanks to Heights police investigator Dear editor: I want to thank Officer Kevin Apostal of the Palos Heights Police Department for his recent help. A man who claimed to be a UPS driver telephoned my home and asked for direc-

tions to my house so he could deliver a package. My husband gave him the directions and I thought the package would arrive later that day. When it did not arrive in a few days, I telephoned UPS who told me they had no such package. I called the Police Department to report this incident and Officer Apostal was sent to my home to investigate.

Without going into all the details of my case, he determined the caller lived in Jamaica and was not an Illinois UPS driver. He told me I was the victim of a telephone scam and suggested ways I could avoid this in the future. I feel safer knowing my Police Department has such welltrained officers to protect us. Ellen M. Swenson Palos Heights

Regional Publishing Corporation 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Voice (708) 448-4000 Fax (708) 448-4012 www.theregionalnews.com TheRegional@comcast.net Office Hours: Mon.- Fri. - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday - 9 a.m. to noon

A ‘flash’ of insight on just how free is our free speech If you associate the First Amendment more with the rarified air of constitutional debate, or powdered wigs and colonial days, try thinking in more modern terms — say speed traps and blinking headlights. For most of us, much of the Bill of Rights comes into play infrequently, if ever. A few examples: According to a 2013 survey, only one in three U.S. households are home to a firearm (Second Amendment). And thankfully, protection in our lifetimes against illegal search and seizure (Fourth) or self-incrimination (Fifth) will be more legal theory rather than active tool. But the First Amendment — the nation’s “blue collar” amendment — goes to work every day alongside us. We regularly, if not daily, use the freedoms of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition to worship as we

REGIONAL NEWS

An independent, locally-owned community newspaper published weekly

Steve Timmermans, Ph.D., is the president of Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights.

will, to speak our minds freely, and to ask our elected leaders to make changes on matters of public interest. There are disputes over the way we apply those core freedoms, sometimes reaching the U.S. Supreme Court. But at other times, the legal collision and decision are more down-to-earth and closer to home. Case in point, Michael J. Elli challenged a city ordinance in his hometown, Ellisville, Mo., that permitted police to ticket drivers who flashed headlights to warn oncoming motorists approaching a speed trap. About 2:50 p.m. on Nov. 17, 2012, Elli flashed his headlights after passing police. He was stopped and ticketed. Elli faced a $1,000 fine, and later was warned by a municipal judge about a charge of “obstruction of justice.” The city dropped the prosecution after Elli pled not guilty, and later said it ordered police

The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. Mail or bring Readers Write letters to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463, or e-mail us at theregional@comcast.net

THE

Inside the First Amendment By Gene Policinski

Letters Policy

not to enforce the law. Nonetheless, Elli proceeded with a federal lawsuit. In early February, U.S. District Judge Henry Autrey issued an order to make certain he stopped the “chilling effect” on citizens exercising their First Amendment right of free speech. Judge Henry’s ruling makes the important point that Missouri law forbids someone from warning of “impending discovery or apprehension,” but specifically excludes telling someone to comply with the law. In other words, communicating “slow down” is protected speech because it encourages safer driving. An attorney for Elli from the American Civil Liberties Union, Tony Rothert, told The Wall Street Journal’s Law Blog that there was a higher principle involved, too: With rare exception, the police shouldn’t be stopping or prosecuting people because of the content of their speech.

As it happens, along with headlight warnings, other courts have protected a range of “speech,” from the spoken word to expressive conduct, where government may not prosecute. While it may be rude to do so, and may well mean a risk of arrest before later exoneration, courts have said people can confront police officers using insulting words, hand and finger gestures to a degree more than they could similarly challenge other “civilians.” In City of Houston v. Hill, in 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court noted “a properly trained officer may reasonably be expected to exercise a greater degree of restraint than the average citizen” to such expressive conduct. The point is not that courts are encouraging us to be insulting or disrespectful to police or other authorities — rather that government, from the lowest to highest official in the land, cannot override our right to speak freely

without presenting good reason rooted in law. In Houston, Justice William J. Brennan wrote that “the right of individuals verbally to oppose or challenge police action without thereby risking arrest is one of the principal characteristics by which we distinguish a free nation from a police state. ... The First Amendment recognizes, wisely we think, that a certain amount of expressive disorder not only is inevitable in a society committed to individual freedom, but must itself be protected if that freedom would survive.” We traditionally celebrate freedom with fireworks on July 4, Independence Day. Maybe an occasional flick or two of the highbeams is in order, too.

Kevin Hodos, Willow Springs “Hugo, an English bulldog, who lived more than 10 years. He went across the country twice with me. He was with me through thick and thin, through every moment in life.”

Susan Withers, Palos Heights “Rufus, a Shih-tzu we rescued when he was 1½. He is 8 now, the same age as my granddaughter, that’s how I remember. He is so full of love. When you get a rescue dog, you have to put in the time and compassion to get them over their fear. He’s turned out to be a wonderful dog for me and my husband.”

Joe Witryk, Worth “Aylee, a Belgium Malemois who is 2½ years old. I like her personality. She is smart. I got her from Animal Welfare. I’ve had three dogs that were rescue dogs.

Gene Policinski is chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute and senior vice president of the Institute’s First Amendment Center. He can be reached at gpolicinski@newseum.org.

Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jack Murray Sports Editor Ken Karrson Advertising Sales Val Draus Phone: 448-4001 Classified Manager Debbie Perrewe Phone: 448-4002 Graphic Design and Layout Rebecca Lanning Jackie Santora Deadlines: Editorial: Noon Saturday Advertising: 5 p.m. Monday Subscription rates: Local, delivered by mail, $45 a year in advance. Out-of-State, $54 a year. Single copies, $1.00. Postmaster: Send address changes to THE REGIONAL NEWS, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932. The Regional News cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material. USPS 419-260 Periodical postage paid at Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Palos Heights, Illinois, 60463 and additional post offices under the Act of March 3, 1879. (©Entire contents copyright 2014 Regional Publishing Corp.)

This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.

V

iewfinder

What was (or is) the name of your favorite pet? (Asked at the PAWWS for Love fundraiser last Saturday.)

Photos by Joan Hadac

Barb Kopca, Palos Park “Buddy Love, a Golden Retriever who is 5. He keeps me company, goes for walks with me and just loves me no matter what.”

Connie Jaramillo, Oak Lawn “Trixie, a 7-year old Terrier mix who we rescued. After we rescued her, we found out she was deaf, and that made me love her all the more.”




The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Mayor Straz recaps state of Heights to Chamber by Tim Hadac staff reporter Palos Heights Mayor Robert Straz, a career community banker, delivered a message of strength through fiscal responsibility in his annual “state of the city” address on Tuesday. The 28-minute speech was given to nearly 70 members and guests of the Palos Area Chamber of Commerce, at a luncheon held at Moraine Valley Community College, 9000 W. College Parkway, Palos Hills. “I think we’re going in the right direction,” Straz said near the end of his remarks. “I’ve talked about financial and fiscal responsibility. I think that’s the way we have to go. “So many times, we hear critics complain about government spending and overspending. We don’t put up with that,” the mayor continued. “We have a very disciplined budget process that we go through every year. We don’t spend the money unless we know the money is going to be there.” Straz milked a few chuckles from the audience when he added, “I can’t make any observations about the State of Illinois, but we’ll leave it at that,” in a reference to years of deficit spending that has led to the current state budget crunch. “I pledge to you that we will continue to spend prudently and frugally,” he concluded, as he received a brief round of applause. Straz broke no new ground in the address, and spent much of the speech recapping what he described as his administration’s successes in being responsible stewards of local tax dollars. “Over the past several years, the city has been hard at work maintaining the highest possible

Photo by Tim Hadac

Several business owners and others approached Mayor Straz after Photo by Tim Hadac the speech to congratulate him on his remarks and offer additional The mayor’s annual address was captured on video by cable Channel 4 and will be available for viewsuggestions for community improvement. ing. level of service to the community, and we have been able to do so with a balanced budget,” the mayor said. “We have been adhering to our fund balance policies, delivering services, making public improvements, and we have been making appropriate levels of investment to our police pension fund per the recommendation of the actuarial reports. “Through proper fiscal planning, we are pleased to report that we have a balanced budget for 2014,” he continued. “The city has been debt free for the past few years, which is vital to us should we need or decide to make any planned improvements that would require additional funding sources.” Straz also touted what he called the city’s success in pur-

suing grant funding for various initiatives. Since 2002, he said, his administration has attracted more than $4.6 million in grants from several different sources. “In 2013 we completed several projects: among them were the completion of the Harlem Avenue Corridor lighting, landscaping and intersection improvements; the resurfacing of 76th Avenue from 127th Street to 131st Street; a sidewalk extension that connects to the south side of the Southwest Highway bridge, allowing for safe access by foot or bike to the Metra station; and we dedicated a new play lot on Natchez Avenue,” the mayor continued. “We were also able to continue the annual residential road improvement program, which included several areas throughout the city. Since

I came into office in 2001, this program has resurfaced and/or repaired a total of 29 miles of the city’s 52 miles of residential streets at a cost of $5.2 million using a combination of motor fuel tax, vehicle sticker, and general funds.” Straz also gave a ringing endorsement to the city’s Parks & Recreation Department for offering programming that is diverse and popular among people of all ages, and for leading the way to bringing the municipal pool back from the brink of closing and into profitability, which he called “remarkable.” He also tipped his cap to municipal cable Channel 4, which he described as a media outlet that has gone from little more than a fairly static presence years

ago to a dynamic, relevant, useful news and information service that today is the envy of the other municipalities. The mayor also hailed the city’s commitment to public art as something that sets it apart from other suburbs and which helps make Palos Heights a destination. In terms of economic development news, Straz recapped the several successes and challenges of the past year, most of which were reported in The Regional News. “Palos Community Hospital has completed the bulk of their new construction, and it looks great,” he said. “The level of care and delivery of service at the new facility, along with the new leadership, will continue to provide our communities with a tremendous asset

for years into the future. “We will also continue our efforts of improving the local economy with programs designed to retain and attract business,” he added, as he mentioned several small businesses expected to open locally in 2014. Straz also praised the administration and staff at the Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens, for creating and maintaining the “jewel of the Southwest Suburbs.” He expressed amazement that while Lake Katherine attracts thousands of visitors from across the greater Chicago area, there are still Palos Heights residents who have never been there. “If you haven’t been there, please, go—and take your family.”

Judge Chris Lawler announces candidacy in 15th Subcircuit race “I think the most important part don’t understand that then it is of being a Judge is understanding hard to issue fair or compassionthe pulse of your community” ate sentences.” – Judge Chris Lawler Judge Lawler is a lifelong resident of the Southside of Chicago With family and friends by his and the Southwest Suburbs. He side, Judge Chris Lawler recently currently lives in Palos Heights officially announced his candidacy with his wife Julie and their two to retain his position as Judge in adopted children. the 15th Judicial Subcircuit of Judge Lawler has been servCook County. ing on the Board of Directors A Palos Heights resident, Judge OF Catholic Charities for over 10 Lawler was appointed by the Il- years and is currently the Chairlinois Supreme Court to fill a man of the Child, Youth & Family vacancy last year, and is up for Services Committee. Lawler and election to remain on the bench his wife are past Presidents of the in the March 18 primary. He cur- Adoptive Parents’ Guild and they rently hears cases at the Markham continue to serve on its Board. Courthouse. Lawler served on the Marist High Judge Lawler has been an School Board of Directors for nine attorney for the past 25 years, years and spent the past five years beginning his career as in-house as its chairman. counsel for AllState Insurance. He Judge Lawler also serves on opened his own litigation firm 20 the St. Alexander Parish Finance years ago, handling both insur- Council and is a member of the St. ance defense matters and personal Alexander School Council. Judge injury lawsuits. Judge Lawler is Lawler is a volunteer for Miseria member of the Southwest Bar cordia Home, Park Lawn, and the Association and served as a past CARA organization, a program president. that assists men and women in “I think the most important returning to the workforce after part of being a Judge is under- being released from prison or standing the pulse your commu- rehabilitation from alcohol and nity,” said Judge Lawler. “If you drug addictions.

Judge Lawler attended St. Germaine Grammar School in Oak Lawn. In 1981, he graduated from Marist High School in Chicago and then Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., where he earned a B.A. in history. Judge Lawler received his Juris Doctor from IIT-Chicago Kent College of Law in 1988. Judge Lawler has been endorsed by the Chicago Federation of Labor, the Chicago Fire Department, Submitted photos and the International Union of Judge Chris Lawler, of Palos Heights, is endorsed by Palos Heights Mayor Bob Straz and former state Operating Engineers Local 399. Sen.Maggie Crotty in his March 18 Democratic primary election bid in the 15th Subcircuit of the Cook He has also been endorsed by County Circuit Court. former State Sen. Maggie Crotty, John O’Sullivan, Worth Township Committeeman; Edward Smollen, Lemont Township Committeeman; Patrick Kitching, Mayor of Alsip; Lou Presta, Mayor of Crestwood; Sharon Rybak, Mayor CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CLEANING of Midlothian; Hank Kuspa, Mayor of Oak Forest; Robert Straz, UPHOLSTERY ANY ROOM WE CAN POWER WASH Mayor of Palos Heights; and Ed JUST ABOUT ANYTHING SPECIALS: PER ROOM Zabrocki, Mayor of Tinley Park. L-shaped rooms & Great rooms $ are considered 2 rooms. 3 Cushions Additionally, every bar assoWHOLE HOUSE SPECIAL ciation group that has evaluated $ 2 Cushions Any 6 Rooms. Judge Chris Lawler’s resume and L-shaped rooms qualifications has found him Qual$ & Great rooms are considered 2 rooms. ified, Recommended, or Highly Recommended to serve as a Judge Toll Free 1-800-339-5333 www.majesticsteam.com in Cook County.

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Promoting Dignity Through Activities On SeMinar i T a c u d ia E A Free DeMenT 4UESDAY &EBRUARY sPMTOPM Featuring Guest Speaker Noreen Gray, LNHA

Director of Lifestyle Programming, Assisted Living Division, HCR ManorCare Planning meaningful activities for persons living with Alzheimer’s plays an integral part in promoting their sense of independence, self-esteem and maintaining a quality lifestyle. Noreen Gray has specialized in improving the environment for those with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia for over 15 years. During this seminar, Noreen Gray will discuss: UÊ œÜÊLi…>ۈœÀÊ>˜`Êi“œÌˆœ˜>ÊÜiÊLiˆ˜}ÊV…>˜}iÃÊ>ÃÊ`i“i˜Ìˆ>Ê«Àœ}ÀiÃÃià UÊ /…iÊLi˜iwÌÃʜvʓi>˜ˆ˜}vՏ]Êi˜}>}ˆ˜}Ê>V̈ۈ̈iÃÊvœÀʈ˜`ˆÛˆ`Õ>ÃʏˆÛˆ˜}Ê with memory loss Submitted photo

Palos-Orland AAUW dinner will delve the Passion Play The Palos-Orland branch of the AAUW will host guest speaker and retired professor, Kate WulleDugan presenting “Oberammergau and the Passion Play” on Thursday, March 6, at The Presbyterian Church, 13401 S. Wolf Road in Orland Park. This is the local AAUW’s annual Ethnic Dinner, a fundraiser in support of the Legal Advocacy Fund combating sex discrimination. The Passion Play has been performed every 10 years since 1634 to thank God for sparing the town from the ravages of the Bubonic Plague. Nearly half the town residents are involved in the performance in some capacity. A dinner of authentic Bavarian food will precede the speaker at 6:30 pm., with the lecture to begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30 for the meal and presentation. Tickets for the speaker only are $5 and payable at the door. Send checks to Joyce Icenogle, 19205 Boulder Ridge Dr, Mokena IL 60448 Deadline to receive checks is Monday, March 3.The public is welcome to attend this event. For more information, visit the poab-il.aauw.net/, or call Program Director Lenette Staudinger at 349-9379.

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Call (708) 361-8070 or e-mail palosheights@arden-courts.com to reserve your seat. 7880 West College Drive Palos Heights, IL 60463 (708) 361-8070 palosheights@arden-courts.com 8357_PalosHgts_5.75x7.indd 1

Memory Care Community

1/27/14 2:11:12 PM




The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Orland Park Area Chamber 2014 leaders installed

Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce President Rob Wehmeier introduces his “Elvis” alter ego during the Chamber’s Installation ceremony held at Silver Lake Country Club. Wehmeier was installed as the Chamber’s 2014 president at the January ceremony.

Orland Park Mayor Dan McLaughlin installed the 2014 Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors at an installation ceremony held on Jan. 30 at Silver Lake Country Club and attended by Village Board Officials and members of the Chamber of Commerce. Rob Wehmeier was installed as the Chamber’s 2014 President. Rob is the owner of Wehmeier Portraits in Orland Park. Wehmeier has been on the Chamber’s Board of Director’s for seven years and has served on the Chamber’s executive board for the past four years. Wehmeier’s involvement in the Chamber includes co-chairing the

Community Expo, photographer at all Chamber events as well as serving as an advisor on the Chamber’s marketing and technology committees. The Chamber’s Presidential Choice awards were also announced at the Installation ceremony. The awards distributed at the Installation Cocktail Party included Rocco Vino’s Italian Restaurant as Business of the Year, Susan Byrne of Coldwell Banker was named as Member of the Year and Carol Inyart of Primerica was named Ambassador of the Year.

The former Chairman of the Ambassadors Club Committee, Glen Borkowski, DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen, honors Ambassador of the Year Carol Inyart, Primerica, in recognition for her service to the chamber. Inyart is an active member of the Chamber’s Ambassadors Club Committee.

Outgoing Chamber President Marc Lochow thanks Susan Byrne, Coldwell Banker, for her service to the Chamber. Byrne serves as chairwoman of the Chamber’s Ambassadors Club committee as well as a volunteer for various events held by the Chamber.

Members of the 2014 Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors were installed by Mayor Dan McLaughlin during the Chamber’s Installation Cocktail Party held at Silver Lake Country Photos by Mary Compton Photography Club in January. Pictured, back row: Lynn Cialdella, Parkway Bank & Trust Company; Mike Hardek, Marc Lochow, outgoing Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce President, thanks Rocco Vino’s Ital- Centrue Bank; Susan Byrne, Coldwell Banker; Keith Massey, Standard Bank & Trust; Glen Borkowski, ian Restaurant for their ongoing dedication to the Chamber. Rocco Vino’s was honored as Business of DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen; Ed Schussler, Village of Orland Park Trustee; Karen Nemeth, BMO Harthe Year at the Chamber’s Installation ceremony held at Silver Lake Country Club in January. Pictured ris Bank N.A.; Michael Buck, Law Offices of Michael Buck. Front row: Marc Lochow, PrintSource Plus; are Rocco Vino’s Italian Restaurant owner Rosanna DeFrenza (from left), Manager Tony Gloria, owner Renee Oswald Your Mind Over Matter; Rob Wehmeier, Wehmeier Portraits; Heather Warthen, debi Rocco DeFrenza and 2013 Chamber President Marc Lochow. Ross, Inside Looks by debi Ross and Renee Tabor, Metamorphosis.

Two Orland cops suspended for ‘Aunt Jemima’ language by Tim Hadac staff reporter Two Orland Park police officers have been suspended for 30 days without pay after they were caught on tape using racially offensive language while on duty. Police Chief Timothy McCarthy told The Regional on Tuesday evening that the officers, whom he declined to name, used the term “Aunt Jemima” in a personal conversation unrelated to their police duties. The department, he said, became aware of the situation late last week during a sidebar conversation at a court trial relating to a traffic stop. An attorney researching a case discovered the epithet on a recording made by a police squad dashboard camera

back in December. “The entire conversation from beginning to end was unprofessional, and it put the department in a very negative image,” McCarthy said to a television news reporter earlier Tuesday. “The remarks are offensive and could be harmful, and we want to hold employees to a high standard.” While Aunt Jemima remains a popular food brand that “stands for warmth, nourishment and trust,” according to its corporate parent, the Quaker Oats Company, the image is generally considered by African Americans and others to be an insult, an offensive throwback to the days of slavery and Jim Crow—akin to the Sambo, Mammy and Stepinfetchit stereotypes of dull-witted, slowmoving, obsequious individuals.

From Sochi

The next myth -- Russians are shooting stray dogs. That’s false. (Continued from page 1) I will say, strays are all over the place—but most of them are sleepThe thousands of very nice volun- ing. I was told the dogs are being teers I mentioned early, yeah I was tranquilized. Clearly, the Russians told they are all packing heat. You do not want thousands of dead don’t see the stereotypical armed dogs around the Olympic park. guards walking around with M4 The next topic people usually weapons. In fact, I’ve yet to see like to hear about is the food. Well, a firearm in Russia. I can say that I’ve had hard-boiled The Russian police likely have eggs and French fries every morna concealed firearm; however, the ing for breakfast. I could however only weapon on their utility belt have hot dogs, cold cuts or what is an old school baton. The se- they call “chocolates balls,” aka curity is top-notch. Whenever a Cocoa Puffs. spectator bus leaves the station Other than the breakfast seit’s inspected for bombs and when lection being strange to say the the bus is parked the driver wraps least, the food is delicious. The tape around the bus to prevent Russians have some really unique any tampering of the bus. and tasty dishes.

Senior Notes SALT at Trinity for older adults

Chicago History Museum. SALT On the Road will explore three destinations. Niagara Falls, Seasoned Adults Learning at June 24-28, offers key stops in Trinity “SALT” is offering a Michigan, Ontario, Pennsylvania, variety of inspiring, three-week Ohio, and Indiana. Enjoy The classes, day trips, book discus- Sights, Sounds, and Scenery of sions, breakfast clubs, and travel Michigan Oct. 8-11 for fun, sightat great prices. seeing, and entertainment. Save Classes are offered at an afford- the date for able price of $28 and cover a range Alaska by Land and Sea, July of topics from iPad and iPhone 2015. Register now for these basics to yoga. Other classes in- trips. clude The Affordable Care Act Join a thought-provoking book and You, Conflict in the Middle discussion on May 15 as readers East, Hollywood and the Civil discuss Orphan Train by ChrisWar, Behind the Headlines, and tina Baker Kline. SALT Breakfast Embracing Urban Wildlife. For Club on May 23 will feature guest a full list of courses, visit www. speaker Priscilla Steinmetz, extrnty.edu/salt. ecutive director and founder of SALT day trips include lunch The Bridge Teen Center. A comand/or dinner in the cost. SALT plimentary breakfast is included. will be heading to the 2014 Chi- There is no cost for this event, cago Flower & Garden Show, but registration is required. Frank Lloyd Wright Oak Park For a free SALT brochure or Tour, Chicago (Shakespeare) Din- detailed information on trips, ner Theater, International College visit www.trnty.edu/salt or contact of Surgeons Museum, and the Ruth De Bruyn at ruth.debruyn@

trnty.edu or 239-4827. Registration is now open.

Casino overnight trip to Battle Creek

Orland Township offers an overnight trip March 6 and 7 to FireKeepers Casino on Thursday, Photo by Kevin Coyne March 6. PLOWS Council on Aging is This trip will take seniors to The sights of Sochi at night were a part of Kevin Coyne’s experience currently hosting a Grandparents Clara’s Lansing Station in Battle at the 2014 Olympics. Raising Grandchildren support Creek, Mich., where lunch and group at the Palos Township of- a guided tour of this historical fice, 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos landmark will be provided, and Hills. then to FireKeepers Casino, Each session focuses on a spe- where seniors can enjoy all ho- "Best Buds" (Puzzle on page 8) (Puzzle on page 8) Sudoku Solution #3110-M cific topic, including financial & tel amenities, from pool to the legal assistance, technology skills, bars and restaurants. This is an V E G A S A Y N A S S E T 6 8 1 5 2 7 9 3 4 A B A C K B O O N E W T O and self-care. Knowledgeable and overnight trip. S A L T Y D O G S G R E A T 9 5 3 1 6 4 7 8 2 experienced guest speakers will Transportation will leave at A D I E S E E L S be invited to provide additional 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, March E Y E M LI M 2 4 7 8 9 3 1 5 6 E M I N T information and guidance. We 6, and will return at 6 p.m.on C A B I N S C L I M A T E S 1 6 2 4 3 8 5 7 9 strongly encourage all grandpar- Friday, March 7. The cost is A L I C E W A I L S O L E ents raising grandchildren to take $175 and includes lunch, hotel R I T E T A S T E C O I N 8 7 9 6 1 5 4 2 3 T H R E E D I T T O advantage of this opportunity. accommodations including the L E T 4 3 5 2 7 9 8 6 1 For information and registra- overnight stay, a $20 casino pack- O N E P O U N D H I T H E R R O O M S O R E tion contact Maria or Amanda age and $5 each day for food.  5 9 6 7 4 2 3 1 8 S Q U E R C A C. at PLOWS, 361-0219. Please Get tickets at the township office, HA PA PI ST I B SI O U R C R E A M 7 1 4 3 8 6 2 9 5 do not contact Palos Township 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland A L L I N L O A T A N G O regarding this program. Park.(403-4222) 3 2 8 9 5 1 6 4 7 B E L T S E N D S H O E S

Grandparents raising grandchildren support group

Answer

Sudoku

© 2009 Hometown Content


The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Orland man charged with theft from church’s donation basket A 28-year-old Orland Park man has been charged with theft after he allegedly stole cash from three local Roman Catholic churches. David A. Kost was apprehended by Orland Park police at about 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11 as he left St. Francis of Assisi Church, 15050 S. Wolf Road. He allegedly admitted stealing $14 from a donation basket in the church, according to a statement released by police. While in custody, Kost allegedly admitted stealing cash from St. Michael Church, 14327 S. Highland, as well as Our Lady of the Woods



Church, 10731 W. 131st St. Orland Park police said they were conducting surveillance at St. Francis of Assisi after they had been contacted by Cook County Sheriff’s Police and alerted to thefts from area churches. Theft from a house of worship is a Class 4 felony in Illinois, punishable by up to three years in jail. Kost is being held without bond by the Cook County Department of Corrections. He is scheduled to appear in court in Bridgeview Submitted photo on March 5, according to Cook David A. Kost, charged with County Sheriff’s Police. theft.

Woman charged with DUI after striking tree, police say Amber M. Ruzicka, 38, of Mokena, was charged with drunken driving Feb. 1 after she struck a tree at 143rd Street and Oakley Avenue, police said. Ruzicka also was charged with improper lane use, no proof of insurance, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident and driving too fast for conditions, according to the police report. Police said Ruzicka was disoriented, had a strong odor of alcohol on her breath and slurred speech. She failed field sobriety tests, and hit her head on the separation barrier in the squad car, police said. Shelby L. Pappas, 21, of Orland Park, was charged with battery Feb. 1 after a disturbance in the

2 after he was stopped at 152nd Street and 94th Avenue, police said. 10200 of block of Hyacinth Drive, Ashton C. Canton, 24, of Chipolice said. cago, was charged with possession Robert A. Subasic, 28, of Chi- of a controlled substance, resisting cago, was charged with driving a police officer and disobeying a without a valid license and making stop sign Jan. 31 following a stop an improper turn Feb. 2 follow- in the 14800 block of LaGrange ing a stop at the intersection of Road, police said. Photo by Tim Hadac 81st Avenue and 143rd Street, James H. Jenson, 41, of Ampolice said. herst, Ohio, was charged with Dontae D. Cole, 19, of Country possession of marijuana and makClub Hills, was charged with retail ing an improper turn after being theft after stealing jewelry Jan. stopped Feb. 1 at 147th Street and Boys from the Webelos Den 1 of Cub Scout Pack 3337, sponsored by St. Alexander Parish, brave 30 from a store in Orland Square, Humphrey Drive, police said. Monday morning’s snow and cold as they learn how to properly hoist and lower Old Glory. police said. Four cases of windshield wiper The lesson, led by firefighter Adam Casper, was held outside the Palos Heights Fire Protection District Steven M. Mischka, 24, of Lan- fluid were stolen Jan. 28 from station, 12300 S. Harlem Ave. sing, of Orland Park, was charged a pallet outside a gas station at The lesson was part of the boys’ efforts to earn the “Citizen” activity badge, according to den leader with possession of marijuana Feb. 159th Street and 94th Avenue. Marcella Castor.

ORLAND PARK POLICE

Lessons in proper flag display

Accused suspended After haircut, man gets his face cut: cops driver is charged by Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

Palos Heights police arrested Shereen Fakhoury, 33, of Alsip, and charged her with driving on a suspended license. Police pulled her vehicle over in the 12700 block of South Ridgeland Avenue at 3:48 p.m. Feb.11 when they reportedly spotted her passenger not wearing a seatbelt. Bond was set at $1,500, and Fakhoury is due in court on March 13. In other Palos Heights police news, Fedda Hamed-Matariyeh, 43, of Burbank, was charged with driving on a suspended license, driving a vehicle with expired registration, and failure to wear a seatbelt. Her vehicle was curbed by police in the 12200 block of

the incident, but was arrested at 7:30 p.m. after he was found in a nearby alley, police said. A Worth barbershop patron was When police arrived, the alcut in the face Feb. 9 following a leged victim was inside the shop, PALOS HEIGHTS POLICE fight with a shop employee over bleeding from several locations on Muslim women, police said. his face. He was taken to Christ South Harlem Avenue at 2:54 Mahmoud M.A. Abbas, 31, of Medical Center in Oak Lawn for p.m. last Friday. Bond was set Chicago Ridge, was charged with treatment. at $1,500, and Hamed-Matariyeh aggravated battery after he allegThe alleged victim, a 22-yearis scheduled to appear in court edly struck a customer of Fresh old Joliet man, said he arrived at on April 4. Fades Barbershop, 11401 S. Har- the barber shop at 5:30 p.m. to Chiedu O. Ikedionwu, 38, of lem Ave., in the face with a sharp get a haircut. He sat down next DeKalb, was charged with driv- object, according to reports. to shop employee who asked if ing on a suspended license, no Abbas fled through the back he wanted coffee from Dunkin proof of insurance, an inoperative door of the barber shop after Donuts. The victim refused. tail light, and driving a vehicle with expired registration. Police stopped his vehicle in the 6600 block of West College Drive at 9:12 p.m. last Saturday. Bond was set at $2,000, and Ikedionwu’s court Early voting will take place 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays 9 date is March 13. from Monday, March 3 through a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 15 for the March The closest early voting locations 18th gubernatorial primary elec- are listed below. There are a total tion. of 43 early voting sites. For more The hours are 9 a.am. to 5 information call 312-603-5656. For p.m. Monday through Satur- further information, call your muday at the suburban locations. nicipal or township clerk for inforOak Lawn Village Hall will be mation on all the available sites. open on Sundays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Clerk’s office at Bridgeview 69 West Washington, Chicago, is 10220 S. 76th Avenue open Monday through Saturday 708-974-6150

When Mahmoud returned, he talked about the Muslim women he saw at Dunkin Donuts. The Joliet man told Abbas should not talk about Muslim women. Instead, he told Abbas, he should “respect them like they are his sisters.” Mahmoud responded by insulting the alleged victim and his mother, according to reports. The victim got out of his chair, Mahmoud got into his face and the two men continued to argue, police said. The alleged victim noticed that Mahmoud had a knife or sharp object in his right hand

and asked what he planned to do with the object. Another shop employee attempted to separate the men and asked the Joliet man to leave. He said he backed away from Mahmoud, retrieved his coat and paid for his haircut. But police reports said Mahmoud told the alleged victim to meet him outside, where the men continued to argue until Mahmoud swung his right hand and struck the victim in the face with the object. The men continued to fight and wrestle until they were separated.

Early voting starts March 3 Oak Lawn Village Hall 9446 S. Raymond Ave. 708-636-4400 Orland Township 14807 Ravinia Avenue Orland Park 708-403-4222 Palos Heights Administration Center 7607 West College Drive 708-361-1800

Lawmaker pushes privacy for 911 callers

‘Lest We Forget’ at McCord

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For more info visit www.electjudgechrislawler.com VOTE LAWLER ON MARCH 18! Paid Political Advertisement.

and the privacy of the individuals making the 911 calls have to be part of the equation,” Cunningham said. “Right now, they are not.” Senate Bill 3072 is currently in the Senate Assignments Committee. If passed, Illinois will join more than a dozen other states in restricting some level of access to 911 calls.

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The most memorable moments of last year’s World War II exhibit at McCord Gallery & Cultural Center came when families were viewing the collections and sharing both world and personal history. This year the public is invited to join noted historian Dr. Theodore Karamanski on Saturday, March 8, at 2 p.m. at McCord for a round table discussion about the war. To honor area veterans, guests are invited to share their stories as well as memorabilia. This event is free and open to all. The program is a precursor to the World War II Part 2 exhibit, which will take place at McCord Wednesday, March 12 – Sunday, March 16. Among the new artifacts to be displayed are a Hitler Youth dagger with a handmade wooden blade, which was surrendered by a 14-year-old boy; a German mauser rifle, a machine gun ammunition belt, Rudolph Hess’s silverware, opium cigarettes given to Kamakazi pilots, and a sake set that survived the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Ticket prices are $12 for the public and $10 for members of McCord. Veterans, students, and children are free. Pictured is Craig Dvorak, one of the docents who will be explaining and demonstrating parts of the exhibit. McCord Gallery & Cultural Center is located at 9602 W. Creek Road (129th and La Grange Road), Palos Park. For more information, call 671-0648, or visit www.mccordgallery.org.

ELECT JUDGE CHRIS LAWLER

Sheriff’s Office. In that capacity, he was forced to balance the public’s right to access information with the privacy rights of average citizens who performed their civic duty and called the authorities for help in emergency situations. “Freedom of Information laws need to strike a balance. Consideration of the victim’s rights

SE R V I N G OAK L AWN & SO U T H W E S T SIDE F OR 6 0 Y E A R S

Submitted photo

calls made during the Sandy Hook School shootings in Newtown, Conn. Local officials initially refused media requests to release the recordings, citing the privacy rights of the victims and callers. But a judge ruled the recordings were considered public records under the state’s Freedom of Information Act and ordered the tapes released. “The thousands of media outlets that aired those recordings weren’t acting as government watchdogs trying to shed light on the conduct of law enforcement,” Cunningham said. “They were simply looking to create shocking program content in order to boost ratings and drive visits to their websites.” Before being elected to the General Assembly, Cunningham spent 16 years as the press secretary for the Cook County

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State Sen. Bill Cunningham is proposing legislation aimed at protecting the privacy of ordinary citizens who call 911 in emergency situations. Under current state law emergency phone calls are subject to Freedom of Information Act requests, which can results in audio recordings of the calls being broadcast on television, radio and the Internet without the consent of the caller. Cunningham wants to change that. “Freedom of Information laws are primarily intended to prevent government secrecy, not violate personal privacy. Unfortunately, we’ve seen that sense of privacy violated repeatedly over the years, often during tragic episodes in the 911 caller’s life,” Cunningham said. Cunningham pointed to the recent airing of the 911 phone




The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Submitted photos

No bullying tolerated at St. Michael School The St. Michael School Ambassador Leadership Team on Jan. 15 presented the first of two antibullying assemblies at the parish school in Orland Park. The classes were split into two groups K-3 and 4-7. They discussed why bulling is wrong, and what one can do about it if one is bullied. The Ambassadors performed skits for the younger children and

gave helpful suggestions. Everyone agreed that being a by-stander and doing nothing was just as bad as being a bully. At the end of each session all classes signed a pledge not to bully and hung these signed pledges in their classrooms. The Ambassador Leadership Team will present their next anti-bullying assembly in May. Their goal is to make St. Michael School an entirely Bully Free Zone.

Trinity Christian College launches new programs Building on the success of its strong traditional undergraduate, adult studies and graduate studies programs, Trinity Christian College is launching two new programs. Adult students can now complete a bachelor’s degree in psychology through the Adult Studies department. Licensed teachers can earn a Learning Behavior Specialist (LBS) II Behavior Intervention Specialist endorsement and BCBA certifica-

tion through the Special Education Graduate Studies department. Psychology • Adults can apply their previous college credit to Trinity’s Adult Studies psychology program and finish a bachelor’s degree in psychology in two years by attending classes just once a week. Through this accelerated program, students develop the theoretical insight and professional skills needed to serve in a variety of psychology-related careers and professions and to en-

ter graduate study. Students who wish to work as Licensed Professional Counselors can go on to earn their master’s degree through Trinity’s Graduate Studies Counseling Psychology program. • “Adult learners at Trinity develop strong, supportive relationships with instructors who are caring, competent and committed to student success,” said Dr. Michael DeVries, professor of psychology. “As a professor and clinician, I am careful to integrate

Christian perspective with established psychological science.” Special Ed LBS II • Licensed teachers who hold an LBS I endorsement can join the Master of Arts in Special Education LBS II program. In just two years, students can earn their master’s degree, LBS II Behavior Intervention Specialist endorsement on their teaching license, and Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) certification. • Students completing the pro-

gram will be qualified to teach in a variety of educational settings serving students with low incidence disabilities and students on the Autism Spectrum ages 3-22. Graduates will be prepared to serve as Behavior Intervention Specialists in a variety of special education or general education settings. Teachers who are interested in earning their LBS I endorsement can join the Master of Arts in Special Education LBS I program at Trinity.

Learn more Prospective students interested in learning more about Trinity’s programs are invited to attend an information session. The Graduate Studies Special Education session will be held on Wednesday, March 19, at 6 p.m. An Adult Studies psychology session will be held on Wednesday, March 26, at 6 p.m. Register online at www.trnty.edu or by calling Trinity Christian College at 239-4768.

Speed dating for book lovers at Shepard by Bob McParland District 218

lovers. Indeed, with Valentine’s Day approaching that was the point of the ‘speed dating’ literDecorated in red and pink, each ary event. of the eight small tables creating As they walked into the library, a ring in the Shepard High School the freshmen in teacher Ryan library overflowed with books. McGuire’s sixth period health They invited sampling, sort education class soon learned what of a box of chocolates for book would happen.

The tables, with seating for four students, featured books with a specific theme. For three minutes -- the speed-dating aspect -- students would read the back covers of books. After the three minutes, a group would move to the next table and repeat the quick-fire absorption of a new group of books. Then they checked out as many as they wanted at the end of the period. “We thought the timing perfect, just before Valentine’s Day,” said LRC coordinator Kim Borgia. The concept: Just like a box of chocolates, students will find something they like when presented with a selection of books with interesting, relevant, and timely themes. The books explored healthrelated themes of bullying, self -image, mental illness, suicide, addiction, obesity, and others. Once Shepard High School health education teacher Ryan McGuire students chose their books, liter(background) walks among his students as they browse books at acy coach Meghan Sisk explained the ‘speed dating’ literary event. the expectations for completing

the readings. Students approached the speeddating concept earnestly. Without exception, they perused the books thoughtfully as Borgia, Sisk, and McGuire walked among the tables talking with them. While fun, the activity pursued serious goals. Borgia and Sisk took the idea from a workshop at Waubonsie Valley High School. “I’m borrowing the enduring understanding and essential question they used,” Sisk said. The project seeks to promote understanding of how “personal choices impact current and long term outcomes on individuals, family, and society,” Sisk added. The essential question: In a culture where we are bombarded by other people trying to define us, how do we make decisions for ourselves? “The themes common in young adult literature naturally lend themselves to opening up discus- Shepard High School LRC coordinator Kim Borgia (left) and literacy sions about the health issues being coach Meghan Sisk talk with freshmen as the peruse books during covered in class,” Sisk said. the ‘speed dating’ literary event.

Marquette Bank offers annual area high school scholarships Marquette Bank, a locallyowned neighborhood bank, has announced the 54 local high schools selected for the 2014 Marquette Bank Education Foundation Scholarship Program. The program has a 48-year tradition of providing scholarships to graduating seniors from neighborhoods near Marquette Bank’s 22 branch locations. Funded by the Marquette Bank

Education Foundation, the scholarships are available to students who demonstrate financial need, have an outstanding record of community service and maintain at least a “B” average. Since 1967, over $2.6 million has been awarded to over 1,300 Chicagoland high school students. “As a neighborhood bank, we want to acknowledge and reward those graduating seniors who have demonstrated a strong com-

mitment to our neighborhoods through volunteering and completing service projects,” George Moncada, Marquette Bank President said. “Providing financial support encourages these students to further their education and will help them to become future leaders of the community, which will benefit the entire community as a whole.” Scholarship recipients are selected by their school’s principal,

St. Michael cross-curriculum blends writing with technology The 3rd-grade class at St. Michael School in Orland Park researched, wrote and developed a PowerPoint presentation on a saint of their choice last month as part of the school’s new cross-curriculum program to bring writing and technology together. The students started the project by researching their topic on the Internet. They learned how to look up topics, what sites to use and what is appropriate. “The Internet is a powerful tool when researching information,” says Mrs. Hnilo, technology instructor at St. Michael. “We want to make sure the children are using the right sites to gain the information they need.” After the information was gathered the students brought these materials to their writing class. They used their research materials to complete pre-writing activities, write drafts, edit and write a final research paper about their saint. The students were simultaneously working on PowerPoint presentations in their computer classes. The students took specific facts from their research papers and developed intricate, creative PowerPoint slides highlighting their facts. They learned how to create a PowerPoint presentation with transitions between slides, unique backgrounds, importing pictures, and individualizing font choices. “We teach the students to effec-

tively use technology to enhance their writing and presentation skills” says Mrs. Stoub, writing teacher at St. Michael. “We want them to learn how to research, develop and present information successfully.” The students presented their PowerPoint slideshows for their classmates. They were expected

guidance counselors or principal-appointed committee and are recognized at an awards ceremony attended by friends and family. The scholarship can be used to cover expenses at any higher education program including: four-year colleges and universities, community colleges, vocational training or trade schools. To apply, students from participating schools can pick up an application from their

School Notes

to speak clearly, face and have eye contact with their audience, point St. Alexander and press the PowerPoint slides correctly and effectively answer School open houses questions from their audience of and registration peers at the end of their presentation. St. Alexander School, Palos For more information on Saint Heights, will host Welcome Michael School, visit www.saint- Wednesdays Open Houses for mike.org or call 349-0068. prospective students and families on Wednesdays, Feb. 26, March 26, April 30 and May 21, from 9 a.m to 11 a.m., at the school located at 126th Street and 71st Avenue. Experience and explore St. Alexander School during the Open House. School tours will showcase the state-of-the-art Technology and Applied Tech Labs as well as students participating in classroom activities. “This is a wonderful opportunity for prospective school families to see first hand how students and teachers interact in a classroom setting,” Principal Cathy Biel said. School Administrators will be available to answer questions and provide detailed information regarding class offerings and extra curricular activities. Registration for the 2014-15 academic year is now underway. For more information, to schedule Submitted photo a tour and to register contact the Saint Michael School 3rd-grader Andrew Hinkes, of Palos Park, re- School Administration Office at searched, wrote and developed a Power Point presentation on Saint 448-0408. To explore all St. AlAndrew. This in part of the school’s new cross-curriculum program, exander has to offer, visit www. to bring writing and technology together. stalexanderschool.com.

guidance counselor’s office by March 15, 2014 and the schools must submit their nominated scholarship recipient by April 25, 2014. Area schools invited to participate in the 2014 Marquette Bank Education Foundation Scholarship Program are Shepard, Sandburg, Stagg, Andrew, Brother Rice, Mother McAuley, Marist, Queen of Peace, Providence and Mount Assisi high schools.

The Marquette Bank Education Foundation Scholarship Program is part of the Marquette Neighborhood Commitment, where each quarter the bank focuses on a different area of need: shelter, hunger, education and health/wellness. For more information on the Marquette Bank Education Foundation Scholarship Program, call 1-888-254-9500 or visit: www. emarquettebank.com.

Sandburg’s 25th annual spring craft fair ahead It was 25 years ago that the first Carl Sandburg High School Music Boosters debuted the first CSHS Spring Craft Fair in an effort to support the renowned music program at CSHS. The craft fair has since grown to become one of the most anticipated annual events in the area. This local event has become not only an annual school tradition, but a tradition for many local families as well. “We attend every year,” said Orland Park resident Cyndee Harris. “I always find such unique and interesting items for my home and the craft fair is a nice way to kick off the spring season.” The 25th annual Carl Sandburg Music Boosters Spring Craft Fair will be held Saturday, March 8, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and

Sunday, March 9, from 10 a.m.to 4 p.m., at Sandburg High School, 13300 S. LaGrange Road., Orland Park. Numerous crafters will be in attendance to make shopping for Easter and spring essentials a breeze. Shoppers can expect to find jewelry, handbags, clothing, holiday items, home decor, candles, handcrafted one-of-akind crafts and so much more! There will also be a bake sale and a “Kids Fun Area” this year to make sure there is something for everyone. Admission is $2 per person/children age 12 and under admitted free. All proceeds from the CSHS Music Boosters directly benefit the music program and students at Carl Sandburg High School.

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The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014



Community Notes Palos Fine Arts foreign film series

items along with a selection of herbs. The Palos Heights Woman’s Club looks forward to strong comPalos Fine Arts will show the munity participation in this annual film, “The Red Violin,” on Friday, event and is most appreciative of Feb. 28, at both 1 p.m. and 6:30 the support it has received over p.m., at the Palos Heights Public the years for the many charitable Library, 12501 S. 71st Ave., as part and educational donations made of its 13th annual adult foreign on an annual basis. film series. Later movies scheduled to be Ridgeland Avenue shown in the series are “The Corridor forum Debt” on Friday, March 28, and “Amour” on Friday, April 25. A draft plan to improve pedestrian and bicycle transit along Ridgeland Avenue through Palos Heights Woman’s Heights will be unveiled to the Club flower sale public at a meeting set for 7 p.m. The Palos Heights Woman’s today (Thursday), at the Palos Club is planning its annual Flower Heights Recreation Center, 6601 Sale scheduled for Saturday May W. 127th St. 17. The Ridgeland Avenue CorriOrder forms will be available dor Study seeks public input on starting next Friday, Feb. 28, at transit issues affecting Ridgeland Lake Katherine, Palos Heights Avenue between 135th and 79th Public Library and City Hall. streets. Pre-ordering is strongly encouraged. Meet women mayors Some day of sale items will be with League of Voters available on May 17. Ted’s Greenhouse is the new supplier this year In last year’s municipal elecand is promising some new floral tions, two area women were

chosen to be the leaders of their towns. In Oak Lawn, Dr. Sandra Bury won the office of Village President over longtime Mayor Dave Heilmann. In Worth, Trustee Mary Werner became the Village President. While both Palos Heights and Palos Park have had women mayors, the experience in Oak Lawn and Worth are each a first. The League of Women Voters of the Palos Orland Area has invited these two ladies to speak at their next regular meeting on Saturday, March 8, at the Palos Heights Public Library. Coffee is on at 9:30 a.m., and the meeting begins at 10. Members of the community are invited to learn from these two leaders. The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organiza- Swallow Cliff Chapter DAR Good Citizen Award winners are Elise Bowler, Andrew High School (from tion dedicated to an informed elec- left); Sergio Dominguez, St. Laurence High School; and Michele Awad, Lemont High School. torate. The League never endorses or opposes political candidates or parties. League meetings are always open to the public. For more information, call 3892888 or go to www.palosorlandlwv. org. The Swallow Cliff Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution last Saturday held its annual Youth Award program to honor the winners of the DAR American History Essay and Good of Palos Park, $90 unincorporated residents of Palos Park, $90 for Citizen Awards. Spanish classes Palos Park, $95 others. unincorporated Palos Park and American History Committee for seniors, kids A Spanish immersion class for $95 others. chairwoman Maxine Piha preSpanish for Seniors will be children ages 3 to 6 will also be Both classes will be held at the sented medals, monetary awards, taught by Language in Action Inc. taught by Language in Action Inc. Palos Park Recreation Center, at and certificates to two Century on Fridays, Feb. 28 through April on Tuesdays, March 4 through 8901 W. 123rd St. To register or Junior High School students: 11, from 9 to 10 a.m. (no class April 15, from 5 to 6 p.m. (no for more information, call 671- 6th-grader Elise Blinn and 7thMarch 28). Fee is $75 for residents class March 25). Fee is $75 for 3760. grader Victoria Marshall. Elise has also been named the DAR District IV winner for her essay and will appear at the March 7 DAR District IV meeting to read her essay. Students were asked to pretend that they lived during Registration is required. and 6:30 p.m. the Revolutionary War and, using Lego creations Teen Program • The library is looking for both historical facts, discuss how the Children ages 4 and up may Children in grades 6 and up experienced and novice American war was affecting their lives. use the library’s Legos to make are invited to make a stitched Mah Jongg players. Meet at the Five local high schools nomiLego creations at the Palos Park felt bookmark for your friends on library on Tuesday, Feb. 25, at nated candidates for the DAR Public Library on Wednesday, Feb. Wednesday, Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. 1 p.m., to play with and learn Good Citizen Award. Good Citizen 19, at 4:30 p.m. from those who are experienced Award chairwoman Miriam Giebel The library is at 12330 Forest players. Bring your game with presented pins, monetary awards, Heights library Glen Blvd. Call the library at 448you. The library is looking for and certificates to this year’s winupcoming programs 1530 to register. donations of gently used Ameri- ners. One of the those awarded, The following will take place at can Mah Jongg games. Space is Michele Awad from Lemont High the Palos Heights Public Library, limited, call to register 448-1473 School, has also been named the Heights library 12501 S. 71st Ave. and ask for Adult Services. DAR District IV winner, invited Swallow Cliff Chapter DAR American History Essay winners Victoria youth programs • Experience the sounds of • On Tuesday, Feb. 25, at 7 to attend the Illinois DAR State Marshall, 7th grade (left) and Elise Blinn, 6th grade, are both students at Century Junior High School in Orland Park. Tween Time Motown and discover the story p.m., join Dramatist Roberta Ran- Conference in April. Have fun with your friends and behind the legend of Berry Gordy dall as she presents an in-depth enjoy a snack today (Thursday) and the talent he gathered at The and intimate portrayal of three faat 7 p.m. This month’s theme is Spirit of Motown with Jose San- mous actresses: Bette Davis, Judy Candy Science. For children in doval on Sunday, Feb. 23, at 2 Garland, and Elizabeth Taylor. grades 4-5. p.m. This program is produced Program registration is always Friday Fun in part by the Illinois Humanities appreciated. Register online at Friday Fun will take place this Council’s Road Scholars Speakers palosheightslibrary.org, by phone Friday, Feb. 21 at 10 a.m. for chil- Bureau. at 448-1473, or in person. All prodren ages 2-6. Drop in for stories, • Bring your projects to the grams are free and open to the music, treats and fun. The theme Needle Club and enjoy the com- public unless otherwise noted. will be Ship Shape Stories. pany of others while working on Teen Gaming Tuesday, Feb. 25, from 10 a.m. Teen gaming will take place on to noon. New members always Friday, Feb. 21 between 2:30 p.m.- welcome. 4:30 p.m. For grades 6 and up. • Thursdays at the Movies on The Mystery Shop Feb. 27 will show the film “The Storyteller Lone Ranger.” in three showings: Do you like a good mystery? 10 a.m.(with subtitles), 2 p.m. and Stagg crafts show Put your sleuthing skills to 6:30 p.m. work or just sit back and en• Palos Fine Arts will be show call for vendors joy this interactive theater pro- the film, “The Red Violin,” on Submitted photo gram. All ages are invited on Friday, Feb. 28, as part of its 13th Crafters are sought for the Saturday, Feb. 22 at 10 a.m. annual adult foreign film series. Stagg High School Music BoostCrafty Kids Later movies include “The Debt” ers annual arts and crafts show Create some Dinomite Dino- on Friday, March 28, and “Amour” to be held Saturday and Sunday, saurs on Tuesday, Feb. 25 at 4 on Friday, April 25. All films will March 22 and 23, at Stagg, 111th The Southtown Dahlia Club will dig into the topic of germinating seed on this Sunday, Feb. 23, from p.m. For children in grades K-4. be shown at the library at 1 p.m. Street and Roberts Road inPalos 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the Crestwood Civic Center, 14025 S. Kostner Ave., Crestwood. Hills. Guest speaker John Thiermann, a dahlia grower and hybridizer, will demonstrate the most effective A. A. Stagg High School Music methods of dahlia seed germination and propagation. Boosters organization is acceptAttendees will learn how to sprout healthy seedlings with the potential to showcase an array of color, ing applications from crafters and shapes, varieties, and sizes that will provide their garden with an explosion of spectacular blooms from artists for the Art for the Season mid-summer to late fall. show. The show is well-received A seed is the embryo of plant life and its bloom could range in size from 14-inch dinner plate dahlias and well-attended. Cost is $95 per to diminutive pompons and mignons of small size. 80 sq. ft. booth space for the twoThe program is free and is open to anyone who is interested in growing dahlias and enjoying day run of the show. Nature’s grand scheme of populating the world with beautiful flowers. Refreshments and snacks will For information or to receive be served. an application, call 974-7520 or For more information on the Southtown Dahlia Club, visit www.southtowndahlia.com or follow the 361-8298. club on Facebook.

Swallow Cliff DAR bestows annual Good Citizenship, history essay awards

Recreation Roundup

Library Notes

Crafts and Bazaars

Dahlia Club plants seeds topic

Benefits and Fundraisers Suburban Cowboy Sertoma fundraiser

Submitted photo

Heights Garden Club will unearth hydrangeas The Palos Heights Garden Club’s first meeting of 2014 will be held Monday, Feb. 24, at Lake Katherine Nature Center in Palos Heights. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for hospitality; meeting starts at 7 p.m. Guest fee is $5. The program will be new information on hydrangeas by Dave Wanninger, Chief horticulturist at Boerner Botanical Gardens in Hales Corners, Wis., shown here with Garden Club member Clara Van Howe. Previously, Wanninger worked many years as horticulturist at Beaver Creek Nursery and Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm. Before that, he operated a landscaping company and was the nursery manager at a large independent garden center. He was also a longtime instructor in the horticulture program at Blackhawk Technical College in Janesville, Wis. For more on the club, visit the website: phgc.blogspot.com.

Club Activities South Suburban Civil War Roundtable

The South Suburban Civil War Rountable will meet Thursday, American Heritage Sertoma Feb. 27, at 7 p.m., at Ed & Joe’s Club presents a Country Western Pizza, 17332 S. Oak Park Ave. in dance fundraiser on Friday, Feb Tinley Park. 28, from 7 to 11 p.m., at Chicago Members night will feature a Gaelic Park in Oak Forest. panel discussion. If coming for Music by Suburban Cowboy. dinner, arrive by 6 p.m. Tickets are $50 and include music, open bar, appetizers, split-the-pot Sons of Italy and basket raffles. For tickets, call Jo Anne at 403The Leone D’Oro Lodge 2700 8734 or Marilyn, 460-8618. Sons of Italy will meet Tuesday,

Feb. 25, at 7 p.m., at the Orland Civic Center, 14750 S. Ravinia Ave. The Lincoln Way Youth Chamber Orchestra will entertain. Din-

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The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Photo Memories from

Crossword Puzzle

"Best Buds"

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Across “Best Buds” 1 "Leaving Las ___" 14 15 16 Across 6 The Fountainhead 1. “Leaving Las ___” 17 18 19 Rand 6. Thenovelist Fountainhead 9 Plus novelist Rand 20 21 22 23 9. 14 Plus Taken ___ 14. Taken ___ (shocked) 24 25 26 (shocked) 15. Ghost’s word 15 Ghost's word 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 16. Not experienced in experienced in 17. 16 OldNot sailors 34 35 36 19. 17 ___Old Lakes sailors 20. 19 Peeper ___ Lakes 37 38 39 21. Word on 20 Peeper a bathroom door 40 41 42 Word___ on a 23. 21 Electric 24. He bathroom works door 43 44 45 without words 23 Electric ___ 46 47 25. After-dinner treat He works without 27. 24 Summer camp shelters words 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 30. Meteorologist’s 25 After-dinner treat concerns 56 57 58 59 34. 27 Wonderland girl Summer camp 35. Cries loudly shelters 60 61 62 36. “Nicely done!” 30 Meteorologist's 37. Baptism or communion 63 64 65 concerns 38. Theme of this puzzle Wonderland girl 39. 34 Penny or quarter 40. 35 Permit 6. Humble home 45. One of 24 Cries loudly 41. 36 Number of Stooges 7. Word before 47. Team "Nicely done!" 62 Dance itBear 42 captain takesortwo Emulates 9-Down 42. “Same here” Berra 11 Chocolate lover's 48. Melville Baptism or to do weak spot 43. 37 Sixteen ounces 8. Sniffer 49. Not tan 44 Brand of sticky 45. ___communion and yon 9. Lee behind 63 Alternatives 12 And others 51. It’s surrounded to notes 46. 38 Kitchen orofparlor the camera by water Theme this suspenders 13 Tater ___ 45 One of 24 47. Aching 10. Williams with 52. Any moment puzzle 64 Finish 18 River blockers53. Nevada 47 Team 48. 39 iPhone downloads Wimbledon wins city Penny or quarter 65 Low pair? 50. Lobster soup 11. Chocolate lover’s 54. Actor48Nicolas 22 "I'm about to take Melville captain Permit letters 53. 40 Electronics weak spot of 1 49 Across your picture!" Not tan Number of Stooges Down 12. And others 56. 41 French-speaking ___ cookies 24 Cheese lovers 55. Famous 51 It's surrounded by island nation 13. Tater 57. Connections 1 Flower holder___ 42 "Same here" 26 Types to of the Caribbean 18. River 59. Crowd’s water cheer 2 Website to sellblockers and 43 Sixteen ounces 27 Monte ___ 52 Any moment 58. Borscht addition 22. “I’m about to buy ___ announcement and yon 60. 45 Poker take your picture!” pagecity 4) 28 UFO traveler (Answers 53 on Nevada 3 Dorothy's last lovers 61. 46 Mauna ___,orHawaii 24. Cheese Kitchen parlor 29 Tough thing to 54 Actor Nicolas of 1name, "The to 62. 47 Dance it takes 26. inTypes Aching swallow Across Wizard of Oz" two to do 27. Monte ___ iPhone downloads 55 Famous ___ 63. 48 Alternatives to 4 Part28. of aUFO play traveler 30 Prepared to burglarize cookies suspenders 29. horizon Tough thing to swallow 50 Lobster soup 5 City's 64. 53 Finish 30. Prepared to burglarize 31 Word in some beer 57 Connections Electronics letters 6 Humble home in some 65. Low pair? 31. Word names 59 Crowd's cheer 56 French-speaking 7 Word before Bear beer names 32 Top of the line island nation of the Down 32. Top of the line or Berra Caribbean 33 Mister, in Mexico 1. Flower holder 33. Mister, in Mexico 8 Sniffer Borscht 2. 58 Website to addition 35. Raise red flags35 Raise red flags 9 Lee38. behind the sellPoker and buy Hitchhiker’s finger 60 38 Hitchhiker's finger camera 3. Dorothy’s last name, 39. Name as a source announcement 39 Name as a source with in “The Wizard of Oz” 10 Williams 41. Also 61 Mauna ___, Hawaii Wimbledon wins 9-Down 41 Also 4. Part of a play 42. Emulates 5. City’s horizon 44. Brand of sticky notes

3 4 5 7 2 4 3 1 4 5 6 8 7 2 3 5 9 6 1 6 7 7 4 8 9 3 2 5 6 1

2 6

THE

REGIONAL Archives

From Feb. 20, 1964

50 Years Ago This Week A 74-year-old village, Orland Park is the third subject of a local government series. Although this village-trustee government dates back to 1890, it has undergone constant change as the character of the area has changed. Indicative of the constant improvement is the recent Village Board action to establish a community development committee composed of board members and community leaders. Orland’s president is Walter R. Schussler Jr.

From Feb. 12, 2004

The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

© 2009 Hometown Content

10 Years Ago Last Week Valentines for life: Doris and Philip Tortorici, of Palos Heights (left), who have been married for 47 years [now 57 years], met in college, in a class at Northern Illinois Univesity. They have lived in Palos Heights since 1959. They share many of the same interests, including exercising, traveling, volunteering and square dancing. At right, William and Doris Grede, of Palos Park, say being able to compromise is essential to a happy marriage. The Gredes met in the 4th grade and started dating in 1943 when William came home to Chicago on leave from the Army Air Forces.

(Answers on page 4)

Tuff Shuffle, snow records and are you Cy-rius, Miley?

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT? It was in the cards that a healthy dose of WHATIZIT? wizards were back in form and guessed that last week’s photo was of a memory card for cameras. Harrison Debre of Willow Springs was back in the saddle, ringing in first with the right answer after his three-week reign was broken last week. Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald, Kelly Peterson and Patty Vandenberg, Evergreen Park’s Jan Merchantz, Henrietta Mysliwiec and Vince Vizza, Worth’s Mary Kurdziel, Sandy Joiner, Theresa and George Rebersky, E.J.Oahueke, Robert Solner and Celeste Cameron and Oak Lawn’s Steve Rosenbaum and Jane Foley were also right on. And someone who not only forgot their hometown, but their name, too, got it right. We had one wrong guess of a floppy disk. This week clue: This hot button is on a “tower”-ing presence. Send those guesses by Monday night to thereporter@comcast.net and put WHATIZIT? in the subject line. Don’t forget your name and hometown.

During several of the many snowstorms – including Monday’s —I was out with the snow blower jamming to a hot mix of Kraftwerk cover songs. On an old iPod shuffle. One that my daughter, Lauren, had back when Hillary Duff was putting her makeup on a Saturday night. Last week on a cold, cold night, my son, T.J. and I were in a broiling hot Apple Store in the Orland Square Mall and replacing his iPhone which suffered some recent software and hardware woes that came with a bill that made me say “woe is me.” To date, our four-member family has purchased five iPhones, five or six iTouches, three iPod Classics, two iPod Nanos, two Shuffles and an iPad. And that’s doesn’t cover the uncountable number chargers and headphones we have gone through. Most of these expensive items have had garbage software problems. To this day, I have no idea why my second Classic crapped out. That was unfair. Some suffered hardware problems. My son’s iPhone and daughter’s iTouch both suffered cracks at the same friend’s house in Wheaton. In different years. T.J.’s was mangled playing basketball. Lauren’s crack came while her device was in my wife’s Maggie’s purse and we presumed safely put away in a closet. Nope. Some of the younger kids got into the closet and must have had a hat dance with the purses. I have a lot of problems with Apple and its products and judging by the many message boards out there in the Internet world, I am not alone. They make their products to be broken. But through all of this, our little

blue 1 GB iPod shuffle, is still going strong. It survived a lot of stuff. It’s hit the floor a few times. It was lost for several months. It’s been in freezing cars in the winter and steaming cars in the summer. It fell in the snow a few times. It survived the wildest variety of music you could fill it with. My daughter’s teenybop pop, my son’s rap music and my wild music that includes crazy rockabilly and loud metal-industrial masters Laibach and Rammstein should have melted its innards long ago. But it’s still working. So, it appears that Apple accidentally made a product that can’t be broken. It’s a miracle.

While most of us are sick of snow and cold, the word is that this is only the third highest snowfall in the Chicago area and we are about 20 inches short of breaking the record. The question I will throw out to the floor is this: Do you wish for another 20 inches in the next month or two so we can brag that we survived the worst winter in history? Heck, we’ve gone this far, why not go for it? Or do you just want this #$%#@ snow to end once and for all on Saturday? While standing knee-deep in snow at the end of the driveway caused mostly by the plows on Tuesday morning, I think I know my answer to that question.

More snow coming

Wrong about Miley

Saturday’s forecast is for more snow! I believe that it has snowed every Saturday in 2014 so this is no surprise.

This week Miley Cyrus was performing a concert in Tacoma when someone threw a thong on stage. Cyrus picked it up and put it

Notes north of the Cal-Sag by Jeff Vorva

in her mouth. Unless the thong was thrown by a plant in the audience (the maybe-late, great Andy Kaufman used to use audience plants all the time), the thong thrown from the throng could have been anywhere, and this goof is putting it in her mouth. Who knows where that thing has been? Kids, don’t try this at home. I remember when Cyrus was the TV star on “Hannah Montana” I thought there were times when she had some comedic chops and timing and if she worked on it a bit more, could have been in Lucille Ball territory. But instead of becoming a really good comedian she is turning into a sad clown.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

We’re about 20 inches of snow shy of a record for the Chicago area. Do we want to break the record or just be done with the snow?


The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014



Submitted photo

Dist. 230 Foundation plans Wellness event with Dr. Principe The District 230 Foundation plans a Health and Wellness Evening with Dr. John Principe, founder of WellBeingMD and Palos Heights TV Channel 4’s “The Mindful Kitchen” program. The dinner and vendors event will be held Thursday, April 3, from 4:30 to 9 p.m., at Silver Lake Country Club, 14700 S. 82nd Ave. in Orland Park. Health and wellness vendors open at 4:30 p.m. Dinner served at 6:30 p.m. Dr. Principe speaks at 7:30 p.m. Raffle prizes announced at 8:45 p.m. Tickets cost $30, includes access to vendors and raffles, a healthy dinner with recipes provided by Dr. Principe, and Dr. Principe’s Wellness talk. Payment can be made online at http://www.d230foundation.org or by check made payable to: District 230 Foundation, 15100 S. 94th Ave., Orland Park, IL 60462. Or call 349-5759. Those interested in being a vendor, may contact Jeanne Krapauskas at jeannekrapauskas@ gmail.com.

Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM • PrairieStateVet.com Dear Dr. Fleming, My sister’s vet told her last week that her dog has mange mites in his skin. Max’s skin looks perfectly fine. Martha said the vet didn’t even do a skin scraping and look through a microscope. I know you have a crystal ball in your exam room but my sister’s vet doesn’t. How could she say this with such confidence, and by the way, why do you have that crystal ball in your exam room? Matthew, Hickory Hills Dear Matthew, For 33 years I’ve told clients the same thing as your sister’s vet. We have always believed that if you skin-scrape any dog long and hard enough you can find Demodex spp. mites. This is the mite that causes the “red mange” that old-timers used to treat with burnt automobile oil on their dog’s skin. In vet school I read an article in Scientific American about mites in humans; the mite photograph looked almost identical to the dog Demodex mite. The article’s author wrote that most humans have these mites in the follicles of their eyebrow hairs. Cool isn’t it? As I said, Demodex mites have long been anecdotally considered to be present in dog skin flora, however this has not been proven until now. Francino et. al., as reported in Vet. Dermatology, 24:168, 2013, used a sensitive real-time PCR assay to look for Demodex spp DNA in the skin of normal dogs. The presence of Demodex ssp mites was investigated in 120 dogs. Hair samples were collected from between 5 and 20 sites. When only 5 sites were assayed, mite DNA was found in 18 percent of dogs, however when 20 skin sites were assayed, 100 percent tested positive for mite DNA. It was not until the development of molecular testing that the presence of Demodex spp mites in the flora of healthy dog skin

is wrong with their dog but refuses to pay for any lab tests or radiographs and such, and like other vets I am forced to either just do a good physical exam and make my best judgment call, or if necessary, I can just make up some ruganutis diagnosis or I can turn to the crystal ball. I’d much rather use the ball instead of just guessing.

Congestive heart failure

Submitted photo

Meet Dan and Copper from Palos Heights. Copper is a wonderful 6-year-old Cavalier King Charles spaniel. could be proven. In practice, if mites are easily found on a skin scraping there is a strong probability that the dog has a compromised immune system and is or will be developing generalized demodicosis.

I do have a very nice, bona fide crystal ball that was given to me years ago by an old physician who lived in the swampy backwaters in Cross Creek, Fla. There are times in practice when a client insists on an answer as to what

Exercise treats arthritis pains by Justina Colonero Palos Health & Fitness Center Feeling a little stiff and achy after our long Chicago winter? If your aches and pains are accompanied by stiff or swollen joints and pain before or after activity, it might be time to talk to your doctor about Arthritis. Arthritis, in its simplest form, means swelling of the joints. There are 100 different forms of arthritis and as many as 50 million Americans suffer from its symptoms. The three most common types of arthritis are Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Juvenile Arthritis. Osteoarthritis is characterized by the breakdown of cartilage within the joints over time. This is the type of arthritis that mainly affects seniors and is felt mostly in hips, knees and the lower back. The stiffness and soreness associated with osteoarthritis is typi-

cally reported after resting for a long period of time or just after waking up in the morning. Anyone who has suffered a bone or joint injury may be more susceptible to osteoarthritis as well as those who are overweight, older, or have a family history of arthritis. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is much different than osteoarthritis. RA is an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Symptoms include pain and stiffness in the joints, but people with RA will also notice warmth and swelling around the affected joints. Also, with RA, the symptoms can be different day to day or have symptomatic flares. Because RA is an autoimmune condition, this form of arthritis can actually break down the joints and over time cause organ damage. Juvenile Arthritis is also an autoimmune condition, similar to RA, but found in patients under the age of 16. Most patients with

Juvenile Arthritis have a genetic predisposition for this disease. At this time, there is no cure for arthritis. There are medications available for the management and treatment of autoimmune related arthritis. Otherwise, the best way to control arthritis is through pain management. Exercise is one of the best tools for managing arthritis. Endurance, strength training, weight management and resistance specific exercises provide benefits to arthritis patients. Palos Health & Fitness Center offers arthritis specific exercise options on land and in water. Equipped with a warm water therapy pool as well as instructors certified by the National Arthritis Foundation, there are thirteen aqua classes weekly to assist in arthritis management. Contact Palos Health & Fitness Center at 226-0555 or visit palosfitness.com for more information about these classes or for an appointment to see the facility.

We see a lot of congestive heart failure and we have some really great medications to deal with it. Pimobendan has turned out to be a wonderful drug in dogs and I am always asking our referral cardiologist whether or not any new evidence has surfaced to suggest that putting dogs on it before they go into clinical failure will help slow down the process. So far her answer has always been a disappointing “No.” There is new evidence, however, that may be of interest to owners of Dobermans. About 25 percent of purebred Dobermans eventually develop dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Recently researchers enrolled 76 dobes with echocardiograph evidence of preclinical DCM and were randomized to receive either pimobendan or a placebo. Dogs in the pimobendan group reached the primary endpoint of evaluation (onset of clinical signs or death) much later than the placebo group (718 days vs. 441 days, respectively). Median survival time was also longer among those in the pimobendan group (623 days) vs. the placebo group (466 days). Thus, pimobendan given to Dobermans with pre-clinical DCM delays onset of clinical signs and extends survival. If I had a Doberman that I really cared for I would have an echo done at least yearly. Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. —William Butler Yeats

Submitted photo, sponsored by Joy’s Best Friends, Ltd. Best Bites

Dog of The Week This is John Henry. He is a 6 month old Boston Terrier. He is full of fun and energy! John Henry is still in training and his parents are hoping he will be in the WAGS Program at Palos Hospital to be a therapy dog. In the meantime, he still gets himself in a lot of trouble. John Henry lives with his family, the Starzyk’s, in Palos Heights. Best Bites is located at 13034 S. LaGrange Road in Palos Park. 708-448-1515. Visit us online at www.joysbestfriends.com. Follow US on Facebook.com/JoysBestFriendsBestBites. Best Bites February Sale—Pet Dental Month Ark Naturals, Petzlife, Whimzees & Fido Breath Chew 20% Off. Zignature Dog Food on Sale too! Huge Savings!

Health Beat Palos hospital offers special cardiac screening According to the American Heart Association, approximately 83.6 million Americans are living with some form of cardiovascular disease or the after-effects of stroke. To help individuals better understand their current risk for heart disease, Palos Community Hospital is offering a $99 Heart Risk Assessment to identify heart disease risk factors. The Heart Risk Screening includes a: • Physician-reviewed stress test • Total blood glucose and cholesterol profile • Body fat analysis • Family history/health risk appraisal • Detailed cardiac risk report Screenings take place at Palos Primary Care Center, 15300 West Ave., Orland Park. To schedule an appointment, call 226-2300.

cherlyk@orlandtwp.org or 4034001.

Wellness Wednesdays at Orland Township Orland Township offers “Wellness Wednesday” on Wednesdays, Feb. 26, March 26 and April 23, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., in the Orland Township Activity Center at 14807 S. Ravinia Ave. Held every fourth Wednesday of the month, an appointment is necessary. Township residents can have their blood pressure (free) and glucose levels ($5) checked by a registered medical professional. A basic cholesterol screening is also offered for a $5 charge; the test requires a nine- to 12-hour fast. Call 403-4222.

Cholesterol, diabetes screenings, Palos Twp.

Palos Township Health Service will offer cholesterol screenings on Monday, Feb. 24, at the township health service, 10802 S. Roberts Road in Palos Hills. Babysitting The total cholesterol screencertification course ing gives total counts for $10 Orland Township offers a Red for township residents and $15 Cross babysitting certification nonresidents. course on Monday, March 3, from HA1C reflects the average blood 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the town- sugar levels over the previous two ship, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave. to three months which is very This class, intended for ages 11 useful for diabetics. HA1C testthrough 15, will be taught by a ing is offered for $10 residents, Red Cross certified instructor and $15 others. will cover the topics of how to care Cholestech screening gives a for infants, how to maintain a safe breakdown of total cholesterol environment, what to do in case of values, high density cholesterol, illness, injuries or other accidents low density cholesterol, triglycerand how to make good, effective ides, ratios, and glucose values. decisions while babysitting. This test is $35 for residents and The cost is $50, which includes $45 for non-residents. materials and lunch. To register, Call 598-2441 for an appointcontact Cheryl Kokaska at ment.

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10

The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Photos and text courtesy Dolores Barnes

Palos Park Woman’s Club purse auction benefits needy orphans The Palos Park Woman’s Club held their annual purse auction earlier this month to raise funds donated to an orphanage and day care center in the African nation of Tanzania. Jenni Gies, the club’s International Outreach chairman, found out about this orphanage through her friend, Ann Cordis, who assists in supporting this home for children who are in extreme need. The amount raised this year was $763. Jenni and her husband, Craig, match this amount so that the total sent to the orphanage this year is $1,526. Those attending the meeting were especially moved by the letters

sent from three of the children who live at the orphanage. Loretta Gaidas served as auctioneer. Also during the meeting, two outstanding members, Muriel Benz and Betty Polson, were recognized for both having reached their 90th birthday, and also for their continued support of both the Palos Park Garden Club and Palos Park Woman’s Club. Both of these ladies have provided support and leadership through their many years as members. The club cancelled its January meeting because of the arctic-like weather of the polar vortex.

He marries her all over again at Arden Courts Couple renew vows on Valentine’s Day by Tim Hadac staff reporter In a world where fealty is often fleeting, Stefan and Lilli Herold have shown that “I do” can mean exactly that. The elderly couple dressed up and renewed their wedding vows on Valentine’s Day at a simple yet emotion-packed ceremony at Arden Courts, an assisted living facility for people with Alzheimer’s Disease and other types of memory loss, located at 7880 W. College Drive, Palos Heights. Lilli has been a resident of the facility for a little more than a month, while Stefan lives a quiet life at their home in Lemont. “Every Valentine’s Day, we put together a ‘sweethearts luncheon’ for our residents who may have spouses living out in the community,” explained Pat Wilczynski, marketing director at Arden Courts. “When I invited Stefan, he told me that he and Lilli had gotten married on Feb. 14, 1948. It was amazing.” She shared the information promptly with Arden Courts Executive Director Frank Troha “and we said, ‘We think we have a wedding here,’” she added with a smile. They swung into action, decking out a reception room with a flower-laden trellis, bringing in clergy (Nancy Shannon, a pastor, and lay minister Bill Palaima, both of Family Harvest Church in Tinley Park), inviting the 55 other Arden Courts residents as guests, as well as other Herold family members to join in. They also ordered a special cake with an image of the couple on their wedding day—an especially touching gesture, because back on their wedding day in 1948, their cake had been stolen before they could take a bite, according to their daughter, Veronika McAdam. The Herolds were married Germany in 1948, in a small town not far from Nuremburg. Stefan was originally from Yugoslavia, and Lilli was from Ukraine. Both were part of the forced mass exodus of

Photo by Tim Hadac

The happy couple is joined for a wedding reception photo by grandson Scott McAdam Jr., of Orland Park, (from left) daughter, Veronika McAdam, granddaughter, Amanda McAdam, of Palos Hills, and son-in-law Scott McAdam Sr. Veronika and Scott Sr. are from Lemont. Photo by Tim Hadac

Having their wedding cake and eating it, too, 66 years after their first wedding cake was stolen by hungry thieves. millions of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe in the months following World War II. With their son and daughter, they immigrated to the U.S. in 1957, settling in a German-American community in west suburban Forest Park. Stefan worked as a custodian for about 30 years at Oak Park-River Forest High School, and Lilli was a traditional homemaker. A quiet, low-key man who avoids the spotlight, Stefan smiled a lot but said little at the ceremony and reception. When Lilli gave him a long and amorous embrace and kiss during there ceremony, he made the audience chuckle when he said to her, “OK, that’s enough. For now.” Lilli, for her part, touched hearts and moistened eyes several times during the renewal of vows. When asked if she promised to love Stefan, she turned to him

and said, “I have always loved you—and always will.” The bittersweet event was part of the Heart’s Desire program, an award-winning initiative that grants wishes to residents of HCR ManorCare facilities across the country. Some the wishes granted to Arden Courts residents have included a gold outing for an Alzheimer’s patient who had been an avid golfer, an airplane ride for a man who had been a pilot, a visit to see the beluga whales at the Shedd Aquarium for a woman who had worked there for many years, and more. “We’re very community-oriented and centered around home life,” Troha concluded. “We care about the people who live here. We work closely with them and their families, and that helps drive our activities and the care we provide. It’s all about maintaining a good Photo by Tim Hadac quality of life.” Stefan and Lilli embrace as others salute their enduring love with tears, smiles and applause.

Death Notices Norbert J. Kowalczyk

Norbert J. “Doc” Kowalczyk, 86, of Watseka, formerly of Orland Park, died Feb. 10 at Watseka Rehabilitation and Health Care Center. Visitation was held at Colonial Chapel funeral home in Orland Park on Feb. 14. A funeral Mass was held at St. Julie Billiart Catholic Church in Tinley Park on Feb. 15. Interment was at Queen of Heaven Cemetery. Mr. Kowalczyk is survived by is son, John; his daughter, Joanne Wertheim; his sisters, Lorraine

Golon and Barbara Marciniak; his brothers, Bernie Skiba and John “Bud” Kowalczk; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mr. Kowalczyk was born in Chicago. He was a retired engineer at People’s Gas. Her served in the Army in the Korean War.

Catholic Church in Orland Park today, at 10 a.m. Entombment is to be held at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Worth. Mrs. McGrath is survived by her son, Vincent, her daughters, Marie Andrews and Eileen Korhonen; eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Stella G. McGrath Mrs. McGrath was born in ManStella G. “Estelle” McGrath, chester, N.H. She was a homemaker. nee Marcoux, 100, of Palos She served as a member of the CariHeights, died Feb. 11 at Joliet tas Society for the former Joseph P. Area Community Hospital. Kennedy School in Palos Park, the Visitation was held at Schma- Palos Community Hospital Auxiledeke Funeral Home in Worth on iary, and served with the cultural Feb. 19. A funeral Mass was to be arts program at St. Xavier College, held at Our Lady of the Woods where she taught French.

Houses of Worship Submitted photo

Seniors invited to join the fun of fellowship with Golden Oaks

Palos United Methodist Church Palos Heights

The choir from Trinity Christian College under the direction All Palos area seniors are invited to join the Golden Oaks Seniors at their first meeting of 2014 on of Marve Wolterstorff will perform Wednesday, March 5, at noon, at Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church, 12312 S. 88th Ave. during the 10 a.m. worship serThe group has lunch at noon, followed by entertainers who perform about an hour. The cost for lunch vice this Sunday, Feb. 23, at the is $5; the cost membership to join Golden Oaks is $8 for the year. church, 12101 S. Harlem Ave. Entertainment for the March meeting features The Convertibles, a barbershop quartet that calls Members of the community themselves “those bad, bad, bad boys straight from the Principal’s office.” They are pictured with are cordially invited to attend Golden Oaks member Dolores Barnes. the service. Nursery care will be To attend, call the church at 448-0819 to make a reservation. provided. (448-0798)

Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church

on March 2. To be part of these Lenten small groups, contact the church at 448-5220. The contemporary worship Children’s ministry during service this Sunday will take worship at 8:30 a.m. and 11 place at 8:30 a.m., followed by a.m., Wee Church throughout a Connections Breakfast at 9:45 worship for children 2 and 3 a.m. provided by the Hospital- years in the Sonrise Room. Chility Team. dren’s worship time dismissed The deacons will be hosting during the worship service for tables for their deacon groups. pre-K through 5th grade for This will be followed by the children in Primary Hall. regular worship service at 11 The church is at 12312 S. a.m. 88th Ave. (448-5220) New Lenten classes will begin


The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Saving is good… but it’s not investing It’s a good thing to have some savings. When you put the money in a low-risk account, you can be pretty sure it will be readily available when you need it. Nonetheless, “saving” is not “investing” — and knowing the difference could pay off for you far into the future. Think about it this way: Saving is for today, while investing is for tomorrow. You need your savings to pay for your daily expenses, such as groceries, and your monthly bills — mortgage, utilities, and so on. In fact, you might even want your savings to include an emergency fund containing six to 12 months’ worth of living expenses to pay for unexpected costs, such as a new furnace or a major car repair. These are all “here and now” expenses — and you could use your savings to pay for them. But in thinking of your long-term goals, such as college for your children and a comfortable retirement for yourself, most individuals typi-

cally can’t simply rely on their savings — they’ll need to invest. Why? Because, quite simply, investments can grow — and you will need this growth potential to help achieve your objectives. To illustrate the difference between saving and investing, let’s do a quick comparison. Suppose you put $200 per month into a savings account that paid hypothetical 3 percent interest (which is actually higher than the rates typically being paid today). After 30 years, you would have accumulated about $106,000, assuming you were in the 25 percent federal tax bracket. Now, suppose you put that same $200 per month in a tax-deferred investment that hypothetically earned 7 percent a year. At the end of 30 years, you would end up with about $243,000. (Keep in mind that you would have to pay taxes on withdrawals. Hypotheticals do not include any transaction costs or fees.) This enormous disparity be-

tween the amounts accumulated in the two accounts clearly shows the difference between “saving” and “investing.” Still, you might be thinking that investing is risky, while savings accounts carry much less risk. And it is certainly true that investing does involve risks — investments can lose value, and there’s no guarantee that losses will be recovered. Nonetheless, if you put all your money in savings, you’re actually incurring an even bigger risk — the risk of not achieving your financial goals. In fact, a low-rate savings account might not even keep up with inflation, which means that, over time, you will lose purchasing power. Ultimately, the question isn’t whether you should save or invest — you need to do both. But you do need to decide how much of your financial resources to devote toward savings and how much toward investments. By paying close attention to your cash flow, you should be able to get a good

11

Jim Van Howe

idea of the best savings and investment mix for your particular situation. For example, if you find yourself constantly dipping into your long-term investments to pay for short-term needs, you probably don’t have enough money in savings. On the other hand, if you consistently find yourself with large sums in your savings account even after you’ve paid all your bills, you might be “sitting” on too much cash — which means you should consider moving some of this money into investments with growth potential. Saving and investing — that’s a winning combination. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Pointers for spring counterpoints

Caroline’s Fashion Chat

and resized flamboyance. Leading the way with maximalist expressions was Phoebe Philo. Her work at Céline tends to be that exuding minimalism, but for the by Caroline spring season, she defied her credo Foreman by taking up bold graffiti graphics, brash colors, intensity of surface acIn the midst of the world’s fash- coutrements and tribal concepts. ion weeks for fall, let us step back Another maximal collection and begin with a more pressing was that of Francisco Costa, who anticipatory discussion. Spring is is also renowned as a minimal near! The rebirth symbolized by master at the house that brought literature’s portrayal of this season minimalism to the forefront, Calcoincides with the rebirth we can vin Klein. Like Philo, he broke similarly enjoy in our wardrobes. the code and branched out of the The spring collections brought purist realm with splashy color, us many shared expressions. We exotica and tribal references like see a fresh new perspective on fringe and colorful snakeskin shirting with rampant shirt col- strips pieced together in a coat. lars, lush and bold textures and Marc Jacobs created an enthuadornments, fantasy-like floral siastic three-dimensional collecimagery and prints, super high tion of maximalism. He created shine metallics, pop art, tons of a fabulously intricate swirl of pleats, bralets and cropped tops Victorian decadence and modern among other musings. It is in- sportiness with opulent variations teresting to note the display of on officers’ jackets with low-slung the season’s mood at opposite board shorts and embroidered ends of the spectrum. We have gowns with every aspect, accespresentations of minimalism with sories and all, supremely decocrisp, clean, purist parameters. On rated. Fausto Puglisi’s collection the other end, we see maximalism was no subtle display. Fabulous expressed through exaggeration jewel-encrusted biker jackets were

worn with evening gowns. One could undoubtedly describe this as Carolina Herrera meets Axl Rose. Miuccia Prada created perhaps the most memorably audacious and in-your-face collection celebrating the New Age power woman. Six different artists were commissioned to create portraits of women to use as Prada’s colorful, oversized motifs on dresses, coats and skirts. These were printed, bejeweled, color-blocked and in fur intarsia. The collection is fearlessly hyperbolized yet remarkably controlled. Olivier Rousteing of Balmain also contributed to the maximalist side through big gold buttons, blown-up hounds’ tooth and gingham. In the minimalist realm, Narciso Rodriguez’s collection is an expression of subtle fabric collaborations, folding and easy color blocking. The simplicity of necklines accentuated the clean and unfussy purity. MaxMara presented simple monochromatic looks of chic tailoring of linens, soft cashmere, wool and tricot for modern sportswear in elongated pencil skirts, boxy jackets, and

Business Notes Small business solutions at Moraine Independent business owners are invited to discuss and receive coaching on pressing business issues during the free PeerSpectives Roundtables breakfast at Moraine Valley Community College on Thursday, March 6, from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. The discussions will take place in the Moraine

Business and Conference Center, on campus, 9000 W. College Pkwy., Palos Hills. PeerSpectives Roundtables occur in a confidential, noncompetitive atmosphere in which established business owners or senior managers will enhance leadership capacity and ability, improve decision-making and foster opportunities for leadership reflection. The roundtables help attendees

who are focused on continuous improvement and consistent, sustainable growth achieve better results by making better decisions through exploration and learning problemsolving techniques while benefiting from a variety of perspectives on pressing business issues. To attend or for more information, call Eda Schrimple at 974-5714 or email schrimplee@ morainevalley.edu.

spaghetti-strapped sheaths. J.W. Anderson’s minimal collection includes delicate cropped tops and pieces that seem to float in place. Transparent fabrics of black, white light blues and creams graced the garments with a clean gentleness. Slouchy trousers, skirts and shorts embraced folds and large pleats with brilliant easiness. Prabal Gurung, likewise, outfitted his hyper-feminine, ‘50s glamour girls with architectural bustlines and plastic harnesses of clean shapes and subtlety. Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler dabbled in minimalism for spring 2014, presenting long dresses of monochrome crème, a canary yellow plunging necked sheath dress, simple coats and flowy gaucho pants, and clean folding red dress. These contrapuntal runway creations are fun to mix into your wardrobe at any time of the year, but spring brought a sense of vitality to both the boldness and the simple shedding of convoluted dressing. Try experimenting with these aesthetics and spring to life for the new season!

Photo by Tim Hadac

PAWWS gala raises funds, and high hopes Pam Barnett, founder and president of PAWWS (Paws Assisting Wounded WarriorS), pauses for a moment with Harold Koal, a black Labrador service dog, at last Saturday’s fundraiser, held at the Lexington House in Hickory Hills. Profiled in The Regional News on Jan. 30, PAWWS acquires and trains service dogs to help military veterans cope with the psychological wounds of war. Barnett owns Pack leader Academy in Palos Heights. According to Barnett, the fundraiser exceeded all expectations. More than 200 people attended on a snowy night, and nearly $5,000 was raised on raffle items alone. Barnett aims to puchase the old Sid’s Greenhouses building in Palos Hills for PAWWS to train its service dogs. Those unable to attend the fundraiser but who want to assist PAWWS are encouraged to visit pawws.org and click on the “donate” button.

It’s Tax Time ~ Are You Ready?

Tips to select a tax preparer Call A Anticipated tax refunds can cause consumers to rush to get their taxes filed as soon as possible. However, being careless about selecting tax preparation help could delay an expected refund, and also may open up consumers to fraud and identity theft. The BBB encourages taxpayers to use caution when selecting an outside tax preparer. “Many consumers seek some form of assistance in filing their returns,” said Steve J. Bernas, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “Not thoroughly researching the tax preparer can cause problems ranging from minor inconveniences to major troubles. Fines, additional fees and a great deal of hassle can be the outcome.” Bernas reminded consumers that even though the tax preparer completes the tax return, it’s the taxpayer who is ultimately responsible for the accuracy of the paperwork and meeting the filing deadline. Consumers should also be aware that some tax preparation businesses are open for only a few months every year. It may be hard to track down the preparer if there are problems after a tax service office closes. The Internal Revenue Service also has issued warnings about online tax-related schemes that can steal taxpayer’s identities. For example, scam emails may state there is an issue with a refund, that the taxpayer is being audited, or that there’s a delay in processing the tax return. Links in the emails usually go to a scammer’s website, which will then ask for Social Security numbers, bank account or credit card information.

“The IRS doesn’t contact taxpayers by email,” noted Bernas, “and it won’t request personal or financial information, or inform you of an audit by email either.” Here are some tips for selecting a tax preparer: • Ask around. Get referrals from friends and family about who they use, and check the BBB Reliability Reports on tax preparation services at www.bbb.org • Look for credentials. Ideally, your tax preparer should be a certified public accountant, a tax attorney or an enrolled agent. All three can represent you affiliated with a professional organization that holds its members to a code of ethics. • Don't fall for the promise of a big refund. Be wary of any tax preparation service that promises larger refunds than the competition, and avoid any tax preparers who base their fee on a percentage of the refund. • Think about accessibility.

Many tax preparation services only set up shop for the months leading up to April 15. In case the IRS finds errors, or in case of an audit, you might need to be able to contact your tax preparer throughout the year. • Read the contract carefully. Read tax preparation service contracts closely to ensure you understand issues such as how much it is going to cost for the service, how the cost will be affected if preparation is more complicated and time consuming than expected, and whether the tax preparer will represent you in case of an audit. • Check your return. Before you sign the return, read it over to check for mistakes. Ask the preparer to explain anything you don’t understand and don’t forget to sign it. For more advice on finding professionals you can trust, visit www.bbb.org —The Better Business Bureau

Mortgage Rates Around the Area United Trust Bank (as of Feb. 11) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

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12

The Regional News Thursday, February 20, 2014

Open HOuSe on March 1st

Outpatient ServiceS

BuiLDinG On eXceLLence. Outpatient ServiceS

Our new Outpatient Pavilion offers an array of services in one comfortable, modern facility. Opening in early 2014, the Outpatient Pavilion will provide the Southland with a wide range of specialists and services under one roof. Featuring state-of-the-art imaging, surgical suites and the Heart and Vascular, Cancer and Neurosciences Institutes, the new Outpatient Pavilion will offer superior care, along with added privacy and comfort.

For more information or to register for the Open House for a chance to win a free iPad, call 1.800.3.ADVOCATE or visit advocatehealth.com/christoutpatient


Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter Ken Karrson, Sports Editor

It’s success to the Max

outhwest

sports@regionalpublishing.com     Thursday, February 20, 2014

Section 2

Page 1

Strus carries Chargers past Lockport By Ken Karrson It’s no secret that Stagg’s basketball fortunes are tied tightly to Max Strus. Simply put, the Chargers usually go only as far as their senior guard takes them. Friday night in Lockport, that meant Stagg bagged a victory. Already a vital component in the Chargers’ operation, Strus’ importance increased when senior guard Kevin White exited with a back injury. White was hurt in the third quarter when he landed hard after absorbing contact while going airborne for a layup attempt, and Stagg coach John Daniels preferred to exercise caution. “Just as a parent, and [the fact] I’ve been through that as a player,” said Daniels, who suffered a severe back injury while playing ball in college. “I’m not going to risk anyone’s health.” Without White as a sidekick, Strus stepped forward both as a scorer and distributor. Two of his assists set up key late baskets by Sebastian Kolpak and Jeff Goral, and then Strus applied the fin-

ishing touch himself by sinking a 3-pointer with 3.4 seconds left to break a tie. Daniels thought less time than that should have remained, and he also didn’t like that a Lockport player was then awarded three free throws for being fouled “in the act of shooting from 72 feet away.” Daniels disagreed with the continuation call, but he was in full agreement with what happened next -- two misses at the stripe relegated the Porters to a 49-47 SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue setback in front of a “Pack The Place” crowd. “I definitely feel we played well [overall],” Daniels said. “It was a fun game and exciting. “Max showed why he’s so special. He was handling the press and he just put us on his back.” Photo by Jeff Vorva Strus concluded the evening with team-best totals of 24 points, Stagg senior Max Strus watches the flight of the ball after releasing his final shot Friday night in Lockport. His 3-pointer with 3.4 10 rebounds and four assists. His seconds remaining handed the Chargers a 49-47 SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue win over the Porters. 3-ball answered one by Lockport that had created a 46-all deadlock et had given the Chargers (17-7, the front end of 1-and-1s. One ever, which meant that Daniels was to throw the ball in, hold and prevented the Porters from 6-5) a five-point edge, but Stagg of those misfires was followed by was going to have the Chargers it and make them foul us. If we generating a greater amount of also undermined itself with three a Porters layup that narrowed adopt a conservative approach. shoot free throws, I have time to momentum. missed free throws in the final the gap. “I’m not aggressive with the set up my defense.” (Continued on page 5) Kolpak’s aforementioned buck- stanza, two of them coming on Only 31 seconds were left, how- lead,” he said. “The game plan

Junior achievement On the right track Finn’s hot hand helps Rice down Vikings

Rice was ahead by 11 points after three periods, then it survived Arguing with Mark Sevedge’s a spirited last-ditch surge by the Vikings to collect a 54-49 victory strategy was difficult. Knowing what Brother Rice se- at Gordon Tech. Both teams were niors Quinn Niego and Ray Ru- back in action this past Wednesday bio have done to so many teams as the tourney continued. Finn finished with 15 points - including his own - this year, the St. Laurence coach opted to and became the first player other try to shut them down as much than Niego or Rubio to pace the possible. Sevedge was banking Crusaders (12-12) in single-game on the idea that no other Cru- scoring this winter. He augmented sader would be able to hurt the his offense with five steals and Vikings too badly when the two two blocks. Rubio added 13 points area rivals squared off again on and Niego tossed in 10, and both Sunday in the Chicago Catholic chipped in fourth-quarter points to help Rice beat back the St. League Tournament. But while it was largely mis- Laurence challenge. “We’ve been begging for that all sion accomplished on Niego and Rubio, thanks to the combined year,” Crusaders coach Rick Harefforts of Matt Gurgone and Mike rigan said, referring to the emerWitkowski, St. Laurence derived gence of a viable third weapon no benefits from its duo’s handi- alongside Rubio and Niego. “That work. That’s because Sevedge’s was encouraging to see that. “It was nice to see Connor replan ultimately backfired when another Rice athlete did indeed lieve a little bit of [scoring] pressure [for us]. Hopefully, he keeps assume a starring role. Junior Connor Finn became the it up. It won’t do us much good Vikings’ worst nightmare in the if we revert back to a two-man third quarter. His three 3-point show.” The Vikings (5-18) boasted baskets and 12 total points were at the forefront of the Crusaders’ some decent offensive balance 24-point eruption, a scoring as- of their own, as Gurgone (18 sault that enabled them to gain points, two assists), Rich Lamb (12 some much-needed breathing points), Bob Kelly (eight points, four rebounds) and Quentin Forroom versus St. Laurence. “That was kind of the poison berg (eight points) all made their we picked,” Sevedge said. “Those presences felt. Five second-half [other] two are such good players 3-pointers by Gurgone helped St. - they can finish at the rim and Laurence stay afloat after Finn they’re deadly shooters, but we blitzed it and created a greater were not letting them get space. advantage for his own team. “I think we played three really The kids we put on Rubio and Niego did a great job and I couldn’t good quarters and one bad quarbe more proud of them, but their ter, and that [latter period] bit us on the butt,” Sevedge said. “We role players stepped forward.” By Ken Karrson

were a little bit slow and little bit careless with the ball [in that stanza], and they capitalized on every mistake we made. “They were [also] more physical than us and got after it. There were too many second-chance opportunities for them.” Rice attempted eight more shots than the Vikings and had six additional baskets, and making the Crusaders’ performance even more notable was their meager two-turnover total. St. Laurence was guilty of 11 miscues, but not until a shot was partially blocked in the final minute were its victory aspirations quashed. Rice wrapped four free throws around that miss to establish a five-point margin. Niego buried four charity tosses during the final quarter and Rubio added one, along with a pair of layups. While the Vikings came much closer to toppling the Crusaders than they had previously - Rice prevailed by 20 points in the earlier encounter - Harrigan was not caught off-guard by St. Laurence’s competitiveness. “That might be a surprise to some people, but not to me,” he said. “They’ve played a lot of Catholic League teams close, so they haven’t conceded anything. We knew they weren’t going to be easy. “They play real hard and are well-prepared. They run their stuff [efficiently] and they hit more shots [against us] than they did the first time around.” Providence Catholic 67 Brother Rice 53 Seeing as how the winner of (Continued on page 5)

RedHawks stifle JCA to stop slide

By Ken Karrson Against the Hilltoppers, Marist refused to bottom out. Losing to Joliet Catholic Academy Friday night certainly wouldn’t have spelled doom for the RedHawks, but it would have extended a feeling of gloom. Marist entered the East Suburban Catholic Conference matchup in Mount Greenwood in the midst of a four-game losing streak, which had gotten extended four days earlier by Tinley Park. Most troubling to RedHawks coach Gene Nolan in that earlier confrontation was his squad’s inability to slow the rapid-paced Titans. Tinley chalked up 78 points against Marist, just enough to net it a two-point triumph. “The team that deserved to win the game did win the game,” Nolan said. “I credit Tinley Park — what they do well, they did very well against us. “They’re playing really fast this year, kind of similar to Eisenhower’s style. They call it ‘chaos,” like VCU plays [in college ball], and they force you to play at their pace. We were not engaged enough defensively to where, when we needed stops, we could get them.” All that changed on Friday, and not just because the youthful Hilltoppers — whose starting lineup consisted of four sophomores and one junior — preferred a more deliberate approach. Nolan felt his guys had put in three good days of practice between games, and those laid the groundwork for a convincing 60-39 win.

“We must have an accurate perception of reality because you’ll never improve the things you need to work on [if you don’t],” Nolan said. “Defense has been our identity, and the kids knew we had not played well on Monday against Tinley Park. “Anytime you’re in a [losing] streak, where you haven’t played as well as you’d like, you want to get off to a good start [in your next game], get ahead and stay ahead. When we came out [against JCA], I thought we played as well defensively as we have all year.” And because of that, the RedHawks (16-8, 3-3) raced to a 19-5 lead. A couple of the Hilltoppers’ 20 turnovers were part of a 10-2 Marist run, and the home team scored after both as Bradley Hill nailed a 3-pointer and Kevin Lerma hit a basket. Lerma totaled eight of his 12 points in the opening stanza, and Brian Holland and Ryan Tucker matched Hill by depositing shots from behind the arc. An 18-11 scoring advantage in the second quarter essentially sealed the deal for Marist, which knocked in eight of its 18 3-point tries and posted a 52 percent overall success rate from the field. “I don’t know if I would have thought in the summer this was a team that would have as one of its strengths perimeter shooting,” Nolan said. “We’re shooting over 40 percent from 3-point [range] this season.” JCA was also effective from long distance (8-of-21), but it clicked on just 37 percent of its total shots and committed all but four of its

turnovers prior to intermission. The Hilltoppers never got closer than 17 points in the final 16 minutes. “We felt if we could pressure their guards and speed them up, we could keep them away from what they do effectively,” Nolan said of JCA. “You want to pressure without fouling, and I think a key statistic was them going 3-of-4 at the foul line. We made them [have to] score from the field.” Holland paced the RedHawks with 15 points, which came on five 3s. Romelo Burrell had eight points and five rebounds, and four other Marist players delivered at least five points. Among them was Nic Weishar, who returned after a four-game, injury-induced absence to provide five points, six rebounds and three steals. Jeremiah Ferguson and Brian Barry passed out 14 assists between them, and the latter was also praised by Nolan for being turnover-free. Tinley Park 78 Marist 76 The Titans had lost three years in a row to the RedHawks, but they ended that victory drought last Monday by scoring the goahead bucket with 3.9 seconds left. The hoop was sandwiched between two Marist turnovers and preceded by a couple of Tinley Park free throws, which pulled the hosts even at 76. The RedHawks dealt well with the Titans’ speedy style early on, as they constructed a 22-10 lead and exited the first period ahead by eight at 24-16. Ken Rivard had (Continued on page 5)

Loving a Valentine’s victory Coach happy as Astros upend SSC Red-leading Bulldogs By Ken Karrson Tony Chiuccariello gave thanks on a different holiday than everyone else. While Shepard’s veteran coach probably expressed gratitude for several things in his life at Thanksgiving, basketball -- and specifically the Astros’ game against rival Richards in the season-opening District 218 Tournament -- likely wasn’t among those items. When the sister schools met the first time, it was all Bulldogs, as the Oak Lawn crew made off with a 28-point triumph. Since then, Richards has lived a bit of an up-and-down existence on the court, although it has still played well enough to sit atop the South Suburban Conference Red standings. And when they visited Palos Heights Friday night, the Bulldogs had a chance to lock up at least a share of their ninth straight league championship. Shepard, however, had other

ideas, and on Valentine’s Day the Astros warmed their boss’ heart with a well-timed clutch performance. Not unexpectedly, Richards was a handful, but when Jacob Littleton nailed a series of free throws in the waning moments, Shepard was able to secure for itself an important 71-67 win. By defeating the Bulldogs for only the second time since 2002, the second-place Astros closed to within a game of the division leaders. Both teams had three conference contests remaining on the schedule at the start of the current week. While Chiuccariello didn’t want to speculate on what may lie ahead for his club, he was more than willing to praise Shepard athletes for a job well done versus Richards. “Coaches don’t win games; players win games,” Chiuccariello said. “[And] our kids played really hard. They played above

their potential. “Everything they had, they used. They maxed out [in that regard] on Friday.” Chiuccariello didn’t get any argument to the contrary from his coaching counterpart. “They just outplayed us from the start,” Richards leader John Chappetto said. “They played together and shared the ball, and we didn’t. They found every little bit of weakness we had and exploited it. “They played pretty good defense -- they had a great game plan, stuck to it and played hard. On offense, they [frequently] beat us down the floor.” Chappetto pointed to an early Astros possession as an illustration of what kind of night it was for his squad. In that particular instance, Shepard fired up an airball, but senior Darren Cohen grabbed it and scored on a short shot. (Continued on page 6)

Not all fun and games

Photo by Jeff Vorva

   Despite the festive atmosphere surrounding last Wednesday’s East Suburban Catholic Conference game between Marist and Benet Academy, Lady RedHawks coach Mary Pat Connolly wears a serious expression on her face. Connolly wasn’t happier at the end of the Senior Night contest, as Marist dropped a 65-58 decision. Story on Page 2.


2

Section 2 Thursday, February 20, 2014  

The Regional News - The Reporter

Here we go again with things to go away Bartosh By now, you’ve seen a sampling of one man’s opinion on what is wrong in the world of sports these days. Last week in this space, I presented some of my personal peeves, using alphabetical order and listing one item per letter. Obviously, there are other examples I could have cited that would certainly be justified. Instead of the letter “D” standing for “dunk,” for instance, it could have referred to “day-night doubleheaders,” the greed-driven abomination that many years ago replaced the two-games-for-oneprice deal major-league baseball teams typically offered fans almost every summer Sunday. And in the “A” category, “agents” could have easily been substituted for “apology” with no difficulty at all. But that’s the fun of compilations — most of them tend to be open to debate. Whether you agreed or disagreed with my earlier suggestions, I’m surmising they at least provided a little food for thought. And now it’s time to mentally nosh once again. This week, I offer those things worthy of disdain that begin with letters “J” through “R,” and I imagine you can see where this is headed. So you’ve got an entire week to start considering your own “S” through “Z” items whose existence you wouldn’t mind having cease. As for this week, here goes: • Jockspeak, like its verbal cousin “coachspeak,” is a phrase attached to the prattle that frequently passes for insight when sportsmen are questioned by interviewers. It can take on various forms, ranging from in-sport jargon to a flood of clichés. Either way, it’s mind-numbing. How many more times must we be subjected to athletes and coaches talking about “A-gaps,” “dime packages,” “diamondand-1s” and “motion offenses” before we become homicidal? Many coaches love to spout a lot of terminology in the hope they can convince outsiders that preparing a game plan is akin to studying nuclear physics. And if the technical terms don’t drive you crazy, surely athletes’ constant references to having to “make plays,” “stay focused” “work harder” and “come together as a team” will have the same negative effect. • Kilometers frustrate me. Call me shallow, stubborn or supercilious — I’ve been called worse — but I never understood the need for metric measurements in the U.S. In a sporting sense, it simply creates confusion among those of us who were schooled in the pre-computer era. Let me put it this way — running backs still seek to become 1,000-yard rushers each season, long-ball hitters aim for 500-foot home runs and football teams occasionally face fourth-andinches situations. Until those circumstances change, and with no animosity directed toward track-and-field athletes, I’d prefer to ignore the kilometers, meters and millimeters. • Legal wrangling has become as much a part of sports coverage as it is in news reporting. If a story isn’t about lawyers trying to keep their trouble-

making clients out of the Big House — and I’m not talking about the football stadium in Ann Arbor, Mich., here — it’s chronicling the efforts of other attorneys to get their law-abiding, but underachieving clients less “insulting” contract offers from franchise owners. Oh, and along the way the legal eagles also make sure to bemoan teams’ penurious habits while conveniently ignoring their own desire for budgetbusting paydays. • Media, of which I’ve been a member for a long time, do not escape my wrath. To some of you, it may seem as if I’m biting the hand that feeds me, but it’d be inexcusable on my part if I totally excused my peers’ shortcomings. My gripe, which is one shared by other detractors of our profession, is that too many reporters go out of their way to try to stir up trouble. Neophytes, especially, often think nothing of breaching trusts, purposely baiting individuals or using information gathered from unreliable sources to get a story out — and, more importantly, their name known — to the public as quickly as possible. Such acts make all of us in the business look bad, which is something our mustard-stained attire is perfectly capable of doing on its own. • NBA officials admittedly don’t have the easiest task in the world, but it also isn’t the toughest, even among rules enforcers. But not since Bobby Brady alienated his TV chums back in the early 1970s by taking his safety-monitor duties at school way too seriously has a group whose primary function is to preserve order been so reviled. Granted, all game officials find themselves in something of a lose-lose scenario in regard to gaining a high level of approval, but NBA referees are singled out here because they are the ones most able — and sometimes, it appears, willing — to alter the tenor of a game. By calling a ticky-tack foul against it, they can immediately halt a team’s momentum and, worse, possibly cost it a couple points on the scoreboard. And the fact it’s long been theorized that stars and marginal players are not treated equally doesn’t enhance the refs’ image any. The average baseball fan probably can’t identify more than a few major-league umpires; the same goes for hockey fans and officials, the latter of which, by the way, are generally outstanding given the speed of the sport they must monitor. But not only do basketball fans know a number of NBA refs by name and sight, they fuel the conspiracy flames far more often than their sports-watching brethren, an accusation not helped by former official Tim Donaghy’s admission that he had bet on some NBA games he worked. • Overpriced items, which these days pretty much describes anything connected to attending a professional sporting event, are also a source of aggravation. About the only thing still without a price tag attached to it is restroom use,

but that’s only fair since patrons are likely ridding themselves of about $50 or $60 worth of beverages by the fourth inning or second quarter of said game. Tickets, souvenirs, parking — they’re all ridiculously expensive, but that’s the financial burden we must all bear to have on our favorite team’s roster a $20 million-per-year first baseman who bats .230 and runs hard only when being pursued by autograph-seeking kids.    • PEDs have called into question most notable accomplishments in baseball over the past couple decades. Not every player suspected of using performance-enhancing drugs during his career has confessed or been officially tied to them, but the evidence against those parties is nevertheless pretty strong. In particular, hitters’ increased power numbers raised eyebrows. Defenders say it was nothing more than coincidental. So, too, I suppose, was the sudden ability of 140-pound, slaphitting shortstops everywhere to go deep at Ruthian rates.    Baseball is supposedly working to clean up its act. Guys like Ryan Braun and Alex Rodriguez show that plenty of work remains to be done. • Quality start may be the biggest misnomer in sports. Think of the various definitions of “quality” — among them are “excellence” and “superiority.” Neither of those words applies to quality start.    Once upon a time, baseball pitchers were expected to throw complete games, barring an offensive siege unleashed by batters in the opposing lineup. And heaven help the manager or coach who attempted to remove any competitive hurler prematurely — former St. Louis Cardinals ace Bob Gibson, for instance, might have fired his next pitch at whomever approached him from the St. Louis dugout. Now, though, six innings represent a quality start, and this is in an era when pitchers are part of a five-man, not four-man, rotation, and, thus, receive an extra day’s rest. And what’s sad is that no one strongly debates the idea. Of course, I imagine nobody has bothered to query Bob Gibson about it. •Richie Incognito, the Miami Dolphins offensive lineman, is the latest poster boy for bad behavior in the NFL and serves as proof of just how much coaches are willing to overlook. Incognito made news over the past couple months for his role in harassing former teammate Jonathan Martin, but he’s been a loose cannon for years. He was involved in a number of scrapes while at the University of Nebraska before Cornhuskers coaches tired of his antics, and Incognito also undermined an ensuing quest to enroll at Oregon. But he’s a big, strong, tough guy, so Incognito has always managed to find work in football. There are plenty of others like him, too, located all around the sports landscape, which can lead to only one conclusion. When it comes to character, it doesn’t matter if jocks are winners or losers, just so long as they can play the game.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Benet Academy guard Morgan Thomalla, a Palos Park resident, chases down a loose ball last Wednesday against Marist.

Girls’ basketball roundup

Screeching Eagles capture regional championship By Anthony Nasella

The Eagles reached the regional title game against Lisle (19-10) by When Mt. Assisi coach Kelsey virtue of their 67-12 rout of HarpJames walked onto the court prior er last Tuesday. Beating the Lady to the start of last Thursday’s Bulldogs was one thing; toppling Class 2A Lisle Regional champi- the Lady Lions was a far greater onship contest against the host challenge, but not an insurmountschool, she happily admitted that able one in James’ opinion — or, she had never seen Screeching more importantly, in the minds Eagles players as focused on a of her athletes. game. “I walked into the gym [and] To be sure, there was some ob- you could tell that no matter what vious motivation for that level of I said or what I was doing, they concentration. Last month came had their minds set and made up,” the announcement that Mt. As- James said. “They were going to sisi would be closing at the end win that game. It just didn’t matof the current school year. ter who the opponent was. It was James wasn’t sure if that reality like that right from the start. would be enough to elevate her “In the couple times we were team to victory over the favored down, they looked at each other Lady Lions. But when the Eagles as if to say, ‘We’re not leaving hoisted their second consecutive here without a win.’ They knew regional trophy after stunning the that this was their game. For me, hosts 52-42, it was obvious this that makes my job easy because Mt. Assisi squad was playing with if they want it, that’s half the a confidence level that even has battle.” James doing some dreaming. The Eagles were down 23-21 at Senior center Mary Kate Wetzel halftime and trailed by six in the poured in 17 points and grabbed third quarter when two baskets seven rebounds, and junior trans- by Tadros and one from Moriarty fer Jess Moriarty added 13 points created a 31-all deadlock. Mt. Asand 11 rebounds to lead the Eagles sisi moved in front and gradually (13-17) past Lisle. Senior Terri stretched out its lead, using TadDearth and freshman Monica Tad- ros’ three-point play, Moriarty’s ros each pitched in with seven 3-point basket and Kathleen Murpoints for Mt. Assisi, which met phy’s free throw to construct a Westmont this past Tuesday in a 46-35 edge with 3:55 remaining Harper Sectional semifinal. in the contest.

Finally seeing the light

Hopes raised for Knights in second of two losses By Ken Karrson

   Some light finally appeared at the end of the dark tunnel in which Chicago Christian has been stuck lately.    And coach Kevin Pittman is convinced it’s not the figurative freight train ready to mow the Knights down even further. He has been optimistic before, then eventually disappointed, but Pittman could point to some tangible evidence of a turnaround during Friday night’s Suburban Christian Conference matchup with Wheaton Academy. While he jokingly said Chicago Christian’s 78-50 loss to the Warriors may have “stopped people from ever wanting to come back,” the reality is that the Knights exhibited a greater degree of fortitude in the face of adversity than at any other time this season.    Wheaton’s massive 41-18 halftime lead proved insurmountable, but the Warriors found themselves engaged in an unexpected dogfight during the third quarter. Playing By Ken Karrson other team hits an unbelievable committing miscues on three of with a sense of defensive abanshot to force overtime, momentum their last four possessions. One don heretofore missing, Christian From extra special to extra ordi- turns against you a lot of times of those was a traveling call with forced a baker’s dozen worth of nary -- that pretty much described [in that situation].” 10 seconds remaining that left turnovers in the third frame, a Sandburg’s overtime adventures What got turned against the the door open for Joliet West to showing that was responsible for last week. Eagles on Friday were the tables, fire up a fade-away shot before reducing the hosts’ deficit to single digits at one point. Not once, but twice the Eagles as Joliet West was the club hit- the buzzer sounded. were forced to play beyond 32 ting overtime foul shots. Eight of In all, Sandburg was guilty    “We completely changed the minutes against SouthWest Sub- them accounted for the Tigers’ of nine fourth-period turnovers, whole dynamic of the game,” urban Conference Blue foes. The entire batch of scoring beyond which represented more than half Pittman said. “The score looked first of those contests featured regulation, and that was enough of its game total. Interestingly, lopsided [by the end], but we Sandburg shaking off the negative for the home team to pocket a the Eagles played error-free ball were basically right there with one of the best -- if not the best effects of a shocking game-tying 59-57 victory and halt Sandburg’s in OT. 3-pointer by Lockport at the end three-game win streak. Four Sandburg players tallied -- teams in either division of our of regulation quickly enough to “We were playing well and had in double figures, but that quartet conference. There’s not anybody garner a 55-51 triumph in OT a chance to go over .500 [in con- also accounted for every point, in their lineup under 6-1. on Tuesday. ference play], so we were pretty thereby depriving the Eagles of    “The game was basically deMaking the win possible was a disappointed we weren’t able to the type of extended scoring bal- cided at halftime, but we said, superb display at the foul line. The close them out,” Allen said. “This ance Allen prefers. Niko Cahue ‘Let’s come out and win the third Eagles attempted 32 free throws one kind of tripped us up.” notched 20 points to spearhead quarter and then let’s win the between the fourth quarter and The Eagles (9-13, 5-6) struggled the Sandburg attack, Eric Straka fourth quarter.’ Teams have come overtime, and point guard Alec in the extra session, missing a tossed in 15, Niko Kogionis had 12 in here and punched us in the mouth, and I told [our players], Martinez was a particular thorn couple of charity tosses and sev- and Martinez finished with 10. 55 ‘I’m tired of taking that. It’s time in the Porters’ side as he went eral 3-point shots. Sandburg was Sandburg 51 to stand up and be accounted for,’ 14-of-16 over that 12-minute span. still within a deuce in the late Lockport He produced seven of his team’s going, but Joliet West was able In the teams’ initial go-around and I finally saw that light bulb 11 points in OT. to run out the clock after suc- this season, the Porters prevailed go on in their heads. “I give our guys credit,” Sand- cessfully inbounding the ball on 34-31, and midway through last    “There was a lot of frustration burg coach Todd Allen said. “We its final possession. Tuesday’s rematch a similar sce- built up in those guys, so that could have maybe folded our The Eagles had also allowed the nario seemed to be unfolding as [response] was really nice to see. If we play this way, at least this is cards. When you kind of think Tigers to gain some headway at the Eagles led 18-13. fun and there’s some enjoyment you have a game won and the the end of the fourth quarter by (Continued on page 4)

Extra special to extra ordinary Eagles earn split in pair of overtime contests

Moriarty then stepped forward to sink five consecutive charity tosses over the final 1:46 to extend what had been a five-point advantage and secure the crown for the Eagles. “Even leading up to the Lisle game — and since the game — they’ve bought into the idea that no matter what is going on, they’re going to want it more than anyone else wants it,” James said of her athletes. “And that’s great because that’s what I have preached to the girls about. “The team buying into that has been a coach’s dream. They’ve also bought into the importance of a solid defense.” Against Westmont, which already owned two victories over Mt. Assisi prior to Tuesday’s sectional clash, the Eagles had to find a way to more adequately cope with the Lady Sentinels’ zone defense. “They play a 2-3 zone the entire game, which forces us to shoot from the outside,” James said. “I’ve stressed to the girls that we can’t just settle for the outside shot. We’ve worked on ways to beat that zone.” What has touched James personally is the overflow of support from the wider Mt. Assisi community, which has embraced (Continued on page 4)

to watching it unfold.”    Christian (7-15, 1-7), which dropped its sixth consecutive decision, converted a number of Wheaton’s third-quarter mistakes into points. However, the Warriors were able to stave off the Knights by sinking 10-of-16 free throws in the fourth period.    Wheaton wasted no time in establishing itself at the outset, as it netted the evening’s first 11 points within a couple minutes, courtesy of three 3-point buckets and another field goal. The Warriors were ahead 23-8 after one quarter and quickly put a damper on an otherwise festive evening that was highlighted by Christian’s placement of some new people onto its athletic Wall of Honor.    “We gave all those alumni quite a show [at the beginning],” Pittman joked.    They saw a better presentation later, when the trio of Blaine Wright, Marcus Parker and Nathan Leo -- who combined for 10 steals -- spearheaded the Knights’ defensive revival.    “They’re always a fundamental team,” Pittman said of Wheaton. “You don’t [normally] do that against them. Thirteen turnovers are about a game’s worth for them.”    The Warriors did, however, maintain a solid shooting eye as they drilled 11-of-23 3-pointers and 24-of-51 field-goal attempts overall. Christian fired away at just a 32 percent clip, got outscored at the foul line and also was out-rebounded.    Wright had 12 points and was the Knights’ lone double-digit man. Trevor Wolterink finished with eight points. While Pittman wished the outcome had been better for his guys, he felt they set themselves up for more pleasing results this weekend, when they tangle with Illiana Christian and Guerin Prep on Friday and Saturday, respectively.    “I’m happy that they stood up against Wheaton,” Pittman said. “They played their guts out. I don’t know why it took so long, but I guess everybody learns at their own pace.    “We went back to doing a lot of

defensive things in practice and I think we’ve been building to this point. I don’t think we could have played this way three or four weeks ago.” Marian Central Catholic 69 Chicago Christian 52 In truth, the Knights really didn’t play that same way last Tuesday, when the Hurricanes blew past them. Marian Catholic Central connected on 50 percent of its shots from the floor, including 40 percent from 3-point land.    “If somebody would have said they shot 20 [3s], I’d have said they’d made 15,” Pittman said of the Hurricanes, who actually were 8-of-20 from long distance. “It seemed like every shot they took went in.    “I was disappointed in our defense. We were not closing out on their shooters and we had poor defensive rotations.”    Marian buried seven of its 3point hoops between the second and third periods, a barrage that led to 47 total points. The Hurricanes’ 23-point third quarter staked them to a 19-point edge. Christian’s two biggest liabilities were 2-of-13 shooting on 3-point tries and 23 miscues, which Pittman said was “just us trying to go too fast and being really sloppy with the ball.”    Wolterink (15 points, seven rebounds), Wright (seven points), Bradford Fitzpatrick (seven points, seven rebounds) and Jay Spencer (seven points) were the Knights’ headliners in a losing cause.

Statistics Chicago Christian 6   17   14   15 - 52 Marian Central Catholic 9 24 23 13 - 69 Chicago Christian Scoring: Wolterink 15, Fitzpatrick 7, Spencer 7, Wright 7, T. Decker 6, Leo 4, J. Decker 2, Washington 2, Boss 1, Van Buren 1. Rebounds: Fitzpatrick 7, Wolterink 7. Assists: Parker 3. Wheaton Academy   23 18   3   4 - 78 Chicago Christian 8   10   16   16 - 50 Chicago Christian Scoring: Wright 12, Wolterink 8, Parker 6, Spencer 6, Washington 5, Fitzpatrick 4, Boss 3, Van Buren 3, Leo 2, T. Decker 1. Rebounds: Fitzpatrick 7. Assists: Parker 4. Steals: Wright 4, Leo 3, Parker 3.


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, February 20, 2014 Section 2

Mustangs are Ram tough Evergreen sneaks past Reavis in road encounter By Ken Karrson Old-time TV references to “beautiful downtown Burbank” certainly weren’t describing the attitude area basketball players tend to have when arriving in the southwest-suburban town bearing that same name.    In particular, those athletes have disliked visiting Reavis. That general feeling didn’t arise from any overt lack of hospitality, but rather from the manner in which the Rams have frequently treated their guests on the court through the years. Beating Reavis on its own floor typically is not a simple task, and Evergreen Park rediscovered that fact Friday night. True to form, the Rams were a tough out, but unlike many other times the Mustangs managed to complete a successful assignment. Issac Matthews’ free throw with two seconds left did the trick, as it snapped the game’s last tie and handed a 44-43 South Suburban Conference Red win to Evergreen. “I was a little surprised to see it called,” Mustangs coach Pat Flannigan said. “It doesn’t happen that often [so late], but the kid fouled him. I was happy to escape. “Reavis is never an easy place to win, but we made just enough plays. We want to get out of [the regular season] with a winning record and we can’t leave one out there. It was good for our kids to win this one.” Evergreen (11-12, 2-9), which was missing Tony Weathersby from its lineup because of a family matter, jumped out to a 10-4 lead in the contest as four different players scored. That six-point edge was the biggest for either team in the opening half, as the clubs swapped the lead five times and were tied on three occasions. Flannigan had the Mustangs apply defensive pressure early, but after a couple of his players were forced to deal with foul trouble, he had Evergreen ease up. That allowed the Rams to regain their footing, and they constructed a 26-21 advantage during the third period. “That’s the type of game they want to play,” Flannigan said of Reavis. “They want to walk it up and get into a half-court game because they’ve got 100 different

[offensive] sets.” But before the Rams could completely seize command, the Mustangs stormed back with seven unanswered points. Matthews provided three charity tosses and a basket, while Jacquet McClendon canned one shot from the field as well. That run, which was also aided by five Reavis misses and three miscues, gave Evergreen a 28-26 lead to take with it into the final frame. And the Mustangs soon embarked on another surge, with Shawn Hughes’ 3-pointer and hoops from Matthews, McClendon and Tobi Oladejo serving as the sparks. The Rams failed to connect on four more field-goal attempts and were guilty of another turnover, and they eventually were staring at a 40-34 deficit. With less than two minutes remaining, Flannigan “thought we had it sealed, but we made a few mistakes.” Indeed, Reavis rallied, and when Jason Puha drilled a 3-pointer with 30 seconds left, the home team had grabbed a 43-42 edge. A Matthews free throw knotted the score, then the Rams missed a try from the line. Flannigan said his assistants were upset by the foul call, but he thought it was a fortuitous happening for Evergreen. “They run such good stuff [that] they were going to get a [favorable] look,” Flannigan said of Reavis. “Even if they had hit the free throws, I actually felt better because I’d much rather have the ball back with some time left on the clock.” Matthews finished with 19 points, eight rebounds and three steals to pace the Mustangs, while McClendon and Oladejo combined for another 17 points and four assists. In addition, Oladejo dished out three assists. Evergreen took reasonably good care of the ball, but its acceptable total of 11 turnovers was somewhat overshadowed by its 39 percent shooting, which included a 2-of-15 exhibition from beyond the arc. The Mustangs also missed eight of their 18 free throws. Leo 74 Evergreen Park 62 Last Tuesday’s journey into Chicago represented a homecoming of sorts for Flannigan, who

was an assistant coach at Leo for three years. “I loved it,” he said of his return to a familiar venue. “I’ve still got friends working over there [and] it’s such a different place to play a game. “In our league, everybody’s got the big gyms, and only Argo’s is a little different. This is just old school [at Leo] and it’s something I wanted to show our players. Hopefully, this is the stuff they’ll remember from their high school careers.” The Mustangs adapted quickly to the smaller surroundings as they tallied the game’s first five points. The Lions roared back and were ahead 23-20 at the period break, but two baskets from McClendon and one by Matthews pushed Evergreen in front 26-23 early in the second quarter. But the bottom dropped out for the visitors soon after. Leo went on an 8-0 run, outscored the Mustangs 20-3 over one stretch, and was up by 17 points entering the final frame. Evergreen was held without a point for a fourplus-minute span that bridged the third and fourth stanzas, during which time it made six turnovers and misfired three times from 3point territory. However, the Mustangs refused to quietly submit. They fought back to within six in the last minute before their comeback was snuffed out by a Lions dunk and some free throws. “It looked worse than it was,” Flannigan said of the final score. “We know what we’ve got [talentwise] and we’re just trying to get better along the way. I have no regrets scheduling them.” Evergreen, which squared off with Lincoln-Way West this past Tuesday, hosts Argo on Friday.

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Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella

Geiger couldn’t say enough about Colson’s impact on the team When Sandburg’s girls’ bowling throughout the season and the fact squad found success last year, it she’s representing Sandburg at was with Nicole Powell leading state as an individual qualifier. the way and a talented group of “She’s been solid for us all underclassmen behind her. season,” he said. “At conference, This season, the Lady Eagles she bowled her two best games of weren’t able to advance to the the season, and now is the best state meet as a team, but senior time to be bowling her best. She Jessica Colson did so individu- feels good about herself and her ally at Saturday’s Morgan Park chances of being competitive at Sectional. Colson rolled a 1,295 state.” six-game series, which was good Besides having the team reach for second place and put her just state, Colson’s main goal was to 27 pins behind sectional champion qualify herself. Kyra Udziela of Lemont. “She knew that she had to adColson’s score was higher than vance past regionals and sectionthat of every bowler on the state- als, and she was able to do that,” qualifying teams. Geiger said. “Now, she gets her “It was one of our best overall chance. We’re excited.” individual performances in SandGYMNASTICS burg bowling history,” Lady EaShepard sophomore Skylar Hilgles coach Joe Geiger said. “Com- ger was the lone area gymnast ing into the event, Jessica had to earn automatic qualification some jitters, but she was definitely for the state meet out of last focused from Game 1 all the way Wednesday’s Hinsdale Central through Game 6. Sectional. Hilger placed third in “Whenever she had a bad game, floor exercise (9.45 points) and she would bounce right back with fourth in the all-around (36.05). a good game. She actually, at one The top five finishers in each point, was in the lead -- if she had event and the all-around advanced struck out in the last game, she automatically. At-large qualifiers would have won the meet. She were to be determined after all wound up with an open in the the state’s sectionals were com10th frame, and that hurt her.” pleted.

WRESTLING Even though Sandburg was denied the opportunity to defend its state team title, the Eagles still will have numerous wrestlers shooting for championships at this weekend’s individual finals. In preliminary matches, Christian Robertson (29-11) will face Grant’s Noah Drabek (24-4) at 126 pounds; John Pellegrino (324) will square off with Edwardsville’s Sam Andresen (36-13) at 145; Brian Krasowski (20-10) will meet Prairie Ridge’s Charlie Popp (32-5) in a 160-pound match; Patrick Brucki (36-14) will tangle with Belleville East’s Matthew Striegel (36-6) at 170; and Hunter Pindel (38-5) will face Lockport’s Tyler Johnson (48-0) at 195. Stagg’s Mantas Drukteinis (404) will dual Moline’s Adarios Jones in the heavyweight class. BOYS’ SWIMMING Sandburg, Stagg and Shepard will be among 14 teams competing at Saturday’s Sandburg Sectional for a shot at qualifying for the state meet. BOYS’ INDOOR TRACK Shepard (53 points) finished sixth at Saturday’s Bloom Indoor Invitational.

Statistics Evergreen Park 10 7 11 16 - 44 Reavis 8 12 6 17 - 43 Evergreen Park Scoring: Matthews 19, McClendon 9, Oladejo 8, Brown 4, Hughes 3, Cheatham 1. Rebounds: Matthews 8, Cheatham 7. Assists: McClendon 2, Oladejo 2. Steals: Matthews 3, Oladejo 3. Blocks: Cheatham 3.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Brother Rice wrestler Rudy Yates carried a 72-0 career record into his semifinal match with Marist’s Nick Lukanich at Saturday’s Class 3A Hinsdale Central Sectional, but Lukanich, right, got the upper hand and defeated Yates in a 113-pound match.

Evergreen Park 20 9 7 26 - 62 Leo 23 16 14 21 - 74 Evergreen Park Scoring: Weathersby 18.

Trinity sports report

Trolls on the verge of qualification By Tim Cronin

The Trolls had opened the week by earning a split against CCAC It comes down to this for Trinity foes Purdue-North Central and Christian College’s men’s basket- Indiana-South Bend. ball team: Win the last two games The win over the Panthers inand then hope to qualify for the cluded a 20-point showing from Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Hehir, 16 points from Jones — Conference Tournament. whose early 3-pointer put Trinity The Trolls came into this past in command — and 13 each from Wednesday’s game against Judson Van Den Berg and Cody Rhorer. University with a 9-19 overall re- Rhorer also grabbed eight record and 5-12 league mark. The bounds. top 10 teams in the 14-school cirThe blowout loss to IUSB ended cuit earn entry into the postseason the Trolls’ winning streak at two event. Heading into the current games largely because the Titans week, 10 programs had a better ran wild offensively, shooting 63 record than Trinity, including St. percent. They also pulled down 44 Xavier University, Saturday’s foe rebounds to Trinity’s 28, thereby in the regular-season finale. rendering Jones’ 20-point effort Judson entered Wednesday’s relatively meaningless. contest at 6-22 overall, 3-14 *** within the CCAC. Nevertheless, • Statistics: 9-19 overall, 5-12 this must-win game wasn’t a lock CCAC, 5-6 home, 4-10 away, 0-3 for the Trolls. neutral. Leaders: Jared Jones The present situation material- 17.6 ppg., 24 steals; Jake Van Den ized after Trinity went 1-2 last Berg, 7.5 rpg.; Evan Pratt 68 asweek. The Trolls opened with a sists; Trey Johnson 22 blocks. 94-68 loss at Indiana University• Schedule: Saturday, vs. St. South Bend, rebounded with an Xavier University, 3 p.m. 86-79 victory over Purdue-North Central and then concluded the WOMEN’S BASKETBALL busy week with a dramatic 75-74 The Trolls’ long-sputtering ofovertime loss to NAIA Division fense contributed to both of their II top-ranked Cardinal Stritch losses last week. Trinity (7-20, University. 3-13) was outplayed by Cardinal Had Trinity upset the Wolves, Stritch in an 84-62 setback, but it would have collected its first- stayed in contention most of the ever first win over a No. 1 team. way against Indiana-South Bend Instead, the Trolls were left to before falling to a 59-44 defeat. lick their emotional wounds after What killed the Trolls’ chances pushing Stritch to the brink. against the Titans was secondThe Wolves led by 11 points half shooting. One basket in a in the first half before Trinity 14-minute span caused a six-point began chipping away. A six-minute lead to become a 12-point defisurge midway though the second cit. Trinity shot only 27 percent half erased a nine-point deficit, overall versus IUSB and just 24 Joe Hehir’s 3-pointer tying the percent (7-of-29) over the final contest at 57 with five minutes to 20 minutes. go. Only once in regulation, on a Aside from Caitlin Cody’s 23layup by Jake Van Den Berg (16 point, 10-rebound night, the Trolls points, eight rebounds) soon after, managed only 21 points and 10 did the Trolls enjoy a lead. field goals on 45 shots. The TiStritch regained the edge and tans had a standout offensive perexpanded it to four points, only former in Maegan Callaway (22 to see Hehir shave Trinity’s defi- points on 10-of-26 shooting), but cit in half at the free-throw line. also cranked up the defense. The loss to 11th-ranked Stritch Then in the final seconds, Ezekiel resulted from the Wolves graduOdonkor rebounded Jared Jones’ 3-point miss and sank a buzzer- ally pulling away. They led by 13 beating putback that created the at intermission and 24 after a second-half surge, then coasted need for an extra session. Four more ties followed in over- in 22 points ahead of Trinity, time, but the Trolls couldn’t get which absorbed its 20th loss of the season. Holly Boetsma and past the Wolves. Jones’ 22 points paced the lo- Brooke Bambrick each scored 17 cals on a night when they outshot points for the Trolls. With a playoff berth now out Stritch (47-to-32 percent), out-reof reach and matchups against bounded it (40-37), and generally outplayed the nation’s top team. Judson and St. Xavier universities the only ones remaining, Trinity Only the victory was missing. can’t reach the 10-victory plateau, ***

which would have been a real accomplishment. Still, after last season’s 3-28 record, there’s still been measurable improvement in coach Reggie Chappel’s second campaign. *** • Statistics: 7-20 overall, 3-13 CCAC, 3-7 home, 3-11 away, 1-2 neutral. Leaders: Caitlin Cody 13.2 ppg, 8.0 rpg., 18 blocks; Allie Paluchniak 57 assists, 35 steals. • Schedule: Saturday, vs. St. Xavier University, 1 p.m. Photo by Jeff Vorva

TRACK & FIELD Stagg wrestler Dennis Egan has a headlock on Lyons Twp.’s Nick Spacek in a 170-pound match The Trolls keep picking off at Saturday’s Class 3A Hinsdale Central Sectional. targets and gaining berths in postseason meets. Last weekend’s jaunt to the Chicagoland meet at North Central College featured Trinity’s women’s distance-medley relay quartet of Ashley Jourdan, Justine VanDyk, Courtney Kalous and Anna Bos producing a school-record run of 12 minutes, 33.16 seconds to earn a spot in the NAIA meet. Bos also excelled as an individual, as she qualified for the National Christian College Athletic Association meet with her 5:18.17 clocking in the mile run. On the men’s side, Alex Clark’s 4:30.46 mile time also advanced him to the NCCAA meet, which takes place this weekend at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais. Meanwhile, Andy Reisdma’s victory in the 5,000-meter run came in a school-record time of 15:07.81, which advanced his seed time for the NAIA indoor meet. Chris Morse’s 7.29 effort in the 60-dash, an event where the Trolls haven’t possessed much speed over the years, represented another school standard. BASEBALL The Trolls seek a second straight postseason berth as they look to Photo by Jeff Vorva build on last season’s 18-12 record in CCAC play, the centerpiece of Although Sandburg’s Kevin Stearns is upside down, he still keeps a grip on Hinsdale Central’s Matt Price in a 113-pound match at Staurday’s Class 3A Hinsdale Central Sectional. a 25-24 overall record. Two words may slow that quest, at least at the start: weather permitting. Trinity opens this weekend with four games against Brescia in Owensboro, Ky., followed by contests in central Indiana and St. Louis as February morphs into March. The questions are how many of those 10 games will be played and how much work can coach Justin Huisman get his pitching staff before the spring-break week in Florida in mid-March? Last year, six of the first 10 games were wiped out by snow or rain.

On the edge... and right on target!

Straight talk from Bartosh in Sports Southwest


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Section 2 Thursday, February 20, 2014    The Regional News - The Reporter

Basketball roundup

Moraine athletics wrap

Cyclones men finally break through

(Continued from page 2) the basketball team, whose two regional titles are the only postseason championships garnered in the program’s 62-year history. “They [were] throwing a pep rally on Tuesday for the girls,” James said. “A lot more people have rallied behind these girls. They’re buying into the fact that the girls are doing well, and that this is the last time this program will be playing and do well. “They’re doing all they can do to support the team, and I appreciate that. It’s a great thing for the girls to feel that support in the school and in the community. “The second regional title was especially satisfying. Talking with the girls, this was a lot more appreciated because it was a close game and Lisle had already beaten us in the past. They worked a lot harder for this one and came away even more confident as a team.” No matter what happened this week, James said she will never forget what her team has accomplished. “This experience has been a real confidence booster for all of us as the team has advanced through the playoffs,” she said. “We all want to end this year on a good note and see how far we can go. I’m so enjoying the time with this group. I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.” OAK LAWN The Lady Spartans finished the regular season with a 25-1 record, the best in school history, and reigned as South Suburban Conference Red champs after logging three victories last week. The first of those was a 60-34 nonconference thrashing of Chicago Christian on Monday. Oak Lawn followed that conquest with drubbings of Eisenhower (77-23) and Evergreen Park (68-25). The latter two triumphs completed the Lady Spartans’ run through the SSC, where they went 12-1. Four players scored in double figures for Oak Lawn in its win over the Lady Knights, who fell behind 21-6 in the first quarter and trailed 40-11 at halftime. Leading the Lady Spartans’ balanced attack were Brianna Markusic and Jannah Mahmoud, who tallied 15 and 14 points, respectively. Also producing notable numbers were Brooke Annerino (12 points, five steals), Dee Dee Shatat (10 points) and LaTondra Brooks (seven points, nine assists, seven steals, six rebounds). Kate Pruim’s nine points paced Chicago Christian. *** Eisenhower also saw hope fade early on Tuesday, as Oak Lawn amassed 35 points in the opening period and led by 31 at the break. Mahmoud (game-high 24 points, eight rebounds, six steals) and Brooks (13 points, seven assists, six steals) combined for 26 of the Lady Spartans’ markers in the first eight minutes. Markusic (18 points, six rebounds), Shatat (six points, six rebounds) and Annerino (six points, six rebounds) also lent a hand as Oak Lawn closed out its home schedule in overwhelming fashion. “The girls were really fired up for the game,” Lady Spartans coach Janet Meyers said. “We had one of the best first quarters we have had all year. The girls really got it done defensively [and] Jannah did a great job of scoring in transition. “All of the senior players scored in the first quarter. It was really exciting to watch. They made some awesome shots and passes. “All year we have stressed the importance of having a strong first quarter, and they have really come through in the second half of the season.” *** It was more of the same for Oak Lawn versus Evergreen, which was 20 points arrears at the end of the first stanza. Mahmoud (14 points, six rebounds), Markusic (14 points, five rebounds), Brooks (12 points, eight assists, four steals) and Annerino (10 points, four assists, three steals) were once again standouts on the Lady Spartans’ behalf. “We had another great first quarter,” Meyers said. “Our press created a lot of scoring opportunities for us.” Capping Oak Lawn’s recordsetting regular campaign was Brooks’ selection as the SSC Red Player of the Year. Joining her on the all-conference team were Mahmoud, Markusic and Annerino. Meyers couldn’t say enough about Brooks’ impact on the Lady Spartans. “She may not have the highest point average, but she does have the best overall stats —points, assists, steals and rebounds — in the area,” Meyers said. “She creates scoring opportunities for her teammates and she has led us to a great season.” STAGG The Lady Chargers (12-13, 6-8) completed their regular season with a pair SouthWest Suburban

By Maura Vizza

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist senior Brooke Wyderski keeps her eye on the ball while stationed near her tribute poster during last Wednesday’s Senior night matchup with Benet Academy.

and gradually put some distance between itself and Elgin. Johnte A long drought is finally over. Shannon (23 points) and Ward A year ago, Moraine Valley (18 points, eight rebounds, seven College’s men and winning bas- assists, two blocks) were the headketball were well acquainted with liners, but they didn’t have to one another. The Cyclones, in fact, go it alone. were successful often enough to Others aiding the Cyclones’ reach the National Junior College cause included Ostruskevicius (10 Athletic Association Division II points, seven rebounds), Harris championship game for the first (nine points, 10 rebounds) and time in school history. Wallace (eight point, five reThat was then. This is now bounds). — just one win over 12 contests heading into last week’s action, WOMEN’S BASKETBALL a stretch dating back to Dec. 19. The Cyclones also enjoyed a Included in the skid were seven prosperous week, and in neither losses in a row. of their two ISCC encounters did But that downward trend got they get severely pushed. reversed last Tuesday, when MoMoraine’s initial victory was raine pocketed a 78-72 Illinois logged last Tuesday versus Skyway Collegiate Conference vic- McHenry, which tumbled to a tory over McHenry College. The 77-39 defeat. The Cyclones were Scots had defeated the Cyclones already in command by intermisin a Jan. 21 matchup. sion, but they padded their 35-18 This time, double-digit scoring edge by hitting 5-of-6 3-pointers from five players propelled Mo- in the second half. raine. Kyle Ward led the quintet Just as happened with Mowith 26 points, seven rebounds raine’s men in their clash with and seven assists, all team-high McHenry, the female Cyclones totals. Also contributing were Pau- benefited from balanced scoring lius Ostruskevicius (16 points), as five players tallied in double Des’nique Harris (11 points, six figures. Marist product Aileen rebounds), Stagg alumnus Brett Gorman (13 points, six steals, Kaiser (10 points, seven rebounds) three assists) and Ashley Cunand Denton Wallace (10 points). ningham (12 points, seven reNo sooner had that win been bounds, four assists) showed the banked than the Cyclones struck way for Moraine, with help from again. On Thursday, they avenged Shavonne Lewis, Nariman Jaber an earlier setback to Elgin College and Evergreen Park grad Amber by notching an 82-68 triumph. Hunter, each of whom delivered Moraine trailed by a deuce at 10 points. halftime, but applied stronger deJaber barely missed a triplefensive pressure after the break double as she augmented her

offense with 10 rebounds and seven blocks. Her work in the latter category lifted her into the No. 3 position nationally in blocks per game within NJCAA Division II. *** Elgin didn’t give the Cyclones much trouble on Thursday, either, as it absorbed a 71-52 loss. Playing some of its finest defense of the season, Moraine limited Elgin to 20 first-half points while constructing a 16-point advantage. With a number of players again involving themselves offensively to a measurable degree, the Cyclones had no problem finishing off the win. Stagg alum Maggie Yandel totaled 14 points, seven steals and six rebounds in a solid all-around performance, and Gorman and Shepard grad Amanda Weiss backed her with 10 points apiece. Just missing double digits were Jamilla Jones and Katie McGann, both of whom tossed in nine points. Jaber registered 10 rebounds and six blocks, and she increased her total rejections to 100. Jaber is four blocks away from eclipsing Moraine’s single-season record holder, Lisa Koschinitzki, who had 103 during the 1988-89 campaign. Koschintzki’s ended her career record with 181. Two other players finished with at least 150: Rhiannon Howard, who had 154 between 2005-07, and LaVetta Mitchell, who rejected 151 opponents’ shots between 1987-89. Mitchell is also the Cyclones’ alltime scoring leader.

The Lady Bulldogs held sway Conference Blue victories: 58-44 over Joliet Central last Tuesday over Eisenhower pretty much the ad 49-36 over Joliet West on whole way on Friday, with the lead standing at double digits both at Thursday. Casey McMahon had a game- halftime (29-16) and after three high 21 points to lead Stagg past periods (38-27). However, the Lady the Steelwomen, who surrendered Cardinals refused to roll over and more than 50 points to the Lady staged a furious fourth-quarter Chargers for the second time this rally that fell just short. “It was Senior Night for the year. Stagg had not reached that total against any other foe during Lady Cardinal seniors and they came out playing very hard,” a 14-game stretch. McMahon, who also made three Kortz said. “I am very proud of steals, included five 3-point bas- my team. We [now] have a sixkets among her scoring and now game win streak after sputtering has 200 for her prep career. Her early in the season. “They are a great group of girls. perimeter marksmanship, plus Hannah Henderson’s dribble pen- I’m very proud of how we finished etration helped the Lady Chargers the back half of the season.” Tears (14 points, six rebounds) build a 24-16 halftime lead, which was extended to an insurmount- and Kwartnik (11 points) were able 42-24 after three quarters. Richards’ ringleaders versus EisenHenderson finished with 12 hower, but Robinson (six points), Illinois Hoopla sets March single-game program standard of ball and football, and develop the points and seven assists. Other Taylor Sonichsen (six points, eight 53 points as the springboard to a concepts of teamwork and sportsStagg contributors included Mia rebounds), Stazak (five points, five tryout dates 118-80 win. Vinny Curta, the son manship. The program is open to Illinois Hoopla Basketball will of Eisenhower coach Mike Curta, DiGiacomo (nine points, eight assists), Andy Sonichsen (four youngsters aged 3-6. rebounds), Noor Elmosa (eight points, six rebounds) and Kuchen- conduct tryouts for youngsters in added 20 points. The cost for each class is $50 points, all at the foul line) and ny (seven rebounds) also pitched grades 3-12 on March 2 and 8. Leading Oak Lawn in a los- for Palos Park residents, $61.25 For more details, visit www.il- ing effort was Josh Prince, who in to the winning effort. Kate Adams (six points). for residents of unincorporated linoishoopla.com or call Mike at finished with 21 points. “We were able to get into the Palos Park and $70 for non-resiEVERGREEN PARK (815) 212-3558. paint and had a good free throwdents. For more information, call Before running afoul of Oak shooting night, going 17-for-23 as Lawn on Thursday, the Lady 671-3760. Department to offer sports a team,” Lady Chargers coach Bill Mustangs battled Reavis on much Oak Lawn splits pair of classes Turner said. “Good ball move- more even terms. However, the games South Side Shooters ment and finding an open team- result was not any more favorable Oak Lawn split a pair of boys’ The Palos Park Recreation mate were the keys to getting for Evergreen, which suffered a basketball games last week, with Department will be offering two conducting tryouts South Side Shooters Girls Bassome easy baskets and improving tough 54-50 SSC Red defeat on the loss coming in South Subur- sports-related programs in the ketball will hold tryouts for its our scoring output.” ban Conference Red play. weeks ahead. Tuesday. spring season today, Tuesday and *** The Spartans (8-13, 3-8) opened Little Pint Hoopsters will introThe Lady Rams fought back Following a Stagg tradition, from a 12-point third-period defi- with a 65-51 nonconference tri- duce children to the game of basket- Thursday, Feb. 27, from 6:30-8 p.m. the Lady Chargers opened their cit and then used free throws to umph over Fenton on Tuesday. ball or help players get to the next each day at Stagg High School. Sessions are open to girls in final regular-season home contest prevail in overtime. Megan Pfis- Propelling Oak Lawn past the skill level. Along with the basic skills with a senior-dominated lineup. ter (17 points, seven rebounds) Bison were David Stacy and of dribbling, passing, shooting and grades 3-11. Those trying out And McMahon (22 points, five and Zoe Monks (16 points) were Leo Nelson, who tallied 23 and defense, the program will instruct must bring a ball with them. The rebounds, three assists) ensured standouts for the Lady Mustangs 17 points, respectively. participants in the importance of South Side Shooters’ season will run from March-May. it would be a good start as she (13-14, 4-9) in a losing effort. On Friday, the Spartans were teamwork in game situations. sank a couple long-range buckets For more information, call Gary victimized by Calviontae WashAlso scheduled is Super Sports, Three-point baskets by Pfister to fuel a 13-9 getaway. and Monks keyed a 10-run that ington’s record-setting perfor- which is designed to create inter- Ferguson at (630) 935-1150 or Two more McMahon 3-balls in created Evergreen’s double-digit mance on Eisenhower’s behalf. est in a variety of sports, including visit www.shootersbball.com.Palos the second quarter staked Stagg margin. The Lady Mustangs were The Cardinals used Washington’s basketball, hockey, soccer, base- Park Recreation to a 26-13 halftime edge, and still ahead by seven with five minshe ended the night going 6-of-8 utes left in regulation, but they scious,” Allen said of Reed. “I turnovers, four of which occurred from behind the arc. McMahon were unable to close out Reavis went against my usual instinct at the onset of the fourth quarter has made 75 3-pointers thus far after going scoreless on their last to foul with a three-point lead and after Lockport ratcheted up its this season. 20 possessions. he hit a huge shot. We knew he defensive pressure. Still, Allen (Continued from page 2) “Her increased offensive proCHICAGO CHRISTIAN was a good shooter, but we never thought the Eagles “did OK in duction from unlimited range is “We pretty much had the lead saw him shoot like that.” handling the basketball.” The Lady Knights didn’t dwell really coming at a great time with long on their loss to Oak Lawn, most of the game, but it was never Fellow District 230 schools AnNo Eagle was able to duplicate us beginning IHSA tournament as evidenced by their 52-49 Sub- a game I thought we were in to- Reed’s shooting prowess, but part drew and Stagg were Sandburg’s play,” Turner said. urban Christian Conference Gold tal control,” Allen said. “Lockport of the reason for that was the slated opponents this week. The Henderson (five points, five re- win over Marian Central Catholic gets you to play at their pace and hosts’ constant trips to the stripe. Eagles beat the Chargers at the bounds, four assists, four steals), the next day. always plays you in a tight, close Twenty-eight of Sandburg points United Center in the squads’ first DiGiacomo (seven points, eight reKaycee Pittman tallied 18 game. I was glad to get the game were recorded on free throws, encounter this season. bounds, four blocks) and Elmosa points for Chicago Christian (9-16, into the high 40s and low 50s.” and it attempted just 23 field (six points) also delivered solid per- 4-7) versus the Lady Hurricanes, That didn’t make the contest goals. Eleven of those were on Statistics formances for the Lady Chargers, while Anna Persenaire posted a any less of a nail-biter, however. target. who were still in front by 13 at double-double of 12 points and Keying the Porters’ fourth-periCahue had 23 points -- 10 of 5 8 9 22 7 - 51 the third-period stop. Megan Hearne 10 rebounds. Two days later, the od noisemaking was Neil Reed, them coming on charity tosses -- to Lockport Sandburg 9 9 9 17 11 - 55 and Alex Abed each drilled a 3-point- Lady Knights were even more who canned four 3s and racked lead the Eagles. Martinez backed Sandburg Scoring: Cahue 23, Martinez er to further aid the offense. impressive as they rolled over up 16 of Lockport’s 22 points in him with 17 points and Kogionis “Everyone played significant Timothy Christian by 30, 59-29. the frame. His game-tying long added 11. Straka was Sandburg’s 17, Kogionis 11, Straka 4. Rebounds: Straka 8. Assists: Martinez 3. minutes in the game, and it was Pittman again led the way for ball with seven seconds left was only other scorer and he supplied a nice way for our seniors to go Chicago Christian as she totaled delivered from deep in the cor- the Eagles’ lone basket of OT, as Sandburg 11 13 17 10 6 - 57 out,” Turner said. “Gerda Sliu- 10 points. Emily Lemmenes ner while a Sandburg defender well as a team-best eight rebounds Joliet West 12 15 10 14 8 - 59 zaite is the fourth senior member backed her with nine. hounded him. Sandburg Scoring: Cahue 20, Straka 15, on the night. on the squad. She has been bat“He absolutely was unconSandburg was charged with 15 Kogionis 12, Martinez 10. MARIST tling some nagging injuries as of It was not a good week for the late, and it was great to see her Lady RedHawks, who got tagged get some playing time.” with three defeats. RICHARDS Things looked promising last With two SSC Red victories last Monday after Marist constructed week — 60-50 over Shepard on a 25-7 first-period lead over MorTuesday and 46-45 over Eisen- gan Park, but the Lady Mustangs hower on Friday — the Lady Bull- recovered from the early blow and dogs finished their regular season eventually bagged a 61-53 victory with a 13-11 overall record and despite strong showings from the But you won’t ask him about the side e You’ll ask him about the side dish. 6-7 conference mark. Lady RedHawks’ duo of Brooke Richards trailed the Lady As- Wyderski (18 points, including five tros after each of the first three 3-pointers) and Skylar Patterson But you won’t ask him about the side effects. frames, but it wiped out the deficit (14 points). You’ll ask him about the side dish. by erupting for 21 fourth-quarterYou’ll But you won’t ask him about the side effects. ask him about the side dish. Morgan Park surged ahead points. Carly Stazak (15 points), down the stretch, then put Marist Sydni Tears (13 points, 14 re- away by sinking 7-of-8 foul shots bounds), Taylor Sonichsen (12 in the last 16 seconds. points, six assists, five steals), The Lady RedHawks (11-15) Anita Robinson (nine points), and also dropped verdicts to Benet Brianna Kuchenny (seven points, Academy (65-58) and Trinity seven rebounds) all contributed (69-46). for the Lady Bulldogs. SHEPARD “Our five seniors — Stazak, After losing to Richards, the Taylor Sonichsen, Christina Kwartnik, Anita Robinson and Lady Astros (6-19, 3-9) bounced Alfredia Crawford — started and back to edge Argo 42-40 in another we jumped out to the early lead,” SSC encounter last Tuesday. Myrissha Mitchell was Shepasaid Richards coach Jeff Kortz, rd’s scoring leader versus the whose club scored eight of the game’s first 10 points. “[Then] we Lady Argonauts with 10 points, came out and played good defense while Courtney Dalton owned the boards. The latter finished with in the third quarter. “I was very proud of our sec- 19 rebounds. ond-half comeback — it was a SANDBURG We ask questions everywhere we go, yet at the doctor’s office, we clam up. tribute to our team and our seThe Lady Eagles lost to HomeAsk questions. For listtheofdoctor’s 10 everyone Questions are the a We ask questions everywhere we go, yeta at office,should we clamknow, up. go to AHRQ.gov. niors. I’m very proud of the team wood-Flossmoor (84-23) and Ask questions. For a list of 10 everyone should know, go to AHRQ.gov. Questions are the answer. and their determination to keep Bolingbrook (54-35) in SWSC fighting.” Blue games last week. Dae Jae Williams had 13 points We Youngwirth ask questions had everywhere we go, yet at the doctor’s office, we clam up. Sam 10 points to pace Shepard. to lead Sandburg 6-8) Ask questions. For (15-13, a list of 10 everyone should know, go to AHRQ.gov. Questions are the answer. against the Lady Raiders. ***

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Eagles


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Rice

(Continued from page 1)

Friday night’s clash between the Crusaders and Celtics would earn a berth in the upper bracket of the Catholic League Tournament, Harrigan considered it a de facto playoff contest. It was also Rice’s Senior Night, so there was plenty of reason to approach the game with a high level of intensity. The squad that did so, however, was the one arriving from New Lenox. “Providence came out with a little more enthusiasm and energy, and we were flat after the ceremony,” Harrigan said. “We couldn’t make a shot and couldn’t get a [defensive] stop.” That was most evident in the first period, when the Celtics sprinted out to an 18-8 lead and made the Crusaders have to pursue them the rest of the way. Niego did his part to spark Rice as he finished with 21 points and five rebounds, but the scoring dropped off considerably after that. Rubio’s eight markers represented the Crusaders’ secondhighest total, and the hosts, despite committing only two turnovers, never did settle into any sort of offensive rhythm. Rice shot just 27 percent from the floor, although it did sink 32 percent of its 3-point attempts. However, Providence countered with a blistering 61 percent success rate and also held a decisive 38-17 edge on the glass. Brother Rice 49 Kennedy 38 Harrigan borrowed a page from San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich’s book when he sat his regulars last Tuesday against Kennedy, a move made in anticipation of the Crusaders’ upcoming tourney appearance. Harrigan said that “maybe [the tactic] didn’t work” seeing as how Rice’s starters struggled somewhat on Friday, but the Crusaders’ reserves certainly didn’t squander their chance to assume lead roles. Rice’s standouts versus Kennedy were Mike Shepski, Jack Collins and Kevin Baldali, who combined for 33 points and six assists. Collins (10 rebounds) and Baldali (seven) were stalwarts on the boards as well, and the former capped a superb all-around effort by also making off with a teamhigh four steals. The Crusaders shot out to a 16-1 first-quarter advantage and were never headed. They prospered despite connecting on just 35 percent of their shots and missing nine free throws, doing so primarily because of a 35-24 rebounding edge and 17 Kennedy turnovers. Rice met up with Seton Academy this past Wednesday in the Catholic League Tournament and plays again on Friday. St. Laurence 60 Argo 51 Harrigan claimed that if the Vi-

kings “were in another league besides the Catholic League, they’d have a lot more wins,” and that assessment certainly had credibility in the wake of St. Laurence’s triumph over the Argonauts last Tuesday. Argo became the second South Suburban Conference Red member to be beaten by the Vikings in a week. Defeated before that was Shepard, which is currently the second-place team in the SSC Red. The Argonauts also remain in the hunt for a division championship. “It really is a credit to our league,” Sevedge said. “I’m the most disappointed person that we’re not winning in the Catholic League, but we’re competing in it. “The last month or monthand-a-half, we’re losing games [by] between five and 10 points to really good teams. It kills me we haven’t been able to pull out some of those games, but [playing them] has really prepared us for our nonconference schedule.” Argo got the early jump on St. Laurence, but the hosts’ 10-4 lead evaporated in the second frame after the Vikings went on a 154 tear. Lamb’s 3-pointer, which came on the heels of a Witkowski jumper, put St. Laurence in front for the first time and Romello Radford’s buzzer-beating bucket culminated a strong showing. “We just started executing well and getting some easy looks at the basket,” Sevedge said. “Once we got some easy baskets, it kind of loosened up their defense.” Kelly’s 3-ball at the start of the third quarter increased the Vikings’ lead to 22-14 and signaled the beginning of a 21-12 run that gave the visitors undeniable control of the proceedings. “Watching them on film and doing our scouting reports, I’ve been extremely impressed with them,” Sevedge said of the Argonauts. “And it was their Senior Night. You always think teams have got some energy on that night and are playing for each other, and you expect them to come out with a flurry, but we guarded really well.” For proof, Sevedge cited the work done on Argo star Tyler Mitchell by Witkowski. Mitchell had recently gone on a streak of four straight games with at least 30 points, but he went scoreless through the opening half and had just six points through three quarters. Mitchell provided the remainder of his 15 points after the Argonauts had fallen in arrears by double digits. Forberg (14 points, five assists), Lamb (13 points, nine rebounds) and Witkowski (10 points) all tallied in double figures for St. Laurence, which shot 50 percent from the field, 79 percent at the line and committed only eight turnovers. “Everybody’s becoming more comfortable in our system,” Sevedge said. “Our guards are starting to get comfortable, and when we execute well, we’re get-

Thursday, February 20, 2014 Section 2 ting guys open. We’re gearing toward the playoffs and we’ll try to sneak up on somebody [that underestimates us].” Mt. Carmel 60 St. Laurence 49 The Vikings’ Friday clash at Mt. Carmel was like so many of their other Catholic League games of late - one brief slip-up was enough to trip them up. In this case, it was a third quarter during which the Caravan piled up 25 points. Forward Gabriel Grant gave them an inside presence with 10 points in the period, and guards David Nichols and Christian Searles supplied 11 more points between them. “They were penetrating hard to the basket,” Sevedge said of the latter pair. “Their size and speed got to us in the third quarter. “We were forcing them to settle for 3s [earlier] and I think Coach [Mike] Flaherty really got on his guys about not being more physical and getting inside.” Just one point separated the two teams at halftime, as Gurgone (14 points, three rebounds), Forberg (10 points) and Kelly (eight) served as St. Laurence’s catalysts. The Vikings posted a 43 percent success rate from the floor, five points lower than the Caravan’s number. St. Laurence returned to the Catholic League Tournament this past Wednesday versus St. Ignatius.

Statistics St. Laurence    9   9   12   19 - 49 Brother Rice    8   9   24   13 - 54 St. Laurence Scoring: Gurgone 18, Lamb 12, Forberg 8, Kelly 8, Radford 2, Witkowski 1. Rebounds: Kelly 4. Assists: Gurgone 2. Brother Rice Scoring: Finn 15, Rubio 13, Niego 10, Scanlon 8, Mueller 4, Baldali 2, Shepski 2. Rebounds: Rubio 6. Assists: Scanlon 4. Steals: Finn 5. Blocks: Finn 2, Niego 2. Providence Catholic 18  19  11  19 - 67 Brother Rice    8   15   11   19 - 53 Brother Rice Scoring: Niego 21, Rubio 8, Finn 7, Gallagher 6, Shepski 6, Conlisk 3, Scanlon 2. Rebounds: Niego 5. Assists: Scanlon 2. Steals: Finn 2, Rubio 2. Kennedy    1   8   12   17 - 38 Brother Rice    16   6   12   15 - 49 Brother Rice Scoring: Shepski 12, Collins 11, Baldali 10, Gallagher 5, Conlisk 4, Swiatek 3, Clifford 2, Gorman 2. Rebounds: Collins 10, Baldali 7, Clifford 6. Assists: Baldali 2m Collins 2, Shepski 2. Steals: Collins 4. St. Laurence    4   15   21   20 - 60 Argo    10   4   12   25 - 51 St. Laurence Scoring: Forberg 14, Lamb 13, Witkowski 10, Delaney 6, Gurgone 6, Radford 5, Kelly 3, Aderman 2, Don Curley 1. Rebounds: Lamb 9. Assists: Forberg 5.

5

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Stagg’s Sebastian Kolpak looks for an open man during the Chargers’ SWSC Blue game versus Lockport Friday night.

Chargers (Continued from page 1) A Lockport steal thwarted that plan, though, and brought the hosts within one. Goral’s breakaway layup stretched the lead back out to three before the Porters connected from long range. “I was really hoping for some breathing room [before that],” Daniels said. “Every time we had a chance to pull away, we’d miss a shot or commit a turnover, and the turnover would turn into points [for Lockport] at the other end.” Stagg was guilty of 16 miscues despite not facing much in the way of defensive pressure most of the evening, and the visitors also went just 12-of-22 at the foul line. Six of those turnovers occurred in the opening frame and caused the Chargers to be limited to six points. “We couldn’t get a rhythm going on offense because of the turnovers,” Daniels said. “We made some bad decisions.” Luckily for Stagg, its defense was in solid working order and Lockport managed a mere five points itself. The Porters, who had beaten the Chargers by 10 in an earlier matchup, trailed at both the second- and third-quarter stops as well. No other Stagg player joined Strus in double figures, but a total of seven Chargers did reach the scoring column. Next in line was

sectional.” Strus was also the Chargers’ Bolingbrook 64 lone double-digit scorer in this Stagg 43 contest, as he totaled 23 points There was no gaining revenge to go along with team highs of on the Raiders last Tuesday. In- eight rebounds and four assists. stead, Bolingbrook completed a However, neither he nor anyone season sweep of the Chargers else on Stagg’s roster posted a by building a 10-point halftime decent field-goal percentage, as advantage and then coasting in evidenced by the team mark of 28. The Chargers went 7-of-26 triumphantly. Stagg’s best opportunity to from 3-point range, 14-of-48 make a run at the Raiders came overall. “I’d like to say [Bolingbrook] in the third period, when it closed within three with under two min- altered our shots, but we got open utes remaining. Back-to-back 3s looks,” Daniels said. “We rely on by the same Bolingbrook player, 3-point shots and we couldn’t hit with a Chargers miss sandwiched [enough of] them.” Also harming Stagg was a in between, restored order for the 37-17 discrepancy on the glass. Raiders. Those long-distance plays ran The Raiders included 13 offensive counter to the way Bolingbrook boards among their total and colinflicted most of the damage upon lected 18 points off those. The Chargers were slated to Stagg. With a front line measuring 6-foot-8, 6-7 and 6-6, the Raiders meet Oak Lawn this past Wednesestablished dominance around the day in an already-twice-postponed paint, something that was also nonconference game. They tangle made possible by looser officiat- with District 230 sister school Sandburg in another SWSC Blue ing. Daniels had no problem with affair on Friday. the referees -- two of whom were from the college ranks -- keeping Statistics their whistles relatively silent, but he admitted that wound up being Bolingbrook 19 14 11 20 - 64 more beneficial to Bolingbrook. Stagg 12 11 12 8 - 43 “They’re very long and they Stagg Scoring: Strus 23, Sims 8, Goral have such a physical advantage 6, White 6. Rebounds: Strus 8. Assists: on you,” Daniels said. “We played Strus 4. all right, but they just pounded us inside. It is what it is. Stagg 6 14 15 14 - 49 “They’re a dangerous team and Lockport 5 12 14 16 - 47 the best team I’ve seen this year. Stagg Scoring: Strus 24, Goral 8, Sims 6, If they get a crew that lets them White 6, Contant 2, Kolpak 2, Gardner 1. play, I think they can win their Rebounds: Strus 10. Assists: Strus 4. Goral with eight points.

St. Laurence    10   13   11   15 - 49 Mt. Carmel    13   11   25   11 - 60 St. Laurence Scoring: Gurgone 14, Forberg 10, Kelly 8, Delaney 4, Risley 4, Witkowski 3, Aderman 2, Gould 2, Lamb 2. Rebounds: Gurgone 3. Assists: Radford 2.

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Photo by Jeff Vorva

Anthony Gardner was an inside force for Stagg Friday night in its matchup with Lockport.

RedHawks

“They run a full-court press, man on the ball, but I thought we handled their pressure real (Continued from page 1) well at the start,” Nolan said six points for Marist during the of Tinley. “[But] there’s nobody opening eight minutes, while Hill in our league that plays this and Chamar Hawkins each con- fast and their pressure wore us down. We will learn from nected once from 3-point land. The RedHawks were still up this game.” And despite the outcome, Noat intermission, but Tinley had dissolved most of a seven-point lan wasn’t sorry Marist played deficit in the last 1:20 of the sec- in it. “When you go into the state ond quarter. “You never want to end the half tournament, you can see anythe way we ended that one,” Nolan thing,” he said. “It’s a great thing said. “They had momentum after playing so many different styles in the regular season.” having scored at the horn.” Lerma (17 points, five rebounds, Not much separated the Titans and Marist from that point for- three steals), Ferguson (16 points, ward, but the RedHawks even- five assists, three steals) and Ritually had problems maintaining vard (12 points, five rebounds) control of the ball. They were were the RedHawks’ headliners. After tangling with Hubbard this charged with 23 turnovers.

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past Tuesday, Marist hosts Notre Dame in another ESCC contest on Friday.

Statistics Marist 24 10 22 20 - 76 Tinley Park 16 17 25 20 - 78 Marist Scoring: Lerma 17, Ferguson 16, Rivard 12, Holland 8, Hill 7, Barry 4, Tucker 4, Burrell 3. Rebounds: Lerma 5, Rivard 5. Assists: Ferguson 5, Barry 4. Steals: Ferguson 3, Lerma 3. JCA 5 11 11 12 - 39 Marist 19 18 14 9 - 60 Marist Scoring: Holland 15, Lerma 12, Burrell 8, Rivard 6, Hill 5, Tucker 5, Weishar 5, Ferguson 4. Rebounds: Lerma 6, Weishar 6, Burrell 5, Rivard 5. Assists: Ferguson 8, Barry 6. Steals: Ferguson 3, Lerma 3.


6 Section 2 Thursday, February 20, 2014   The Regional News - The Reporter SXU sports summary

Cougars women shift into high gear

St. Xavier University is saving its best for last. At least that’s the way coach Bob Hallberg’s women made it look last week. As the regular season nears its end, the Cougars are beginning to assert themselves in impressive fashion. A loss to Purdue University Calumet the week before that broke a 16-game unbeaten streak was long forgotten after SXU pummeled both Robert Morris and Trinity International universities in two more Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference encounters. First, the NAIA Division II No. 6-ranked Cougars blasted the Eagles 90-62 on Wednesday and then they ran roughshod over the Trojans, 9450, in a Saturday tilt. The dual wins allowed SXU (24-4, 15-2) to maintain its grip on the top spot in the CCAC standings. “We’re on a roll, both defensively and offensively, right now,” Hallberg said. “Winning our last two games by 28 and 44 points [means] we’re clicking on all cylinders on both sides of the ball heading into the final week of the regular season. “With a 24-4 record and at least a No. 6 national ranking, I think we’re playing our best basketball at the right time. We’re getting a lot of solid contributions off the bench, [and] Morgan [Stuut] and Suzie [Broski] continue to be solid. “It would be great if we could finish the regular season playing this kind of basketball.” Stuut led the way for the Cougars versus Robert Morris with a double-double of 29 points and 18 rebounds. The latter total gave the junior forward 1,015 boards in her collegiate career and made her SXU’s first female player to ever eclipse the 1,000 plateau. Broski contributed 20 points and six rebounds for the Cougars, who shot a sizzling 59 percent from the floor in the first half and established a 22-point cushion by the break. Also lending a hand were Jordan Brandt (15 points, three steals) and Caitlin McMahon (nine points, 15 rebounds, six assists). As a team, SXU out-rebounded the Eagles 60-42 for the game. The visitors connected on only 30 percent of their field-goal attempts and were also victimized by 13 Cougars steals. Robert Morris’ only lead was at 2-0, and it trailed 21-9 at the 11-minute mark of the first half and then by the aforementioned 22-point margin at halftime after Stuut converted a three-point play. It was more of the same for the Eagles when play resumed, as SXU extended its advantage to 35 points (73-38) on Broski’s jumper with 12:30 remaining. What especially pleased Hall-

berg about his team’s conquest was that it vanquished a foe that was riding high. Robert Morris had just scored a road win over Cardinal Stritch University, which is responsible for one of the Cougars’ setbacks to date. “Robert Morris was feeling good about itself,” Hallberg said. “We always have had a tough time against Cardinal Stritch and Robert Morris had a 20-point lead against them, which is something we’ve never been able to accomplish. “We [figured] we were in for a tough game against Robert Morris, and yet we’re up 50-28 at halftime. Our guards, Mallory Johnson and Jordan Brandt, are both playing well, and [they] played especially well against Robert Morris — Jordan had 15 points and Mallory was solid at running the offense.” *** The Cougars racked up 17 steals in their triumph over Trinity International and scored 39 of their points off Trojans turnovers. Stuut led the SXU charge by registering game-best totals of 22 points, 11 rebounds and five steals. Broski added 12 points for the Cougars, McMahon had nine points and five rebounds, and redshirt freshman Sidney Prasse finished with nine points and four assists. All 12 SXU players who took the court landed in the scoring column. Complementing that potency was a Cougars defense that, in addition to the swipes, held Trinity International to a 32 percent accuracy rate from the field. SXU was ahead by just a 72 margin six minutes into the contest, but it soon dashed the Trojans’ hopes for an upset. The Cougars were up 44-22 at intermission and then began the second half with a 15-2 surge to silence Trinity for good. “Saturday was a fun type of game, where every player got into the box score,” Hallberg said. “We had several eight- and nine-point contributions. It was great to see a player like Megan McMahon, who had been injured early in the season, come off the bench and get eight points in just six minutes. “We feel really good about the team right now. The distribution of points and the sharing of the ball are solid.” SXU played its final home contest this past Wednesday against Roosevelt University and visits Trinity Christian College on Saturday. Hallberg expected stern competition in both games. “We only beat Roosevelt by a couple of points the last time we played them,” he said. “And Trinity Christian was ahead of us with just 13 minutes left to play in our

last meeting. To keep our hold on first place, we have to beat two teams that have given us a tough time this season.” On Sunday, the CCAC coaches will meet at SXU to set up brackets for the conference tournament, which commences on Tuesday and ends on Saturday. The tournament champion will receive an automatic bid to the NAIA Division II national tournament in Sioux City, Iowa. “We could possibly wind up playing Cardinal Stritch or Purdue Calumet,” Hallberg said. “And if we face a team that we beat twice, it’s especially tough to beat that team a third time around.” — Anthony Nasella MEN’S BASKETBALL Robert Morris swapped frustration for elation when it met up with the Cougars last Wednesday at the Shannon Center. When the teams clashed in an earlier CCAC contest, SXU not only defeated the Eagles, but did so in a fairly lopsided manner that created some discomfort among the latter’s athletes. Cougars coach Tom O’Malley noted at the time that Robert Morris players found themselves in somewhat unfamiliar territory, and their negative reactions reflected such. The Eagles were also standing on shaky ground before the rematch, but for a different reason. “They needed all the wins they could get,” O’Malley said. “If they did not beat us, they would probably have taken themselves out of [NAIA Division II] tournament consideration unless they won the conference tournament. They had 18 wins, and you probably need about 22 [to qualify].” Given the circumstances, Robert Morris’ ability to issue payback to SXU wasn’t too surprising. What may have bothered O’Malley even more than his squad’s 82-76 loss, however, was its forgettable shooting display. While the Eagles made good on 52 percent of their field-goal tries, the Cougars (24-4, 14-3) floundered. Although it launched 12 more shots than its foe, SXU hit three fewer baskets, which translated into a 38 percent success rate. The locals went 6-of-28 from 3-point range. And compounding that situation was a continuation of it on Saturday. The Cougars managed to overcome another bout of inaccuracy well enough to down Trinity International University 80-72, but as O’Malley pointed out, the Trojans had succumbed to SXU by more than 20 points previously. “We played down to a [lower] level on Saturday and we didn’t play particularly well on Wednes-

‘Don’t leave this locker room if you don’t think you can win. “I’ve used the word ‘resiliency’ (Continued from page 1) a lot, but sometimes [our kids] “They had a lot of plays like impress me with how they bounce that,” Chappetto said. back.” Nevertheless, the Bulldogs The Astros lost the battle of (14-10, 7-3) not only refused to the boards by a 46-31 margin, but crumble, they inched in front dur- offset that shortage by connecting ing the fourth quarter. Chicago on a higher percentage of fieldState University-bound center goal tries. Shepard’s 41 percent Josh Meier was Richards’ ring- accuracy was eight points better leader as he tallied 12 of his 23 than the Bulldogs’ display, and the points over the last eight minutes, Astros were also superior at the four of them coming on consecu- charity stripe (73 percent to 60) tive alley-oop dunks. and in the turnovers category (13 “We finally figured out how to miscues to Richards’ 17). score,” Chappetto said. “We went Chappetto wasn’t shocked at to Meier more often, and whatever Shepard’s ability to execute a he missed he cleaned up.” turnaround against his club. Fortunately for Shepard (9-13, “The first game was so long ago 6-4), Littleton countered Meier’s and we had a different kind of heroics with 12 fourth-period makeup,” he said. “Our attitude points of his own, eight of which is nowhere near what it was. We were delivered at the foul line in didn’t play with as much energy the final 75 seconds. [as the Astros] and it’s been like “He’s got ice water in his veins,” a regression for us. Chiuccariello said of Littleton, “Are we 14-10 or are we 7-10 who registered 19 points and five after a 7-0 start? I think we’re assists on the Astros’ behalf. more of a 7-10 team right now, And unlike in some other out- but nobody’s going to feel sorry for ings, Littleton wasn’t a one-man you, and they shouldn’t. They’re gang. Senior Kyle Longfield, who licking their chops [about playing missed a significant chunk of time us], and some teams have taken this winter because of a leg in- advantage. jury, stepped forward to supply “It doesn’t matter how angry we Shepard with 20 points and nine get if we don’t play better.” rebounds in “the best game I’ve Spencer Tears and Dedrick seen him play,” according to Chi- Shannon added 16 and 10 points, uccariello. respectively, for Richards, which Longfield contributed a basket attempted to secure a piece of the to the Astros’ late surge, but also SSC Red title this past Tuesday pivotal were the three charges against Reavis. On tap for the he drew during the evening, one Bulldogs on Friday is a cross-town of which came at crunch time. visit to Oak Lawn High School. Two Longfield free throws, plus hoops by Nick Heidinger and Zack Peotone 46 Haxel were part of a 6-0 spurt Shepard 44 that firmed up the hosts’ grip on The Astros’ first-ever encounter their lead. with the Blue Devils ended in a Prior to that, Chiuccariello tough defeat for the locals, who was having flashbacks to last were victimized by a buzzer-beatyear, when Shepard was unable ing bucket last Tuesday. to hold onto a 13-point advantage Right before that, Shepard apin the fourth frame and Richards peared to have gone ahead, but staged a winning rally. Littleton’s layup was erased by “I had a little bit of that [same] an offensive foul whistled against feeling,” Chiuccariello said. “We him. The play had begun after have a great deal of respect for Littleton rebounded a Peotone their program, but we didn’t hype miss, and with a 3-on-3 develthis game at all. We just prepared oping Chiuccariello opted to not for Richards like a normal game, call the timeout he had been conand we said before the game, templating.

“I was second-guessing myself for 24 hours,” he said. “I liked that situation, so I didn’t do anything. “Did I do the right thing? There are two schools of thought, but if I had to do it over, I’d do the same thing. You let [Littleton] push it and hope the result is better.” Cohen (15 points, three assists) and Littleton (11 points, six rebounds, three assists) were the Astros’ main men. Shepard shot just 36 percent from the floor, and a drought that lasted for seven minutes of the third quarter put it in an especially difficult predicament. “We didn’t hit shots obviously, but there were some unforced errors,” Chiuccariello said. “Our execution wasn’t very good.” Amazingly, the Astros were facing only a three-point deficit entering the fourth period, and when Littleton popped in a 3-pointer off a Heidinger screen at the 48second mark, the visitors found themselves in a 44-all tie. “They’re a smaller school, but they’re fundamentally sound and they’ve got good shooters,” Chiuccariello said of the Blue Devils. “They’re in the same summer league as us and we played them twice then, so I’m glad they were on the schedule. They had a good crowd, we were welcomed, and it was a good experience for us.” SSC Red road games at Eisenhower and Reavis were on the docket for Shepard this week.

Astros

Statistics Shepard 13 12 4 15 - 44 Peotone 9 10 13 14 - 46 Shepard Scoring: Cohen 15, Littleton 11, Gorski 7, Heidinger 7, Lawson 2, Witherspoon 2. Rebounds: Littleton 6. Assists: Cohen 3, Littleton 3. Richards 19 11 16 21 - 67 Shepard 19 14 15 23 - 71 Richards Scoring: Meier 23, Tears 16, Shannon 11, Alexander 7, Cottrell 4, Anagnostopolous 2, Catledge 2, Listenbee 2. Rebounds: Meier 13. Shepard Scoring: Longfield 20, Littleton 19, Cohen 8, Heidinger 7, Lawson 7, Haxel 5, Witherspoon 3, Gorski 2. Rebounds: Longfield 9. Assists: Littleton 5.

day,” O’Malley said. “Sometimes the [poor] shooting is a result of the other team playing pretty good defense, but I don’t think Robert Morris played particularly good defense against us, and I don’t think Trinity International did, either. “I don’t remember us taking a really bad shot. When guys are taking shots they normally make, that’s what gets to me. “I took a few shots myself when I played, so I know what it’s like [to labor at times], but it’s really disheartening. Shooting has not been a problem for us — we’re over 50 percent for the year and about 38 percent on 3-pointers — but we’ve got to figure out why we’re all of a sudden not shooting the ball well.” The Cougars connected on 43 percent of their attempts versus the Trojans, which caused them to be locked in 10 ties with the hosts and trade the lead five times. Neither club ever led by more than single digits. SXU was up 59-50 seven minutes into the second half, but TIU roared back with a 14-0 run fueled by eight points from Thomas Amrine, who included two 3-point baskets among his production. The Cougars unintentionally aided the Trojans’ rally with three turnovers and six missed shots. The score was tied at 71-all with 4:17 remaining when 3s by Josh Mawhorr and Kyle Huppe finally put SXU in front for keeps. Huppe ended the day with four 3-pointers, part of a 17-point output. Brad Karp paced the Cougars with 32 points and nine rebounds. Also pitching in for SXU were Tony Core (13 points, eight rebounds) and Michael Simpson (10 points, five assists, four steals). One of the Cougars’ regulars, Jack Krieger, sat out with a knee strain, but O’Malley didn’t cite that as the main reason SXU struggled to put away TIU. “On Saturday, a lot of it had to do with missed opportunities,” he said. “We shot 43, 26 and 57 [percent] from two- [and] 3-[point territory] and the free-throw line, and we missed 18 free throws.” Were the No. 5-ranked Cougars simply feeling the effects of being a season-long target for pretty much everybody on their schedule? “You hope to say not,” O’Malley said, when asked about the fatigue factor. “Trinity had a pretty good crowd and was coming off a win after losing about 12 in a row, so they were up. And we were looking at a team we beat by 25 [before], so it was just a bit of a natural letdown.” *** Robert Morris went with a smaller lineup than it had used previously against SXU and benefited from increased quickness, but the Eagles also harmed the Cougars in the paint. “Their big guys accounted for about 43 points; ours had about 18,” O’Malley said. “They outplayed us on the interior.” Robert Morris expunged an early 17-12 deficit with a 13-0 run that featured three layups from Cortney Bell, plus a layup, jumper and free throw by Maurice Williams. The Eagles held a ninepoint edge at intermission. Robert Morris kept SXU at

arm’s length throughout the second half, although the Cougars did make things interesting near the end. Down by 11 with 2:08 remaining, SXU scored six quick points on Simpson’s three-point play and 3-point basket before ultimately falling short. Simpson totaled 21 points and seven assists while being an able partner for Karp, who wound up with 30 points and eight rebounds. The Cougars conclude their regular-season slate this week opposite Roosevelt University and Trinity Christian College. The Trolls recently suffered a one-point overtime setback to top-ranked Cardinal Stritch. — Ken Karrson AWARDS SXU’s best basketball players are also very good students. Brad Karp, the men’s team’s career scoring leader, and the women’s team’s junior duo of Morgan Stuut and Suzie Broski were all chosen as Capital One Academic All-Americans when announcements were made last week. The College Sports Information Directors of America was responsible for the selections. Karp, a biology major who carries a 3.56 cumulative grade-point average, was tabbed for the College Division men’s team for the third season in a row and was named Team Member of the Year for the second time. The College Division consists of NAIA, Canadian and two-year institutions. Karp became SXU’s career scoring leader earlier this season and currently owns team-best averages of 26.7 and 8.2 rebounds per game. He ranks fourth in NAIA Division II in scoring average, sixth in per-game steals (2.6) and eighth in field-goal percentage (61.4). Karp has been chosen as the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Player of the Week six times during the 201314 campaign. “As excellent as Brad is as a basketball player, he is equally as impressive as a student and person,” Cougars coach Tom O’Malley said. “He excels at everything he works toward and is a great example for his teammates and for young athletes everywhere. “This award is extra special because it combines and showcases his efforts both on the court and in the classroom. For Brad to earn this [first-team] achievement each of the last two seasons is a testament to his hard work and dedication.” Stuut and Broski are both making their second appearances on the College Division women’s team. Broski, a second-team selection as a sophomore, is a biology (pre-health) major who boasts a perfect 4.0 GPA. Stuut was named to the third team a year ago. On the court, Stuut is the Cougars’ per-game scoring (20.9 ppg.), rebounding (13.1) and assists (4.6) leader and has posted 20 double-doubles this season. She also recorded the women’s team’s first two triple-doubles. Broski is shooting a team-best 54 percent from the field while averaging 14.8 points and 4.0 rebounds per contest. Stuut and Broski made SXU the only school in any collegiate division to have two players chosen

for the first team. “Suzie and Morgan are everything a coach dreams about having in a student-athlete,” Cougars coach Bob Hallberg said. “Their dedication, hard work and enthusiasm are channeled into the countless hours of preparation it takes to be successful, both on the basketball court and in the classroom. “To have two players from the same school earn first-team honors for a national award of this caliber is quite an accomplishment. We are so proud of both of them because they reflect the type of student-athlete that every school strives to have.” MEN’S VOLLEYBALL Sophomore middle blocker Sam Kull recorded seven kills and four total blocks — including three solos — but the Cougars still fell short against Carthage College Saturday afternoon in nonconference action in Kenosha, Wis. SXU (1-10) dropped the match in straight sets, 25-14, 25-21 and 25-13. The Cougars struggled offensively, totaling just 20 team kills while making that same number of attacking errors. Freshman outside hitter Sean Barry had six kills for SXU, while freshman setter Moises Lopez (Oak Lawn) distributed 19 assists. Senior outside hitter Justin Cousin scooped up a team-best eight digs in the match. The Cougars host Robert Morris University in a Great Lakes Division match on Friday at 7 p.m. at the Shannon Center. *** Senior middle blocker J.T. O’Connell (Brother Rice) and Kull combined for 19 kills, five service aces and eight total blocks last Tuesday, but that wasn’t enough to save the Cougars against No. 10-ranked Cardinal Stritch University. The Wolves survived a five-set battle and recorded a 22-25, 25-19, 25-16, 22-25, 15-6 victory at the Shannon Center. SXU looked to have the momentum after surging late in the fourth game to force the decisive fifth set, but Stritch jumped out to a quick 8-2 lead in the final game and never looked back. O’Connell amassed 10 kills and four block assists in the match, while Kull added nine kills, five aces and four total blocks. Barry (11 kills) and Cousin (10) were also strong along the net, while Lopez had team-best totals of 35 assists and 11 digs. Senior middle hitter Noah Mader had a match-high 15 kills on for the Wolves. FOOTBALL Cougars coach Mike Feminis continued to strengthen his 2014 roster with the recent signing of two more prep players from Chicago-area schools. Joining SXU’s program in the fall will be Lemont High School punter Joe Bailey and St. Rita wide receiver Jack Ladd. “Joe should be our punter for the next four years,” Feminis said. “He’s got a really nice leg and certainly fills the need we have at the punter position. “Jack got overshadowed a little bit because his team had some great skill players, [but] he’s a tall, smooth athlete and the third Ladd to come play for us. We’re happy to have Joe and Jack in the program.”

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“ Colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer.

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1 - 8 0 0 - C D C - I N F O ( 1 - 8 0 0 - 2 3 2 - 4 6 3 6 ) • w w w. c d c . g o v / s c re e n f o r l i f e

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MARCELO ROSILLO, MARIA MEDRANO D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 39897 10736 S. Christa Ct. Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 19, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 20, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10736 S. Christa Ct., Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-408-004-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $375,397.64. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 11 CH 39897 TJSC#: 34-739 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I586204

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����������������� For Notice Sale For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, -v.MARIA GOMEZ, MATTHEW C. ARNOUX OF NADLER PRITIKIN & MIRABELLI, CITY OF CHICAGO, STATE OF ILLINOIS, ADVANCE CAPITAL, INCORPORATED, PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES, L.L.C., SPRINGLEAF FINANCIAL SERVICES OF ILLINOIS, INC., LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER Defendants 13 CH 016979 7825 W. 102ND STREET PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 14, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7825 W. 102ND STREET, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 2312-308-007. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-09436. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-09436 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 016979 TJSC#: 33-27552 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I588356

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Cook County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � James E. Pancratz aka James Pancratz; Erika Pancratz; Black Walnut Trails Homeowners Corporation aka Black Walnut Trails Homeowners Association; Unknown Owners and Non-Record C l a i m a n t s � D e f e n d a n t s , � 1 2 C H 4 2 6 7 5 � Sheriff's # 131010 F12090405 CHOH Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on March 20, 2014, at 1pm in room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: Common Address: 10 Black Walnut Trail, Palos Park, Illinois 60464 P.I.N: 23-34-100-048-0000 Improvements: This property consists of a Single Family Home. Sale shall be under the following terms: payment of not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the successful and highest bid to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds at the sale; and the full remaining balance to be paid to the Sheriff by cashier's check or certified funds within twenty-four (24) hours after the sale. Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special a s s e s s m e n t s . � Premise will NOT be open for inspection. Firm Information: Plaintiff's Attorney FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC Anthony Porto 1807 W. DIEHL., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60566-7228 forecl o s u r e n o t i c e @ f a l - i l l i n o i s . c o m � 866-402-8661 fax 630-428-4620 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I583451

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ANDRIUS BALTAKYS, SCENIC TREE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 004481 8425 W. 101ST TERRACE UNIT #107 PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 17, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 14, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8425 W. 101ST TERRACE UNIT #107, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-11-302-003-1240, Property Index No. (23-11-302-002 underlying). The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-02692. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-02692 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 004481 TJSC#: 34-2153 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I590681

Publisher’s Notice    All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE A S S O C I A T I O N , � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � DENISE M. CYBOR D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 11550 7982 W. 100TH STREET Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 10, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 12, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7982 W. 100TH STREET, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-12-303-040-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $251,821.61. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 541-9710. Please refer to file number 13-7179. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 541-9710 Attorney File No. 13-7179 Attorney Code. 40342 Case Number: 13 CH 11550 TJSC#: 33-27218 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I586610

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION SOVEREIGN BANK P l a i n t i f f , � v . � SHERELE L. TENCLAY, MILL CREEK CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 01234 9755 WEST CREEK ROAD UNTI E2 PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 8, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 6, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9755 WEST CREEK ROAD UNTI E2, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-33-209-031-1006. The real estate is improved with a mid-rise condominium building; no garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1038627. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1038627 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 11 CH 01234 TJSC#: 34-1784 I589034

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2 x 1-1/2 Cell: 708-212-1342 For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR DEUTSCHE MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 04-5 Plaintiff, -v.THOMAS E. REYNDERS, CHERYL ROSE REYNDERS A/K/A CHERYL REYNDERS, FIRST MIDWEST BANK, THSC LLC, OAK HILLS COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, OAK HILLS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 13 CH 011256 7931 W. LAKEVIEW COURT, UNIT #2B PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 17, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 19, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7931 W. LAKEVIEW COURT, UNIT #2B, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-303-143-1048. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-34170. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-34170 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 011256 TJSC#: 33-27821 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I588812

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The Regional News - The Reporter

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For Sale

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For Sale For Notice Sale

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For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, P l a i n t i f f , � v . � HECTOR TAMAYO, ARACELI SANCHEZ D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 13211 10119 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE Palos Heights, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 10, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 12, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10119 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE, Palos Heights, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-11-405-030-0000 VOL. 0151. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $215,515.71. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 541-9710. Please refer to file number 13-7526. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 541-9710 Attorney File No. 13-7526 Attorney Code. 40342 Case Number: 13 CH 13211 TJSC#: 33-27371 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I586660

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � GINA IACOPONI, FIFTH THIRD BANK, THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT A S S O C I A T I O N � D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 20312 20 Cour LeRoux Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 9, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 27, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 20 Cour LeRoux, Palos Hills, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � Property Index No. 23-23-101-036-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $98,392.61. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 20312 TJSC#: 34-983 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I586865

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CALIBER HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, -v.JOHN B. MANIKAS, ATHENA M. MANIKAS, LAS FUENTES VILLAS TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION Defendants 13 CH 002441 9083 DEL PRADO DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 3, 2013, Auction.com, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on March 5, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, 350 West Mart Center Drive (in the Auction. com room), CHICAGO, IL, 60654, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9083 DEL PRADO DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-200-053. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-01501. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. AUCTION.COM LLC For Additional Information regarding Auction.com, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800-280-2832) CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-01501 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 002441 TJSC#: 33-27030 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I587252

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS T R U S T E E , � SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF A M E R I C A , � NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE AS S U C C E S S O R � BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BEAR STEARNS A S S E T � BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, ASSET BACKEDCERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-EC1 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � THERESA POSPISIL; DAVID POSPISIL D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 18345 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on November 4, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 8812 West 103rd Place, Palos Hills, Il 60465 P.I.N. 23-15-202-008-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 651-6705. 1 3 0 2 2 4 5 1 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I587707

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ELIZABETH WILSON; RIVIERA REGAL A S S O C I A T I O N � AKA RIVIERA REGAL I CONDOMINIUM A S S O C I A T I O N ; � RIVIERA REGAL - PHASE II ASSOCIATION AKA RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. FKA WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC R E G I S T R A T I O N � SYSTEMS, INC.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND N O N - R E C O R D � C L A I M A N T S ; � D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 13787 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on December 18, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-23-101-116-1044 Commonly known as 11114 South 84th Avenue, Unit 1B, Palos Hills, Il 60465 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F13050187 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I587688

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � MONICA LINARES A/K/A MONICA OROSCO, MARYANN MORENO A/K/A MARY ANN MORENO A/K/A MARY ANN PEREZ, RAFAEL LINARES, 7951-7959 W. 112TH PLACE TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., S/I/I TO CAPITAL ONE BANK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 10011 7955 WEST 112TH PLACE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 29, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 20, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7955 WEST 112TH PLACE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-24-100-161-0000. The real estate is improved with a 4 or more units townhouse with an attached 2 car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1204744. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1204744 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 10011 TJSC#: 34-384 I589563

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Firstsecure Bank and Trust Co. f/k/a Family Bank and Trust Company, P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Firstsecure Bank and Trust Co. f/k/a Family Bank and Trust Company, as Trustee for Trust No. 1-269, Auburn Iron Works, Inc., Anthony J. Pietro, Roberta R. Pietro, Non-Record Claimants, and Unknown Owners, D e f e n d a n t s . � Case No. 10CH 17253; Sheriff's No. 140003-001F. Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on March 12, 2014, at 1:00 p.m. in Room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, Chicago, IL, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment: PIN: 24-31-112-010-0000. Address: 12924 S. Forestview, Palos Heights, IL 60463. Improvements: Single family home (residential). Sale shall be under the following terms: Sold at public auction requiring payment not less than 10% at the time of sale and the balance within 24 hours plus interest at the statutory rate on any unpaid portion of the sale price from the date of sale to the date of payment. All payments shall be in certified funds payable to the Sale Officer.Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments, and any prior first mortgages. Premises will NOT be open for inspection. For information: Kent Maynard; Kent Maynard & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 120 S. LaSalle Street, Suite 1440, Chicago, IL 60603, Tel. No. (312) 265-6935.This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I587048

For Sale F 1 3 0 7 0 3 2 6 � IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � DONALD A. GALLAGHER; SANDRA A. G A L L A G H E R ; � UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S � D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 18333 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on November 7, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, March 10, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � P.I.N. 23-02-303-069-0000. Commonly known as 9419 South 85th Court, Hickory Hills, IL 60457. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a multi-family residence. The successful purchaser is entitled to possession of the property only. The purchaser may only obtain possession of units within the multi-unit property occupied by individuals named in the order of possession. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Mr. Anthony Porto at Plaintiff's Attorney, Freedman Anselmo, Lindberg LLC, 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (866) 402-8661. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F13070326 INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I587584

For Sale 9 5 0 6 0 2 0 2 � IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BANK ONE, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK AND T R U S T � CO. OF CHICAGO; Plaintiff, v s . � ACE-CHICAGO GREAT DANE CORP., AN ILLINOIS CORPORATION; FIFTH THIRD BANK, S U C C E S S O R � TRUSTEE TO OLD KENT BANK AS TRUSTEE U N D E R � TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1985 AND K N O W N � AS TRUST NO. 8459; WHALER LTD; GERALDINE R. GORAL AS REPRESENTATIVE FOR DENNIS G O R A L ; � GERALDINE R GORAL; AND UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 02 CH 10672 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on March 18, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, March 10, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 12411 South Nashville, Palos Heights, IL 60463. P.I.N. 24-30-421-014-0000. The mortgaged real estate is a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: Bidders must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Ms. Jennifer E. Frick at Plaintiff's Attorney, Crowley & Lamb, P.C., 221 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 670-6900. 9 5 0 6 0 2 0 2 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I587507

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � JO ELLEN T AYWARD AKA JO ELLEN AYLWARD; T H E � RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 00854 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on September 6, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, March 10, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-23-111-057-0000 Commonly known as 25 COUR DEAUVILLE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a townhouse residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1225203. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I587567

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4 P l a i n t i f f , � v . � FRANK OSKOREP A/K/A FRANK T. OSKOREP, LORRAINE M. OSKOREP D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 021702 9132 STRATFORD LANE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 26, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 27, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9132 STRATFORD LANE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-411-014. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-08134. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-08134 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 021702 TJSC#: 34-1064 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I587270

Do you have

For Notice Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.MARGARET ZYDEK, CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 9/21/2000 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1109002, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 9/21/2000 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1109002, DENNIS DEGREGORIO, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 13 CH 010485 8123 BOB-O-LINK ROAD ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 13, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 5, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8123 BOB-O-LINK ROAD, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-212-038. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-08883. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 1413-08883 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 010485 TJSC#: 34-1476 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I588373

A HOUSE for sale? Call to place your ad today!

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Do you have a vacation home for rent? Call today to place your ad!

BOOKLETS PRINTED IN ONE DAY FROM YOUR COPY

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Call (708) 448-4000 HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sat. 9 A.M. to Noon


10

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For Sale

Various antiques. Pine pie safe, roller desk, storage cabinet and others. Call Brad at (708) 903-6889

Help Wanted

Drivers - Local Drivers with Chicagoland delivery experience wanted. Company paid health insurance!   Must have hazmat & tanker, 1 yr              or 50k miles exp. in last 5 years in               like-kind equipment. www.hollandregional.com/careers

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sified ads its prints. However, when an ad is submitted from(815) outside 468-7819 this area, it is often Call impossible for us to check its credibility.

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For moregood information regarding financsonably running condition. ing, business opportunities and/or work-atMust have 2 rear doors (not 3).we home opportunities in this newspaper,

  /!+1 &)( +)3!+ urge our readers to contact the Better Busi0$)!*-,')(!1!")+!-$!1 ness Bureau, N. Wabash Call 330 Tim or PatAve. B.#2006, *+)/% !1).0%-$&)('.,Chicago,at IL (708) 60611, (312) 832-0500. 448-4000 !+!#%,-!+! 0%-$-$!&&%()%, !.+%-%!, !*+-'!(- +) -!-1).+,!&"( #!--$!"-, !")+! 1). $(  )/!+ 1).+ ������ $+ !+(! ')(!11)(-- %(# -$! &&%()%, !+!-+1 )" ������� �� ������ ����� ������ --!2,!.+%-%!,!*+-'!(����������������������������� -     $%, () ���������������������������� -%! *+)/% !  ,  *.&% ,!+ ������������������������������� /%!1$!!#%)(&!0,( ����������� ������������ ���� $! !*)+-!+ !0,**!+, ������������������������������� ������� ���� ����� ����� ���� �����������������������������  ���� ���� ��������� ���������� �� ����������������������������� ��� �� ������  ���������� ������  .+,.(- -) ��� -$! ����� ��������� ��� �� �������&!, ���� .,%(!,, **)+-.(%-1 ����������������������������� 0)"  !/!+1.,%(!,,)* ���� ��������� ������������ *)+-.(%-1 '.,- ! +!#%,-!+! 0%-$-$!&&%()%,!.+%-%!,! *+-'!(-+)-!-1).+,!&"( ������ #!--$!"-,!")+!1).$( )/!+1).+$+ !+(! ')(!1 1)(--%(#-$!&&%()%,! ������� �� ��������� ��� ��� +!-+1)"--!2,!.+%-%!,! ��������� ����� *+-'!(- ������������ -     ������������������������������� $%, ()-%! *+)/% !  ,  ���������� ����� ��� ���������� *.&%,!+/%!1$!!#%)(& �������������������������������� !0,$!!*)+-!+!0,* ������������������������������ *!+, ����������������������������� ��������������������������� ������������������������������� �������������������������������� ��������� ��� �� ������ ��������� ������ ������� ��������� ��� � ������������������������������ ��������������������������� ������

ADOPTION

HEALTH

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for your unused or unwanted items $7,500 in The Classifieds!

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This newspaper strives to monitor the classified ads it prints. However, when an ad is submitted from outside this area, it is often impossible for us to check its credibility. Therefore, we suggest caution when answering ads with offers that seem too good to be true.

your ad!

s ).4%2-/$!,,/!$3DROPANDHOOKs$%$)#!4%$7/2+-ULTI STOPFREIGHT CONSISTENTMILES s 4!.+%2$2)6%23(OMEDAYSAMONTH MOSTLY&RIDAYSAND3ATURDAYS

For more information regarding financing, business opportunities and/or work-at-home opportunities in this newspaper, we urge our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 330 N. Wabash Ave. #2006, Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 832-0500.

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Plumbing & Sewer



           

   

    

 

    

           

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OWNER OPERATORS & teams in your area! Small Please Call: (602) 648-5307 ONE BANK, GMAC, LLC, CITIBANK N.A. S/I/I TO NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY CLAIMANTS HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB Average $3K per(SOUTH week! DAKOTA), Company, BIG Benefits! CITIBANK N.A., UNKNOWN GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Defendants PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. Be out up to 14 days, enjoy Top PayTRUST for Hazmat. MISCELLANEOUS BENEFICIARIES OF THE GLADYS STAM Sale entered in the above cause on April 24, 2012, an 11 CH 008790 CALL AIM 800-481-8312. GUARENTEED home time! CDL Grads Welcome! DATED 5/13/1999, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 14430 MASON LANE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 Weekly settlements. Cardinal 888-928-6011 NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS AM on February 27, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales NOTICE OF- SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY MAKEPUBLIC & SAVE MONEY with Greatwide pays loaded/ www.TotalMS.com Defendants Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, GIVEN that your pursuant a Judgment Forecloown tobandmill. Cut of lumber unloaded. Class-A 12 CH 7014 CDL & CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the Flatbed Drivers New Paysure Scaleand Sale entered in the above cause on Febany dimension. In stock ready 7503 experience. HALESIA COURT ORLAND PARK, Up ILto .04cpm highest bidder, as set forth below, the following1yr driving Start @ .37cpm ruary 21, 2013, agentFREE for The Judicial Sales to an ship. Info/DVD: Owners Welcome. described real estate: Fleet 60462 Mileage Bonus Home Corporation,www.NorwoodSawmills.com will at 10:30 AM on March 6, 2014, Operate under your own NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY Commonly known as 7648 W. 105TH STREET, PALOS Weekends Insurance &at401K the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N ours! GIVEN or that pursuant to a Judgment ForecloHILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-13-107-035. The authority Apply @ofBoydandsons.com Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, Call Matt sure866-904-8367. and Sale entered in the above cause on real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 800-648-9915 sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set DriveForCardinal.com 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the May 2, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales forth below, the following described real estate: close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 6, 2014, Commonly known as 14430 MASON LANE, Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, 27-10-215-016. The real estate is improved with Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at forth below, the following described real estate: of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the Commonly known as 7503 HALESIA COURT, the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporaamount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. tion. No third party checks will be accepted. The certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four 27-13-203-002-0000. The real estate is improved balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Aban(24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee with a one story single family home with a two doned Residential Property Municipality Relief acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of Fund, which is calculated on residential real escredit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment the highest bid by certified funds at the close of tate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporathereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate tion. No third party checks will be accepted. The to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abanis due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or doned Residential Property Municipality Relief be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residenspecial taxes levied against said real estate and is Fund, which is calculated on residential real estial real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale offered for sale without any representation as to quality tate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, rights in and to the residential real estate arose confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residengeneral real estate taxes, special assessments, or Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real tial real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale special taxes levied against said real estate and estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other is offered for sale without any representation as NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose to quality or quantity of title and without recourse representation as to the condition of the property. rights in and to the residential real estate arose to Plaintiff and in “AS ISâ€? condition. The sale is Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon file to verify all information. If this property is a general real estate taxes, special assessments, or payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the special taxes levied against said real estate and will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the is offered for sale without any representation as the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after assessments and the legal fees required by The to quality or quantity of title and without recourse confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and to Plaintiff and in “AS ISâ€? condition. The sale is be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon part of a common interest community, the purchaser of representation as to the condition of the property. payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee Prospective bidders are admonished to check the will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle shall pay the assessments required by The court file to verify all information. If this property the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN shall pay the assessments and the legal fees representation as to the condition of the property. POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 Prospective bidders are admonished to check the ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a court file to verify all information. If this property WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS condominium unit which is part of a common inis a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, terest community, the purchaser of the unit at the at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay shall pay the assessments and the legal fees CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH the assessments required by The Condominium required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU condominium unit which is part of a common in14-11-35527. THE JUDICIAL SALES HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION terest community, the purchaser of the unit at the CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECthe assessments required by The Condominium visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for TION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: COHAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) DILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-35527 Attorney FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file numTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE Number: 11 CH 037847 TJSC#: 34-1256 NOTE: ber 14-11-04821. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORFORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you PORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street information obtained will be used for that purpose. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) I588087 CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1129183. FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 11-04821 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attor60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit ney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 008790 The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com TJSC#: 34-1605 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE Collection Practices Act, you are advised that & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorattempting to collect a debt and any information ney File No. PA1129183 Attorney Code. 91220 obtained will be used for that purpose. Case Number: 12 CH 7014 TJSC#: 34-1781 I588774 I589032

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The Regional News - The Reporter

7

Out & About

Thursday, February 20, 2014 Section 2

11

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Broaden Your Horizons This week  

Moraine Valley art exhibit by Justin Santora

Moraine Valley Community College is hosting “Vestiges” by printmaker Justin Santora in the Robert F. DeCaprio Art Gallery, in the Fine and Performing Arts Center, 9000 W. College Pkwy., Palos Hills. The exhibit runs through March 8. An artist’s reception is scheduled for today (Thursday) from 2 to 4 p.m. Santora will give an artist’s talk at 3 p.m. Much of Santora’s work is focused around images of quiet rural or suburban settings, construction, architecture, and large open spaces. His approach is also formed by an interest in anarcho-syndicalism, egalitarianism and animal rights, as well as a lifelong passion for skateboarding and punk rock. Santora has been producing handmade posters, screen printed art, paintings, and illustrations professionally since 2008. “This work is largely about making something of one’s own, whatever that something happens to be. As we grow up, we are routinely compelled to act against our own best interests, and there will always exist a need for something entirely of our own that we can control,” Santora said. Santora has a bachelor of arts in printmaking from Northeastern Illinois University. He is a studio artist, freelance illustrator and screen printer who has exhibited in several group and solo exhibitions around the country and internationally.  He currently resides in Chicago. The Robert F. DeCaprio Art Gallery provides an opportunity to view locally and nationally recognized artists. Exhibits in the art gallery are free to the public and are available for viewing Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., as well as during most performances in the Fine and Performing Arts Center.

Womantalk discussion The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, will host its monthly Womantalk coffee hour and discussion on Tuesday, Feb. 25, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.  Led by MaryAnn Grzych, ladies are invited to join the discussion of Simple Abundance by Sarah Ban Breathnach or other inspirational readings that participants wish to bring.  There is no cost, but advance reservations are required. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Papercraft workshop The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, will offer a papercraft workshop on Tuesday, Feb. 25 from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Ann Fowler will teach students to make Bits and Pieces Cards from scraps using stripes, triangles, and punched shapes. The workshop cost of $18 plus a $6 materials fee. Advance registration is required. For more information, call The Center at 361-3650.

CineVerse    CineVerse, the Oak Lawn Park District’s free weekly film discussion group open to anyone age 17 and older, will celebrate the 50th anniversary of “A Hard Day’s Night.” The movie was released in 1964, starring The Beatles. The group will discuss the movie from 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19 at Oak View Community Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn. Participants should check building signage for the room number. For more information, call 529-9028, or visit cineversegroup. blogspot.com.    CineVerse, the Oak Lawn Park District’s free weekly film discussion group open to anyone age 17 and older, will explore “Harvey.” The movie was released in 1950, starring James Stewart. The group will meet from 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26, at Oak View Community Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn. Participants should check building signage for the room number. For more information, call 529-9028, or visit cineversegroup.blogspot.com.

‘Diary of Anne Frank’ at Moraine Valley A new adaptation of “The Diary of Anne Frank” will be performed when Moraine Valley Community College’s Academic Theater Department presents the popular Holocaust survival story Feb. 21 to March 2. Performances are scheduled for Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., and Sundays at 3 p.m. The play will be in the John and Angeline Oremus Theater, in the Fine and Performing Arts Center, 9000 W. College Pkwy., Palos Hills. Tickets are $12 for the general public, and $10 for seniors and students. In this adaptation by Wendy Kesselman, newly discovered writings from the diary of Anne Frank, as well as survivor accounts, are interwoven to create a contemporary impassioned story of the lives of people persecuted under Nazi rule. This is an adaptation for a new generation able to confront the true horrors of the Holocaust. Moraine Valley’s performance

of “The Diary of Anne Frank” is being directed by Dr. Craig Rosen, associate professor of theater and coordinator of the Academic Theater Program at Moraine Valley. The cast list for the show is: Tickets for “The Diary of Anne Frank” and other upcoming performances can be purchased online at morainevalley. edu/fpac, by calling 974-5500, or at the Box Office, located on the south end of the Fine and Performing Arts Center. 

Upcoming  

Center Cinema

“Casablanca” will be shown on Friday, Feb. 28, at 6:30 p.m., as part of the monthly Center Cinema series at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.  Set in unoccupied Africa during the early days of World War II, this 1942 classic stars Humphrey Bogart as an American expatriate who meets a former lover Ingrid Bergman, with unforeseen complications. A discussion follows the movie.  Free popcorn is served. No fee is charged but pre-registration is necessary.   Call The Center at 361-3650.

The Bridge Teen Center Events    • Love and Acceptance with PASS — 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 20 and 27, The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Orland Park, knows that everyone desires companionship through loving, healthy relationships, but relationships are tough. Learn how to have healthy relationships.    • Magic Variety Show—7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Feb. 21. One of the Bridge’s own students will perform magic, with samples from Famous Dave’s.    • Pool Tournament with Peppo’s — 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Feb. 22, free food; event is exclusively for students in 9th-12th grade and is free with a student membership application or $5 with a school ID. For more information call (708) 532-0500 or visit www. thebridgeteencenter.org.    • Kickboxing — 4:45 to 6:15 p.m. Feb. 25, get fit in a fun way. Join the Bridge at UFC gym to learn everything you need to know about kickboxing while getting in shape.    • Lead U: True to You — for high schoolers only, 4:30 to 6 p.m. Feb. 26, participate in this leadership pod focused on getting to know yourself better and discovering your strengths as a leader. This free event is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.    For more information call 532-0500 or visitwww.thebridgeteencenter.org.

Broadway Today choral show at Chgo. Christian High Chicago Christian High School will present Broadway Today, this year’s choir show, on Thursday, March 13, at 7 p.m. The “outside-the-box” performance, not your typical choral concert, has become both a student and audience favorite. It includes music from “Wicked,’ “Hairspray” and “Jersey Boys,” and recent revivals such as “Grease,” and “Les Miserables.” The show includes student created choreography as well as professional choreography, staging, costuming, visual narration, solos and pit band. Free for all ages. CCHS is located at 12001 S Oak Park Ave. in Palos Heights. (388-7650)

Encore Band winter concert

Submitted photo

Art classes for youths begin at the Log Cabin New six-week sessions of Children’s Art Classes will begin at The Log Cabin Center for the Arts on Saturday morning, March 1, at 9 and 10:30 a.m. at the Log Cabin Art Center, a part of The Center at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Teen pottery classes begin Monday, March 3, 6:30 to 8 p.m. for six weeks. Art instructors Heather Young and Jessie Schaar teach the children to use a variety of artistic media and techniques, including drawing, painting, papermaking, papier-mâché, printmaking, pottery and more. Children are divided into two grade-level groups: K-2nd, and 3rd8th-graders. The natural areas of The Center’s farm and woods provide subject matter, inspiration and sometimes the raw materials for the classes. Heather Young also teaches the teen potters, who learn to hand build clay pieces and throw pots on the wheels. The classes combine the worlds of art and nature, and are kept small to encourage individual self-expression. Class fees of $72 for Children’s Art and $78 for Teen Pottery cover all supplies for each six-week session. Advance registration is required. Call The Center at 361-3650.

The Encore Concert Band continues its 15th concert season with a Winter Concert on Sunday, March 2, at 3 p.m., at Mokena Junior High School, 19815 Kirkstone Way in Mokena. This free concert will feature selections from “The King and I,” “El Camino Real” by Alfred Reed, “Finlandia” by Jean Sibelius and Little Fugue in G Minor by J.S. Bach. For more information about the Encore Concert Band and the complete concert schedule, visit www.encoreband.org. Band members range in age from high school students to adults; musicians interested in joining are encouraged to sit in with the band at a weekly rehearsal on Thursday nights at 7 p.m. at Mokena Junior High School in Mokena. For information on scheduling a concert in your area or joining the band, please call Rachel Ozark at 437-7051, send an e-mail to info@encoreband.org, or visit their website at www.encoreband.org

Submitted photo

Nights of comedy at Chicago Christian     The Chicago Christian High School Theater Department will offer a night of comedy at the end of the month. Hilarity Ensues: A Night of Comedy, will feature the first Chicago Christian High School Improv Team, as well as two one-act comedies, and a special performance by the girl’s a capella group, The Knightingales. The one-acts that are featured are  “Sure Thing” by David Ives and “Philosophy 101: A Play”, based on a work by Woody Allen. Members of the Chicago Christian Improv team are Shannon Kuiper of Tinley Park (from left), Sarah Seidler of Chicago, Sami Koster of Tinley Park, Eli Altena of Evergreen Park, Edmond Hood of Oak Lawn and Ben Friesen of Tinley Park. Performances will be Feb. 28 and March 1 at 7 p.m. in the CCHS auditorium, 12001 S. Oak Park Ave, Palos Heights. Tickets are $5 for students and seniors and $7 for adults. Tickets will be on sale in the main office at CCHS beginning Feb. 18 and are also available at the door the night of the show. (388-7650)

Videoview by Jay Bobbin    (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)    STARTING THIS WEEK: “GAME OF THRONES: THE COMPLETE THIRD SEASON”: The phrase “Red Wedding” joined television’s lexicon for all time with this round of the acclaimed HBO drama series. The power struggle among the Seven Kingdoms continues, with various forces contending to assume ultimate rule. Diana Rigg, Ciaran Hinds and Thomas Brodie-Sangster are among those joining a cast that includes Peter Dinklage, Lena Headey, Emilia Clarke, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Iain Glen and Richard Madden. DVD extras: four “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by cast and crew; deleted and extended scenes. **** (Not rated: AS, N, P, GV) (Also on Blu-ray)    “ B A T T L E S T A R GALACTICA: THE COMPLETE EPIC SERIES”: The late-1970s show that started the franchise gets a home video re-launch, with Lorne Greene as Commander Adama, leader of a spaceship fleet transporting the last remnants of mankind. Close on their tail are the sinister Cylons, determined to destroy the humans. Lt. Starbuck was a man in this first version, played by Dirk Benedict, and Richard Hatch also stars as Adama’s son, Captain Apollo. Jane Seymour has a featured role early in the show. *** (Not rated: V)    “HELLBENDERS”: The recent “Thor” movies have helped the notion of a Norseman’s visit to contemporary America be accepted, but whereas that one was pretty benevolent, the one in the case of this horror tale has no reservations about destroying New York. That calls a fraternity of offbeat clergymen into action, since they may be the only ones capable of vanquishing the villain. Stars include Clancy Brown, Clifton Collins Jr. and Dan Fogler. DVD extras: two “making-of” documentaries; audio commentary by writer-director J.T. Petty. ** (R: AS, P, GV) (Also on Blu-ray)    “NURSE JACKIE: SEASON FIVE”: Emmy winner Edie Falco continues her acclaimed performance as a medical assistant with her own related problems in this season of the Showtime series. Out of rehab, Jackie is celebrating a new lease on life when an accident suddenly makes her a patient in her own hospital ... but the situation has a silver lining, since the investigating policeman (Adam Ferrara) takes a clear interest in her. Fellow Emmy recipient Merritt Wever — who famously gave one of the shortest award acceptance speeches ever last fall — and Peter Facinelli also continue as cast regulars. *** (Not rated: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray)    “TOM AND JERRY: MOUSE TROUBLE”: The literal cat-andmouse games are in high gear

again, as this collection of 30 animated short subjects features one of the most beloved cartoon teams of all time. In one of the tales, Tom is working at a hotel where Jerry is a guest ... and you just know it won’t take long for staff-and-customer relations to go south under those circumstances. *** (Not rated: V)    “THE SIX MILLION DOL­ LAR MAN: SEASON 5”: The final round of the adventure series that made the word “bionic” commonplace stars Lee Majors as Steve Austin, the ex-astronaut refitted with artificial limbs that make him stronger and faster after a devastating accident. Many of the episodes in this season hearken back to earlier ones, with our hero again facing Bigfoot (played by Ted Cassidy, previously Lurch on “The Addams Family”) as one example. Other guest stars include Rick Springfield, Suzanne Somers and Martin Caidin, who wrote the book (“Cyborg”) the series was based on. *** (Not rated: V)    COMING SOON: “THOR: THE DARK WORLD” (Feb. 25): A portal between Earth and his home planet yields new trouble for the Norse god (Chris Hemsworth). (PG-13: AS, P, V)    “GRAVITY” (Feb. 25): Director

and co-writer Alfonso Cuaron’s blockbuster stars Sandra Bullock and George Clooney as astronauts stranded in space. (PG-13: AS, V)    “THE GRANDMASTER” (March 4): The story of Ip Man, the martial arts icon who trained Bruce Lee, is dramatized in director Wong Kar Wai’s film starring Tony Leung. (PG-13: AS, P, V)     “HOURS” (March 4): In one of the last films he completed, Paul Walker plays a man determined to keep his prematurely born child alive as Hurricane Katrina strikes New Orleans. (PG-13: AS, V)    “THE BOOK THIEF” (March 11): A youngster (Sophie Nelisse) endures the tension of World War II by stealing books and sharing them with others. (PG-13: AS, V)    “FROZEN” (March 18): A young woman (voice of Kristen Bell) seeks her runaway sister (voice of Idina Menzel), who can turn anything or anyone to ice, in the animated Disney hit. (PG: AS)     FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.


12 Section 2

Thursday, February 20, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Wolfgang Puck’s Kitchen by Wolfgang Puck

Turn home-style bread pudding into last-minute dessert

Submitted photo

Log Cabin art classes offered Knitting student Anita Milosevic is shown with her granddaughter Leah Milosevic who attended class with her one day. New six-week sessions of adult art classes begin soon at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. The Log Cabins are located in the woods and feature the natural beauty of the Palos area. Knitting classes with Georgann Ring begin on Monday, Feb. 24, at 6:30 p.m,. and on Friday morning, Feb. 28 at 9:30 a.m. On Wednesday, Feb. 26, Collage with April Schabes bgins at 9:30 a.m. and Quilting with Denise Dulzo begins at 1 p.m. Lenox Wallace teaches a Wednesday Watercolor Level 1 class at 6:30 p.m. beginning Feb. 26 and a Thursday Watercolor class for experienced painters beginning Feb. 27 at 6:30 p.m. Basketry classes begin Thursday, Feb. 27 at 9:30 a.m. with Ann Fowler and at 6:30 p.m. with Jane Dwyer. Advance registration is required for all classes at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts. Call 361-3650 or check the website: www.thecenterpalos.org.

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders    ARIES (March 21-April 19): A small act of defiance could upset the even balance in your home or workplace during the upcoming week, but you might be surprised when others show concern instead of aggravation. Stand up for your rights to win new friends.    TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Consistency and reliability will help you make your way through changing situations in the week ahead. You’re life a life raft that other people tend to cling to whenever they get in over their heads.    GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The least important transactions can run smoothly. You may be better off pursuing hobbies or social activities that brighten your heart but don’t necessarily bring you recognition or monetary rewards in the week to come.    CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take pride in home and family. Being proactive in that area of life could bring you good luck elsewhere. You like to feel financially secure, and a glimpse of future comforts can come into sight if you’re willing to work hard.    LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Ask people what they think and they’ll be happy to tell you. Shake off an inclination to be a homebody and mingle with people from different walks of life in the week ahead. Be your own best friend and toot your own horn.    VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Circulate for success. It’s perfectly acceptable to listen to opinions that differ from those held by your family or professors. Keep your finger on the pulse of public opinion this week. Find out more about the latest fads and trends.    LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Life

may revolve around friends or small inconsequential things in the week ahead, so you could feel you’re not the center of attention. Remember, however, that other people are watching your example. Cooperation arrives when needed.    SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): If this week were a tarot card, your card could be The Fool. You may think everything is going very well but might be oblivious of problems directly in your path. Be glad for friends who steer you in the right direction.    SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Social pressures could push you into a corner, but from a corner you can see the whole room. Sitting through lectures or dealing with people you don’t really care for may be necessary to reach your goals this week.    CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your feet may be dancing a boogie-woogie to the beat of a very different drummer while your head is engaged in a sedate fox trot. During the week to come, your financial outlook can be affected by group idealism and ethics.    AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You may radiate friendliness during the week ahead. Pull out all the stops and mingle with groups of people. Explore new places like a museum, join a book club or exercise group, or drag a friend out to a new restaurant.    PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You can be carried away by inspiration. This week, don’t ignore obligations if sidetracked by romantic ideals and be sure to “do the right thing.” Act according to the rules, even when swept by the urge to break them.

   In my last column, I shared with you a delightful holiday recipe that called for you to seek out a special ingredient, North African brik pastry, with which to make my Valentine chocolate “purses,” a treat straight out of Spago restaurant. This week I’d like to suggest yet another wonderful dessert. Better still, this time it’s a home-style recipe: bread pudding made with a rich bittersweet-chocolate custard, featuring basic ingredients you can find in any supermarket, or that you may already have in your home refrigerator and pantry.    I’d have to rack my brain to think of anyone I know who doesn’t like a good bread pudding. It seems to be a perfect definition of comfort food: slices of good bread soaked in and baked with a rich, sweet custard to form a dessert that delivers smooth satisfaction with every spoonful. Adding a generous dose of chocolate makes it even better.    As I said, the ingredients couldn’t be more basic: halfand-half; eggs; some good-quality bittersweet chocolate, bitter baking chocolate and cocoa powder, plus an egg-enriched loaf of bread like brioche or challah. While my recipe is easy, I do suggest that you prepare its custard base the day before you plan to serve it - or at least the morning before you’ll do the final assembly and cooking. That will allow plenty of time for the mixture to chill well and thicken. Then, the next day, all you have to do is cut and soak the bread, assemble the pudding in individual-sized baking cups, and cook the dessert in the oven using a hot-water bath (easy to set up with a baking pan and some boiling water) that helps the custard cook gently and stay moist and delicate.    The puddings taste delicious whether you serve them hot from the oven, warm, or chilled in the refrigerator. The recipe works most efficiently if you make enough for eight servings, as you might want to do for a dinner party. But if it’s for just the two of you, you have not only seconds if you want them, but also more wonderful chocolate bread pudding to share the next day. BITTERSWEET CHOCOLATE CUSTARD BREAD PUDDING Makes 8 servings, 3/4 cup each CHOCOLATE CUSTARD: 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped 1- 1/2 ounces bitter chocolate, coarsely chopped 3 whole large cage-free eggs 3 large cage-free egg yolks 1/2 cup sugar 2 cups half-and-half SOAKING LIQUID: 1-1/2 cups half-and-half 1/3 cup sugar 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder ASSEMBLY: 8 slices brioche, challah, or other

rich egg bread, each 1/2 inch thick Unsalted butter, softened, for greasing SERVING: Confectioners’ sugar Unsweetened whipped cream    Several hours or a day ahead, make the custard: In a stainlesssteel bowl or the top half of a double boiler placed over but not touching simmering water, melt the bittersweet and bitter chocolates.    In a large stainless-steel bowl, beat together the whole eggs and egg yolks until well combined. While whisking continuously, gradually pour in the sugar. Continue whisking until fluffy.    Meanwhile, in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the 2 cups of half-and-half to a rolling boil. Remove the pan from the heat. While whisking the egg mixture continuously, very slowly pour in the hot half-and-half. Whisk in the melted chocolate.    Fill a large mixing bowl with ice cubes. Rest the stainlesssteel bowl inside and stir until the custard mixture has chilled. Then, cover the bowl of custard and refrigerate.    When ready to make the pudding, combine the soaking liquid ingredients in a saucepan and stir over medium heat until the cocoa has dissolved completely. Set aside.    Using a round 2-inch cookie cutter, cut 2 circles from each bread slice. Arrange the 16 circles in 1 or 2 baking dishes large enough to hold them in a single layer. Pour the soaking liquid over the bread and soak well, turning the circles so they absorb as much liquid as possible.    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. With the butter, grease the insides of 8 individual 3/4-cup custard cups or molds. Bring a kettle of water to a boil.    Spoon about 2 ounces of the custard into the bottom of each cup or mold. With a slotted spoon, lift a circle of bread and place it in a cup. Spoon more custard on top; then, add another circle of bread and another layer of custard. Repeat with the remaining cups.    Arrange the cups in a large baking pan. Pull out an oven rack partway and place the pan on it. Fill the pan with enough boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the cups. Very carefully slide

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Combine coarsely chopped bittersweet and baking chocolate for the custard mixture. the rack into the oven.    Bake the bread puddings until the custard has set, about 30 minutes. Carefully remove the pan from the oven and transfer the individual cups to a wire rack. Serve them hot or lukewarm, or leave them to cool to room temperature and then chill in the refrigerator.    To serve, sift powdered sugar

over the tops of the hot or cool puddings. Offer whipped cream on the side.

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KIWANIS

Showcase of Talent Saturday, March 1st at 7pm Sunday, March 2nd at 2pm A.A. Stagg High School

111th St. & Roberts Road, Palos Hills, IL

Submitted photo

Spotlight Youth Theater Orland holds signup      Spotlight

Youth Theater is an after-school theater arts education program for children ages 5-18. Spotlight offers classes in Orland Park and 11 other areas around Illinois and Wisconsin, giving students an opportunity to develop their talents in singing, dancing, acting and more. Spring classes will be held Tuesdays, Feb. 25-April 29, from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m., at Calvary Church, 16100 S. 104th Ave. in Orland Park. Registration is open for spring classes. Visit www.spotlight.org/class to view all the classes available and to register, or call (847) 516-2298. Spotlight Youth Theater is a non-profit, educational theater arts program for students. Each area group offers summer camps and after-school classes in dance, voice, drama and theatrical specialties, and performs three fully staged musical productions per year. Spotlight also offers an inclusion program, which assists students with special needs to participate in classes and productions.

TICKETS: $10.00

Students K-12: $5.00 Groups of 8: $8.00 each

For tickets: call Mary @ 815-469-0673 or Wally @ 708-598-4714 visit: http://www.hickoryhillskiwanis.org/ for more details


20140220 regional news  

73rd Year, No. 8 3 Sections Thursday, February 20, 2014.

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